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Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT for the Year Ended… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1966]

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 Minister of Mines and
Petroleum Resources
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
for the Year Ended December 31
1964
SSM&
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1965
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES
VICTORIA, B.C.
Hon. Donald L. Brothers, Minister.
P. J. Mulcahy, Deputy Minister.
J. W. Peck, Chief Inspector of Mines.
S. Metcalfe, Chief Analyst and Assayer.
Hartley Sargent, Chief Mineralogical Branch.
K. B. Blakey, Chief Gold Commissioner and Chief Commissioner,
Petroleum and Natural Gas
J. D. Lineham, Chief, Petroleum and Natural Gas Conservation Branch.
 Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Mineral Industry of the Province for the year 1964
is herewith respectfully submitted.
DONALD L. BROTHERS,
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources Office,
March 31, 1965.
  CONTENTS
Page
Introduction  A 9
Review of the Mineral Industry  A 10
Statistics—
Co-operation with Dominion Bureau of Statistics  A 14
Methods of Computing Production  A 14
Notes on Products  A 16
Table I.—Mineral Production—Total to Date, Latest Decade, and
Latest Year   A 21
Table II.—Total Value of Production, 1836-1964    A 22
Table III.—Quantity and Value of Mineral Products for Years 1955
to 1964    A 24
Table IV (Graph).—Mineral Production of British Columbia—Value,
1836-1964    A 26
Table V (Graph).—MineralTroduction of British Columbia—Quantity,
1836-1964    A 27
Table VI.—Production of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc, 1858—
1964    A 28
Table VIIa.—Production, 1963 and 1964, and Total to Date, by Mining
Divisions—Summary    A 30
Table VIIb.—Production, 1963 and 1964, and Total to Date, by Mining
Divisions—Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc    A 32
Table Vile.—Production, 1963 and 1964, and Total to Date, by Mining
Divisions—Other Metals    A 34
Table VIId.—Production, 1963 and 1964, and Total to Date, by Mining
Divisions—Industrial Minerals   A 38
Table VIIe.—Production, 1963 and 1964, and Total to Date by Mining
Divisions—Structural Materials    A 40
Table VIIIa.—Quantity and Value of Coal per Year to Date    A 42
Table VIIIb.—Quantity and Value of Coal Sold and Used    A 43
Table IX.—Coke and By-products for Years 1895 to 1925 and by
Years 1926 to 1964    A 44
Table X.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1964    A 45
Table XL—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for Operations
of All Classes    A 49
Table XII.—Average Number Employed in the Mining Industry,
1901-64   A 50
Table XIII.—Lode-metal Mines—Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and
Gross Value, 1901-64   A 51
Table XIV.—Lode-metal Production in 1964    A 52
Table XV.—Lode-metal Operations' Employment during 1964    A 57
A 5
 A 6 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
Page
Departmental Work  A 58
Administration Branch  A 58
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)  A 58
List of Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders in the Province A 59
Gold Commissioners' and Mining Recorders' Office Statistics, 1964 A 60
Coal, Petroleum, and Natural Gas  A 61
Analytical and Assay Branch  A 62
Inspection Branch    A 64
Mineralogical Branch  A 65
Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch  A 66
Grub-staking Prospectors  A 69
Mining Roads and Trails  A 75
Museums  A 75
Rock and Mineral Specimens  A 76
Publications  A 76
Maps Showing Mineral Claims, Placer Claims, and Placer-mining Leases A 76
Offices of the British Columbia Department of Mines and Petroleum
Resources and the Department of Mines and Technical Surveys,
Canada  A 76
Topographic Mapping and Air Photography  A 77
Department of Mines and Technical Surveys  A 79
Geological Survey of Canada  A 79
Field Work by the Geological Survey in British Columbia, 1964  A 79
Publications of the Geological Survey  A 80
Mines Branch  A 80
Mineral Resources Division  A 80
Lode Metals  4
Reports on Geological, Geophysical, and Geochemical Work  171
Placer  175
Structural Materials and Industrial Minerals  179
Petroleum and Natural Gas  209
Inspection of Lode Mines, Placer Mines, and Quarries  283
Coal  306
Inspection of Electrical Equipment and Installations  327
Lode-metal Deposits Reffered to in the 1964 Annual Report  337
 CONTENTS A 7
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Photographs
Page
On the GJ claim group, Klastline Plateau     12
Helicopter pad at drill-site, Galore Creek     12
Stikine Copper Limited—Galore Creek camp     14
Stikine Copper Limited — core examination and assay buildings left, core
shacks right     14
Julian Mining Co. Ltd. — bulldozer trenches and geophysical lines on Ann
property     16
Headwaters of Split Creek from high trench on Ann property  16
Granduc Mine at fork of the Leduc glacier  20
Exploration camp, Alice molybdenum property, Lime Creek  24
Looking up 48-inch raise drilled by a raise-boring machine  93
Johnsby Mines Limited, Silverton—portal of Hecla adit  128
Camp on Big Ledge property, west of Pingston Creek  128
Myra Creek valley and south end of Buttle Lake  165
Looking across Myra Creek—Lynx mine clearing  165
Cassiar Asbestos Corporation Limited—aerial tram  180
Cassiar Asbestos Corporation Limited—open pit and head of tram  180
Boundary Lake gas-conservation plant  225
Air-sampling equipment  298
Air-sampling equipment  298
Drawings
1. Geology of the Lime Creek area Facing   25
2. British Columbia Molybdenum Limited—geology of Lime Creek property  Facing    31
3. Geology of Roundy Creek stock and vicinity  37
4. Geology of Tidewater molybdenite property  40
5. Dolly Varden Mines Ltd.—plan of Wolf workings  42
6. Geology of Mount Thomlinson molybdenite showings  49
7. Len group, Huckleberry Mountain  54
8. Index map, Boss Mountain mine  66
9. Geology of Boss Mountain mine area     68
10. Silverquick workings—pace and compass sketch _     82
 A 8 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
Page
11. Property map, Highland Valley area       87
12. Bright Star Trio—geology at main showing  107
13. Giant Mascot Mines Limited—positions of orebodies  138
14. Texada Mines Ltd.—geology of mine area  148
15. Texada Mines Ltd.—cross-section of Paxton and Lake orebodies  150
16. Texada Mines Ltd.—geology of main levels Facing 151
17. Western Mines Limited—plan of Lynx 925 level Facing 157
18. Western Mines Limited—section through Lynx mine  160
19. Cowichan Copper Co. Ltd.—diagram of positions of cave and washout  170
20. Geology of Marysville magnesite area Facing 187
21. Probable fault movements—Marysville magnesite  192
22. Geology of Brisco magnesite area Facing 195
23. Footage drilled in British Columbia wells, 1954-64  218
24. Petroleum and natural-gas fields, 1964  220
25. Natural-gas production, 1954-64  222
26. Oil production, 1954-64  222
27. Petroleum and natural-gas pipe-lines  223
28. Average dust counts obtained each year since 1937  300
 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES, 1964
Introduction
A report of the Minister of Mines of the Province of British Columbia has been
published each year from 1874 to 1959. Beginning in 1960, it is the Report of the
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
The Annual Report records the salient facts in the progress of the mineral
industry, also much detail about individual operations, including those undertaken
in the search for, exploration of, and development of mineral deposits, as well as
the actual winning of material from mineral deposits.
The Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources now
contains introductory sections dealing with Statistics and Departmental Work, followed by sections dealing with Lode Metals; Placer; Structural Materials and
Industrial Minerals; Petroleum and Natural Gas; Inspection of Lode Mines, Placer
Mines, and Quarries; Coal; and Inspection of Electrical Equipment and Installations at Mines and Quarries, each with its own table of contents. A table listing
lode-metal properties, in geographic groupings, precedes the index.
An introductory review of the mineral industry and notes at the first of several
of the main sections deal generally with the industry or its principal subdivisions.
Notes in the various sections deal briefly with exploration or production operations
during the year or describe a property in more complete detail, outlining the history
of past work and the geological setting as well as describing the workings and the
mineral deposits exposed in them. Some notes deal with areas rather than with a
single property.
The work of the branches of the Department is outlined briefly in the section
on Departmental Work. This section is followed by notes dealing briefly with the
work of other British Columbia or Federal Government services of particular interest
to the mineral industry of British Columbia. Information concerning mine operations and some of the activities of the Inspection Branch of the Department of Mines
and Petroleum Resources is contained in the section on Inspection of Lode Mines,
Placer Mines, and Quarries, early in the section on Coal, and in the section on
Inspection of Electrical Equipment and Installations at Mines and Quarries.
The section on Statistics begins with an outline of current and past practice in
arriving at quantities and calculating the value of the various products.
A 9
 Review of the Mineral Industry *
For the third year in succession it is possible to say that the value of British
Columbia mineral production exceeds that of any previous year. The value for
1964 amounted to more than $267 million, a gain of $11.6 million or 4.5 per cent
over 1963. The value for each of the four classes of mineral products—metals,
industrial minerals, structural materials, and fuels—exceeded that of 1963, and for
each the 1964 value is the highest value to date. The percentage gains over 1963
were for structural materials, 11.1 per cent; for metals, 4.6 per cent; for industrial
minerals, 5.0 per cent; and for fuel, 0.4 per cent.
Notwithstanding the low gain by fuel, all fuels except oil gained. Most items
in the industrial-minerals group showed moderate gains over 1963. Structural
materials were mostly produced at high rate; cement and sand and gravel showed
the greatest gains over previous years.
Metals accounted for 67.6 per cent of the total value; industrial minerals, 6.5
per cent; structural materials, 9.9 per cent; and fuels, 16 per cent.
The increase in metals reflects increased prices for copper, lead, zinc, and for
several of the by-product metals. The 1964 quantities of copper and lead were considerably below those of 1963, but increased prices gave values moderately higher
than those of 1963.
The year-average prices for gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, and coal are
tabulated on page A 20. Most of the metal is exported, and the returns from it are
affected by the premium on United States funds. The premium in Canadian funds
averaged 7.856 cents on the United States dollar, compared with 7.87 cents in 1963.
In 1964 the premium ranged from 8.126 cents in My to 7.403 cents in November
and was 7.451 cents in December.
The price for silver was constant in the United States throughout 1964, the
equivalent in Canadian funds varying with the exchange premium. The prices for
copper, lead, and zinc all rose during 1964 and were at their highest in December,
the averages for 1964 being substantially higher than for 1963. Increased prices
for by-product metals, notably for antimony, cadmium, and tin, gave the by-products
of siver-lead-zinc mining a value of more than $8 million, more than a million dollars
above their 1963 value.
Phoenix copper increased its rate of milling in 1964; Zeballos iron resumed
production; Mount Washington copper began producing in December; Bethlehem
began recovering by-product molybdenum, which, although contributing only
$47,063 to the total value of metals, marks the beginning of regular production.
At the end of 1964 Bethlehem was nearly ready to increase its daily tonnage. In
the autumn Cominco's iron smelter at Kimberley increased its pig-iron production
from 100 to 300 tons daily, and the capacities of the acid and fertilizer plants there
were doubled. These increases were paralleled by increased use of iron sinter,
credited as iron concentrate, and an increase in sulphur used. Resumption of production at Zeballos also contributed to the iron output, as did by-product iron concentrate from the Coast Copper mine.
Although 1964 silver and lead output figures for British Columbia mines are
considerably below 1963 quantities, and zinc is moderately below, the report of the
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company shows that its output of lead from the
Trail smelter was much closer to its 1963 output, and silver and zinc exceeded 1963
* By Hartley Sargent, Chief of the Mineralogical Branch.
A 10
 REVIEW OF THE MINERAL INDUSTRY,  1964 A 11
output. Shipments from British Columbia silver-lead-zinc mines were less than
in 1963, and customs and other figures show that lead and zinc concentrates and
ore brought into British Columbia from foreign countries and other parts of Canada
exceeded 1963 imports. The lead and zinc content of concentrates shipped to
foreign smelters contained some 22 million pounds of lead and 48 million pounds
of zinc, approximately 8 per cent of the lead and 12 per cent of the zinc British
Columbia produced.
The international nature of the industry is indicated by the number of countries
from which lead and zinc concentrates are received, and the number of countries to
which refined silver, lead, and zinc are shipped. All the nickel, 96 per cent of the
iron, and 88 per cent of the copper went to Japan in the form of concentrates. The
remainder of the copper went to the Tacoma smelter. Iron sinter smelted at Kim-
berley amounted to about 4 per cent of the iron output for 1964. Asbestos went to
19 countries in North America, South America, Asia, and Europe, and 40 per cent
of the coal went to Japan.
Preparations were being made for molybdenum production at Boss Mountain
early in 1965, and at Endako by mid-year. Three new mines—Granisle, copper;
Tasu, iron and copper; and Western (Buttle Lake), copper, zinc, and gold—are
all scheduled for production in 1966. At Alice Arm, British Columbia Molybdenum
Limited has scheduled production for 1967, and Granduc was working toward
copper production in 1968.
Exploration for ores of metals has been at a lively pace for more than a decade.
In 1964, 118 companies reported having worked on 253 properties. Interest was
focused most sharply on molybdenum and copper, but gold, silver-lead-zinc, and
iron all received attention, and a revival of interest in antimony and mercury became
apparent. Long-established companies continued their exploratory operations, and
several new companies entered the field. Recently several oil companies have
entered mining exploration or shown interest in the possibilities.
In 1964 the Geological Survey's programme included 26 ground projects in
British Columbia, 9 being 4 miles to the inch and 3 being 1 mile to the inch mapping
projects, and 14 being studies relating to stratigraphy and palaeontology, hydrology,
and other special projects. The time assigned for several of the projects was considerably less than the field season.
An airborne magnetometer survey, of four map-sheets in the vicinity of Revel-
stoke, was carried out by contract, the expense being borne by the Geological Survey
of Canada and the British Columbia Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
The British Columbia Department had 10 of its staff geologists assigned to field
projects and three geologists, not on the permanent staff, doing independent or semi-
independent work. The projects in the main involved detailed studies of mines
and their immediate settings, but also included studies of larger areas on Vancouver
Island, in the southern Interior, central British Columbia, and near Alice Arm and
Stewart.
As a measure of the active interest of companies, syndicates, and individuals
in exploration, figures from the office of the Chief Gold Commissioner are of interest.
Assessment work was recorded on 32,047 mineral claims in 1964, compared with
24,648 in 1963, cash paid in lieu of performing assessment work increased from
$62,080 to $96,596, and 29,244 mineral claims were recorded, compared with
25,160 in 1963.
The needs of mines being developed and the need to provide access to parts
of northern British Columbia, whose important mineral potential is already demonstrated, call for building roads in areas that currently depend largely on aircraft for
 A 12 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
transportation.   The Stewart-Cassiar road progresses slowly.   Roads of more local
concern are under construction or are proposed.
Because of increased production, 1964 fuel values were greater than those of
1963, for coal by 1.5 per cent; natural gas, 13.7 per cent; and liquid by-products,
1.2 per cent. Oil output decreased by 5.6 per cent. Coal output increased moderately, at the Crow's Nest Pass and Telkwa collieries. Of the coal mined, more than
90 per cent came from the Crowsnest Pass area.
Exploration for petroleum and natural gas, including geophysical and geological work, and exploratory and development drilling were greatly reduced compared
with 1963. Interest in offshore possibilities increased. Offshore exploration included seismic surveys off the west coast of Vancouver Island and the Queen Charlotte Islands and in Hecate Strait. Development drilling in northeastern British
Columbia amounted to 385,676 feet, slightly greater than in 1963, but the footage
drilled in exploratory and wildcat wells was substantially below that of 1963. The
number of successfully completed gas wells declined 47 per cent from 1963, but
successful completions of oil wells increased 45 per cent over 1963. More than
half the new oil wells were in a newly discovered pool in the Nancy area.
Pressure-maintenance schemes account for the slightly decreased production
of petroleum, at the same time increasing the petroleum ultimately recoverable.
This increase and new discoveries give an increase of 65 per cent in oil reserves.
Gas reserves declined 7 per cent. Submitted gas analyses were reviewed completely,
and new calculations give an increase of 10 per cent for reserves of natural-gas
liquids and a decrease of 6 per cent for reserves of sulphur.
A gas-conservation plant was completed and began delivering associated gas
from the Boundary Lake oil field to the gas pipe-line. A new transmission-line,
consisting of 220 miles of 30-inch pipe, from the Fort Nelson area to the Westcoast
Transmission Company Limited Pipeline at Chetwynd was nearly completed by the
end of 1964. A plant 15 miles south of Fort Nelson to treat high-pressure gas
containing carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and hydrogen sulphide, was completed. It is to
begin delivering gas of pipe-line standards to the 30-inch transmission line early
in 1965.   Oil- and gas-gathering lines were also considerably increased.
Direct revenue to the Government from sales of free miners' certificates and
from recording fees, lease rentals, cash paid in lieu of assessment work, etc.,
amounted to $583,455.70, compared with $366,140.38 in 1963.
Royalty on iron concentrates amounted to $269,774, and payments on industrial minerals and structural materials amounted to $37,091. Fees and rentals
from coal licences and leases amounted to $5,362.45, compared with $4,737.45 in
1963.
Revenue to the Government from petroleum and natural gas was rentals,
fees, and miscellaneous, $8,444.59; sale of Crown reserves, $13,093,872; royalties,
gas, $1,583,292; oil, $3,502,222; a grand total of $26,755,820, compared with
$20,350,040 in 1963.
Returns received by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics give the following
data: Average number employed through 1964 in placer, lode, coal, industrial-
mineral, and structural-material mining, 11,645. Major expenditures by those
branches of the industry (except that items marked with an asterisk (*) are not
reported or are reported incompletely by producers of structural materials and coal):
Salaries and wages, $62,499,415; fuel and electricity, $10,032,340; process supplies,* including explosives, chemicals, drill steel, lubricants, etc., $26,351,879;
Federal taxes,* $17,271,386; Provincial taxes,* $8,098,167; Provincial royalties,
$306,865; municipal and other taxes,* $1,623,280;  levies* for workmen's com-
