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REPORT of the LANDS SERVICE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1965 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1966

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Hon. R. G. Williston, Minister E. W. Bassett, Deputy Minister of Lands
REPORT
of the
LANDS SERVICE
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1965
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1966
  Victoria, B.C., March 14, 1966.
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C, C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the British Columbia Lands Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources for
the year ended December 31, 1965.
R. G. WILLISTON,
Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources.
 Victoria, B.C., March 14, 1966.
The Honourable R. G. Williston,
Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the British Columbia
Lands Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources for the
12 months ended December 31, 1965.
E. W. BASSETT,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
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  CONTENTS
Introduction by the Deputy Minister of Lands	
Accounting Division	
Lands Branch—
Superintendent of Lands	
Land Inspection Division	
Surveys and Mapping Branch-
Surveyor-General	
Legal Surveys Division-
Topographic Division-
Geographic Division	
Air Division	
University Endowment Lands.
Land Settlement Board	
Page
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Personnel Office  87
Mail and File Room  91
COVER PHOTO
Topographic survey, Klastline Plateau, northwest side of Edziza Peak, overlooking the lava
beds and cinder cones.
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,1
 Report of the British Columbia Lands Service
E. W. Bassett, B.A.Sc, B.C.R.F., Deputy Minister of Lands
Recent Lands Service Annual Reports have stressed the continuing need to
preserve orderly and equitable Crown-land alienation amid the complexities stemming from rapid growth of the Provincial population and economy. Improvement
and extension of the transportation network, together with work on major industrial
projects, have greatly stimulated interest in Crown land for settlement and recreational use. Construction of major hydro-electric projects on the Peace and Columbia Rivers, extension of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway to Stuart Lake, extension
and reconstruction of the Northern Trans-Provincial Highway, and opening of the
Squamish-Pemberton Highway are but a few developments contributing to the
spread of settlement. Also, expansion of the forest and mining industries has led
to the establishment of entirely new communities. In this latter respect, for example, during the past year the Lands Service co-operated with industry in establishing
townsites at Gold River, Fraser Lake, and Morfee Lake.
In 1965 the Lands Service reached a new milestone in Crown-land administration. After being effectively tested in the Peace River region since 1963, a policy
based on a lease-develop-purchase principle was expanded to cover all applications
for Crown land for agricultural purposes. Basically, the regulations provide the
land must be not less than 50 per cent arable and that initial alienation be by leasehold, with the lessee being required to clear and cultivate a proportion of the arable
acreage within a given period of time. When the land has reached a defined level
of improvement, the lessee may exercise an option to purchase. Direct alienation
of agricultural land by Crown grant had sometimes resulted in land being acquired
solely for speculation, to the general disadvantage of rural settlement.
For the sixth consecutive year, revenue collections increased. Collections under
the Land Act exceeded $2,594,000 in 1965, a slight increase from 1964, while sales
of maps and aerial photographs, valued at $114,423, were 10.8 per cent higher.
The Lands Branch handled 4,709 applications for Crown land, of which 2,631
were for lease, 1,556 for purchase, and 522 for pre-emptions and other tenures.
Leasehold continued to attract the majority of applications for alienation. Though
fewer certificates of purchase were issued than in 1964, revenues from Crown-land
sales reached an all-time high of more than $1,017,000. For many years the trend
in pre-emptions has been downward, mainly because, except for scattered parcels
in the Peace River and Central Interior regions, practically no surveyed arable Crown
land remains which is suitable for this form of alienation. Changing agricultural
technology and rural attitudes have also tended to emphasize the decline.
The 5,266 examinations made by the Land Inspection Division of the Branch
during 1965 represented a 2-per-cent increase over 1964. Work in connection with
land and foreshore leases accounted for 53 per cent of the total; purchases, 25 per
cent; and all other types of inspection, 22 per cent.
The great interest in Crown land, though apparent throughout the Province, is
especially so in the Central and Northern Interior. Accordingly, to accommodate
public needs and equalize the staff work load, three new land inspection districts
were established—Prince Rupert, Burns Lake, and Vanderhoof—bringing the Provincial total to 17 district offices. To provide assistance in district offices, 12 Deputy
Land Inspectors were added to the staff.   This is a new grade within the Service.
Under the direction of the Surveyor-General, the Legal Surveys, Topographic,
Geographic, and Air Divisions of the Surveys and Mapping Branch supply the official surveys and cartographic detail which are basic to Provincial development.
 DD  10     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
The Branch has steadily adopted new technological innovations. For example,
the introduction of electronic computers has made possible the programming of several surveys and mapping computations. At the end of 1965 nine programmes were
operating and two others were being converted for use on the new model I.B.M.
1620 computer.
During the year, 1,139 sets of survey instructions were issued and field-notes
covering 860 lots were indexed, checked, and compiled by the Legal Surveys Division. Besides maintaining 245 cadastral reference maps and preparing 2,212 plans
for use by Land Inspectors, the Division cleared for status 10,140 applications made
under the Land Act and Forest Act. Field work of the Division included surveys
of 222 town lots, 142 lake-front lots, 106 roadside lots, 51 ski-cabin sites, and 4
Provincial parks.
The Topographic Division responded to the needs of the mineral industry by
completing two major survey projects in widely separated parts of the Province.
In the Iskut River-Stikine River region, field survey control was established for IV2
National Topographic map-sheets at 1:50,000 scale. A second field project involved
co-ordinating 44 triangulation stations on the west coast of Vancouver Island.
Integrated survey systems were established in the Trail region, where 75 monuments were co-ordinated; Penticton, 53 monuments; Kimberley, 25; Marysville,
11; and New Westminster, 95. A newly acquired Model 6b geodimeter was especially useful in measuring short distances with great accuracy.
The Photogrammetric Section of the Topographic Division compiled four National Topographic Series map-sheets and also processed 12 large-scale projects
ranging in scale from 1:600 to 1:15,840.
The Geographic Division continued to expand coverage of maps showing
Crown-land status. Two new status sheets, 82J/SE-SW (Canal Flats) and 82L/NE
(Revelstoke), were printed at l-inch-to-2-miles scale and four maps, 82M (Seymour
Arm), 82N-0 (Golden), 83D-C (Canoe River), and 93H-83E (McBride), at
1:250,000 scale. Distribution of the new sheets completed replacement of the old
Topographical Series Map 5D (Revelstoke-Golden) and Pre-emptor Map 3H (Tete
Jaune).   At the end of 1965, 62 lithographed maps showed the status of Crown land.
The Air Division achieved new records in the processing and distribution of
aerial photographs. More than 200,000 aerial photographs were reprinted in the
film-processing laboratory, while reprints and loans distributed to Government departments and the public totalled 256,902, up 36,785 from 1964.
With better than average photographic weather, the two aircraft of the Operations Section of the Division completed 37,200 square miles of l-inch-to-20-chains
and l-inch-to-40-chains photography, the second highest on record. Strip-type flying
projects added another 3,758 lineal miles. A new Wild RC8 camera capable of
handling panchromatic or colour film was placed in service.
The University Endowment Lands reported revenues of $193,731, compared
with a 10-year average of $127,941.
The Land Settlement Board continued to emphasize disposal of Doukhobor
lands, which accounted for 57 per cent of the $133,996 revenue collected by the
Board. Subdivision surveys of Doukhobor lands were made at Ootishenia (59
parcels) and Krestova (114 parcels).
The following pages contain complete descriptions of Lands Service activities
during 1965. The reader's attention is also drawn to the Lands Service organization chart preceding this introduction, and to the indexes to maps and aerial photographs in the manila envelope attached to the back cover of this Report.
 ACCOUNTING DIVISION
  ACCOUNTING DIVISION DD 13
ACCOUNTING DIVISION
M. B. Maclean, B.Com., Departmental Comptroller
Revenue collections under the Land Act for the year 1965 again reflected the
high level of economic activity in the Province. While the demand for Crown lands
continued unabated throughout the year, alienation was again, primarily, as in 1964,
by lease tenure. Lease accounts increased 10.5 per cent during the past year, bringing the total number of active lease accounts as at December 31, 1965, to 8,194.
Purchase accounts were down from 1964. However, actual revenue from land
sales showed an increase. This is partly accounted for by larger selling prices and
partly through more purchasers paying off their accounts before the due date. As
lessees prove their bona fide intentions with respect to agricultural and other performance leases and convert to purchase, the number of purchase accounts should
again start to increase.
Statistical Tables
Table 1.—Summary of Lands Service Net Revenue Collections for the
Year Ended December 31, 1965
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc  $1,462,024.93
Land sales     1,017,893.16
Sale of maps and air photos        114,423.23
Net revenue collections  $2,594,341.32
Table 2.—Comparison of Revenue Collections for 10-year
Period 1956-65, Inclusive
1956    i inn ii in ■mimil $1,437,130.44
1957 ilium imiii 11 ■  1,302,065.35
1958     i 1,340,045,76
1959 i  ■■  1,323,877.29
1960 ■■Mini ■■mum ii mm 1,714,220.41
1961 i i     miiimihm iihii i   i 1,765,207.54
1962 mm i_hiimiiiiiiiiiiihiiii ihmiiiwiiiiiii 1,847,457.83
1963 ——..■■—   2,034,841.80
1964 i                    2,587,110.34
1965 i ■■■ ■   2,594,341.321
1 Net revenue 1965.
Table 3.—Classification of Revenue Collections for the Year Ended
December 31, 1965
Land sales—
Country lands  $846,488.85
Town lots     186,132.19
Surface rights, mineral claims         3,714.15
Indian reserve cut-off lands  123.30
  $1,036,458.49
 DD 14     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc.—
Foreshore leases—
Booming and log storage  $412,701.96
Commercial (marinas, etc.)     329,270.03
Oyster         7,170.19
Miscellaneous   (foreshore  protection, etc.)         1,195.88
  $750,338.06
Land leases—
Grazing and (or) agriculture  $109,167.02
Quarrying   (limestone,   sand   and
gravel)        32,461.06
Camp-site (lodge, fishing)         4,938.21
Home-site          1,565.70
Miscellaneous (residential, etc.)     150,081.89
     298,213.88
Land-use permits  1,965.00
Licences of occupation  16,310.05
Royalty collections  157,335.54
Easement collections—
Annual rentals       $1,998.21
Outright considerations       90,134.46
  92,132.67
Fees—
Crown grant       $9,960.00
Assignment         2,865.00
Miscellaneous (lease, search, etc.) _        6,468.00
       19,293.00
Sundry  collections   (occupational   rental,   survey
charges, etc.)     135,968.70
  $1,471,556.90
Sale of maps and air photos—
Legal Division     $37,420.92
Geographic Division       46,166.33
Air Division       46,215.86
        129,803.11
Gross revenue for year  $2,637,818.50
Less refunds and taxes  43,477.18
Net revenue for year  $2,594,341.32
 ACCOUNTING DIVISION DD 15
Table 4.—Comparison of Land Leases, Rentals, Fees, Etc., Revenue for
10-year Period, 1956-65, Inclusive
1956 mmm mm iiiii $576,331.17
1957 ■mHBHH 472,415,55
1958 _■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■_ 605,229.73
1959 hum i mm ■ ■ ■ w in 668,367.70
1960    mi un         842,413.17
1961 iiibii ii mi m  1,001,071.13
1962 ■"-"—! i ii i wi i 933,607.66
1963 un ii mm in miii i n ■iiiiiiuii 1,149,650.45
1964 ii urn i i in ii n iiiii n iwn 1,485,539.13
1965     ii i ■■■ iiimiii iiii ■nil mi 1,462,024.93!
i Net revenue 1965.
Table 5.—Comparison of Land Sales Revenue for 10-year Period 1956-65,
Inclusive
195,6    mi urn p--.—!....-.— $573,976.49
1957 -—» ■■«■■!  522,825.65
1958    i mi i mi win i 677,036.15
1959 -—■■< inn 589,975.24
1960    i ii mini i ii mil in i n—iiiiiiuii 806,723.54
1961 —fv.... ——_.■.—.._■ 703,705,71
1962 niiii iiiii in 111 mi ■■iimiiiiiii 836,270.32
1963                           mi m in ■!!■ 787,184.11
1964    iiiii ii ■      iiii iiiiiiuii 11 ii ii 982,137.88
1965 i        in in mil ■iiiiwii iiiii ■■mi 1,017,893.16'
l Net revenue 1965.
  LANDS BRANCH
 THE LANDS BRANCH
At the time of the Fraser River gold-rush in 1858 the demand for land in British
Columbia was greatly intensified and pre-emptions predated surveys. Within four years
254 pre-emptors had taken up more than 50,000 acres of land. To facilitate the transfer
of real estate and provide for the registration of titles, the Land Registry Act was passed
in 1860. The Government of the Province of British Columbia was now in the real-
estate business in a big way; the more than 366,000 square miles of land and water that
constitutes British Columbia was the real estate in question.
With the entrance of British Columbia into Confederation in 1871, the demand for
land quickened to a rush, and over the next thirty years the land-settler (and the promoter) succeeded the gold-miner in importance. Railroads were built and land grants
passed, cities came into being, and companies became established. Land was at the core
of all developments.
The task of land administration became very heavy and necessitated the formation
of a Department of Lands in 1908. In 1912 a Forest Branch was included in the Department of Lands. Today the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources exercises
control of more than 90 per cent of the surface of British Columbia.
How does the Lands Branch fit into the total organization of the British Columbia
Lands Service of today? The relation may be expressed briefly. The Lands Branch
has jurisdiction in matters pertaining to the disposition of Crown land, and is
charged with so administering and disposing of the land that the general welfare,
present and future, of the Province must be protected at all times.
When an individual, or group, desires to purchase or lease Crown land, the application is directed to the Superintendent of Lands, head of the Lands Branch. His authority governs the following matters:—
Sale, lease, and pre-emption of Crown lands for such purposes as agricultural,
industrial, commercial, and home-sites.
Preparation and issuance of Crown grants under the Land Act and the Mineral
Act.
Preparation and issuance of right-of-way easements for power, telephone, pipe
lines, etc.
Reservation of suitable Crown lands and foreshore for national defence, use
and enjoyment of the public, forestry experimentation, fisheries research
work, highways, etc.
Granting railway rights-of-way under various Statutes.
Protection of historic sites from alienation.
Reservation and conveying of Crown lands for such purposes as school-sites,
cemeteries, and fair grounds.
Leasing of land and foreshore for such varied purposes as wharf-sites, booming-
grounds, canneries, oyster and other mollusc fisheries, and for boat-houses,
quarry-sites,  cattle-ranching, trappers' cabins, ship-building,  and  aircraft
bases.
To perform these and other functions efficiently, the Lands Branch works in close
co-operation with a great number of other agencies, such as municipal and city administrations, town-planning authorities, the British Columbia Forest Service, the Water Resources Service, the Surveys and Mapping Branch within the British Columbia Lands
Service, and all the departments in the Government of the Province, notably Highways,
Education, Attorney-General, and Agriculture.
Outside the Provincial departments there is much business transacted with Federal
departments, such as the Department of National Defence, the Veterans' Land Settlement
Act administration, the Public Works Department, and the Indian Affairs Branch of the
Department of Citizenship and Immigration.
Direct service to the people of British Columbia is the first duty of the Lands Branch
and this takes the bulk of the time of the Lands Branch personnel. Associated with this
prime duty is the important function of the maintenance of the records, which in many
cases are the only ones in British Columbia showing the correct legal status of the surface of the Province.
 Preliminary development, Gold River pulp-mill site.
 DD 20    DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
LANDS BRANCH
D. Borthwick, B.S.A., B.Ed., A.A.C.I., Superintendent of Lands
The year 1965 was a very busy one for the Lands Service owing to a continuing
interest in and demand for Crown land. Although the total number of applications
decreased by 8 per cent from the 1964 figure, Land Act revenue collections increased
by $55,124 to $2,479,918. The Land Inspection Division completed 5,266 field
examinations during 1965. Again this year much of the activity has been in the
central and northern sections of the Province and in areas where new developments
in forestry, mining, and hydro power are taking place.
New pulp-mill projects planned or started at Prince Rupert, Prince George,
Morfee Lake, Kamloops, and Skookumchuck Prairie in the East Kootenay region
have all contributed to the continuing demand for Crown lands to meet the needs
of people for mill-sites, townsites, and recreational areas. Similar demands have
been created by new mining activity in the Stewart, Alice Arm, Smithers, Stikine,
Babine Lake, Osoyoos, Kootenay, and Vancouver Island areas. The impact of
major power developments upon the demand for Crown land was very noticeable
this year. The Portage Mountain Dam at Hudson Hope generated activity in the
South Peace River area, particularly around Chetwynd, where a new 116-lot
Crown subdivision was laid out to meet the anticipated demand for residential lots
in this community. In the Kootenays, both the Arrow Lake and Duncan Lake
Dams stimulated increased demands for Crown lands.
During the past year, 13 Crown subdivisions and two rural electrification
projects were initiated throughout the Province. This is a continuation of the policy
of meeting the needs of people in the unorganized areas of the Province, both for
recreational and residential purposes. Many of these subdivisions comprise waterfront lots that fill a recreational need for the residents of British Columbia. All
such waterfront lots are disposed of on a leasehold basis by public competition.
Agricultural applications in the South Peace River area have levelled off, and
there is a noticeable trend toward a stabilized farm economy with consolidation of
farming units and a rounding-out of holdings taking place. In the North Peace
River the demand is still very active; the new applications are generally found in
remote areas and well removed from the established local communities. Elsewhere
in the Province the demand for agricultural land is still active. Again, the available
land is often isolated and becoming more so every year. Lease renewals and reviews,
particularly in the grazing areas of the Cariboo and southern parts of the Province,
continue to generate an active annual work load.
The policy of disposing of arable agricultural lands on a lease-develop-purchase
basis has tended to dissuade the speculator. Under this policy, land which is at
least 50 per cent arable is leased for agricultural purposes with a purchase option.
The leases are issued for three years, renewable for a further term of 18 years upon
the performance of development work. To renew such a lease, at least 10 per cent
of the potentially arable land must be brought under cultivation. Before an assignment of a lease will be considered, 20 per cent of the potentially arable land must
be under cultivation. After 80 per cent of the potentially arable land within the
leasehold has been developed, the purchase option may be exercised. This policy
has been very well received by the farming community of the Province, who have
recognized that besides encouraging development of agricultural land, the policy
has all but completely removed the speculative element from applications for
potential farm land.
 LANDS BRANCH DD 21
Again this year the Lands Service established reserves for the Federal Government, the Highways Department, and British Columbia Forest Service and reserved
many areas for the use, recreation, and enjoyment of the public. Licences of
occupation were issued for radio sites and easements for power and telephone lines,
oil and gas pipe-lines, water-lines, access roads, and microwave, radio, television,
ski, and aerial tramway sites.
A brief summary of the activities of the various sections of the Administration
Division of the Lands Branch is set out hereunder:—
Lease Section.—The number of new lease applications increased from
2,374 to 2,631 in 1965. This increase in activity is largely attributable to the new agricultural policy of lease-develop-purchase which
was fully instituted by the Department during the past year.
Purchase Section.—The load volume of this Section was reduced considerably during the past year with a decrease in applications from
2,326 to 1,556 in 1965. In view of the emphasis on agricultural
leases containing a purchase option this was expected, and it follows
that the work load will increase in future years as the purchase options
in the present leases are exercised.
