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Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the YEAR ENDED MARCH 31 1965 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1966

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Annual Report of the
Department of Social Welfare
for the
YEAR ENDED MARCH 31
1965
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1966
  Victoria, B.C., November 20, 1965.
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the year ended
March 31, 1965, is herewith respectfully submitted.
W. D. BLACK,
Minister of Social Welfare.
Office of the Minister of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
 Department of Social Welfare,
Victoria, B.C., November 20, 1965.
The Honourable W. D. Black,
Minister of Social Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department
of Social Welfare for the year ended March 31, 1965.
E. R. RICKINSON,
Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
 DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE
April 1, 1964, to March 31, 1965
Hon. W. D. Black Minister of Social Welfare.
SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
 Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
E. R. Rickinson	
J. A. Sadler Director of Social Welfare.
R. J. Burnham Assistant Director of Social Welfare.
R. I. Stringer Director of Regional Services.
DIVISIONAL AND INSTITUTIONAL ADMINISTRATION
J. McDiarmid Departmental Comptroller.
T. D. Bingham Superintendent of Child Welfare.
F. G. Hassard Superintendent, Brannan Lake School for Boys.
Miss W. M. Urquhart Superintendent, Willingdon School for Girls.
Dr. P. W. Laundy Director of Medical Services.
E. W. Berry Chairman, Old-age Assistance and Blind Persons' and Disabled Persons' Allowances and
Supplementary Assistance.
 Personnel Officer.
 Superintendent, Provincial Home.
 {Casework Supervisors, Social Assistance and
 |    Rehabilitation Division.
 Training Supervisor.
 Supervisor, Social Service Department, Division
of Tuberculosis Control.
 Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions.
Mrs. M. Dighton	
G. P. Willie	
N. S. Brooke	
Mrs. J. P. Scott	
D. W. Fowler	
Mrs. M. Titterington.
A. A. Shipp	
REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
Miss M. Jamieson Director, Region I.
W. J. Camozzi Director, Region II.
G. A. Reed Director, Region III.
W. H. Crossley Director, Region IV.
V. H. Dallamore Director, Region V.
A. E. Bingham Director, Region VI.
A. J. Wright Director, Region VII.
J. A. Mollberg Director, Region VIII.
C. W. GORBY	
C. S. Jones	
Mrs. C. Mackenzie.
F. S. Hatcher	
Miss B. W. Snider...
CONSULTANTS
 Juvenile Delinquency Prevention Services.
.Medical Social Work.
..Office Procedures.
Rehabilitation.
.Research.
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Part I.—General Administration:
Page
Director of Social Welfare  9
Assistant Director of Social Welfare  11
Part II.—Regional Administration:
Region I  15
Region II  16
Region III  18
Region IV  20
Region V  23
Region VI  26
Region VII  29
Region VIII  31
Part III.—Divisions:
Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division  33
Child Welfare Division  40
Medical Services Division  57
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowances, and Disabled Persons'
Allowances Board  60
Part IV.—Institutions:
Brannan Lake School for Boys  79
Willingdon School for Girls  84
Provincial Home, Kamloops  89
Welfare Institutions Board  92
Part V.—Medical Social Work Services:
Division of Tuberculosis Control and Pearson Poliomyelitis Pavilion  97
Part VI.—Accounting Division  100
  Report of the Department of Social Welfare
PART I.—GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE
J. A. Sadler
On the surface it would seem that with increased economic activity and
development there would be fewer demands for social welfare services. Unfortunately this is not so because there are many persons who cannot adjust and compete
in today's fast-moving society.
In the following pages there are outlines and descriptions of the services offered
by the Department of Social Welfare, the municipalities, and various private agencies
in the Province of British Columbia, and from them it will be seen that social welfare
services encompass help in many ways for dependent people, not always financial in
content, but in the form of guidance, counselling, care of neglected children, assistance with medical coverage, and retraining of persons who must be given the
opportunity to regain their self-supporting position in the community.
The development of resources continues, with an increasing number of receiving homes and group-living homes being established for young people who, through
exigencies in their own homes, become the responsibility of society. These homes
reflect in the well-being of such youngsters, and the development of these resources
has been aided by the increasing awareness in the communities themselves of the
problems which face many young people and the realization that in some cases these
problems can be handled in the communities.
Planning has been completed for the opening of a youth centre in New Denver
for early adolescents who need help in learning to live with themselves and with
society.
With more and more youngsters in need of families of their own, the adoption
programme has been increasing rapidly, and special effort has been put forth by the
Department to meet the needs of these children for permanent homes and permanent
parents.
With great economic developments and immediate technical changes, it is not
sufficient to extend temporary help to an unemployed person in the hope that he
can return to his former employment because in some instances his type of employment has disappeared, and thus Social Allowance case loads are being given careful
scrutiny with the object of bringing forward as many people as possible for retraining.
There are, nevertheless, people who are receiving Social Allowance who may have
to be carried on a long-term basis because of their inability to assimilate the high
degree of technical knowledge and training necessary for present-day employment
possibilities.
During the past year, through change in status of their incorporation, some
additional municipalities have become responsible for welfare services. The tremendous development in the northern part of the Province called for the creation of
a new administrative region, known as Region VIII, with headquarters in Dawson
Creek. A new position, Director of Regional Services, with headquarters in Victoria, was established.
The Emergency Welfare Services Supervisor, Co-ordinator of Juvenile Delinquency Prevention Services, and Office Consultant have continued their efforts in
 G 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
consolidating and increasing the efficiency of the work in their various areas. The
Research Consultant has continued to guide research projects and to provide the
necessary statistical material so vital to Departmental planning.
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
as at March 31st for the Years 1964 and 1965
Category
1964
Number        Per Cent
1965
Number       Per Cent
Family Service 	
Social Allowance  _
Blind Persons' Allowancei..
Old-age Assistance1-
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowancei..
Disabled Persons' Allowance*  	
Child Welfare   -   	
Health and Institutional-
1,671
29,076
654
8,275
28,241
2,500
9,173
873
21
36.1
0.8
10.3
35.1
3.1
11.4
1.1
1,680
28,597
621
7,862
27,040
2,584
9,882
882
Totals for Province-
80,463      ;      100.0        j      79,148
2.1
36.1
0.8
9.9
34.2
3.3
12.5
1.1
100.0
1 Includes Old-age Assistance Board figures which are not shown in regional reports.
Table II.—Movement in Case Load during Fiscal Year 1964/65
Category
Cases Opened during Year
Cases Closed during Year
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Centi
2,686
68,100
305
1,052
5,341
9.577
2.7
67.7
0.3
1.0
5.3
9.5
2,677
68,579
338
968
5,754
10,778
12,238
621
2.6
67.3
Blind Persons' Allowance	
0.3
0.9
Old-age Assistance 	
5.6
10.6
Child Welfare                            	
12,947      |        12.9
630      |          0.6
12.0
06
Totals inr Province
100,638       |       100.0
101,953
100.0
i Percentages may not add due to rounding.
Table III.—Number of Cases by Category at March 31st and as a Percentage
of the Population at June 1st for the Years 1964 and 1965
Category
1964
1965
Per Cent of
Per Cent of
Number
Population
Number
Population
(1,738,000)
(1,789,000)
1,671
0.10
1,680
0.09
29,076
1.67
28,597
1.60
654
004
621
0.03
8,275
0.48
7,862
0.44
28,241
1.62
27,040
1.51
2,500
0.14
2,584
0.14
9,173
0.53
9,882
0.55
873
0.05
882
0.05
Family Service 	
Social Allowance	
Blind Persons' AUowancei..
Old-age Assistance1..
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowancei-
Disabled Persons' Allowancel 	
Child Welfare.
Health and Institutional-
Totals for Province.
