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Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1965 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1966]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1965
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31, 1965.
RALPH R. LOFFMARK,
Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce.
 The Honourable Ralph R. Loffmark,
Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31,
1965.
THOMAS L. STURGESS,
Deputy Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce.
 Report of the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce
For the Year Ended December 31, 1965
FOREWORD
Favourable economic conditions prevailed in British Columbia during 1965,
the fourth year of economic expansion since 1961. The upward trend in business
activity was supported by an unprecedented level of capital investment and strong
foreign and domestic demand for British Columbia products.
During 1965 the increase in total employment was greater than the growth of
the labour force, resulting in a low unemployment rate. The average rate of unemployment, estimated at 4.2 per cent in 1965, was the lowest since 1956. Total
personal income rose by 11 per cent and per capita personal income by 8 per cent.
This growth in employment and income was reflected in an 8.5-per-cent increase
in retail sales. Strong demand in Canadian domestic markets led to an increase of
over 2 per cent in consumer prices and a 1-per-cent rise in wholesale prices.
Capital expenditures are expected to reach a new high of $1.95 billion in 1965,
a 12.5-per-cent gain over last year. A significant part of this increase resulted from
expansion in the pulp and paper industry and accelerated development of the immense Peace and Columbia River projects. The value of housing construction
increased, although there was a decrease in apartment building in the metropolitan
areas. Social capital expenditure was substantially ahead of 1964, particularly for
the expansion of educational facilities.
The pulp and paper industry spent an estimated $164,000,000 on new plant
and equipment in 1965. A $17,000,000 pulp-mill was completed at Kamloops,
while four other mills were under construction—two at Prince George and the
remaining two at Prince Rupert and Gold River on Vancouver Island.
Work continued on all stages of the Peace River project, including the dam,
power-house, and transmission-lines to the Lower Mainland. A total of $280,000,-
000 had been spent by the end of September, 1965. Construction of the three
Columbia River Treaty dams proceeded on schedule, and an estimated $60,000,000
had been spent to October, 1965.
Exports through British Columbia customs ports were estimated at $1.58 billion
in 1965, down nearly 3 per cent from 1964, principally because of decreased grain
shipments to the U.S.S.R. However, exports to the United States and United
Kingdom were at record levels.
The selling value of factory shipments from all manufacturing industries in the
Province reached an estimated $2,875 billion in 1965, nearly 8 per cent over 1964.
Forestry production as measured by the net value of production increased nearly
5 per cent, led by a 14-per-cent gain in the volume of pulp production and a
10-per-cent expansion in the volume of paper output.
Mining activity was highlighted by production at two new molybdenum properties. The value of mineral production advanced slightly over the record level of
1964. Declines in lead, zinc, and copper were more than offset by increases in the
value of oil and gas, and other minerals.
 Q 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Farm cash receipts would have reached a record level in 1965 except for a
disastrous freeze in December, 1964, which severely reduced tree-fruit production.
Production of live stock, dairy products, grain crops, and vegetables registered gains
over 1964.
The value of fisheries production was down from 1964 but above the average
of the past decade. Salmon landings were particularly disappointing. A below-
normal halibut catch was compensated for by record prices.
The tourist industry continued to expand during the year. A record number
of United States tourists visited the Province, as indicated by the 8-per-cent increase
in foreign vehicles that entered British Columbia. The Province also attracted a
large number of visitors from other parts of Canada.
The outlook for 1966 is highly promising, assuming that costs and prices can
be held in line. Many large projects under way during 1965 will be continued into
1966, thus ensuring a high level of capital investment.
Following in this Report are summaries of the various divisions of this Department—namely, the Bureau of Economics and Statistics; the Industrial and Trade
Office; the Data Processing Division; British Columbia House, London, England;
and British Columbia House, San Francisco, California. The objectives and organization of the British Columbia Research Council are also included.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1965 Q 7
BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS
The Bureau continued to advise the Government and other public bodies
regarding matters of economics and industrial development; to keep the Government
and the public informed of current business conditions, trends, and the outlook; to
undertake a broad range of economic research, some of which led to the publication
of regional surveys, industry studies, and trade reports; and to collect varied statistical information on British Columbia in co-operation with the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics and other Provincial Government departments.
During 1965, efforts to improve the Bureau's statistical resources were continued. Some of the changes implemented evolved from the biennial Federal-
Provincial Conference on Statistics held in Ottawa in November, 1964, which was
attended by two senior Bureau staff members. Particular items arising from the
conference and dealt with during 1965 included Bureau participation at a subcommittee dealing with interprovincial and international trade statistics. Further
refinements were also made to statistical coverage of construction, manufacturing,
primary industries, and employment and payrolls.
Senior members of the Bureau staff participated in conferences such as the
Second Dominion-Provincial Conference on Forestry and Forest Product Statistics.
They took part in hearings, such as those of the Provincial Redistribution Commission and the Board of Transport Commissioners public financial review of the British
Columbia Telephone Company. The Bureau was also represented on the Provincial
Pipe-line Committee and on a working committee in connection with the agricultural
rehabilitation and development programme.
In fulfilling its function of publishing data on current economic conditions, the
Bureau issued the " Monthly Bulletin of Business Activity " and the "Annual Summary of Economic Activity." At the end of the year the Bureau released its annual
" Business Outlook," which describes business conditions during the past year and
the prospects for the coming year and is based on a survey of 300 of the principal
companies in British Columbia.
During 1965 the " Regional Index of British Columbia " was completed and
will be released in January. This is the Bureau's principal contribution in the
sphere of regional data. In this 550-page publication the Province is divided into
80 areas, on each of which there is a description of the economic base and component
sectors together with supporting statistics, and data on the principal community. In
addition, an economic survey was carried out on the Grand Forks-Greenwood area,
and work is under way on studies of two other areas.
Other publications released during 1965 included " Facts and Statistics,"
" Establishing a Business in British Columbia," " Preliminary Statement of External
Trade through British Columbia Customs Ports," "A Manual of Resources and
Development," " Industrial Expansion in British Columbia," and the " Salary and
Wage Rate Survey." In addition to the usual trade reports, the Bureau published
" Summary of Pacific Rim Trade Opportunities," which draws from the previously
issued series of publications dealing with trade between British Columbia and other
countries bordering the Pacific Ocean.
Because of the growing national and international interest in the Province's
rapidly expanding economy, the Bureau was also called upon to service a large
number of routine requests for economic and statistical data on British Columbia.
 Q 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1963,1964, and 1965
Unit or
Base
Period
1963
1964
1965
Preliminary
Estimates
Mining—
Total value of production	
Zinc _	
Copper	
Lead   	
Iron concentrates	
Industrial minerals	
Structural materials _	
Petroleum, crude	
Natural gas —	
Forestry—
Total value of production .__	
Timber scaled	
Lumber production —      	
Pulp production	
Paper production 	
Fisheries—
Wholesale marketed value of production .
Pack of canned salmon _	
Agriculture—Farm cash receipts	
Manufacturing—Factory shipments	
External trade—
Exports through B.C. customs ports	
Imports through B.C. customs ports	
Internal trade—
Gasoline consumed   	
Electric power generated — _
Railway freight loaded and received in British
Columbia  	
Sales of life insurance	
Total retail sales . 	
Motor-vehicle dealers	
Department stores	
Capital investment—
Capital and repair expenditure .._
Building permits 	
New residential units—starts -	
Finance—Cheques cashed _	
Employment—
Labour force	
Employed
Unemployed —.
Employment indices (based on firms with 15
or more employees)—
All employment —	
Manufacturing  	
Iron and steel products ...	
Saw and planing mills 	
Pulp and paper   	
Mining   —    	
Logging
Transportation, storage and communication
Service	
Construction —
Wages and salaries.
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
M cu. ft.
M f .b.m.
Tons
Tons
$000
Cases
$000
$000
$000
$000
Gallons
000 kwh.
Tons
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
Units
$000
Number
Number
Number
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
$000
255,864
53,069
36,238
37,835
20,746
16,511
23,882
25,470
10,909
881,255
1,473
6,701
2,480
1,220
76,000
1,203,271
148,611
2,475,538
1,398,720
458,431
377,625,000
15,516,000
14,741,324
496,080
1,910,501
346,279
282,742
1,400,400
270,809
12,559
25,069,589
610,000
571,000
39,000
119.9
124.8
125.4
128.5
210.3
82.6
80.3
115.1
142.9
102.6
2,159,000
267,497
58,649
38,609
39,402
20,419
17,347
26,429
24,048
12,419
936,000
1,515
6,855
2,843
1,387
92,117
1,255,308
149,923
2,672,000
1,624,604
563,320
413,554,000
17,263,000
15,819,505
506,520
2,095,649
396,454
315,586
1,734,800
360,452
17,657
29,372,078
639,000
605,000
34,000
125.4
127.2
140.9
129.7
225.4
80.7
82.2
119.8
163.2
110.4
2,362,000
270,750
50,300
34,350
41,400
19,400
19,850
28,500
26,800
14,100
980,000
1,533
6,990
3,248
1,532
80,000
920,000
147,900
2,875,000
1,580,000
620,000
445,773,000
18,500,000
17,000,000
580,000
2,275,000
440,000
340,000
1,950,000
422,518
16,361
32,600,000
667,000
639,000
28,000
134.0
134.0
165.0
131.0
247.0
83.0
86.0
124.0
188.0
130.0
2,670,000
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1965
Economic Indicators in British Columbia
Q 9
CLEARINGS
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YEARS
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 Q 10
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 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1965
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 Q 12
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 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1965 Q 13
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 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1965 Q 15
TRANSPORTATION
The recommendations of the MacPherson Royal Commission on Transportation again received attention from the Bureau. In April, 1965, the Government of
British Columbia presented a submission proposing a number of amendments to
Bill C-120, and this was followed by a later submission regarding export grain
rates. The Bill did not become law during 1965, and a revised version is expected
to be introduced early in 1966. Railway statistics are being maintained on a
current basis in order that the provisions of the new Bill may be evaluated as soon
as possible after it is introduced.