Crown Grants Section.—The volume of work in the Crown Grants
Section decreased in 1965 to 1,087 from 1,163 in 1964, or 6.6 per
cent. This decrease was to be expected in the light of the reduction
in the Purchase Section. The great majority of Crown grants issued
cover purchases of country lands and town lots, and in both cases
these were reduced last year from the preceding one.
Pre-emption and Reserve Section.—The number of applications in both
cases decreased in 1965 from a total of 551 in 1964 to 522 this
year. Correspondingly, the number of pre-emptions allowed and
the reserves established decreased as well. Inquiries concerning the
availability of Crown lands, which are handled by this Section, increased by 4.2 per cent, from 3,145 in 1964 to 3,279 this year.
Status Section.—-The number of statuses completed increased from 24,172
in 1964 to 32,913 in 1965, a climb of 36 per cent. Once again, most
of this increase occurred in the statusing of town lots.
Easement Section.-—The number of easements granted in 1965 was 132
compared with 90 granted in 1964. The additional easements
granted were largely in the power-line and microwave categories.
GENERAL ACTIVITY
During 1965 a total of 56 parcels was tendered for sale, of which 37 were sold
for a price of $27,445. Two hundred and forty-eight parcels were exposed by
public auction, and of these, 33 sold at the auction date for $36,615. Subsequently
27 parcels were disposed of by direct application.
Lease tenders offered during 1965 were 14 in number and comprised 6,742
acres. One hundred and nineteen lots were offered by public competition, and of
these, 46 were leased at the time of auction. Of the 119 lots, 110 were waterfront
parcels and 40 were leased at the auction date.
During 1965, 1,070 town lots were sold, realizing the sum of $169,141.
The following tables indicate in detail the work carried out by the various sections of the Lands Service in 1965.
 DD 22     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 1.—Country Land Sales, 1965
Acres
Surveyed   44,063.45
Unsurveyed  28,768.83
Total  72,832.28
Table 2.—Certificates of Purchase Issued, 1965
Land Recording District Total
Alberni  18
Atlin   2
Cranbrook   9
Fernie   8
Fort Fraser ..  102
Fort George  67
Fort St. John   81
Golden  9
Kamloops   28
Kaslo   10
Lillooet   30
Nanaimo   25
Nelson   21
New Westminster   18
Osoyoos   4
Pouce Coupe  5 5
Prince Rupert  42
Quesnel  44
Revelstoke   15
Similkameen   70
Smithers  60
Telegraph Creek  Nil
Vancouver   14
Victoria   7
Williams Lake  80
Total  819
 LANDS BRANCH DD 23
Table 3.—New Leases Issued, 1965
Land  Number Acreage
Agriculture   294 117,845.67
Hay and grazing (pasture and hay-cutting) 305 109,967.81
Quarrying (sand, gravel, limestone, etc.) 18 1,942.36
Home-site (section 78, Land Act)  4 40.00
Residential  298 588.87
Miscellaneous (resorts, service-stations,
camp-sites, mill-sites, etc.)  71 2,106.00
Foreshore—
Booming, log storage, log-dumping, etc.  84 1,780.04
Oyster and shellfish  2 14.00
Industrial (canneries, mill-sites, wharves,
etc.)   18 669.23
Quarrying (sand, gravel from river-beds) 5 57.02
Commercial (boat rentals, marinas, marine
service-stations, etc.)   24 63.79
Miscellaneous (private wharves and boat-
houses, etc.)   21 145.51
Totals   1,144 235,220.30
Table 4.—Temporary Tenure Leases Renewed, 1965
Number   223
Acreage   30,779.27
Table 5.—Land-use Permits Issued, 1965
Number         18
Acreage  55.53
Table 6.—Licences to Occupy Issued, 1965
Number  12
Acreage   5,429.72
Table 7.—Assignments Approved, 1965
Leases, land-use permits, licences of occupation  570
 DD 24     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 8.—Easements Granted, 1965
Number
Miles
Acres
Foreshore
Submarine power cable	
Submarine telephone cable-
Overhead power-line	
Sewer outfall	
Power-line, telephone-line, and water pipe-line..
Totals 	
Land
Oil and gas pipe-lines and well-sites-
Oil and gas pipe-lines_
Compressor-station and well-site..
Compressor-station..
Water pipe-line, well-site, and pump-house	
Sewer pipe-line, water pipe-line, and overhead footpath-
Water pipe-line	
Salt-water pipe-line 	
Power-lines	
Telephone-lines	
Access roads	
Microwave sites 	
Microwave site and power-line	
Microwave site and road 	
Radio transmitter sites	
Television antenna sites	
Television antenna sites and power-lines..
Ski lifts  	
Aerial tramway _
Totals....
Licences of Occupation
Radio sites-
Grand totals..
16
13
11
1
2
1
1
1
1
42
4
2
10
3
3
6
2
5
2
1
11,1
132
4.810
8.083
0.969
0.326
0.060
14.248
27.097
35.517
3.200
0.024
0.029
0.050
70.618
1.330
0.690
1.130
7.5701
4.230
1.945
0.500
42.220
44.755
6.490
0.709
0.039
94.213
176.560
164.430
2.830
3.240
36.660
0.260
0.014
0.450
556.879
3.011
5.120
47.570
15.700
109.363
44.138
4.610
11.091
19.080
11.0101
153.930
1,212.016
1.319
168.178
1,307.548
1 Approximate.
In line with current Departmental policy, 99 letters of consent for the construction of access roads were issued
during the year.
Table 9.—Crown Grants Issued, 1965
Purchases (country lands) __
Purchases (town lots) 	
Pre-emptions	
Surface rights (Mineral Act).
Public Schools Act	
Veterans' Land Settlement Act	
Home-site leases	
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company
Supplementary timber grants	
Miscellaneous	
Total .___	
Certified copies of Crown grants issued.
671
282
48
25
18
1
5
14
1
22
1,087
.  1
 LANDS BRANCH
DD 25
Table 10.—Crown Grants Issued for Past 10 Years
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
Total
1,518
1,426
1,043
1,471
1,399
1,074
1,081
1,042
1,163
1,087
12,304
Ten-year average, 1,230.
Table 11.—Total Area Deeded by Crown Grant, 1965
Purchases (country lands).
Pre-emptions
Surface rights (Mineral Act)	
Public Schools Act	
Veterans' Land Settlement Act
Home-site leases	
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company
Supplementary timber grants 	
Miscellaneous	
Acres
76,536.85
7,629.20
727.18
67.79
159.00
47.31
836.57
40.00
121.94
Total
86,165.84
 DD 26     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 12.—Pre-emption Records, 1965
Land Recording District
Pre-emptions
Applications
Received
Applications
Allowed
Cancelled
C. of I.
Issued
Alberni  	
Atlin   	
Cranbrook  _
Fernie   	
Fort Fraser (Burns Lake) 	
Fort George (Prince George) _	
Fort St. John	
Golden	
Kamloops  _ 	
Kaslo  — —
Lillooet (Clinton)	
Nanaimo  	
Nelson	
New Westminster. .	
Osoyoos (Vernon)	
Pouce Coupe	
Prince Rupert  _
Quesnel _	
Revelstoke 	
Similkameen (Penticton)	
Smithers ....  _	
Telegraph Creek (Prince Rupert)..
Vancouver 	
Victoria	
Williams Lake 	
Totals	
5
11
22
30
3
....
4
76
4
18
26
1
50
2
5
15
28
1
1
53
1
23
43
Table 13.—Reserves, 1965
Reserves
Established
Use, recreation, and enjoyment of the public  109
British Columbia Department of Highways  (rights-of-way, gravel
pits, bridge-sites, etc.)   111
Federal Government (defence purposes, wharf-sites, etc.)      15
British Columbia Forest Service (Ranger stations, grazing, radio-
sites, reforestation, etc.)      46
Miscellaneous (Game Branch, water-power projects, garbage dumps,
school-sites, cemeteries, etc.)      89
Total
370
 LANDS BRANCH
DD 27
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 DD 28     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
LAND INSPECTION DIVISION
L. D. Fraser, B.Sc.A., P.Ag., A.A.C.I., Chief, Land Inspection Division
The trend established in past years toward an increasing volume of work
handled by this Division continued during 1965. Reference is made to attached
Table 3, which represents an analysis of requests for land examinations processed
by this Division during the years 1961 to 1965, inclusive, for the various inspection
districts. The increase in volume over 1964 is 3 per cent, while over 1961 it
amounted to 38 per cent.
Table 2 represents an analysis of inspections completed and those outstanding
at the end of the year for each district for the past five years. The total number
of inspections completed for the past year was 5,266, up 2 per cent over 1964.
The outstanding backlog for the Division at the year end was 1,281 inspections,
a decrease of 38 over the previous year.
The most notable feature of this past year's activity was the formation of three
new land inspection districts and the employment of 12 Deputy Land Inspectors
to facilitate the task of keeping abreast of the current work load and reducing the
backlog to a reasonable level. The additional men were taken on staff toward the
end of the working season, and their effect was not too obvious this year. The names
and placement of the staff involved are discussed under the heading " Staff."
A change in Lands Service policy was implemented during this past year to
encourage the development of Crown lands throughout the Province. This policy
dictates that Crown land will be alienated by lease tenure leading to purchase after
appreciable improvements have been completed. As a result, there has been a noticeable decrease in purchase applications, particularly in the Peace River area. At the
same time it has discouraged the leasing of lands by strictly speculative entrepreneurs.
The shift in work is therefore toward the examination and review of land leases,
which accounted for a total of 2,338 examinations or 44 per cent of the entire work
load.   In 1964 this type of work accounted for 38 per cent of the inspections.
The Inspection Division again examined properties and submitted appraisal
reports for many Government departments and agencies. Specifically, appraisals
were completed for the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, Land Settlement Board,
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, Department of Social Welfare,
Southern Okanagan Lands Project, University Endowment Lands, and the Veterans'
Land Act.
Applications to lease for agricultural purposes still represent the major portion
of the work load in the Fort St. John area, and some 52 per cent of the total work
was of this nature. In the South Peace River area, the demand for Crown lands
appears to have been stabilized, and there is now a definite trend toward the establishment of larger farm units and the gradual elimination of the smaller farms.
Farm sales in the Pouce Coupe area are down by 50 per cent over last year,
suggesting a decrease in interest in improved farm holdings. However, there has
been a slight increase in the demand for unimproved lands.
A large portion of the activity in the South Peace River area has centred around
Chetwynd, and such interest takes the form of applications for home-sites and small
holdings. This activity has resulted from the Portage Mountain Dam construction
together with an increase in the lumbering industry in this area.
The first major staking for agricultural lands in the Fort Nelson area occurred
this year, which has emphasized the need for land-use planning.
The Prince George District was reduced in size with the reopening of the land
inspection office at Vanderhoof.   This has resulted in a decrease in the travelling
 LANDS BRANCH DD 29
time required by the field staff to undertake the examination of applications for
Crown lands.
The rapid increase in population in the Vanderhoof-Prince George area has
precipitated a notable interest in the recreational land use of the many chains of
large lakes in the district. However, many of the lakes are only accessible by boat,
and land examinations are therefore time-consuming.
The development of the Endako Mines molybdenum property at Fraser Lake
together with the extension of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway into Fort St. James
have both had a decided impact on the demand for Crown lands in this region. It is
anticipated that this surge of interest will continue and serve to stabilize the economy
of these areas during the next few years.
Land alienation for agricultural purposes still represents the major interest in
the Vanderhoof and Prince George areas. However, the agricultural economy of
this district is moving toward a beef forage type because of climatic conditions and
the cost of clearing the land. It would seem that the history of farming indicates
that the second or third generations are really the ones to benefit from the efforts
of today's pioneers on such lands.
During the past year the continued demand for Crown land has resulted in
increased land values in the Prince George area, particularly in and adjacent to the
city. The impetus for this interest has been mostly attributable to the rapidly
developing pulp industry. Three pulp-mills are nearing completion in the vicinity
of Prince George, and two additional mills are now in the planning stage at Morfee
Lake, 120 miles north of the city. However, there is a trend toward a levelling off
for residential and industrial values, but this trend may be short-lived due to the
supply and demand factors relative to suitable lands for such uses.
The Smithers District was also divided this year, with new offices being established at Burns Lake and Prince Rupert. A considerable saving in travelling time
will enable a more expeditious handling of land applications in this region. As in
past years, the emphasis in the work load has been on applications for agricultural
development. However, the proposed pulp-mill at Houston and the possible development of a large molybdenum deposit at Smithers together with the expansion of
the Columbia Cellulose pulp-mill plant at Port Edward are encouraging interest in
land for both industrial and home-site use.
Highway No. 16 is rapidly approaching completion as a paved highway between
Prince George and Prince Rupert. This factor, together with the establishment of
a Government ferry run between the north end of Vancouver Island and Prince
Rupert, should do much to encourage further commercial developments of a service
nature to this highway.
In the new Prince Rupert District there is a preponderance of applications for
commercial and industrial waterfront lands and foreshore areas. The majority of
the interest in such lands is local in nature, caused by existing enterprises wishing
to expand or new ones starting. Vehicular access, for the most part, is limited to
just a few roads, resulting in the reliance on boat or aeroplane for access to much of
the district. This imposes very severe restrictions on the ease of examining such
areas. The expanded mining activity in the Stewart area and the projected requirements of Stewart as a future seaport has focused attention on the industrial land in
this region.
In the Quesnel area there has been a very marked decrease in land applications.
This is largely due to the inhibiting influence of both the special sale area requirements and the policy relative to leasing rather than making direct sales. It would
appear that the activity in the Quesnel area should continue at perhaps a reduced
but, nevertheless, steady level.
 DD 30     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
In the Central Southern Interior area the conflict between established rancher
land use and any and all outside interests still presents the greatest problem to land
alienation. There has been an increase in demand for home-sites in the Clinton
area, both in the vicinity of the main highway and on the lakes, the latter for summer
use. The influx of secondary forest industries into the Clinton area should have
a desirable stabilizing effect on the local economy.
There is some reduction in logging activity in the Williams Lake area. Annual
carloadings dropped from 6,000 cars in 1964 to 5,000 cars in 1965 for lumber.
However, 2,200 cars of chips and 674 carloads of veneer were shipped in the same
period. The reduction in lumber output is due to restrictions imposed to curtail
overcutting.
The work load in the Kamloops area has remained static during the past year,
but there is an ever-increasing demand for Crown lands for residential, commercial,
and industrial development. Large areas of land suitable for such purposes are
currently held under grazing lease tenure. Most of these leases were issued many
years ago before the established communities and cities started their post-war
expansion. Grazing lease tenure in many instances no longer represents the highest
and best use of these lands, and care will have to be taken to protect present and
future land requirements as such leases come up for renewal.
The increase in activity noted last year in the Boundary area of the Kelowna
District is continuing. The majority of applications are from people living in the
district.
The new Okanagan Regional College, proposed to be built on Okanagan Lake
opposite Kelowna, is expected to enhance that area and create some demand for
residential lands.
A new type of residential development has been started on flat lands adjacent
to and bordering Okanagan Lake. This development is such that inland water
channels are dredged out to provide water access to all lots. This type of development has occurred in Florida and California, but this is the first such project in
British Columbia.
The two large dam projects in the Kootenays, the Arrow Lakes Dam above
Castlegar on Lower Arrow Lake and the Duncan Lake Dam, are responsible for
a considerable demand for lands in these area. This demand, in turn, has resulted
in an appreciable rise in real-estate values.
In the Castlegar-Nelson area the main road is being rebuilt along the Kootenay
River, a new bridge is under construction above the mouth of the Kootenay River,
the Castlegar Airport is being extended, and a new regional college is now under
construction.
In the East Kootenay the City of Cranbrook is continuing to expand as the
main centre for this region. The beef-cattle industry is thriving, and the importance
of the forest industry is becoming more meaningful. A pulp-mill is under consideration in the Skookumchuck Prairie area, and a large mill expansion is proposed at
Morrisey.
A portion of the Vancouver District was transferred to New Westminster this
year to provide a more equitable division of the work load. The area so transferred
was the Cheakamus Valley-Pemberton Valley area. This area, in turn, accounted
for 37 per cent of the New Westminster District work load. Considerable interest
has been shown in this area in the past two or three years due to the construction
and near completion of the Squamish-Pemberton Highway. The Alta Lake-Green
Lake area is sufficiently high in elevation to provide late fall, winter, and spring snow
conditions. This, together with the fact that the area is only 70 miles from Vancouver, is resulting in the development of a winter playground area.   There is a very
 ^——
■
LANDS BRANCH
DD 31
The birth of a new townsite, Gold River, B.C.
keen interest in ski-cabin sites adjacent to the lakes and rivers which can serve both
for winter and summer use.
The other areas in the Lower Mainland which are showing an increase in
activity and demand for land are Powell River, Sechelt Peninsula, and Harrison
Lake districts. It is anticipated that such trends will continue for the next few
years.
The southern portion of the Courtenay District, being Ranger District No. 2,
was deleted and added to the Victoria District this year. At the same time, Ranger
Districts Nos. 15 and 16, being Port McNeill and Port Hardy, were added to the
Courtenay District. This has resulted in elimination of some of the need for assistance by the Forest Service in doing the work for this Division along the coastal and
north Vancouver Island areas.
The work load on the north end of the Island is continuing to increase, due
mainly to the increase in expansion of the forest industry. A new pulp-mill has been
started at Gold River. A million-dollar hotel and shopping-centre complex has been
built at Tahsis, and public townsites are being developed at Kelsey Bay and Port
 DD 32     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Hardy. The proposed extension of the highway to Port Hardy and the introduction
of the new ferry system from the north end of the Island to Prince Rupert should
encourage further development and increase the demand for Crown land.
STAFF
During the past year several changes were made in the location and employment of field staff. Mr. H. C. R. Gavin was transferred from Smithers to Burns
Lake, effective June 1,1965, to take charge of the newly formed Burns Lake District.
Mr. A. Paulsen was transferred from Kelowna to New Westminster, effective January
1, 1965, and promoted to Land Inspector —- Grade 3. Mr. R. F. Gilmour was
transferred from Quesnel to Kelowna, effective July 1, 1965, and Mr. D. Havard
was employed as Land Inspector—Grade 2 to fill the vacancy at Quesnel, effective
June 1,1965.
Mr. A. F. Smith, former Land Inspector for the Victoria District, was appointed
Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent of Lands, effective April 1, 1965.
Mr. G. H. Wilson was transferred from Vancouver to Victoria, effective June 1,
1965, and the vacancy in the Vancouver District was filled by Mr. H. D. Kent, who
was promoted to a Grade 3 Land Inspector, effective July 29, 1965. Mr. G. A.
Rhoades was appointed Senior Land Inspector in the Prince George office following
Mr. Kent's transfer and promotion to Vancouver.
Mr. Warner was transferred from Pouce Coupe to Prince Rupert, effective
June 1, 1965, to assume charge of the newly formed Prince Rupert District. Similarly, Mr. Lowry was transferred from Fort St. John to Vanderhoof to assume charge
of that district, which was also newly formed this year. Mr. Lowry's transfer was
effective June 1, 1965.
The rapid increase in the work load during the past few years has resulted in
a gradual increase in the number of outstanding inspections at the end of each year.