 REVIEW OF THE MINERAL INDUSTRY, 1964 A 13
pensation (including silicosis), $1,521,597; unemployment insurance,* $680,310.
The lode-mining industry spent $39,516,641 on freight and treatment charges on
ores and concentrates. Taxes, levies, and unemployment insurance are incomplete
for lode-metal companies in respect of preparation of new properties for production,
and exploration and development. Work done by contract is reported as lump
sums not broken down in any way.
Returns from lode-metal companies show capital expenditures of $21,900,000,
and expenditures on exploration and development of $18,980,000 in addition to
salaries and wages on exploration and development amounting to $4,495,528, included in the salaries and wages item in the preceding paragraph. The capital expenditures include preparation for increasing production at two properties and
preparations for converting from surface to underground mining at four properties.
They include expenditures of $ 13,600,000f at three properties being prepared for
production. The exploration and development expenditures cover work reported
by 118 companies on 253 properties, consisting largely of properties under exploration, but include one property being prepared for production. Industrial-mineral
producers reported capital expenditures of $1,810,021 and $18,023 on exploration
and development, and structural-material producers reported capital expenditures
of $908,896. The sum of the expenditures by the lode-metal, industrial-mineral,
structural-materials, and coal-mining segments of the industry, including fees,
licences, royalties, and the items noted in this and the preceding paragraph, exceed
$211,000,000.   Dividends amounted to $38,927,308.
Reports from 23 petroleum and natural-gas companies show the following expenditures: Salaries and wages, $1,225,144; fuel and electricity, $173,521; and
process supplies, $1,278,074. These returns do not cover the petroleum and
natural-gas industry completely. The Canadian Petroleum Association presented
the following estimates of total expenditures by the petroleum and natural-gas
industry in British Columbia in 1964: Exploration—geological and geophysical,
$7,500,000; exploratory drilling, $10,700,000; land acquisition and rentals,
$21,600,000; overhead, $3,000,000; total exploration, $42,800,000; development
drilling, $7,300,000; capital expenditures, $8,900,000; operation of wells and
flow-lines, $4,500,000; capital expenditures and operation of natural-gas plants,
$15,200,000; general — taxes (excluding income tax), $500,000; royalties,
$5,200,000; all other expenses, $500,000; total general, $6,200,000; grand total,
$84,900,000.
t For two properties include proportion of expenditure reported for a period ending in 1965.
 Statistics
The statistics of the mineral industry are collected and compiled and tabulated
for this Report by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Department of Industrial
Development, Trade, and Commerce.
CO-OPERATION WITH DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS
In the interests of uniformity and to avoid duplication of effort, beginning with
the statistics for 1925, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and the various Provincial
departments have co-operated in the collection and processing of mineral statistics.
Producers of metals, industrial minerals, structural materials, coal, and petroleum and natural gas are requested to submit returns in duplicate on forms prepared
for use by the Province and by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
So far as possible both organizations follow the same practice in processing
the data. The final compilation by the Dominion Bureau is usually pubished considerably later than the Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources
for British Columbia. Differences between the figures published by the two organizations arise mainly from the facts that the Dominion Bureau bases its quantities
of lode metals on returns made by smelter operators, whereas the British Columbia
mining statistician uses the returns covering shipments from individual mines in
the same period, and the Dominion Bureau uses average prices for metals considered
applicable to the total Canadian production, whereas the British Columbia mining
statistician uses prices considered applicable to British Columbia production. Peat,
included under the classification of fuel by the Dominion Bureau, has not been
regarded as mineral or fuel, and accordingly has not been included in the British
Columbia statistics of mineral production. The value of peat for the current year
is shown in a note under Table I.
METHODS OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION
The tabulated statistics are designed to cover mineral production in quantity
and value, employment, principal expenditures of the mineral industry, and dividends paid. The data are arranged so as to facilitate comparison of the production
records for the various mining divisions, and from year to year (1951,1958,1963).*
Beginning with the 1960 Report, Tables I and II were given new forms, Table
VIII was amalgamated with Table VII, and subsequent tables were renumbered.
Beginning with the 1963 Report, the parts of Tables I and III dealing with metals
were combined, so that all metals are now listed alphabetically in a single section.
Beginning with the 1964 Report, Table II gives the value for each group of products for each year after 1886.
In this 1964 Report, most of the explanatory notes that had appeared as footnotes to the production tables have been concentrated, arranged alphabetically in
a section headed "Notes on Products," immediately following this introductory
section.
From time to time, revisions have been made to earlier figures as additional
data became available or errors came to light.
Data from the certified returns made by producers of lode metals, industrial
minerals and structural materials, and coal are augmented by data obtained from
* In these notes, references such as (1958) are to this section in the Report for the year indicated, where
additional information will be found.
A 14
 STATISTICS
A 15
the operators of customs smelters. For placer gold, returns from operators are augmented by data obtained from the Royal Canadian Mint and from Gold Commissioners and other sources. For petroleum, natural gas, and liquid by-products,
production figures are supplied by the Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch of the
Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources and are compiled from the monthly
disposition report, and Crown royalty statement filed with the Department by the
producers.
Values are in Canadian funds. Weights are avoirdupois pounds and tons
(2,000 lb.) and troy ounces.
Lode Metals
Prior to 1925 the average prices for gold and copper are true average prices,
but, as a means of correcting for losses in smelting and refining, the prices of other
metals were taken at the following percentages of the year's average price for the
metal: Silver, 95 per cent; lead, 90 per cent; and zinc, 85 per cent. For 1925 and
subsequent years the value has been calculated using the true average price and the
net metal contents, in accordance with the procedures adopted by the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics and the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
Gross and Net Contents and Calculated Value
The gross contents for any metal are the total assay contents, obtained by
multiplying the assay by the weight of ore, concentrates, or bullion.
The value is calculated by multiplying the quantity, gross for gold, net for
silver, copper, lead, and zinc, by the average price for the year and by using appropriate prices for other products. Beginning with 1963, net contents are obtained
from the gross as tabulated:—
Lead
Concentrates
Zinc
Concentrates
Copper
Concentrates
Copper-Nickel
Concentrates
Copper
Matte
Silver
Per Cent
98
W
98
90
Per Cent
98
50
90
70
Per Cent
95
(2)
50
70
Per Cent
85
88
Per Cent
95
Copper   	
(3)
50
Zinc       	
Cadmium-.     	
Nickel	
1 Less 26 pounds per ton of concentrates.
2 Less 20 pounds per ton of concentrates for 1963; less 10 pounds for 1964 and other years.
3 Less 10 pounds per ton of matte.
Formerly the net silver content in copper concentrates was taken as 95 per
cent of the gross; the net lead content of lead ores and concentrates was taken as
95 per cent; and the net zinc content in lead ores, lead concentrates, and zinc
concentrates was taken as 85 per cent, except that for zinc concentrates exported
to foreign smelters the net zinc content was calculated by deducting from the gross
8 units; that is, 160 pounds per ton of concentrates. The net copper content of
copper concentrates for 1963 was obtained by deducting from the gross content
20 pounds of copper per ton of concentrates; formerly the deduction was 10
pounds, and for 1964 the deduction is also 10 pounds.
Other metals, including by-product metals refined in British Columbia and
iron, tin, and tungsten exported as ores and concentrates, are treated similarly,
except that quantities and values for several are as reported by shippers for sales
in the year. The value of by-product iron ore used in making pig iron at Kimberley
has been computed from the value per ton of ore of comparable grade, at the point
 A 16 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
of export from British Columbia; 1960 and 1961 valuations have been recalculated
on this basis.
Average Prices
The methods of computing prices have varied because of changing conditions
(1958). The prices are now arrived at by methods given in footnotes to the table
of average prices on page A 20.
Placer Gold and Silver
Beginning with 1962, Mint reports giving the fine-gold content have been
available for all but a negligible part of the reported placer-gold production, and
the value of the fine-gold content has been used. Previously the value had been
calculated, taking the average fineness as 822Vi.
A record of the silver content of placer gold, received at the Royal Canadian
Mint since 1947, has been incorporated in the appropriate tables.
Industrial Minerals and Structural Materials
Prices for these materials approximate the prices at the point of origin.
Fuel
Coal
The price per ton used in valuing coal (see p. A 20) is the weighted average
of the f.o.b. prices at the mines for coal sold and used.
Petroleum and Natural Gas
The values for natural gas, natural-gas liquid by-products, and for petroleum,
including condensate/pentanes plus, are the aggregates of amounts received for
the products at the well-head.
NOTES ON PRODUCTS
Antimony.—Production began in 1939. Antimony assigned to individual
mining divisions is the reported content of concentrates exported to foreign smelters.
Antimony " not assigned " is the antimony content of antimonial lead or of other
antimony products at the Trail smelter.   See Tables I, III, and Vile.
Arsenious Oxide.—Production began in 1917. Principal productive periods:
Omineca, 1928, 16,997 pounds, $340; Osoyoos, 1917-30 and 1942, 22,002,423
pounds, $272,861.   See Table VIId.
Asbestos.—Production began in 1952. From 1953 to 1961 asbestos was
valued at the shipping point in North Vancouver. Beginning with 1962 the value
has been taken as the value at that pricing point less shipping cost from the mine
to North Vancouver. The values for the preceding years have been recalculated
on the same basis.   See Tables I, III, and VIId.
Barite.—Production began in 1940.   See Tables I, III, VIId.
Bentonite.—Principal productive period, 1926-44, 791 tons.   See Table VIId.
Bismuth.—Production began in 1929. Recovered as by-product at Trail
smelter.   See Tables I, III, and Vile.
Cadmium.—Production began in 1928. Cadmium assigned to individual
niining divisions is the reported content of custom shipments to the Trail smelter
and to foreign smelters. Cadmium " not assigned " is the remainder of the reported
estimated recovery at the Trail smelter from British Columbia concentrates. See
Tables I, III, and Vila
 STATISTICS A 17
Chromite.—Produced in 1918 and 1929.   See Table Vile.
Coal.—All coal produced, including that used in making coke, is shown as
primary mine production. Quantity from 1836 to 1909 is gross mine output and
includes material lost in picking and washing. For 1910 and subsequent years the
quantity is that sold and used. First production: Cariboo, 1942; Fort Steele, 1898;
Kamloops, 1893; Liard, 1923; Nanaimo, 1836; Nicola, 1907; Omineca, 1918;
Osoyoos, 1926; Similkameen, 1909; Skeena, 1912. For washery loss, change in
stock, and differences between gross mine output and coal sold, refer to the table
" Production and Distribution by Collieries and by Districts " in section headed
" Coal " or " Coal-mining " in this and preceding Annual Reports. The totals
" sold and used " include: Sales to retail and wholesale dealers, industrial users,
and company employees; coal used in company boilers, including steam locomotives; coal used in making coke.   See Tables I, III, VIIa, VIIIa, and VIIIb.
Cobalt.—Production of 1,730 pounds, 1928.   See Table Vila
Diatomite.—First production, 1928.   See Table VIId.
Fluorspar.—Principal productive periods: Greenwood, 1918-29 and 1942,
35,309 tons, $783,578; Osoyoos, 1958, 32 tons, $1,386. See Table VIId; see
also note re fluxes.
Fluxes.—First production, 1911, mainly quartz and limestone. See Tables
I, III, and VIId. In 1958, 32 tons of fluorspar is included with the fluxes. See
Table III.
Fuel.—See Coal, Petroleum, and Natural Gas.
Gold, Lode.—Gold is mainly the product of lode-gold mines, but a substantial
part is a by-product from copper and silver-lead-zinc mines. See page A 20 and
Tables I, III, VI, and VIIb.
Gold, Placer.—First year of production for major placer-producing divisions:
Atlin, 1898, Cariboo, 1858; Lillooet, 1874; and Quesnel, 1858. See Tables I,
III, VI, and VIIa.
Granules.—First production, 1930.   See Tables I, III, and VIId.
Gypsum and Gypsite.—First production, 1911.   See Tables I, III, and VIId.
Hydromagnesite.—First production, 1904. Principal productive periods:
Atlin, 1915-16, 1,450 tons, $20,325; Clinton, 1921, 803 tons, $7,211. See
Table VIId.
Indium.—Production began in 1942. Not reported as individual metal since
1958, but value taken into total value of all metals.
Iron Concentrates.—Principal productive period began in 1951. Includes
sinter used in making pig iron: 1964, 73,460 tons of sinter valued at $769,126
used in making 48,425 tons of pig iron.   See Tables I, III, and Vile.
Iron Oxide and Ochre.—Principal productive periods: Golden, 1927-39, 27
tons, $920; Nelson, 1948-50, 7,292 tons, $55,901; Vancouver, 1918-50, 10,669
tons, $97,389; Victoria, 1923, 120 tons, $840.   See Table VIId.
Lead.—Revisions were made in 1958 to some yearly totals for lead and zinc
to bring them into agreement with the best records of recoveries of lead and zinc
from slags treated at the Trail smelter.   See Tables I, III, VI, and VIIb.
Magnesium.—Produced 204,632 pounds, 1941 and 1942.   See Table Vila
Magnesium Sulphate.—Principal productive periods: Clinton, 1918 to 1920,
1,923 tons, $39,085; Kamloops, 1918-42, 8,742 tons, $193,967; Osoyoos, 1915-
19, 3,229 tons, $21,300.   See Table VIId.
Manganese.—Estimated manganese content of about 40 tons of ore shipped
for testing by Olalla Mines Ltd. in 1956. Principal productive period, 1918-20.
See Table Vile.
 A 18 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
Mercury.—Principal productive period, 1940-44. See Tables I, III, and
Vile.
Mica.—First production, 1932.   See Tables I, III, and VIId.
Molybdenum.—Principal productive periods, 1914-18 and 1964. See Tables
I, III, and Vila
Natro-alunite.—Principal productive period, 1912-27, 522 tons. See Table
VIId.
Natural Gas.—Commercial production of natural gas began in 1954. The
production shown in Tables I, III, and VIIa is the total dry and residue gas sold;
that is, the quantity delivered to the main transmission-line. The quantity is net
after deducting gas used on leases, metering difference, and gas used or lost in the
cleaning plant. The quantity is reported as thousands of cubic feet at standard
conditions (14.4 pounds per square inch pressure, 60° F. temperature up to and
including the year 1960, and thereafter 14.65 pounds per square inch pressure,
60° F. temperature). Gross well output, other production, delivery, and sales
data are tabulated in the Petroleum and Natural Gas section of this report.
Natural-gas Liquid By-products.—The liquid by-products are the butane and
propane recovered in processing natural gas at Taylor, beginning with 1958. For
natural gasoline, condensate/pentane plus, see under " Petroleum." See Tables I,
III, and VIIa, and Petroleum and Natural Gas section of this report.
Nickel—Production began in 1958.   See Tables I, III, and Vila
Palladium.—Production recorded, 1928.    See Table Vila
Perlite.—In 1953, 1,112 tons valued at $11,120 was produced. See Table
VIId.
Petroleum, Crude.—Production of petroleum began in 1955, and is shown in
Tables I, III, and VIIa. The quantity is "net sales," reported in barrels (35
imperial gallons=l barrel). Natural gasoline, condensate/pentanes plus, recovered
at the gas-processing plant at Taylor is credited as petroleum production (1962).
Production in 1964 includes 11,639,024 barrels of crude petroleum and 991,342
barrels of condensate/pentanes plus, valued at $23,460,152 and $587,685. See
Tables I, III, and VIIa. Gross well output, other production, delivery, and sales
data are tabulated in the Petroleum and Natural Gas section of this report.
Phosphate Rock.—Produced 1927-33, 3,842 tons.   See Table VIId.
Platinum.—Produced intermittently 1887-1963.   See Tables I, III, and Vila
Rock.—Rubble, riprap, and crushed stone.   See Tables I, III, and VIIe.
Selenium.—Produced 731 pounds in 1931.   See Table Vile.
Silver, Lode.—Produced yearly, beginning 1887, mainly from silver-lead-zinc
ore and as a by-product from copper ore.   See Tables I, III, VI, and VIIb.
Silver, Placer.—The accumulated value of placer silver is the value of the
silver content of placer gold received at the Royal Canadian Mint in 1947 and
subsequent years. See Tables I, III, VI, and VIIa. The silver shown in Table VI
includes placer silver.
Sodium Carbonate.—Principal productive periods: Clinton, 1921-49, 9,524
tons, $109,895; Kamloops, 1931-35, 968 tons, $9,088.   See Table VIId.
Structural Materials.—The figure $5,972,171 in Table VIIe is the total for
structural materials in the period 1886-1919 that cannot be allotted to particular
classes of structural materials or assigned to mining divisions, and includes $726,-
323 shown against 1896 in Table II that includes unclassified structural materials
in that and previous years not assignable to particular years. The figure $3,150,828
in Table VIIe under other clay products is the value in the period 1886-1910 that
cannot be allotted to particular clay products or assigned to mining divisions.
 STATISTICS A 19
Sulphur.—From 1916 to 1927 the figures include pyrites shipped. From
1928 the tonnages include the estimated sulphur content of pyrites shipped plus the
sulphur contained in sulphuric acid made from waste smelter gases. Iron sulphide
roasting at the Kimberley acid plant commenced in 1953, and the sulphur content
is included. Elemental sulphur has been recovered from the natural-gas plant at
Taylor since 1958.   See Tables I, III, and VIId.
Talc.—Principal productive periods: Golden, 1927, 5 tons, $356; Lillooet,
1916-36, 296 tons, $5,129; Victoria, 1919-35, 1,504 tons, $29,386. See Tables
I, III, and VIId.
Tin.—First production 1941.   See Tables I, III, and Vila
Tungsten.—Principal productive period, 1937-58.   See Table Vila
Volcanic Ash.—Cariboo, 30 tons.   See Table VIId.
Zinc.—For 1905-08, inclusive, records show shipments of a combined total
of 18,847 tons of zinc ore and zinc concentrates of unstated zinc content. Revisions
were made in 1958 to some yearly totals for lead and zinc to bring them into agreement with the best records of recoveries of lead and zinc from slags treated at the
Trail smelter.   See Tables I, III, VI, and VIIb.
 A 20
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
Average Prices Used in Valuing Provincial Production of Gold,
Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, and Coal
Year
Gold.i
Crude,
Oz.
Gold,
Fine,
Oz.
Silver,
Fine,
Oz.
Copper,
Lb.
Lead,
Lb.
Zinc,
Lb.
Coal,
Short
Ton
1901	
$
17.00
19.30
23.02
28.37
28.94
28.81
28.77
28.93
29.72
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.60
31.66
31.66
30.22
28.78
28.78
29.60
31.29
30.30
28.18
28.31
27.52
28.39
28.32
27.59
27.94
27.61
27.92
29.24
29.25
29.31
29.96
20.67
	
