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Minister of Public Works REPORT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1964/65 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1966]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Minister of Public Works
REPORT
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
1964/65
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1966
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Department
of Public Works for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1965, in compliance with the
provisions of the Public Works Act.
W. N. CHANT,
Minister of Public Works.
Office of the Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, December 31, 1965.
 " We require from buildings, as from men, two kinds of goodness; first,
the doing their practical duty well; then that they be graceful and pleasing
in doing it;  which last is itself another form of duty."—.John Ruskin.
 INDEX
Page
Report of the Deputy Minister     7
Report of the Chief Architect     8
Report of the Senior Electrical Designer  13
Report of the Civil and Structural Engineer  14
Report of the Landscape Architect  15
Report of the Mechanical Engineer  20
Report of the Architect-Planner  24
Report of the Chief Engineer, Safety Engineering Division  28
Report of the Construction and Maintenance Architect  32
Report of the Chief Gas Inspector  36
Report of the Inspector of Electrical Energy  37
Report of the Chief Inspector of Boilers and Pressure Vessels  41
Report of the Comptroller of Expenditure  44
Tenders Received and Contracts Awarded  48
As in previous years, this Report contains
examples of work by artists and architects
of the Department of Public Works.
 " We will lead, not follow."
 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER
The Honourable W. N. Chant,
Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—/ have the honour to submit for your consideration the Annual Report of
the Department for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1965.
Elsewhere in this Report will be found those of the heads of divisions. These
set out work accomplished and planned, tenders let and accepted, and Departmental
accounts.
Sharp increases in the cost-of-construction index have given concern. Efforts
to keep within earlier estimates put before you can be directed only at the size or
quality of buildings. Both have limitations. Size is governed by requirements and,
even with most careful study, a point is reached where both economics and good
planning dictate size.
Quality is even more difficult. A decision can only be reached by considering
each building on its merits. What would be adequate in one instance would be
inadequate in another. Factors such as use, locality, and weather conditions must
be borne in mind. We are reluctant, also, to retreat too far from the design features
which have been so well received.
On the positive side, however, this problem of rising costs has afforded Department architects and engineers a challenge to exercise their full ingenuity. The
result is that the Government is obtaining very good value for moneys expended.
With the opening of the Ganges Courthouse, the first all-electric Government
building went into use. Experience to date, while short, indicates a very satisfactory
result. During the year further studies in depth were made by our engineers in
co-operation with British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority engineers as to the
application of the all-electric principle to large buildings. The conclusions reached
so far are most promising, and further studies are being made.
As reported elsewhere, satisfactory progress has been made on co-ordinating
the work of the Safety Divisions. Standardization of office procedures has been
effected and the issuance of permits simplified. Further measures to provide more
convenient service are being planned.
The year has been a very busy one, and I would like to again record my thanks
to the staff for their loyal and cheerful service.
A. E. WEBB,
Deputy Minister.
Victoria, B.C., December 30,1965.
 U 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF ARCHITECT
" Observe degree, priority and place."—Shakespeare.
It is noteworthy that the past few years have seen an emergence of quality
architecture produced by the Department of Public Works. " Quality " implies a
judgment of values. However, it is possible to produce a prestige building with
quality materials, but vapid so far as design is concerned, and unworkmanlike in
execution.
These possibilities are now being lessened, and there are evidences that the
trend toward total quality is progressing well. In large measure the vigilance of
our project inspectors is responsible for better workmanship in the field.
A plea must be made for adequate time for the design architect's creativity,
both in matters aesthetic and constructional. To inhibit this is to court the risk of
producing what might be termed " parvenu architecture," analogous to the acquisition of expensive vestments worn in execrable taste.
Work undertaken by the Department of Public Works is set forth as follows:—
Category 1:  Contracts let during the fiscal year 1964/65.
Category 2: Projects researched and planned during the same period.
CATEGORY 1
Thirty-two principal capital contracts were let. Thirty-eight per cent were
classified under general projects, 34 per cent for the Department of Education, and
28 per cent for the Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance.
Particulars of these contracts will be found in the back of the Public Works
Report, but three projects of considerable interest are mentioned here.
1. Bull River—Kootenay Fish Hatchery.—The purpose of this project is to
accommodate the various facilities required for the artificial propagation of game
fish, and for research work in fish culture. This operation will be conducted'by the
Fish and Game Branch of the Department of Recreation and Conservation.
The gross area of the buildings including the staff residences will exceed
27,000 square feet.
When complete this project should be a classic example of the combination of
business and pleasure—the business for which the hatchery was designed, and the
tourist attraction of great interest to sportsmen and the general public alike.
No effort has been spared in the design to make the hatchery with its outdoor
reflecting pools and its interior displays extremely attractive to visitors.
2. Quesnel—New Provincial Government Building.—This new building, designed to house nine Government departments, will undoubtedly be one of the finest
contributions to contemporary architecture in the Cariboo District.
There are two wings—the four-story and basement office wing and the single-
story and basement Courtroom wing. These wings are joined by a 50-foot single-
story link containing the entrance foyer and the Government Agent's office.
One of the most striking features of the building is the use of highly decorative
cast aluminum screens at the north and south ends of the Courtroom wing. The
use of large precast concrete panels in the office block provides a rich texture to the
face of the building.
It will be a structure of which the citizens of Quesnel may well be proud.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1964/65
U 9
3. Ganges—New Provincial Government Building.—This small and attractive
building provides considerably expanded facilities for the administration of the
district.
It accommodates three major departments, and the windows of the Magistrate's
Court look out on to a small, pleasant enclosed garden.
The new building is unique among Government buildings in that it is the first
to be heated entirely by electricity, providing clean heat with individual control in
every major room.
CATEGORY 2
Approximately 35 projects were in the planning stage in the fiscal year under
review, and of these, 13 went out to tender during this period.
The fiscal year 1964/65 saw a resurgence of vocational-school planning, similar
in many ways to the original development of a few years earlier.
Four locations in various areas of the Province were scheduled for new
vocational-school projects. These were Victoria, Kamloops, Terrace, and Dawson
Creek.
Additional buildings and facilities were planned for the existing vocational
schools at Burnaby, Nanaimo, Kelowna, Prince George, and Nelson. The new
facilities are briefly outlined hereunder.
1. Victoria.—The acquisition of a highly suitable site is being negotiated and
planning is in the formative stage. It is believed that the facilities to be provided
will be most suitable to the needs of this region.
2. Kamloops.—A site of approximately 1,500 acres, formerly used as a Royal
Canadian Navy ammunition depot has been acquired from Crown Assets Disposal
Corporation. No programme of the required disciplines has yet been received, and
therefore planning of the site to date has been confined to the area to be occupied
by facilities for the Attorney-General's Department.
3. Terrace.—The complex being planned comprises an administration building,
classrooms for business training, coastal navigation, and other courses. Workshops
for heavy-duty mechanics, welding and millwright work, marine diesel and gas
engineers, carpentry and millwork, and industrial electrical and instrumentation are
being planned.   The complex will also be provided with dormitories and a cafeteria.
4. Dawson Creek.—The R.C.A.F. sector control centre site was acquired from
Crown Assets Disposal Corporation, and is approximately 60 acres in extent.
Eighteen existing and serviceable buildings will be converted for vocational-school
purposes. These will comprise dormitories for both sexes, a cafeteria, a gymnasium,
administration offices, classrooms, and workshops. In addition, two new buildings
were planned for automotive work and agricultural services.
It is anticipated that contracts will be under way for this work in the latter part
of 1965.
New Buildings and Alterations and Additions to Existing Vocational Schools
1. Burnaby Vocational School and British Columbia Institute of Technol-
ology:—
(a) New teacher-training building.
(b) New gymnasium-auditorium.
(c) New library-bookstore.
(d) New trowel trades workshop.
(e) New electronics building.
(/) Alterations to the existing Institute of Technology to provide new classrooms, laboratories, and a lecture theatre.   The boiler-house, of necessity,
 U 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
is being increased to take the additional demand of these and other
contiguous facilities.
(g) Additions to enlarge the capacity of the jointly shared cafeteria.
2. Nanaimo.—To supplement existing facilities, three major additions were
planned, as follows:—
(a) A general-purpose workshop.
(b) Dormitory for women.
(c) An additional floor to the existing classroom block.
3. Kelowna.—Four major additions were planned, as follows:—
(a) A cafeteria.
(b) A gymnasium-auditorium.
(c) Dormitories for both sexes.
(d) Addition to the existing boiler-house.
4. Prince George.—The new added facilities planned for this vocational school
are as follows:—
(a) A general-purpose workshop.
(b) A sawmill shed.
(c) Alterations to the classroom block to augment existing facilities.
(d) Dormitories for both sexes.
■   (e) A cafeteria.
(/) Additions to the present boiler-house.
5. Nelson.—Somewhat similar additions to those planned for the Nanaimo
Vocational School were designed for this school, as follows:—
(a) A general-purpose workshop.
(b) Dormitories for both sexes.
(c) A cafeteria.
(d) An extension to the existing boiler-house.
Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance
1. Tranquille.—Planning was commenced for a new 104-bed hospital. At
the same time, consideration was given to expanding the kitchen and dining facilities
to meet new demands.
2. Essondale.—Detailed sketch plans of the proposed new medical clinic addition to North Lawn were sent to the user department for committee study.
3. Essondale.—Continuing the programme of total revision of procedures in
garbage-handling, planning was started for remodelling facilities at Centre and
West Lawn Buildings.