It therefore became necessary to employ sufficient additional staff to cope with the
work load and reduce the backlog to a manageable level. To this end, 12 men
were taken on staff as Deputy Land Inspectors—Grade 1. The new personnel were
transferred to this Division from the British Columbia Forest Service, where they
had been employed for many years. The experience gained in their former employment has been invaluable to this Division. The personnel involved were Mr. M. H.
Barton, Deputy Land Inspector—Grade 1, assigned to the Prince George office,
effective August 1, 1965; Mr. R. L. Cawston, Deputy Land Inspector—Grade 1,
assigned to the Smithers office, effective August 16, 1965; Mr. P. H. Downs, Deputy
Land Inspector—Grade 1, assigned to the Fort St. John office, effective September
15, 1965; Mr. R. A. Drew, Deputy Land Inspector—Grade 1, assigned to the
Pouce Coupe office, effective August 1, 1965; Mr. N. Elder, Deputy Land Inspector—Grade 1, assigned to the Courtenay office, effective August 16, 1965; Mr.
D. M. Ferrier, Deputy Land Inspector—Grade 1, assigned to the Kamloops office,
effective August 16, 1965; Mr. R. L. Lussier, Deputy Land Inspector—Grade 1,
assigned to the Nelson office, effective August 16, 1965; Mr. J. E. Perdue, Deputy
Land Inspector—Grade 1, assigned to the Williams Lake office, effective August 1,
1965; Mr. E. E. Peterson, Deputy Land Inspector—Grade 1, assigned to the Fort
St. John office, effective August 1, 1965; Mr. W. O. Pistak, Deputy Land Inspector—Grade 1, assigned to the Vanderhoof office, effective August 1, 1965; Mr.
K. G. Stearns, Deputy Land Inspector—Grade 1, assigned to the Burns Lake office,
effective August 1, 1965; and Mr. W. Kalau, Deputy Land Inspector—Grade 1,
assigned to the Vanderhoof office, effective August 1, 1965.
 LANDS BRANCH DD 33
TRAINING
Six Land Inspectors together with the Chief and Assistant Chief Land Inspector are now accredited as appraisers with the Appraisal Institute of Canada. Other
Inspectors who have successfully completed the Appraisal 1 and 2 Courses are now
writing the necessary demonstration appraisals which lead to accreditation.
Twelve Deputy Land Inspectors who were taken on staff this year, together
with six Land Inspectors who had previously been on staff, are now enrolled in the
Appraisal 1 Course, which is sponsored by the Civil Service Commission. This
course involves a home study programme during the winter months followed by two
weeks of lecturing and studying in the last two weeks of March, 1966. Examinations will then be written.
Two Land Inspectors, Mr. H. Gavin and Mr. A. Paulsen, this year completed
the Executive Administration Course sponsored by the Civil Service Commission.
At the present time three Land Inspectors and the Assistant Chief Land Inspector
have completed this course. One Inspector has enrolled in his first year of the course.
A one-week training course was held during September, 1965, for the purpose
of acquainting the new Deputy Inspectors with office and field procedures used by
this Division. The course was well received by the Deputy Inspectors and proved
beneficial.
STATISTICS
Table 1 represents a summary of the number and type of inspections completed
in the Province by this Division during 1965. Table 2 represents a comparison, on
a year-to-year basis, of the volume of field work completed and requests outstanding
at the end of each year for the period 1961 to 1965, inclusive.
Table 3 represents an analysis of requests for inspections processed by this
Division for the years 1961 to 1965, inclusive.
 DD 34     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 1.—Types of Inspections, 1965
Purchases—
Agriculture (other than grazing)  395
Access (roads, etc.)  10
Commercial (resorts, service-stations, hotels, airfields, etc.)  89
Community (cemeteries, church-sites, parking areas, etc.)  30
Grazing (pasture, range)  239
Home-sites (permanent)  409
Industrial (mill-sites, power-sites, manufacturing plants, etc.) 55
Summer-home or camp sites  69
Wood-lots or tree-farms  4
Others   4
Leases—
Land—
Agriculture (other than grazing)  566
Commercial   (resorts, service-stations, hotel, airfields,
etc.)   68
Community (parks, cemeteries, dump-sites, etc)  43
Fur-farming   1
Grazing (pasture, range, hay-cutting, etc)  491
Home-sites (section 78 of the Land Act)  31
Home-sites (permanent, other than section 78 of the
Land Act)   29
Industrial (mill-sites, power-sites, manufacturing plants,
etc.)  32
Summer-home or camp sites  297
Quarrying (sand, gravel, limestone, diatomaceous earth,
etc.)   38
Reviews (rentals and (or) diligent use)  737
Others  4
Foreshore—
Booming and log storage or log-dumping  121
Commercial   (boat   rentals,   marine   service   stations,
wharves, etc.)  65
Industrial (mill-sites, canneries, factory-sites, wharves,
etc.)   14
Quarrying (sand and gravel from river-beds)  4
Oyster and shellfish  16
Private (floats, boat-houses)   15
Reviews (rentals and (or) diligent use)  241
Land-use permits  40
Licence of occupation  34
Easements and (or) rights-of-way  8
Pre-emptions—
Applications  27
Annual inspections (including applications for Crown grant) 111
Subdivisions—
Valuations  21
Survey inspection  2
Plans cancellation  3
Proposals (lake-shore, residential, etc)  17
 LANDS BRANCH
DD 35
Table 1.
Reserves—
Grazing 	
Gravel pits	
Recreational _
-Types of Inspections, 1965—Continued
Others (state purpose).
Veterans' Land Act	
Land Settlement Board—
Classification 	
Valuations	
Doukhobor lands	
Southern Okanagan Lands Project	
Pacific Great Eastern Railway	
Department of Social Welfare	
Other agencies—University Endowment Lands
Miscellaneous inspections—
Assignments	
Delinquent accounts	
Lake reconnaissance	
Land-use surveys	
Revaluations of special nature
Protests 	
Section 53 (2) of Land Act (verifying improvements)	
Section 65 of Land Act (free grants)	
Section 78 of Land Act (re compliance with provisions of)	
Section 130 of Land Act (lands vested in Crown under Taxation Act)
Section 13 1b of Land Act (cases of doubt regarding inclusion
of body of water in Crown grant)	
Trespass (land) 	
Trespass (water) ___
Quieting Titles Act
Others	
3
l
48
12
3
6
7
12
3
4
1
6
2
14
30
17
86
18
444
15
4
23
62
23
40
Total
5,266
 DD 36     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 2.—Analysis of Inspections Completed and Inspections Outstanding at
Year-end for the Years 1961 to 1965, Inclusive
Land Inspection District
Examinations Made During-
Outstanding at End of—
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
,1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
Burns Lake 	
Clinton 	
Courtenay 	
Fort St. John	
234
199
'580
229
198
290
133    i
436
503
195   i
217
287
129   i
389
56
186
187
584
277
160
211
177
512
474
218
290
219
100
457
98
139
212
593
329
166
252
110
513
480
213
279
240
216
421
72
269
283
853
460
202
249
67
450
668   i
282
401
245   i
172
438
19   i
96
.136
235
293
582
482
201
278
242
454
591
67
173
317
250
236
156
530
13
70
41
18
60
8
25
19
1
44
67
24
66
,11
2
68
......   i
16
33
,100   i
22   i
13
42
12
30
73
43
116
19
3
49
48
30
156
78
28 i
43
7
87 I
183
58
279 I
9
17
61
33
29
33
104
75
36
38
36
81
262
56
418
46
li8
58 I
29
151
35
32
230
50
Kelowna  	
26
63
61
Pouce Coupe  	
121
52
85
51
Smithers ..   	
Vancouver _ _ 	
Vanderhoof  —
178
30
35
32
Williams Lake 	
Headquarters 	
B.C. Forest Service and others
33
16
Totals	
4,075   '
4,150
4,235
5,174
5,266
454
571
1,117
1,319
1,281
Note.—These figures include pre-emptions.
Burns Lake, Prince Rupert, and Vanderhoof are new districts this year.
Table 3.—Analysis of Requests for Inspection Processed by Land Inspection
Division for Years 1961 to 1965, Inclusive
District
New Requests Received during—
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
287
247
169
170
249
241
177
202
209
286
292
515
542
629
761
708
222
286
380
452
457
196
147'
179
209
190
306
235
253
244
312
132
188
104
116
267
422
402
466
398
450
501'
455
570
730
457'
.
108
164
220
214
263
162
244
339
442
540
366
282
227
230
282
256
	
	
	
168
128
101
212
176
172
331
434
430
433
19
503
13
85
56
98
105
57
3,952
4,002
4,586
5,263
5,466
Per Cent
Change,
1965 over
1964
Per Cent
Change,
1965 over
1961
Burns Lake	
Clinton	
Courtenay	
Fort St. John_
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Nelson.. 	
New Westminster..
Pouce Coupe.	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert—.	
QuesneL
Smithers	
Vancouver	
Vanderhoof..
Victoria	
Williams Lake_
Headquarters.-
B.C. Forest Service and others.
Totals-
—3
+2
—7
+ 1
—9
4-28
+130
+13
—37
-38
-32
—10
—2
+17
-45
—2
+64
+35
+105
-3
+2
+ 103
+7
—9
—1
+50
-9
+34
+52
-33
Average change for 1965 over 1964 for Province is +3 per cent.
Average change for 1965 over 1961 for Province is +3'8 per cent.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING
BRANCH
 THE   SURVEYS   AND   MAPPING   BRANCH
The framework of maps and surveys so necessary for the orderly development and
settlement of British Columbia is provided through the Surveys and Mapping Branch.
That such scientific foundations were necessary even in the earliest days is shown by the
fact that in 1851 the position of Colonial Surveyor for the young Crown Colony of
Vancouver Island was created. In more than 100 years which have passed since Joseph
Despard Pemberton was appointed first Surveyor-General, British Columbia has expanded
immensely in all spheres of human endeavour. Much of the foundation for the way of
life we have in British Columbia today rests on the reliability of our basic surveys. As
British Columbia has progressed through time, so the surveys and maps of the Province
have increased in magnitude and complexity.
It is the responsibility of the Surveys and Mapping Branch, through the Boundary
Commissioner, to establish and maintain co-operatively the boundaries between this
Province and the other adjacent Provinces and Territories of Canada. Within the Province, the Branch has established and is ever extending a basic network of triangulation
surveys which are fundamental to determining geographical locations and co-ordinating
property boundaries. The surveying procedures vary according to the intended purposes.
Topographic surveys are constantly improving the portrayal of various physical features.
Cadastral (legal) surveys, on the other hand, delineate the parcels of Crown lands subject
to alienation under the Land Act. Finally, it is necessary to show on published maps the
combined survey effort in order to give a visual account of the position of land alienation
and geographic features of British Columbia. Maps must satisfy a wide range of uses,
whether it be by the sportsman searching for an untapped valley or virgin lake, the homesteader seeking unsettled lands, or the industrialist planning new ways and new places to
develop the resources of this Province.
So much for the uses of maps and surveys and their necessity. Also interesting is the
great variety of techniques and equipment which must support our complex surveying and
mapping organization. This includes photography from aircraft using precise cameras
calibrated to less than a thousandth of an inch, modern optical surveyors' theodolites
which read directly to seconds of arc, other instruments such as the tellurometer (a
distance-measuring device which operates on a principal similar to radar), and plotting
devices which are capable of precise mapping directly from aerial photographs. Helicopters and other aircraft speed surveyors to the remotest locations. Surveying is also
expanding into the realm of electronic computers which can process the contents of field-
notes in seconds compared with hours by manual methods. In all these ways, the science
of surveying and mapping continues to serve the people by keeping pace with their needs
and with the continual technological advances of our age.
The following is a brief summary of the functions of the various divisions of the
Surveys and Mapping Branch:—
/. Administration.—General co-ordination of the four divisions of the Branch, being
Legal Surveys, Geographic, Topographic, and Air; delineation and maintenance of
boundaries under the Provincial Boundary Commissioner—namely, (a) Alberta-British
Columbia Boundary and (6) British Columbia-Yukon-Northwest Territories Boundary;
interdepartmental and intergovernmental liaison.
//. Legal Surveys Division.—Regulations for surveys under the various Provincial
Acts, such as Land, Land Registry, Mineral, Petroleum and Natural Gas; instructions to
British Columbia land surveyors regarding surveys of Crown lands and subsequent check
of field-notes and plans of same; preparation and custody of official plans; preparation
and maintenance of Departmental reference maps, mineral reference maps, and composite
(cadastral) maps; processing for status of all applications concerning Crown lands; field
surveys of Crown lands, highway rights-of-way, etc.; preparation of legal descriptions;
operation of blue-print and photostat sections; computational scrutiny of certain land
registry subdivision plans; inspection surveys; restoration surveys.
HI. Geographic Division.—Map compilation, drawing and negative engraving, editing, and reproduction; map checking, distribution, geographical naming—Gazetteer of
British Columbia; field and culture surveys for preparation of land bulletins and maps;
preparation of lep .1 descr'Dtions for and delineation of administrative boundaries; compilation and distribution of annual Lands Service Report; trigonometric computation and
recording of geographic co-ordinates; general liaison between this Department and Federal and other mapping agencies on exchange of survey and mapping data; checking well-
site survey plans under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act.
IV. Topographic Division.—Propagation of field survey control—namely, triangulation, traverses, and photo-topographic control; operation of Beaver float-plane and M.V.
" B.C. Surveyor "; helicopters on charter; compilation and fair drawing of manuscripts
for standard topographic mapping; special field control for composite and photogram-
metric mapping and other special projects; precise mapping from aerial photographs
through the use of the most modern plotting-machines.
V. Air Division.—Aerial photographic operations involving maintenance and operation of three aircraft; photographic processing, air-photo distribution, and Provincial airphoto library; compilation of interim base maps, primarily for the forest inventory;
air-photo control propagation; instrument-shop for the repair, maintenance, and development of technical equipment.
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 DD 40     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
G. S. Andrews, M.B.E., B.Sc.F., P.Eng., B.C.R.F., B.C.L.S., F.R.G.S.,
Surveyor-General and Director
Two of the year's major field projects were, in effect, " crash " programmes,
not having been requested and approved until well after the normal planning stages.
They were thus handicapped by various factors associated with a late start, one of
which was the scarcity of helicopters available on contract, due to an unusually active
season, chiefly in mining and forest protection. Another difficulty was the loss of
weather opportunity in the first half of the season. One of these projects was a twofold topographic programme in the Stikine-Iskut area and the other was a precise
perimeter control structure along the west coast of Vancouver Island, about both of
which further details are given elsewhere in this report. In cases like these, provision
of money to do the job does not necessarily ensure success, which depends so much
on the imponderables of weather and other uncontrollable factors. We acknowledge
that in the case of both projects success was due in part to good luck as well as to
good management, and they focused emphasis on the value of planning and coordination of cost estimates well in advance of the operational season and, indeed,
in advance of budget-making.
With the foregoing in mind, an Interdepartmental Co-ordinating Committee on
Surveys and Mapping was activated during the year at the instigation of the Deputy
Minister of Lands. As the name implies, this Committee aims to ensure that operational programmes of this Branch will most effectively meet the over-all needs of
Government by anticipating requirements of all departments concerned sufficiently
early to utilize the full season, to ensure funds being provided, to avoid duplication,
and to consolidate priorities to aim at the optimum benefit on the broadest possible
basis. This Committee is really a reincarnation of the old Interdepartmental Committee on Air Surveys set up in 1948, but allowed to lapse in succeeding years due
to various preoccupations. The new Committee is broader in scope, and its title
tacitly implies that air-survey photography is indeed an integral part of most surveys
and mapping operations.
An inaugural meeting of the new Committee was held on August 17th, at which
its purpose and terms of reference were clarified. A second meeting followed on
September 16th to finalize, as far as possible, the co-ordination of 1966 requests in
surveys and mapping in anticipation of estimates for the 1966/67 budget. Indications are that the purpose of the Interdepartmental Committee will be realized to
good effect, and that it will reduce to a minimum the incidence of last-minute
"crash" projects with the risk of compromised efficiency and reduced success.
Contrary to the hope expressed in my previous report, the year has ended
without the first " integrated survey area " being proclaimed under provisions of the
Official Surveys Act as amended in 1964. A number of areas are, however, almost
ready for this historic step, their major control networks having been installed, surveyed, adjusted, checked and double checked to the required specifications. Several
other areas are waiting further intensification of the survey control by the local
authorities, the City of Dawson Creek being one. Other areas still require some
residual technical attention; for example, an apparent error in our distance between
primary stations "Kelly" and "Lake," governing control for the Trail-Rossland
area, came to light as a result of preliminary computational adjustments, but too late
in the season for further field checks. This anomaly must be investigated in 1966;
meanwhile final co-ordinate adjustment of the said Trail-Rossland control net must
be held in abeyance.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
DD 41
The difficulty with electronic measurement of distance less than 1 mile, mentioned a year ago, has been effectively solved by the use of a Model 6b geodimeter
(developed in Sweden). This instrument, which resolves lineal differences to within
a few millimetres, utilizes the transmission of light impulses instead of radio waves
between the master station and a reflector placed at the remote end of the line. While
its range is limited to something less than 3 miles in daylight and it requires good
visibility, the ray path is narrow, very selective, and is immune to random reflections
or electronic emanations from power-lines, traffic, etc. The geodimeter is thus ideal
for close work in congested urban and suburban areas. The tellurometer is still
unchallenged for measurement of longer lines, from, say, 2 to over 20 miles, comprising major control structures.
Two of the criteria used to assess the accuracy achieved in co-ordinating an
array of surveyed points in the field is the proportional magnitude of the "closing
error " between initial and terminal control in distance and angle, and the standard
deviation from the mean of the adjustments to individual observed values connecting
adjacent points which make up the scheme. If the over-all closures do not exceed,
say, 1/100,000 for distance and, say, 1 or 2 seconds of arc for azimuth, we feel pretty
good. However, one must also take close scrutiny of the list of corrections to
azimuth and distance for each connecting course in the system to be sure that none
of these exceeds the allowable error. Any and each offending instance must be
thoroughly investigated, including a field check, if necessary. We have learned that
trouble of this sort may arise, not from a significant error in the field observation,
but from certain peculiarities in the use of the computational adjustment programmes. Further experience in application of the new programmes BRIDE and
GROOM, mentioned in my report a year ago, has brought to light two areas of
possible trouble. One is improper relative weighting between angles and distances
due to improper appreciation of each.
Care must be taken to apply weighting of angles versus distances in proportion
to the probable relative accuracy of each type of measurement. These may vary
according to the size and nature of the job. On primary schemes with large unit
figures, that is to say, with long sides, the tellurometer gives remarkably high relative
accuracy for distances, normally between 1/200,000 and 1/500,000, depending on
field conditions. Similar angular precision on such a job may be rare or impossible,
due not to instruments or procedures, but to uncontrollable factors such as visibility,
atmospherics, and the human element (as in adjusting and reading a theodolite
micrometer on a frigid wind-blown mountain-top, eyes watering, fingers numb,
instrument possibly vibrating, etc.). For tellurometer schemes, the weighting of
observed distances in proportion to the weighting of observed bearings (angles)
should increase with the average length of the sides in the scheme, and vice versa.