The Canadian Pacific Railway Company applied to the Board of Transport
Commissioners for permission to cancel its second transcontinental passenger train,
" The Dominion," effective September 7, 1965. The Bureau maintained a watching
brief at the Board's hearing in Vancouver and assisted Provincial counsel in the
preparation of a submission and its presentation in Ottawa. The Board's decision
is still awaited.
The progress of the Great Northern-Northern Pacific-Burlington Railway merger
application is still being closely watched, and the terms of merger, if approved, will
be studied in relation to their effect on the economy of British Columbia.
A study of shipping conference tariffs and freight rates was completed for the
Department by a firm of consultants in the fall of 1965. This was followed by a
study of National Harbours Board tariffs and procedures, which was prepared
jointly by the Bureau and the consulting firm. Both of these studies indicated areas
where transportation facilities and tariffs, both rail and water, could be improved
to the benefit of the Provincial economy.
During the year the Bureau provided transportation information for other
Government departments and for business and industry and maintained its file of
transportation statistics on a current basis.
MINING
It is the responsibility of the Bureau to collect and compile the production
statistics on all minerals, with the exception of coal, natural gas, and petroleum.
The statistics which it compiles are subsequently published in detail in the Annual
Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
For the fourth year in succession it is possible to report that the value of
British Columbia mineral production exceeds that of any previous year. The estimated value for 1965 is $270,750,000 or almost $3,500,000 greater than in 1964.
Although the total value of mineral production shows an increase, there have been
some significant changes in individual minerals. The production in British Columbia of lead and zinc is down considerably in 1965 due to the Trail smelter receiving
shipments from Pine Point, thus displacing other shipments from Kimberley. Copper
production is also down as a result of the mining of low-grade ore, and labour
problems at Craigmont and Britannia. The effect of the reduced production of
lead, zinc, and copper was partially minimized by higher prices. Other major
influences that affected the total were increased markets for oil and gas and two
molybdenum mines coming into production.
Zinc is still the most important mineral produced in British Columbia. The
estimated value in 1965 is $50,300,000 or 18.5 per cent of the total. Lead is next
in value at $41,400,000 or 15.2 per cent, followed by copper at $34,350,000 or
12.7 per cent.   The value of other major minerals are:  Crude petroleum, $26,800,-
 Q 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
000; iron concentrates, $19,400,000; natural gas, $14,100,000; asbestos, $13,-
700,000; cement, $12,150,000; molybdenum, $11,500,000; sand and gravel,
$10,000,000.
EXTERNAL TRADE
Numerous requests for external trade statistics were received from other
Provincial Government departments and from agencies, businesses, libraries, individuals, universities, and other organizations. Included in these requests were
special compilations of data for a number of British Columbia trade missions to
Asia and Europe.
The seventh publication in the " Pacific Rim " series " Summary of Pacific
Rim Trade Opportunities " was completed and published in November, 1965. The
report provides a digest of the information presented in the other " Pacific Rim "
publications. In addition, more than 700 copies of the annual " Preliminary Statement of External Trade through British Columbia Customs Ports, 1964," were
distributed.
The first of the following two tables shows exports of products of British
Columbia origin through all Canadian customs ports, and the second shows imports
through British Columbia customs ports. The export statistics involve estimates and
differ from regularly published export statistics. The special tabulation shown
excludes products originating in other Provinces and makes allowance for British
Columbia products exported via customs ports in other Provinces. Import statistics
give the value of all commodities entering Canada through British Columbia customs
ports irrespective of their ultimate destination. At the present time there is not
sufficient data available to estimate the Province's consumption of imported goods.
It will be noted that the commodity group descriptions in the import table have been
changed from prior years. This was done in order to conform with a new classification of imports instituted by the Canadian Government in 1964. The groups
listed were selected from the new classification so as to show those imports most
significant to British Columbia's economy.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1965
Q 17
 Q 18
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 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1965 Q 19
FORESTRY
The Bureau, in co-operation with various Federal and Provincial agencies and
industrial associations, is actively engaged in the collection of forestry statistics. The
subsequent economic analysis and dissemination of statistical data pertaining to
forest industries of the Province form an integral part of the Bureau's activities.
During the year, assistance was provided to other Government departments, industrial associations, and trade delegations. Early in the year the Bureau, in association
with forest-industry representatives, participated in a Second Dominion-Provincial
Conference on Forestry Statistics. The British Columbia delegation was well received, and its brief has led to important advancements.
The forest-based industrial complex is by far the most important in the Province. It has been estimated that the 1965 net value of forestry production was in
excess of $980,000,000; over 75,000 persons were employed. British Columbia
accounts for 67 per cent of Canada's total lumber production, 80 per cent of its
plywood production, 21 per cent of the pulp, 13 per cent of the paper, and 17 per
cent of Canada's combined production of pulp and paper.
Log production in British Columbia during 1965 was recorded at 1,533 million
cubic feet (9.0 billion board-feet), up 18 million cubic feet over last year's record.
According to data available to the end of December, Coast log scale was up 3.6 per
cent over 1964, while the scale of Interior logs was down by 1.7 per cent. Vancouver
log-market prices for all major species except cedar were consistently above those
of 1964.
The sawmill industry was expected to produce 6.9 billion board-feet of lumber
in 1965 or nearly 2 per cent more than last year. The production of Interior mills
was down somewhat from a year ago, but Coast mills cut and shipped a greater
volume. Most lumber markets remained satisfactory throughout the year. Overseas
lumber shipments to the end of September declined from last year, but an increased
flow to the United States kept total water-borne lumber movements 6.5 per cent
ahead of 1964.   Shipments by rail declined on a quiet market and mixed prices.
Despite a poor first half, plywood-industry production, at an expected 1,516
million square feet (%-inch basis), was 1 per cent better than last year. An accurate
comparison cannot be made since production in previous years was measured on a
.4-inch basis. A slow domestic market firmed at year-end, while export shipments
in the first seven months were up 6.6 per cent in volume and 11 per cent in value.
Output in the Province's pulp and paper industry averaged better than 90 per
cent of capacity for the year and hit a 95-plus-per-cent level by year-end. Pulp
production was up 14 per cent to an estimated 3,248,000 tons, while sales advanced
18 per cent during the first 10 months. Total paper production in 1965 was estimated at 1,532,000 tons, a 10-per-cent increase over 1964. Additional pulp
capacity totalling 455,000 tons per year was brought on line in 1965.
An estimated $250,000,000 in new capital was invested in the British Columbia
forest industry during 1965. The pulp and paper sector accounted for $164,000,000
of this total. The remainder was about equally divided amongst the wood industries
and logging. The year was further highlighted by the coming on line of the
Interior's second pulp-mill at Kamloops. Other pulp and paper mill projects currently under way and having an installed value in excess of $500,000,000 will add
over 1.8 million tons to the industry's capacity by 1967-68. This development is
an impressive stride toward a fuller utilization of the Province's forest resource and
will in the long run be of direct benefit to the entire economy.
 Q 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
LABOUR
During 1965 increasing emphasis was placed on the examination and revision
of existing methods used in compilation of labour statistics. This section was
represented at two Federal-Provincial Conferences on Labour Statistics held at
Quebec City. The first was the seventh annual meeting of the Statistics and Research
Committee of the Canadian Association of Administrators of Labour Legislation.
The second was a sub-committee on labour statistics of the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics and the Provincial Governments. Considerable attention was directed
during both meetings to methods of extending both statistical and analytical procedures in respect to an assessment of manpower requirements.
Continued effort on the part of both Provincial and Federal departments has
been effective in the general improvement of present procedures and the revision
and updating of existing material. Early in the year a complete revision of labour-
force data was completed by the Federal department on the basis of new population
counts available.
As in previous years, the Bureau was responsible for the completion of the
main statistical sections of the Annual Report of the Department of Labour, the
current material appearing under headings of "Highlights of the 1965 Statistical
Report on Trades and Industries" and "Annual Survey of Organized Labour in
British Columbia, 1965."
The increasing importance of wage and salary data during periods of labour
unrest was most evident in the rising demand for the salary and wage-rate surveys
conducted by the Bureau. In addition to the annual July " Salary and Wage Rate
Survey," intensive study was again extended to a separate group of larger firms in
connection with specialized wage and salary material required for the Civil Service
Commission.