4. Victoria, Lee Avenue.—Research was commenced on a new mental health
facility. The plans envisage a building 400 feet long (on the basement and first
floors) by 100 feet, with six upper floors. Bed capacity will total 180. The
numerous facilities will include recreational, occupational, and group therapy rooms,
day rooms, a cafeteria, and a dining-room.
It is anticipated that a first-phase tender call will be made early in January,
1966.
5. Victoria, Royal Oak.—Due to protracted negotiations on sewage disposal
at the site, little firm planning of the proposed 400-bed hospital for retarded children
has been possible. However, preliminary sketches have been submitted to the user
department for study.
6. Burnaby.—Planning was started on the residental care unit for children on
the last day of the fiscal year under review, and, therefore, it is inappropriate to
make further mention of the project in this Report.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1964/65 U 11
Department of the Attorney-General
1. Prince George—Addition to Men's Gaol.—The work involved consisted in
providing the gaol with additional facilities and accommodation for 30 extra prisoners in cells and 40 in dormitories. Approximately 33,000 extra square feet of space
was planned.
Tenders were called in February, 1965, but due to irregularity in bidding
these were cancelled. Following the receipt of new tenders on a modified plan, a
contract was subsequently awarded.
2. Saltair, Vancouver Island.—Planning was started on a new Men's Gaol to
accommodate 220 prisoners and 75 staff.
3. Haney—Allco Institution.—Continued planning took place on this project
to provide a kitchen and stores building as the next stage of development.
4. Vancouver—Addition to the Courthouse.—A copy of an initial report
submitted to the Attorney-General by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of
British Columbia was received in December, 1964. This formed the tentative
basis for preparing a schedule of accommodation, which was submitted to the
Attorney-General's Department at the end of January, 1965.
This schedule was incomplete due to the lack of criteria and statistics relevant
to the numerous ancillary facilities. This information is presently being obtained
by the user department, and its receipt will enable areas to be determined and cost
analyses to be prepared.       ..
General
1. Victoria—Archives and Museum.—Intensive planning proceeded on this
large and important project with a view to letting contracts for demolition and
excavation, bulk steel, Haddington Island stone, and footings and foundations during
the period May to August, 1965. It is gratifying to report that all these contracts
were let during this period.
It is difficult to visualize the vast amount of detailed research requisite in
designing a large modern museum, quite apart from purely aesthetic requirements.
Nevertheless, planning proceeded well in co-operation with the Museum Steering
Committee.
2. Duncan—New Provincial Government Building.—Concurrently with the
letting of Phase No. 1 contract for the reinforced-concrete shell of the Courts Building, planning was continued on this building and the multi-story circular office
structure.
3. Vanderhoof.—Planning was commenced of a new Highways Department
establishment for the repair, maintenance, and storage of Highways equipment. The
buildings will include a large maintenance workshop, a storage warehouse, and a
four-bay vehicle-storage building.
4. Deas Island.—Plans were completed for the British Columbia Ferry Authority for a large steel-frame structure to house fuels, paints, and lubricating-oils.
5. Chetwynd.—Plans were started for a weigh-scale house required for new
traffic proceeding in a north-south direction west of Dawson Creek.
6. Burnaby.—Following the letting of a Phase No. 1 contract for foundations,
structural steelwork, and roofing, planning continued on the Public Works Building
on the interior work necessary for total completion of the building.
7. Cranbrook, Kelowna, and Fort St. John—Provincial Government Buildings.—Planning was commenced on major additions to these three Government
buildings, but pressures on other projects necessitated putting the planning temporarily in abeyance.
 U 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
8. Essondale, Colony Farm—Barn Alterations and New Silo.—Extensive alterations were planned to bring physical requirements up to an acceptable level and to
provide proper mechanical cleaning equipment.
GENERAL
During the fiscal year 1964/65, approximately 16 projects for senior citizens'
housing were reviewed and reported on for the Provincial Secretary's Department.
Similar service was performed for Lands Service for buildings to be constructed
on University Endowment Lands at the University of British Columbia.
On the last day of the fiscal year, a Provincial Government plan-viewing room
was established by the Department of Public Works at 207 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver, for all Government departments wishing to display plans and specifications prior to tendering.
This free service to general contractors and sub-contractors materially augments
existing facilities for the industry when bidding on Government projects.
In conclusion, it is most satisfactory to report that in spite of the difficulties
engendered by the wide physical separation of the various divisions of the Public
Works Department, excellent co-operation and liaison were given by all members
of the staff.
W. R. H. Curtis, M.R.A.I.C, A.R.I.B.A.:
A.N.Z.I.A.,
Chief Architect.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1964/65 U 13
REPORT OF THE SENIOR ELECTRICAL DESIGNER
During the past year we have continued to carry out many extensive electrical
and lighting designs in co-operation with our Architectural Division on new Government Buildings, including such units as Kootenay Fish Hatchery; addition to
Prince George Gaol; Government Building, Fort Nelson; Hillside Building, Essondale; 104-bed unit, Tranquille; Dawson Creek Vocational School; Public Works
maintenance building, Burnaby; trowel and trades building, Vocational School,
Burnaby; Government building, Duncan; and kitchen and dining facilities, Tranquille. . '
This year the first all-electric Government building was opened at Ganges, and
we are pleased to report that it is proving to be highly satisfactory both functionally
and economically. It is predicted that the future could see more of our new office
buildings designed to operate as complete electrical units.
We continued to prepare electrical plans and specifications for many other
Government departments, including Highways, Forestry, British Columbia Ferry
Authority, Commercial Transport, and Education.
In the past year we have carried out the complete electrical designs for the new
Swartz Bay ferry terminal and Otter Bay, Comox, and Westview terminals. We are
at present working on the new Kelsey Bay and Prince Rupert installations, which
are the latest ports of the continuing expansion of the B.C. Ferry system.
We have also continued to prepare electrical plans and specifications for the
Construction and Maintenance Division covering the many projects carried out by
it during the year. Technical advice and assistance were supplied as requested to all
maintenance branches throughout the Province. The co-operation of the maintenance staffs during the year has been excellent.
As of September 1, 1965, all telephones and communications became the
responsibility of this Division. This included all Public Works switchboard
personnel.
Many advanced changes and design of telephone systems are now under way,
which will greatly increase both in efficiency and capacity the service to the Province's major centres.
The new system now being installed in the Douglas Building in Victoria is
known as the " Telpak " system and will supply foreign exchange lines from Vancouver, Kamloops, Kelowna, Prince George, Nelson, and Nanaimo, and all terminating on the new Parliament Buildings telephone exchange.
Operators on the Parliament Buildings switchboard will be trained to cover the
operation of the " Telpak " system.
It is interesting to note that telephone communication traffic has increased over
25 per cent during the past year between the major centres mentioned. This condition is being brought on by the extensive growth of our Province, and continual
checks are being made on the telephone systems of the Government in an effort to
keep pace with the ever-increasing communications traffic.
Our thanks to all divisions—Architectural, Mechanical, Structural, Landscape,
and Construction and Maintenance—who gave us their utmost co-operation in correlating the many projects carried out.
The attention given our electrical installations by the project inspectors is also
greatly appreciated.
J. R. Walker,
Senior Electrical Designer.
 U 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CIVIL AND STRUCTURAL ENGINEER
" There is more to life than increasing its speed."—Mohatma Gandhi.
During the past year the Civil and Structural Engineering Division has been
engaged on the design of higher, more complex, and unconventional buildings than
previously. More stringent structural analyses have been required to meet modern
earthquake-resistant requirements.
The writer had the privilege of being appointed a member of the Canadian
National Committee on Earthquake Engineering, sponsored by the National Research Council. This body, composed of engineers and seismologists, is meeting to
formulate a new Earthquake Code for Canada.
There are certain well-defined regions known to be subject to earthquakes, and
the Pacific Coast of British Columbia is one of them. Considerable knowledge has
been gained in the last three decades about the behaviour of structures subjected to
earthquake forces. Design criteria and codes have been developed. In spite of this,
however, the unknowns and complexities are still great, and an earthquake-resistant
design is still not fully possible by means of mathematical analysis or rules of procedure.
Earthquakes consist of horizontal and vertical ground vibrations, vertical movements being generally so small that they may be disregarded. When the ground
underneath a structure is moved suddenly to one side the building will tend to
remain in its original position because of its inertia. The acceleration of the horizontal movement varies, and its maximum value is the yardstick commonly adopted
for measuring the equivalent static force.
Lateral forces must be resisted by the walls or the framing system. All parts of
the building must be tied together and stiffly braced so that the building will tend to
move as a unit. Symmetrical arrangement of cross walls or approximate coincidence
of the centre of mass with the centre of rigidity is desirable, otherwise stresses due to
rotation must be taken into consideration.
Mathematical analysis by conventional methods becomes unwieldy and too
time-consuming. This is when the electronic computer may be employed. Certain
features of the Exhibit Hall and the Curatorial Building of the new British Columbia
Museum were analysed by this means. The analysis of the Exhibit Hall indicated
that deflections of the floor slabs during earthquakes could be excessive, and additional stiffening members were incorporated as a result.
Preliminary site investigations for vocational schools, gaols, and other institutions form a large part of the work of this Division. Proving adequate water supplies and negotiating sewage-disposal methods with local municipal governments and
other public bodies are taking an increasing amount of time. In many instances the
selection of a site is understandably not subject to a simple engineering or economic
analysis.
Recent years have seen a high level of activity in the Public Works Department.
Projects under construction, as well as those maintained by the Department, have
increased in proportion. The administration of works, particularly in the early
stages of construction, falls largely to the design engineers of this Division, who are,
of necessity, most familiar with the plans. This, of course, reduces the amount of
time available for design. Periods of overtime when offices and telephones are quiet
helped to maintain production.