The other area where sophisticated computing programmes can give impressive
over-all accuracy, but at the same time produce individual intolerable absurdities, is
in the nature of the actual survey structure being treated. The BRIDE and GROOM
programmes are designed to make least-squares adjustments to a consolidated block
of points, all interconnected by observed distances and bearings, which they can do
very efficiently. If a scheme in reality consists of one or more separate expansions
or blocks of points, these blocks being connected with each other and to the terminal
control by what is essentially a simple but circuitous control traverse, it is better,
first, to adjust the main structure of the control traverse on the basis of an orthodox
approach such as the "compass rule" with a programme such as Surmap 13, and
then to employ BRIDE or GROOM separately for each block expansion, holding to
the values obtained for the main route points from Surmap 13.
 DD 42     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
The clarification of these really simple and common-sense features has come
to us poignantly and gradually, by trial and error, during the past year, and accounts
for some of the delay in finalizing results of control operations for survey integration.
The concern of the parachutist that his equipment is in perfect order before the leap
into space is understandable, and has its parallel in our reluctance to push any of
our integrated survey areas " through the hatch " until we are satisfied that the control
data for them are infallible as far as is humanly possible.
In connection with the establishment of a suitable control system for survey
integration to serve the communities in the Okanagan Valley and those north toward
the Salmon Arm region, there had been a complete lack of primary control along
that route. To remedy this situation, a co-operative scheme with the Geodetic Survey
of Canada was successfully completed. Provincial participation was to design and
select a suitable series of stations, prove them, check access and intervisibility, and
install the monuments, then in the latter part of the season a Federal survey party
moved in to carry out the observing programme to Geodetic Survey standards. This
operation was a complete success and a gratifying example of Federal-Provincial
teamwork which, I am pleased to say, is the rule rather than the exception. We now
await the results of this work from Ottawa to enable the final co-ordination of local
control schemes done by this Branch in Penticton and planned for other communities in the near future.
The Geodetic Survey of Canada also carried out a primary control project
north and east from Fort Nelson to connect with an existing chain of the same
category following the route of the Mackenzie Highway in Northern Alberta. This
new " cross member " of survey control will strengthen both the primary network
following down the Alaska Highway from the Yukon and our Provincial secondary
network in North-east British Columbia established some 10 years ago. It is understood at least two of our original stations, " Lesellen " and " Louise," were incorporated in the new first-order structure. This should facilitate correlation and
readjustment of the older secondary net.
Among several items of new legislation affecting surveys, enacted by the
Provincial Legislature at its 1965 Session, an amendment to the Land Act provided,
at long last, for a legal sanctuary around survey control monuments situated on
Crown land, through a new section, 88a, as follows:—■
" 88a. Where any geodetic or survey control monument of the Province is
established on Crown lands, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council may, by notice
signed by the Minister and published in the Gazette, reserve the Crown lands within
a radius of twenty-five feet surrounding any such monument and measured from the
centre of the monument."
The choice of a circular reserve of 25-foot radius, centred on the survey
monument to be protected, eliminates the need for survey in the first instance, as
the control monument itself automatically serves as legal evidence of the location
of the reserve. To give effect to this legislation, preparation of the initial Order in
Council is in hand. Subsequent alienations of Crown land may then contain provision to exclude the control-monument site from the grant or lease. Interference
with or destruction of the monument, or erection of structures over it, will then
constitute trespass, with the legal implications arising therefrom.
Section 102 of the Land Registry Act, as amended in 1965, provides, in subsection (2) thereof, for the consolidation of accreted land adjacent to Crown land
into the title of adjoining lands being subdivided by the simple device of a certificate
on the subdivision plan by the Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources
that the unregistered land is lawfully accreted land.   This is less complicated than
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
DD 43
dealing with small accretions under the Quieting Titles Act when the Crown elects
to concede its title thereto.
Subsection (3) of the above-mentioned amended section 102 provides for the
acceptance by a Registrar of a subdivision plan containing a natural boundary
which may not agree with the purported same natural boundary as shown on a
plan already on record in the Land Registry Office, owing to lack of detail in the
latter plan, by the device of a certification on the new plan by the Minister of
Lands, Forests, and Water Resources that the natural boundary shown thereon is
the true natural boundary. In many cases the older survey, represented by a plan
on deposit in the Land Registry Office, was done in an early period when the importance of a meticulous location of the natural boundary, such as high-water
mark, was not justified due to the then low value of the land being surveyed. The
later survey, being cognizant of modern values of the land, provides a more precise
and detailed location of such a boundary, which obviously should merit legal
acceptance.
An agreement between this Branch and the Army Survey Establishment in
Ottawa has now endured for 18 years whereby the latter agency undertook to print
and supply us with adequate stocks, free of charge, of all map-sheets of the standard
1:50,000 scale National Topographic Series which this Branch itself has completed
up to and including the fairdrawn manuscript form. Normally our part of this
co-operative effort has included the air photography, field control surveys, and
photogrammetric compilation, as well as the fairdrawing of the manuscript sheets
at 1:31,680 or 2-inches-per-mile scale with 100-foot contours. This arrangement
has been a real benefit to the Province and a praiseworthy example of Federal-
Provincial co-operation in the mapping field. The arrangement also recognized
the competence of the Provincial Branch as a mapping agency and the value of its
contribution to the National mapping programme of Canada as a whole. Unfortunately military priorities have, over the years, resulted in the accumulation of
a sizeable backlog of British Columbia sheets waiting in Ottawa for printing under
this arrangement, but it has resulted, nevertheless, in many printed map-sheets
being made available at a significant financial saving. In recent months we have
been advised that, due to high-level policy affecting the operational role of the
Army in the mapping field, this arrangement must soon be terminated, and that
the Army facilities for lithographic map printing will be transferred to and consolidated with those of the Department of Mines and Technical Surveys. Negotiations with the latter Department are therefore in progress with a view to a similar
understanding being set up, and on the basis of the high level of co-operation also
enjoyed with that Department in all survey matters over many years, we are hopeful that these efforts will result in a satisfactory agreement.
As one of only two members from Provincial Governments, the writer's
appointment to the National Advisory Committee on Control Surveys and Mapping,
on the invitation of the Federal Government and with approval of the Honourable
Minister of this Department in January last, was another tribute to the eminence
of this Province in the mapping field, as well as a distinct personal compliment.
An inaugural meeting of the said Committee was held in Ottawa during March,
at which time three sub-committees were set up according to the terms of the
authorizing Order in Council (P.C. 1964-1568), namely:—
(a) Sub-committee on Survey Education and Research.
(b) Sub-committee on Mapping and Control Surveys.
(c) Sub-committee on Aeronautical Charting.
 DD 44     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
The writer was asked to head up and organize Sub-committee (b) on a similar
pattern to that of the parent committee, representative of Government, both Federal
and Provincial, and industry, with due regional considerations. The interval between the second meeting of the main committee in October, again in Ottawa,
afforded sufficient time to recruit a very strong sub-committee and to explore by
correspondence the broad area of concern in time for later plenary meetings in
Ottawa.
The writer feels that the time and effort on this commitment is of much value,
since broad aspects of survey and mapping policy are brought into sharper focus,
thanks to the meeting of minds, so to speak, of a select and authoritative group of
leaders in the field. According to the ancient dictum, " Walk with the wise and
ye become wise," he has gained much personal benefit, with the likelihood that it
may be shed on his official responsibilities at home in British Columbia.
While attending the Ottawa meetings, the opportunity was taken to execute
several other items of Provincial business. For example, in March it was possible
to attend the annual joint meeting of the American Society of Photogrammetry and
the American Congress of Surveying and Mapping in Washington, prior to the
Ottawa meetings, for only the extra travel between Ottawa and Washington. It
was also possible, during the week of October, to attend meetings of the Canadian
Council on Cadastral Surveys and the Conference of Federal and Provincial Survey
Officers in Ottawa.
My past reports have stressed the importance of the human factor in the
quality, volume, and usefulness of the output of this Branch. This emphasis bears
repetition. Our complex and varied operations, and the extent to which they fulfil
the required type and magnitude of service to the Province, depend no less on flesh,
blood, brains, and spirit than upon the spectacular array of modern technological
equipment and processes at our disposal. The psychological and physiological
metabolism of human response in our staff is no less important than complex
circuitry in black boxes crammed with transistors, micron-splitting resolution of
instrumental optics, the mysteries of occult dials and knobs, the scintillating consoles of electronic data processors, and the alchemy of photochemical and lithographic processes. However impressive this fantastic technological array may be,
it is naught without the complement of human skills, judgment, and spirit embodied
in an adequate and inspired staff.
Past recommendations for additional staff resulted in a AVi -per-cent increase
in total authorized Branch establishment during the year, being eight new bodies.
The modest gain, for which we, however, are grateful, was unfortunately offset
appreciably by an abnormal total of separations during the year, involving a heavy
proportion of skilled and experienced staff. A total of 19 separations, being 10
per cent of total staff, was sustained, of which 2 were retirements on superannuation,
13 went to other (apparently more attractive) employment, and 4 were for personal
reasons, such as health, education, or change of domicile. The same total included
5 people of senior or supervisory status, 12 skilled journeymen, and 2 juniors.
Considering the difficulties of recruitment and training to effectively fill these vacancies, we suffered grievous loss of highly productive personnel, which adds substance
to our pleas for better classifications of many of the positions in our organization,
whereby not only would there be less cause to look to greener fields afar, but there
would be better incentive for promotion within the Branch; otherwise we become
simply a training organization for specialized skills, and as such cannot fulfil the
services expected of us, either in quality or in volume.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH DD 45
One of the superannuants was Mr. F. W. Rich, Draughtsman 4, who joined
the Branch in 1948 as a supervising draughtsman in the Topographic Division. In
1953 he transferred to the Air Division. His outstanding artistic skills were much
appreciated and used to good effect in many special assignments, including two
temporary attachments to the Fraser River Board in connection with the preparation of its preliminary and final reports.
The other superannuant was Mr. C. R. W. Leak, B.C.L.S., D.L.S., from the
position of Land Surveyor 2, with the Legal Surveys Division. Having obtained
his D.L.S. in 1931, Mr. Leak joined the Topographic Division in 1944 after returning from service with the Royal Canadian Engineers overseas. In 1951 he obtained
his British Columbia land surveyor's commission, and in 1953 transferred to the
Legal Surveys Division. Mr. Leak exercised the option of voluntary retirement
prior to the maximum statutory age.
The usual statistical and factual record of the year's operations is reported by
each of the Branch's four divisions in following pages, a synoptic summary of
which is given by the Deputy Minister in preceding pages. In this part, therefore,
a few special aspects of Branch activities have been discussed. More topics could
have been included had there been no limit on space, time, and the patience of the
reader.
I repeat, with sustained sincerity, my annual expression of appreciation and
acknowledgment of the high level of staff performance and loyalty, the agreeable
and effective co-operation with other segments of the Lands Service, the Department,
other Provincial and Federal Government agencies, the land-surveying profession,
industry, and the thousands of individual citizens with whom we have done business
during the past year. I also gratefully acknowledge, on behalf of myself and the
staff, the support and interest of the higher administration in the Department and
in the Government generally.
 DD 46     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
LEGAL SURVEYS DIVISION
D. Pearmain, Chief
The Legal Surveys Division, under the direction of the Surveyor-General, is
responsible for cadastral surveys of all Crown lands of the Province. This entails
the issuing of instructions to the land surveyors engaged to make each survey and
supplying them with copies of the field-notes and plans of adjoining or adjacent
surveys. After the completion of the survey, the returns are forwarded to this office
for checking and plotting. Included in the above returns are all right-of-way surveys, including those for highways, railways, and transmission-lines. During the
year 1,139 sets of the above instructions were issued, which is a decrease of 60
from 1964.
During the year 565 sets of field-notes or survey plans covering the surveys of
860 lots were received in this office and duly indexed, checked, plotted, and official
plans prepared therefrom. Of the above-mentioned surveys, 760 were made under
the Land Act and 100 under the Mineral Act. At the present time there are approximately 99,145 sets of field-notes on record in our vaults.
There were 543 plans received from land surveyors covering subdivision and
rights-of-way surveys which were made under the Land Registry Act. These were
duly indexed and checked, and certified copies deposited in the respective Land
Registry Offices.
In order that a graphic record may be kept of alienations of both surveyed and
unsurveyed Crown lands together with reserves, a set of 245 reference maps, covering the whole of the Province, must be maintained. These show all cadastral surveys which are on file in the Department, and are kept up to date by adding new
information as it accrues from day to day. Prints are available to the public (see
Indexes 1 to 7 in the envelope attached to the back cover of this Annual Report).
All applications to purchase or lease Crown lands or foreshore which are received by the Lands Branch and all applications to purchase Crown timber received
by the Forest Service are channelled through this Division for clearance. The
orderly processing of these applications requires that an exhaustive status be made
from the reference maps, official plans, and Land Registry Office plans. From the
reference maps, together with other information and facilities maintained by this
Division, it is possible to give an up-to-the-minute status of any parcel of Crown
land in the Province.
It was necessary during the year, for status and compilation purposes, to obtain
5,270 plans from the various Land Registry Offices.
This Division co-operates with the other departments of Government by preparing and checking legal descriptions which they require. Those assisted in this
way were the Attorney-General's Department (descriptions of Small Debts Courts),
the Department of Agriculture (descriptions of disease-free areas and pound districts), the Department of Municipal Affairs (descriptions for the incorporation or
amendment of municipal areas), the Forest Service (descriptions of tree-farm
licences and working circles), and the Lands Branch (descriptions for gazetted
reserves, etc.). During the year 150 of the above descriptions were prepared, and
this entailed 507 man-hours.
REPRODUCTION SECTION
The Legal Surveys Division, through this Section, continues to supply a service to all departments of Government and to the public, as well as supplying all the
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH DD 47
prints and photostats, etc., required by the Surveys and Mapping Branch. The
total number of prints made during the year was 323,604, in the preparation of
which 231,040 yards or 131.3 miles of paper and linen were used. The number
of photostats, films, and autopositives made was 151,105.
Of the 323,604 prints made, 66,029 were for the Surveys and Mapping Branch,
66,704 for other branches of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, 173,468 for other departments of Government, and 17,403 for the public.
Likewise, of the 151,105 photostats, films, etc., made, 40,041 were for the Surveys
and Mapping Branch, 94,923 for other branches of the Department, 13,691 for
other departments of Government, and 2,450 for the public.
The multilith machine turned out 284,580 copies during the year.
COMPOSITE MAP SECTION
This Section is responsible for the compilation and fairdrawing of composite
maps, mostly at a scale of 500 feet to 1 inch, of the more densely subdivided areas
of the Province and especially where they occur in unorganized territory (see Index 3
inside back cover).
During the year no composite mapping was done; instead this Section was
given the responsibility of recompiling and renewing reference maps which, through
constant use, had become very worn and dirty. In certain cases the scale of the
new maps has been changed from 1 inch to 1 mile to 1 inch to one-half mile.
A series of reference maps, 31 in number, covering the area between Vancouver
and Hope on a scale of 1 inch to one-quarter mile was completed.
The total number of reference maps recompiled and redrawn during the year
was 50.
LAND EXAMINATION PLANS SECTION
This Section is responsible for the preparation of plans for the use of the Land
Inspectors in their examination of applications for Crown lands. These plans are
a consolidation of all the information available in this Department and pertinent to
the applications requiring inspection. A synopsis of the work accomplished by this
Section during the past six years is as follows:—
Year Plans Prepared Year Plans Prepared
1960 2,609      1963  2,944
1961  2,660       1964  2,827
1962 2,941      1965  2,212
LAND REGISTRY OFFICE PLAN CHECKING SECTION
This Section supplies a service to the Land Registry Offices at Victoria, Kamloops, Nelson, and Prince Rupert by giving a thorough mathematical check to plans
tendered for deposit in the said offices. On December 1st a start was made on a
two-month trial basis to supply this service to the Land Registry Office at Vancouver.
This mathematical check is accomplished through the use of the electronic
computer which is available to the Division.
During the year 2,436 plans received this check, as compared with 2,216 in
1964 and 1,558 in 1963.
GENERAL
The receiving and distribution of survey-posts, which are stored at 859 Devonshire Road, has operated smoothly and efficiently. The following synopsis shows
the quantities of posts shipped during the past year and to whom:—
 DD 48     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Standard
Pipe
Driveable
Pipe
Standard
Rock
B.C.L.S.
Bars
95
70
660
381
722
4,308
157
63
919
125
3,061
925
Totals 	
825
5,411
1,139
4,111
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING
No new programmes were written during 1965. The greater part of the year
was spent in rewriting existing programmes for the 1620 Model II computer which
was installed in October. The conversions have expanded the scope of the programmes at the same time as increasing speed by a factor of three to five. The new
computer uses disk storage instead of cards for the storage of programmes and intermediate results, and output is printed on an on-line printer instead of being punched
on cards which subsequently had to be interpreted.
In addition to the programme conversion, a good deal of experimentation has
been carried out with computing methods, and as a result a number of changes and
improvements were made to the programmes at the time of conversion.
At the end of the year the following converted programmes were operational:—
SMI 13:  Traverse and Plan Check Programme—used by all divisions of the
Surveys and Mapping Branch and the Department of Highways.
SMI 19:   Field Survey Programme—used by the Legal Surveys Division and
the Water Resources Service.
SMI20:  Hydraulic Cross Section Programme—used by the Water Resources
Service.
SMI22:  Level Network Adjustment—used by the Topographic Division and
the Water Resources Service.
SMI25:   Conversion between Geographical and Polyconic Rectangular Coordinates—used by all divisions and the Water Resources Service.
SM117, 217, 317: Aerotriangulation Strip Adjustment Programmes-—used by
the Photogrammetric Section.
SM131 ("BRIDE"):   Traverse Network Adjustment Programme—used by
the Geographic Division in connection with integrated surveys and by the
Water Resources Service.
The conversions of " GROOM "—Triangulation Adjustment Programme—and
Aerotriangulation Block Adjustment Programmes are in progress.    These programmes were obtained from Ottawa, and their conversion is made more difficult
due to our unfamiliarity with the exact method of operation.   These programmes,
and a few other minor programmes yet to be converted, are still usable, in their
original forms, on the new computer.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
DD 49
Summary of Office Work for the Years 1964 and 1965,
Legal Surveys Division
Number of field-books received
,, lots surveyed	
„        lots plotted	
„        lots gazetted	
„        lots cancelled .___	
„        lots amended	
mineral-claim field-books prepared _...
reference maps compiled or renewed _
applications for purchase cleared	
applications for pre-emption cleared..
applications for lease cleared	
water licences cleared	
timber sales cleared	
Crown-grant applications cleared	
cancellations made	
inquiries cleared	
letters received and dealt with	
land-examination plans
Crown-grant and lease tracings made _
miscellaneous tracings made	
photostats made	
blueprints made	
offset prints made	
FIELD WORK
1964
660
910
646
712
14
223
47
4
2,938
104
3,703
238
5,329
1,224
4,170
1,499
6,369
2,827
5,623
137,515
249,678
280,670
1965
565
860
735
648
11
212
70
50
2,025
67
4,138
132
3,910
1,146
3,361
1,454
6,423
2,212
5,557
7
151,105
323,604
284,580
Subdivisions of Crown Land
An addition to the Hart Lake townsite created 46 more town lots there as well
as a new school-site. In the Nechako Improvement District a subdivision of 56
town lots was made, and at Chetwynd an additional 117 lots were laid out. Single
lots were surveyed at Prince George, Kamloops, and at the University of British
Columbia for various purposes. A total of 142 lake-front home-site lease lots was
created, being made up of 12 at Greeny Lake near Lac la Hache, 11 at Bednesti
Lake, 13 at Big Fish Lake near Brisco, 15 at Jewell Lake in the Boundary country,
5 at Peachland to cover some existing cabins formerly in a park reserve, with the
balance of 86 in a large subdivision on Village Bay Lake on Quadra Island.