Under the existing arrangement with Federal authorities, a complementary
service was provided by the Bureau in the follow-up survey of British Columbia
labour organizations. Information collected by Ottawa together with data resulting
from this localized survey are being used as a basis for a directory of trade-unions
completed for the British Columbia Department of Labour.
In addition to maintaining current labour statistics used by the Bureau, the
labour section completed the following projects during the year:—
(1) The 1965 survey of British Columbia salary and wage rates:
(2) Statistical sections for the 1965 Annual Report of the British Columbia
Department of Labour:
(3) The annual survey of organized-labour membership in British Columbia
together with a directory of trade-unions and labour organizations was
prepared for the Department of Labour:
(4) A survey of clerical salary rates in the Vancouver area was tabulated and
compiled for the Vancouver Board of Trade; and
(5) Compiled selected occupational salary data required in wage studies conducted by the Bureau for the Civil Service Commission.
The following table shows the revised totals representing the estimated annual
wages and salaries in British Columbia for the years 1953 to 1965.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1965
Q 21
Estimated Annual Wages and Salaries in British Columbia
Year
Total Wages
and Salaries
1953  $1,227,000,000
1954  1,246,000,000
1955  1,365,000,000
1956  1,579,000,000
1957  1,687,000,000
1958  1,683,000,000
1959  1,790,000,000
Year
Total Wages
and Salaries
1960  $1,858,000,000
1961  1,894,000,000
1962  2,008,000,000
1963  2,159,000,000
1964  2,362,000,000
1965  2,670,000,000 *
i Preliminary estimate.
Source:   Estimates of Labour Income, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, Ont.
PUBLICATIONS
Periodical
Monthly Bulletin of Business Activity.—This publication contains articles of
current interest and incorporates a monthly review of current changes in the principal segments of the Provincial economy.
Summary of Economic Activity in British Columbia.—This is a companion to
the Monthly Bulletin and is issued annually. It summarizes the current year's economic picture and presents historical series relating to economic activity in the
Province.
Business Outlook.—This publication is issued at the end of the current year
and indicates business conditions during the past year and the outlook for the coming
year. It covers the following economic factors: Sales, prices, employment, wages,
earnings, and capital expenditure. It is based in part on a survey of 300 of the
major companies in British Columbia.
Preliminary Statement of External Trade through British Columbia Customs
Ports.—Provides statistics covering in detail all commodities imported or exported
through British Columbia customs ports having an aggregate value of $75,000 and
over.
British Columbia Facts and Statistics.—Portrays graphically some of the salient
features of British Columbia's economy and describes its geography, government,
judiciary, and educational systems.
Salary and Wage Rate Survey.—This annual publication summarizes salary
and wage rates in selected clerical, professional, and trade occupations, in business
and industrial establishments, for Metropolitan Vancouver and Victoria, Southern
Interior centres, and Northern centres.
Occasional
A Manual of Resources and Development.—This publication contains up-to-
date information on the location and development of British Columbia's resources.
It is well documented with maps and diagrams.
British Columbia Directory of Wholesalers and Distributors, Importers, Exporters, and Manufacturers' Agents.—Revised edition, 1964.
British Columbia Manufacturers' Directory.—A new edition of this publication
(formerly the British Columbia Trade Index) is being prepared and will be issued
shortly. It will include names and addresses of manufacturers in British Columbia
and a directory of products manufactured in British Columbia.
Industry Studies.—A series of studies analysing particular industries which
are located, or might be encouraged to locate, in British Columbia.   These include
 Q 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Commercial Fisheries of British Columbia, Petrochemicals, Glass and Glass
Products.
Area Surveys.—These are detailed studies of economic area in British Columbia. A report on the Grand Forks-Greenwood area, published in 1965, is the most
recent study.
Import Items Meriting Further Investigation for Domestic Production or
Substitution.—This report is intended to aid those entrepreneurs in the Province
who are considering establishing industries to supply the domestic markets.
Pacific Rim Trade Studies.—The latest issue in this series, published November,
1965, entitled "A Summary of Pacific Rim Opportunities," is a summary of the
findings of the previous seven publications. The series was designed to encourage
British Columbia exporters and producers to examine the possibilities for expanding
or diversifying exports to countries bordering on the Pacific Ocean.
Regional Index of British Columbia.—In this 550-page publication the
Province is divided into 80 areas, each of which is described in detail. There is a
description of each area's economic base and component sectors, together with
relevant supporting statistics and economic indicators. Following this, there is a
description of the area's facilities, utilities, and other local considerations. Details
are also provided on municipal taxes, services, utilities, and amenities in the principal community within each area. The charge for this publication (which is to be
released in January, 1966) is $1.90 plus 10 cents tax.
(Note.—A complete listing of Bureau publications is contained in the Department's List of Publications, obtainable free of charge.)
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1965 Q 23
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE OFFICE
The main functions of this office are to promote new industrial and commercial
enterprises throughout the Province, provide assistance when necessary to established
businesses, and develop the domestic and export trade. The office also provides
industry with data on location-sites, land-use maps, availability of raw materials,
and information on the services offered by the British Columbia Research Council
on matters concerning industrial and scientific research.
This work is carried out in co-operation with other Provincial Government
departments, Federal Government departments, Boards of Trade, Chambers of
Commerce, the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, industrial commissions, chartered banks, railway industrial agents, and foreign
trade representatives in Canada and overseas.
BRANCH PLANTS AND MANUFACTURING UNDER LICENCE
The response to the Departmental direct-mailing campaign during the year
was gratifying. Several firms indicated they would be establishing branch plants
in British Columbia in the near future. Considerable interest was shown in
Interior locations, indicating that a greater decentralization of industry is taking
place in British Columbia.
Numerous licence manufacturing proposals from the United Kingdom and the
Continent, United States, and Eastern Canada were handled by the Department
during the year. Some of the items examined by British Columbia firms included
patented noise converter for pneumatic tools, patented aluminum shelving brackets,
new braking system for vehicles, telescopic trailer unit, patented particle-board
process, special patented summer ski, new design for a strong light-weight roof, sail
trainer for teaching people to sail, aluminum awnings, steel arches for mining industry, X-ray separating device, tri-wall pak corrugated material, special-type floor
and wall tiles, and a patented automatic sliding-door closer.
COMPOSITE INDUSTRIAL MAPS OF THE FRASER VALLEY
AND METROPOLITAN LOWER MAINLAND AREAS
Requests for these maps from individuals, real-estate and business firms continued to be heavy. As the supply of the Metropolitan Lower Mainland Map was
exhausted, compilation of a new edition was commenced in December. The new
edition should be available for distribution early in the new year.
The two maps cover an area extending from Burrard Inlet and the mouth of
the Fraser River to Hope and indicate the zoned and potential heavy and light
industrial areas, main highways, railway lines, natural-gas line, oil pipe-line, and
other facilities serving the area. Each of these maps may be purchased for $1 a
copy (which includes the 5-per-cent social services tax).
HANDICRAFT DIRECTORY
Copies of the 14th edition of this directory were distributed through the year
to retail and wholesale firms, resorts, and other outlets, and to British Columbia
Houses in San Francisco and London, England. The usual contact was made with
Eastern Canadian Provinces interested in handicraft developments. Four showcases of British Columbia handicrafts are on display in the Empress Hotel in
Victoria, and special thanks on behalf of the Department are extended to Mrs. P.
 Q 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Sheppard and Mrs. H. D. Foster, local handicraft producers, for all their assistance
in arranging the displays.
BRITISH COLUMBIA INDUSTRIAL DESIGN COMMITTEE
During the year under review, the British Columbia Industrial Design Committee was active in working with designers and manufacturers in promoting good
design throughout the Province. Some of the Committee's activities included a
British Columbia school design competition to encourage good industrial design by
school students; a photographic exhibition of 10 panels displaying photographs of
well-designed British Columbia manufactured products (this display was exhibited
in 11 centres throughout British Columbia, and at the request of the National Design
Branch was also sent to Ottawa and later was on display in Toronto); and compilation of a brochure illustrating some well-designed products of British Columbia
manufacturers.
The British Columbia Industrial Design Committee includes representation
from the Federal Department of Trade and Commerce; Provincial Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce; Department of Education; University of British Columbia; Canadian Manufacturers' Association; Vancouver Board
of Trade; Vancouver School of Art; British Columbia Research Council; Association of Professional Engineers of British Columbia; Canadian Association of Consumers; Architectural Institute of British Columbia; and Community Arts Council
of Vancouver.
The purpose of the Committee is to encourage appreciation of industrial design
and its importance as a factor in production and marketing of British Columbia
products.
REGIONAL INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES
This survey lists many investment opportunities in the fields of hotel and motel
requirements, housing developments, warehousing, and wholesale and retail outlets.
The survey covers 10 regional areas of the Province, and the suggestions for investment opportunities are submitted by members of the Chambers of Commerce and
Boards of Trade throughout the Province. Many of the suggestions listed have
resulted in encouraging capital investment in commercial enterprises. The demand
for this survey has again been very heavy during the year, and it will be necessary
to print a new edition early in the new year.