80,463      j        4.63        j      79,148
4.42
1 Includes Old-age Assistance Board figures which are not shown in regional reports.
The co-operation given by all Government departments, municipalities, and
private agencies has been appreciated by all staff members of the Department of
Social Welfare.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 11
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE
R. J. Burnham
The many and varied responsibilities carried by our social-work staff require
that we continue to give constant attention to our staff-development programme.
The social problems which face us today are of a more complex nature than those
of years past and require a more sophisticated approach in dealing with them. For
example, rehabilitation is more difficult in today's technical society, where greater
knowledge and finer skills are required. Technical developments have relieved man
from much physical labour, but at the same time imposed pressures on families
heretofore not experienced to any extent. The competition for higher learning is
much keener for our younger generation and creates problems which often require
the social worker's services. We have, then, ever-increasing complexities in the
responsibilities our social-work staff carry, and hence a clearly demonstrated need
for an imaginative and comprehensive staff-development programme.
During the year the staff was increased by over 50. This was of tremendous
assistance to our field operation but taxed our training and staff-development facilities. The universities in Canada fall far short of being able to produce a sufficient
number of trained social-work staff to meet the needs of the public and private
agencies, and consequently we have to accept the responsibility of training the bulk
of our newly hired staff. To provide this necessary training, consultation service
to the field was stepped up in order to assist the supervisors in instructing new staff
on the job. We also held three regional development conferences, giving each social
worker an opportunity of attending one of the sessions. Our district supervisors
attended a two-week refresher course, allowing them the chance of discussing problems vital to their job. A good number of our staff took part in out-of-Province
conferences, which help us maintain a broader outlook on our problems. The bursary programme was accelerated to a point where we were able to provide assistance
to 14 staff persons returning to the University of British Columbia for training, as
well as help two students, who had just received their Bachelor of Arts, to continue
on in social work. We also continued our local instructive meetings at the senior
clerical, social-work, and supervisory levels.
Our Office Consultant, Mrs. C. Mackenzie, retired this year, and the responsibilities carried by her office were redefined and expanded to include the study and
installation of systems which will involve the use of electronic data-processing equipment, as well as the procurement, rentals, leasing, equipping, and supplying of
district offices. Mr. A. G. Gilmore was employed as our new Office Administrator
and will assume these duties.
Our Department, together with the Public Health Branch and the National
Employment Service, has continued to expand and develop rehabilitative services
throughout the Province. Some 13 communities now have local rehabilitation committees at work attempting to assist the handicapped to regain their independence.
Six committees are well established, while the balance are relatively new.
PERSONNEL
Mrs. M. E. Dighton, Personnel Officer
The fiscal year under review, April 1, 1964, to March 31, 1965, has brought
many changes within the Department. There were a number of resources developed
concerning child welfare, which are discussed in that section of the Annual Report.
A new region was created, and some changes made in administrative responsibility
 G 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
wih the creation of the position of Director of Regional Services. Certain expansion
also occurred as a result of an increase to staff. This will be detailed later in the
Report.
The changes have been positive, and are a reflection of greater interest and
concern for social welfare at the community level. Our efforts have been directed
toward supplying the best possible staff to meet the normal turnover and the increase,
and to bringing up the professional level of social-work staff.
The goal of the Department has not changed; that is, we have continued to do
everything possible to give a high level of service to every individual seeking our
help, to groups of persons either offering or requesting service, and to the community in general. Children are being helped in their own homes and in foster
homes, both young and older people are being comforted and helped toward independence, and families are being held together who might otherwise break up. We
are grateful to the staff for their devotion to public service, and to the tremendous
efforts on the part of local communities through their service groups and individuals.
The estimates for the year April 1, 1964, to March 31, 1965, provided for an
increase of 54 positions, and added to this by Order in Council dated April 23,
1964, were another five positions. Recruiting for this large increase proved to be
a heavy task for the Training Division and Personnel, but the mapority of additional
positions were filled by August 31, 1964, and the few remaining were filled by
October, 1964.
Seven senior positions were created as a result of the increase, which included
the appointment of a Director of Regional Services, a Regional Director, and five
supervisors with headquarters at Alberni, West Vancouver, Cranbrook, Chilliwack,
and Terrace. The remaining 52 positions were allocated to 35 social-work and
17 clerical positions.
The following table shows the number of staff (clerical, professional, and technical) who were employed and their location in the Department as of March 31,
1965:—
General Administraton  12
Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division  5
Field Service  395
Medical Services Division  13
Child Welfare Division  30
Provincial Home  3 5
Brannan Lake School for Boys  62
Willingdon School for Girls  50
Old-age Assistance Board  77
Federal grants projects  9
Total  688
The Provincial-grants programme has proven of valuable assistance in helping
the Department staff various projects throughout the Province. The positions
which were added in 1963, along with a project added in 1964, have continued.
These included 2Vi clerical staff and seven professional staff, of which one is a
Research Consultant, one a Child Welfare Consultant for Special Placements, one
is responsible for the Surrey adoption-home finding project, three are responsible
for the Fort St. John project, and one is responsible for K Cottage project, Prince
George.
Although we wished to implement additional projects, it was necessary to locate
suitable staff.   Several of these could not be started in the fiscal year with which
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 13
this Report is concerned, but we are pleased to state that as of April 1, 1965,
additional projects located at Terrace and Nanaimo involving adoption-home finding, the deserted wives and children project at Surrey, and additional help for the
Special Placements Section are all under way. It is our intention to implement
other projects when trained staff are located.
The following table shows the total social-work staff employed for the fiscal
years ended March 31, 1964, and March 31, 1965:—
University
Trained
In-service
Trained
Total
Total staff, March 31, 1964 L_	
Completed formal training during fiscal year..
, 1965.
Staff appointed April 1, 1964, to March 31,
Resignations and retirments (2), April 1, 1964, to March 31, 1965..
Total staff, March 31, 1965 (excluding institutions) .
Brannan Lake School for Boys and Willingdon School for Girls..
Welfare grant project.
Totals	
99
+9
108
26
14
120
5
179
-9
170
61
36
195
3
125
7
198
132
I
198
278
278
87
50
315
323
7
330
In addition to the Provincial social workers, there are municipal social workers
located in both municipal and (or) amalgamated offices. It is necessary to record
the number of these positions as this provides a complete picture of the social welfare
staff servicing the total case load as shown in the Director's report. As of
March 31, 1965, the municipal social workers numbered 89 plus 14 social-work
assistants, making a total of 103.
The following table shows the breakdown of social-work degrees as of March
31, 1965:—
Men
Women
Total
6
6
26
2
11
7
2
99
8
2
27
19
8
3
5
4
88
14
8
53
21
19
3
Staff on educational leave toward Bachelor of Social Work or Diploma	
12
6
187
Totals
159
164
323
During the year under review there was a total of 50 social-worker separations,
and they occurred for the following reasons:—
Domestic	
To further education	
To accept other employment	
To accept municipal employment
To travel	
111 health	
Unsatisfactory	
Retired 	
12
14
11
4
1
2
4
2
Total
50
 G 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TRAINING DIVISION
Douglas W. Fowler, Supervisor
This Division has had another active year in meeting the problem of recruiting,
selecting, and training staff to ensure continuing service to our clients. During the
year 103 new appointments were made, which included 2 persons with their
Master of Social Work, 25 with their Bachelor of Social Work, 14 with their Social
Work Diploma, 47 with their B.A. degree, and 15 with other educational qualifications and relevant experience.
Our training schedule consisted of four 4-week Part I orientation programmes
involving 51 persons and five 4-week Part III programmes involving 50 persons.
Three of the persons included in these groups were employed by municipal departments, and we note an increase in the number of requests from municipalities to
provide this training for their staff.
This Division also organized four supervisors' refresher courses of two weeks'
duration, which involved 34 of our own supervisors and one municipal supervisor.
The course was given in both Vancouver and Victoria with participation by all
divisions.