23.47
28.60
34.50
35.19
35.03
34.99
35.18
36.14
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
36.75
35.00
35.00
36.00
38.05
36.85
34.27
34.42
34.07
34.52
34.44
33.55
33.98
33.57
33.95
35.46
37.41
37.75
37.75
Cents
56.002 N.Y.
49.55  „
80.78 „
53.36 ,.
51.33  „
63.45  .,
62.06  „
50.22
48.93
50.812 „
50.64 „
57.79 „
56.80 ,.
52.10  .,
47.20  „
62.38  „
77.35
91.93
105.57
95.80  ..
59.52
64.14
61.63  „
63.442 ,.
69.065 .,
62.107 ..
56.37 ,.
58.176 „
52.993 ..
38.154 ..
28.700 „
31.671 „
37.832 „
47.461 „
64.790 „
45.127 ..
44.881 „
43.477 ..
40.488 ,.
38.249 „
38.261 „
41.166 ,.
45.254 „
43.000 „
47.000 ..
83.650 „
72.000 ..
75.000 Mont.
74.250 U.S.
80.635 .,
94.55
83.157 ,.
83.774 „
82.982 ..
87.851 .,
89.373 .,
87.057 „
86.448 ..
87.469 „
88.633 .,
93.696 ..
116.029 „
137.965 ,,
139.458 „
Cents
16.11 N.Y.
11.70  „
13.24  ..
12.82
15.59
19.28
20.00
13.20
12.98
12.738 „
12.38
16.341 „
15.27
13.60
17.28
27.202 ,.
27.18
24.63
18.70  „
17.45
12.50  „
13.38  „
14.42
13.02
14.042 „
13.795 „
12.92  ,.
14.570 „
18.107 ..
12.982 „
8.116 „
6.380 Lond.
7.454 „
7.419 „
7.795 „
9.477 „
13.078 „
9.972 ,,
10.092 ..
10.086 .,
10.086 „
10.086 ..
11.75  „
12.000 „
12.550 .,
12.80  ..
20.39
22.35 U.S.
19.973 „
23.428 ..
27.70  „
31.079 „
30.333 „
29.112 „
38.276 „
39.787 „
26.031 „
23.419 ..
27.708 „
28.985 .,
28.288 ..
30.473 „
30.646 „
33.412 „
Cents
2.577 N.Y.
3.66 „
3.81
3.88  „
4.24
4.81
4.80
3.78
3.85
4.00
3.98  „
4.024 „
3.93
3.50
4.17
6.172 „
7.91  „
6.67 .,
5.19
7.16  .,
4.09
5.16  „
6.54
7.287 ..
7.848 Lond.
6.751 ,.
5.256 ,.
4.575 „
5.050 „
3.927 „
2.710 „
2.113 ..
2.391 ,.
2.436 „
3.133 „
3.913 „
5.110 „
3.344 .,
3.169 .,
3.362 ,,
3.362 „
3.362 ,.
3.754 „
4.500 „
5.000 ..
6.750 ,.
13.670 ..
18.040 ,,
15.800 U.S.
14.454 „
18.4
16.121 „
13.265 „
13.680 „
14.926 „
15.756 „
14.051 .,
11.755 „
11.670 ..
11.589 „
11.011 „
10.301 „
12.012 „
14.662 „
Cents
t
2.679
1902	
1903	
1904	
1905	
1906	
1907	
3.125
1908	
1909	
1910	
4.60 E. St. L.
4.90  „
5.90  „
4.80  „
4.40  ..
11.25  „
10.88  .,
7.566 „
6.94
6.24  „
6.52
3.95
4.86  .,
5.62
5.39
7.892 Lond.
7.409 „
6.194 „
5.493 „
5.385 .,
3.599 „
2.554 „
2.405 „
3.210 „
3.044 „
3.099 „
3.315 ,.
4.902 „
3.073 .,
3.069 ..
3.411 „
3.411 „
3.411 .,
4.000 „
4.300 „
6.440 „
7.810 .,
11.230 ..
13.930 ,.
13.247 U.S.
15.075 „
19.9
15.874 „
10.675 ,.
10.417 ,.
12.127 „
13.278 „
11.175 „
10.009 .,
10.978 .,
12.557 „
11.695 „
12.422 ..
13.173 „
14.633 „
1911	
1912	
1913	
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
4.464
1919	
1921	
1923	
1925	
1926	
1929	
1930	
4.018
1932	
3.795
1933	
1934	
1935	
1936	
1937	
1939	
1940	
1942	
1943	
1944	
1946	
4.68
1947	
5.12
1948	
6.09
6.51
1950	
6.43
19 51	
6.46
1952	
6.94
1953 	
6.88
1954 	
7.00
6.74
1956	
6.59
195 7	
6.76
1958 	
7.45
7.93
1960	
1961	
6.64
7.40
1962	
7.43
1963	
7.33
1964	
6.94
l Beginning with 1962, the value of the fine-gold content has been used.
Prices for fine gold are the Canadian Mint buying prices. Prices for other metals are those of the markets
indicated, converted into Canadian funds. The abbreviations are: Mont.=Montreal; N.Y.=New York;
Lond.=London; E. St. L.^East St. Louis;  and U.S.=United States.
Prior to 1925 the prices for gold and copper are true average prices, but the prices of other metals were
taken at the following percentages of the year's average price for the metal: Silver, 95 per cent; lead, 90 per
cent; and zinc, 85 per cent.
 STATISTICS
A 21
Table I.—Mineral Production:  Total to Date, Latest Decade,
and Latest Year
Total Quantity
to Date
Total Value
to Date
Total Quantity, 1955-64
Total Value,
1955-64
Quantity,
1964
Value,
1964
 lb.
 lb.
Cadmium 	
 lb.
Chromite 	
Cobalt- _	
tons
.. lb.
lb.
Gold—placer, crude	
oz.
Iron concentrates*	
..tons
.  .lb.
Magnesium      	
.  lb.
Manganese    „
Mercury 	
tons
lb.
Molybdenum	
lb.
lb.
 lb.
Silver—placer*
_ oz.
„       lode 	
n»
Tin	
lb.
Tungsten (WO3) -
 lb.
lh-
Others	
Totals    	
Industrial Minerals
Arsenious oxide -	
lb.
Bentonite —	
Fluorspar  _
Fluxes -   -	
tons
Granules                   	
Gypsum and gypsite	
Hydro-magnesite	
Iron oxide and ochre
Jade   -	
..tons
-tons
tons
 lb.
Magnesium sulphate...
tons
lb.
Natro-alunite —	
Perlite  	
Phosphate rock 	
..tons
Sodium carbonate ...
Talc 	
Totals	
Structural Materials
Clay products	
Lime and limestone	
Rock* ..	
.tons
Sand and gravel	
Stone..  	
Not assigned	
Totals          ..     .
Fuels
Coal*	
-tons
Natural gas—
To pipe-line  M s.c.f.
Liquid by-products* bbl.
Petroleum crude* ..bbl.
Totals	
Grand totals.
3,355
5
16
13,
14,501.
449.
15
16
12,670
,884,672
009,477
369,110
796
1,730|
160,467|
230,556|
,321,506|
785,606|
971,504]1
204,632
1,742
169,210
59,548
286,459
749
1,407
731
20,6951
136,854|
748,8861
019,324|
200,22611
12,547,086
10,546,386
54,044,819
32,295
420
611,303,497
96,816,604
477,340,842
117,052,387
,137,350,475
88,184
32,668
10,432,457
93,261
16,532,393
30,462
135,008
1,389
17,946|
288,550,907|
12,321,941
38,663,751
,120,002,479
5,644,365
16,137,575
1,894,531
17,217,093
5,919,859
4,065,128
32,035,003
1,591,523
213,428
1,864,255
700,270
480,213
6,040,186
555,516,031
44,727
1,842,840
11,168,819
,086,773,148
176,422,637
1,269,499
64,552,901
100,045,739
115,554,700
1,842
138,487
2,002,562
390,351,273|268,737,503
-I-
38,609,136
55,191
5,227,884
20,419,487
39,402,293
5,623
33,659
21,005,006
23
56,563'
16,444,669
--
11
785
5,516
70,373,980
7,071,624
6,791,234
,165,115,048
5,548
28,245
3,398,560
22,848
47,063
2,854,790
5,434     230
69,936,082  5,269,412
5,635,429   352,350
18,937,031
507,696,145|400,796,562
5,611,6731	
321
7,348,617
535,572
58,648,561
533,897
-14,009,582,022].
1,399,008,9481...
1180,926,329
I
22,019,420|
416,608]
212,922]
7911
3,675|
35,3411
3,856,908|
218,014|
2,643,829|
2,253|
18,108|
219,523]
13,894|
12,822,050|
5221
1,H2|
3,842|
10,492]
5,290,556|
1,8051
273,201
85,209,837
2,582,978
16,858
136,195
784,964
6,656,173
3,212,729
10,721,823
27,536
155,050
86,294
254,352
185,818
9,398
11,120
16,894
118,983
58,183,156
34,871
404,887
144,616
2,276
82,078,690]
2,165,843
105,180
919,667
172,106
1,230,264
2,777,220
2,575,683
4,075,349
219,123
1,255,300
2,411,004
86,294
11,537
20,156
30,643,648
278,385
67,460
10,588
____
73,021
19,289
188,303
..|   168,678,230|-
124,528,063
8,880,839
1,075,499
132,384,152
52,093,131
35,927,325
32,116,135
129,620,432
8,746,193
5,972,171
5,840,172
16,268,433
142,398,587
100,023
71,952,543
22,660,515
15,664,733
16,592,740
83,138,706
901,676
537,396
1,211,320
1,449,449
17,708,225
846
11,714,494
119,370
64,555
237,298
397,639
939,559
13,804
3,860,436
17,347,155
10,040,776
3,008,158
2,055,195
1,285,318
10,013,970
25,522
396,859,539|..
210,910,9131.
26,428,939
I
137,923,118] 582,362,582
I
639,376,609| 56,827,835
3,048,373| 723,556
41,916,218! 76,381,862
I
9,617,170
639,315,726
3,048,373
41,916,218
67,827,300
911,326       6,327,678
56,821,290 118,959,880
723,556        706,563
76,381,862| 12,474,054
12,192,816
226,100
24,047,837
-I   716,295,835|.
201,754,008].
| 42,794,4311
I5,291,415,626|.
1,936,201,932|  |267,496,854
* See notes on individual minerals listed alphabetically on pages A 16 to A 19.
i Does not include 71,341 tons of peat moss, valued at $3,991,084.
 A 22
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
Table II.—Total Value of Production, 1836-1964
Year
Metals
Industrial
Minerals
Structural
Materials
Fuels
Total
Totals, 1836-
1900, and by
Decadesi
I
1836-86-
1887	
1888	
1889	
1890	
1891	
1892	
1893	
1894.	
1895	
1896	
1897	
1898	
1899	
1900	
1901_
1902-
1903..
1904_
1905-
1906-
1907-
1908...
1909-
1910..
1911-
1912-.
1913..
1914-
1915...
1916..
1917..
1918-
1919-
1920...
1921-
1922...
1923...
1924...
1925-
1926...
1927...
1928-
1929-
1930...
1931-
1932...
1933_
1934-
1935-
1936-.
1937...
1938-
1939..
1940-
1941..
1942..
1943-
1944-
1945..
1946.
1947-
1948..
1949..
1950.
52,808,750
729,381
745,794
685,512
572,884
447,136
511,075
659,969
1,191,728
2,834,629
4,973,769
7,575,262
7,176,870
8,107,509 I
11,360,546
14,258,455
12,163,561
12,640,083
13,424,755
16,289,165
18,449,602
17,101,305
15,227,991
14,668,141
13,768,731
11,880,062
18,218,266
17,701,432
15,790,727
20,765,212
32,092,648
27,299,934
27,957,302
20,058,217
19,687,532
13,160,417
19,605,401 |
25,769,215
35,959,566
46,480,742
51,867,792
45,134,289
48,640,158
52,805,345
41,785,380
23,530,469
20,129,869
25,777,723
35,177,224
42,006,618
45,889,944
65,224,245
55,959,713
56,216,049
64,332,166
65,807,630
63,626,140
55,005,394
42,095,013
50,673,592
58,834,747
95,729,867
124,091,753
110,219,917
117,166,836
2,400
46,345
17,500
46,446
51,810
133,114
150,718
174,107
281,131
289,426
508,601
330,503
251,922
140,409
116,932
101,319
223,748
437,729
544,192
807,502
457,225
480,319
447,495
460,683
486,554
543,583
724,362
976,171
916,841
1,381,720
1,073,023
1,253,561
1,434,382
1,378,337
1,419,248
1,497,720
1,783,010
2,275,972
2,358,877
2,500,799
2,462,340
43,650
22,168
46,432
77,517
75,201
79,475
129,234
726,3231
150,000
150,000
200,000
250,000
400,000
450,000
525,000
575,000
660,800
982,900
1,149,400
1,200,000
1,270,559
1,500,000
3,500,917
3,436,222
3,249,605
2,794,107
1,509,235
1,247,912
1,097,900
783,280
980,790
1,962,824
1,808,392
2,469,967
2,742,388
2,764,013
2,766,838
3,335,885
2,879,160
3,409,142
3.820,732
4,085,105
3,538,519
1,705,708
1,025,586
1,018,719
1,238,718
1,796,677
2,098,339
1,974,976
1,832,464
2,534,840
2,845
3,173
3,025
3,010
3,401
5,199
5,896
8,968
9,955
10,246
,262
,635
,255
,088
229
563
,803
,222
790
,939
10,758,565
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,824,687
2,693,961
2,734,522
3,582,595
4,126,803
4,744,530
5,016,398
4,832,257
4,332,297
4,953,024
5,511,861
5,548,044
7,637,713
7,356,866
8,574,884
11,108,335
8,071,747
10,786,812
9,197,460
7,745,847
7,114,178
8,900,675
8,484,343
12,833,994
11,975,671
13,450,169
12,836,013
12,880,060
12,678,548
9,911,935
12,168,905
11,650,180
12,269,135
12,633,510
11,256,260
9,435,650
7,684,155
6,523,644
5,375,171
5,725,133
5,048,864
5,722,502
6,139,920
5,565.069
6,280,956
7,088,265
7,660,000
8,237,172
7,742,030
8,217,966
6,454,360
6,732,470
8,680,440
9,765,395
10,549,924
10,119,303
63,610,965
1,991,629
2,260,129
2,502,519
2,682,505
3,613,902
3,119,314
3,594,851
4,230,587
5,659,316
8,394,053
10,459,784
10,909,465
12,434,312
16,355,076
19,674,853
17,445,818
17,497,380
18,955,179
22,461,826
24,980,546
25,888,418
23,784,857
24,513,584
26,377,066
23,499,071
32,458,800
30,194,943
26,382,491
29,521,739
42,391,953
37,056,284
41,855,707
33,304,104
35,609,126
28,135,325
35,207,350
41,330.560
48,752,446
61,517,804
67,077,605
60,720,313
65,227,002
68,689,839
55,763,360
35,233,462
28,806,716
32,639,163
42,407,630
48,837,783
54,133,485
74,438,675
64,416,599
65,711,189
75,028,294
77,566,453
76,471,329
67,151,016
54,742,315
62,026,901
72,549,790
112,583,082
145,184,247
133,226,430
139,995,418
151,818,407
221,579,527
332,274,218
I
532,421,604
521,652,996
941,496,981
1 See note on structural materials, page A 18.
J
 STATISTICS
A 23
Table II.—Total Value of Production, 1836-1964—Continued
Year
Metals
Industrial
Minerals
Structural
Materials
Fuels
Total
Totals, 1836-
1900, and by
Decadesi
1951 	
1952	
$
153,598,411
147,857,523
126,755,705
123,834,286
142,609,505
149,441,246
125,353,920
104,251,112
105,076,530
130,304,373
128,565,774
159,627,293
172,852,866
180,926,329
$
2,493,840
2,181,464
3,002,673
5,504,114
6,939,490
9,172,792
11,474,050
9,958,768
12,110,286
13,762,102
12,948,308
14,304,214
16,510,898
17,347,155
$
10,606,048
11,596,961
13,555,038
14,395,174
15,299,254
20,573,631
25,626,939
19,999,576
19,025,209
18,829,989
19,878,921
21,366,265
23,882,190
26,428,939
$
10,169,617
9,729,739
9,528,279
9,161,089
9,005,111
9,665,983
8,537,920
10,744,093
11,431,938
14,468,869
18,414,318
34,073,712
42,617,633
42,794,431
$
176,867,916
171,365,687
152,841,695
152,894,663
173,853,360
188,853,652
170,992,829
144,953,549
147,643,963
177,365,333
179,807,321
229,331,650
255,863,587
267,496,854
$
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957	
1958 	
1959	
1960 	
1961 ..     .
1,657,632,647
1967.
1963 	
1964	
	