CANADA-UNITED STATES DEFENCE PRODUCTION SHARING
Notwithstanding the keen competition offered by United States firms, some
British Columbia firms have been able to bid successfully on United States defence
contracts. British Columbia House, San Francisco, continued to work closely
with the Federal Government representative in Los Angeles in developing this
programme.
BUSINESS CLOSING DAYS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
This booklet was compiled in response to the many inquiries received from
businessmen, salesmen, and tourists requesting information on the closing days for
retail and wholesale establishments in various centres throughout British Columbia.
The closing days shown indicate the days observed by the majority of the establishments for each centre.
Sincere appreciation is expressed to the many Municipal Clerks and others
who so readily furnished the basic data from which this listing was compiled.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1965
Q 25
Visitors to component parts exhibition.
BRITISH COLUMBIA COMPONENT PARTS EXHIBITION
The Department, in co-operation with the Canadian Manufacturers' Association (British Columbia Division), the Industrial Development Commission of
Greater Vancouver, and the Vancouver Board of Trade, sponsored this exhibit to
stimulate secondary manufacturing in British Columbia. Hundreds of items {see
illustration), from small springs to furnace castings, from paint-rollers to plastic
cups were among the many products on display in the British Columbia Building
at the Pacific National Exhibition grounds, Vancouver, on November 9th, when
British Columbia manufacturers were invited to view imported component parts
presently being incorporated in many finished articles produced in the Province.
Two hundred and forty manufacturers participated in the show, which was primarily
designed to encourage local manufacturers to produce these imported component
parts in British Columbia at a competitive price. In the opinion of those who were
visitors and those who exhibited, the event was extremely successful for a first
attempt and should be repeated in larger premises and over a longer period. It was
apparent from comments made that, for the manufacturer with imagination and
vision, there is room for expansion in secondary industry, particularly in the fields
of castings, forgings, and stampings.
INDUSTRIAL SEMINAR
Members of the Department participated in an industrial development workshop organized by the Vancouver Board of Trade and held June 23rd in Vancouver.
This event offered a new approach to ways and means of expanding and developing
British Columbia secondary industries.   The workshop provided a full programme
 Q 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
of challenging topics, and listed among the speakers, panelists, and leaders of round-
table discussions were a number of outstanding businessmen.
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS' TRADE AND INDUSTRY COUNCIL
The 17th annual conference of this Council was held in Quebec City from
September 20th to 22nd. The Minister, Deputy Minister, and Industrial Commissioner were in attendance. Some of the topics discussed included: Provincial
Governments' programmes on decentralization of industry; technical services provided to industry by the Provinces; shortage of skilled labour; Canadian Standards
Association; Federal Government report on area development programme; the
business development facilities of Expo '67; report on G.A.T.T.; and financing
exports of capital goods.
The aims of the Council are to provide interprovincial consultation and
co-operation on matters of trade and industrial development, to supply traders and
manufacturers from Canada and abroad with a nation-wide Provincial service in
these fields, and to promote greater understanding throughout Canada of the economic conditions affecting the development of each of the Provinces and all of
Canada.
ASSISTANCE IN PROMOTION
The Department assisted a large department store in a "Made in British
Columbia " products promotion, entitled " British Columbia Today," which took
place in Vancouver from May 12 to 22, 1965. This event, which featured the past,
present, and future development of production in this Province, had the enthusiastic
co-operation of British Columbia industrial and manufacturing groups. Additionally, a number of cultural, educational, and artistic organizations contributed in time
and effort to produce events during the programme. One of the highlights of the
promotion was a fashion show presented by the designers and craftsmen of British
Columbia's clothing industry.
As a part of the promotion, British Columbia school-children were invited to
participate in a poster contest. The theme of the poster was also " British Columbia
Today " with interpretation of this theme left open to the imagination of the
students. Response was most gratifying, and suitable cash prizes were awarded to
entries selected by a panel of industry and government judges.
EXHIBITS WITHIN THE PROVINCE
The Departmental portable exhibit is a pictorial and statistical presentation of
this Province's industry and progress. The use of this exhibit at various events
within the Province has resulted in many inquiries being received for information
on all aspects of our economy.
Events at which the exhibit was displayed include the Victoria Exhibition from
May 17th to 22nd in Victoria, the Vancouver Island Exhibition from August 18th
to 21st in Nanaimo, and the Canadian Chartered Accountants' Conference held
September 13th to 15th in Vancouver.
TRADE AND INDUSTRY BULLETIN
During 1965 the Bulletin completed 16 years of continuous publication listing
trade inquiries, export opportunities, manufacture under licence agreements available to British Columbia firms, notices of tender, and news of general commercial
interest. Special features have been included, covering participation in trade fairs
and market reports on selected regions.   In order to reduce the time factor involved
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1965
Q 27
in establishing contact between principals, the name and address of each opportunity
is now listed.
The increased use of the Bulletin by the trade representatives of other nations
bears out the importance of this publication to the commercial and industrial
organizations in Western Canada. The circulation of the Bulletin has increased
to 1,300 copies a month.
TRADE MISSIONS
The Department sponsored and organized two trade missions during 1965.
Trade missions are an effective means of opening and developing foreign markets
where there is no adequate substitute for personal visits by responsible company
representatives. To those businessmen participating, trade missions offer a most
effective way to promote the sale of products in foreign markets. Additionally,
other British Columbia firms benefit from the new appreciation of this Province's
products and capabilities generated during the visits.
ia'M-
The British Columbia trade mission to Europe on their arrival at Schiphol Airport,
Amsterdam, October 6, 1965.
Mission to Europe (October 5th to 26th)
The Minister of the Department, accompanied by the Deputy Minister, led an
18-man mission to Europe for three weeks in October. Buyers as well as sellers
were included in the delegation, which also had as its objective the encouragement
of industrial and commercial enterprises in British Columbia as well as promoting
participation in the forthcoming 1967 British Columbia International Trade Fair.
Following a programme of visits in The Netherlands, the mission proceeded to
Belgium and the Federal Republic of West Germany. In each country, members
had opportunities to make business appointments of individual interest. The mission
was well received, and in each of its objectives satisfactory results were achieved.
 Q 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Mission to California (November 17th to 24th)
In mid-November a 10-man mission travelled to San Francisco and Los
Angeles. This mission was organized to assess the prospects for increasing British
Columbia exports for a range of manufactured products and also to allow mission
members to become familiar with the production and marketing operations in the
important California market.
During the visit, discussions were held on the feasibility of increasing British
Columbia participation in the United States-Canada defence production contract
sharing programme as well as highlighting opportunities in British Columbia for
branch-plant locations, manufacture under licence agreements, or joint ventures
in industry and commerce.
1967 BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR,
MAY 17th TO 27th
Plans for the fourth British Columbia International Trade Fair are well
advanced, and another highly successful Trade Fair is assured.
The British Columbia International Trade Fair is sponsored by the Department
of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce and administered on a volunteer
basis by a dedicated group of leaders of British Columbia's business, industry, and
Government. The president and chairman of the board of directors is Mr. W. J.
Burnett, and the general manager is Mr. D. K. Brown. The executive offices of
the 1967 British Columbia International Trade Fair are located at Suite 601, 207
West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
The British Columbia International Trade Fair is the largest fair of its kind
held in Canada.
During the year under review, members of the executive committee, directors,
and the general manager separately visited some 20 different countries discussing
with government trade offices, chambers of commerce, and manufacturers plans for
the fair. Further reference is made to some of these missions elsewhere in the
Annual Report.
A great majority of governments and companies who exhibited in the previous
Trade Fairs are returning in 1967, many with increased display areas. This type of
participation is evidence of the importance and value placed on these successful
trading events by those seeking to do business throughout the dynamic trading area
comprising the four Western Provinces and the United States Pacific Coast States
of Washington, Oregon, and California.
The British Overseas Fairs Limited will stage a special British exhibition within
the Trade Fair. The British promotion will be the largest single feature occupying
the whole Hall of Industry " B," comprising over 15,500 square feet of display
space. The Republic of China and Sweden have also contracted for space and will
display a wide range of consumer goods. Negotiations are in an advanced stage
with Austria, Belgium, The Netherlands, West Germany, Japan, France, Italy, and
the Phillipines.
During the past year, management of the Trade Fair organized two highly
successful dinners in support of the 1967 Trade Fair. The first, tendered by the
Government and the people of British Columbia to the members of the Vancouver
consular corps, was held at the Dogwood Room, Exhibition Park, Vancouver. The
Honourable W. A. C. Bennett, Premier and Minister of Finance, welcomed guests
and thanked them for the whole-hearted support the consular corps had extended
to the Government in previous Trade Fairs.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1965 Q 29
Later in the year another dinner was held at the Chateau Laurier Hotel in
Ottawa for the Ambassadors and representatives of the diplomatic corps. The
Honourable Ralph R. Loffmark, Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and
Commerce, welcomed the distinguished guests on behalf of the Province of British
Columbia, and the Honourable R. W. Bonner, Attorney-General and Minister of
Commercial Transport, delivered the keynote address, " The Dynamic Golden
Triangle." This was complemented by the premiere showing of the 16-mm. coloured
movie " The 1967 British Columbia International Trade Fair." This film is an
excellent production highlighting the industry of British Columbia and the dynamic
market potential of Western Canada and the Pacific Coast States of Washington,
Oregon, California.