An encouraging development this year has been the interest of the staff in
obtaining professional training. The Provincial-Federal welfare grants programme
has made additional bursaries and training grants available, and of 18 staff members
who proceeded on educational leave, 14 received financial assistance. An additional
two bursaries offered to promising B.A. students were awarded, and financial assistance was given to a former staff member to obtain an M.S.W. degree.
Our recruiting efforts have been extended to campuses of the University of
British Columbia and the University of Victoria, and these have been successful in
attracting new staff for in-service training. We also note continued interest in
social work on the part of many young people, and we have interviewed about 400
persons during the year, in addition to responding to innumerable telephone calls
and letters.
Our teaching material is under constant review, and in the next year we are
planning extensive changes to bring it into line with current needs.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65       G 15
PART IL—REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
REGION I
Miss M. Jamieson, Regional Director
The region includes Vancouver Island, adjacent islands, and a northern strip
of the west coast of the Mainland. There were minor changes in geographical
boundaries, but two new municipalities came into being—Ladysmith, with a population of 3,409, and Campbell River, with a population of 7,009. It is anticipated
that there will be a substantial number of new municipalities in the coming year.
A district office was opened in Campbell River in June, 1964, increasing the
number of offices in the region from seven to eight. A resident supervisor was
appointed to the Alberni district office.
The case load for this region on March 31, 1965, was 10,800. Table I shows
the administrative offices with distribution of case load by category of services, and
Table II indicates the numerical and percentage comparison of case load by major
categories in Region I for the fiscal years 1963/64 and 1964/65.
Table I.—Administrative Offices with Distribution of Case Load by Category
of Services in Region I as at March 31,1965
Category
<
|
O.U.
ea;
3.2
OK
a
_
3
o
U
s
_
§
Q
o
|
ra
a
«
JS
'5
rt
rt
Vi
ra
•a
o
-_>
>U
raw
'E.H
o E
i>5
3
,0
h
23
328
2
30
107
278
265
9
25
104
7
15
50
170
147
5
10
255
3
19
90
273
201
8
28
241
5
28
102
353
226
28
112
591
7
71
218
876
372
32
205
8
55
97
503
31
710
23
99
267
1,436
62
67
283
4
60
137
786
194
59
265
2,717
59
377
1,068
Old Age Security Supplementary Social
4,675
Phild Wplfarp.
1,405
234
Totals
1,042
523
859
1,011
2,279
899
2,597
1,590
10,800
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region I for the Fiscal Years 1963/64 and 1964/65
1963/64
1964/65
Number
Per Centl
Number
Per Centl
218
3,001
70
371
1,228
5,014
1,250
228
1.9
26.4
0.6
3.3
10.8
44.0
11.0
2.0
265
2,717
59
377
1,068
4,675
1,405
234
2.5
25.2
0.5
3.5
9.9
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance
Child Welfare           _   .
43.3
13.0
2.2
Totals	
11,380
100.0
10,800
100.0
i Percentage may not add due to rounding.
 G 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
These tables indicate a decrease of 580 cases and show a downward trend in
the financial-aid categories of service although the family service and child welfare
cases increased during the year.
While there was a substantial increase in the number of adoption and foster
homes during the year, there continues a pressing need for many more homes.
A new group home for four to six teen-age boys was opened, and several more
are in process.
In co-operation with the Department of Health Services, rehabilitation committees are active in three districts, and active planning is under way in several
other areas.
The northern area of the region is developing rapidly; air and bus transportation facilities are serving communities formerly quite isolated.
As part of the staff-development programme, a joint conference was held with
Region II; there were staff meetings for social-work and clerical staff, as well as
field visits by divisional consultants.
In conclusion, I take this opportunity of commending staff, social workers and
clerical, municipal and provincial, for their capable and unflagging work throughout
the year. To all whose thoughtful co-operation and help lightened our task, we
render sincere thanks.
REGION II
Walter J. Camozzi, Regional Director
The social welfare programme for Burnaby, District of Coquitlam, New Westminster City, North Vancouver (City and District), Richmond, Vancouver City,
and West Vancouver is administered by Mr. E. L. Coughlin, Mr. J. Kincaid, Mr.
A. G. Brine, Mrs. W. N. Keeling, Mr. C. Gillingham, Mr. T. T. Hill, and Mr. C. K.
Toren, respectively, in close co-operation with the Regional Director. Supervisory
assistance is given in Burnaby by Mr. W. Rasmussen, and in New Westminster City
and Coquitlam District by Mr. R. I. Murray. Mrs. B. Mabee gives this service in
North Vancouver and West Vancouver. Miss J. V. Brown offers the same assistance in Richmond, as well as being responsible for Powell River. New Westminster
District, which takes in the per capita municipalities of Delta, Port Coquitlam, and
Port Moody, comes under the purview of Mrs. M. C. DeHaan. The Vancouver
district office, which comprises the coast from Squamish to Egmont to the northwest and up the Cheakamus Valley to McGillivray Falls, as well as other unorganized territory outside Vancouver, is supervised by Mr. G. C. Knowles.
From this it is evident that Region II holds well over half the population. This
makes for particular emphasis with regard to a great flow of people in and out who
are looking for work, for entertainment, and for the other special facilities afforded
by the urban character of the region.
Region II has shared the general economic progress in the forest industries
particularly, in building, and in the expansion of public facilities and small industries.
Again this means that many people come here looking for work, and the City of
Vancouver bears the brunt of large numbers of single unemployed men. Apart
from statistics, which show us holding our own in most categories, our Department
is increasingly used by the public and reflects as much as any the revolutionary
expansion of service industries.
Table I demonstrates absolutely the increasing number of children coming
into care. This is of great concern to workers and administrators alike. We have
to give credit to our foster-parents for the efforts they put out for these children,
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G  17
but children can never permit themselves to forget that they have natural parents
somewhere. Very strong and successful co-ordinated efforts were made to depreciate
the widening pool of adoptable children by hiring more staff in a crash programme
to complete adoption studies and find more homes.
This year saw the retirement of Mr. H. E. Blanchard, Regional Director of
Region II since 1958, whom we have all admired and respected. In this my first
year as Regional Director in Region II, I must express my appreciation for the
" welcome home " kind of reception I have received and the generous co-operation
given by everyone.
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region II as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1963/64 and 1964/65
Category
1963/64
1964/65
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
285
12,693
306
1,073
3,346
13,407
2,111
265
0.9
37.9
0.9
3.2
10.0
40.0
6.3
0.8
296
12,464
282
1,060
3,145
12,961
2,337
260
0.9
38.0
0.9
3.2
Old-age Assistance	
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance	
Child Welfare	
9.6
39.5
7.1
Health and Institutional _
0.8
Totals  .	
33,486
100.0
32,805
100.0
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region II as at March 31, 1965
Category
a
UP
££o
E
Ih
>
g-a
x: R
SJ.S3
5 i
O 03
z>
Pi
>u
C3.B
>0
Total
Mar.
31,
1965
Family Service.- _.
Social Allowance 	
Blind Persons' Allowance...	
Disabled Persons' Allowance-
Old-age Assistance.
56
1,010
26
100
301
Old Age Security Supplementary Social
Allowance    	
Child Welfare	
Health and Institutional-
Totals  _
1,576 297
487 204
83   12
51
787
10
55
158
629
171
21
24
395
7
36
100
330
291
19
3,639 9371 1,882
1,202
38
426
13
51
133
624
242
43
21
99
2
15
33
102
102
6
26
253
6
41
89
356
258
15
8,952
197
681
2,138
8,524
(!)
32
174
8
34
72
254
510
34
20
106
4
17
26
269
72
27
1,570
380
1,044
20,492
1,118
296
12,464
282
1,060
3,145
12,961
2,337
260
541   32,805
1 Carried in Vancouver by Children's Aid Societies.
 G 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REGION III
G. A. Reed, Regional Director
During the past year there has been no change in the regional boundaries.