Totals   -
4.009.582.022  1     168.678.230
396.850 53Q   1     T1fi.795.81S
5,291,415,626
 A 24
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
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NO  NO   _
 A 30 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1964
Table VIIa.—Production, 1963 and 1964, and
Period
Placer
Lode
Metals
Industrial
Minerals
Division
Quantity
(Crude)
Gold»
Value
Silver*
Value
Structural
Materials
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
Oz.
$
$
$
7,951,884
9,131,133
36,128,604
$
$
213,735
90,942
1,554,307
12,739
1,617
186
317
735,470
1,760
1,023
2,607,373
21
9
10,171
33,253
5,548
8,720
17,378,926
53,138
31,446
54,077,253
642
189
243,069
9,398
Atlin	
37
60
1,604
284
165
2,343
3
4
23
430
38,045,476
695,494
754,393
41,800,725
20,325
16,030
64,555
279,375
309,425
523,763
373,185
6,966,130
31,834
848,354
68,617,438
70,504,477
1,809,201,216
3,382,581
2,663,952
54,834,493
4,088,631
4,419,970
137,557,578
6,053,988
8,838,231
18,046,081
162,427
541,549
855,100
7,546,421
552,450
1,058,929
6,666,009
142,762
171.807
67,610
20,531
468,450
5
5,351,732
9,378
	
48,732
469
11,268
1,739,499
27,257
26,116
5,074
115,682
2
2,323,897
858,698
832,928
21
27,592
604
604,710
4
7
824,396
10,939,726
537,586
6,528,308
13,475,931
13,339,110
91,816,989
15,529
11,404
89,023
44,000
74,510
896,610
81,438
76,956
240,032
88,000
84,000
1,066,261
261,181
50,184
25
1,248,151
755
7
4
6,391
3,308,082
2,831,057
136,641,810
13,388,639
11,913,569
101,026,394
13,164,583
17,838,859
267,890,996
3,641,406
3,409,162
19,326,859
17,622,062
18,114,466
62,075,519
20,239
22,440
33,069,267
3,531
9,112
51,140,478
1,382
2,886,361
209,952
196,717
91,916
1,894,304
36
2,027,666
1,896,475
2,186,199
866
19,300
39,405,121
237,217
320,795
3,585
88,988
3,694,284
5,841,366
6,637,614
11,608
243,614
86,807,623
38,392
5,250
234
2,336
180
56,255
4,764
66,989
5,587
1,498,840
10,050
561,407
519
32
756
172 500
2,400
13,860
358,042
399,401
4.875,345
342,796
4,486,952
111,826
Revel strike
13
234
302
5.315
1
6
64,304
1,296,365
68,768
74,662
7,582
10
33
12,194
164,477
301
906
289,493
B7
11,237,401
172
1,594
120,194,164
3,112,191
4,033,464
218,806,143
7,331,224
8,190,919
210,398,536
75,010
12,186
1,459,551
Similkameen
131,000
10
10
142,450
18,558
2,747,827
193,334
334,117
4,603
105,569
1,229,400
7,830,000
38,490
63,582
366
9,397
1,137,032
Trail Crept
66,232
68,907
851
24,260
2,065,110
5,476,475
4,947,375
225,080,604
11,004
810
6,460,128
5,097,385
6,152,684
182
27
5,306
603
63,189,998
4
134,723
98,362
2,732
72,885
26
197,845
2,539,116
3,979
12,928,756
12,242,429
13,230,479
222,520,661
3,978
75
70
188,451
1,326,850
1,379,910
38,233,385
2,951,651
5,778,979
6,511,971
628
255
246
1,578,239
15,680
7,435
7,437
18,193,670
131,597,637
47
45
13,064
1,536,358
1,504,103
14,852,675
Totals
1963
1964
To date
4,620
1,842
5,230,556
135,411
65,191
96,816,604
898
321
17,946
172,716,557
180,870,817
3,912,747,472
16,510,898
17,347,155
168,678,230
23 882,190
26,428,939
396,859,539
* See notes on individual minerals listed alphabetically on pages A 16 to A 19.
iRe "not assigned," see footnotes under Tables VIIb and VIIe.
Note.—For individual metals, industrial minerals, and structural materials, see Tables VIIb, VIIe, VIId,
and VIIe.
 STATISTICS
Total to Date, by Mining Divisions—Summary
a 31
Fuels
Coal*
Petroleum*
Natural Gas
(Direct to Pipe-line)
Liquid
By-products*
Division
Totals
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Tons
$
Bbl.
$
M S.C.F.
i
$
Bbl.
$
$
8,165,619
9,222,075
37,725,562
18,324
9,210
55,755,756
1,288,709
1,223,744
290
1,100
103,126,926
645
32,027
1,396,635
766,907
5,454,401
5,668,799
247,433,871
74,785,195
846,059
77,095,986
55,537,404
2,070,001,695
3,944,409
3,771,613
63,251,269
4.115,888
4,446,086
140,855,837
6,886,916
9,663,235
15,087
1,146
50
99,433
59,765
10,414
750
699,521
36,178,597
50,403,567
50,067,794
230,590,673
3,534,322
3,039,178
140,652,839
13,458,739
12,474,054
41,916,218
25,470,361
24,047,837
76,381,862
105,525,373
118,959,880
639,376,609
10,719,298
12,192,816
56,827,835
614,249
706,563
3,048.373
189,977
226,100
723,556
76,728
711,085
588,622
300,619,487
16 040,199
58,382
74,277,423
441,966,912
13,483,238
271,914,300
9,570,772
10,130,776
107,444,357
17,661,114
18,119,716
73,732,576
321,684
442,762
41,978,828
473,399
473,120
57,322,517
70,150
60
660
2,929,584
5,700
6,835
11,080,836
61,437
69,507
2,909,153
445,297
1,122
5,008
74,662
12,861,486
131,473
144,960
142,803,777
3,305,525
4,367,581
227,971,228
7,369,714
8,254,501
211,544,965
141,242
4,617,442
19,553,725
36
116
85,832,491
10,584,864
11,100,869
294,736,036
135,330
98,362
3,226,385
8,318,170
6,516,020
144,730,524
15,113,119
16,121,974
293,813,455
850,541
911,326
137,923,118
6,237,997
6,327,678
582,362,582
13,458,739
12,474,054
41,916,218
25,470,361
24,047,837
76,381,862
105,525,373
118,959,880
639,376,609
10,719,298
12,192,816
56,827,835
614,249
706,563
3,048,373
189,977
226,100
723,556
255,863,587
267,496,854
5,291,415,626
 A 32
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1964
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MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
Table VIId.—Production, 1963 and 1964, and Total
Period
Asbestos
Barite
Diatomite
Fluxes (Quartz
and Limestone)
Granules, (Quartz,
Limestone, and
Granite)
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Alberni	
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1903
1964
To date
1903
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
19G3
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
Tons
S
Tons
$
Tons
$
Tons
$
Tons
$
Cariboo- 	
458
1,143
3,645
16,030
64,555
135,895
48
168
8
8,207
10,688
212,914
80
69,588
119,370
2,582,898
Golden	
1,790,502
1,540,319
Kamloops— —
Liard 	
63,215
67,460
416,008
11,681,337
11,714,494
85,209,837
Lillooet  -
20,000
31,012
755,831
44,000
74,510
896,610
S 7K2I        R1  438
3,418
8,011
6,000
4,000
79,487
7,601
8,174
175,957
New Westminster
88,000
84,000
1,066,261
Osoyoos  —
40,483
42,002
701,865
178,937
162,718
3.159,203
9.692
11,871
91,171
1,394,657
601,019
1,050,722
29,692
418,606
7
7
90
75
70
1,145
9,605
157,080
Not assigned  	
Totals	
1963
1964
To date
63,215
67,460
416,608
11,681,337
11,714,494
85,209,837
8,207
10,588
212,922
69,588
119,370
2,582,978
458
1,143
3,645
16,030
64,555
135,895
60,490
73,021
3.856,908
223,012
237,298
6,656,173
19,444
19,289
218,014
348,543
397,639
3,212,729
See notes on individual minerals listed alphabetically on pages A 16 to A 19.
i Arsenious oxide. 3 Fluorspar.
2 Bentonite. * Hydromagnesite.
5 Iron oxide and ochre.
6 Magnesium sulphate.
 STATISTICS
to Date, by Mining Divisions—Industrial Minerals
A 39
Gypsum and
Gypsite
Jade
Mica
Sulphur
Other
Value
Division
Totals
Period
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Tons
$
Lb.
$
Lb.
$
Tons
$
$
$
1963
1964
9,3987
9,398
To date
1963
1964
20,3256
20,325
16,030
64,555
279,375
To date
1963
1964
10,013,800
143,012
30012
To date
1963
1964
873
6.236
156,1914 6 10
162,427
541,549
855,100
7,546,421
552,450
1,058,929
6.666,009
To date
44,940
70,963
440,714
541,549
855,100
7,230,623
1963
1964
112,878
298,824
482,862
939,559
4,081,835
16.8949
To date
160,954
1963
188,303
1,280,503
1964
1,2765 11
To date
1963
1964
783,5783
2,323,897
To date
1963
1964
1,246,918
6,323.178
424,700
2,075
203,0556 10
6,528,308
13,475,931
13,339,110
91.816,989
15,529
11,404
89,023
44,000
74,510
896,610
83,438
76,956
240,032
88,000
84,000
1,066,261
To date
75,795
69,1 61
336,174
1,794,594
1,624,616
6,607,152
1963
1964
To date
16,000
10,337
218,323
15,529
11,404
83,894
1963
1964
5,12911
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
55.9015
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
2,407
10,050
10,050
To date
1963
1,200
1,200
2,400
2,400
2,400
13,860
358,042
399,401
4,875.345
1964
11,46018
To date
1963
1964
1.588.800
25,938
295,5471 3 6
1963
1964
250
1,700
16,8582
18,558
To date
1963
1964
41,624
777
270
633,736
178,678
11,004
810
5.933,318
1,229,400
11,004
810
6.460,128
To date
1963
1964
634.250
10,815
97,3895
To date
160,500
3,978
3,978
75
70
188,451
1,326,850
1,379,910
38,233,385
80,22611
132,685
137,991
3,838,308
1,326,850
1,379,910
38,233,385
1963
1964
To date
160,954
482,862
939,659
10,721,823
16,000
11,537
219,523
15,529
13,804
86,294
i
254,197
278,385
5,290,556
3,673,997
3,860,436
58,183,156
16,510,898
17,347,155
168,678,230
188,303
1964
2,643,829
12,82S;0B0 188,818
1
1,703,527
To date
7 Natro-alunite.
8 Perlite.
» Phosphate rock,
io Sodium carbonate.
11 Talc.
12 Volcanic ash.
 A 40                  MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
Table VIIe.—Production, 1963 and 1964, and Total
Division
Period
Cement
Lime and
Limestone
Building-
stone
Rubble,
Riprap,
and
Crushed
Rock
Sand and
Gravel
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
t
$
$
$
85.2S3
53,337
199,487
$
128,452
37,605
1,354,820
12,739
430
209,839
466,488
323,072
5,857,879
Atlin	
1,108
98,478
46,475
50,113
1,056,874
7,500
31,834
141,156
108,308
55,545
3,908,162
9,378
48,732
1,575,506
27,257
25,116
493,036
281,594
244,180
4,826,462
537,586
258,181
2,849,696
137,748
139,335
1,498,238
256,038
237,824
3,160,314
224,118
298,805
2,752,384
1,606
63,499
12,065
43,873
71,941
1,311,838
1,000
24,000
125,339
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1903
1964
	