DEVELOPMENT OF EXTERNAL TRADE
Members of the Department continue to visit secondary industries of the
Province to ascertain what products might be exported to foreign markets. This
co-operative effort has resulted in an additional 65 firms having their products listed
in the Canadian Exporters Directory, a publication which is used by the Canadian
Trade Commissioners serving throughout the world.
The Trade Office has continued its vigorous campaign to help foreign manufacturers establish representatives in British Columbia. Over the years the Trade
Office has worked closely with the representatives of the Vancouver consular corps
and others in an effort to identify the major unified trading areas of Canada. This
programme has been highly successful, and an increasing number of B.C.-based
distributors have been established to serve the Western Canadian market.
PUBLIC RELATIONS, ITINERARIES, AND INTRODUCTIONS
This field, like all other sections of the office, has grown considerably in the
past year and has proven to be of major importance to government representatives
and businessmen from foreign lands who visit this Province. Assistance has been
given under six main headings, as follows:—
(1) Itineraries and other arrangements for business visitors from Eastern
Canada and overseas:
(2) Arrangements for visits of commodity officers from the Department of
Trade and Commerce, Ottawa, and for tours of Federal and Foreign
Trade Commissioners from different parts of the world:
(3) Arrangements for visits of teams of Assistant Trade Commissioners
(Department of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa) on tours of industries
prior to overseas posting:
(4) Co-operation with Commonwealth and other trade missions (practical
assistance has been given in their surveys and itineraries):
(5) Arrangements for visits of diplomatic representatives, High Commissioners of Commonwealth countries, or their staffs; and
(6) Co-operation with Vancouver consular corps and with offices in Commonwealth and foreign governments.
 Q 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
DATA PROCESSING DIVISION
The main function of the Data Processing Division since its inception in 1938
has been to serve as a data-processing centre for the various departments of the
Government. Over this 27-year period there have been many changes in equipment and methods to meet the growing requirement of the various departments for
faster and more complex reports. The past year has been no exception and has
seen a major change in equipment and procedures as we pass through the second
phase of a three-stage conversion from basic punched-card procedures to the more
sophisticated stored-programme equipment using a full operating system. The
first stage was the conversion from Unit Record equipment to stored-programme
machines, using first an I.B.M. 650 and then the 1620 and 1401 systems. The
second phase has been the addition of magnetic tapes and disk drives to the stored-
programme equipment, permitting the use of a limited control or monitor system.
The final stage, which will be developed during the coming year, will be the introduction of a complete operating system suitable for use on the I.B.M. system 360.
The 360 system is scheduled for delivery early in 1967 and will replace the 1620
and 1401 systems currently in operation, and both the engineering and data-
processing application will be run simultaneously on a single system using a variety
of input-out devices.
Due to the time required for training and reprogramming, full benefit of the
intermediate system has not yet been obtained, but the additional speed and power
of the new equipment have become evident in many of the applications. Reports
formerly taking weeks or months to prepare are now available in days or even hours,
not to mention the ability to handle problems of greater complexity that could not
even be attempted on the older equipment.
The most important new job undertaken during the past year was the conversion
of motor-vehicle records from an addressograph system to magnetic tapes. The
greater part of this work—the programming and punching of the files—was done
by the staff of the Motor-vehxle Branch, but this Division undertook the responsibility for the preparation and updating of the magnetic-tape files and all associated
computer operations. It is interesting to note that the annual motor-vehicle registration renewal run has just been completed, taking just over two weeks; under the
old system the preparation of these notices took up to five weeks. A similar operation for drivers' licences will be put into operation early in the new year; again the
programming and punching will be handled by the staff of the Motor-vehicle Branch.
Other smaller jobs, such as pension cheques for the Superannuation Branch,
revision of the Liquor Control Board payroll procedures, a farm research study for
the Markets Branch of the Department of Agriculture, were undertaken, but the
development of new applications has been curtailed somewhat because of time spent
on converting existing jobs to meet the requirements of the magnetic-tape and disk
systems. Once the programmes for the current jobs are operational, it is anticipated
that all work will benefit from the increased speed and flexibility on the new
equipment. This trend is depicted in the statistical tables of this report, which show
many of the routine jobs with a drop in cost despite normal volume increases over
the past year. The tape and disk systems will permit the use of a monitor programme
which will make stacked job operation possible, thus providing for even greater
machine through-put. The preparation and operation of these systems is providing
valuable experience for our staff for the conversion to the system 360.
The Division is now equipped with three electronic systems, which has resulted
in the releasing of a considerable amount of Unit Record equipment.   The present
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1965 Q 31
machine configuration, all of which is leased on a monthly basis, includes the
following:—
One 8k 1401 system with four magnetic-tape and one magnetic-disk drive.
One 8k 1401 system with four magnetic-tape drives and special printer.
One 60k 1620 Model II with two magnetx-disk drives and an on-line
printer.
One 407 alphabetic printer.
Six 083 sorters.
One 088 collator.
One 519 reproducing punch.
One 557 alphabetic interpreter.
One 954 facsimile posting machine.
Thirteen key-punches.
Five verifiers.
In addition, a 1440 system is installed in the Vancouver Forest District to
handle scaling and royalty records for that area. The cost of this equipment is
recoverable from the Scaling Fund, which is provided for by the forest industry.
The British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service and Forest Surveys Division both
maintain a small key-punch section, whose work is funnelled into our computer
operations. Similarly, the Liquor Control Board operates a small Unit Record
installation in its Vancouver warehouse from which cards eventually flow to this
Division for the preparation of monthly and annual reports.
To operate the systems and provide service to our customers, it is necessary
to maintain a highly trained staff in the fields of systems and procedures, programming, and equipment operation to cover all types of work involving accounting,
data-processing, information retrieval, statistical analysis, and engineering problems.
During the year the staff was reorganized and increased by adding two programmers,
two console operators, a magnetic-tape librarian, and a key-punch operator, and the
staff (including three Forest Service personnel) is now distributed as follows: A
Director and Assistant Director of Data Processing, three systems analysts each in
charge of a section of work, five programmers, four console operators, five machine
operators, one key-punch supervisor, fourteen key-punch operators, one supervisor
of file maintenance, one control clerk, one tape librarian, and a senior clerk-
stenographer.
In addition, the Liquor Control Board has three clerks attached to our staff
to handle clerical work associated with its operations.
The Division is currently handling 135 jobs from 15 departments or agencies.
A complete list would be bulky and of little value to a report of this nature; however,
an indication of the major jobs and their size can be obtained from the material
shown in Table I.
The very nature of the work dictates that we employ a different method of
handling work for the 1620 and 1401 systems. In the case of the 1620 computer
system, an open-shop plan is employed; here the engineer or technical expert has
been trained to do the programming in his specialized field, and this Division supplies
assistance with the more sophisticated programming and debugging, but once the
programme becomes a routine operation, it is turned over to our staff for processing.
In the case of the data-processing applications for the 1401 system which do
not require the same technical knowledge, we operate a closed shop, the programming being done by our staff in co-operation with officials of the department concerned. Experience to date has proved the operation of the two plans to be most
satisfactory for all concerned as any deviations have presented difficulties.
 Q 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Accurate job cost records are maintained through a time-card system. While
no billing is presented for work done, the system does provide a valuable assessment
of the value of work done for each department. These figures have been used to
complete the tables included with this report.
Control of work is established by presenting any requests for new work to the
Electronic Data Processing Committee, who approve or reject applications on their
merit. This Committee is comprised of Deputy Ministers whose departments are
involved in data-processing.
Table I shows a comparative statement of the value of work done for the
various departments during the past five years. These figures are based on actual
costs and show a steady annual increase over the period, although in several cases
the department's costs show a drop in value this year, which has come about by the
use of more efficient equipment. Where a large increase is shown, it can usually
be attributed to the undertaking of a new job, such as the work for the Motor-vehicle
Branch.
Table II shows a two-year comparison of the number of productive hours spent
in machine operations for the various departments. It is interesting to note the
drop in time on the Unit Record and an increase in the 1401 time, which is of
course, due to the conversion to the stored-programmed equipment.
The decline in the 1620 time is due largely to the slackening of overtime, which
was heavy during the first year.
Table III is similar to Table II in make-up, except that it shows time spent in
clerical operations rather than machine time. The noticeably small amount of
programming time on the 1620 system is accounted for by the fact that users of
this system do much of their own programming under the open-shop principle.
The chart in Fig. I shows graphically the distribution of work for each department, with the British Columbia Forest Service as the leading user, followed by a
fairly even distribution by the Attorney-General, Liquor Control Board, Industrial
Development, and Health and Hospital Insurance.
Figs. II and III show the distribution of work on the 1401 and 1620 systems.