The region encompasses the same area as in previous years; that is, from the International Border to Wells Gray Park and from the Revelstoke area to Bralorne.
Social welfare services have been provided from the seven Provincial offices
that existed in the previous years—namely, Lillooet, Kamloops, Salmon Arm,
Vernon, Kelowna, Oliver, and Penticton. During the year two new offices were
opened in North Kamloops and Revelstoke to provide more direct and intensive
services to these greatly expanding areas. The North Kamloops office was opened
with a staff of three social workers and a full-time supervisor for this office, combined with the Lillooet office. The Revelstoke office was staffed with one social
worker as well as the necessary clerical staff. The opening of these new offices has
not only resulted in better services for the areas concerned, but also has relieved the
congestion in the offices that formerly served these areas.
The economy of the area has continued to expand, particularly in certain parts
of the area. There has been greatly increased activity in the field of mining in the
Merritt-Ashcroft area and a great increase in the construction industry in Kamloops
and Revelstoke. The tourist industry in the whole region has continued the growth
noted in previous Reports, and the region has become a prime recreational area.
With this economic growth and development and an increase in population, there
has been an increased demand for services from the Department of Social Welfare,
particularly in the areas of family services and child welfare. Some communities
like Merritt, North Kamloops, and Revelstoke have experienced great change over
preceding years, and such change is accompanied by a need for resources and a
demand for services. During the winter of 1964/65 much frost damage occurred
to the orchards, which has greatly affected the packing-house and fruit-canning industries. This will greatly decrease the seasonal employment created by these industries, and the effect of this will be noticed in the next fiscal year.
From the following table it can be noted that the Social Allowance case load
increased from 32.9 to 34.0 per cent of the total case load, an actual increase from
3,146 to 3,277 cases.
A total of $615,842.85 was granted to employable persons, a decrease of
$1,224.28 over the previous year. There was also a decrease of 136 in Supplementary Social Allowance to Old Age Security. There was, however, an increase in the
total case load from 9,560 to 9,648, an increase of approximately 0.9 per cent.
In addition to this increase in the case load, there were 32,806 cases opened
and closed, approximately 13.2 per cent more than the year before, and the children-
in-care case load rose from 709 to 786, an increase of 77 children-in-care or 10 per
cent over the previous year.
During the year we received 10Vi additional staff, as noted in the previous
report, and this was of great assistance in meeting the increased demand for services,
and it enabled the opening of new offices. The statistics show not only an increase
in case load, but also an increase in activity, as revealed by the turnover of cases
opened and closed, and it would have been impossible to give adequate service
without this increase in staff.
One problem in staffing that was experienced in the region was that of turnover
of staff. This was largely due to more social workers than ever before taking educational leave for further professional training in social work, from which the Department will accrue benefit upon the return of these staff members.    Another
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 19
change took place during the latter part of the year when my predecessor was appointed Director of Regional Services, and much of the progress in this annual
report took place under his guidance.
In the area of services to people, all district offices report a concern for giving
adequate casework services to families where there are family — parent-child —
marital problems and social and economic disintegration taking place. The staff are
endeavouring to give as much service as possible to these problem cases to prevent
family breakdown and to assist, through rehabilitation planning, a better level of
functioning in the family. It is noted that staff increases have furthered the cause
of rehabilitation. The various rehabilitation committees noted in the previous report
continue to function, and they attest to this interest in rehabilitation.
In several areas, in co-operation with community groups, notably ministerial
associations, concerned with family problems, a marriage counselling programme
has developed. This participation and sharing of interest and responsibility have
resulted in many cases requesting counselling early enough for prevention to be
possible.
In the Kamloops area we have been in liaison with the Anglican Council for
Social Services concerning its interest in establishing a home for unmarried mothers,
and we have given much consultation on this. The several offices in this area combined to run a foster-home campaign as we needed homes for infants and children
pending adoption. We will be able to carry this programme forward with the Provincial programme of Joint Effort for Fostering. The staff throughout the region
are greatly concerned with the increase in illegitimate births, and they are interested
in a programme of prevention. Extra effort has been made throughout to find and
assess adoption homes for children.
The opening of the Revelstoke office has enabled us to give more intensive
services to families and children, and there has been an increase in adoption homes
accepted. It has also assisted us to meet the requests for assistance from the unemployed employable persons who have come to that area as a result of the increased
activity in the construction industry. In the Penticton area we have continued to
work closely with the Penticton Indian Affairs Committee, and we have observed
development in the Indian group taking more responsibilities. Youth Guidance
Councils have continued to operate throughout the region, so that there is joint
planning amongst the various disciplines and agencies in the communities in services
for children. The study of effectiveness of services to families who had been deserted by the bread-winner, reported in the previous annual report, has focused staff
concern on this problem with the objective of more effective services to these
families.
In the area of development of resources to assist in meeting problems, we have
a group-living home on the Kamloops Indian Reserve for six Indian boys, and this
is a Provincial resource. In Kelowna we have participated in the formation of a
Kelowna and District Foster Parent Association. This has been very successful in
the development of new foster-home resources, and tribute is due to the parents
belonging to this association. The several homemaking and housekeeper service
community agencies have been of real assistance to the staff in providing housekeepers where necessary. We have valued this assistance of agencies in the communities, and we have appreciated the interest we have received by the communities
at large in our programme and the willingness to volunteer to assist us.
I commend all staff, municipal and provincial, for the level of services they
have maintained and their interest and devotion in prevention, rehabilitation, and
helping those in need to help themselves.
 G 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region III as at March 31, 1965
Category
tn
a
o
o
i
•sA
rt
c
S
■a
_.
u
o
o
t/i
a
o
j_a
Eg
o _
O
c
o
u
c
u
Bh
ta
o
tfl
>
to
(A
c
o
c
o
c
>
tfi
a
o
o
E>,
rt
Q
a
o
ni
a>—h
CO
c
o
>u
OS
1
o
136
412
15
97
255
20
465
20
13
216
4
65
196
36
138
18
48
184
8
94
103
18
113
3
571
38
212
6
41
77
5
167
8
_554
59
168
2
90
223
32
82
6
87
221
4
65
206
30
317
14
5
139
1
22
48
7
41
2
20
207
8
73
229
17
153
7
14
235
4
156
297
35
185
15
530
~~~36
157
12
~261
6
130
363
55
323
5
100
264
32
3
420
169
4
89
314
29
3,277
67
1,058
2,732
328
1,661
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Old-age Assistance 	
Supplementary Assistance to Old
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Child Welfare ._    	
Health and Institutional. 	
9
105
Totals	
1,420
686
662
944
265
714
941
735
824
727
605
9,648
Table II.-
-Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region III for the Fiscal Years 1963/64 and 1964/65
Category
1963/64
1964/65
Number
Per Centl
Number
Per Cent!
467
3,146
68
1,070
2,868
315
1,519
107
4.9
32.9
0.7
11.2
30.0
3.3
15.9
1.1
420
3,277
67
1.058
2,732
328
1,661
105
4.4
34.0
0.7
M.O
28.3
Disabled Persons' Allowance              	
Child Welfare
3.4
17.2
1.1
Totals
9,560
100.0
9,648
100 0
i Percentage may not add due to rounding.
REGION IV
W. H. Crossley, Regional Director
Region IV lies in the south-east corner of British Columbia and embraces most
of the areas generally known as the East Kootenay, West Kootenay, Arrow Lakes,
Slocan, and Boundary Districts. The boundaries of the region have remained
unchanged for several years.