Rural roadsite subdivisions produced 13 home-sites near Williams Lake, 19 on
the Beatton River Road, 3 at Clinton, 13 at Creston, 22 at Ryder Lake near Chilliwack, 19 at Sechelt, 8 at Port Hardy, and 9 at Port Edward. Two ski-cabin subdivisions were made; the larger one of 34 sites for individual leases was on Apex
Mountain and the other of 17 larger sites for club use was at Garibaldi. One acreage
unit near Golden completed this work.
Land Settlement Board Lands
Continuing work was done on subdivision of lands in areas occupied by the
Doukhobor people. At Krestova, the last large unsubdivided area, a total of 114
parcels, was surveyed, mostly to contain existing dwellings and gardens with some
extra parcels for new occupation.   At Ootishenia a compact subdivision of lots of
 DD 50     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
town size was surveyed on the bank of the Columbia River to provide 59 more
building-sites in that area.
Park Sites and Reserves
A marine park of 59 acres on De Courcy Island, an area of 55 acres fronting
the Island Highway at Nanoose Bay, one of 23 acres on the Northern Trans-
Provincial Highway at Hazelton, and the old established Bromley Park of 353 acres
on the Similkameen River were surveyed. A large block of land on the Forbidden
Plateau was cut out to provide a wilderness and winter sport area, and to facilitate
this transfer a comparable large block was surveyed in the Campbell River area.
Public reserves of various types were surveyed at Monte Lake, Bednesti Lake, Prince
George, and Alexandria, and a cemetery-site at Elko was included.
Forest Service Roads and Sites
At Port Hardy, 5 miles of road was surveyed through a very old area with
complicated ownership pattern. This presented an opportunity to carry out some
very useful cancellation of old unused survey lines and general tidying up of the
survey picture in that area. The resultant plan, of considerable extent, will be very
useful for future surveys. A survey of a Ranger station site was carried out at
Penticton.
Reposting and Restoration
In Telkwa and New Hazelton 51 block corners were re-established, with 22 at
Beaverly and a smaller number in Topley, Perow, and Prince George. At Sooke
four district lots were resurveyed in a continuing programme in that area, and a
similar single district lot at Wellington was also resurveyed. Work begun at China
Gulch on the Fraser River near Big Bar last year was carried to completion, and a
substantial error in the old cadastral surveys in that area is now clarified. This large
restoration was tied into the Provincial triangulation system. Several sections were
reposted at Kamloops in connection with the new vocational-school site. Smaller
jobs in connection with a Forest Service nursery-site at Rawleigh, north of Kamloops,
and various parking-lots in the Victoria government precinct area were accomplished.
Highways
South of Merritt a 16.75-mile section of the road to Princeton was surveyed.
On the Southern Trans-Canada Highway near Hedley 7.9 miles was completed with
another 5.3 miles in the Richter Pass area. It was possible to tie this latter section
to the Provincial triangulation network. On the Northern Trans-Provincial Highway
10.8 miles in the Topley-Perow area and another 7.3 miles made up of four small
sections west to Hazelton were completed. Some very bad areas for survey were
encountered where the time taken up in restoration of old obliterated corners was
out of all proportion to the time expended in surveying the centre fine of the road
ahead. The restoration of old corners by Highway Surveys continues to be the
major effort in this direction.
Inspections and Miscellaneous
Inspection surveys were made in the vicinity of Penticton, Pender Harbour, and
Peachland, the results of which proved the necessity for the surveys. A survey to
close and transfer a part of old highway was made at Princeton where a sizeable
encroachment was encountered.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
DD 51
TOPOGRAPHIC DIVISION
A. G. Slocomb, B.C.L.S., Chief
Highlights of this past year's field season was the satisfactory completion of
two special survey projects despite the fact that they were not started until July.
The larger of the two, a combination of several requests, in the Iskut-Stikine River
area, commenced on July 7th, while the other, on the west coast of Vancouver Island,
was delayed until July 31st.
For the Iskut-Stikine area a three-month helicopter contract was arranged with
Foothills Aviation Ltd., of Calgary, for a Bell 47G3 Bl machine, which allowed 260
flying-hours. From past experience in this vicinity during 1951, it was expected
there would be difficulty in flying that number of hours because of the normal cloudy
weather that usually develops during August. This year good flying weather was
encountered; the crews flew 160 hours during the first 30 days, completed the contract in two months, and the whole job 10 days later. Control was obtained for IV2
National Topographic Series 1:50,000 scale map-sheets, which more than doubled
the original request from the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources for a
minimum of six half-sheets (see Fig. 1). In addition, all of the pondage control
required by the Water Resources Service was obtained, and sufficient vertical control to accurately map proposed dam-sites. Using the volume of work as a yardstick, it was the most successful operation completed by this Division over the past
decade.
However, it has been said that any large helicopter-equipped survey such as
this operates from crisis to crisis, and indeed this one had its problems. Working in
remote areas always means long-distance hauling, and our two 3-ton trucks, of
Cinder cone on plateau north of Edziza Peak, Stikine River area.
 DD 52     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
GEODETIC  TRIANGULATION ®
PROVINCIAL  TRIANGULATION    A
TELLUROMETER     STATIONS     •
Fig. 1.
1954—55 vintage, were taxed to the limit; consequently there were several breakdowns which almost caused a gasoline famine.
The Otter aircraft was operational in its first season in spite of various technical
problems, some of which were not solved satisfactorily until the return to Victoria
on completion of the survey.
Part of the control obtained was for large-scale maps of proposed dam-sites,
and in this connection a crew from the International Power and Engineering Consultants Ltd. (IPEC) were in the area at the same time investigating all these sites.
They boarded at our survey camp, but had their own helicopter and truck.
The second special project was the result of exploratory offshore investigations
by the petroleum industry. The industry had made its own surveys, basing the work
on a combination of Hydrographic and Provincial triangulation stations. These two
systems, designed for different purposes, and not of the same order of accuracy,
never having been co-ordinated, were thus unsuitable, as their results showed.
A request by the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources for the establishment of a uniform west coast triangulation was made to the Minister of Lands,
Forests, and Water Resources and approved.
A proposed second-order tellurometer traverse between Geodetic Stations
"Tzartus" in Barkley Sound and "Shushartie" at the northern end of Vancouver
Island was laid out in the office with the express purpose of tying together as many
of the existing networks as possible along the way.   Helicopter was to be the mode
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH DD 53
of transport, involving a machine available from Shell Canada Ltd., augmented by
other machines in the vicinity on a day-by-day basis as they became available.
The crew was hastily assembled from other projects and organized at Tofino on
July 31st. Difficulty was immediately experienced in obtaining a helicopter. The
Shell machine, attempting to do two jobs, suffered a minor breakdown, and all the
other machines were commandeered by the Forest Service to fight fires on the east
coast of the Island and the Mainland. Fog and low clouds on the west coast interfered continually for the first two weeks. During this period a Deep V Hull offshore
cruiser, 20 feet long with an 8-foot beam and an inboard-outboard motor capable
of speeds up to 30 knots, supplied excellent service. Its seaworthiness was adequately tested under typical Pacific Ocean west coast conditions, and proved ideal
for moving three-man crews to fly camps.
On August 17th a one-month charter of a Hiller helicopter was obtained from
Spartan Air Services Ltd., of Calgary, and that machine completed the survey. The
west coast of Vancouver Island is most unsuitable for helicopter operation where
landing-sites on the ridges or tops are required. In all cases a landing-site had to be
cleared, and many were marginal, depending entirely on wind direction.
Of the 44 stations co-ordinated, four, including the two terminals, were Geodetic, nine were Provincial triangulation, six were Hydrographic Survey of Canada
stations, and three were Shell Canada's positions. The remainder were the intermediate stations necessary to carry the traverse through, some of which were
designed to be useful to the Shell personnel or other operators in their future exploration surveys.
There were five separate integrated surveys worked on during the year. The
largest, in the Trail area, comprised the Cities of Trail and Rossland, the Villages of
Warfield and Montrose, and the Municipality of Tadanac adjacent to the smelter-site
at the City of Trail. Under direction of the Department, a local British Columbia
land surveyor laid out the control pattern, enabling the local authorities to install the
monuments. A total of 55 monuments was set in Trail, Tadanac, and Warfield, nine
in the City of Rossland, and four in the Village of Montrose. In addition, our survey
crew set four on the highway between Trail and Montrose and three between War-
field and Rossland. A total of 73 monuments was co-ordinated in the area plus 13
third-order and four second-order triangulation stations. Elevations were carried
by spirit level, and in this regard the hilly nature of the Trail area presented some
problems, and great care had to be taken with the elevations and instrument heights
because in some instances the slopes were up to 20 degrees. The smoke problem of
the area caused by the Trail smelter and the chemical plant at Warfield bothered the
observers continually. Mention should be made of the fact that it was in this area
we used our new Model 6B geodimeter for the first time, finding it excellent on the
short distances it was used for and exactly as claimed by the makers. Following
its use in Trail, it was shipped to the New Westminster area, where it performed
equally well.
The City of Penticton installed 53 monuments following a visit by a member of
this Division earlier in the season. They were co-ordinated and tied into the main
triangulation during August. Elevations were run by spirit levels, directions read
by Wild T2 theodolites, and the distances measured by tellurometer M.R.A. 3's.
One short distance was measured later with the geodimeter.
The City of Kimberley installed 25 monuments and the Village of Marysville
11 following a visit by a staff surveyor, who then co-ordinated both into the new
10-station network he had brought through from a geodetic base in the Cranbrook
area earlier in the season.   He then moved to the New Westminster district and co-
 DD 54    DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
ordinated 95 monuments previously established by the city. Most of the distances
measured here were done by the Model 6B geodimeter.
A site plan for 32 monuments was prepared for the City of Kelowna, and these
monuments should be in place and ready for our next field season.
Following correspondence with the Geodetic Survey of Canada, a request was
made by this Branch for the completion of a 125-mile link through the Okanagan
Valley from Vernon to Osoyoos, offering to co-operate in any way possible and
suggesting doing the preliminary location of such a link. This offer was accepted
following a field reconnaissance by a Federal representative. The original plan was
amended slightly following this visit, and two ties were added to include a radio-
telescope site at White Lake and the Queen Elizabeth Observatory on Mount Kobau.
Twenty-three stations were finally set and made ready for the observing crew of the
Geodetic Survey of Canada, which completed the work later in the year.
Our crew also established four second-order stations from this new geodetic
net for the City of Penticton integrated survey.
The fifth crew did the smaller jobs, including five site plans, at Nelson, Burnaby,
and in the vicinity of Victoria for the Public Works Department, a mapping job for
the Regional Planning Board in the Colwood-Langford district, and additional work
for the Forest Service for the Chilcotin Forest access road. This crew also worked
on the Southern Vancouver Island map-revision programme before joining up with
the west coast of Vancouver Island project and forming the nucleus of that party.
Four National Topographic Series map-sheets, totalling approximately 1,417
square miles, were compiled in the Photogrammetric Section. In addition, 17 cross
flight strips were bridged and 11 map-sheets were readied for mapping with the new
pantograph attachment to the multiplex, ordered but as yet not received. There were
12 large-scale projects ranging in scale from 50 to 1,320 feet to 1 inch, including
reconnaissance and dam-site maps, as well as detailed plans for various projects.
The Draughting Section reports the completion of 31 standard topographic
manuscripts at the scale of 2 inches to 1 mile and 139 large-scale mapping plans at
various scales. In addition, the plotting of the cadastral survey on 101 Federal
Government 1:50,000 manuscripts was completed. Fourteen mosaics were assembled and distributed to the various departments requesting them.
The Federal Government now has 101 of our 1: 50,000 scale manuscripts on
hand for printing, which are in various stages of reproduction.
Copies of the photogrammetric large-scale mapping and the completed manuscripts listed following this report are available upon request (see Indexes 4 and 6
contained in the envelope attached to the back cover of this Annual Report).
 surveys and mapping branch
List of Large-scale Mapping
DD 55
No.
Name
Available
Scale
Contour
Interval
No. of
Sheets
Date
XI
Goldfields 	
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
1"=800', 900',
1,000', 1,320'
1"=200', 600'
1"=1,000'
1"=1,000'
l''=20 ch.
1"=   550'
1"=10 ch.
l"=10ch.
l"=10ch.
1"=1,300'
1"=13 ch.
1"=   100'
1"=1,000'
1"=.   500'
1"=   100'
1"=1,000'
i"= soc
1"=   500'
1"=1,320'
1"=   200"
1"=   200'
1"=   400'
!"=_   4001
1"_=   400'
1" = 1,320'
1"=   400'
1"=   500-
1"=   500'
1"=1,000'
1"=1,320'
1"=   500'
V—   500'
1"=   500'
4"-=l,32ty
1"=1,000'
1"=   500"
1"=1,000'
1"=   50C
V'=   500'
V'=   500'
\"=   500'
l" = 1.0O(Y
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=1.000'
1"=   400'
1"=   200'
v— soc?
1"=1,000'
1"=: 1,000'
1"= 1.000'
1"=   500'
1"=   500"
V'=   500-
1"=   600'
1"=1,000'
1"=   600'
1"=1,320'
1"=   200'
1"=   200'
1"=   500"
1"=2,640'
1"=   500'
l''=l,320'
100
Mosaic
5'-50', then 50'
5'-5C, then 50'
20'
20'
loose
50'
5V
500'
5'
50'
IV-M
5'
50'
1C-20'
20'-40'
50'
5'
Spot heights
5'-10'-25'
5'-10'-25'
Planimetric
50'
20'-100'
20'-40'
2C-40'
50'
50'
2C^t0'
20'-40'
20'^t0'
50'
2C
2C
50"
2C-^0'
W
10'
10"
2C
5MOM5*
20'-^0'
1C
2C
10'
Planimetric
lO^C
20,-4C
2C-40'
2C-40'
2C
W
10'-20'
20'
20'
20'
50'
5'
5'
50'
100'
2C
20"
18
20
C1)
13
1
1
38
8
~6
13
28
73
2
7
1
(2j
11
12
8
6
6
1
1
26
3
48
8
23
11
5
2
7
7
20
8
11
2
4
2
4
5
3
9
16
40
7
3
10
2
8
17
1
10
2
S.P. 1
S.P. 2
1957
S.P. 3
1958
1
1952
2
1951-52
3
1950
4
1951-52'
5
1951
6
1952 53
7
8
Mount Farrow  .
1951
1951 52
9
1952
10
1952
11
1952
13
1953
14
15
1953
16
1953
1953
1953-54
1953^54
17
18
19
Doukhobor Lands—
20
Krestova, Raspberry, etc....
Krestova revision	
1953-54
1963
1953^54
21
1954
24
28
M2
1954-55
M3
1955
M4
1955
M5
1955
M6
1955
M7
1955 56
M8
M9
Upper McGregor River.	
1956
1956—62
Mil
1955
M12
1955
M13
M14
M15
Penticton-Osoyoos 	
Kelowna  __	
1954
1954
1954
M16
1956
M17
1954
M21
1955
M24
M27
1958
M29
1956
M30
1956
M34
1957
M36
1957
M37
1956-57
M38
1956-57
M39
1956-57
(1957)
M39
(1958)
M39
(1960)
M40
Dease-Stikine Dam-sites	
Dease-Stikine Dam-sites	
Chilliwack River _	
1959
1960
1956
M41
1959
M42
1957
M43
Alert Bay	
1956
M44
1958
M45
1958
M52
1959-60
M54
TlijRar
1957
M56
1958
M59
1958
1 One map (5e).
2 See No. 17.
 DD 56     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
List of Large-scale Mapping—Continued
No.
Name
Available
Scale
Contour
Interval
No. of
Sheets
Date
M62
M63
M63A
M66
M67
M68
M70
M73
M73
M74
M75
M76
M77
M83
M84
M88
M88
M89
M89
M90
M90a
M92
M98
M100
M100
M105
M107
M108
Mill
M113
M114
M114
M117
M117
M118
M121
M122
M125
M 126
M127
M129
M130
M131
M134
M135
M136
M138
M139
M141
M141
M142
M144
M145
M146
M146
M150
M150
M151
M152
M155
M160
M161
M162
M163
M164
M165
M165
Alberni 	
Parsnip River Pondage	
Parsnip River Pondage Addition... _ 	
Glen Lake 	
Chemainus River. 	
Hansard Lake	
Courtenay-Comox	
North Okanagan  	
North Okanagan 	
Glinz Lake... 	
Duncan	
Nanaimo _ 	
Prince George 	
Oakalla	
Victoria University, Gordon
Head...... 	
South Okanagan..	
South Okanagan	
North Thompson  	
North Thompson 	
Similkameen. _
Similkameen 	
Skeena River	
Aberdeen-Haddo Lake	
Essondale 	
Essondale 	
Clearwater Lake-Azure Lake
Campbell River _ 	
Kootenay River	
Clearwater River Dam-site.	
Nanaimo 	
Tranquille 	
Tranquille   -
Liard River..... 	
Liard River Dam-site 	
Nitinat 	
Winfield    	
Stuart Lake Pondage	
Port Hardy  	
Thompson River.	
Parksville  	
Aleza Lake  	
McGregor River Pondage	
Long Lake 	
Kamloops Lake 	
Quesnel  	
Haney	
Hobson Lake Extension	
Norbury Creek	
Legislative Precinct, Victoria
Legislative Precinct, Victoria
(under-surface plan)	
Kaleden.  	
Marysville	
KamloopsGovernmentBuild-
ings    	
Brannan Lake School	
Brannan Lake School	
Prince George Gaol	
Prince George Gaol	
Prospect Lake  	
Ruby Burn _ 	
Sechelt.... 	
Ladysmith _ __
Hudson Bay Mountain	
Haney By-pass 	
Slesse Creek Bridge 	
Saanich Garbage Disposal.	