Some departments, of course, take advantage of both systems. The Attorney-
General and Health and Hospital Insurance account for over half the time on the
1401 systems, with the Forest Service and Liquor Control Board the next heaviest
users.
The British Columbia Forest Service is the major user of the 1620, with the
Lands Department and Department of Highways following in that order.
The utilization of the Unit Record equipment is shown in Fig. IV, where again
the Forest Service is the major user, followed closely by the Liquor Control Board,
the Lands Department, Provincial Secretary, Department of Highways, and Hospital
Insurance in that order.
The key-punching distribution is depicted in Fig. V, where the Department of
Social Welfare is the leader, with a fairly even distribution among the Liquor Control
Board, Industrial Development, Lands Department, Education, Provincial Secretary,
and Attorney-General. In this case it must be remembered that the Attorney-
General, Forest Service, and Hospital Insurance do most of their own punching,
which is, of course, not included in these figures.
Clerical operations are shown in Figs. VI to VIII. Fig. VI is devoted to
systems development work, and since much of this is applicable to all jobs, it is
charged to our own Department, which occupies the greater part of the chart.
Health and Hospital Insurance and the Liquor Control Board took the greatest
advantage of this service during the year.
The programming service was fairly evenly distributed between several departments, with the Forest Service the leader.   Here again to get a true picture of the
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1965
Q 33
total programming effort it must be remembered that departments with the engineering type of application, such as Lands and Highways, did their own programming,
which is not recorded in this chart. Details of the distribution of programming for
the 1620 and 1401 systems are located in Table III.
Other clerical operations, which include file maintenance, are shown in Fig.
VIII. Obviously our own Department will be charged with most of this work, and
it is interesting to note the high ratio of clerical work done for the Liquor Control
Board despite the fact it supplies three clerks whose work is not charged in these
records.
The continuous growth of the Division has constantly presented a problem of
finding space to house the equipment, with the result many moves have been made
since the inception of the Division. With the addition of the new equipment, overcrowding again became a major problem, with the result new and more spacious
quarters are being renovated for us on Menzies Street, and it is anticipated that the
move to the new quarters will be made during the month of February. Needless
to say, many hours went into the planning of this new layout.
In closing we would like to comment on the dedicated attitude of our staff,
from whom we have demanded overtime and shift work in order that we could meet
our many deadlines. We would also like to thank the many officials of the various
branches who have assisted us with the planning and development of their operations
so that we have been able to provide what we hope has been a valuable service to
them.
Table I.—
-Comparative Cost Statement
Department and Branch
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
Agriculture—
$124.11
5,795.59
 	
$2,212.71
$3,649.45
$3,948.16
$4,850.32
5,829.06
1,223.85
Totals	
$3,649.45
$3,948.16
$4,850.32
$5,919.70
$9,265.62
Attorney-General—
$1,389.90
1,249.51
245.31
7,712.19
33,025.47
$1,061.39
892.07
26.63
7,288.62
30,414.67
$3,030.10
1,346.05
19.46
6,635.28
38,487.67
$1,010.15
1,270.95
....	
$1,644.38
10,058.78
39,275.09
49,164.22
41,927.27
Totals  	
$43,622.38
$39,683.38
$49,518.56
$51,614.97
$92,735.87
Commercial Transport—
$1,700.55
Education—
$1,497.93
8,199.65
1,138.54
$1,236.75
10,914.06
$1,901.38
20,244.56
2,221.62
1,254.05
1,525.40
$2,206.87
7,760.90
1,228.88
1,526.22
3,653.53 .
$2,802.25
10,073.91
High School Correspondence 	
1,060.66
2,942.81
1,221.48
9.05
Totals         	
$10,836.12
$16,154.28
$27,147.01
$16,376.40
$14,106.69
Finance-
$1,308.39
922.22
1
$3.91
$63.32
Totals  ...	
$2,230.61
$3.91
$63.32
	
Forest Service—
Engineering Service  	
$3,227.54
64,380.45
281.66
$1,479.73
60,932.19
1,056.01
685.90
$2,371.63
31,903.67
4,182.21
1,442.06
660.62
$4,873.95
53,033.13
4,933.03
4,819.20
26.84
$12,747.74
43,399.65
3,180.57
3,554.80
Totals 	
$67,889.65
$64,153.83
$40,560.19
$67,686.15
$62,882.76
Health Services and Hospital Insurance—■
Vital Statistics.   	
$39.06
19,616.98
$8.39
22,518.09
$51.45
24,940.93
$29.98 '
25,639.08
$14 06
35,503.31
Totals   ,    	
$19,656.04
$22,526.48
$24,992.38
$25,669.06
$35,517.37
 Q 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table I.—Comparative Cost Statement—Continued
Department and Branch
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
Highways—
$1,638.29
1,577.90
137.48
$2,030.14
15,103.09
37.12
$14,351.00
$4,517.01
$2,340.63
13,491.97 1      10,724.00
2,851.34 1       2,177.09
12,730.02
2,682.68
Totals    .   ...
$3,353.67 |    $17,170.35
$30,694.31 |    $17,418.10 |    $17,753.33
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce—
$7,031.32
$7,032.74
	
$8,214.84          $8,653.48
$4,734.17
12,141.13 |      21,540.94 j      33,747.21
Totals
$7,031.32 |      $7,032.74
$20,355.97 |    $30,194.42 |    $38,481.38
Labour—
$768.59
$452.88
$1,227.51 j         $535.62
$672.78
Lands—
Surveys and Mapping, Legal Surveys
$8,832.13
15.05
10,143.23
4,154.73
$16,954.04
$18,698.78
12.49
7,124.68
2,890.02
$21,644.58
12.49
10,532.44
$21,826.21
Water Rights Branch Administration	
6,635.54
3,427.11
9,560.23
Totals	
$23,145.14 |    $27,016.69
$28,725.97 |    $32,189.51  j    $31,386.44
Mines and Petroleum Resources—
]
$2,720.93
$705.04
Provincial Secretary—
$10,355.73
6,787.40
4,048.60
$8,821.04
2,513.35
3,452.38
10.84
$8,674.62
1,779.58
3,608.22
$9,048.93
6.993.32
$6,960.05
5.944.14
5,092.06 1        4,732.85
P.S. Medical Plan	
86.47
I
Totals                      	
$21,191.73 |    $14,797.61
$14,148.89 |    $21,134.31 |    $17,637.04
Recreation and Conservation-
SI. 802.84          $1,757.00          $7,968.17
$4,583.06
63.71  |             79.31
...
$4,583.06
$1,866.55 ,|      $1,836.31 |      $7,968.17
Social Welf are—
$23,948.08
$17,277.51
$24,577.70
$23,809.54
$29,522.44
Municipal Affairs—
$561.37 '
	
Water Resources—
Water Rights
$669.90
$6,759.45
$7,607.02
Other—
B.C. Medical Plan              	
$1,213.73
$1,860.04          Sl.012.10
$98.98 ■
110.37
Totals                       	
$1,860.04 |      $1,012.10
$98.98 |      $1,324.10
$229,744.19
$235,809.07
$269,335.26
$303,967.36 1 $369,329.92
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1965
Q 35
Table II.—Showing the Number of Productive Hours Spent in Machine Operations
during the 12-month Period Ended September 30, 1965, Compared to the
Similar Period of the Previous Year.
Department
Key-punching
Unit Record
Equipment
1401 Systems
1620 Systems
1963/64
1964/65
1963/64
1964/65
1963/64
1964/65
1963/64
1964/65
Agriculture	
Attorney-General 	
718.1
1 693 5
1,034.5
9 170 7
275.5
422.9
1,922.2
139.4
208.1
2,018.6
25.0
61.2
367.8
75.6
1,014.2
353.2
7.0
141.8
402.7
653.9
4.8
107.7
6.2 •
86.0
6.7
116.3 ,
9.1
79.4
18.8
2.9
25.6
3.391.0 '   3.238.4
216.2
2,475.1
1,664.4
232.4
1,293.0 '
3,099.0
71.2
2,399.2 ,
14.8
2,309.1
448.3
6,017.5
427.3
348.3
2,122.7
1,893.0
135.7
642.9
1,802.8
5.0
2,664.0
160.4
2,866.0 '
247.9
4,299.8
457.7 ,
364.4
1,640.8
1,319.5
183.7
747.9
34.6
885.3
21.6
880.6
38.7
794.7
114.7
21.2
228.5
1,528.8
635.2
298.0
449.6
17.2
858.3
25.6
650.1
37.0
428.2
164.7
30.5
187.6
209.7
482.6
0.2
141.9
7.4
74.3
25.4
112.8
1.9
89.2
22.1
16.6
1,164.1
British Columbia Forest Service	
910.7
446.4
82.9
407.9
371.3
Industrial Development, Trade, and
Commerce  	
30.0
	
British Columbia Lands Service	
482.9
8.7
12.1
129.4
26.5
111.1
0.5
146.6
Other                          	
23,100.5
27,459.4 '
9,668.3
7,717.8
1,809.1
3,086.3
2,241.6
2,131.7
Table HI.—Showing the Number of Hours Spent in Clerical Operations for Each
Department for the 12-month Period Ended September 30, 1965, Compared
to the Similar Period of the Previous Year.