The economic outlook regionally was buoyant during the year despite the usual
winter slow-down in heavy construction and lumbering. There was a marked speedup in economic activity in the later months. The continued demand for wood
products across the region, the steady production of Consolidated Mining and
Smelting plants in Trail and Marysville, the increased Japanese market for Crowsnest
Pass coal, stepped-up base-metal activities, and latterly bridge and highway construction together with preliminary work on the Duncan and Arrow Dams projects were
all factors in this buoyancy. The tourist business also has shown a marked increase,
particularly in the East Kootenay area. There has been an increase in home construction in the Castlegar area as a result of the Arrow Dam project, and in the
Grand Forks area as a result of the sale of Doukhobor lands. As a result, unemployment was not a grave problem for those clients who were physically or otherwise
" saleable " on the employment market.   There was a slightly increased flow of
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 21
transients, largely from the East, into the Cranbrook, Nelson, Trail, and Castlegar
areas due to the rumoured employment on the dam projects, but the expected flood
and crisis did not develop. We attribute this to the general boom across British
Columbia absorbing to a large extent the " floating pool " of unskilled labour. In
Trail the office was faced with the difficulty of finding transient accommodation
when one of the hotels that had offered excellent facilities closed down. In the Trail-
Castlegar area, as a result of the boom due to the Arrow Dam and highway projects,
our regular Social Allowance clients are facing difficulties in finding housing at suitable rentals because the whole rent structure has become inflated.
The staff situation remained stable throughout the region this year, permitting
better services to clients. The addition of a second district supervisor to the Cranbrook office in June improved supervisory services to the staff in Cranbrook, Creston,
and Fernie offices and relieved an overburdened supervisor. It was apparent by
the year's end, however, that an additional social worker was required in Cranbrook
due to the rapid population expansion in the Golden area, which is the result of the
Rogers Pass Highway opening and additional lumbering activities.
There were interesting programmes and services undertaken in the region this
year. In most, our staff was actively engaged, either directly or in an advisory
capacity.   Moving from west to east, they are as follows:—
In Grand Forks a school upgrading programme for adult Social Allowance
recipients was developed by Mr. John Unroe, of our staff, and Mr. John Walsh,
principal of one of the Grand Forks schools. The school staff at first donated their
time to this project, but were later partly subsidized by this Department. The clients,
all of Doukhobor culture, five or six in number, were enabled to move toward
vocational training, increasing their grade level in mathematics and English from
Grade IV or V to Grade VII, VIII, or IX.   This programme is continuing.
Tn the Trail area the Foster Home Committee of the local Council of Women
continued to function successfully. This volunteer group, unique in British Columbia, has located many foster homes required by youngsters needing this resource.
The district supervisor in Trail sparked this effort. This year also saw the innovation
of a homemaker's service in Trail, supported again by a committee from the local
Council of Women, with administration costs underwritten by the Trail Community
Chest. Our Department participated in surveys to establish the need, in the initial
planning, and is represented on the board of directors in Trail.
In the Nelson area there was some interest shown by a local service club in
developing a receiving and observation home. Several meetings have been held
with it, and it is still interested in this project.
Another milestone was passed on October 17th when the Kiwanis Villa at
Nelson, a low-rent apartment complex for senior citizens, built under the provisions
of the Elderly Citizens' Housing Aid Act, at a total furnished cost of $106,294.04,
was officially opened by the Honourable W. D. Black.
Another resource, largely for elderly citizens, was enlarged when Willowhaven
Private Hospital, a nursing home at Willow Point, opened a modern addition with
24 beds in November, 1964.
During the year, National Employment Service added a special placement
officer to its staff in Nelson, which will be of help in locating employment for some
of our clients.
The Pavilion, a small nursing home operated by our Department in New
Denver, continued to operate at full capacity, meeting the needs for this service in
the Slocan and Arrow Lakes area.
 G 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
A great deal of enthusiastic interest was engendered in the communities in
the area by the announcement by the Honourable Mr. Black that the dormitory at
New Denver, formerly used to house Doukhobor children whose parents would not
send them to school, was to be reactivated as a youth centre for boys. In this
regard, Mr. T. D. Bingham, Superintendent of Child Welfare, held a community
information meeting in New Denver in January, which was well attended.
A major community development in Creston this year was the completion of
the Dr. Endicott Home, a 30-bed home for retarded children, age 6 to 16 years,
built through the combined efforts of the chapters of the Mental Retardation Society
of British Columbia in the Kootenays. Prior to the end of the fiscal year, the first
children were admitted. Our Department is represented on the board of management and on the screening or admissions committee. The Provincial Government
gave a generous grant-in-aid for construction. In addition, our Department will
help with subsidization of patients' daily care costs since few parents can afford to
pay the total cost of care.
The staff in Creston through the year was active in joint consultative committee
meetings with school and public health personnel.
There were no realized developments in Cranbrook or Fernie, though much
exploratory work to develop a transient hostel was completed in the former city
and a senior citizens' housing organization was active in the latter town.
Civil defence was again a staff activity. The mobile feeding van was used once
for feeding rescue personnel looking for lost hunters. It was also used many times
to train people in various parts of the region in its operation. Various social workers
and people selected from the community took civil defence courses both at Arnprior
and Victoria.
This was a busy year in staff development. In September a successful joint
regional conference was held with Regions III and IV staffs in Nelson.
In November Mrs. Laura Fowler, of the Adoption Placement Section, visited
the region with a twofold purpose: to speak to staff about adoption placement generally and to spark the drive to recruit more adoption homes. Both objectives were
achieved.
The policy adopted by the Department this year of utilizing our trained or
experienced workers to carry smaller, more intensive counselling case loads was
instituted in Nelson and Cranbrook offices at the year's end with apparent success.
Table /.-
-Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region IV as at March 31, 1965
Category
M
O
O
a
rt
tj
a
o
V
u
u
'3
tt.
CA
Ih
O
HH
c
ct
u
a
B
O
tfi
%
z
U
>
a
u
a
u
z
rt
fi
28
430
2
116
319
38
268
25
7
216
3
58
203
28
71
5
2
162
3
61
134
19
36
3
12
167
6
65
234
25
46
7
23
578
2
91
369
35
103
9
16
110
5
40
169
13
46
4
42
376
6
110
334
55
182
22
130
2,039
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Old age Assistance   	
27
541
1,762
213
Child Welfare                                                         	
752
75
Totals	
1,226
591
420
562
1,210
4.3
1,127
5,539
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 23
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories in Region IV as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1963/64 and 1964/65
Category
1963/64
1964/65
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
133
1,945
32
572
1,856
193
654
76
2.4
35.6
0.6
10.5
34.0
3.5
12.0
1.4
130
2,039
27
541
1,762
213
752
75
2.3
36.8
Blind Persons' Allowance 	
Old-age Assistance 	
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance
Disabled Persons' Allowance  -
Child Welfare ... ■
0.5
9.8
31.8
3.8
13.6
1.4
Totals	
5.461          1         100 0
5,539
100.0
1
The most significant facts brought out in the preceding tables are in Table II.
It will be noted that the increase in the total case load is a relatively small 78 cases,
yet there are important factors not so easily spotted. There is an increase in the
Social Allowance cases, up 94 cases, and in the child welfare cases, which show an
increase of 98 cases. These increases are partly offset by a decrease of 110 in the
pension cases, which are Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowance, Disabled
Persons' Allowance, and supplementary assistance to Old Age Security recipients.
There are insignificant gains or losses in other categories. The child welfare increase
is largely in the " child-in-care " and " pending adoption home " categories.
May I thank municipal authorities, police officials, lawyers, school personnel,
Probation Officers, public health personnel, Government Agents, many service clubs,
church groups, and individuals for the assistance that they have rendered us or our
clients this past year. Above all, my thanks go to the clerical and professional staff
for their constant devotion to the clients we serve.
REGION V
V. H. Dallamore, Regional Director
The fiscal year of 1964/65 was one of considerable change in Region V.
In the first place the administrative area was reduced when the northern
boundary was redrawn in the general area of the Pine Pass. The Liard-Peace area
north of that line was organized as Region VIII on September 1, 1964, with
administrative offices in Dawson Creek and Fort St. John. Region V was left with
five administrative offices in Prince George (two offices), Quesnel, Vanderhoof, and
Williams Lake.