1,000
171,319
551,334
580,216
6,010,885
42,560
30,500
12,000
18,000
3,000
30,065
72,204
	
	
57,382
527,328
44,701
78,554
544,658
2,003
3,711
496,389
2RK 989
To date
1963
100
1,595,736
1,869,821
31,321,900
2,000
	
Nelson	
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
3,199,257
11,096
18,279
388,994
34.543
53.626
116,857
1,592,818
6,664
20,974
9,310,882
35,008,306
38,392
5,250
420,066
153,809
316,319
3,789,003
110,176
62,550
1,097,084
63,204
66,135
1,113.323
130,000
136,950
2,152,057
118,006
173,451
4,674,622
35,101
58,922
909,540
62,182
63,394
1,732,228
1,069,070
1,525,486
28,067,230
131,786
92,950
2,457,416
933,939
615,627
15,116,496    . .
1.462.341
8,000
133,341
18,091
26,477
689,598
650
1,040
150,047
5,564
8,527
339,053
1,000
5,500
536,344
20,069
112,683
1.455,702
3,389
4,660
111,349
1,200
5,513
223,398
4
3,077
1,000
714
33,784
14,850
1.000
5,575
10,500
11.571
55,259
47,983
1,542,427
24,000
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
1903
1964
To date
1963
1964
To date
	
144,000
1,000
115.143
2,850
28,000
81,484
4,028,311
4,626,619
22,483,010
579
4,011,360
40,885
7,498,921
2,937
5,412
205,430
46,499
18,175
19,820
846,182
81,052
4,518,457
5,414,157
109,890,642
45
456,413
74.017
Totals	
67,1191     1,436,984
423,591|     4,455,569
315,498
505,018
1963
1964
To date
8,546,768
10,040,776
132,384,152
1,723,796
2,055,195
35,927,325
13,946
25,522
8,746,193
1,259,0021     9,514,095
1,285,3181   10,013,970
32,110,1351129.620,432
1
* See note under structural materials,
page A 18.
 STATISTICS
to Date, by Mining Divisions—Structural Materials
A 41
Brick
(Common)
Face,
Paving,
and
Sewer
Brick
Firebricks,
Blocks
Clays
Structural Tile
(Hollow
Blocks),
Roof-tile,
Floor-
tile
Drain-tile
and
Sewer-
pipe
Pottery
(Glazed
or Un-
glazed)
Other
Clay
Products
Unclassified
Material
Division
Totals
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
213,735
90,942
1,554,307
12,739
430
309,425
10,800
523,763
373,185
1.193
184
4,651
15,807
22,042
6,966,130
31,834
142,762
171,807
67,610
7,800
8,118
5,351,732
9,378
48,732
13,654
1,739,499
  1
|
27,257
26,116
114,361
6,922
858,698
832,928
|
824,396
72,379
10,939,720
|
537,586
|
261,181
209,952
196,717
2,027,666
1,896,475
2,186,199
1,104,295
38,939
35 758
39,405,121
237,217
|
320,795
19,110
2,864
292,535
60,594
5,472,618
        |     .
3,694,284
63,499
49,826
1,780,773
758,008
811,572
13,648,983
33,151|       31,376
38,585        31,017
952,21512,909,788
i              • •
846,202
1,071,324
13,609,337
14,562
13,332
379,231
466,042
469,541
2,121,698
86,807,623
38,392
|
5,250
561,407
|
172.500
|     .
342,796
5,274
I
|
4,486,952
|
111,826
|
64,304
1,29G,365
|
68,768
1,459,551
|
131 000
          1
142,450
1,363
11,992
2.747,827
1
	
193,334
1
334,117
4,925
8,324
7,830,000
	
38,490
1                     1     ■
63,582
|
1,137,032
... |     .
66,232
1                     1 	
68,607
|     .
2,065,110
1     •
5,097,385
1
6,152,684
142,208
241,216
580,778
12,724
23,3621      88,304
!        	
63,189,998
	
134,723
    |     	
98,362
131,467
6,202
1,011
5|       18,224
 |	
4,325
20
308,408
462,367
1,408,009
2,951,651
5,778,979
 |	
6,511,971
1,814,647
29,552
119,930
1,050|    705,821
 j	
1,072,346
136,504
131,597,637
1,536,358
 |   	
 |	
1,504,103
 1	
 1	
3,180,828*
5,972,171*
14,852,675
63,4991    292,535
49.8261        R0.R34
758,008
811,572
14,355,353
33,1511      31,376
38.5851       31.017
846,202
1,071,324
14,562
13,332
539,097
785,250
931,908
6,862,989
23,882,190
26,428,939
396,859,539
5,193,507
5,791,575
1,030,769
3,633,833
14,686,008
5,972,171
 A 42 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
Table VIIIa.—Quantity1 and Value of Coal per Year to Date
Year
Tons
(2,000 Lb.)
Value
Year
Tons
(2,000 Lb.)
Value
1836-^0
41,871
15,956
15,427
20,292
23,906
32,068
36,757
28,129
34,988
49,286
40,098
33,424
55,4582
55,4582
55,4592
91,334
123,362
155,895
172,540
191,348
270,257
299,708
255,760
315,997
238,895
441,358
409,468
365,832
462,964
548,017
649,411
759,518
1,152,590
925,495
1,095,690
1,134,509
1,052,412
1,002,268
999,372
1,263,272
1,435,314
1,781,000
1,894,544
1,838,621
1,624,742
1,887,981
2,044,931
2,126,965
2,485,961
2,362,514
2,688,672
3,314,749
2,541,698
3,211,907    1
1
$149,548
56,988
55,096
72,472
85,380
115,528
131,276
100,460
124,956
176,020
143,208
119,372
164,612
164,612
164,612
244,641
330,435
417,576
462,156
522,538
723,903
802,785
685,171
846,417
639,897
1,182,210
1,096,788
979,908
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,824,687
2,693,961
2,734,522
3,582,595
4,126,803
4,744,530
5,016,398
4,832,257
4,332,297
4,953,024
5,511,861
5,548,044
7,637,713
7,356,866
8,574,884
11,108,335
8,071,747
10,786,812
1Q13
2,713,535
2,237,042
2,076,601
2,583,469
2,436,101
2,575,275
2,433,540
2,852,535
2,670,314
2,726,793
2,636,740
2,027,843
2,541,212
2,406,094
2,553,416
2,680,608
2,375,060
1,994,493
1,765,471
1,614,629
1,377,177
1,430,042
1,278,380
1,352,301
1,446,243
1,388,507
1,561,084
1,662,027
1,844,745
1,996,000
1,854,749
1,931,950
1,523,021
1,439,092
1,696,350
1,604,480
1,621,268
1,574,006
1,573,572
1,402,313
1,384,138
1,308,284
1,332,874
1,417,209
1,085,657
796,413
690,011
788,658
919,142
825,339
850,541
911,326
$9,197,460
IRfiO
1914
7,745,847
1f!fi1
7,114,178
186?
iqk;
8,900,675
8,484,343
12,833,994
1R63
1917
1918
1R«4
1R«
1919
11,975,671
1866
1990
13,450,169
1867
1R6R
1921
1077
12,836,013
12,880,060
I860
io-n
12,678,548
1870
1Q/>4
9,911,935
1871
1925
1076
12,168,905
1872
11,650,180
1R73
1077
12,269,135
1874
107R
12,633,510
1R7S
19?9
11,256,260
1876
1030
9,435,650
1R77
1031
7,684,155
1878
1037
6,523,644
1R79
icm
5,375,171
1880             ..         _   _ .
1914
5,725,133
1RR1
1935	
1036
5,048,864
1882
5,722,502
1883
1937
1938.
1939
1940
1941
104?
6,139,920
1884
5,565,069
1R8S
6,280,956
1RR6
7,088,265
1RR7
7,660,000
1888
8,237,172
1889
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
7,742,030
1890
8,217,966
1RQ1
6,454,360
1892
6,732,470
1893
8,680,440
1894
9,765,395
1895      -
1896      	
1897	
1R9R
1949
1950.-..             	
1951
1952
1953
1954
10,549,924
10,119,303
10,169,617
9,729,739
9,528,279
1900
9,154,544
1901
19S5
8,986,501
1QSK
9,346,518
1903
1904
1957
19SR
7,340,339
5,937,860
1905
1906
1959
1960.
1961	
1962            	
1963
1964
Totals
5,472,064
5,242,223
1907   	
1908
1909
6,802,134
6,133,986
6,237,997
1910
6,327,678
1912
137,923,118
$582,362,582
i Quantity from 1836 to 1909 is gross mine output and includes material lost in picking and washing.   For
1910 and subsequent years the quantity is that sold and used.
2 Estimated breakdown of previously combined figure for three years.
 STATISTICS A 43
Table VIIIb.—Quantity1 and Value of Coal Sold and Used2
Mining Division and Period
Total Sales
Used under
Company
Boilers
Used in
Making
Coke
Total Sold and Used
Cariboo—
Total to 1950  ...
Tons
257
Tons
33
Tons
Tons
290
$
1,100
Total to date   .
257
33
290
1,100
Fort Steele—
Total to 1950   	
31,287,472
7,014,784
619,828
532,289
557,939
639,265
2,006,789
145,624
14,698
10,788
17,089
17,452
9,704,778
2,195,744
200,190
191,454
191,879
189,342
42,999,039
9,356,152
834,716
734,531
766,907
846,059
166,468,348
1951-60..	
1961   	
1962...                                              	
1963
58,606,978
5,979,805
5,255,540
5,454,401
1964         	
5,668,799
Kamloops—
Total to 1950	
14,348
739
15,087
59,765
Total to date	
14,348
739    |    	
15,087
59,765
Liard—
Total to 1950             	
1951-60
58,417
36,083
2,062
1,389
1,146
50
266
20
58,683
36,103
2,062
1,389
1,146
50
325,395
333,461
1961	
17,000
1962    ....
1963 ...                   	
——	
12,501
10,414
1964 	
750
Total to date	
99,147
286
99,433
699,521
Nanaimo—
Total to 1950  	
1951-60
67,181,037
1,951,075
76,009
83,534
76,728
58,382
4,280,602
11,071
558,985
72,020,624
1,962,146
76,009
83,534
76,728
58,382
278,647,173
19,134,499
1961	
736,814
196?
801,294
1963
1964
711,085
588,622
Total to date 	
69,426,765    I
4,291,673    I
558,985
74,277,423
300,619,487
Nicola—
Total to 1950—	
2,731,340
9,016
159
125
60
188,884
2,920,224
9,016
159
125
60
10 985,359
1951-60	
91,725
1961	
1,717
1962	
	
1,375
1963 --	
660
Total to date 	
2,740,700
188,884    |    	
2,929,584
11,080,836
Omineca—
Total to 1950
214,126
202,931
5,850
5,760
5,700
6,835
4,095
218,221
202,931
5,850
5,760
5,700
6,835
1,034,134
1951-60
1,616,775
1961	
64,024
1962_
63,276
1963 ...
61,437
1964	
	
69,507
Total to date	
441,107
4,095    |     	
445,297
2,909,153
Osoyoos—
Total to 1950 _.  	
1,122
|
1,122
5,008
Total to date	
1,122
1,122
5,008
Similkameen—
Total to 1950	
4,055,080
212,781
346
349,235
	
4,404,315
212,781
346
18,426,725
1951-60	
1,124,226
1961 	
2,774
Total to date	
4,268,207
349,235    |
4,617,442
19,553,725
Skeena—
Total to 1950.   .   	
36
|
36
116
Total to date	
36
	