We wish to express our appreciation to all those who have been associated with
us and who have helped to make this a rewarding and interesting year.
J. R. Simpson, S.Sc, A.M.I.C.E., Dip. Pub. Admin.,
Senior Structural Engineer.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1964/65 U 15
REPORT OF THE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT
"A creation in space is an interweaving of parts of space."—Moholy-Nagy.
A characteristic of contemporary architecture is the importance of plants and
trees. These are not only pleasing incidentals, but an integral part of the design.
The relationship of planting to building cannot be treated casually, for it is of major
importance.
Modern planting areas inside a building, or closely associated with it outside,
are practically part of the architecture, involving major decisions of design and
organization. There are few plants, if healthy and not mutilated by unskilled maintenance, that are without charm and grace when displayed to advantage.
The outline of a tree silhouetted against a wall, its shadows on the surrounding paving, its motion in the wind, all add to its decorative value.
However, all the effect can be nullified if the material is unsuitable in type or
are unthrifty specimens struggling against adverse environment, soil condition, or
unskilled attention.
The Landscape Division gives close study to maintenance conditions to be
met, and uses the most modern methods to ensure success. Even though thriving
well-grown material is procured at the outset, it must still be given every chance
to maintain its satisfactory condition. Soil must be properly prepared and of the
right quality, correct fertilization given, and a high-quality maintenance programme
carried out. That this care is worth while is strongly evidenced by the general
improvement in Provincial Government grounds throughout the Province.
It is the writer's experience that planners tend to undertake at one time both
too much and too little in regard to the planting areas. Frequently the location
and size of the planting areas, their depth, facilities for draining and watering, could
have been greatly helped if horticultural requirements had been properly understood.
Paving, curbs, wall surfaces, and canopies are part of the total scheme involving the planted area and cannot be considered independently. For example, the
paving may be formal or informal, free draining or impervious. It may consist of
large or small units. All these are conditions that have a direct bearing on the
choice of plant material.    The planting area cannot be treated as separate.
Many problems of this type occur with modern buildings; for instance, the
grounds of the large building of the British Columbia Technical Institute in Burnaby,
finished during this last year, and the new Courthouse at Quesnel.
Maintenance is an expense, and this fact must be met. Poor maintenance
will ruin attractive and promising landscapes. This is no job for the unskilled.
A strong back is not enough. In a restrictive or unfavourable environment, plants
need daily care during the growing season. This is particularly true when they
are in full public view. Careful and intelligent application of water and food is
needed, so also is grooming and pruning. Faded leaves and spent flowers are both
unattractive and untidy. To allocate these tasks to an unskilled person is neither
fair to him or to the garden material. If he has other duties, he cannot give
adequate attention to the plantings. Then the services of a professional gardener
become necessary in an attempt to correct the damage due to neglect.
We, in the Public Works Department, believe we must take the lead, and that
attractive well-maintained Government grounds will encourage similar efforts on
the part of others.
 U 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Landscape Division believes that a reasonable solution to the maintenance
problem is to contract this work out to established horticultural firms. This method
has operated with success in the larger establishments, and though some revision
may become necessary, it is probably the best and most practical way of maintaining
these grounds.
Smaller Government establishments, Courthouses, etc., are another problem
and require a different approach. There is the same need, but they are in most
cases too small to make contracts economical. There are two solutions. The first
is to use a large measure of " hard " landscaping which can be kept presentable by
a janitor. The other is the implementation of a movable skilled work crew with
sufficient motive equipment to give rapid but technically correct and effective care.
The year's work has been gratifying. There have been problems, but much
success. It has been satisfying to watch planted areas come to full production, and
I would like to thank those of my colleagues and staff who have given of their help
so freely.
R. H. Savery,
Landscape Architect.
 r
PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1964/65
U 17
"AIR-BORNE GARBAGE"
This is the title of a colour film produced by the Air Pollution Control Society,
located in Vancouver, B.C.   (It is an excellent film and available for group viewing).
The fact that the Air Pollution Society exists, is sponsored and financed by
civic authorities, expends considerable amount of volunteer effort in serious study
of this subject, is evidence of concern over air-pollution problems.
Air pollution knows no boundaries. Surrounding areas contribute to and
suffer from air pollution as does the urban community. By-laws with teeth are
being enacted in cities and municipalities where the problem was not recognized as
important a few years ago.
Why this concern over air pollution?
Those who have waited upon delayed aircraft, the aeroplane pilots, the marine
navigators, and those who have experienced the odour-bearing variety, are conscious
of one answer—smog.
The phenomenon of temperature inversion and presence of moisture-laden
ocean air aid the creation of smog in the Lower Mainland. No industrialized community is free of air pollution.
Health considerations are important. Each of us breathes 35 pounds of air
a day. Solid pollutants settle on lungs and throat surfaces, and gaseous constituents
are absorbed by the moist tissue, forming irritating acids. The increase in cancer
and respiratory illnesses in urban areas is a grim reminder of the danger to health.
The deleterious effects of pollutants upon painted surfaces, the corrosion of
exposed metals, the leaching of mortar and other building material, the soiling of
fabrics and fine finishes are all well established and easily seen.
What are the principal sources of air pollution?
For the Vancouver urban area it is estimated that something between 340 to
640 tons a month of visible fallout are deposited. There are many sources of
visible fallout—cement plants, foundries, grain elevators, diesel trucks and trains
and ships, oil- and coal-fired heating plants, automobiles, back-yard incinerators,
and household heating units.
The invisible pollution is equally important to health, corrosion, and surface
deterioration. This type of pollution amounts to some 100 tons a day in the Vancouver area: sulphur dioxide and hydrogen sulphide from oil burners, coal-burning
plants, pulp-mills, oil refineries; hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxide, sulphur dioxide,
aerosols, aldohydes, keytones, and organic acids from automobile exhausts; microp-
tons and acids from food-processing plants—all form invisible but major components of our " air-borne garbage."
All of us have a common interest in improving the quality of the air we
breathe. In many cases the reduction in emission of smoke, fumes, cinders, and
odours can be of direct benefit in improved cycle efficiency, recovery of waste
products, improved product cleanliness, and improved employee and public
relations.
 U 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Project Inspectors
A. E. Sandstrom.
Jack Martin.
F. Gordon.
J. Coupal.
R. Dyson.
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R. Lindblad.
H. Edlund.
A. Bartle.
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 U 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE MECHANICAL ENGINEER
"A friendly gesture is seldom out of order."—Anon.
DESIGN SECTION
The Division participated in most of the capital projects listed elsewhere in
this Report, and has experienced a busy year. There are three of these projects
we wish to point out as unusual.   These are: —
(a) The New Courthouse at Quesnel.—In this building the heating-boiler
was located in a mechanical penthouse together with the air-handling
equipment. This arrangement has several advantages, such as putting
the mechanical equipment in one place and thus saving space, using a
low-pressure boiler unit and thus a more economical unit, a short stub
stack saves the cost of a chimney and adds additional space in the building, minimizing the vertical runs of piping through the building. Although
the idea of putting the heating-boiler in a roof penthouse is not new, this
is the first use of this principle by the Department.
(b) The New Courthouse at Ganges on Saltspring Island.—This smaller
Courthouse is heated electrically. This is not an adaptation, it was designed into the building. It is too early to comment accurately upon the
use of electric heating from the Department's point of view, but it does
appear to be very satisfactory.
(c) The Veterinary Laboratory at Abbotsford.—This building is a medical
type of research centre. Special attention had to be paid to containing
and sterilizing contagious diseases. Many of the specialty pieces of
equipment required were designed by the Mechanical Division. These
included a sewage-cooker for all the sewage out of the building. All
sewage is boiled for half an hour before it goes to the septic tank. There
is also a pathological incinerator with a capacity of reducing 250 pounds
of viscera an hour to ash. This is done without smoke and odour. An
autopsy table capable of handling a 3,000-pound load, large enough to
take a moose. An animal-cage sterilizer in which the whole cage can
be cleaned and sterilized at the same time. All the exhaust air from the
building is passed through ultraviolet light sterilizers to prevent any
chance of air-borne contagious diseases escaping.
MAINTENANCE SECTION
During the year this section of the Division prepared drawings and specifications
for 41 projects involving repairs, additions, alterations, or renovations to mechanical
services in Government buildings. The following lists a few of the projects carried
out:—
(1) Renewal of plumbing, West Wing, Oakalla Prison Farm.
(2) New boiler feed-water system, Courthouse, Prince Rupert.
(3) Renewal of heating and ventilation system in main kitchen, Oakalla
Prison Farm.
(4) Installation of a steam turbine fire-pump, Tranquille School.
(5) Renewal of laundry machinery, Skeenaview Hospital.
(6) Conversion of heating-boiler to oil firing, Courthouse, Courtenay.
(7) Repairs to boiler-plant chimney, Oakalla Prison Farm.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1964/65
U 21
(8) Automatically controlled greenhouse ventilation system at Government
House.
In providing headquarters supervision over the operation and maintenance
of heating plants and mechanical services, 18 field trips were made, with visits to
a majority of the Government office buildings and institutions.
The successful operation of mechanical systems is, in the main, dependent on
the day-to-day attention which is given by our field staffs. We feel very fortunate
in the high calibre of chief stationary engineers which we have in our service, and
we would like to take this opportunity to thank them and their staffs for the good
work they are doing.
In concluding this report, I would like to record my appreciation to all the
divisions in the Department, and to the superintendents of works and project inspectors for the co-operation and assistance they have given us during the year.