Then, to make the supervisory loads more equitable, responsibility for the Vanderhoof office was transferred from the district supervisor of the Prince George main
office to that of the Prince George sub-office.
A further change for Vanderhoof was the move into more adequate accommodation in the Federal Building.
In Quesnel allocation of case loads to social-work staff was changed from the
clients' area of residence to need for casework services or social welfare services.
The district was divided in two with a social caseworker and a social welfare worker
attending to the cases in each.
Community organization was changed when, on February 15, 1965, Williams
Lake was incorporated as a town under the Municipal Act and thereupon became
responsible for welfare services to its citizenry.   Thus it joined Prince George and
 G 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Quesnel as municipalities served by the Provincial Department of Social Welfare on
a per capita basis.
Community resources were improved by the opening of the Simon Fraser
Private Hospital in May, 1964, with a capacity of 75 beds, of which sufficient for
departmental needs were made available to us. Also in Prince George, a third
receiving home was opened in December, 1964, giving accommodation for two
infants.
In May, 1964, the Voth Group-living Home for Boys was opened in the Vanderhoof district with a capacity for four and a potential for six teen-age boys.
Two Foster Home Committees, one Roman Catholic and one Protestant, were
formed with the backing of local churches in Prince George. It is anticipated that
they will help significantly in finding needed foster homes in the area.
The economic activity in the area grew to boom proportions. Job placements
were reported by the National Employment Service as being at an all-time high, but
influx of job-seekers was proportionate. At the end of the fiscal year the National
Employment Service reported a record number of job-seekers but also a significant
number of unfilled job openings, mostly in the skilled trades. The effect of this on
our case load will be recorded later in this report.
The change in case load may be observed in the following tables. It will be
remembered that the region was reduced in size during the fiscal year and some
2,125 cases were transferred to the new administration of Region VIII. The distribution by administrative offices is seen in Table II.
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region V as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1963/64 and 1964/65
Category
1963/641
1964/65
Number
Per Cents
Number
Per Centa
Family Service  	
127
2,027
40
340
590
52
856
24
3.1
50.0
1.0
8.4
14.5
1.3
21.1
0.6
156
2,012
44
409
579
55
981
30
3.6
47.2
Blind Persons' Allowance                       .  —
1.0
9.6
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance
13.6
1.3
Child Welfare
23.0
0.7
Totals)
4.056         1         100.0
4.266         1         100.0
i The figures for 1963/64 do not include statistics for the districts of Dawson Creek and Fort St. John,
which are now part of Region VIII.
2 Percentage may not add due to rounding.
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices in
Region V as at March 31, 1965
Category
Prince
George
Main
Prince
George
Sub
Ouesnel
Vanderhoof
Williams
Lake
Total
61
539
9
187
227
23
461
20
698
42
474
3
71
lii 9
9                 44
156
70
9
64
102
231
23
87
131
14
169
2,012
44
409
579
Blind Persons' Allowance         	
Old-age Assistance
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allow-
13    |           5
177     1         174
55
Child Welfare
981
3     1             2     1             5
30
435
Totals             .          	
1.527    I       698    I       am
704     I     4766
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 25
The case-load decrease noted last year was not repeated in this. Indeed, during the 1964/65 fiscal year the case load increased by 210 or 5.2 per cent.
However, the Social Allowance case load decreased by 15 or 0.7 per cent and
declined from 50 per cent of the case load to 47.2 per cent. The significance of
this lies in the fact that the population has increased approximately 10 per cent during the year, and that a vast majority of those moving into the region were in an age-
group for which social assistance would apply if need arose.
It is interesting to compare the number of unemployed employable applicants
for social assistance who received grants in March, 1965, with the number who
received assistance in March, 1964. Single persons only differed by one, numbering
497 in March, 1965, and 498 in March, 1964. But the families decreased by 96,
being 258 in March, 1965, and 354 in March, 1964. The total expenditure in
social assistance grants to unemployed employables in March, 1965, was 26.7 per
cent less than the amount granted in March, 1964. Transient unemployed employables (those having less than 30 days residence in local areas) became a much more
significant proportion of the social assistance to unemployed employable case load.
Records were kept in Prince George and Quesnel, and it was noted that whereas in
March, 1964, transients comprised 16.2 and 19.2 per cent of the Prince George
and Quesnel case loads respectively, they occupied 26.4 and 40.1 per cent of the
unemployed employable case load in those two communities in March, 1965. The
majority of these individuals and families who required assistance needed it only
for short periods.
In Prince George the statistics for the hostel for single transient men, which
was opened on February 17, 1964, corroborates this statement. During the fiscal
year under review, 2,009 men were admitted to this hostel and 1,198 discharged.
The average stay per man was 5.5 days. Known to have jobs to go to when leaving
the hostel were 811 of these men.
Adoption cases open at the end of the fiscal year numbered 30 more than at
the beginning. Approved foster homes increased by 28 in number, but pending
foster homes, those still requiring investigation, decreased by four. At the same
time the number of children in care increased by 44.
Although the relationship of children in care to approved foster homes was
reduced from 2.6 to 2.4 during the fiscal year, it is clear that more foster homes are
needed. The situation is poorest in Prince George, where this relationship of children in care to approved foster homes is 2.8. It is best in Williams Lake, where the
relationship is 1.5 children in care to approved foster homes.
During the year seven social workers and seven clerk-stenographers left the
district offices of the present (reduced) region. However, appointments numbered
12 social workers and 10 clerk-stenographers, so the over-all staff was increased by
eight. On March 31, 1965, social-work staff numbered 2\Vi and the clerical-
stenographic staff numbered 15. Supervisory staff numbered three and was unchanged from the previous year.
Our thanks go out to municipal officials, public health personnel, teachers, and
the numerous societies and community-minded persons who have helped so much
in our work.
 G 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REGION VI
A. E. Bingham, Regional Director
This report deals with some of the developments, events, and activities of the
past year in Region VI, the Fraser Valley region. Region VI is one of eight regions
into which the Province is divided for social welfare administration.
The area served lies between the mountains and the Vancouver-Lower Mainland region. It extends east along both sides of the Fraser River from Surrey and
Pitt Meadows to Lytton and to Manning Park. There was a population increase of
10,000 during the year, bringing the estimated population to 202,500.
A date to be noted in the year under review is June 12th, the opening of the
Port Mann Bridge and freeway system through the Fraser Valley. The new closeness of Vancouver has an increasing impact on the way of life in the Fraser Valley.
Metropolitan expansion eastward from Vancouver is pushing back the farm lands a
little farther each year. The centre of agricultural activity has been moving east and
is now about the Aldergrove-Abbotsford area.
The Village of Hope became the Town of Hope on January 1, 1965. In so
doing, it became responsible for its share of social welfare costs and administration.
The Department now provides social welfare services for 10 such municipalities in
the region on a 60-cents-per-capita basis.
How do we serve the people in the various communities of the Fraser Valley?
Social workers appointed to carry out the social welfare programmes are available in
Provincial offices at Abbotsford, Chilliwack, Langley, Haney, and White Rock.
The Chilliwack Provincial office operates a sub-office at Hope.
In Surrey, social welfare services are provided through the Surrey municipal
social welfare department. The Province shares in the administrative costs of the
municipal department by providing a supervisor and one-half the staff of social
workers.
In serving the people of the region, the social workers carry out casework
services in three general areas—Social Allowance, Child Welfare, and assistance to
those over age 65, the blind, and the disabled.
Individuals and families who are unable to provide for themselves and who
qualify are provided with Social Allowance for their general support. Many of the
individuals and families receiving assistance during the year were helped to reach
independence. We know that material help alone will not solve problems. A caseworker studies each situation and tries to assess the causes of the problem and then
plan with those concerned along an avenue of rehabilitation. Table I shows that
at the end of the year there were 98 fewer Social Allowance cases than at the end
of the preceding year.