Systems
Development
Programming
Other Clerical
Department
1401 Systems
1620 System
Work
1963/64
1964/65
1963/64
1964/65
1963/64
1964/65
1963/64
1964/65
Agriculture	
14.2
17.6
89.9
4.0
147.8
6.8
146.0
277.9
156.6
184.0
126.8
297.7
100.9
2.6
792.1
495.5
17.4
451.9
18.1
94.5
37.5
166.2
68.6
505.9
57.3 ',
109.2
74.3
779.8
70.2
Attorney-General	
82.4
Liquor Control Board  	
—
■
1,354.2
8.9
5.7
191.3
272.8
144.8
568.2
294.1
23.5
41.3
51.1
42.4
British Columbia Forest Service
30.6
73.0
454.9
18.0
171.7
215.4
6.3
26.8
2.5
2.2
3.9
Industrial Development, Trade, and
Commerce  _	
745.0
1.5
21.3
190.6
394.4
293.4
19.9
127.6
41.6
233.6
11.2
113.9
99.9
2,157.9
1.1
170.1
2,884.4
45
British Columbia Lands Service	
184.6
9.0
11.1
8.5
76.0
4.8
525.0
1.8
424.8
1.5
495 7
13.7
69.2 '
34.9
5.0
7.3
251.7
81 4
551 1
Water Resources 	
2.5
3 5
Other	
	
3.3
Total hours	
1,632.8
761.2
2,428.8.
3,359.7
539.9
429.4
4,361.4
6,162.4
 Q 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1965
Q 39
REPORT OF THE AGENT-GENERAL FROM
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, LONDON
During the past year, interest in our Provincial economy shown by industrial
and financial institutions, as well as the general public, in the United Kingdom and
Europe has reached unequalled proportions.   This has been accelerated to a large
degree by impressive and continuous
economic growth, sound financial position, wider knowledge of its vast resources and power-generating potential,
and has resulted in an ever-increasing
flow of venture capital to British Columbia from the United Kingdom and
from Europe. That this trend will
strengthen is self-evident as awareness
of our tremendous resources and potential grows in other nations of the world.
Exports of British Columbia products to Great Britain and Europe continue to increase, amounting during the
last year to over $326,000,000. Further details of this trade appear in the
latter section of this report.
VISIT OF THE PREMIER
One of the highlights of the year
was the visit in September of our Premier, the Honourable W. A. C. Bennett, to the United Kingdom and Italy.
While in Rome and Milan he met leading industrialists of Italy. This mission
subsequently resulted in a number of
inquiries being received in this office
and a delegation of Italian businessmen
visiting British Columbia this year. In
London a reception was held at British
at which he met prominent industrialists
\
A winter's afternoon in Westminster—
half-past two by distant Big Ben. Late sun
bathes the fronts of Waterloo Place, the
Duke of York's Column, the Foreign Office,
No. 10 Downing Street, and, away beyond,
the twin towers of Westminster Abbey.
(Photo taken from roof of British Columbia House, No. 1 Regent Street, London.)
Columbia House in honour of the Premier,
of Great Britain.
VISIT OF THE MINISTER
The Honourable Ralph R. Loffmark, in October, paid his first visit to London
since his appointment as Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce.
He was accorded the unique honour of an official luncheon by the Minister of State
for Commonwealth Relations, Mr. Cledwyn Hughes, M.P. Through British Columbia House, several high-level and important contacts were made with members of
the House of Lords, members of Parliament, and, most important, industrialists
interested in participating in the economic development of British Columbia.
 Q 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPRESENTATIONAL ACTIVITIES
The Agent-General has made visits to various regions of the British Isles, to
Germany, and to Italy, during which many good promotional contacts have been
re-established or newly formed.
Close liaison was maintained with the Office of the High Commissioner for
Canada, Provincial Agents-General, and all Canadian institutions in London.
Relations were maintained with other Commonwealth governments represented
in London, foreign embassies, and departments of the United Kingdom Government,
particularly the Commonwealth Relations Office and the Board of Trade.
The Agent-General had the honour of representing the Province at the state
funeral of Sir Winston Churchill in St. Paul's Cathedral. The Deputy Agent-
General represented the Province at the Shakespeare birthday celebrations at Stratford-upon-Avon in April and at the state opening of Parliament in November.
It is most gratifying to record in this report that so many British Columbians,
either on business or private visits, had registered at this office and made it their
headquarters while abroad.
IMMIGRATION AND SETTLEMENT
Immigration inquiries this year at British Columbia House were almost double
those of last year, numbering as they did some 800. This is due in part to the fact
that the clerks attending to immigration are now located on the ground floor of
British Columbia House, which is open to the street. At the same time the Canadian
Government throughout the year was actively engaged in advertising for immigrants,
a procedure which has only recently been attempted on the present scale. In addition to this number of counter inquiries, letters dealing with this subject were
answered to the number of 520 (excluding those dealing with school-teachers).
SCHOOL-TEACHERS
Again we were able to place at the disposal of Mr. D. P. Todd, of the Department of Education, interviewing accommodation during his three-week stay in the
British Isles recruiting teachers. Itineraries were prepared and much preliminary
work was done by the staff in arranging interviews before Mr. Todd arrived. This
led to considerable correspondence. In all, our advertisements placed in the daily
press resulted in some 300 replies; of this, 160 teachers applied for interview, and
147 were interviewed, resulting in 53 teachers being recommended to School Boards
for appointment, while 46 appointments were made before Mr. Todd returned to
the Province.
During the year, British Columbia House placed a number of advertisements
for teaching staff for the West Kootenay Regional College. This resulted in some
300 applications being received by the college from United Kingdom teachers. In
addition, some 100 sundry school-teacher inquiries were handled exclusive of the
above-mentioned special schemes.
VISITORS
Some 3,673 visitors from British Columbia registered at British Columbia
House, while the staff during the year handled some 17,770 pieces of mail on
their behalf.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1965 Q 41
FILMS AND PUBLICITY
Again there has been an increase in the demand for films, rising from an
audience of 22,000 to 30,000 in 1965. This represented 320 screenings. These
figures refer only to films handled by this office. Other Canadian agencies in the
United Kingdom having film-distribution arrangements which include British Columbia films are the Canadian Government Travel Bureau, Air Canada, Canadian
Pacific Airlines, the Canadian railway companies, Canada House, and the National
Film Board.
Each month the Agent-General's newsletter has been mailed to a growing list
of readers, and many compliments have been sent to the office. The newsletter is
easy to read, up to date, and is of particular value to industrialists, businessmen, and
bankers.
The move to the ground floor of the inquiries office and visitors' bureau has
given British Columbia House staff the opportunity to utilize a window on Regent
Street during the year. Various window displays have been shown. These include
British Columbia minerals, Canadian salmon and fruit, and a special apple display
placed by the Canadian Government Exhibition Commission. Readers of this
report are reminded that this window is available to any industry in British Columbia that wishes to make use of it.
TOURISM
Inquiries at British Columbia House in respect to tourism numbered 110
throughout the year, which is an increase over past years, and a variety of tourist
literature has been handed out and sent by mail to written inquiries.
ADMINISTRATION
A number of tenants have vacated the building, and in most cases have surrendered their leases without penalty. This has enabled the Agent-General to make
new lettings on much more favourable terms considering that so many of the leases
were taken out in 1946. During 1966 and 1967 several of the old leases will have
terminated. Renewals will be at rates consistent with fair market value at the time
of renewal.
REPORT OF THE INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE COUNSELLOR
Industrial and trade inquiries continued at a high level during 1965. The
noticeable trend was that producers in British Columbia were paying increasing
attention to British and Western European markets.
TRADE FROM BRITISH COLUMBIA
During the year, 125 inquiries were received from British Columbia, most of
which had to do with the sale of British Columbia products. Suitable contacts were
arranged for the majority of these inquiries, and in many cases buyers and distributors were found.
TRADE INQUIRIES FROM EUROPE
During 1965 the following inquiries were received from the United Kingdom
and the countries of Western Europe:—
 Q 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA |
United Kingdom  278
Germany  42
Scandinavia   28
The Netherlands  20
Switzerland  14
Italy  13
France   7
Austria   6
Spain   6
Belgium   5
Portugal   2
Other countries  14
Total  435
EXPORT OPPORTUNITIES
During 1964 a new service was instituted, that of sending to the Department
of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce inquiries for goods or services
from countries outside the jurisdiction of this office but which came to notice
through embassies, government departments, chambers of commerce, trade associations, etc.   Forty-eight of these were forwarded to the Department in Victoria.
TRADE MISSIONS FROM BRITISH COLUMBIA
Western White Spruce Symposium (March 28 to April 12, 1965)
This mission was organized by Seaboard Lumber Sales and included six British
Columbian members, all from the Northern Interior of the Province. The mission
visited various centres in England, Scotland, Northern Ireland, and Eire. The
object of this mission was to popularize the use of western white spruce in these
markets.   This was the first lumber mission from the Interior of the Province.