W. E. Mills, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Dip. Pub. Admin..
Senior Mechanic
\eer.
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  U 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE ARCHITECT-PLANNER
" While we consider when to begin, it becomes too late."—Latin proverb.
The work of the Division is becoming increasingly concerned with the use of
land in all its phases as each year unfolds. The one just passed has proven the
point most markedly. The greater part of the work load has been concerned with
the exchange of lands and property, and the purchase or releasing of ownerships,
together with all the legal and political facets involved.
A major part of the second half of this year has concerned the Legislative
Precinct. Concern has been expressed by this Department at the ever-tightening
ring of private development surrounding, and encroaching on, the 1961 perimeter
line. Action has been taken to combat this trend, and during the past year some
45 lots involving over 6 acres of land have been purchased. Purchases have, as
far as is possible, been made strategically with a view to satisfying the immediate
demand for car-parking, withstanding the outside pressure of private urban renewal,
and in such a position as to allow new structures to be constructed without recourse
to extensive purchases.
The Precinct parking plan has progressed very smoothly. In spite of quite
serious disruption caused by the displacement of almost 500 cars to make way for
the Museum and Archives complex, the current position is better than before.
Great credit must be given to the Civil Service Parking Committee, who have dealt
with a great number of problems throughout the year.
Now nearing completion are land purchases for the vocational-school programme taking place throughout the Province, involving enlargement of existing
areas and the choosing of entirely new sites in designated built-up areas.
The Division was consulted and took an active part, in so far as it affected
Provincial planning, in support of the preparation of data for the traffic survey of
the Capital area. This report has now been made public, after being prepared by
a team of consultants.
A report on parking conditions and possible solutions at Essondale has been
completed and handed to the standing committee for their consideration and action.
Planning policy and legal matters involving land assembly at Duncan for the
new Government offices and Courthouse are being satisfactorily concluded, and the
architectural construction is now well advanced.
A heavy programme of rental projects has been carried out throughout the
Province, with some of the more successful, from the point of view of co-ordination,
being carried out in the Capital. There appears to be no end in sight to the constant
demand for more and more office and storage space as departments expand and
new divisions are planned, which in turn, will become larger as the Province grows
in population, stature, and wealth.
The survey of sites chosen for Governmental projects continues as in previous
years, and the Department is indebted to those divisions in the Department of
Lands, Forests, and Water Resources concerned with such matters.
Mention should also be made of assistance given by counsel of the Attorney-
General's Department and officials of the Department of Highways in the preparation of easements and rights-of-way processed by this Division.
With the opening of the new Y.W.-Y.M.CA. Building, another valuable step
has been taken in the growth of the Cathedral Hill Precinct. Although not sited
in the exact location recommended in the development plan, this does not prohibit
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1964/65
U 25
the eventual realization of the total scheme, which can be adapted as each project
materializes. Probably the factor most necessary to ensure the steady fulfilment of
any such plan is constant vigilance by those interested and already committed.
In the slower pace of the past, man was able to sit and think, towns and
villages were able to blend with their environment and surroundings. Today man
is making decisions without due regard to the future, the pressures being upon him
24 hours of the day, and likewise environment becomes merely the residual product
of the technological revolution. If we are to be part of this environment, as our
forefathers were able and learned to do, and if we wish to enjoy our longer lives,
greater affluence, better education, and larger leisure time, then we must pay more
respect to our land resources, from which we garner these riches, and from whose
form we enjoy some of the wealth of experience open to us. Unless we create a
realization of mutual trusteeship for this common environment into our day-to-day
thinking, we shall achieve nothing.
W. D. Lougher-Goodey, M.T.P.I., M.T.P.I.C, M.I.F.L.A.,
M.A.S.P.O., F.I.L.A., A.I.Struct.E.,
A rchitect-Planner.
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  U 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF  ENGINEER, SAFETY
ENGINEERING DIVISION
Any approach to the unification of three inspection services which were once
independent entities must, of necessity, be a gradual process. Apart from the possibility of disturbing the relationship between the public and the Department, there is
the impact of new methods on personnel. Old loyalties and esprit de corps developed over the years must yield to new concepts and then be guided toward progressive teamwork of one division.
To provide smooth entry into the project, attention was given first to the office
procedures of the Boilers and Pressure Vessels Branch and the Gas Inspection
Branch since they have an affinity in field operation. The Gas Branch presented
little difficulty. Being a comparative newcomer, it had already adopted the best of
the tried methods of the pioneers and evaded their pitfalls. With this advantage,
a well-planned office organization had been established.
On the other hand, from its beginning in 1898 the Boiler and Machinery Inspection Department, as it was known then, had to pursue trial-and-result methods.
It had to keep pliable enough to meet industrial growth, to absorb new techniques in
pressure-vessel construction, and to adjust examinations to the available quality of
plant personnel. Hence it was inevitable that its office procedures, although still
quite functional, had become decidedly cumbersome.
To compound the situation, there was the diversity of revenue sources in the
Boiler Branch—annual inspections of steam and refrigeration plants, inspection of
equipment under construction, examinations of engineers and welders, licensing of
contractors, survey and approval of designs. On occasion, revenue has been
received from points as far apart as Sweden and Singapore, United States and Japan.
Two Orders in Council enabled us to revise fees and so render them amenable to
addressograph billing and speedy computation for office staff, the public, and
auditors. At once the office load was reduced. A scheme of revalidation of existing
certificates of inspection by inspectors in the field and a new report form, which the
inspector made out on the job-site, eliminated many typing hours. Correspondence
relating to engineers was reduced by designing forms so that they would be returned
with fees.   Collection of fees for examinations in the field was abolished.
What fears we may have had were now being allayed by the willing co-operation
of the office staff. The new order had eliminated time-consuming operations, enabling them to meet the onslaught of new work stemming from our industrial expansion.
Next on our programme is examination of field operations to determine how
much inspection is necessary and to what limits.
RECOVERY BOILER- COMMITTEE
Meetings were held in the recovery plants of Port Alberni, Celgar, and Wood-
fibre. Principal work of the Committee is the preparation of safety rules in construction and operation of recovery plants.
The members, who are chief engineers, are already implementing many of the
rules in their own plants. Two delegates from the Black Liquor Recovery Committee of the United States attended and reported on progress in their own group.
It has been encouraging to note that throughout our work management has
shown keen interest and has given us every assistance during visits to their mills.
D. Denham, M.E.I.C, P.Eng.,
Chief Engineer.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1964/65 U 29
VANCOUVER COURTHOUSE
At the spring session of the Legislature in 1905 it was announced that the
sum of $ 1,000 had been included in the estimates for " competitive designs " for
a new Courthouse in Vancouver. In February, 1906, the Government bought the
block bounded by Howe, Robson, Hornby, and Georgia Streets for $35,000. The
then Premier, Mr. Bowser, said " the buildings should be situated fairly well back
in the block and the grounds should be beautiful and transformed into what will
practically be a small park."
On August 15, 1906, it was announced that the Courthouse would be built
" right away." F. M. Rattenbury, of Victoria, who designed the Parliament Buildings, had been selected by competition as architect and had drafted " general plans."
Messrs. Dalton and Eveleigh, of Vancouver, would prepare working drawings and
would supervise construction.
On September 27, 1907, it was reported that the Honourable W. J. Bowser;
the Honourable R. F. Green, Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works; and Mr.
W. T. Dalton had decided on the exact placing of the building.
Work was not very far advanced before plans had to be altered. On March
14, 1907, the Province reported, under the heading " Forgot Registrar in New Court
House," the following:—
The architect who drew up the plans forgot that the registrar of the Supreme Court required office space,
while two handsome little parlours, which might do well to serve afternoon tea in, were provided for the use
of the Timber Inspector. The quarters provided for the Land Registry Office are deemed altogether too
small even for present requirements.
Rattenbury drew up "new and enlarged plans," and on August, 1907, the
contract was awarded to Messrs. McDonald, Wilson and Snider " to be completed
August, 1909."   Expenditure was to be $114,211.76.
Once again, however, and before completion, the building had to be enlarged.
A new wing, designed by T. Hooper, architect, and supervised by Messrs. Dalton
and Eveleigh, was added. The Public Works Report for 1911/12 shows two items:
"Court House, Vancouver (completion), $125,000," and "Court House, Vancouver (New Wing), $100,000."
The main building was brought into service on October 9, 1911, when the
Province headlined " Assizes Are Held in New Court House." During ceremonies
L. M. McPhillips and Mr. Justice Murphy referred to the " splendid structure " and
the " magnificent structure." In thanking them on behalf of the Government, Mr.
Bowser said:—
I regret it has been found that the new structure is not large enough to accommodate the demands of
the local courts, but a new wing is now in the course of erection. If necessary, the Government will begin
the erection, at a very early date, of another wing.
The other wing was never built, although preparatory sketches for an East
Wing were drawn by Messrs. Dalton and Eveleigh at a cost of $4,000.
On December 22, 1912, almost eight years after the first announcement, the
Victoria Colonist reported the completion of the West Wing, and thus the Courthouse as it exists today. Even so, it was still not quite finished, for in July, 1936,
the Vancouver Sun ran a story:—■
COURT HOUSE—UNFINISHED BUSINESS
For 24 years the granite [sic] lions have been waiting to be finished. The cleaning they have just had by
sandblasting reminds the pioneers who watched them emerge from huge blocks of Haddington Island stone
that much work remains to be done on the heads.