Saltair Gaol Site	
Saltair Gaol Site.-	
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
'=   50C
'=1,32C
= 1,000'
: 400'
= 400'
"'=1,320'
'=1,320'
'=1,000'
'= 500"
'= 200'
'= 500'
'= 500-
'=1,000'
'=     40'
=     40'
'=   500'
= 1,000'
'=   300'
'=   500'
'=   200'
'=   200'
'=   500"
'=   5CC
'=     5C
'=   100'
'=1,000'
'=1,000'
"=   500'
"=   25C
"—   500'
"=     5C
"=   100'
" = 1,000'
"=   500'
"=   500'
"=   500'
"=1,320'
"=   100'
"=   200'
"=   50C
"=     40"
"=1,000'
"=1,320'
"=1,000'
"=   500'
"=   500'
"=1,000'
"=   40O"
"=     40'
"= 40'
"= 50C
"=1,000'
"= 40'
"= IOC
"= 50"
"= 100'
"= SO"
"= 200'
"= 200'
"= 500'
"= 600'
"=1,000'
"= 10C
"= 300'
"= 20C
"= 100'
"=_■ 20C
10'
20'-2,60C, then 50
20'
10'
10'
20'
25'
20'
1C
10'
1C-20'
1C-20'
20'
2'
2'-5*
10'-2C
20'
5'
2C
5'
5'
10'
10'
2'
Spot heights
5C
20'
Planimetric
5'
5'-10'
2'
2'
2C
10'
10'-2C
10'-2C
20'
2'^T
10'-2C
10'
2'
2C
5C-100'
2C
10'
25'
50'
10'
2'
1C
25'-50'
2"
1C
2'
1C-20'
2'-5'
2'
5'
2C
20'
50'
2'-5'
5'-2C
5'
5'
50'
2
98
5
10
4
3
10
48
5
1
25
20
17
4
5
11
5
5
14
15
19
11
4
4
2
6
5
12
4
8
2
3
68
7
7
4
9
4
3
5
1
6
4
4
7
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
22
1
8
24
1
1
1
1
1958
1958, 59,
61, 62, 63
1962
1958
1958
1958
1958
1959
1959
1959
1959
1960
1960-61
1960
1960
1963
1964-65
1960
1960
1961
1965
1962
1960
1962
1962
1962
1961
1961
1961
1963
1962
1962
1962
1962
1962
1961
1962
1962
1962
1965
1962
1962
1962
1962
1963-65
1962
1962
1962
1963
1963
1963
1963
1963
1963
1963
1963
1963
1963
1963
1964
1964
1964
1964
1964
1964
1964
1964
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
List of Large-scale Mapping—Continued
DD 57
No.
Name
Available
Scale
Contour
Interval
No. of
Sheets
Date
M 168
Peace River Pondage (Find-
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
1"=1,32C
1"=1,00C
1"=   2CC
1"=   SOC
V-   100'
1"=   20C
l"=l,0OC
1"=   200'
1"=1,32C
1"=   200'
1"=   400'
1"=   20C
1"=   200'
1"=   200'
1"=1,000'
1"=     2C
1"=     2C
1"=     20'
25'-2,5O0', then 50'
25'-5C
5'
10'
5'
10'
50'
5' and spot heights
10C
5' and spot heights
50'
5'
5'
2'
2'-5'
2'
31
2
2
1
9
5
4
2
3
1
1
2
5
1
1965
M 170
1965
M171
M171
Black Tusk Meadows 	
1965
1965
M172
1965
M172
1965
M 173
1965
M 175
M 176
Shuswap Canal Diversion.
1965
M 178
1965
M179
1965
M 180
M181
M182
M 182
Nematode  	
Stikine-lskut Dam-sites	
1965
Government House Grounds.
Victoria University Campus...
1959
-      —
1960
1963
British Columbia Topographic Surveys Showing Dates of Field Work
Manuscripts complete except as follows:—
* Field work not complete, photo identification of shoreline stations only.
t Field work completed, no manuscript available.
% Compilation completed, no manuscript available.
Sheet Date Sheet
82F/3 - 1951, 1960 92E/16 	
82F/4     1944, 1947 92 F/l   	
82 K/ll, W   1952 92 F/2   —
82 K/12     1952 92 F/2, part -	
82 L/7    1958 92 F/3	
82 L/10       1958 92 F/4    	
82M/13       1959 92 F/5 	
83 D/4       ...41959 92 F/6 	
83 D/5   J1959 92 F/7   	
83 D/12   --.1959, 1960 92 F/8  	
83D/13, W   .....41960 92 F/9 _ _	
92B/5      .1937, 1938, 1955 92 F/10 	
92B/5, W       £1963 92 F/l 1 	
92 B/6, W     1955 92 F/12  —
92B/11, W.     1955 92F/13 	
92 B/12  1938, 1955, 1963 92 F/14   _.
92 B/13    1942, 1943, 1951 92 F/15, E., part
92 B/13   -tl963 92 F/16, E., part
92 B/14   1951 92 G/4 	
92 C/8  1937, 1938 92 G/5	
92 C/8       ... fl963 92 G/7, part	
92 C/9   1937, 1938 92 G/10, part	
92C/9, E   _  $1963 92G/11   	
92 C/9, W.      fl963 92 G/12   	
92 C/10      1937, 1938 92 G/13  	
92 C/10        tl965 92 G/14  	
92C/11, E   1938 92H/1    	
92C/11, E   _    fl965 92H/2 	
92C13, E   _   1938 92H/3 	
92C/14... —     1938 92H/4
92C/14, E.              fl965 92 1/12
92 C/15  —    1937, 1938 92 1/13
92C/15  fl965 92 J/4, W.
92C/16   .......1937, 1938, 1942 92 J/15  	
92C/16        tl965 92 J/16 _
92E/1, E.     —.    _    1942 92 K/l, E„ part .
92 E/7, E.          1946 92 K/2, E.
92E/8    __ 1943, 1946 KK/2, W.
92E/9     .1938, 1946, 1947 92 K/3
92E/10        1947 92K/4
92 E/14    1948 92 K/5
Date
   1947
 1942, 1943
 1940, 1942
  -tl965
 1938, 1940, 1941
  — 1942
 1937, 1938, 1943
1937, 1940, 1941, 1943
  1942, 1943
 1942, 1943. 1950
    1950
  1950, 1953
  1934, 1935
 1936, 1937, 1938
 1935, 1936
  1935
  - .- 1950
  1950
  1942, 1943
 1950, 1952
  1940
  1940
  ._ 1952
  .1950, 1952
 1950, 1952
  — 1952
 1920, 1923, 1950
 1923, 1949
1924, 1931, 1948, 1949
1948, 1956
  1958
 — 1958
 *1962
1948, 1949
1948, 1949
1950
*1962
tl961
1949
1949
1949
 DD 58     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
British Columbia Topographic Surveys Showing Dates of Field Work-
Continued
Sheet
92 K/6 	
92K/7 	
92 K/8, W. _
92 K/10, W. .
92K/11 	
92K/12 	
92K/13 	
92K/14 	
92K/15 	
92L/1   	
92L/2  	
92L/3   	
92 L/4 	
92L/6  	
92 L/7	
92 L/8 	
92 L/10 	
92L/11 	
92L/12	
92L/13   	
92M/2 	
92M/3  	
92M/4  -	
92M/5  	
92 M/6 	
92 M/ll, W.
92M/12  	
92 M/13 	
92 M/14, W. .
92 N/1  	
92 N/7 	
92 N/8  	
92 N/9 	
92 N/10 	
92 N/15 	
92 0/1   	
92 0/2  	
92 0/3 	
92 0/4 	
92 0/5  	
92 0/6	
92 0/7	
92 0/8  	
92 0/9 	
92 0/10	
92 O/ll  	
92 0/12  	
92 0/16	
92P/2 	
92P/3 	
92 P/4	
92P/5 	
92P/6 	
92 P/7	
92 P/10 	
92P/11	
92 P/12 	
92P/13 	
92 P/14  _
92P/15 	
92 P/16  _
93 A/1  	
93 A/2 	
93 A/3 	
93 A/4 	
93 A/5 	
93 A/6 _..
93 A/7 	
93 A/8	
93 A/9 	
93 A/10 	
93 A/11 	
93 A/12 	
93 A/13	
93 A/14	
Date
  1949
 tl961
 *1962
 *1962
 *1962
 *1962
 *1962
 *1962
 "1962
— 1932
 1931, 1932
   1948
  1948
 1931, 1934
  1931
 1931, 1932
-1931, 1940, 1956
  1940
 1935, 1936
 1936
 *1962
  1959
  1959
    1959
 *1962
  .....«1962
 *1962
  "1962
  *1962
   1958
  1958
  1958
   1958
  1958
   1958
   1950
  1947
  1958
   1958
  1958
  1958
 1950, 1958
  1950
  1951
   1958
  1958
  1958
  1951
  1959
  1959
  1958
  1958
  1959
  1959
  1959
    1959
  1958
  1958
  1959
  1959
   1959
  _ .1959
-41936, 1959, 1960
 1959, 1960
   1959
   1935
  1935
.41936, 1959, 1960
 $1959
 $1959, 1960
 $1934, 1960
 1933, 1934
-1931, 1933, 1934
  1934
 1933, 1934
Sheet
93 A/15 	
93 A/16 	
93B/1 	
93 B/6 	
93 B/7  	
93 B/8 	
93 B/9 	
93 B/9, W	
93 B/10 	
93B/11 	
93 B/12	
93 B/13 	
93 B/14 ..._	
93 B/15  —
93 B/16 	
93 B/16, W. ....
93 C/5	
93D/2 ..._
93 D/3 	
93D/4 ..._	
93D/5 	
93 D/6 	
93D/7,  E	
93 D/7, W.	
93 D/8  	
93D/11, E. __
93E/5, W. 	
93 G/2	
93 G/3 	
93 G/4 	
93 G/5	
93 G/6	
93 G/7  	
93 G/10	
93 G/ll	
93 G/12 	
93 G/14	
93 1/8  ._	
93 1/9 .... 	
93 1/10	
93 1/11 _	
93 1/12 	
93 1/13 	
93 1/14 	
93 1/15  	
93 1/16 	
93 J/2 	
93 J/3	
93 J/5	
93 J/6 ..._	
93 J/11 	
93 J/12 _.. _
93 J/13 	
93K/1  	
93K/2	
93K/7 	
93 K/8	
93K/9 	
93 K/10 	
93K/11  	
93 K/12  	
93K/13 	
93K/14 _.
93K/15 	
93K/16  	
93 L/2 	
93 L/7 	
93 L/8 	
93 L/9 	
93 L/10	
93L/11 	
93 L/14 	
93 L/15	
93 L/16 —
93 M/l 	
Date
.41934, 1960
  .I960
  1951
 fl963
 tl963
  1952
  1950
 $1965
- .41963
 tl963
  tl963
 fl963
 tl963
 tl963
  1950
 .1965
—  1959
 *1962
 *1962
_ *1962
 *1962
 *1962
  1958
 *1962
.1958, 1959
 *1962
 »1963
-1933, 1960
  1960
  1960
  1960
  1960
..1933, 1960
  1960
   1960
   1960
  1948
 1956
  1956
  1956
  1957
  1957
 1957
 — 1957
  1956
 1956
 1949
  1949
 .1961
 .1961
 .1961
 .1961
 $1961
  1946
  1946
 .I960
 $1960
 $1960
 $1960
 $1961
 $1961
 $1961
 $1961
 $1961
— $1961
  1951
  1951
  1951
 1951
.1950, 1951
  1950
  1950
 $1962
  $1962
 $1962
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
DD 59
British Columbia Topographic Surveys Showing Dates of Field Work—
Continued
Sheet
93 M/2	
93 M/5 	
93 M/7 	
93 M/8 	
93 M/9 -	
93 M/10 	
93M/11 .	
93 M/12	
93 M/13 	
93 M/14 	
93 M/15 	
93 M/16 	
93 N/1  	
93 N/2 	
93 N/3	
93 N/4 	
93 N/5 	
93 N/6 -	
93 N/7 	
93 N/8  -	
93 N/9 	
93 N/10
93 N/11  	
93 N/12 	
93 0/1	
93 0/4 	
93 0/5	
93 0/6 -
93 0/8  	
93 O/ll  	
93 0/12 	
93 0/13  .......
93 0/14 	
93P/1 	
93 P/2 	
93 P/3 	
93 P/4 	
93 P/5 	
93 P/6  	
93 P/7 	
93 P/8 	
94 B/4 —	
94 C, part._
94D/1  	
94D/2 	
94D/3 	
94D/4 	
94D/5 	
94D/6 	
94D/7 	
94D/8  	
94 E, part ...
94 F, part ...
94 L, part ...
94 M, part...
102 1/8, E. ..
102 1/9 	
102 1/15	
102 1/16  	
102 P/8, E. .
102 P/9, E. .
102 P/16, E.
103 A/1 	
103 A/2, E.
103 A/6, E. .
103 A/7 	
103 A/8  	
103 A/9 	
103 A/10 -
103 A/11
Date
.—41963
  1949
 $1963
—41963
—41963
 tl963
 $1963
  1949
 $1963
—41963
—41963
—41963
 T1962
.....41962
 $1962
— 41962
 $1962
 11962
—41962
 U962
 fl962
 $1962
—41962
 $1962
.  1957
 $1961
 $1961
—- 1957
  1957
  1957
  1957
—- 1957
.  1957
.... 1956
...... 1956
— -. 1957
  1957
— 1957
  1957
  1956
  1956
..1939, 1957
  1939
 $1963
 $1963
 $1963
 $1963
 -41963
 $1963
 $1963
  $1963
  1939
  1939
.1940, 1941
1941
 1935, 1937
..1935, 1936, 1937
1937
103 A/13, E.
.1936, 1937
 $1961
 $1961
 $1961
 $1961
 $1961
 "1963
 *1963
 $1961
 $1961
_ *1963
 *1963
 $1961
Sheet
103 A/14 	
103 A/15 	
103 A/16 	
103 G/l, E. _.
103 G/7, E. -
103 G/8 	
103 G/9 	
103 G/10, E.
103G/15, E.
103G/16 	
103 H/l, W. .
103 H/2	
103 H/3 	
103 H/4	
103 H/5 	
103 H/6 	
103 H/7 	
103 H/8 	
103 H/10 	
103H/15 	
103 1/2 	
103 1/7 	
103 1/10 	
103 P/9 	
103 P/10, E. .
103 P/14, E. .
103 P/15 	
104 A/2, W. .
104 A/3  —	
104 A/5, E. ...
104 A/6 	
104 A/11, W.
104 A/12 	
104 A/13, W.
104 B/13, E. .
104 B/14	
104B/15 -	
104 B/16 	
104 G/l  	
104 G/2  	
104 G/3  	
104 G/4, E. ...
104 G/5, E. ._
104 G/6 	
104 G/7 	
104 G/8	
104 G/9 	
104G/14 	
104G/15  	
104G/16 	
104 H/12, W.
104H/13.W.
104J/2, W. _.
104 J/3 	
104 J/4 —	
104 J/5 	
104 J/12 --	
104 J/13 	
104K/16, E. .
104 N/1 	
104 N/2 	
104 N/3, E. ...
104 N/5 -	
104 N/6 	
Date
 *1963
 *1963
. *1963
 $1961
.-$1961
—41961
 $1961
 $1961
-.41961
 $1961
.—•1963
 *1963
 $1961
.—$1961
 $1961
 $1961
—_*1962
 *1962
 *1962
 *1962
  1949
   1948
..... 1947
  1949
— 1950
. - 1950
  1950
.  1950
  1950
  1950
..... 1950
  1951
  1951
  1951
— $1965
 $1965
 $1965
  1951
  1951
 $1965
.—.$1965
 $1965
 $1965
 $1965
 $1965
 1951
—. 1951
  1951
  1951
  1951
  1951
..... 1951
  1952
 1952
.  1952
 1952
.  1952
...... 1952
104 N/7, W	
104 N/7, E., part
104 N/11, W. 	
104 N/12 	
104 N/13 	
104 P, part 	
104 P/15 	
..1952, 1953
1952, 1953
  1953
  1953
  1952
.1952, 1953
  1953
  1953
  1952
 - 1952
  1952
  1941
  1941
 DD 60     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES i  i
GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION
W. R. Young, B.C.L.S., Chief, and Provincial Representative on
Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names
During 1965 the Geographic Division maintained its emphasis on the preparation and reproduction of maps showing vacant and alienated Crown land.
Nine Provincial land-status maps were prepared and reproduced in 1965, and
these are listed in Table H. Stocks of existing Maps 3a and 93m were replenished,
while a complete road and status revision was undertaken on Map 3e, the boundaries
of which were realigned to incorporate the northward expansion of land alienation
in the Peace River region. During compilation, Sheets 82n, 83d, and 93h were
extended eastward to the Alberta Border to include small portions of adjacent National Topographic units. This resulted in slightly wider, seven-colour first status
editions of Maps 82n-o (Golden), 83d-c (Canoe River), and 93h-83e (McBride).
The first status edition of 82m (Seymour Arm), together with 82n-o and 83d-c,
replaced the Topographical Series Map 5d (Revelstoke-Golden), last published in
1953. Sheet 93h-83e replaced Pre-emptor Map 3h (Tete Jaune), of 1958 vintage,
and in addition filled a gap which existed in both Federal and Provincial coverage at
1:250,000 scale.
New seven-colour contoured sheets at l-inch-to-2-miles scale were 82J/SE-SW
(Canal Flats) and 82L/NE (Revelstoke). They supersede parts of Degree Sheets
4e, 4f, and 4g, which will be completely eliminated by the remaining l-inch-to-2-
miles scale maps currently in production. At the end of 1965 the Geographic Division's inventory of map-sheets showing the status of Crown land stood at 62, of
which 29 were at l-inch-to-2-miles scale, 26 were at 1:250,000, and 7 were Pre-
empor or Land Series at a scale of 1 inch to 3, or 4 miles.
Production of Maps 93a, 93b, 93g, and 93j, currently under way (see Table
J), will provide status coverage at 1:250,000 scale for a very rapidly developing
section of the Central Interior and replace most of the remaining Pre-emptor maps.
Sheet 93g will also fill a gap in both Provincial and Federal map coverage. The
unusually large number of maps in process (14) is partly the result of delays in
waiting for camera and press work. As noted in Table J, no fewer than three map-
sheets were stalled at the proving and printing stage at the end of the year, and had
lost a cumulative total of approximately 23 weeks due to printing delays.
Two new mapping projects were begun. In response to a need for a single
sheet showing roads and topography on Vancouver Island, Topographic Map SGS-1
(Vancouver Island) is being prepared at l-inch-to-6-miles scale. The topography
will be highlighted by contours and relief shading, and selected historical notations
are to be added. Growing public interest in Bowron Lake Provincial Park as a
recreational area has created such a demand for our temporary black-and-white
Ozalid prints of PS-B.2 (Bowron Lake Park) that this contoured sheet is being
redrawn for lithography in three colours at 1-inch-to-1-mile scale. Showing the park
on a single sheet gives better coverage than five National Topographic sheets at
1:50,000 scale.
Several special cartographic projects were successfully completed by the Map
Reproduction Section during 1965. Examples of such work are a new edition of
the British Columbia Air Facilities Chart, 27 strip and area maps for a Travel
Bureau publication, and revision of three Land Series bulletin maps.
The Army Survey Establishment, Ottawa, reprinted, at 1:50,000 scale, 11
Provincial Government topographic maps covering parts of Vancouver Island.   One
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH DD 61
additional sheet of the Kitimat area was issued in revised form. Table I fists these
National Topographic sheets for which stocks were received. Stocks were also
received of 11 maps produced by the Army Survey Establishment during the year.
As shown in Table K, the backlog of Provincial topographic manuscripts waiting
publication at Ottawa continues to grow. At the end of 1965 it reached 104, an
increase of 12 during the year.
The Federal Department of Mines and Technical Surveys printed 26 full-colour
and eight provisional two-colour National Topographic sheets at 1: 50,000 scale and
three at 1:250,000 scale.
A field culture check was made during the early fall in connection with second
status editions of 92H/NW (Yale), 92I/NW (Ashcroft), and 82L/SE (Sugar
Lake) at l-inch-to-2-miles scale.