36
116
Provincial totals—
Total to 1950	
105,543,235
9,426,670
704,254
623,097
641,573
704,532
6,830,643
156,715
14,698
10,788
17,089
17,452
10,263,763
2,195,744
200,190
191,454
191,879
189,342
122,637,641
11,779,129
919,142
825.339
850,541
911,326
475,953,123
1951-60
80,907,664
1961
6,802,134
1962 	
6,133,986
1963...	
1964 	
6,237,997
6,327,678
Total to date 	
117,643,266
7,047,385
13,232,372
137,923,118
582,362,582
i For differences between gross mine output and coal sold refer to table " Production and Distribution by
Collieries and by Districts " in section headed " Coal " or " Coal-mining " in this and preceding Annual Reports.
2 The totals " sold and used " include:—
Sales to retail and wholesale dealers, industrial users, and company employees.
Coal used in company boilers, including steam locomotives.
Coal used in making coke.
 A 44
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
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 STATISTICS
A 45
Table X.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1964
Dividends Paid during 1963 and 1964
Bralorne Pioneer Mines Ltd.
Brynnor Mines Ltd..
1963
$645,740
Cassiar Asbestos Corporation Ltd  2,376,000
Craigmont Mines Ltd  4,084,480
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of
Canada, Ltd  21,294,551
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. Ltd  582,878
Giant Mascot Mines Ltd  244,141
Nimpkish Iron Mines Ltd  756,000
Sheep Creek Mines Ltd  225,000
Others  4,300
1964
$645,740
3,220,000
2,376,000
5,139,166
26,453,906
582,878
279,018
225,600
5,000
Totals.
$30,213,090      $38,927,308
Dividends Paid Yearly, 1917 to 1964, Inclusive
Year
1917.
Amount Paid
  $3,269,494
1918  2,704,469
1919  2,494,28 3
1920  1,870,296
1921  736,629
1922  3,174,756
1923  2,983,570
1924  2,977,276
1925  5,853,419
1926  8,011,137
1927  8,816,681
1928  9,572,536
1929  11,263,118
1930  10,543,500
1931  4,650,857
1932  2,786,958
1933  2,471,735
1934  4,745,905
1935  7,386,070
1936  10,513,705
1937  15,085,293
1938  12,068,875
1939  11,865,698
1940  14,595,530
1941  16,598,110
Year Amount Paid
1942  $ 13,627,104
1943  11,860,159
1944  11,367,732
1945  10,487,395
1946  15,566,047
1947  27,940,213
1948  37,672,319
1949  33,651,096
1950  34,399,330
1951  40,921,238
1952  32,603,956
1953  22,323,089
1954  25,368,262
1955  35,071,583
1956  36,262,682
1957  24,247,420
1958  14,996,123
1959  16,444,281
1960  20,595,943
1961  20,720,239
1962  24,394,297
1963  30,213,090
1964  38,927,308
Total  $736,700,797
 A 46 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
Table X.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1964—Continued
Lode-gold Mines1
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Erie                                   	
Nelson
Tye Siding	
Gold
$94,872
Gold	
Gold        ..
Gold	
25,000
Bavnnne
25,000
Bralorne Mines Ltd.2 	
17,759,500
Bralorne Pioneer Mines Ltd.2 	
Bridge River  	
Princess Royal Island	
Wells.  .  	
Gold	
Gold.	
Gold	
Gold 	
Gold	
Gold-copper
Gold	
Gold..  	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold _ 	
Gold
3,818,905
Belmont-Surf Inlet
1,437,500
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Co. Ltd.        	
Cariboo-McKinney Con. M. & M. Co	
1,679,976
565,588
Canadian Pacific Exploration (Porto Rico)	
Centre Star...
Nelson	
Rossland	
Oliver	
37,500
472,255
Fairview Amalgamated
Fern Gold Mining & Milling Co. Ltd	
5,254
9,375
Gold Brit Mining Co, Ltd.
Sheep Creek	
Ymir	
Hedley  	
Wells    	
Rossland   	
Greenwood	
Hedley   	
Hedley	
668,5953
Goodenough (leasers) _   ..
13,731
1,290,553
2,491,2363
I.X.L  _. ...
134,025
Gold	
Gold	
Gold
11,751
Kelowna Exploration Co. Ltd. (Nickel Plate)
2,040,000
780,0001
Kootenay Belle Gold Mines Ltd	
Gold....	
Gold-copper	
Gold-copper	
Gold 	
Gold	
Gold           ..   .
Gold	
Gold
357,856
1,475,000
Le Roi No. 2 Ltd.. _
1,574,640
20,450
Motherlode	
163,500
Mount Zeballos Gold Mines Ltd  ...
165,000
Nickel Plate (Hedley Gold Mining Co. Ltd.)
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C. Ltd.2	
Hedley	
Bridge River	
3,423,191
10,048,914
Poorman	
Gold    .
25,000
Premier Gold Mining Co. Ltd ~   ..
Premier - 	
Zeballos	
Sheep Creek 	
Erie 	
Sheep Creek	
Sheep Creek	
Premier 	
Zeballos. 	
Gold
Gold...	
Gold.	
18,858,0755
Privateer Mine T.tri.
1,914,183
Queen (prior to Sheep Creek Gold Mines Ltd.)..
98,674
Relief Arlington Mines Ltd. (Second Relief)	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold
308,0003
1,433,6403
3,796,875 7
Silbak Premier Mines Ltd.	
Spud Valley Gold Mines Ltd	
2,425,0005
168,000
Sunset No. 9.
Gold-copper	
Gold
Gold-copper	
Gold	
Gold  .
Gold
115,007
Surf Inlet Consolidated Gold Mines Ltd	
Surf Inlet...	
120,279
1,245,250
Ymir Gold
Ymir
300,000
Ymir Yankee Girl
Ymir	
415,0023
Miscellaneous mines
108,623
$81,920,775
t The gold-copper properties of Rossland are included in this table.
2 Early in 1959 Bralorne Mines Ltd. and Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C. Ltd. were merged under the name of
Bralorne Pioneer Mines Ltd., and dividend payments for 1959 and subsequent years are entered under the new
company listing.
3 Includes " return of capital " and " liquidating " payments.
* Former Kelowna Exploration Company Limited; changed in January, 1951.
5 Up to and including 1936, dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company Limited were derived from
operations of the company in British Columbia. Subsequent dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company
Limited have been derived from the operations of subsidiary companies in British Columbia and elsewhere and
are not included in the figure given. In 1936, Silbak Premier, a subsidiary of Premier Gold Mining Company,
took over the former gold operations of that company in British Columbia. Dividends paid by Silbak Premier
are given above.
6 Since March, 1956, company name is Sheep Creek Mines Ltd.
7 In several years, preceding 1953, company revenue included profits from operations of the Lucky Jim zinc-
lead mine.
 STATISTICS
A 47
Table X.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1964—Continued
Silver-Lead-Zinc Mines
Company ox Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc—
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc   .
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc ....
Silver-lead-zinc—
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc    ..
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc 	
Silver-lead-zinc ...
Silver-lead-zinc—
Silver-lead-zinc.
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc ...
Silver-lead-zinc ....
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc—
Silver-lead-zinc.—
Silver-lead-zinc......
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc.._
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc  ...
Silver-lead-zinc.   ..
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc.—
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc   ..
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
$10,000
Base Metals Mining Corporation Ltd.  (Monarch and Kicking Horse)
Field
586,1431
Beaverdell 	
Greenwood	
97,200
48,000
388,297
25,000
11,175,400
New Denver 	
5,500
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Can-
Trail	
Field. 	
Smithers                 	
Ainsworth	
580,428,2792
5,203
50,000
35,393
Giant Mascot Mines Ltd..	
179,263
Cody	
Hall Creek _	
45,668
8,904
Beaverdell	
132,464
Highland-Bell Ltd    - .
2,111,840
Similkameen	
Sandon	
6,000
400,000
20,000
Retallack 	
Three Forks	
20,000
213,000
Sandon-	
50,000
Three Forks	
80,000
Sandon	
6,000
10,257
70,500
Three Forks 	
Cody.	
Three Forks
71,387
45,088
Cody  	
Kimberiey...	
Sandon	
72,859
North Star	
497,901
6,754
Slocan City	
110,429
Sandon — 	
1,438,000
142,2383
25,000
Alamo —   	
Rambler	
467,250
4,033,050
Remac.	
Cody	
Sandon -	
Movie.	
334,992
Ruth Mines Ltd.                                   	
125,490
566,000
1,088,100
1,267,600
1,715,333
10,365
2,734,688
88,000
Invermere  	
Sandon 	
Hazelton 	
Ainsworth	
Silverton	
Retallack  	
Beaton	
Sunshine Lardeau Mines Ltd   	
Torbrit Silver Mines Ltd. _	
164,000
390,000
64,000
850,000
Utica    	
Violamac Mines (B.C.) Ltd	
Wallace Mines Ltd. (Sally)	
Beaverdell 	
135,000
Washington
20,000
30,867
592,515
278,620
70,239
Miscellaneous mines     ... .
Total, silver-lead-zinc mines 	
$613,644,076
i Includes $466,143 " return of capital " distribution prior to 1949.
2 Earnings of several company mines, and custom smelter at Trail.
3 Includes $10,504 paid in 1944 but not included in the yearly figure.
4 These two properties were amalgamated as Silversmith Mines Limited in August, 1939.
 A 48 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
Table X.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1964—Continued
Copper Mines
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Britannia M. A S. Cn.l
Britannia Beach.... 	
Greenwood	
Texada Island	
Merritt..    .    	
Phoenix, Anyox, Copper
Copper 	
Copper—	
$18,803,772
615,399
8,500
Craigmnnt Mines ltd,
Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co.2 	
Copper	
Copper 	
Copper.. 	
Copper -	
Copper 	
10,117,618
29,873,226
175,000
Nelson. ~   	
233,280
Miscellaneous mines
261,470
$60,088,265
i The Britannia Mining and Smelting Co. Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Howe Sound Company
(Maine), paid the dividends shown to its parent company. On June 30, 1958, consolidation between the Howe
Sound Company (Maine) and Haile Mines Inc. became effective, bringing into existence Howe Sound Company
(Delaware). The Britannia mine became a division of the new Howe Sound Company, and in August Britannia
Mining and Smelting Co. was liquidated voluntarily.
2 The Granby Consolidated Mining Smelting and Power Company dividends commenced in 1904 and cover
all company activities in British Columbia to date. The figure includes all dividends, capital distributions, and
interim liquidating payments, the latter being $4,500,000, paid, in 1936, prior to reorganization.
Coal Mines
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Coal  	
Coal 	
Coal  	
Coal	
Coal     	
$16,000,000
Bulkley Valley Collieries Ltd 	
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. Ltd	
Telkwa..       .
Fernie	
Nanaimo - 	
Nanaimo -	
24,000
19,702,477
828,271
Unsworth & Dunn
7,065
Total, coal mines  	
$36,561,813
Aggregate of All Classes
Lode-gold mining-
  $81,920,775
Silver-lead-zinc mining and smelting  613,644,076
Copper-mining  60,088,265
Coal-mining  36,561,813
Miscellaneous, structural, and placer gold  27,112,084
Total  $819,327,013
Note.—The term " miscellaneous " noted in each class of dividend covers all payments of $5,000 and under,
together with payments made by companies or individuals requesting that the item be not disclosed.
In compiling the foregoing table of dividends paid, the Department wishes to acknowledge the kind assistance
given by companies, individuals, and trade journals in giving information on the subject.
 STATISTICS
A 49
Table XI.—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for
Operations of All Classes
Class
Salaries and
Wages
Fuel and
Electricityl
Process
Supplies! 2
$50,270,379
21,491
2,787,760
1,225,144
2,962,052
6,357,733
$6,234,889
243
289,221
173.521
880,017
2,627,970
$19,782,555
Placer-mining                         	
35,284
1,278,074
2,659,036
Structural materials industry	
3,875,004
563,624,559
57,939,294
55,522,171
50,887,275
52,694,818
49.961,996
48.933,560
56.409,056
57.2G6.026
51,890,246
48.702,746
55.543.490
C2.250,631
52.607,171
42,738,035
41,023,786
38.813.506
32,160,338
26,190,200
22,620,975
23.131,874
26.051.4G7
26,913.160
26,050,491
23,391.330
22,357,035
22,765,711
21,349.690
17,887,619
16,753,367
$10,205,861
10,546,806
9,505,559
8,907,034
7,834,728
7,677.321
8,080,989
8.937.507
9.702,777
9,144.034
7,128,669
8,668.099
8,557.845
7,283,051
6,775,908
7,206,037
6,139.470
5,319,470
5,427,458
7,239.726
5,788,671
7,432,585
7,060,109
3,770,747
3.474,721
3,266,000
3,396.106
3,066,311
2,724,144
2.619.639
$27,629,953
Totals, 1963	
12,923,325
1962                                             .   . .
14,024,799
1<>61
17.787,127
1960	
1959
1958
1957                                                    	
1956.            .        	
1955                         	
1954
21,496,912
17,371,638
15,053,036
24,257,177
22,030.839
21,131,572
19,654,724
1953
1957
20,979.411
27.024,500
1951            	
24.724.101
1950..             	
1949
17.500.663
17.884,408
1948
1947  	
11.532,121
13,008,948
1946                  	
1945..
8,367,705
5.756.628
1944
1943      ..
1947.
6,138,084
0,572.317
6,863,398
1941.              	
1940
7,260,441
6,962,162
1939      	
1938
1937
1936
6,714,347
6,544.500
6,845,330
4,434,501
1935
4,552.730
Grand totals, 1935-64	
$1,194,437,623
$202,959,830
$423,093,397
1 In some cases prior to 1964 this detail is not available and is included in a total that contains expenditures
on fixed assets plus cost of goods, materials, and supplies not chargeable to fixed assets.
2 In previous years designated as " process supplies (except fuel)—explosives, flux, chemicals, drill steel,
oxygen, acetylene, diamonds, etc." The forms used in collecting 1964 data for all minerals excepting fuels and
sulphur read:   " Process, operating, maintenance and repair supplies  .   .   .  used in the mine/mill operations;
that is, explosives, chemicals, drill steel, bits, lubricants, electrical, etc not charged to Fixed Assets
Account . . . provisions and supplies sold in any company operated cafeteria or commissary." The amount
shown by 1964 returns is substantially greater than for any previous year, and because of the difference in
specification is not comparable.
s Prior to 1962 this included data related to the principal lode metals as detailed in Table 1. The lode
metals classed as miscellaneous metals in Table I were previously included under the heading " Miscellaneous
Metals and Industrial Minerals."
 A 50 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
Table XII.—Average Number Employed in the Mining Industry,1 1901-64
c
u
u
M
E
Lode-mining
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G
u
0
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a
Coal-mining
Structural
Materials
a
Year
u
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1804	
299
415
355
341
425
688
874
1,134
1,122
1,291
1,124
1,371
1.303
1,252
1,004
939
489
212
255
209
347
360
348
303
327
205
230
132
199
103
105
67
75
99
86
74
35
3 43
5
2,736
2,219
1,662
2,143
2,470
2,689
2.704
2.567
2.184
2,472
2,435
2,472
2,773
2.741
2,769
3.357
3,290
2,626
2,513
2,074
1,355
1.510
2,102
2,353
2,298
2.606
2,671
2,707
2.926
2.316
1.463
1.355
1.786
2.796
2,740
2,959
3,603
3.849
3,995
3.923
3,901
2.920
2,394
1,896
1.933
1.918
3.024
3.143
3.034
3,399
3,785
4,171
3,145
2,644
2,564
2.637
2.393
1,919
1,937
1,782
1,785
1,684
1,752
1,839
1,212
1.126
1,088
1,163
1.240
1,303
1,239
1,127
1,070
1.237
1.159
1.364
1.505
1.433
1.435
2,036
2,198
1.764
1,746
1,605
975
1,239
1,516
1.680
2,840
1,735
1,910
2,469
2,052
1,260
834
900
1,335
1,729
1,497
1,840
1,818
2.266
2,050
2,104
1.823
1,504
1,699
1,825
1.750
1.817
2.238
2.429
2.724
2,415
3.695
3,923
2,589
2.520
2,553
2.827
2.447
1.809
1,761
1,959
1.582
2,238
2,423
2,739
3.948
3,346
2,750
3,306
3.710
3,983
3.943
3.694
3.254
3,709
3,594
3,837
4,278
4,174
4,144
5,393
5,488
4,390
4,259
3.679
2,330
2.749
3.618
4,033
5,138
4,341
4,587
5,176
4,978
3,576
2.297
2,255
3,121
4.525
4.237
4,799
5,421
6.115
5,955
6,027
5,724
4,424
4,093
3.721
3,683
3,735
5.262
5,572
5,758
5,814
7,480
8,094
5,734
5,164
5,117
5.464
4,840
3,728
3.698
3,741
3.867
3,922
4,175
4,578
	
808
	
	
2,461
3.041     931
3,101     910
3,137 1,127
3.278 1.175
3,127 1,280
3,415 1,390
2,862     907
4,432 1,641
4,713 1,705
5,903 1,855
5,212 1,661
5,275 1,855
4,950 1,721
4,267|1,465
3.708 1,283
3,694 1,366
3,760 1,410
3,658 1.769
4.145 1,821
4,191 2.158
3,974
4,011
4,264
4.453
4,407
4,805
3,769
6,073
6,418
7.758
6,873
7,130
6,671
5,732
4,991
5,060
5,170
5,247
5,906
6.349
493
647
412
492
843
460
536
376
377
536
931
724
900
652
827
766
842
673
690
921
827
977
1.591
2.120
1,910
1.783
1,530
1,909
1,861
1,646
1,598
1.705
1,483
1,357
1,704
1,828
1,523
909
1,293
324
138
368
544
344
526
329
269
187
270
288
327
295
311
334
413
378
326
351
335
555
585
656
542
616
628
557
559
638
641
770
625
677
484
557
1   508
481
460
|    444
124
122
120
268
170
380
344
408
360
754
825
938
369
561
647
422
262
567
7,922
7,356
7,014
7,759
1906 	
8,117
8,788
7,712
1908 	
9,767
1910	
9,672
11,467
1911	
10,467
1913	
10.967
10,949
1915	
9,906
9,135
1917	
10,453
10,658
1919	
9,637
10,225
1920	
10,028
1921	
4.72212,16316.885
9,215
1926	
4.712
4,342
3,894
3.828
3.757
1.932|0,644
1.807|6.149
1.524|5,418
1,615[5,443
1.565I5.322
9.393
9.767
9.451
10.581
14,172
1927	
854|2.842
911|2,748
966|2.948
832J3.197
581|3,157
542J2.036
531J2.436
631|2.899
907|2.771
720|2.678
1,168|3,027
919|3.158
99613,187
1,048|2,944
1,02513,072
960|3,555
891|2,835
849|2,981
82212,834
67212,813
960|3,461
1,126|3,884
1.20313,763
1,25913,759
1,307|4,044
1.51614,120
1,37113,901
1.129J3.119
1,09113,394
1,04313,339
838|3,328
62513,081
618|3,008
648|3,034
626|3,118
950|3,356
850|3,239
822 3,281
3,646|1.579|5.225
3.814|1.520|5.334
3,675 1,853 6,028
3.38911.25614.645
14,830
] 928	
15,424
1929	
15,565
1930   	
14,032
1931	
2.957
2.628
1,125|4,082
12,171
1932	
980I3.008
10,524
1933	
2,241|    853|3.094
2,050     843J2.893
2,145     826|2,971
2,015|    799J2.814
2,286|    867|3.153
2.0881    87412.962
11,369
1934	
12,985
1935   	
13,737
1936	
14,179
16,129
1938	
16.021
1939	
2.167|    809
2,1751    699
2.229     494
2,976
2,874
2.723
15,890
15,705
1941	
15.084
1942	
1,892|   468|2.360
2,240|    611J2.851
2.150|    689]2.839
1,927|    503|2,430
1,773|    532J2.305
1.694J    731|2,425
1.594J    872|2.466
1.7611    54512.306
13.270
1943	
12.448
1944	
628
586
679
12,314
1945	
11,820
1946	
11.933
1947	
869|14.899
1948	
754|16,397
1949   	
626|16.621
1950	
1,745|    516
1.462J    463
1,280     401
1.1541    396
2.261
1,925
1,681
1.550
660|16,612
1951	
491|17.863
1952	
629|18.267
634J15.790
1953	
1954 	
1.076|    358|1,434
1,100|   378J1.478
968|   398|1,366
1,020|   360J1.380
826|   260J1.086
765|   29111,056
894|   288|1,182
7051   2371   942
648|   228|   776
501|   247|    748
446]    267     713
584114.128-
1956  	
722|14.102
1956	
854|14.539
474|13.257
1957	
1958 	
446|11.201
1959	
459]10,779
1960	
589|11,541
1961	
|   571|11,034
1962	
517|11,560
1963	
528|10,952
1964	
|    509|11,645
'            I
i Mining industry includes all branches of the mineral industry except petroleum and natural gas.
2 The average number employed in the industry is the sum of the averages for individual companies. The
average for each company is obtained by taking the sum of the numbers employed each month and dividing by
12, regardless of the number of months worked.
3 Includes estimated employment of 6 at Germansen Mines Ltd. and 35 at Wingdam and Lightning Creek
Mining Co. Ltd.
 STATISTICS
A 51
Table XIII.—Lode-metal Mines—Tonnage, Number of Mines,
Net and Gross Value,1 1901-64
Year
Tonnage2
Number
of
Shipping
Mines
Number
of Mines
Shipping
over 100
Tons
Gross Value
as reported
by Shippers3
Freight
and
Treatments
Net Value
to
Shipper4
Value of
Copper,
Lead and
Zinci
Gross Value
of Metals
Produced*
(Excluding
Placer)
1901......
1902	
1903	
1904	
1905	
1906	
1907	
1908	
1909	
1910	
1911	
1912	
1913	
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919	
1920	
1921	
1922	
1923	
1924	
1925	
1926	
1927	
1928	
1929	
1930	
1931	
1932	
1933	
1934	
1935	
1936	
1937	
1938	
1939	
1940	
1941	
1942	
1943	
1944	
1945	
1946	
1947	
1948	
1949	
1950	
1951	
1952	
1953	
1954	
1955	
1950	
1957	
1958	
1959	
1969	
1961	
1962	
1963	
1964	
926,162
009,016
.288,466
,461,609
,706,679
,963,872
805,614
083,606
057.713
216,428
770,755
688,532
.663,809
,175,971
,720,669
229,942
797,368
912,516
146,920
215,445
586,428
592,163
447.672
,413,912
849,269
775,327
416,411
241,672
977,903
804,276
549,622
.354,904
063,775
,141,744
927,204
381,173
145,244
377,117
,212,171
,949,736
007,937
,894,844
,786,864
879,851
377,722
705,594
011,271
702,321
125,460
802,482
972,400
.174,617
,669,281
,513,865
126,902
827,037
282,436
402,198
990,985
242,703
392,161
212,106
893,594
523,636
119
124
125
142
146
154
147
108
89
83
80
86
110
98
132
169
193
175
144
121
80
98
77
86
102
138
132
110
106
68
44
75
109
145
177
168
185
211
217
216
200
126
48
51
36
50
75
97
118
112
119
95
80
63
53
70
59
57
60
67
59
64
65
78
75
74
76
79
77
72
59
52
50
45
51
58
66
59
81
87
80
74
60
35
33
28
37
40
55
52
49
48
32
22
29
47
69
72
70
113
92
99
92
96
76
32
31
27
32
33
51
54
58
64
58
48
40
34
40
40
28
44
31
39
45
36
42
48,617,920
40,222,237
45,133,788
50,004,909
52,354,870
50,494,041
37,234,070
29,327,114
34,154,917
48,920,971
81,033,093
118,713,859
99,426,678
108,864,792
142,590,427
140,070,389
94,555,069
106,223,833
119,039,285
125,043,590
95,644,930
83,023,111
92,287,277
114,852,061
112,488,918
137,759,188
139,881,792
169,503,670
4,663,843
4,943,754
4,416,919
6,334,611
5,673,048
5,294,637
3,940,367
2,877,706
2,771,292
2,904,130
4,722,010
18,585,183
19,613,185
22,113,431
25,096,743
30,444,575
27,815,152
29,135,673
30,696,044
31,933,681
30,273,900
28,068,396
27,079,911
29,505,158
30,304,050
34,274,698
34.008,151
39,516,641
I
38
27,
29,
34
21
10
7
13
20
25
30
43
35
40
43
46
45
33
26
31
46
76
100
79
86
117
106
66
77
88
93
65
54
65
85
82
103
105
129
,558,613
750,364
079,075
713,887
977,688
513,931
075,393
976,358
243,278
407,914
051,207
954,077
278,483
716,869
670,298
681,822
199,404
293,703
449,408
,383,625
016,841
311,087
,128,727
,814,604
751,361
,493,684
,601,451
,739,892
088,160
343,241
110,262
370,185
955,069
,208,728
,346,903
184,868
484,490
873,641
,987,029
$
6.457
4,275
5,237
5,999
8,414
10,973,
10,504
7,972
8,027
6,450
5.770,
10,530
9,594
8,239
13,235
24,835
22,155,
20,979,
13,007,
13,726
8,525
10,587,
17,923
25,125
36,578
40,668
35,395
38,211,
43,436
33,645
17,624
13,176
15,915
19,729
21,800
25,283
41,714
29,541
27,939
34,203
34,607
35,313
34,903
29,494
39,077.
47,006.
79,819
105,005,
91,067
94,711
129,469
118.181
95,161
94,887
114,142
120,889
97,945
80,826
82,209
98,902
96,649
119,103
128,721.
136,659
149
,123
,622
,911
444
243
102
344
781
335
257
279
742
321
,224
941
535
596
180
993
043
382
939
,528
048
566
438
267
831
669
,413
965
,836
,720
218
229
705
421
,627
578
700
,546
,052
325
876
285
647
155
630
755
924
,241
,406
953
703
292
232
443
495
362
609
,045
353
990
I
$
13,288.355
11,090,421
11,579,663
12,309,455
15,319,865
17,501,202
16,273,305
14,580,991
14,191,141
13,228,731
11,454,062
17,662,766
17,191,432
15,225,727
19,995,212
31,512,148
26,803.934
27,637,302
19,771,717
19,465,932
12,927,217
19,236,601
25,349,215
35,538,816
46,200,650
51,512,289
44,978,042
48,496,960
52,686,634
41,633,145
23,238,477
19,734,327
25,214,936
34,462,793
41,111,560
44,640,004
63,666,000
54,288,698
54,737,557
63,095,238
64,421,668
62,584,368
54,543,124
41,733,036
50,275,001
58,359,386
95,528,728
123,505,044
109,691,706
116,566,320
152,877,635
147.360,895
126,350,912
123,594.282
142,391,009
149,331,373
125,272,668
104,093,241
104,867,557
130,196,595
128,465,488
159,530,089
172,716,557
180,870,817
1 Gross value calculated by valuing gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, mercury (1938^14, 1955), and nickel (1936-37,
1958-63) at yearly average prices, and iron (1901-03, 1907, 1918-23, 1928, 1948-63) and tungsten (1939-45, 1947-58)
at values given by operators.
2 Includes ores of iron, mercury, nickel, tungsten, and silica (flux).
3 Data not collected before 1937.
* Previous to 1937 the shipper reported " Net Value at Shipping Point," no indication being given as to how the net
value was computed. From 1937 on, the shipper has reported " Gross Value," from which deduction of freight and
treatment gives " Net Value."
 *     i ■
■Si
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!%
 STATISTICS A 57
Table XV.—Lode-metal Operations, Employment during 19641
Name of Mine or Operator
Days
Operating
Tons
Average Number
Employed
Mine
Mill
Mined
Milled
Mine
Mill
Shipping Mines
Bethlehem  Copper  Corp.   Ltd.   (including   Floods
251
366
255
174
306
366
366
366
358
366
265
255
366
245
308
250
254
366
81
366
366
325
174
360
366
366
366
358
366
366
363
366
300
360
346
258
1   366
127
1,379,429
257,871
153,115
443,264
1,191,050
407,062
31,635
306,132
1,815,477
1,379,429
257,871
153,080
444,757
1,017,343
407,062
31,635
306,132
1,839,058
161
207
344
270
140
206
118
218
417
28
136
92
101
85
36
87
102
769
251
1
29
15
62
25
36
16
52
11    1
10
14
39
1.16
12
13
39
43
15
62
192
57
Bluebell (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada Ltd.)	
15
38
Britannia (The Anaconda Co. (Canada) Ltd.)   .
22
23
11
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Co. Ltd.
Coast Copper Co. Ltd	
Craigmont Mines Ltd.1 (including Pooley Bros.)
ill
10
188
Giant Mascot Mines Ltd. (Pride of Emory)— -
319,801
681,179
477,800
693,907
25,090
183,971
402,632
2,722,775
1,006,563
102,566
319,801
686,267
477,800
695,120
25,090
183,971
397,269
2,722,775
1,013,488
127,259
20
Granby Mining Co. Ltd. (Phoenix)
H.B. (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada Ltd.)	
18
19
65
8
12
Hwivk Mac.rinnaM  Minps T.tH
Sullivan (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada Ltd.)
17
227
26
40
1
Development and Exploration^
Anaconda American Rrass
 	