S. M. Eveleigh, who, with his partner, the late W. T. Dalton, drew the plans for the Court House, recalls
that the money for the lions ran out before the mane, nose and ears were finished. So John Bruce, stonecutter, went on to other work. The Government changed, and the need, a few thousand dollars to finish the
lions, was forgotten in the shuffle.
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 U 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE
ARCHITECT
" Knowledge is the only instrument of production that is not subject to
diminishing returns."—English Digest quote.
MAINTENANCE AND BUILDING MANAGEMENT
A major step was taken during the period under review. The Province was
divided into six work zones, and this necessitated readjustment of three Superintendent of Works areas. The move has resulted in the Department providing field
supervision of daily maintenance operations in at least 80 per cent of the Province.
Implementation of this plan has enabled the Department to decentralize authority
and responsibility to the field for detailed routine work. The object has been to
free Division headquarters staff to concentrate on major problems and provide
technical and professional service to the zones.
In order to obtain 100 per cent supervision in the field, it is respectfully
suggested that a Superintendent of Works be appointed and established in the
Kootenays. In support of this contention it is pointed out that with the recent
establishment of the vocational school at Nelson, with the possibility of additions
thereto, with the completion of the Kootenay Fish Hatchery, in addition to existing
Government property and leased accommodation, operational problems are increasing.   It is difficult to handle these satisfactorily from headquarters.
Arising from the shortage of space in Government buildings caused by expansion throughout the Province, the Division has handled an unprecedented volume
of work in preparing plans for suitable rented premises. Many of these required
the preparation of detailed plans showing the subdivision of the space and additional
facilities, such as counters, fitments, electrical outlets, etc. This Division's project
inspectors were employed to ensure the rapid and satisfactory conversion, by the
landlord's agent, of the premises.
The largest conversion of rented accommodation undertaken by this Division
during the period under review was 1450 Government Street, Victoria. Here were
relocated the Provincial Library Commission, Division of Vital Statistics, Department of Health, Civil Defence, and some temporary accommodation for the
Museum. In addition, many smaller rented premises throughout the Province for
the Department of Social Welfare, Motor-vehicles Branch, and other activities of
the Government required our attention.
Some 68 specifications and numerous plans were prepared at headquarters,
and contracts awarded for miscellaneous maintenance projects. Our five Superintendents with their maintenance crews were kept constantly busy trying to keep
pace with essential maintenance and alteration work in their respective work zones.
It has been of some concern that due to the volume of new buildings increasing the
work load on all zones, we have had to sacrifice part of our programme of preventive maintenance. The advisability of preserving such a programme in the
interests of economy is hard to dispute, but would entail at this time an increase in
personnel.
The following list includes some of the larger maintenance renovations and
minor new building construction contracts throughout the Province:—
(a) Restoration of the masonry and exterior fabric of the Fernie Courthouse.
(b) Provision of new toilet and bathing facilities, New Haven Borstal Institution, Vancouver.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1964/65
U 33
(c) Major renovations to accommodation previously occupied by the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police in Princeton Courthouse.
(d) Renovation, including new foundations, electric wiring, heating, etc., to
three residences, Charlie Lake Mines Station.
(e) Relocation of bakery, Oakalla Prison Farm, Burnaby.
(/) Alterations to accommodation, Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital, Vancouver, to make suitable accommodation for aged patients.
(g)  Government Agency residence, Kaslo.
(/.)  Interior decoration of Kelowna Courthouse.
(i)  Extensive renovation to R.C.M.P. area in Penticton Courthouse.
Again I would like to acknowledge the aid we have received from Government
Agents and others who have acted on our behalf in the Interior, for the help and
co-operation they have given us in connection with our maintenance and operational
programme. Appreciation is due to all members of the Division staff, including the
Superintendents of Works, who, despite an ever-increasing work load, have managed
to overcome many emergencies and continue to make an invaluable contribution
to the success of this Department's operations.
CONSTRUCTION
The unprecedented increase in the number of buildings under construction in
this fiscal period entailed the employment of eight project inspectors. These personnel were stationed throughout the Province on building-sites to provide continuous supervision, which has ensured a standard of quality, workmanship, and
economy of a very high order.
During this period we have implemented a programme of progressively supplying to these personnel instruments to ascertain the quality, size, and composition
of materials delivered on site. In co-operation with the Specification Branch of
the Design Division, samples of materials approved for use are sent to the site for
comparison with delivered material.
Prior to the start of construction, the project inspector designated to supervise
the construction has been called into headquarters. Besides familiarizing himself
with the project, he has been briefed by other divisions regarding the technical
aspects involved. During construction our representative is called into headquarters
to report upon progress and receive instructions. These measures have proved of
great value in keeping active liaison among all divisions, the work, and the general
contractor.
Although headquarters personnel have, throughout the period, made a number
of visits to building-sites, the value of periodic regular visits by senior officials who
can resolve current difficulties or issue explicit directions on site to the contractor's
representative cannot be overemphasized.
Project inspectors were appointed to the following projects under construction
during this period:—
(1) Ganges Provincial Building.
(2) Pearson Hospital, Vancouver—day room.
(3) Fort Nelson Government Building.
(4) Kootenay Fish Hatchery, Phase 2.
(5) Duncan Provincial Building, Phase 1.
(6) Quesnel Courthouse, Phase 2.
(7) Penticton Highways establishment.
(8) Hillside Building, Essondale.
 Carillon Tower, British Columbia Archives and Museum, Victoria.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1964/65 U 35
(9) Hope—addition to R.C.M.P. Building.
(10) Dry-kiln, British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby.
(11) Vernon—Dellview Hospital boiler-house.
(12) Garbage-handling, East Lawn, Essondale.
(13) Dormitories 2 and 3, Allco, Haney.
(14) Prince George—weigh-scale.
Also under construction, and accepted as substantially complete during this
period, were the following:—
(a) Abbotsford Pathology Building (December, 1964).
(b) Classroom Block, Jericho Hill School.
(c) University of British Columbia—College of Education, Phase 2 (February, 1965).
(d) Oliver Courthouse (September, 1964).
(e) Creston Highways establishment (February, 1965).
(/) Public Works Department Building, Essondale.
In conclusion, I would like to state that close liaison with other divisions has
been maintained, and frequent conferences have proved invaluable in increasing the
efficiency of our operations.
Stanley Lloyd, M.R.A.I.C, A.R.I.B.A., Dip. Pub. Admin.,
Senior Construction and Maintenance Architect.
 U 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF GAS INSPECTOR
THE ACT
There were no amendments made to the Gas Act or pursuant regulations
during the past year.
THE BRANCH
Clerical staff of the Boilers and Pressure Vessels Branch and the Gas Inspection
Branch were amalgamated under the Chief Engineer of the Safety Engineering
Services Division.
Two offices were established in conjunction with the Electrical Energy Inspection Branch—one in Dawson Creek to serve the Peace River District and the other
at Abbotsford.
Government Agents in 14 municipalities now issue single-family dwelling
permits.
Night schools were conducted in Vancouver, Burnaby, Victoria, Abbotsford,
and Prince George.
Developments in the gas-distribution industry are of great interest and may
result in substantial changes and increases in this Division's activities. The emergence of liquefied natural gas as an industrial factor may result in smaller communities, not presently served, having gas-distribution facilities. It is not possible, at
this time, to accurately forecast the extent to which this trend may develop, but it is
known that serious thought is being given, by some centres, to the use of this
convenience fuel. If this should become a significant factor, this Division may have
to contend with an increased call on its services.
Wider use has been made of propane as a fuel. Originally this derivative
was confined to relatively minor and very localized use, but recently its application
has been widened to encompass larger installations. With the development of. liquefied natural gas, this trend may be slowed or halted. Nevertheless, it is obvious that
this Division must become more conscious of the need for vigilance as to the safety
of installations.
ACCIDENTS
During the fiscal year there were no fatalities or major accidents caused by
natural gas.
SUMMARY OF WORK
1964/65
1963/64
1962/63
New designs checked, industrial approval..
Gas codes distributed	
Gas-fitters' licences issued 	
Gas contractors' licences issued	
Provisional licences issued  	
Gas-fitters' examinations	
Gas-fitters' re-examinations	
Number of gas-fitters passed examination.	
Number of gas permits issued, municipalities-
Number of gas permits issued by this Branch-
Permit application pads distributed	
1,003
580
1,608
528
521
159
54
116
10,499
14,303
377
834
2,021
1,661
516
513
169
46
147
10,153
14,558
688
765
590
1,514
566
621
210
48
158
11,296
13,534
680
J. Kaneen, P.Eng.,
Chief Inspector.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1964/65
U 37
REPORT OF THE  INSPECTOR OF  ELECTRICAL ENERGY
BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
The Honourable Minister of Public Works has been pleased to appoint the
following members to the Board, effective January 1, 1965: Mr. N. V. Beech,
electrical contractor, representing the Vancouver Electrical Association; Mr. H.
Reid, electrical contractor, representing the Associated Electrical Contractors of
British Columbia; and Mr. L. Glover, electrical inspector for the Municipality of
Burnaby, representing cities and municipalities. Other members of the Board are
Mr. L. Robson (Chairman), Chief Inspector of Electrical Energy, and Mr. G. A.
Harrower, Assistant Inspector of Electrical Energy. Eight meetings were held
throughout the year.
The total number of certificates of competency in effect during the year was
as follows:—■
Class A  220 Class PC       102
Class B   458 Class TC   1
Class C  530 	
Class PA     57 Total   1,459
Class PB '____    91
Three hundred and three candidates for electrical contractors' certificates of
competency were examined during the year, with the following results:—
Class
Number of
Candidates
Examined
Passed
Failed
A             	
50
128
125
32
68
64
18
B	
60
C _	
61
303
164
139
PERMITS
Effective May 1, 1964, a new system was instituted whereby applicants for
permits for wiring in single- or duplex-family dwellings may apply to any Government Agency office throughout the Province. This service is now available at 38
Agency offices as well as at six offices of this Branch.