As shown in Table E, maps issued to Government departments and the general
public numbered 86,755, down slightly from the previous year, but well above the
10-year average of 76,366. There was a sharp rise in the number of map-sheets and
charts checked for place-names. During 1965 a total of 93 sheets was checked,
compared with only 22 in 1964 (see Table D). Publication by Ottawa of the new
Gazetteer of British Columbia is still awaited. The 824 inquiries for place-names
and locations handled during 1965 would have been fewer if the new edition was
available. The situation was further aggravated by the fact that the 1953 Gazetteer
has been out of print for nearly a year.
Four Land Series bulletins were reprinted in 1965. These were Prince Rupert-
Smithers (No. 8), Kamloops (No. 6), Atlin (No. 9), and Peace River (No. 10).
The manuscript for an entirely new edition of the Lower Coast Land Series Bulletin
(No. 3 ) was submitted by the research officer for publication. Following a field trip,
work began on complete revision of the Quesnel-Lillooet Land Series Bulletin (No.
5). The manuscript for Bulletin No. 5 was well in hand by the end of the year.
Early in 1965, as the result of a reallocation of space because of the new
Archives-Museum construction, we were forced to move our bulk map stocks from
the main Parliament Buildings. Room was made available in the Topaz Street
storage vaults, which, while offering a considerable expansion of space, are less
convenient, being nearly 2 miles from the map distribution office.
In January the Supervisor of Map Distribution travelled to Ottawa to consult with Federal agencies concerning production of the Provincial Gazetteer and
Provincial 1:50,000 scale maps. In October the Chief of the Division attended a
meeting in Ottawa of the Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names.
One staff member resigned to return to university, and one transferred to another
department, with two new draughtsmen being obtained as replacements.
The volume of work undertaken by this Division for other departments was
maintained at the high level reached in the previous year. As shown in Table F,
the number of items was substantially the same, the work including legal descriptions, by metes and bounds, for administrative boundary changes to school districts,
polling divisions, vital statistic registration districts, and counties. This Division
was also assigned the huge task of preparing working maps, complete legal descriptions by metes and bounds, and accompanying detail maps for and by the approval
of the Commission of Inquiry into Redefinition of Electoral Districts. This task
will carry over well into 1966.
In the early days of the Trigonometric Control Section, the work consisted
largely of calculating geographic positions for district lot corners, using ties which
had been made to Geodetic or other triangulation stations as base information and
propagating additional positions from the data contained in surveyors' field-notes on
 DD 62     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
file in the Department. However, as time went on the emphasis changed; more
triangulation was established by Provincial survey parties and mapping control
broken down from Geodetic and Provincial main networks began to form quite dense
patterns in various parts of the Province. Thus the Trigonometric Control Section
spent most of its time calculating positions for those stations and making adjustments
by the method of least squares. As this work increased and for plotting purposes,
positions were also calculated in rectangular co-ordinates, so further changes occurred in the methods used for computing. More use was made of desk calculators,
which, in themselves, became more sophisticated, and greater use was made of tables
of natural functions as opposed to logarithmic tables; at the same time, considerable
interest was aroused in the possible use of electronic computers for the work of
the Section.
In October, 1956, the Chief of the Division, with the Supervisor of the Trigonometric Control Section, attended a meeting held at the University of British Columbia
to discuss the acquisition by the university of a computer (ALWAC-3e digital computer) and its various areas of use. This led in time to experimentation regarding
computer programmes suitable for least-square adjustments and solution of traverses,
reductions to sea-level calculations, and transferring geographic positions to rectangular co-ordinates and the reverse.
The above changes went hand in hand with similar changes in field work,
greater use of aircraft of all types, the advent of electronic measuring equipment and
resultant emphasis on long-distance precise traverse, coupled with trilateration in
place of the former triangulation with widely spaced measured base lines.
Parallel with method changes came policy changes, and in the last few years
field staffs have been largely employed in the establishment of fairly dense patterns
of precise control for integrated survey areas, all of which resulted in still greater
use of computer programmes with more complex machines available within the
Government service.
With excellent help and co-operation from the Geodetic staff at Ottawa and
very capable members of the Branch staff, programmes have been developed to cope
satisfactorily with the resulting increase in calculations required, and in 1965 the
Statistical Tables A, B, and C show almost complete change-over to programmed
calculations.
Tables A to K, which follow, summarize the main achievements of the Geographic Division during 1965. A printed Index to Published Maps (Indexes 8 to
14) may be found in the envelope attached to the back cover of this Annual Report.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH DD 63
STATISTICAL COMPUTATIONS
Table A.—Least-square Adjustments by " Groom 'n Completed
Net
Locality
Type of
Bearings
Number of
Triangles or
Traverse Stations Involved
True
True
True
True
True
True
True
True
True
True
True
True
True
True
133
Canadian Hydrographic Service
Provincial 	
Burke Channel and North Bentinck Arm (revision)—
Sheets 93 J, K, L, M, N, and O, 94 C and D
95
105
Provincial 	
Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Islands 	
88
Provincial 	
154
Provincial 	
84
106
12
Provincial  .
36
Provincial	
93
Telegraph Creek to Rocky Mountain Trench (revision)
Williams Lake-Smithers-Bella Coola (revision)	
Provincial
43
Provincial 	
38
i " Groom " is an electronic computer programme for the adjustment of triangulation and (or) trilateration,
which produces geographic positions.
Checking of petroleum and natural-gas well-site surveys totalled 294.
Table B.—Least-square Adjustments by " Bride 'n Completed
Net
Locality
Type of
Bearings
Number of
Traverse Stations Involved
Grid
Grid
60
359
1 " Bride " is a similar electronic computer programme which produces rectangular co-ordinates based on a
polyconic projection.
Table C.—Records
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
Index cards—
1,419
551
30,444   '
349
1,930
149
32,374
333
917
9
33,291
417
781
6
34,072
341
1,475
293
35,547
389
1,693
1,453
37,240
334
Table D.—Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
41
4,949
322
74
7,837
360
35
7,168
215
59
6,821
375
22
6,090
277
93
Number of names checked  	
Number of new names recorded 	
5,854
402
 DD 64     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table E.—Map Stock and Distribution
1968
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
7,065
68,518
175,495
$24,378
9,130
87,198
126,502
$32,936
10,549
99,324
130,420
$35,391
8,700
78,165
116,705
$48,674
10,395
88,322
71,178
$58,469
9,429
86,755
107,741
$56,152
Maps issued to department and public	
Table F.—Geographical Work for Other Departments and Public
I960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
18
$1,370
22
$1,452
18
$1,708
18
$1,729
19
$5,213
20
$4,460
Table G.—Letters
I960    |     1961    1     1962
1 I
1963
1964 1965
Letters received and attended to..
6,929    I    8,670
I
8,790
7,274
469        7,297
Table H.—Maps Prepared and Reproduced by the Geographic Division,
Victoria, during 1965
Map No.
Name
Scale
Remarks
3a
3e
82m
82n-o
83d-c
93H-83E
93m
82 J/SE-SW
!82 L/NE
Fort George-
Peace River...
Seymour Arm (first status edition) .
Golden (first status edition)	
Canoe River (first status edition)—
McBride (first status edition)	
Hazelton (first status edition)	
Canal Flats (first status edition)	
Revelstoke (first status edition)	
1 in. to 3 mi.
I in. to 4 mi.
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:25O,O0O
1: 250,000
1 in. to 2 mi.
1 in. to 2 mi.
Reprint, no revision
Complete revision.
New, seven colours,
New, seven colours,
New, seven colours,
New, seven colours,
Status overprint, no
New, seven colours,
New, seven colours,
contoured.
contoured.
contoured.
contoured.
revision.
contoured.
contoured.
Table I.—Provincial Government Topographic Manuscripts Prepared and Reproduced at 1:50,000 Scale by the Canadian Government, Ottawa, during 1965
Map No.
Name
Map No.
Name
92 F/6, E. & W.
92 F/8, W.
92 F/13, E.
92 F/14, E. & W.
Great Central (second edition reprint)
Parksville (first edition reprint)
Upper Campbell (second edition reprint)
Oyster River (second edition reprint)
92 K/4, E.
92L/1.E. &W.
92 L/2, E. & W.
1031 1/2, E.
Salmon River (first edition reprint)
Schoen Lake (third edition reprint)
Woss Lake (third edition reprint)
Kitimat (first edition revised)
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH DD 65
Table J.—Maps Being Prepared by the Geographic Division, Victoria, during 1965
Map No.
Name
Scale
Remarks
PS-B.2
SGS-1
92p
93a
93b
93e
93o
93'J
93m
82 K/NE
'82 K/NW
82 L/SW
92H/NW
92I/NW
Bowron Lake Park	
Vancouver Island— 	
Bonaparte River (third status edition)..
Quesnel Lake (first status edition)	
Quesnel (first status edition).
Whitesail Lake (second status edition)..
Prince George (first status edition)	
McLeodLake (first status edition)	
Hazelton (second status edition)	
Invermere (first status ecJition)	
Beaton (first status edition)	
Vernon (second status edition)	
Yale (second status edition)	
Ashcroft (second status edition)	
1 in. to 1 mi.
1 in to 6 mi.
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1 in. to 2 mi.
1 in. to 2 mi.
1 in. to 2 mi.
1 In. to 2 mi.
1 in. to 2 mi.
In draughting.
In draughting.
In compilation.
In compilation.
In draughting.
In lithography.
In draughting.
In compilation.
In lithography.
In lithography.
In draughting.
In draughting.
In draughting.
In draughting.
Tabel K.—Provincial Government Topographic Manuscripts Being Prepared at
1:50,000 Scale by the Canadian Government, Ottawa, during 1965
Map No.
Name
Map No.
Name
82 F/3, E. & W.
Salmo (second edition).
931/10, E.&W.
Wapiti Lake (first edition).
82 K/ll, W.
Trout Lake (first edition).
931/11. E.&W.
MonkmanPass (first edition).
82K/12, E. &W.
Beaton (first edition).
931/12, E.&W.
Missinka River (first edition).
82 L/7, E. & W.
Lumby (first edition).
93 1/13, E. & W.
Sentinel Peak (first edition).
82 L/10, E. &W.
Mabel Lake (first edition).
93 1/14, E. & W.
Kinuseo Falls (first edition).
82 M/13, E. & W.
Raft River (first edition).
931/15, E.&W.
Kinuseo Creek (first edition).
921/12, E.&W.
Lillooet (first edition).
93 1/16, E. & W.
Redwillow River (first edition).
92 1/13, E. & W.
Pavilion (first edition).
03O/1.E. &W.
Mount Reynolds (first edition).
92 L/10, E. & W.
Alert Bay (first edition).
93 0/6, E. & W.
Morfee Lakes (first edition).
92 M/3, E. & W.
Belize Inlet (first edition).
03 0/8, E. & W.
Le Moray Creek (first edition).
92 M/4, E. & W.
Cape Caution (first edition).
93 0/11, E. &W.
Cut Thumb Creek (first edition).
92 M/5, E. & W.
Goose Bay (first edition).
93 0/12, E. & W.
Blackwater Creek (first edition).
92N/1, E. &W.
Chilko Mountain (first edition).
93 0/13, E. &W.
Finlay Forks (first edition).
92 N/7, E. & W.
Mount Queen Bess (first edition).
93 0/14, E. & W.
Point Creek (first edition).
92 N/8, E. & W.
Stikelan Creek (first edition).
93P/1.E. &W.
Kiskatinaw River (first edition).
92 N/9, E. & W.
Tatlayoko Lake (first edition).
93 P/2, E. & W.
Flatbed Creek (first edition).
92 N/10, E. & W.
Razorback Mountain (first edition).
93 P/3, E. & W.
Bullmoose Creek (first edition).
92 N/15, E. & W.
Tatla Lake (first edition).
93 P/4, E. & W.
Sukunka River (first edition).
92 P/4, E. & W.
Clinton (first edition).
93 P/5, E. & W.
Burnt River (first edition).
92 P/5, E. & W.
Jesmond (first edition).
93 P/6, E. & W.
Gwillim Lake (first edition).
92 P/12, E. & W.
GustafsenLake (first edition).
93 P/7, E. & W.
Sundown Creek (first edition).
92P/13, E. &W.
Chimney Lake (first edition).
93 P/8, E. & W.
Tupper Creek (first edition).
93 C/5, E. & W.
Atnarko (first edition).
94B/4, E. &W.
Wicked River (first edition).
93 D/7, E.
Bella Coola (first edition).
104K/16, E.
Nahlin River (first edition).
93 D/8, E. & W.
Stuie (first edition).
104 N/1, E.&W.
Nakina Lake (first edition).
93 1/8, E. & W.
Narraway River (first edition).
104 N/2, E. & W.
Nakina (first edition).
93 1/9, E. & W.
Belcourt Creek (first edition).
104 N/3, E.
Sloko River (first edition).
  SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH DD 67
AIR DIVISION
A. C. Kinnear, B.C.R.F., Chief
MAPPING AND COMPILATION
The plotting of control and compilation of survey detail for an area of 15,500
square miles, covering 337 map-sheets at the scale of 1 inch to 20 chains (1:15,840)
and an area of some 22,800 square miles at a scale of 1 inch to 40 chains (1:31,680),
was completed this year. This increase over that reported for the past few years is
due, in part, to the smaller amount of survey control and cadastral surveys that exist
in the areas of current mapping.
Principal-point lay-downs were completed for 352 map-sheets covering approximately 17,000 square miles at a scale of 1 inch to 20 chains (1:15,840) and 94
map-sheets covering some 17,800 square miles at a scale of 1 inch to 40 chains
(1:31,680). Kail plotted sheets showing all planimetric detail for an area of about
11,800 square miles have been completed at the larger scale and are available in
pencil form only.
Map-revision work showing new cadastral surveys, highways, forest access
roads, and detail from more recent air photographs has not progressed very rapidly
due to the amount of more urgently required current mapping.
The number of requests for copies of the fairdrawn interim maps from public
sources and other Government departments still continues at a high rate. Very
little progress can be reported in overcoming the backlog of pencil manuscripts into
final ink tracings mentioned in last year's Report.
Index Maps Nos. 5 and 7, contained in envelope attached to back cover of
this Annual Report, show the availability of all mapping by this Division.
PROCESS LABORATORY
The production record of the laboratory continues to show an increase in each
year-end report. Approval for a small increase in staff and equipment during the
year had a direct bearing on increasing the production of 10- by 10-inch reprints,
from both 5- by 5-inch and 9- by 9-inch negatives, by nearly 20 per cent over last
year and reducing the delivery dates of reprint orders in periods of high demand.
This year's total of 200,686 reprints is an all-time record.
A further increase in the demand for Kelsh A7 and A8 glass plates was noted
from both private sources and the Topographic Division.
Two rolls of Kodak Ektachrome colour film were processed, and the results
were promising. Although the basic cost of colour film is more expensive than
standard panchromatic film, there are probably many research problems which can
economically use aerial colour film.
The Cintel electronic contact printer, reported last year, was in operation for
most of the year, but it is still not producing to the limit of its capabilities. There
are still technical modifications and adjustments to be made before it can be fully
utilized. There is no question that the rate of production of 10- by 10-inch contact
reprints is considerably increased when this piece of equipment is in full working
order.
Production figures for the Process Laboratory will be found at the end of
this report.
 DD 68     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
FLYING OPERATIONS
The weather during the operating season of 1965 was more favourable for air
photography than has been experienced during the past several years. The second
highest ever total of area accomplishment for the Division was recorded this year—
37,200 square miles of both l-inch-to-20-chains and l-inch-to-40-chains photography—and the second highest total number of new air photographs—28,313.
Air photography was taken for 65 projects at the request of 23 different divisions or departments of the Provincial Government. The smallest request was for
three photographs, and the largest required 6,515 photographs. (See Key Maps
Nos. 15 to 18 contained in envelope attached to back cover of this Annual Report.)
This Section lost one of the original members of the Division, A. S. Lukinuk,
Supervisor of Air Operations, during the year through a promotion to another Government department. Mr. Lukinuk's promotion was a distinct loss to the Division,
but the Section he developed was competent to complete the summer's operation
with a minimum of direct supervision.
The new Wild RC8 camera, mentioned in last year's report, was put into service
this summer. This camera has a colour corrected lens which permits either panchromatic film or colour film to be exposed. With the success obtained this year
with one roll of Ektachrome and one roll of infra-red it is intended to do more of
this work on specialized projects in the future.
An A.D.F. (automatic direction finder) unit was installed in one Beech aircraft
(CF-BCD) on an experimental basis, and the results were impressive enough to
proceed with a similar installation in the second Beech (CF-BCE) this coming year.
This limited I.F.R. (instrument flight regulations) capability allowed the detachment
■»■
K|f3?..
-■**,;.   ■.'    •.      '•   ..      •_»."... ..'i""*'".'_»y' '" ■ .
'?yyyyy,:iyk,**',:''';C,ryyyy*M.y;y. 4IHHHE
 ___&* *._ tittff   .i3..g.Qti.rrriMl«til«illHpW^'?- y-ilHilliiil!
fc.-*"': '    %■ •' -/Si*.    '   """ ,
Slotted template lay-down (scale 1:15840). This 10,000-square-mile area requires
6,037 air photographs flown from 20,000 feet above sea-level and is a portion of Forest
Service Chilko Sustained-yield Unit.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH DD 69
to move over areas of restricted visibility into areas of suitable photographic weather.
In many instances in the past a detachment was non-operative due to prohibitive
weather patterns en route to a project.
Several photographic missions during the past summer had a duration of IVx
hours per day. This accomplishment speaks very highly of the Beech aircraft, the
maintenance staff, and the physical stamina of the air crews. The ability and desire
to take advantage of every photographic opportunity are a credit to all personnel
on field operations.
The aircraft-maintenance work was of a general nature only, and no major
modifications were required. Another season of no lost photographic opportunity
due to aircraft unserviceability can be reported again. As has so often been shown
in the past, the personal and systematic servicing of these aircraft pays dividends in
the final photographic accomplishment for the year.
Statistics for Air Operations will be found at the end of this report.
AIR PHOTO LIBRARY
The increased production of reprints from the Process Laboratory, plus the
greater use of the library facilities by the public, has resulted in another busy year
for the staff. A more modern system of handling the administrative detail was
instituted during the year, and the saving of time for the library personnel was visibly
noticeable.
Again this year the sale and loan of air photos to the public has increased, and
the total revenue from this source is nearly $49,000. Mining companies, educational
institutions, and forest industries make up the largest group of users of air photos
from the public.
The Federal Government purchased nearly three times as many air photos as
it used the previous year, with the largest single user being the Department of Agriculture for the ARDA programme. Within the Provincial Government, the Forest
Service was the largest single department using air photos, and it accounted for some
87,000 reprints.
Complete records of Air Photo Library services will be found at the end of this
report.
INSTRUMENT-SHOP
Maintenance and servicing of Division equipment were the main activities of
the shop this past year. It had been hoped to reconstruct a new fixed-focus enlarger
for the older 5-inch air film, but actual work had to be temporarily postponed in
order to keep existing equipment fully operational.
Considerable effort was made in investigating the function of the O.S.C. shutters. These shutters, in the 12-inch cameras, have been in operation for many years
and are continuing to show signs of excessive wear. It is hoped suitable replacement
shutters can be purchased, at reasonable cost, in the near future.
Co-operation continues to be given to other departments for small specialized
servicing problems requiring either our shop equipment or personnel, or both.