Cariboo Lumber Mission (May 9 to 28, 1965)
This mission consisted of the secretary of the Cariboo Lumber Manufacturers'
Association and three mill-owners from the Quesnel-Williams Lake area. The
mission's itinerary covered some of the main lumber import centres—London,
Liverpool, Cardiff, Belfast, and Dublin.
One of the interesting sidelights of this mission was the offer of a flagpole to be
cut from the Cariboo forests and shipped to the Leander Club at Henley. The pole,
80 feet long, arrived in England on November 22nd and will be dedicated at the
Henley Rowing Regatta in July, 1966.
TRADE MISSIONS FROM EUROPE
Catering Mission to Canada (February, 1965)
This mission consisted of the chief buyers for some of the largest catering firms
in Britain who were looking for new products from Canada. It is interesting to
note that on the return of this mission they reported that the best frozen foods seen
throughout the whole of Canada were produced in the Fraser Valley. They also
reported that in the United Kingdom there is a tremendous sales potential for
Canadian frozen beef and fresh frozen salmon.    The first tangible result of this
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1965 Q 43
most successful mission was that its report went to all catering associations throughout the British Isles.
Birmingham Business Mission to Canada
(October 16 to November 3, 1965)
This mission spent from October 30th until November 3rd in Vancouver,
where the members dispersed. Arrangements were made by this office for the
mission to meet government representatives, boards of trade, trade associations,
and individual firms. The organizers of this mission reported that the immediate
result was a total of new business well over $2,000,000. Canadian agents and sales
representatives were appointed as a consequence of this mission.
VISIT OF THE INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE COUNSELLOR
TO BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Industrial and Trade Counsellor paid a short visit to the Province in
August and September.
FILM INDUSTRY FOR THE PROVINCE
A new development during the year was the interest in British Columbia as
a location for the making and processing of films by British producers.
BUSINESS EMIGRATION
Inquiries are still being received from businessmen who intend to become
re-established in their own line of business or move to the Province and invest.
In dealing with such inquiries, this office works closely with the Canadian Department of Citizenship and Immigration and other agencies in the Province, such as
government departments, boards of trade, trade associations. Letters of introduction have been supplied throughout the year in over 50 such cases.
NOTES ON TRADE WITH EUROPE
The 1964 figures for trade with Western Europe are published by the Department's Bureau of Economics and Statistics in mid-1965. Below are British Columbia's markets in order of importance, showing the value of exports to each
country:—
United Kingdom  $220,312,000
The Netherlands   36,685,000
West Germany  27,884,000
France   12,765,000
Belgium-Luxembourg  11,363,000
Italy   10,216,000
Spain   1,828,000
Sweden  1,545,000
Ireland   950,000
Switzerland  864,000
Greece   737,000
Finland  388,000
Denmark   370,000
Austria   333,000
Norway  249,000
Other Western European countries  34,000
Total  $326,523,000
 Q 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
It is to be noted from the foregoing that British Columbia exports to the United
Kingdom are almost two-thirds of the total for Western Europe. British Columbia
imports from the United Kingdom for 1964 were $54,402,000.
This office uses this statistical grading in advising visitors or correspondents
who are making plans to sell in or buy from the United Kingdom and Western
Europe.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1965 Q 45
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, SAN FRANCISCO
The economic growth and industrial development which have taken place in
British Columbia over the past few years continue to stimulate interest in the
Province among manufacturing and commercial firms in the Western United States.
This is indicated in many ways, the most important being the fact that 1965 was
the most active and interesting year of the operation of British Columbia House in
San Francisco.
It has long been recognized that the west coast of North America from British
Columbia to Mexico is a geographic and economic unit. Many economic studies
have been made in this region, and in almost every case California and British
Columbia emerge as the most attractive areas for expansion of industry and
commerce.
The American manufacturers and investors are fully aware of the tremendous
hydro projects under construction, the growth and expansion of the pulp and paper
facilities, other forest products, the increasing activity in mining, petroleum, and
natural-gas developments. On the other hand, California represents a larger market
to the British Columbia manufacturers than all of Canada. The recognition of the
potential in these respective areas has led to increased requests for information by
California businessmen and commercial enterprises for market information on a
variety of products.
A number of California-based engineering firms approached British Columbia
House for information on the developments taking place in British Columbia with
a view to possible establishment of consulting services or complete engineering
services in the Province. The opportunities in the petroleum field have interested
an American firm to the extent that a refinery in Central British Columbia is under
construction. Manufacturers of petro-chemicals in California appear to be interested in the growth and expansion of the petroleum and natural-gas industry.
The Commercial Representative is watching this situation closely.
The development of hydro power will undoubtedly increase the interest of
electro-chemical manufacturing facilities. Several American firms are studying the
potential for such power-oriented industries, according to inquiries received.
Interest has been shown by two California firms in expansion of their British
Columbia forestry operations. Other firms producing equipment and providing
auxiliary services to the pulp and paper manufacturers are planning to establish
representation in British Columbia.
British Columbia House offers assistance to British Columbia businessmen and
companies exploring California markets. The Commercial Representative accompanied the Canadian Technical Wood Products Mission sponsored by the Federal
Department of Industry on a fact-finding mission on the assessment of the wood-
using industries in California. It is established that a definite market exists in California for dimension stock and furniture parts. This has been previously reported
by our Commercial Representative on several occasions. He has in the past made
extensive inquiries on this subject as a regular part of his duties. He also accompanied a second mission sponsored by the British Columbia Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce in November where representatives of
British Columbia manufacturers visited California in the interest of their products.
The British Columbia House representatives attended trade shows in California
where British Columbia firms had exhibits during 1965.    Close association is
 Q 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
maintained with Federal Trade Commissioners, Canadian bank representatives in
California, investment brokers, and financial organizations for the purpose of advertising investment opportunities in British Columbia. Several real-estate developments have taken place through these contacts in British Columbia House, San
Francisco.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1965          Q 47
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL
The British Columbia Research Council was incorporated in 1944 under the
Societies Act.
The broad objectives of the Council are to provide scientific and technical
services to the industry of the Province, and to conduct research leading to the establishment of new industries and the development of the natural resources of British
Columbia.
From a very modest beginning, the Council has grown with the development
of the Province.   It now employs a staff of 87, and operates from its own laboratory,
located on the campus of the University of British Columbia.
Financial support comes from a Provincial grant through the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, and from earned income from
contract research for industry and Government agencies.   It also receives a limited
amount of financial assistance from the National Research Council and other
organizations.
The following graph shows the growth of the Council's major sources of income
over the years, projected to the end of 1965:—
800
700
s
<        600
O         500
Q
w        400
s
H        300
200
100
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YEARS
ii ■■■■■in   FROM B.C. GOVERNMENT
■m^™^—■   FROM RESEARCH CONTRACTS
 Q 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Council is supervised by a board of management, who met and reviewed
the activities of the Council on April 9, July 14, and November 9, 1965, and consisted of the following:—
Mr. E. W. Bassett, Deputy Minister of Lands, Parliament Buildings, Victoria,
B.C.
Mr. John Bene, President, Weldwood of Canada Limited, 900 East Kent Street,
Vancouver 15, B.C.
Mr. Edward Benson, Vice-President and General Manager, Pacific Press, 2250
Granville Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.
Dr. J. J. R. Campbell, Head of Department of Bacteriology and Immunology,
University of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Dr. John A. Gower, Exploration District Manager, Kennco Explorations
Western Limited, 1030 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.
Mr. G. H. Gwyn, Manager, Kitimat Works, Aluminum Company of Canada
Limited, P.O. Box 1800, Kitimat, B.C.
Mr. G. H. D. Hobbs, President, Western Canada Steel Limited, 450 South-east
Marine Drive, Vancouver 15, B.C.
Mr. R. M. Hungerford, President, Clayburn-Harbison Limited, 1690 West
Broadway, Vancouver 9, B.C.
Dr. Peter Larkin, Director, Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries Research Board
of Canada, Nanaimo, B.C.
Mr. J. E. Liersch, Vice-President, Canadian Forest Products Limited, 999 West
Pender Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
The Honourable Ralph R. Loffmark, Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Dr. Harold Madsen, Head of Entomology Section, Research Station, Canada
Department of Agriculture, Summerland, B.C.
Mr. F. D. Mathers, President, Royal City Foods Limited, P.O. Box 159, New
Westminster, B.C.
Mr. C. H. McLean, Chairman of the Board, British Columbia Telephone Company, 768 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
Mr. E. P. O'Neal, Secretary-Treasurer, British Columbia Federation of Labour,
517 East Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Mr. A. F. Paget, Deputy Minister of Water Resources, Department of Lands,
Forests, and Water Resources, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Dr. G. L. Pickard, Director, Institute of Oceanography, University of British
Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Mr. E. G. Shorter, Vice-Chairman, Board of Directors, MacMillan, Bloedel
and Powell River Limited, 1199 West Pender Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Mr. T. L. Sturgess, Deputy Minister, Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Dr. G. M. Volkoff, Head of Department of Physics, University of British
Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1966
830-1265-830

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