It is planned to extend this availability to other and larger types of electrical
installations as time and opportunity will permit.
The total number of permits issued during the year was as follows: —
April, 1964   3,944
May, 1964  3,816
June, 1964  4,408
July, 1964   4,030
August, 1964  3,891
September, 1964   4,349 	
October, 1964   4,318 Total  47,403
This represents a net increase of about 5Vi per cent over the previous year.
November, 1964   4,271
December,  1964   3,468
January, 1965   3,233
February, 1965   3,639
March, 1965   4,036
 U 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
DISTRICT OFFICES AND INSPECTIONS
Office Location Inspections
Abbotsford   2,907
Alberni   2,570
Chilliwack  2,482
Courtenay  3,699
Cranbrook     2,088
Dawson Creek  1,801
Duncan  2,804
Fort St. John  1,666
Kamloops   3,576
Kelowna   2,342
Langley, Delta, and White Rock  2,569
Nanaimo     2,708
Nelson     1,825
New Westminster (three inspectors)   4,873
Penticton  3,117
Powell River   1,920
Prince George (two inspectors)  6,950
Prince Rupert  2,771
Quesnel  2,271
Richmond (two inspectors)   4,275
Trail   1,872
Vernon     2,298
Victoria (three inspectors)   7,605
Total  70,989
CANADIAN STANDARDS ASSOCIATION
The Chief Inspector continued to represent the Province at meetings of the
Canadian Standards Association. Two meetings each of the Approvals Council
(Electrical) and the Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, Committee were attended
—one each in June in Charlottetown, P.E.I., and one each in November in Toronto.
The work involved in maintaining up-to-date standards for electrical installations continues to be very active. No less than approximately 200 subjects are in
the committee stage. The end result of this activity is that Canada has available
to it one of the most complete and comprehensive sets of electrical standards to be
found anywhere.
EQUIPMENT SECTION
The volume of electrical equipment offered for installation which is not listed
by the National laboratory service continues to increase. This year 435 applications were accepted, requiring inspection and labelling of 2,243 pieces of equipment. This indicates an increase in applications of 115 over the previous year,
or a percentage increase of approximately 35 per cent.
Much of this type of equipment is special, and the scope is continually expanding. Included are items required for hospitals, schools, traffic-signal applications,
and industry. Examples of the two latter categories are the new equipment which
was custom built for the First Narrows Bridge north approaches and special equipment for the new chemical plant at Squamish, which was of Italian origin.
 :■_-.   :■.....,:.::■,■.
PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1964/65 U 39
Small manufacturers are assisted in starting production on new lines of equipment until such time as they can be processed for approval through the National
laboratory service.
EXAMINATION OF MOTION-PICTURE PROJECTIONISTS
The Branch assisted the Provincial Fire Marshal in conducting seven examinations for projectionists. The regulations covering such examinations provide that
the Inspector of Electrical Energy be a member of this Examining Board in company
with the Fire Marshal. In this connection, all fees arising from these examinations
accrue to the credit of the Fire Marshal's department.
POLE-LINE PERMITS
During the year the Branch checked 1,069 applications for the erection of
pole-lines on Crown lands or Provincial highways. Recommendations on each
application were forwarded to the Regional Engineer of the Department of Highways.   This is approximately 10 per cent higher than last year.
ACCIDENTS
There were 14 accidents recorded during the year, and six of these were fatal.
May 8, 1964, at Richmond: One person was electrocuted and one injured
when a crane fall line contacted a 12-kilovolt transmission-line.
August 24, 1964, at Vancouver: One person was electrocuted when a crane
cable contacted a 220-volt power-line.
August 24, 1964, at Fort St. John: One person was electrocuted when a supporting cable came in contact with a 7,200-volt primary line.
December 16, 1964, at Kitimat: One person was electrocuted when he grasped
a bus bar accidentally.
March 20, 1965, at Nelson: One person was electrocuted when a logging-truck
boom contacted, or came close to, a centre phase line.
April 7, 1965, at North Okanagan: One person was electrocuted when he
apparently, without authority, attempted to close a cut-out on a B.C. Hydro pole.
May I again express my appreciation for your splendid co-operation and continued interest in our problems and to your Departmental staff for valuable assistance
rendered during the year.
L. Robson, P.Eng.,
Chief Inspector of Electrical Energy.
  -■'■"■■■   ■-■.
PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1964/65 U 41
REPORT OF THE CHIEF  INSPECTOR OF  BOILERS
AND PRESSURE VESSELS
GENERAL
The heavy work load in the design office shows no easement over the last three
years, a consequence of the steady industrial growth. Design office staff has been
augmented by an inspector drawn from the field, which accounts for the drop in
inspections.
Although our local boiler-shops are finding it difficult to compete with Eastern
manufacturers in boiler construction, they are busy constructing pressure vessels
for our new pulp-mills and the oil fields and refineries of Alberta and Saskatchewan.
OPERATIONS
All district inspectors report brisk activity in their areas as new industries
appear; consequently, their itineraries are taking longer; and since much of their
time is consumed in the inspection of heating plants and small operations, we are
giving consideration to the recruitment of Grade 1 inspectors to do this work.
Welders, who are the key men in the heavy-construction industry, are in
demand; our training facilities are excellent but cannot supply enough welders;
many are entering the Province from other parts of Canada. The testing of welders,
therefore, is also a heavy task and promises to become a more specialized operation
of this Branch. The new welding regulations approved in 1961 have proved helpful
and functional to both industry and ourselves.
Efficiency in office operations has advanced with new methods of certification
of boilers and of collection of revenue, and a new type of report form has reduced
typists' work and speeded up the report to the owner.
REGULATIONS
A revised edition of Regulations Respecting Stationary Engineers (Part VI)
was approved by Order in Council No. 1568 on June 8, 1964. Among the highlights of the new edition are better educational credits, recognition of certificates
issued by other Provinces, and a scheme for apprenticeship.
Regulations as to fees (Part V) were completely redrawn and approved by
Order in Council No. 2213 on August 6, 1964.
Regulations Governing Low-pressure Heating Plants (Part IV) were amended
by Order in Council No. 2212 on August 6, 1964, to introduce a single fee for
installation permits.
Orders in Council Nos. 2212 and 2213 have eased the task of computing fees,
not only for ourselves, but for manufacturers, contractors, and owners also.
ACCIDENTS
Two persons were killed and two injured in separate accidents to boilers and
pressure equipment, as follows:—
April 10, 1964, at Port Kells, North Surrey, an oil heater used at an asphalt-
mixing plant exploded due to overheating.   No one was injured.
April 18, 1964, at Port Alberni, an accumulation of hydrocarbon gas in an
oil barge exploded when a welder was making repairs on the deck. The welder
was killed.
 U 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
May 30, 1964, at Watson Island, Prince Rupert, one workman was killed and
two burned by hot ashes while repairing a precipitation hopper at a pulp-mill.
August 7, 1964, at Port Mellon, a dissolving-tank exploded when detonations
became excessive, resulting in the breaking of the spout, causing an excessive runoff of smelt, setting up a chain reaction of heavier detonations, and filled the boiler-
room with lethal gas and short-circuiting electrical equipment. Fortunately the
situation was brought back under control without injuries to anyone.
December 17, 1964, at Vancouver, a water tube boiler suffered a furnace
explosion due to failure of ignition of an oil burner. Several tubes were distorted
and the damage of boiler casing was extensive.   No one was injured.
September 20, 1964, at Prince Rupert, a boiler was damaged due to a low
water condition caused by a defective feed-water control.
October 18, 1964, at Elk Falls, a tube ruptured in a recovery boiler, causing
an emergency shut-down. The tube had developed a pinhole leak, which in turn
damaged adjacent tubes.   No one was injured.
Complete investigations were made of all these accidents, and full reports with
recommendations are on file.
SUMMARY OF WORK
1964/65
1963/64
1962/63
Designs registered     ' —	
843
91
1,503
4,120
2,182
399
798
1,301
872
131
1,433
4,378
2,531
443
570
1,201
782
108
Pressure vessels built under inspection   •	
1,291
4,582
2,203
New boiler installations _	
389
544
1,427
ENGINEERS' E
KAMINATIC
NS
Class
Number
Examined
Passed
Failed
First, A	
First, B...	
20
9
153
162
336
57
53
8
11
8
97
121
249
49
34
5
9
1
Third                                         	
56
41
87
8
Boiler operator, L.P.B	
19
3
Totals                        	
798
574
224
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1964/65
WELDERS' TESTS
U 43
Grade
Number
Examined
Passed
Failed
A  	
290
370
55
78
91
212
205
259
289
45
70
84
201
196
31
B      .	
r.	
81
10
n   _	
8
7
Special  ~        	
11
9
Totals              	
1,301
!           1,144
157
S. Smith,
Chief Inspector.
HE'LL   WAVE. THOS.TN
S>OIL-e.E.A&.kl<t Ft<.l>__,£&\
IN A  MOMENT , Sift-!    )
 U 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF EXPENDITURE
The following pages present in detail the expenditures relating to the construction, alteration, and repairs on the various Government buildings and institutions, etc., coming under the management, charge, and direction of the Minister of
Public Works.
A. E. Rhodes,
Comptroller of Expenditure.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1964/65
U 45
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, FISCAL YEAR 1964/65
ADMINISTRATION AND MAINTENANCE VOTES
(For details see Public Accounts.)