Canex Aerial Exploration Ltd	
Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada Ltd.                 . ~
	
- —
Falconbridge' Nickel Mines Ltd	
Giant Mascot Mines Ltd	
Gunnex Ltd  	
Newconex Canadian Exploration Ltd	
	
Newmont Mining Corp. of Canada Ltd	
	
Noranda Exploration Co. Ltd	
Noranda Mines Ltd. (Boss Mountain)	
Phelps Dodge Corp. of Canada Ltd	
—	
_....„._..
Stikine Copper Ltd.	
■	
i The average number employed includes wage-earners and salaried employees.   The average is obtained by
adding the monthly figures and dividing by 12, irrespective of the number of months worked.
2 May not include employees of contractors doing diamond drilling and other work.
'   .
 Departmental Work
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
The Administration Branch is responsible for the administration of the
Provincial laws regarding the acquisition of rights to mineral and to coal, petroleum,
and natural gas, and deals with other departments of the Provincial service for the
Department or for any branch.
Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-Mining Recorders, whose
duties are laid down in the Mineral Act and Placer-mining Act, administer these
Acts and other Acts relating to mining. Mining Recorders, in addition to their
own functions, may also exercise the powers conferred upon Gold Commissioners
with regard to mineral claims within the mining division for which they have been
appointed. Similar duties may be performed by Mining Recorders with regard to
placer claims but not in respect of placer-mining leases. Recording of location and
of work upon a mineral claim as required by the Mineral Act and upon a placer
claim or a placer-mining lease as required by the Placer-mining Act must be made
at the office of the Mining Recorder for the mining division in which the claim or
lease is located. Information concerning claims and leases and concerning the
ownership and standing of claims and leases in any mining division may be obtained
from the Mining Recorder for the mining division in which the property is situated
or from the Department's offices at Victoria, and Room 101, 739 West Hastings
Street, Vancouver. Officials in the offices of the Gold Commissioner at Victoria
and the Gold Commissioner at Vancouver act as Sub-Mining Recorders for all
mining divisions. Sub-Mining Recorders, who act as forwarding agents, are
appointed at various places throughout the Province. They are authorized to
accept documents and fees, and forward them to the office of the Mining Recorder
for the correct mining division. Officials and their offices in various parts of the
Province are listed in the table on page A 59.
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)
Transcripts of all recordings in Mining Recorders' offices throughout the
Province are sent to the office of the Chief Gold Commissioner in Victoria twice
each month, and include the names of lessees of reverted surveyed mineral claims.
These records and maps showing the approximate positions of mineral claims held
by record and of placer-mining leases may be consulted by the public during office
hours at Victoria and at the office of the Gold Commissioner at Vancouver, Room
101, 739 West Hastings Street. The approximate position of mineral claims held
by record and of placer-mining leases are plotted from details supplied by locators.
Late in 1963 a start was made toward converting the plotting of claims and leases
to a map scheme based on the National Topographic system. This will result,
ultimately, in the Province being completely covered with maps of the same scale
(40 chains to 1 inch approximately) rather than a confusion of scales necessitated
by maps based on the Lands Service branch of the Department of Lands, Forests,
and Water Resources reference and mineral reference maps. It is expected the
transition to the National Topographic system will occupy about two years' time.
A 58
 departmental work a 59
List of Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders in the Province
Mining Division
Location of Office
Gold Commissioner
Mining Recorder
T, G O'Neill
T. G. O'Neill.
Atlin  .
Atlin	
Cariboo	
Clinton. 	
Fort Steele ..           	
Quesnel          	
Clinton	
F. E. P. Hughes •	
R. H. Archibald   	
E. L. Hedley
W. G. Mundell
R. Macgregor	
F. J. Sell..
R. H. McCrimmon.
B. J. H. Ryley	
E. B. Offln	
G  T. Rrnri>.
F. E. P. Hughes.
R. H. Archibald.
E. L. Hedley.
W. G. Mundell.
Kamloops
Liard
Lillooet	
Nanaimo  	
F. J. Sell.
Victoria	
Lillooet	
Nanaimo              	
B. J. H. Ryley.
E. B. Offln.
G. L. Brodie.
New Westminster	
Nicola	
New Westminster	
Merritt	
Smithers  ...       -	
J. F. McDonald.
T. S. Dobson	
G. H. Beley	
T. S. Dalby. 	
D. V. Drew      ..
E. W. Pedersen.
T. S. Dobson.
G. H. Beley.
Osoyoos
Revelstoke  _ 	
Penticton	
Revelstoke	
T. S. Dalby.
D. V. Drew.
B. Kennelly.
Skeena	
Slocan	
Trail C.rpfk
Prince Rupert 	
Kaslo
Rossland	
T. H. W. Harding	
T. P. McKinnon	
W. L. Draper      	
J.Egdell	
W. T. McGruder	
R. H. McCrimmon. -
T. H. W. Harding.
T. P. McKinnon.
W. L. Draper.
Vernon          	
Victoria               	
Vernon	
Victoria	
W. T. McGruder.
E. J. Bowles.
 A 60
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1964
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H H
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 61
Coal, Petroleum, and Natural Gas
The Administration Branch is responsible for the administration of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act and for the Coal Act. Information concerning applications for permits and leases issued under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act and
concerning the ownership and standing of them may be obtained upon application
to the office of the Chief Commissioner, Department of Mines and Petroleum
Resources, Victoria, B.C. Similar information may be obtained respecting licences
and leases issued under the Coal Act. Maps showing the locations of permits and
leases under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act are available, and copies may be
obtained upon application to the office of the Department of Mines and Petroleum
Resources, Victoria, B.C. Monthly reports listing additions and revisions to permit-
location maps and listing changes in title to permits, licences, and leases and related
matters are available from the office of the Chief Commissioner upon application
and payment of the required fee.
Coal Revenue, 1964
Licences—
Fees    $650.00
Rental   4,617.95
  $5,267.95
Leases—
Fees	
Rental       $94.50
Cash in lieu	
  94.50
$5,362.45
At the end of 1964, 34,727,862 acres, or approximately 54,262 square miles,
of Crown petroleum and natural-gas rights, issued pursuant to the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Act, were held in good standing. This acreage, held by operators
ranging from small independent companies to major international ones, comprised:—
Acreage
302 permits   22,417,836
1 natural-gas licence  9,669
19 drilling reservations        451,998
3,716 leases (all types)   11,848,359
34,727,862
Petroleum and Natural-gas Revenue, 1964
Rentals and fees—
Permits   $1,302,305
Drilling reservations         64,800
Natural-gas licences	
Petroleum, natural-gas, and petroleum and
natural-gas leases     7,077,488
Total rentals and fees  $8,444,593
 A 62
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1964
Petroleum and Natural-gas Revenue, 1964—Continued
Sales of Crown reserves—
Permits 	
Drilling reservations _
Leases 	
Total Crown reserve sales
Royalties—
Gas	
Oil 	
Processed products	
Total royalties 	
Miscellaneous fees	
$721,193
1,541,685
10,830,994
$13,093,872
$1,583,292
3,502,222
104,990
Total petroleum and natural-gas revenues
$5,190,504
26,851
$26,755,820
ANALYTICAL AND ASSAY BRANCH
By S. W. Metcalfe, Chief Analyst and Assayer
Rock Samples
During 1964 the chemical laboratory in Victoria issued reports on 2,397
samples from prospectors* and Departmental engineers. A laboratory examination
of a prospector's sample generally consists of the following: (1) A spectrographic
analysis to determine if any base metals are present in interesting percentages;
(2) assays for precious metals and for base metals shown by the spectrographic
analysis to be present in interesting percentages. The degree of radioactivity is
measured on all samples submitted by prospectors and Departmental engineers;
these radiometric assays are not listed in the table below.
The laboratory reports were distributed in the following manner among prospectors who were not grantees, prospectors who were grantees under the Prospectors' Grub-stake Act, and Departmental engineers:—
Samples
Spectrographic
Analyses
Assays
Prospectors (not grantees) , „	
1,995
186
216
1,977
184
98
5,160
459
580
Totals - -      	
2,397
2,259
6,199
Samples submitted to the laboratory for identification are examined by the
Mineralogical Branch of the Department. During the year 84 such samples were
examined.
Petroleum and Natural-gas Samples
Reports were issued on 21 samples. Of this number, seven were samples of
formation waters from wells being drilled for gas and oil in the Province, one was
a sample of natural gas, one was a sample from a suspected oil seep, and one was a
crude oil for specific gravity determination. Finally, a black material in 11 rock
samples was examined by X-ray and found to be amorphous carbon.
* A reasonable number of samples are assayed, without charge, for a prospector who makes application for
free assays and who satisfies the Chief Analyst that prospecting is his principal occupation during the summer
months.   A form for use in applying for free assays may be obtained from the office of any Mining Recorder.
 departmental work a 63
Coal Samples
Reports were issued on 35 samples of coal submitted by the Purchasing Commission, etc.
Miscellaneous Samples
Reports were issued on 341 samples of a miscellaneous nature. One hundred
and fifty-six assays and 11 spectrographic analyses were reported in this category.
For the Purchasing Commission, spectrographic analyses were performed on
three steel reinforcing rods.
For the Department of Agriculture, 11 samples of animal forage were analysed
for copper, manganese, phosphorus, molybdenum, and sulphur; one marl sample
and a calcareous waste product from a pulp-mill were also analysed.
For the Department of Highways, Materials Testing Branch, four materials
used in the manufacture of concrete were spectrographed; three clay samples were
analysed for sodium and calcium, and one for sodium alone; one crust from a
tunnel was identified as calcium carbonate; a partial analysis was conducted upon
a water sample, and the content of organic material in another water sample was
determined; finally, a white material in a rock sample was identified as the hemi-
hydrate of calcium sulphate (plaster of Paris).
For the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, for the Inspection
Branch, four samples of diesel exhaust gas were analysed for oxides of nitrogen
and two for aldehydes; elements in trace amounts were determined in two water
samples, and two other water samples were examined for the presence of cyanide;
finally, a proximate coal analysis was performed on a coal sample. For the Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch, a rock sample was analysed for its phosphorous pent-
oxide content.
For the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, Water Resources
Service, four samples of water from the Nakusp Hot Springs were analysed, and
partial analyses were performed on three other water samples.
For the City of Victoria, for smoke inspection, determination was made of the
weight of residue collected in 285 bottles of water placed in various open locations
in the city; for the city engineers' department, determination of specific gravity
was made on four water samples.
For citizens of the Province, proximate analyses were performed on three coal
samples, and a coal ash was examined for the presence of germanium; a sample
of gypsum was analysed for sulphur, and a sample of limestone was analysed for
lime and magnesia, these latter two samples having been referred to us by the
Department of Agriculture.
X-ray Powder Diffraction Analyses
Sixty-five analyses of this type were performed for identification purposes.
Examination for Assayers
Two Provincial Government examinations for certificates of efficiency were
held at Trail in May and December. In the May examination, eight candidates
were granted licences to practise assaying in the Province, one was granted a
supplemental in fire assaying, and one a supplemental in wet assaying. In the
December examination, four candidates were granted licences to practise assaying,
one was granted a supplemental in wet assaying, and one failed the entire examination.
 A 64 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
INSPECTION BRANCH
Organization and Staff
Inspectors and Resident Engineers
J. W. Peck, Chief Inspector Victoria
Robert B. Bonar, Deputy Chief Inspector of Mines .Victoria
L. Wardman, Senior Electrical Inspector of Mines -Victoria
E. R. Hughes, Senior Inspector of Mines Victoria
R. J. Craig, Senior Inspector of Mines, Silicosis Control Vancouver
S. Elias, Inspector, Silicosis Control .Vancouver
J. E. Merrett, Inspector and Resident Engineer Vancouver
A. R. C. James, Inspector and Resident Engineer. Vancouver
D. R. Morgan, Inspector and Resident Engineer. Cranbrook
David Smith, Inspector and Resident Engineer. Kamloops
W. C. Robinson, Inspector and Resident Engineer Kamloops
Harry Bapty, Inspector and Resident Engineer. Prince Rupert
P. E. Olson, Inspector and Resident Engineer Nelson
The Inspectors are stationed at the places listed and inspect coal mines, metalliferous mines, and quarries in their respective districts. They also examine prospects, mining properties, and roads and trails. The Silicosis Control Inspectors
make dust and ventilation surveys at all mines and quarries. E. R. Hughes supervised the Department's roads and trails programme and prospectors' grub-stakes.
Instructors, Mine-rescue Stations
Arthur Williams Fernie Station
W. H. Childress Nanaimo Station
T. H. Robertson Kamloops Station
G. J. Lee Nelson Station
Staff Changes
There were no staff changes during 1964.
Board of Examiners for Coal-mine Officials
Robert B. Bonar, Chairman and Secretary. Victoria
A. R. C. James, Member. Vancouver
D. R. Morgan, Member Cranbrook
R. B. Bonar, A. R. C. James, D. R. Morgan, and the mine-rescue instructors
for the district in which an examination is being held form the Board for granting
certificates of competency to coal-miners.
An Inspector is empowered to grant provisional certificates to coal-miners for
a period not exceeding 60 days between regular examinations.
Board of Examiners for Shiftbosses (Metalliferous Mines)
Robert B. Bonar, Chairman Victoria
A. R. C. James, Member Vancouver
J. E. Merrett, Member .Vancouver
The Board conducts written examinations in various mining centres for applicants for underground shiftboss certificates.   The Board is also empowered to grant
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 65
provisional certificates without examination under such conditions as the Board
considers necessary.
MINERALOGICAL BRANCH
Field work by officers of the Mineralogical Branch includes geological mapping
and examinations of mineral deposits and studies related to ground-water and engineering geology. The results are published partly in the Annual Report of the
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources and partly in a series of bulletins. Since
March, 1964, a charge has been made for Annual Reports and bulletins. The
Mineralogical Branch supplies information regarding mineral deposits and the
mineral industry, in response to inquiries received in great number. The activities
of the Branch also include identification of rock and mineral specimens submitted
directly by prospectors and others, or through the Analytical Branch.
Professional Staff
On December 31, 1964, the professional staff included the following geologists,
all stationed at Victoria:—
H. Sargent Chief of the Branch
M. S. Hedley Senior Geologist
Stuart S. Holland Geologist
J. W. McCammon Geologist
N. D. McKechnie Geologist
G. E. P. Eastwood Geologist
James T. Fyles Geologist
A. Sutherland Brown Geologist
J. M. Carr Geologist
W. G. Jeffery Geologist
A. F. Shepherd Geologist
J. E. Hughes Geologist
E. W. Grove Geologist
N. C. Carter Geologist
N. C. Carter joined the staff as geologist on March 1, 1964. R. V. Kirkham
was employed for the field season, and in the autumn he returned to the University
of Wisconsin to continue postgraduate studies in geology. N. Haimila, a postgraduate student in geology at Michigan State University, was employed for the field
season under the general supervision of W. G. Jeffery. H. E. O. Neugebauer, a
postgraduate student at the University of Oregon, was employed for the field season
under the general supervision of N. D. McKechnie.
Technical editing of the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum
Resources and of other publications was directed by M. S. Hedley. Copy for
printing was prepared by and under the direction of Mrs. Rosalyn J. Moir. Messrs.
Hedley and Holland assisted in directing and supervising field work. Most of the
other members of the professional staff are assigned to mapping the geology of
selected areas and of mineral deposits. Mr. McCammon is responsible for studies
of industrial minerals and structural materials, and Mr. Shepherd for records and
library.
Field Work, 1964 Season
A. Sutherland Brown made a reconnaissance geological study in the Port San
Juan-Cowichan Lake area. He also made geological studies and property examinations at Britannia, Texada Mines, and at Skidegate Inlet, Jedway, Skonun Point,
and Tasu, in the Queen Charlotte Islands.
3
 A 66 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
J. M. Carr studied molybdenum deposits at Bone Lake, Whiting Creek, Huckleberry Mountain, and Endako, in the central Interior. The Endako project involved
extensive studies on the surface and underground, including the examination of a
representative series of diamond-drill holes. He also made property examinations
in the Princeton-Merritt-Highland Valley-Spences Bridge area.
N. C. Carter made geological studies in the Alice Arm area, including a detailed
study of the Lime Creek stock and associated molybdenum deposit, a less detailed
study of the Lime Creek-Roundy Creek area, and property examinations in those
sections, at the Tidewater molybdenum property, and silver properties on the upper
Kitsault River.
G. E. P. Eastwood made detailed geological studies in the Giant Mascot nickel
mine at Choate, and underground and surface studies at the Boss Mountain molybdenum mine.
James T. Fyles completed detailed mapping and studies of the structural features
of the Ainsworth-Kaslo area, and began a study of the mineralized area at the Mount
Copeland (King Fissure) property as a preliminary phase of a detailed study in the
Jordan River area northwest of Revelstoke. Dr. Fyles also made examinations at
the Big Ledge and Teddy Glacier properties.
E. W. Grove began working in the Stewart area. His work included geological
mapping from Stewart to the Bell-Irving River, along the Stewart-Cassiar road, detailed geological mapping of the surface and some underground mapping at the
Silbak-Premier mine, and of the area between Bear Ridge and the Salmon Glacier,
from Stewart northerly toward Mitre Mountain.
M. S. Hedley made preliminary inspections of proposed dam-sites along the
Grand Canyon of the Stikine River, and visited properties in the Stikine, Stewart, and
Kootenay areas.
W. G. Jeffery, with a senior assistant and two junior assistants, completed geological mapping of an area west of Buttle Lake and extending south to the head of
Great Central Lake, on Vancouver Island. Moderate use of a helicopter was made
for observation and in setting out fly camps.
J. W. McCammon completed mapping magnesite deposits at Marysville and
Brisco, in the East Kootenay district. He also examined deposits of quartz, kyanite,
talc, and dolomite, in selected areas, and a deposit of mercury near the Bridge
River area.
N. D. McKechnie, with a senior assistant, mapped the Old Tom and Shoemaker
Formations in an area north of Keremeos. Mr. McKechnie also made property
examinations in the Aspen Grove area, and at Hedley, Peachland, upper Similka-
meen River, Greenwood, Mabel Lake, and Westwold.
R. V. Kirkham continued geological mapping at Hudson Bay Mountain
(Smithers) and examined properties there and the molybdenum prospect at Mount
Thomlinson.
Air-borne Magnetometer Mapping
As a project financed jointly by the Geological Survey of Canada and the
British Columbia Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, the contractor,
Spartan Air Services Ltd., did the field work for the production of four maps covering adjoining sheets at Revelstoke. Each sheet covers a quarter degree of latitude
by a quarter degree of longitude.
PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS BRANCH
The Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch is responsible for the administration of
the Regulations Governing the Drilling of Wells and the Production and Conserva-
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 67
tion of Oil and Natural Gas, and the Regulations Establishing Gas-Oil Ratio Adjustment Factors, Oil Production Allowables, and Overproduction and Underproduction,
made pursuant to the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act.
The first named regulations provide for the use of efficient and safe practices in
the drilling, completion, and abandonment of wells; for the orderly development of
fields discovered within the Province; and for the conservation and prevention of
waste of oil and natural gas within the reservoir and during production operations.
The regulations concerning gas-oil ratio factors, production allowables, and
overproduction and underproduction provide for conservation of reservoir energy
by limiting the volume of oil that can be produced during any day, month, or year
from a well or pool in accordance with the schedule of gas-oil ratio adjustment factors. The factors are applicable against oil production when the average volume of
gas produced with each barrel of oil exceeds a specified level, and, when applied,
result in reduction of the producing rate. Overproduction and underproduction are
adjusted on a monthly basis.
Every well location must be approved by the Branch before the well is drilled.
All operations related to drilling and production are inspected frequently to ensure
compliance with the provision of all regulations, including such features as facilities
and practices used, adequate plugging of abandoned wells, surface restoration of
well-sites, well testing and measurement procedures employed, disposal of produced
water, protection of installations against fire, and general conservation.
Investigations are made of complaints of property damage resulting from drilling and producing operations, and from geophysical work programmes.
Comprehensive records of all drilling and producing operations are maintained
at Victoria and are made available for study, or are published, for the use and benefit
of anyone interested in oil or gas development in British Columbia. Samples of bit
cuttings, as well as all core, obtained from every well drilled in the Province are
collected and retained at the field office located at Charlie Lake, where they may be
studied by interested persons. Charlie Lake is adjacent to the Alaska Highway
about 5 miles northwest of Fort St. John.
Detailed reservoir engineering and geological studies are conducted on the
basis of technical information submitted to the Branch from operating companies,
as well as information acquired through field work by Branch personnel. Estimates
of the reserves of oil and natural gas are made twice a year, at the end of June and
December. Crown-owned oil and natural-gas rights are evaluated prior to being disposed of by public tender.
Administration
The Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch is subdivided for administrative purposes into three sections. The sections and the supervisors are as follows: Reservoir
Engineering, R. R. McLeod; Development Engineering, W. L. Ingram; and Geology, S. S. Cosburn.
The field office at Charlie Lake, which includes the core and sample laboratory,
is supervised by the District Engineer, G. E. Blue.
Staff
Headquarters, Victoria
J. D. Lineham Chief of Branch
R. R. McLeod Senior Reservoir Engineer and member of the
Board of Arbitration
K. C. Gilbart Reservoir Engineer
 A 68 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1964
G. V. Rehwald Reservoir Engineer
P. K. Huus Reservoir Assistant
W. L. Ingram Senior Development Engineer
M. B. Hamersley Development Assistant
J. F. Tomczak Statistician
S. S. Cosburn Senior Petroleum Geologist
D. L. Griffin Petroleum Geologist
H. B. Fulton Petroleum Geologist
D. M. Callan Petroleum Geologist
The headquarters staff includes also one geological draughtsman, one clerk-
stenographer, three clerks, and three clerk-typists.
Field Office, Charlie Lake
G. E. Blue District Engineer
D. L. Johnson Field Engineer
M. A. Churchill Field Technician
D. A. Selby Field Technician
G. T. Mohler Field Technician
The field staff includes also three core and sample laboratory assistants, one
clerk-stenographer, and one clerk.
Staff Changes
H. B. Fulton, petroleum geologist, was transferred from the field office to headquarters, effective June 30th.
Board of Arbitration
Chairman: A. W. Hobbs, solicitor, Department of the Attorney-General.
Members: R. R. McLeod, engineer, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources;
S. G. Preston, agrologist, Department of Agriculture.
The Board of Arbitration is responsible to the Minister of Mines and Petroleum
Resources, and is established under the authority of the Petroleum and Natural Gas
Act. The Board grants right of entry by oil and gas companies upon alienated land
and determines conditions of entry and compensation therefor. It also terminates
the right of entry when the company has ceased to use the land.
The Board held one hearing in 1964, at which the two applications, carried over
from 1963, were heard and settled by Board awards. No further applications were
received during the year.
Conservation Committee
Chairman: P. J. Mulcahy, Deputy Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
Members: N. D. McKechnie, geologist, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources; M. H. A. Glover, economist, Department of Industrial Development, Trade,
and Commerce.
The Conservation Committee is responsible to the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources, and was established originally on October 11, 1957, under the
authority of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act.   Its duties are as follows:—
(1) To act as an advisory committee to the Minister on such questions of conservation that the Minister, in writing, shall refer to the Committee for
consideration and recommendation.
(2) To deal with such questions of conservation and production in the various
fields of British Columbia as may arise between two or more operators in
the same field or between operators and the Branch when appeals on such
questions are made to the Minister and referred by him to the Committee.
The Conservation Committee did not meet in 1964.
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 69
GRUB-STAKING PROSPECTORS
Under authority of the Prospectors' Grub-stake Act the Department has provided grub-stakes each year since 1943 to a limited number of applicants able to
qualify. The normal maximum grub-stake is $300, with an additional amount up
to $200 for travelling expenses. A limited number of experienced prospectors of
proven ability may be granted top priority grub-stakes of as much as $400, plus
a maximum of $300 for travelling expenses, where prospecting is to be done in
approved areas where air transportation is necessary. Items such as guns, fishing-
gear, stoves, boats, and outboard motors are not a legitimate charge against the grant
and must be provided by the applicant. Costly items such as geophysical survey
equipment, mineralights, Geiger counters, berylometers, packsack diamond drills,
two-way radios, horses, and packsaddles are not expendable in any one season and
cannot be accepted at full cost against the grant, but a reasonable rental charge may
be considered.
To qualify at the present time, the Department requires that the applicant shall
be a bona fide prospector holding a free miner's certificate. He must be a British
subject, between the ages of 18 and 70 years, and must have resided in British
Columbia during the year preceding the date of application. He must be able to
identify common rocks and minerals. He should have bush experience and be
physically and mentally fit. He must agree to abide by the regulations which the Department may make. The grub-staked prospector is provided with maps, a current
list of prices of metals and ores, and the latest Departmental information circulars
on prospecting and related matters.
It is required that in order to obtain the maximum grub-stake, he agree to spend
at least 60 days actually prospecting in the area of his choice in British Columbia
considered favourably by officers of the Department. If he prospects a lesser time,
the grant will be reduced proportionately. The grub-stakes are not intended for
week-end prospecting or for short trips from a home base. The grant is usually
made in two payments: the first at the beginning of the season, and the second after
he has completed 60 days in the field and has submitted a diary. In the past, rebates
have been recovered from grantees to whom payments have exceeded the proper
amount for the time and effort devoted to prospecting. A field engineer is employed,
who contacts as many prospectors as he is able during the field season and gives
advice and direction to those who need it. Grantees are permitted a reasonable
number of free assays.
The grub-stakes are granted with the object of maintaining the search for mineral occurrences with mine-making possibilities. The grants are not intended for
the purpose of exploring and developing occurrences already found, but one year is
allowed to prospect ground that has been staked by a grantee while on the grubstake. No interest is retained by the Government in any discovery made by a
grantee, other than that which applies in common with all free miners. Time is not
allowed for prospecting on old properties which have had work done on them, unless
mineral deposits of present economic importance have been discovered on them for
the first time. Grub-stakes are not given for prospecting for placer deposits or gem
stones. The grantee must not accept pay from other sources for services rendered
during the period credited to the grub-stake.
It is recognized that competent and experienced prospectors are capable of
looking after themselves in wilderness areas. Nevertheless, experience has shown
that less hazard may result when prospecting is done by two or three men in a team.
A man working alone may be injured or be taken seriously ill and, if alone, he may
have to endure extreme hardship and pain.
 A 70
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
Grub-stake grantees are not working for the Government but are self-employed
and are not covered under the provisions of the Workmen's Compensation Act.
Therefore, it is recommended that prospectors make their own arrangements concerning insurance coverage to provide for medical and other expenditures that may
be incurred in the event of an accident.