The basis of our service to chUdren is service to the family. Child welfare
service is fourfold: protection in which the focus is to assist families handle their
own problems; service to unmarried parents in which we offer assistance in arriving
at a sound plan for mother and child; adoption placement service around the placement of children on a permanent basis; and foster care, a service to children where
we have been unable to assist parents to adequately care for their own children. It
will be seen in Table I that child welfare case load is down 14 cases from the
preceding year.
About one-half of the regional case load is made up of assistance to those over
age 65, the blind, and the disabled. Our service to these people is by specialized
case loads; that is, the social worker carries only cases administered by the Old-age
Assistance Board.    Visits and interviews must be made to appraise individuals'
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 27
material resources and so help them determine their eligibility for financial assistance.
In addition, however, much time is spent in assisting older people obtain medical
services and with changes in living arrangements. We try to assist the older person
to remain independent in his own home as long as possible. In the past year we
assisted toward this end with financial assistance, medical services, house repairs,
and housekeeper service. When home care was no longer possible, boarding-home
or private-hospital placements were made.
A sizeable increase in staff was the highlight of the year. At the year's end the
staff in the region totalled 44 social workers, 6 district supervisors, 1 municipal
administrator, and Regional Director.
The need for adoption homes was of paramount importance during the year.
Each office placed special emphasis on the recruitment of prospective adopting
parents. In addition, an electronic exhibit for adoption recruitment was displayed
at fall fairs at Chilliwack and Abbotsford.
The Federal-Provincial-Municipal adoption project in Surrey continued. The
first phase, the study of a backlog of adoption applications, was completed. During
the year the project focused on recruitment of additional applications, plus prompt
service with respect to the study of the homes and placement of children.
Well-trained personnel are the most important factor in sound social welfare
administration. Each of the six district supervisors took part in a refresher course
that was designed to provide direct training to persons responsible to oversee, administer, and evaluate the work of our local field offices. With the purpose that
staff might add to their knowledge and improve their skills, an inter-regional conference was held at Harrison in October. The theme was " Communication in
Social Work."
For the retarded child (as with other children) there is no substitute for an
adequate family environment. Children reared in a large institution get little
fondling or individual attention. With this in view the Department of Social Welfare
is co-operating with Mental Health Services in an experiment of foster-home placement of some of the children in The Woodlands School. At the end of the year
there were 17 certified children from this school placed in Fraser Valley foster
homes. The project social worker makes her headquarters at the Abbotsford district
office.
How can field staff be used the most productively? An experiment in case
assignment commenced in Abbotsford in July. Public welfare cases are usually
assigned to a social worker by geographic area or by category. The new approach
is family-focused, and cases are assigned by problem.
Another development in Abbotsford was the creation of a Rehabilitation Committee. It is similar to the committee now operating in Chilliwack. This is a team
approach, designed to encourage self-support among some individuals and families
receiving Social Allowance. This Committee, in a systematic way, reviews the
physical, mental, and vocational powers of the individual, and vocational counselling is given. To help some men and women give up the security of public assistance
for the satisfaction of self-support is not easy. There is no magic in these committees, but rather hard work by representatives of medical, social, and vocational fields.
An emerging social problem in the region is the number of young people who
apply for Social Allowance. They have passed up the three R's at school for three
£/'s—unschooled, unskilled, and unemployed. Some of those who had Grade X
or better were referred for vocational training and some were assisted to return to
school for another term. Those who quit school at the Grade VIII level showed
little interest or motivation to return to school for upgrading as they believed the
 G 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
training would take too long. It was noted that many of these young people were
not aware of the many resources available to them. The prospect for work for the
unskilled in the Fraser Valley seems to be seasonal at best.
The flexibility of the Social Assistance Act has permitted us in the past few
years to co-operate with Mental Health Services in the placement of patients who
have been treated in the mental hospitals. These are patients who have lost contact
with or have no family ties. They need some supervision and possibly some medication, but they no longer need the intensive care of a hospital. At the end of the
year we were co-operating in the boarding-home placement of about 180 of these
patients.
An Emergency Welfare Services vehicle is assigned to this region. It has a
fully equipped mobile kitchen. During the year it was used in two emergencies—
once in June, when the Fraser River was high, for seven days of dyke operation at
Harrison Mills and again in January at the slide on the Hope-Princeton Highway.
In addition, it was used for two training courses and was placed on display at two
fall fairs.
Without responsible people who can make decisions on the spot day by day,
the social welfare programme would not be effective. Therefore, in closing, a sincere
thank you to district supervisors, social workers, clerical staff, Provincial employees
and municipal employees alike.
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region VI as at March 31st, for the Fiscal Years 1963/64 and 1964/65
Category
1963/64
1964/65
Number
Per Centl
Number
Per Centl
216
4,248
62
1,176
3,826
349
1,631
121
1.9
36.5
0.5
101
32.9
3.0
14.0
1.0
198
4,150
67
1,107
3,668
357
1,617
133
1 8
Social Allowance -    	
Blind Persons' Allowance "	
36.7
0.6
9.8
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance ...
32.5
3 2
Child Welfare      .
14.3
1 2
11.629          1          1(¥)0
11,297
100 0
i Percentage may not add due to rounding.
Table II.—Case Load by Maj
or Categories as at March 31
1965
Category
Abbotsford
Chilliwack
Haney
Langley
Surrey
White
Rock
Total
22
832
19
78
228
798
257
29
66
1,001
14
66
263
606
522
25
14
480
5
41
98
425
124
19
16
426
9
43
122
446
168
7
77
1,243
15
107
337
1,150
501
46
3
168
5
22
59
243
45
7
198
4,150
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Disabled Persons' Allowance 	
67
357
1,107
3,668
1 617
Old Age Security Supplementary Social
Child Welfare
133
Totals -	
2,263
2,563
1,206
1,237
3,476
552
11,297
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 29
REGION VII
A. J. Wright, Regional Director
The area covered by Region VII remains unchanged. It stretches from the
village of Endako on the east to the Queen Charlotte Islands on the west. Northward is the Alaska Border and to the south is Milbanke Sound. The population of
this area continues to increase, particularly in the westward municipalities. According to the census taken this year, Terrace, including the outlying districts, showed
the highest increase with a population now of approximately 14,000.
The economic situation showed a continued improvement over last year. This
was somewhat hampered however by an unusually severe winter, which closed many
lumber-mills for periods of time but did not, to any great extent, affect the logging
operations. Another factor that helped the employment situation was a reasonably
good fishing year, which not only affects the Prince Rupert area, but also has its
effect on the areas as far east as Hazelton as people in these areas still rely on fishing and make annual trips to Prince Rupert for the fishing season.
Announcements were also made on the establishment of two new pulp-mills,
one to be located in Houston and the other in Kitimat. There was also an announcement of a sizeable increase to the already existing mill in Prince Rupert. This caused
an expected flurry of activity, particularly among job-seekers, but as time wore on
and no concrete action was taken except for Columbia Cellulose in Prince Rupert
and Endako Mines, this gradually wore off.
Community interest and participation in provision of resources continued this
year at a high level. The Van Der Sander Receiving Home continued to give care
to infants, which amounted to approximately 1,540 days for the year. This privately sponsored home, as can be seen by these figures, has been a valuable resource
to the Prince Rupert staff and used almost to capacity. A similar private home was
also established and used to capacity in Smithers.
; In October, 1964, the Friendship House Association opened the doors of the
Friendship House Receiving Home, with Mr. and Mrs. Ben Cunliffe as parents.
This was a community-sponsored home built largely through community subscription on land donated by the City of Prince Rupert. This Department entered into
agreement with this association whereby it will care for children between the ages
of 2 and 14. A similar home was also opened in Terrace in February, 1965, sponsored by the Terrace and District Christian Welfare Council. This was situated on
10 acres of land donated by a private citizen. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Crown, former
foster-parents in Terrace, moved in to run the establishment.