Vote 290—Minister's Office	
Vote 291—General Administration	
Vote 292—Government Buildings (Maintenance) 	
Vote 294—Rentals _.	
Vote 295—Safety Inspection Division, Vancouver (includes Gas Inspection, Steam
Boiler Inspection, and Electrical Energy Inspection Branches) 	
Less credits—
Rentals and recoverable items, Government buildings, etc.
Repayable by commissions, boards, etc.—Rental Vote	
$23,492.32
198,594.82
5,449,953.52
752,923.10
724,078.32
$7,149,042.08
143,591.72
31,985.69
$6,973,464.67
CAPITAL
Vote 293—Construction of Provincial Buildings  (see expenditure  by building
listed below)
Less Parliament Buildings parking-lot fees	
Less Federal Government contributions—
Project No. 486-B—Museum and Archives Building, Victoria  $41,746.97
Project No. 231-B-4—Nanaimo Vocational School   21,580.74
Project No. 299-B—Burnaby Vocational School  52,421.60
Project No. 312-B—Prince George Vocational School  8,188.83
Project No. 401-B—Burnaby Institute of Technology   505,964.87
Project No. 412-B—Kelowna Vocational School   73,499.27
Project No. 429-B—Nelson Vocational School   143,187.51
Project No. 481-B—Dawson Creek Vocational School .... 260,790.62
$9,110,234.62
43,368.00
1,107,380.41
$7,959,486.21
SUMMARY
Net expenditure, Department of Public Works-
Administration and maintenance	
Capital  	
.. $6,973,464.67
..    7,959,486.21
$14,932,950.88
Project No.
456-B
453-B
458-B
473-B
480-B
421-B
460-B
484-B
299-B-2
478-B
433-B
334-B
6-B-33
6-B-34
6-B-37
VOTE 293—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS
Description
Agriculture Testing Laboratory, Vancouver—addition 	
Allco Infirmary, Haney	
Abbotsford—Animal Pathology Building	
Abbotsford—office building, Random Sample Poultry Testing Station
Atlin—outpost hospital	
Bull River Fish Hatchery 	
Burnaby Mental Health Centre—playground area .
Burnaby Mental Health Centre—repairs to roofs and paved courts	
Burnaby Vocational Training School—Public Works buildings	
Burns Lake—purchase of residence for the District Superintendent,
Department of Highways 	
Charlie Lake—Department of Mines—residences 	
Chetwynd duplexes—connecting water supply and sewage system	
Colony Farm—
Power-line  	
Repairs to piggery
Repairs to Coquitlam River Bridge
Expenditure
$13,344.64
177,248.37
380,286.00
7,840.48
12,240.35
222,875.68
10,217.30
11,386.35
77,954.71
16,953.00
9,858.90
11,108.41
10,221.50
8,013.80
9,712.90
 U 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 293—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.
457-B
420-B
25-B-12
468-B-l
5-B-102
5-B-108
5-B-116
5-B-117
5-B-119
5-B-120
5-B-121
5-B-123
5-B-129
5-B-130
5-B-131
5-B-132
5-B-350
451-B
482-B
485-B
289-B
467-B
384-B
123-B-5
123-B-16
399-B
450-B
483-B
79-B-10
79-B-ll
474-B
477-B
416-B
39-B-18
39-B-62
39-B-63
39-B-64
39-B-65
39-B-66
39-B-67
39-B-68
39-B-69
382-B
31-B-9
31-B-10
471-B
381-B
491-B
479-B
455-B
452-B
24-B-6
10-B-12
10-B-41
10-B-44
10-B-49
10-B-50
476-B
Description
Creston—Highways establishment 	
Dease Lake—maintenance depot 	
Dellview Hospital, Vernon—addition to boiler-house	
Duncan—Government offices 	
Essondale—
Alterations and renovations to kitchen and staff rooms, dining-
room areas 	
Hillside Building 	
Landscaping, roads, parking, etc.
Underground   steam   and   condensate  piping   to  North   Lawn
Building  	
Garbage-handling incinerator 	
Industrial Therapy Buildings 	
Structural alterations 	
Renovations, Valleyview, Units 1, 2, and 3
Toilet facilities 	
Fire-stairs, Centre Lawn Building 	
Laundry  equipment
Emergency electric power, boiler-house
Public Works building 	
Fernie Courthouse—exterior restoration 	
Fort Nelson—Government office building and residence
Ganges—Government office building 	
General expenses (planning, surveys, supplies, etc.) 	
Golden—residence for Government Agent
Grounds improvement—various government buildings (Provincial).
Haney—
Development of grounds and irrigation	
Sewage plant and water supply	
Helmcken House—renovations 	
Hope—additional lockup facilities 	
Hudson Hope—road foreman's residence 	
lericho Hill School—
Dormitory unit and development
Classroom and Industrial Arts Building
lordan River—Health Supplies Emergency Warehouse	
Kaslo—Government Agent's residence, purchase of property and purchase and erection of pre-fab building 	
Langford—addition to sign-shop	
Oakalla—
Security fence 	
Roads (drainage and parking) 	
Additional gaol facilities (Westgate)
Women's gaol—electrical distribution system
Kitchen—renovations 	
Conversion to gas
Security—West Wing 	
West Wing	
Westgate—roofing 	
Oliver Courthouse 	
Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital—
Modifications   	
Activity room
Penticton—Department of Highways garage and yard site
Prince Rupert—Forestry building 	
Prince George—weigh-scale station
Prince George area—structural alterations, Zone 5
Quesnel Courthouse	
Revelstoke Courthouse—exterior restoration 	
Skeenaview Hospital—laundry equipment	
Tranquille—
Water supply and sewage disposal 	
Main building—alterations   	
Renovations to boiler-house 	
Playground 	
Conversion of additional facilities	
Vancouver Island Gaol 	
Expenditure
$253,627.36
30,223.40
69,782.60
3,023.43
211,327.02
44,476.52
33,015.15
15,000.00
125,537.63
13,802.01
49,405.04
15,000.00
3,000.00
4,928.73
15,874.64
6,417.75
75,059.13
12,575.75
17,375.17
83,047.23
280,839.08
17,195.00
47,483.20
6,672.87
15,767.65
3,959.46
24.724.80
11,003.00
4,834.15
788,939.33
38.80
16,464.67
25,950.40
2,883.97
1,639.15
9,150.06
3,947.45
33,374.62
25,802.33
11,488.64
66,244.50
47,055.73
274,494.07
13,098.92
22,414.73
196,335.91
9,556.01
Nil
8.974.69
714.850.75
6,505.34
10,335.89
5,405.21
49,997.04
13,065.47
9,997.76
70,450.60
5,334.46
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1964/65
U 47
VOTE 293—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.                                                  Description Expenditure
408-B        Vancouver area—structural alterations  $32,926.88
489-B         Vancouver—Pesticide Laboratory   35,337.41
488-B         Vancouver—Civic Square, acquisition of property  1,912,431.80
292-B         Victoria area—structural alterations   66,712.76
385-B         Parliament Buildings—parking facilities   33,652.49
487-B         Parliament Buildings Precinct—acquisition of property  20,620.00
500-B        Parliament Buildings area—purchase of certain property and preparing it for parking   192,100.00
339-B         Victoria Law Courts  9,100.93
464-B        Victoria—Mental Health buildings, Lee Avenue and Fort Street—
renovations and part purchase of property  108,665.07
486-B         Victoria—Provincial Museum   116,377.82
492-B         Victoria—Motor-vehicle Building, Data Processing Centre   23,446.29
The Woodlands School—
7-B-40            Landscaping, fencing, paving, etc.  23,640.47
7-B-46            Structural alterations  20,270.12
369-B Education—College of Education, University of British Columbia,
Vancouver   244,668.87
Vocational—■
401-B                 Burnaby—Institute of Technology   632,815.99
299-B                 Burnaby Vocational School  51,812.06
481-B Dawson Creek Vocational School (transfer charges and security
and maintenance costs)   356,952.69
412-B                 Kelowna Vocational School   107,424.72
231-B-4              Nanaimo Vocational School   28,413.92
429-B                 Nelson Vocational School   123,630.74
312-B                 Prince George Vocational School   11,080.93
Highways, garages, etc.—
415-B                 Albert Canyon—equipment-shed and oil-house (Revelstoke)  15,315.21
413-B                 Castlegar—equipment-shed and oil-house (Rossland-Trail)  4,985.67
493-B                Hazelton—foreman mechanic's residence (Skeena (East))   11,553.00
475-B Prince George—Department of Highways yard, fencing  (Fort
George)     8,262.12
$9,110,234.62
 U 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED
FOR BUILDINGS
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
Roads and Drainage Work around British Columbia Institute of Technology,
Burnaby:
Beaver Construction Co   	
Standard General Construction International Ltd  	
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd 	
Jamieson Construction Co. Ltd.	
British  Columbia  Vocational School,  Nelson—Lawn  Construction  and Plant
Material and Preparation:
Holland Landscapers Ltd.
Jensen & Johnston Landscape Contractors Ltd..
Bert Murray	
Conniston Construction Co. Ltd.	
British Columbia Vocational School, Kelowna-
for the Landscape:
Kelowna Nurseries Ltd _ 	
Murray Nurseries Ltd   	
Holland Landscapers Ltd..
-Plant Material to Be Supplied
Janitorial Service, British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby:
Excelsior Building Maintenance Ltd ___   ___	
American Building Maintenance Co. Ltd  _ 	
Best Cleaners & Contractors   _ _	
Modern Building Cleaning Services of Canada Ltd.	