The grants are intended only to assist grantees to go out and prospect and are
not intended for the support of dependents. Therefore, applicants who are married
and have dependents are required to give assurance that their dependents will be
adequately provided for during the time the applicant is absent in the field.
Statistical information covering the grub-stake programme since its inception
is given in the following table:—
Grub-stake Statistics
Field Season
Approximate
Expenditure
Men
Grub-staked
Samples and
Specimens
Received at
Department
Laboratory
Mineral
Claims
Recorded
1943
$18,500
27,215
27,310
35,200
36,230
35,975
31,175
26,800
19,385
19,083
17,850
19,989
21,169
20,270
22,000
24,850
21,575
28,115
29,175
26,730
29,000
31,751
90
105
84
95
91
92
98
78
63
50
41
48
47
47
46
47
38
50
47
52
50
53
773
606
448
419
469
443
567
226
255
251
201
336
288
163
174
287
195
358
309
233
150
213
87
1944
135
1945
181
1946
162
1947
142
1948
138
1949      	
103
1950
95
1951
137
1952
95
1953
141
1954
123
1955
183
1956
217
1957
101
1958
211
1959
202
1960
241
1961
325
IQfi?
189
1963
843
1964
351
Samples and specimens received from grub-staked prospectors are spectro-
graphed, assayed, and tested for radioactivity. Mineralogical identifications are
made on request.
Sixty-five applications were received in 1964, and 53 grub-stakes were authorized. Three grantees were unable to go out, and their initial payments were returned.
Grantees who were unable to complete the terms and conditions of the grant received
only partial payment. Seventeen prospectors were given grants for the first time.
Six grantees proved to be unsatisfactory. Several grantees used aircraft for transportation to their prospecting areas. Two grantees were taken ill and were unable
to continue prospecting.
D. H. Rae interviewed applicants in Vancouver and contacted 30 grantees in
the field and gave advice and direction to those who needed it. The following notes
have been largely compiled from Mr. Rae's observations while in the field and from
information provided in the diaries of the grantees.
Alberni Mining Division.—Some prospecting was done in the Bedwell River
area, close to Mount Tom Taylor, where minor mineralization was found near a
granite-porphyry contact.
Atlin Mining Division.—In the Squaw Creek-Rainy Hollow area, close to the
British Columbia-Yukon boundary, further work was done on a large mineralized
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 71
zone showing much chalcopyrite. Claim holdings in this area have interested several
mining companies. Prospecting was also done west of the Haines road between
Miles 71 and 87 on several mineral zones exposed in the area. Nothing of value
was reported.
Cariboo Mining Division.—Near Philip Lakes, in the northern part of the
mining division, some prospecting was done. Fifteen miles southwest of Prince
George, prospecting was carried on in an area underlain mainly by andesite and
limestone. One carbonate zone was investigated, and a small talc deposit was found.
In the Willow River district a small area underlain by granite was prospected at La
Pier Creek, and another near Giscome. A base camp was established at an unnamed
lake 40 miles southwest of Vanderhoof and field work was done in the area; out-
croppings of pyritized granite were examined. In the Snowshoe Creek-Harveys
Creek area, slate and wide barren quartz veins were found. Some inconclusive work
was done near Moorehead Lake, near Keithley Creek, where considerable quartz in
slate was found, and near Kersley. Nothing of interest resulted from work done
near Cariboo Lake, Beaver Creek, or Upper Hat Creek.
Clinton Mining Division. — Some prospecting was done near Canim Lake,
where the underlying rocks are diorite, limestone, and some volcanic rocks. A base
camp was established on Bluff Lake near Tatla Lake, and considerable work was
done about that and nearby lakes. At Tatlayoko Lake one barren-looking quartz
vein was investigated. In the vicinity of Taseko Lake, metamorphic rocks, shear
zones, and numerous dykes were seen. In the valley of the Tchaikazan River the
geology was reported to be complex, but the prospecting possibilities were reported
to be better than average.
Fort Steele Mining Division.—Some work was done along the United States
boundary on Monk Creek and Priest River—rusty quartz in dolomite, and a wide
quartz vein containing minor lead and silver were reported.
Greenwood Mining Division.—At the headwaters of Kerr Creek, prospecting
was done in the Wallace Creek valley, in the Granby River area where chalcopyrite
was found in limestone, and Porter Creek where a 4-foot-wide quartz vein mineralized with chalcopyrite and pyrite was found. In the McCarren Creek area nothing
new was reported.
Kamloops Mining Division.—Some prospecting was done in areas adjacent to
Charcoal and Chase Creeks. In the Fly Hills area, several quartz veins and pegmatite dykes were prospected, and low metal values were found. In the Clearwater
River area, minor occurrences of barite and molybdenite were reported. Close to
Wallenstein Lake, copper stain over a fairly wide area was investigated. A small
amount of work was done around Mahood Lake and close to Star Lake. In the
Louis Creek area, narrow quartz veins in volcanics were found to contain minor
amounts of galena. Some rhodonite was found near Barriere, and in the Barriere
River area a mineralized zone containing galena, pyrrhotite, and arsenopyrite was
prospected; values were low. Prospecting was done on both sides of Adams Lake.
On the east side, nearly opposite Agate Bay, some interesting mineralized zones were
found above the 2,500-foot level; some barite was found on the east side of the lake
6 miles north of Agate Bay. On Johnson Creek, in an area underlain mainly by
schists and breccia, small amounts of galena in quartz were found. Near the headwaters of Tshinakin Creek, narrow quartz veins in argillite were prospected. On
the north side of lower Shuswap Lake above Celista, arsenopyrite was found associated with quartz veins.
Liard Mining Division.—Prospecting was done 30 miles below the headwaters
of Turnagain River in the general vicinity of Wheaton Creek and on King Mountain.
Small amounts of chromite and some veins of asbestos were found in serpentine.
 A 72 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
Some work was done in the Cold Fish Lake area and at Nation Peak. Northwest of
Nation Peak, some barite stringers were examined. In the Mink Creek area, claims
were staked on a showing of barite and galena. In the Dalton Creek valley, the
lower slopes showed limestone, quartzite, and pyritized tuff. Near Gnat Creek,
green copper stain and minor amounts of bornite were found near a contact zone of
granite and volcanics. Close to the Three Sisters Range, narrow discontinuous
stringers of bornite were noted. At Tanzilla River, serpentine, limestone, and outcrops of volcanics were observed. The Pitman River area received some attention;
small pieces of chalcopyrite float were found in several places, but the source of
these was not discovered.
Some inconclusive work was done on showings of both asbestos and molybdenite within 15 miles of the Cassiar Asbestos mine. Some prospecting was done
in other parts of the area, but nothing of interest was reported.
Base camps were established on Nuttlude and Kakiddi Lakes, and considerable
prospecting was done there and on the Klastline Plateau. Some narrow stringers of
bornite were found along the Klappan River.
Some work was done from a base camp on Boulder Creek, an area underlain
by serpentine, and where some good jade boulders have been found. West of King
Mountain, occurrences of serpentine and schist were noted; along Wheaton Creek,
sedimentary rocks, serpentine, andesite, and slate showing numerous quartz stringers
were reported; along Ferry Creek, andesite and some occurrences of bog iron. On
King Mountain, serpentine containing narrow asbestos fibres was observed, and
along Faulkner Creek, granite with abundant quartz.
A considerable amount of prospecting was done in flat and swampy country,
with numerous lakes and streams, at the southern edge of the Kawdy Plateau west
of the Tuya River. Some sulphide minerals were found on and close to Nuthinaw
Mountain.
About 10 miles northeast of Tootsie Lake, some prospecting was done on a
mineralized zone containing molybdenite, and a number of mineral claims were
staked.
Lillooet Mining Division.—Prospecting was done on Sallus Creek south of
Pavilion and Mount Bren and Riley Creek south of Lillooet. Outcrops of nephrite
jade on Ama Creek in the lower Bridge River received some attention, as well as
chalcopyrite in a breccia zone. A short distance below the mouth of the Yalakom
River a gold-bearing shear zone was discovered and staked. Work was done on
Moon, Applespring, Antoine, and Camoo Creeks.
Work in the Marshall Creek area north of the Bridge River extended from Liza
Lake to Bighorn Creek. A little copper mineralization was found, and stringers of
asbestos fibre were investigated. Disseminated chalcopyrite was seen at Spider
Creek south of Shalalth.
A large deposit of dolomite above the village of Lillooet was investigated and
staked. Barren quartz veins in porphyry were seen near Jesmond. Quartz float
showing gold was found in the area of Black Dome Mountain.
Nanaimo Mining Division.—A considerable amount of intensive prospecting
was done on Quadra Island, from Granite Bay on the west side to Open Bay on the
east side, and including a large area inland from these localities. No commercial
ore exposures were found, but the whole area is interesting from the point of view
of prospecting.
Nelson Mining Division.—A fair amount of work was done in areas southeast
and north of Creston, including Sanca Creek, Corn Creek north of Boundary Creek
(pyritized granite and some kyanite outcrops were reported), Dodge Creek, Goat
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 73
River valley, and the junction of Goat and Cameron Creeks. Nothing of immediate
importance was discovered.
New Westminster Mining Division.—An intensive programme of prospecting
was carried out in the Ashloo Creek valley, both above and below the old gold-mine
camp. Both conventional and geochemical methods of prospecting were employed.
Similar work was done in the upper Pitt Lake area. Some interesting preliminary
results of this work were obtained.
Prospecting was done north of loco, at Widgeon Lake, Alouette Lake, east of
Stake Lake, and in the Kanaka Creek area.
A great deal of prospecting in the form of surface trenching and diamond
drilling was done on an occurrence of sericite-talcose schist close to the railway
bridge over Ruby Creek (a few miles north of Agassiz). Nothing of commercial
importance was reported in the Mahood Creek valley and also at Dog Mountain
near Hope.
Nicola Mining Division.—Some prospecting was done in the Coldwater River
valley near Juliet in an area mainly underlain by granite. Nothing of importance
was reported from these areas.
Omineca Mining Division.—Some work was done near the centre of the eastern
side of Babine Lake, but no mineralization of interest was reported. Near Francois
Lake an area underlain by Topley granite and other rocks was investigated. Considerable work was done between Chuchi Lake and Witch Lake, southwest of Witch
Lake, and in the Jean Marie Creek area. Some work was done on a mineralized
zone on Tchentlo Lake, where disseminated low-grade showings of molybdenite had
been found. A great deal of prospecting was done fairly close to the Manson River
about 20 miles south of Manson Creek, where fairly good mineralization of molybdenite and narrow quartz veing containing chalcopyrite had been discovered. Near
Gillis Mountain, granodiorite and quartzite showing some molybdenite and galena
were reported. Some mineralization was seen on Boulder Creek. These various
mineral zones appear to warrant further prospecting.
At and near Manson Creek, work was done at Government Gulch, on a low-
grade copper showing at Skeleton Gulch, galena-bearing quartz stringers at Skeleton
Creek, a quartz vein with tetrahedrite at Slate Creek. Work was done to the east on
Blackjack Mountain, Lost Creek, and Jackfish Creek.
West of Germanson Lake, work was done on upper Twenty Mile Creek, where
stibnite was found in a major fault. At Twin Creek and Groundhog Creek, tributaries of Kwanika Creek, some copper mineralization was seen. A wide carbonate
zone was reported at Wasi Lake, south of the Osilinka River.
On the south side of Tsayta Lake at the head of Nation River, some narrow
asbestos veins were found in serpentine. On Klawli Creek north of Nation Lake,
some molybdenite was found in a large quartz vein near a granite-slate contact.
From camps on Stuart Lake, work was done at several localities. Near Pam
Lake very fine blebs of cinnabar were found in argillite, and at Mount Nielsp narrow
stringers of asbestos were seen in amphibolite.
At the extreme south of the mining division, considerable work was done on a
large mineralized zone lying at a high elevation above Tesla Lake; chalcopyrite,
bornite, and malachite in commercial amounts are found in this zone, which may
develop into something of importance.
A little work was done south and southeast of Vanderhoof and to the southwest in the Fawnie and Nechako Hills region.
From a base camp established by helicopter on the top of Mount Loring on
the westerly side of Morice Lake, intensive prospecting was done on copper mineral-
 A 74 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1964
ization scattered over a wide area, and sufficiently strong in several sections to be of
importance. Copper minerals include chalcopyrite, chalcocite, and bornite, and a
great deal of malachite and azurite. This area warrants further intensive prospecting.
Near Sweeney Lake small quartz veins mineralized with chalcopyrite were found in
volcanic rocks; no commercial material was reported.
Osoyoos Mining Division.—In the Peachland Creek valley, some work was
done on a mineralized zone showing minor amounts of chalcopyrite and molybdenite
in an area underlain by argillite and tuff. On the south slope of Mount Kathleen,
high-grade copper float was found, but the source was not located. Some work was
done along Shuttleworth Creek and in the Trout Creek area, where low values in
copper were found in quartz-diorite. On Apex Mountain, low values in molybdenite
were found in quartz-diorite and low copper values in chert.
Similkameen Mining Division.—Some further work was done in the Princeton
area on Badger, McNulty, Hines, and Red Creeks; some low values in copper and
molybdenite were reported. In Olivine Creek valley, some lenses of magnetite in
basic rocks were found.
A limited amount of work was done on Nickel Plate Mountain. Some work
was done from the old Summit camp in the upper Tulameen River, but nothing of
interest was reported.
Skeena Mining Division.—On Banks Island, pyritic quartz veins were investigated near Banks Lake and in Colby Bay. Float was found in Porcher Inlet, and
quartz veins were seen on Prescott and Stephens Islands. Nothing of importance
was reported from any of these findings.
Prospecting was done at Lime Creek in Alice Arm area on quartz veins giving
commercial assays in silver, lead, and zinc. In the Olh Creek valley in Hastings
Arm, barren wide quartz veins were investigated. Some work was done northwest of
Terrace in the Star Creek area. At Mitchell Inlet on the Queen Charlotte Islands,
gold-bearing quartz veins received some attention.
A little work was done in the upper Bella Coola River valley, where serpentine
containing short narrow stringers of asbestos fibre were reported. Work was also
done near Hagensborg in the Salloomt and Nusatsum River valleys, North Bentinck
Arm, and at the head of South Bentinck Arm.
Slocan Mining Division.—A considerable amount of work was done within
reach of Burton, within the valleys of Caribou, Tyee, Independence, Slewiskin, Ice,
and Woden Creeks, and on Silver Mountain. Nothing of economic value was reported.  Some inconclusive work was done in the upper reaches of the Duncan River.
Vancouver Mining Division.—A short time was spent in the Squamish River
area and some prospecting was reported to have been done in the Clowhom Lake
area, in the Mount Murchison area, and close to Mount Roderick; no information
is available on the results of this. Two prospectors were flown in and landed on a
glacier in the Mount Waddington area; supplies for the season were air-dropped
nearby.   An excellent report on the work done has been submitted.
Work extended from Scimitar Glacier, Remote and Bell Mountains, Dorothy
Creek, Fank Peak, Mount Geddes, and Twist Creek to Calwell Creek. Nothing of
definite commercial importance was reported, but much valuable information was
submitted, including the occurrence of gossans, shears, and copper mineralization.
Vernon Mining Division.—Work was done 5 miles above the junction of Mc-
Cauley and Harris Creeks, near Nicklen Lake and in the Vidler Creek valley.
Victoria Mining Division.—Some work was done on a quartz vein in the Sooke
Lake area; no information was submitted.
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 75
MINING ROADS AND TRAILS
Provision is made in the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources Act
whereby the Minister may, with the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council,
authorize the expenditure of public funds for the construction or repair of roads and
trails into mining areas. Assistance on a half-cost basis may also be provided on
roads and trails to individual properties.
Requests for road and trail assistance must be made to the Department before
the commencement of work. The type of access upon which assistance may be
given depends upon the value of the property, the stage of development, and the
amount of work to be done. A trail is sometimes sufficient for initial exploration,
and a tractor-road may be adequate for preliminary work. Subsequent development might warrant assistance on the construction of a trunk road. A carefully
drawn sketch or plan of the location of the road is required to be submitted and,
where warranted by the amount of assistance requested, a report on the property by
a professional geological or mining engineer may be required. An engineer from
the Department may be required to report on the property before a grant is made
and to inspect the road after the work has been done.
Total mileages and disbursements under " Grants in Aid of Mining Roads and
Trails" during the fiscal year ended March 31, 1965, were as follows:—
Mining roads and trails— Miles c^
Construction and reconstruction  123.6      $194,846.80
Maintenance  189.0 35,567.53
Bridges—Construction and reconstruction       10,307.50
Total  $240,721.83
In addition to the above, work was continued on the Stewart-Cassiar road.
This road is being constructed under the Roads to Resources Agreement between
Canada and British Columbia. The construction is supervised by the Department
of Highways on behalf of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources. At
the north end of the road the 40.12-mile section from Eddontenajon Lake to Burrage
River is 99 per cent completed. At the south end of the road the 31.87-mile section
between Strohn Lake and the lower crossing of the Bell-Irving River is 91 per cent
completed. A contract was let in October for clearing and grubbing on the 38.1-
mile section from the south to the north crossings of the Bell-Irving River.
MUSEUMS
The Department has a large exhibit of mineral and rock specimens in the Douglas Building, Victoria; collections are also displayed in the offices of the Inspectors
of Mines at Nelson, Vancouver, and Prince Rupert.
Specimens from the collection in Victoria, accumulated in a period of more
than 60 years, are displayed in cases on the fourth floor of the Douglas Building.
The collection includes specimens from many of the mines and prospects in the
Province, and also specimens of type rocks and special minerals from British Columbia and elsewhere.
British Columbia material includes specimens collected by officers of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources and specimens donated by property-
owners. The collection also includes type specimens purchased from distributors.
Other valued specimens or groups of specimens have been donated or loaned to
the museum.
 A 76 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1964
ROCK AND MINERAL SPECIMENS
Information regarding collections of specimens of rocks and minerals available
to prospectors and schools in British Columbia may be obtained from the Chief of
the Mineralogical Branch.
PUBLICATIONS
Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources, bulletins,
and other publications of the Department, with prices charged for them, are listed
in the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources List of Publications available
from the Chief of the Mineralogical Branch.
Publications may be obtained from the offices of the Department in Victoria
and elsewhere in the Province. They are also available for reference use in the
Department's library (Mineralogical Branch) at Victoria, in the reading-room of
the office of the Geological Survey of Canada in Vancouver, and in the offices of
the Inspectors of Mines in Nelson and Prince Rupert, as well as in public libraries.
MAPS SHOWING MINERAL CLAIMS, PLACER CLAIMS, AND
PLACER-MINING LEASES
From the details supplied by the locators, the approximate positions of mineral
claims held by record and of placer-mining leases are shown on maps that may be
inspected in the central records offices of the Department of Mines and Petroleum
Resources in Victoria and in Vancouver. Copies of these maps may be obtained on
request. The boundaries of surveyed claims and leases are shown on the reference
maps and other maps of the British Columbia Department of Lands, Forests, and
Water Resources.
OFFICES OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND
PETROLEUM RESOURCES AND THE DEPARTMENT OF MINES
AND TECHNICAL SURVEYS, CANADA.
The Provincial Inspectors of Mines and Resident Engineers for the Vancouver
Island and Lower Mainland districts, the Silicosis Control Inspectors, and the Gold
Commissioner and Mining Recorder for Vancouver Mining Division occupy offices
at 739 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 1. Next door, at 326 Howe Street, officers
of the Geological Survey of Canada are stationed, and a technical library is maintained.
The services offered to the public at these two offices include technical information on mining and the geology of the Province, the identification of mineral
specimens, distribution of Federal and Provincial mining and geological publications,
a reference library, a display of rocks and minerals, and a central records office.
 Topographic Mapping and Air Photography
The Legal, Topographic, Air, and Geographic Divisions of the Surveys and
Mapping Branch are responsible for the official surveys and mapping programme of
the Province of British Columbia. A complete summary of the activities of the
Surveys and Mapping Branch is published in the Annual Report of the British Columbia Lands Service, 1964.
In 1964 the Legal Surveys Division received 660 sets of field notes covering
910 lots surveyed under the Land Act and 78 under the Mineral Act. The 210
Departmental reference maps showing cadastral information were maintained, and
four of them were renewed. Home-site subdivisions produced 66 lots at Port Hardy,
104 at the south end of Dease Lake, 46 at Windermere Lake, 46 at 70 Mile House,
11 at 150 Mile House, and 1 near Chetwynd. A total of 69 miles of highway right-
of-way was surveyed on the Northern Trans-Provincial (Route No. 16), Southern
Trans-Canada (No. 3), Kootenay-Columbia (No. 93), and Okanagan (No. 97)
highways.
The Topographic Division conducted co-ordinate surveys and ran nearly 175
miles of levelling in Surrey Municipality. A control survey was made around the
perimeter of Graham Island, while another field crew established control on the
Peace River power project reservoir. At the request of the petroleum industry, 170
miles of levels were run and 48 bench-marks established north of Fort St. John.
Eight National Topographic map-sheets covering approximately 2,930 square
miles were produced photogrammetrically, and 16 standard topographic manuscripts
were draughted at 2-inches-to-l-mile scale.
The Air Division added interim sheets covering 3,200 square miles to its 20-
chain (4 inches to 1 mile) scale programme. Interim mapping at 40-chain (2 inches
to 1 mile) scale produced 13 full sheets and 12 partial sheets of the Esquimalt and
Nanaimo Railway Company lands.
Aerial photographic block coverage totalled 20,390 square miles at 40-chain
scale and 18,965 square miles at 20 chains. For the first time the entire Queen
Charlotte Islands group was photographed, the area covered by 938 photos at
40-chain scale being 4,500 square miles. Other assignments included photography
of sections of the Bridge, Fraser, Thompson, Salmon, and Similkameen Rivers.
The mining industry requisitioned 14,126 photographs by loan or reprint; this
represented 27 per cent of the prints taken by the general public in 1964.
New maps issued by the Geographic Division included one sheet at 1-inch-to-
2-miles scale, 82G/NW-NE (Cranbrook), and three at 1:250,000 scale—namely,
93f (Nechako), 103i-j (Prince Rupert-Terrace), and 103p (Nass River). Also
completed was map Ijps (British Columbia, Physiographic Subdivisions). This
sheet, at l-inch-to-30-miles scale, was specially prepared at the request of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources to accompany its Bulletin No. 48,
Landforms of British Columbia. A variation of map Ijps without the overprint of
physiographic subdivisions was issued separately as map Ijp (British Columbia,
Physical).
Plans of 152 petroleum and natural-gas well sites surveyed under the Petroleum
and Natural Gas Act were checked during 1964.
Ottawa agencies printed 38 Federal and two Provincial map-sheets at 1:50,000
scale and two at 1:250,000 scale.   A list of place-name revisions and additions was
A 77
 A 78 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
sent to Ottawa for publication in a new Provincial Gazetteer.   At the end of the
year the Gazetteer of British Columbia, 1953, was virtually out of print.
Indexes showing the extent and types of aerial photography and map coverage
are available from the Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch, Department of Lands,
Forests, and Water Resources, Victoria, B.C.
 Department of Mines and Technical Surveys
The Canadian Government Department of Mines and Technical Surveys performs many functions related to mining and the mineral industry in general. The
Mines Branch, Geological Survey of Canada, Surveys and Mapping Branch, and
Mineral Resources Division are services of the Department of direct interest to the
mineral industry. Brief reference to the work of the Surveys and Mapping Branch
in British Columbia is made in the preceding note headed " Topographic Mapping
and Air Photography." A note on the Geological Survey of Canada follows this
paragraph and is followed by notes on the Mines Branch and the Mineral Resources
Division.
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA
By an arrangement made at the time the Province of British Columbia entered
Confederation, geological investigations and mapping in the Province are carried on
by the Geological Survey of Canada. Several geological parties are in the field each
year. Many excellent reports and maps covering areas of British Columbia have
been issued by the Geological Survey of Canada, and they have made available a
great amount of information that has been of much benefit to the mining and prospecting activities in British Columbia.
A branch office of the Geological Survey of Canada is maintained in Vancouver. Maps and reports on British Columbia can be obtained there. J. E. Armstrong
is in charge of this office at Room 102, 326 Howe Street, Vancouver 1.
Field Work by Geological Survey of Canada in British Columbia, 1964
Geological mapping was done in the following map-sheets and major areas:—
A. J. Baer in the Bella Coola (93 D) map-area.
R. B. Campbell in the Canoe River West Half (83 D, W V2) map-area.
R. J. Fulton on the surficial geology of the Vernon West Half (82 L, W V2)
map-area.
E. C. Halstead on the surficial geology of southeast Vancouver Island.
W. W. Hutchison in the Prince Rupert East Half (103 J, E Vi) and Terrace
West Half (103 I, W Vi) map-areas.
H. W. Little and R. I. Thorpe in the Greenwood (82 E/2) map-area.
J. E. Muller in the Alberni (92 F) map-area.
G. C. Taylor, E. W. Bamber, R. T. Bell, B. S. Norford, and D. F. Stott on
Operation Liard in northeastern British Columbia.
H. W. Tipper and R. B. Campbell in the Bonaparte River East Half (92 P,
E V2) map-area.
H. W. Tipper in the Bonaparte River West Half (92 P, W Vt) map-area.
H. W. Tipper in the Taseko Lakes (92 O) map-area.
J. O. Wheeler in the Big Bend (82 M, E V2) map-area.
G. B. Leech in the Kananaskis Lakes West Half (82 J, W V2) map-area
extending into Alberta.
The following special studies and mapping projects were carried out:—
E. W. Bamber studied the stratigraphy of Permo-Carboniferous rocks in conjunction with Operation Liard.
D. J. T. Carson commenced a metallogenic study of metal-bearing deposits
on Vancouver Island.
A 79
 A 80 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1964
J. Coates made structural studies in and near Manning Park.
Raymond Cox studied the biostratigraphy of the Sooke and Carmanah Formations.
J. A. Jeletzky studied Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous rocks in the
Taseko Lakes map-area.
S. F. Learning completed a study of sand and gravel deposits in south central
British Columbia.
B. S. Norford studied Ordovician and Silurian biostratigraphy in the Rocky
Mountains.
Peter B. Read studied the eastern contact area of the Kuskanax batholith,
Lardeau district.
J. E. Reesor studied the Thor-Odin gneiss dome west of Upper Arrow Lake.
J. V. Ross conducted structural studies in the Mount Revelstoke area.
D. F. Stott studied the Cretaceous stratigraphy of northeastern British Columbia.
H. P. Trettin studied limestones in the Marble Range.
E. D. Kindle studied copper deposits in Yukon and northern British Columbia.
D. K. Norris made lithostratigraphic studies in the southeastern Cordillera in
British Columbia and Alberta.
R. A. Price studied Tectonic fabrics in the southeastern Cordillera of British
Columbia and Alberta.
Publications of the Geological Survey
A total of 32 publications of the Geological Survey of Canada relating to
British Columbia was received by the British Columbia Department of Mines and
Petroleum Resources in 1964.
MINES BRANCH
The Mines Branch has branches dealing with mineral dressing and process
metallurgy, physical metallurgy, radioactivity, and fuels and explosives. A total
of 23 publications of the Mines Branch pertaining to British Columbia was received
in 1964 by the British Columbia Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
They included tabular pamphlets dealing with coal mines, gold mines, stone
quarries, petroleum refineries, and milling plants in Canada.
MINERAL RESOURCES DIVISION
The Mineral Resources Division publishes studies on mineral resources, mineral economics, mineral legislation, mineral taxation, mining technology, and other
miscellaneous mineral-industry subjects. A total of five publications published
by this Division was received by the library.

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