 DD 70     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
STATISTICS
Orders for Standard Prints (9 by 9 Inches) From
British Columbia Negatives, 1965
Reprints
Loans
Requisitions
Number
Requisitions
Number
Public-
987
150
291
116
21
90
77
341
4,745
1,281
20,536
11,488
803
2,066
266
11,956
185
55
126
16
1
47
51
173
1,985
1,119
3,447
279
15
978
683
4,527
Totals
2,073
53,141
654
13,033
Federal Government—
Department of Mines and Technical Surveys..	
39
13
49
10
6,273
211
531
7,433
5
7
137
340
625
ARDA
7,636
Totals	
111
14,448
149
8,601
Provincial Government—
Lands Inspection Branch 	
64
217
31
194
61
25
17
19
27
5
18
15
8,316
22,139
3,037
87,376
1,364
6,367
2,081
1,110
437
305
418
147
59
264
69
436
163
41
7
46
13
18
13®
11
468
7,265
1,069
19,094
Department of Highways   	
2,099
1,033
23
715
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority	
118
356
2,167
Miscellaneous -	
175
Totals-  .-	
693
133,097
1,265
34,582
2,877
200,686
2,068
56,216
Public Loans and Reprints
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
13,399
34,659
9,960
28,226
12,568
27,281
16,727
35,385
13,033
53,141
Totals 	
48,058
38,186
39,849
52,112
66,174
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Letters Inward and Loan Requisitions
DD 71
Letters inward—2,843
Loan service requisitions—722
Revenue
Reprints
Loans	
Lands accounts
Total	
$4,913.33
3,075.90
40,985.65
$48,974.88
Production Record to 1965, Process Laboratory
1946-1962
1963
1964
1965
Grand
Total
Processing completed'—
Air Films—
O.S.C. and RC8	
F24 and Eagle III-
F24 obliques	
Test rolls	
Colour fllms-
70-mm. helicopter.
Topographic mountain stations (116)	
K20-F24  (Dominion Hydrographic, H.M.C
Dockyard)
Printing completed—
Standard prints, 5 by 5 inches enlarged to 10
by 10 inches
Contact prints, 5 by 5 inches	
Kenora prints, 9 by 9 inches reduced to 5 by
5 inches	
184
2,798
72
20.5
5.5
1,360
3,834
1,755,357
46,087
Contact prints, 10 by 10 inches..
Contact prints, 20 by 24 inches and larger-
Enlargements up to 40 by 96 inches	
Topographic, 11 by 14 inches..
Lantern slides, 2 by 2 inches and stereo—
Autopositive films up to 40 by 42 inches-
Film transparencies up to 40 by 42 inches	
Kelsh A7, and A8 plates, miscellaneous copy
negatives
Requisitions completed-
87,525
3,499
23,486
22,101
372
7,948
274
3,630
28,176
107
23
1
2
32
49,195
4,132
85,312
229
1,286
194
6
103
366
397
2,373
120
1.5
0.5
1(1)
500
45,173
117,037
30
1,649
95
6
77
379
284
2,854
116
5
1
3
2(2)
8O0
75
56,831
143,855
1
1,554
17
72
80
559
3,047
527
2,826
75.5
26
8.5
2,660
3,941
1,906,556
46,087
4,132
433,729
3,759
27,975
22,407
384
8,200
1,099
4,870
36,450
1 One hundred feet of 70-mm.
2RC8.
 DD 72     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
1965 Air Operations Cost Summary by Projects
PS
p
Accomplishment
o
rt cq
3S
►^ t+H  <->
|
_>>
E
O co
A. 40-chain vertical cover, interim map
ping and topographic—
1. New cover—Block 104 b and G	
2. Revision—
Block 82l  	
Block 92 H and I	
Mount 'Waddington-Chilcotin	
Sub-totals	
3. Improvement flying—Port Renfrew-
Barkley Sound	
Totals	
Average cost	
B. Triangulation control identification	
C. 20-chain   vertical  cover,   Surveys  and
Inventory Division—
1. New cover—
Hazelton    	
Monkman	
Nisconlith	
Purden	
Queen Charlotte Islands	
Raft-Adams-Barriere 	
Redonda-Sayward	
Slocan-Nakusp	
Tatla-Taseko 	
Sub-totals	
2. Improvement flying, all districts	
Totals... 	
Average cost.— 	
D. Special projects—
Agriculture Department—Okanagan
area   	
Assessment Commission—Campbell
River	
Attorney - General's   Department —
Parsons Bridge	
District Forester, Prince George—
Westlake	
Forest Engineering—
Ashnola River	
Babine-Skeena	
Buckhorn Creek	
Fry-Carney Creeks  	
Giscome-B owron River.	
Hamill Creek	
Kispiox-Meziadin Route  _
Klaskish Inlet-Port Alice	
Morice-Owen	
Ranger Stations	
Forest Management—Sugar Lake-
Fisheries Research Board—Cordova
Bay Sewer Investigation	
Geographic   Division — Burnaby
Freeway	
Health Department—Victoria Sewage Survey	
Highways Department—
Hope-Princeton Highway Slide	
Sayward-Beaver Cove	
Land Inspection Division—
False Creek	
Fort St. James	
Harrison Lake 	
Kaslo  	
Pend d'Oreille  	
Hr. Min
22 00
6 30
11 05
44 25
1,030
350
590
2,990
4,570
1,600
2,660
9,830
84 00
2 45
4,960 18,660
110
$2,212.59
653.72
1,114.68
4,467.09
$2,088.68
709.74
1,196.42
6,063.24
$4,301.27
1,363.46
2,311.10
10,530.33
$8,448.08|$10,058.08
276.571
223.07
$18,506.16
499.64
86 45
5,070| 18,660
$3,751 $1.02
32 35
3 00
14 55
3 OO
12 00
29 40
35 10
16 35
78 45
2,245
280
605
175
2,510
3,255
895
6,315
225 40
3 35
2,695
295
725
220
2,775
3,700
1,000
7,130
16,280 18,540
145
229 15
16,425118,540
$3.43, $3.04
724.65 $10,281.15
3 00
2 00
30
1 25
1 30
1 00
25
1 15
1 30
1 15
2 45
2 00
35
2 00
2 50
4 05
1 25
30 55
4 05
2 25
30
45
1 30
1 10
1 15
175
105
3
54
67
70
14
37
115
26
130
50
30
40
104
270
24
1,543
58
245
3
33
44
33
53
101
67
1
30
46
46
4
24
100
19
110
40
11
10
29
39
43
7
124
1
26
71
18
37
$19,005.80
$3,276.98
301.72
1,500.20
301.72
1.206.87
2,983.65
3,536.79
1,667.82
7,920.08
$4,552.50
567.79
1,226.84
354.87
5,089.87
6,600.62
1,814.92
12,805.80
$22,695.83 $33,013.21
360.39   294.04
$23,056.22|$33,307.25
5301.72
$354.87
201.14
212.92
50.29
6.08
142.48
109.50
150.86
135.87
100.57
141.95
41.91
28.39
125.72
75.03
150.86
233.20
125.72
52.72
276.57
263.62
201.14
101.39
58.66
60.84
201.14
81.11
284.95
210.90
410.67
142.48
3,109.36
410.67
243.05
50.29
75.43
150.86
117.33
125.72
547.52
48.67
3,128.95
117.61
496.82
6.08
66.92
89.22
66.92
107.48
$7,829.48
869.51
2,727.04
656.59
1,206.87
8,073.52
10,137.41
3,482.74
20,725.88
$55,709.04
654.43
$56,363.47
$656.59
414.06
56.37
251.98
286.73
242.52
70.30
200.75
384.06
178.44
540.19
302.53
119.50
282.25
495.85
958.19
191.15
6,238.31
528.28
739.87
56.37
142.35
240.08
184.25
233.20
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH DD 73
1965 Air Operations Cost Summary by Projects—Continued
S3
tn
Accomplishment
Cfl
co
O
u
on
a
'?.
E
o
3
Ch
ea
M
3s
O v>
n
fa
as
1 §
S   -a
Z ot/i
o
U
8
o
H
D. Special projects—Continued
Land Inspection Division—Cont'd
Hr. Min.
2 20
30
1 00
1 35
1 15
45
1 45
3 '50
35
1 25
4 05
15
.10 00
11 55
35
5 55
16 15
21 40
2 00
1 55
1 00
2 35
9 20
3 50
1 10
90
8
63
5
$234.67
50.29
100.57
159.24
125.72
75.43
176.00
385.53
58.66
142.48
410.67
25.14
1,005.72
1,198.49
58.66
595.05
1,634.31
2,179.07
201.14
192.76
100.57
259.81
938.68
385.53
117.33
$182.51
16.22
$417.18
I
66.51
100.57
80
24i
11
19
89
30
68
17
8
15
66
12
6
10
162.23
48.67
22.31
38.53
180.48
60.84
20.28
81.11
10.14
669.19
780.72
6.08
66.92
1,125.45
1,754.08
131.81
111.53
81.1,1
365.01
770.58
192.64
202.78
321.47
174.39
Legal Surveys Division—
97.74
i
	
214.53
Mines and Technical  Surveys Department—
Mount Kobau Observatory -	
566.01
119 50
Municipal Affairs Department—
10
40
5
330
385
3
33
S55
162.76
i
491 78
Public Works Department—
5
510
645
2
24
815
35.28
Surveyor of Taxes—
1
1,674.91
1,979.21
64 74
::
Topographic Division—
661.97
i
2,759.76
3,933.15
332.95
Improvement flying, Iskut-Stikine
Water Resources—
865
65
55
40
180
	
121
32
20
—
304 29
181.68
108
83
515
—
624.82
Okanagan Reservoirs	
380
95
100
	
1,709.26
578.17
Internal—Tatla Gap	
66
!	
320.11
Totals 	
179 35
6,818
$4.68
3,758
$8.49
$18,061.11
$113,825.80
$31,886.91
Average cost ,...
E. Miscellaneous flying—
Highways Department—
1 00
9 35
2 15
2 45
1 05
21 55
7 30
5 45
6 50
7 25
$100.57
963 82
$100.57
963 82
Public Relations and Information—
226.29
276.57
108.95
2,204.21
i
226.29
276.57
Recreation  and   Conservation  Department—photographic recce	
Regional Planning Board—Victoria
Internal—
2,204.21
687.25
687 25
Totals _ 	
66 05
 1     ... J]           I
$4,567.66
$4,567.66
561    40
28.313137.2001   3.758
8
$54,409.64
$57,414.20
$1,11,823.84
i Cost of maintenance and training charged to all projects.
  UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT
LANDS
 .
■
 UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS DD 77
UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
M. E. Ferguson, Project Manager
During 1965, Blanca Street was widened and 16th Avenue was brought up to
desired standard to serve as a major access to the university. Despite this action,
traffic will continue to be a problem until 16th Avenue is opened up between Blanca
Street and the campus. It is expected an early start will be made on this project
and that the road will be ready for the fall term of 1966.
The new water reservoir and pumping-station was completed and in operation
early in the summer and produced a marked improvement in water pressure and
supply during the dry period when sprinkling demand was high. The peak period
has shown that consideration will have to be given to the laying of another water
main, probably along the proposed 16th Avenue extension, to serve the rapidly
increasing demands from the university consequent upon addition of large new
buildings and an ever-increasing enrolment.
General taxes were again below the 1961 mill rate, which was something of
a record in view of rising costs and considering the fact there was very little new
construction to increase the assessment.
During the year, negotiations were completed to lease a site for a new service-
station to Standard Oil Company and a new Chevron station was built and opened
late in December. Present indications are that this will be an asset and service to
the community.
One new fraternity house was built during the year and a second one started.
A third fraternity was granted a lease, and it is anticipated an early start will be
made on construction. This leaves five lots remaining in the area zoned for fraternities, and three of those will be leased during 1966 if present plans are finalized.
Applications by two Lutheran Church organizations resulted in a joint venture
whereby they have joined forces and have leased a site adjacent to the university
campus.   Construction of a student centre is expected during 1966.
The only other major item to report was the installation by contract of a storm-
drain culvert in the ravine near Drummond Drive. This will now permit filling of
the ravine between Chancellor Boulevard and a point north of Fourth Avenue so
that Fourth Avenue can eventually be extended to join Chancellor Boulevard, which
is an important part of the planned traffic design for the City of Vancouver. Negotiations are under way whereby the City of Vancouver will use this ravine for depositing surplus excavation material. Arrangements will also be made for contractors
on campus to move their excavation material to this site, which should have the
effect of reducing excavation costs on campus and at the same time reclaim land for
the Endowment Lands. Construction of a bridge when Fourth Avenue is extended
will also be eliminated.
The following tabulation shows comparative figures for the past several years
regarding revenues and collections in addition to the number and types of permits
issued.
 DD 78     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Number and Value of Building Permits Issued for the
Calendar Years 1963, 1964, and 1965
1963
1964
1965
Number
Value
Number
Value
Number
Value
1
14
1
6
3
10
1
1
7
1
2
9
1
2
5
1
$354,894.00
$60,000.00
63,000.00
40,800.00
70,000.00
42,000.00
4,785.00
5,000.00
39,125.00
$38,500.00
55,000.00
15,500.00
7,350.00
Alterations to fraternity houses.	
Garages, etc.	
17,400.00
7,325.00
47,300.00
-
Totals
25
$171,150.00
19        | $116,350.00
I
21
$580,479.00
 UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
DD 79
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  LAND SETTLEMENT BOARD
  LAND SETTLEMENT BOARD DD 83
LAND SETTLEMENT BOARD
The Land Settlement Board's balance-sheets will appear in the Public Accounts
of the Province as in the past. The following is a brief summary of the Board's
activities and collections for 1965.
During the year the sales made by the Board amounted to $47,056.60. One
hundred and ninety-four purchasers completed payment and received tide deeds,
and five borrowers paid up in full and received release of mortgage. Collections
were as follows:—
Loans      $31,994.10
Land sales       93,285.81
Miscellaneous revenue        8,766.07
$133,995.98
The above figures include collections from the sale and rental of Doukhobor
lands in the amount of $76,288.44.
As in the past few years, the activities of the Board were concentrated this
year on the sale of Doukhobor lands in accordance with the recommendations of
the report of Justice Arthur E. Lord, and various subdivisions were made of Board
lands for disposition to Doukhobors, principally at Ootishenia and Krestova.
Disposition of Board land was approved to enable the expansion of the Castlegar Airport, which was necessitated by additional traffic due to the Columbia River
development and the relocation of weather-forecasting facilities from Crescent
Valley to the immediate environs of the airport.
    ; PERSONNEL OFFICE DD 87
PERSONNEL OFFICE
J. H. Palmer, Personnel Officer
The establishment of the Department was increased by 20 positions this year.
Twelve Deputy Land Inspector positions, a new sub-professional grade, were added
to the Land Inspection Division at various centres, mainly in the Northern Interior.
The advertising of these vacancies attracted some 56 applications. Eleven of the
selected candidates were graduates of the Forest Service Ranger School, and the
12th man was a graduate of an agricultural college and was also an employee of
the Forest Service. These men were given a one-week combined field and office
training course in land inspection work by Departmental officials in September, and
are now working on a study programme in preparation for a course in Appraisal I
and ultimate qualification as registered appraisers. Along with the recruitment of
these men, the Department was able to transfer experienced Land Inspectors to
take charge of new land inspection districts with headquarters in Prince Rupert,
Vanderhoof, and Burns Lake. The other eight positions added to establishment
were in the Surveys and Mapping Branch. Four were classified as Draughtsman 3
and one as Mapping Assistant 3 in the Legal Surveys Division. Two positions
classified as Draughtsman 3 and one as a Photographic Technician were added to
the Air Division. Difficulty was encountered in recruiting experienced candidates
for these positions. Only three qualified persons were available, and these were
employed without interview from localities outside the Province. The remaining
five positions were filled with beginners.
The foregoing additions to staff combined with a high level of turnover to
produce a record number of personnel actions, as listed below:—
Recruitments for continuous staff	
Reclassifications   	
Promotions 	
Internal transfers     3
Transfers to other departments	
Terminations for continuous staff	
Retirements 	
Short-term casual appointments and terminations	
1965
Comparable
1964 figures
45
25
12
18
23
4
3
6
9
7
28
15
2
1
55
42
In addition to 11 Deputy Land Inspectors whose appointments involved
changes of headquarters, the headquarters for six Land Inspectors was also changed.
Scarcity of housing in the Northern Interior imposed a considerable strain and
inconvenience on many of the persons involved in transfers and placed a particularly
heavy load of correspondence on this office.
Messrs. H. C. R. Gavin and A. Paulsen, of the Land Inspection Division,
were awarded Diplomas in Public Administration from the University of Victoria
following the completion of the three-year study course under the Executive Development Training Plan. Messrs. A. M. Barber, B.C.L.S., A. P. McLaughlin,
B.C.L.S., A. D. Wight, B.C.L.S., and R. P. Murdock completed the second year
of the course, and Messrs. R. H. McAra, K. M. Bridge, B.C.L.S., P. J. Brennan,
B.C.L.S., and J. H. Palmer completed the first year of this course. Mr. D. Thorn,
Land Inspector, Kamloops, was enrolled in the first year of the course, and Messrs.
R. Rutherford and A. M. Broughton enrolled in the correspondence course in
Basic Public Administration offered by the Civil Service Commission.    Messrs.
 DD 88     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
H. K. Kidd and C. R. Irving were awarded certificates following the completion
of the first course in Basic Public Administration.
Messrs. F. Rich, Draughtsman 4, and C. R. W. Leak, B.C.L.S., Surveyor 2,
retired from service, the latter electing early retirement. Reference to these retirements is made in the section of the report filed by the Surveys and Mapping Branch.
The Department's safety record continued to be favourable, there being apparently close attention paid to safety matters by supervisors and staff alike.
   MAIL AND FILE ROOM
DD 91
MAIL AND FILE ROOM
John A. Grant
A total of 242,375 letters was received in the Department during 1965, and
1,973 reels of microfilm were referred to during the year. There were 9,989 new
files created.
The Vault staff was moved from Room 13 to Room 14 in the middle of August,
and on October 19th the Mail Room staff was moved to Room 13. Lands Branch
stenographers now occupy the former Mail Room. This has resulted in much less
crowded conditions in the Lands General Office.
Letters Inward
Branch
1964
1965
10-year Average,
1956-65
Lands    	
52,833
152,038
29,375
22,255
53,467
138,313
29,893
20,702
44,307
143,023
25,845
19,186
Totals 	
256,501
242,375
232,361
Letters Outward (Recorded)
Branch
1964
1965
10-year Average,
1956-65
13,972
1,600
3,500
10,295
1,740
4,365
13,271
Forests      	
1,972
2,437
Totals     .   - 	
19,072
16,400
17,680
Miscellaneous Reports
Designation
1934
1965
10-year Average,
1956-65
Forest-fire reports 	
Logging-inspection reports	
Land-classification reports	
Stumpage-adjustment notices..
Totals	
1,120
13,883
5,174
6,737
26,914
2,688
9,873
5,266
614
18,441
5,031
14,577
3,810
3,774
27,192
New Files Created
Designation
1964
1965
10-year Average,
1956-65
" O " files  	
6,068
1,653
2,295
6,642
1,634
1,713
5 697
Timber-mark files.	
1,392
Timber-sale files.. _    	
2,821
Totals	
10,016
9,989
9,910
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1966
1,060-466-2910
 

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