National Building Maintenance Ltd  __ _   .	
Landscape Development of  Grounds and Concrete  Work,  British  Columbia
Institute of Technology, Burnaby:
Holland Landscapers Ltd.— _ _ _
Jensen & Johnson Landscape Contractors Ltd   	
Conniston Construction Co. Ltd 	
Irrigation, British Columbia Vocational School, Kelowna:
Pacific Pipe & Flume Ltd _  	
Pacific Lawn Sprinklers Ltd..
Construction of Residence, Golden:
Burnham Construction Ltd	
Kriese Bros. Construction..	
Eyford Anderson Construction Co. Ltd	
Electrical Circuit Installation, Public Works Building, Essondale:
Paragon Electric Ltd  ____	
C. H. E. Williams Co. Ltd	
Ricketts-Sewell Electric Ltd	
Peterson Electrical Construction Co.
Highways Establishment, Penticton:
Bennett & White Construction Co. Ltd
Interior Contracting Co. Ltd	
Kenyon & Co. Ltd	
C. J. Oliver Ltd  	
Ltd..
Janitorial Service, Provincial Government Buildings, Vancouver, Works Zone
No. 2:
Modern Building Cleaning Services of Canada Ltd „  	
American Building Maintenance Co. Ltd.    	
Excelsior Building Maintenance Ltd._	
National Building Maintenance Ltd _	
Conversion, 1904 Fort Street, Victoria:
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd.	
M. P. Paine & Co   	
Provincial Government Building, Quesnel:
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd	
Bennett & White Construction Ltd 	
Narod Construction Ltd _ _	
Addition to R.C.M.P. Detachment, Hope:
R. A. Adair Construction Ltd.  . _—	
Burdett Construction Co. Ltd _ _	
Pine Tree Construction Co. Ltd	
Walter Cabott Construction Ltd..
Irrigation, British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby:
Pacific Lawn Sprinklers Ltd	
Terra Irrigation Ltd	
$74,000.00
49,828.00
58,650.00
47,620.00
Awarded.
55,727.00
73,675.00
79,082.00
53,133.00
Awarded.
15,417.00
8,896.62
5,100.00
Awarded.
123,096.00
144,600.00
144,400.00
153,095.00
102,000.00
Awarded.
82,538.00
73,844.00
89,640.00
Awarded.
59,653.00
38,384.00
Awarded.
17,850.00
18,964.00
18,575.00
33,535.00
38,649.00
33,250.00
39,151.00
Awarded.
Not awarded
208,888.00
294,275.00
189,867.00
201,999.00
Awarded.
88,584.00
54,000.00
85,920.00
102,000.00
Awarded.
56,520.00
53,720.00
Awarded.
1,172,000.00
1,184,136.00
1,159,217.00
Awarded.
27,661.00
30,350.00
24,948.87
29,380.00
Awarded.
19,194.00
18,460.00
Awarded.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1964/65 U 49
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
Irrigation, British Columbia Vocational School, Nelson:
$33,154.00
25,163.40
26,163.00
34,550.00
36,900.00
30,944.00
32,477.00
20,378.00
17,027.00
14,579.00
14,490.00
18,811.00
69,675.00
79,384.00
71,987.00
127,126.00
117,299.00
115,480.00
23,240.00
18,620.00
42,316.00
17,360.00
15,400.00
7,588.00
15,232.00
36,960.00
36,624.00
28,800.00
271,985.00
311,100.00
276,800.00
276,485.00
264,988.00
276,790.00
273,463.00
275,433.00
28,266.00
19,960.00
55,680.00
59,760.00
56,532.00
57,000.00
57,824.00
Pacific Pipe & Flume Ltd	
Experimental Wood Kiln, British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby:
Burns & Dutton Construction (1962) Ltd 	
E. H. Shockley & Son Ltd	
Construction of Residence, Kaslo:
Not awarded.
Christmas Seal Auditorium, Vancouver:
E. H. Shockley & Son Ltd                                                              	
Alex Park & Son Ltd 	
Addition to Boiler-house, Dellview Hospital, Vernon:
Smith Bros. & Wilson Ltd	
Alterations and Garbage-handling Facilities, East Lawn Building, Essondale:
Maintenance of Grounds at British Columbia Vocational School, Nelson:
Maintenance of Grounds at British Columbia Vocational School, Kelowna:
Awarded.
Maintenance of Grounds at British Columbia Vocational School, Nanaimo:
Awarded.
Maintenance of Grounds at Prince George Vocational School and Courthouse:
Awarded.
Maintenance of Grounds of Provincial Government Properties at British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby, and British Columbia Institute of
Technology, Burnaby:
Jensen & Johnson Landscape Contractors Ltd _	
Janitorial Services, British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby:
Ulf Dehn (Best Cleaners & Contractors)           	
Awarded.
Allco Institution, Dormitories Nos. 2 and 3, Haney:
E. H. Shockley & Son                      ___                            	
Allan & Viner Construction Ltd  	
Landscaping at Provincial Government Building, Oliver:
Not awarded.
Weigh-scale Station, Prince George:
Dezell Construction Co. Ltd  __          	
Alterations,   Buildings Nos.  5 and   7,  British   Columbia   Vocational  School,
Burnaby:
Kennett Construction Co. Ltd	
Awarded.
Not awarded.
E. H. Shockley & Son Ltd      _.	
Cain Truscott Contractors Ltd            	
Shopland Construction Co. Ltd..— _   -
Maintenance  of   Grounds,   Provincial  Government  Properties  at  Courthouse
and Adjacent Offices, Prince Rupert:
Holland  Landscapers   Ltd.   (lawns,   15   cents  per   square   yard;    plants,
22 cents per square yard)	
Jensen & Johnson Landscape Contractors Ltd. (lawns, 6 cents per square
 U 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
Alterations to 944 Howe Street, Vancouver:
$21,402.00
23,183.00
16,950.00
37,970.00
41,878.00
40,423.00
44,450.00
1,340,431.00
1,347,500.00
1,357,059.00
1,372,000.00
1,366,875.00
276,950.00
247,412.00
251,626.00
268,186.00
256,800.00
251,606.00
249,900.00
241,296.00
248,306.00
249,892.00
247,900.00
242,647.00
62,302.80
50,400.00
58,608.00
65,736.00
70,056.00
301,850.00
377,434.00
299,777.00
319,000.00
368,820.00
94,848.82
74,649.00
92,276.00
119,299.00
85,100.00
28,435.00
24,852.00
22,712.00
22,733.00
24,123.00
23,543.04
22,868.00
963,578.00
966,500.00
979,627.00
954,900.00
887,423.00
68,979.00
75,231.00
66,735.00
David Mitchell Co. Ltd              	
Alterations to 800 Cassiar Street, Vancouver:
Pacific Western Contractors Ltd	
Lickley Johnson Palmer Conduction Ltd -	
David Mitchell Co. Ltd                   	
Kootenay Trout Hatchery, Bull River (Phase 2):
E. H. Shockley & Son ._.	
Burns & Dutton Contsruction (1962) Ltd _	
Bennett & White Construction Co. Ltd   _	
Provincial Government Offices, Ganges:
Walter Cabott Construction Ltd.               	
E. J. Hunter & Sons Ltd.                           	
G. H. Wheaton Ltd          ... 	
Hillside Building, Essondale:
Kennett Construction Ltd   	
C. J. Oliver Ltd.                                          	
Awarded.
Bennett & White Construction Co. Ltd  , 	
Sorenson Construction Co. Ltd...    	
Janitorial Service, Victoria Law Courts, Victoria:
Awarded.
Excelsior Building  Maintenance  Ltd    	
Government Office Building, Fort Nelson:
Awarded.
Landscape Development, Jericho School, Vancouver:
Awarded.
Spra-Mac Landscaping Ltd..  	
Jensen & Johnson Landscape Contractors Ltd _ —	
Emergency Health Service and Emergency Welfare Service Storage Building,
Abbotsford:
Not awarded.
Addition to Men's Gaol, Prince George:
Smith Bros. & Wilson Ltd 	
Not awarded.
Provincial Government Office Building, Duncan (Phase 1):
E. J   Hunter & Sons Ltd.                                     _  	
Awarded.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1964/65 U 51
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
Day Room Addition, Pearson Hospital, Vancouver:
Hodgson, King & Marble Ltd _
E. H. Shockley & Son Ltd....	
Western Building Ltd	
Hall Construction Ltd 	
Brockbank & Hemingway Ltd...
Janitorial Service, College of Education, University of British Columbia, Vancouver:
Excelsior Building Maintenance Ltd _ _	
John Christianson and Helge Jensen	
National Building Maintenance Ltd..
Best Cleaners & Contractors Ltd	
Landscape Development, Animal Pathology Laboratory, Abbotsford:
Jensen & Johnson Landscape Contractors Ltd	
Bro-Cro Nurseries Ltd 	
Holland Landscapers Ltd	
Spray-Mac Landscaping Ltd	
Janitorial Service, Windermere Building, Victoria:
National Building Maintenance Ltd...	
Excelsior Building Maintenance Ltd	
Canadian Building Maintenance Ltd.....	
Best Cleaners & Contractors Ltd	
Modern Building Cleaning Services of Canada Ltd..
$259,952.00
255,844.00
256,522.00
250,740.00
250,000.00
47,750.00
58,800.00
47,220.00
44,868.00
23,700.00
19,337.00
36,828.00
47,812.00
16,440.00
21,528.00
22.704.00
23,352.00
18,205.20
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1966
410-166-1331
 

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