Friendship House Association has remained extremely active during the past
year. Friendship House itself continues to give care to homeless transient men, and
plans are under way to extend services and facilities to the surrounding community
to help particularly the native population of Prince Rupert. A donation of three
houses by a private citizen has started plans to establish a group home in one of
these buildings for teen-age girls either delinquent or pre-delinquent.
Interest in accommodation for the aged still remains high. This year saw the
opening in Prince Rupert of a low-cost rental complex for the aged. Plans are still
under study for a boarding home in Terrace, and Smithers and Burns Lake are iii
the process of raising money to build low-cost housing in these communities.
A staff-development programme was carried on again this year. A joint meeting between Health Branch and welfare staff was held in Prince Rupert early in the
spring to discuss mental health and other subjects of mutual interest. This proved
highly successful, and future meetings were planned.   However, with the subsequent
 G 30                                                   BRITISH COLUMBIA
loss of the Medical Health Officer and no replacement, these meetings were shelved
temporarily.
Improved services by the Mental Health Travelling Clinic commenced in October, when the team started visiitng Terrace-Kitimat-Prince Rupert every other month
instead of twice a year.   This has proved invaluable to staff as consultation in this
area is limited.
The staff were engaged this year in a good deal of public speaking and community participation.   In Terrace the adoption recruitment programme commenced
with television and radio appearances as well as speaking engagements by the staff.
Speaking engagements were held in Prince Rupert, Smithers, and Burns Lake.   As
well as this, a Youth Advisory Committee was set up in Smithers and Burns Lake
comprised of various members of the community who are involved in working with
this group.
Weekly group meetings with parents with problems was also established in
Smithers in February, 1965, and so far has been meeting with some degree of success.
The Indian project went into its second year of operation in Smithers.   The
Hagwilget Receiving Home, established through the efforts of the project worker,
also went into its second year of operation with many improvements, both physically
and operationally, being noted.   A number of projects initiated by the project worker
and carried through by the native people themselves not only was of material benefit
to the Indian people, but also provided valuable research material to the worker.
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region VII for the Year 1964/65 as at March 31,1965
Category
Burns
Lake
Prince
Rupert
Smithers
Terrace
Totals
9
128
9
24
53
5
69
4
27
272
17
97
134
25
204
15
42
276
22
63
97
19
157
2
36
211
8
45
57
12
233
6
114
887
56
229
341
61
663
27
Child Welfare 	
Health and InstitutionaL    ..  	
Totals
301
791
678
608
2,378
Table I, above, indicates the case-load make-up in each office.    Again this
year the majority of the case load is comprised of cases requiring the most intensive
casework services as there is a low number of pension cases.   Once again there was
a significant drop in the total number of cases.   This is most noteworthy in Prince
Rupert, where the case load reached an all-time low equal to that of 1957 despite
the increase in population.   This was in part due to the improved income situation
as well as experienced staff in sufficient numbers.   A slight decrease was also noted
in Smithers, while Burns Lake and Terrace showed a slight increase.   It can therefore be safely stated that in the area the combination of a good economic situation
and ability of the staff to cope led to a relatively stable year as far as the categories
in the case loads are concerned.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 31
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in Region VII as at March 31st
for the Fiscal Years 1963/64 and 1964/65
Category
1963/64
1964/65
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
115
915
59
209
394
61
680
22
4.7
37.3
2.4
8.5
16.0
2.5
27.7
0.9
114
887
56
229
341
61
663
27
4.8
37.3
2.4
9.6
14.3
Disabled Persons' Allowance
Child Welfare                              	
2.6
27.9
1.1
Totals	
2.455      1       100.0
2.378      1       100.0
It is significant to note that there has been relatively no change in the percentages of the case loads. The same reasons for this can be given as for the totals.
In addition, it can be said that as the staff gain more experience, they are in a better
position to give better service to their clients.
In closing I wish to thank the staff of this region for their devotion and efforts
to bring the services of this Department to their clients. We also have received
excellent co-operation from the communities and municipalities within our boundaries, school authorities, Indian Affairs Branch, public health and probation services,
as well as many organizations and individuals.
REGION VIII
J. A. Mollberg, Regional Director
Region VIII is a new region formed out of Region V as of September 1, 1964.
It consists of the Peace River and Alaska Highway area from the Pine Pass on the
south to the Yukon Border on the north, and the Alberta Border on the east to the
Alaska Panhandle on the west. It includes the communities of Chetwynd, Hudson
Hope, Pouce Coupe, Dawson Creek, Fort St. John, Fort Nelson, Lower Post,
Cassiar, Telegraph Creek, and Atlin. It is served by the Regional Director's office
in Dawson Creek, and two district offices—one in Dawson Creek and one in Fort
St. John. There are two per capita municipalities—Dawson Creek and Fort St.
John. Staff consists of a supervisor, 7 social workers, and SVz stenographers in
Dawson Creek and a supervisor, 5 social workers, and 3V_ stenographers in Fort
St. John.
The present population of the region is estimated at approximately 40,000
people. Over the past several years the region has been experiencing extensive
economic development from farming, gas and oil exploration, and latterly the Peace
River power development at Portage Mountain. The gas and oil exploration has
recently levelled off, which appears to have had a stabilizing effect on the region.
The population is continuing to increase in the communities of Chetwynd and Hudson Hope. However, the growth of Dawson Creek, Fort St. John, and Fort Nelson
has been falling off, and they are developing into stable residential communities.
There were three major developments in the region during the year. In
September, 1964, our work was divided into two streams—casework and social
work. This provided better utilization of staff and helped to provide a more comprehensive service to our clients.
 G 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
In September, 1964, our new receiving home was opened in Fort St. John.
This was a joint effort by the Rotary Club in Fort St. John, the community, and
our Department. This resource is proving to be a real help to the children in this
area. The community of Fort St. John, and the Rotary Club in particular, deserves
our sincere thanks for the development of this resource.
October, 1964, saw the beginning of the Dawson Creek Rehabilitation Committee. This is a joint effort among the health unit, the National Employment
Service, and our Department, headed by the Medical Health Officer in Dawson
Creek. Since its inception it has processed 31 cases and is proving to be an excellent
resource for the rehabilitation of some of our clients.
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region VIII as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1963/64 and 1964/65
Category
1963/64
Number     Per Centl
1964/65
Number     Per Centl
Family Service	
Social Allowance	
Blind Persons' Allowance-
Old-age Assistance-
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance-
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Child Welfare	
Health and Institutional-
Totals	
110
1,101
6
1134
262
26
472
30
5.1
51.4
0.3
6.3
12.2
1.2
22.0
1.4
2,141
100.0
101
1,051
6
132
24)1
24
466
18
2,039
5.0
51.5
0.3
6.5
11.8
1.2
22.9
_0.9_
100.0
i Percentage may not add due to rounding.
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region VIII as at March 31, 1965
Category
Dawson
Creek
Fort St.
John
Total
Family Service	
Social Allowance	
Blind Persons' Allowance-
Old-age Assistance-
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance-
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Child Welfare .	
Health and Institutional-
Totals	
60
654
3
89
154
18
282
11
1,271
41
397
3
43
87
6
184
7
768
101
1,051
6
132
241
24
466
18
2,039"
I would like to thank the supervisors, social workers, and stenographers for
their help and co-operation, as well as senior administration, for their support and
encouragement during my first year in this region. I would also like to thank the
many individuals who have volunteered their time and effort in serving the people
in the north.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 33
PART III.—DIVISIONS
SOCIAL ASSISTANCE AND REHABILITATION DIVISION
R. J. Burnham, Assistant Director of Social Welfare
SOCIAL ALLOWANCES SECTION
The Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division supervises the assistance
programme for persons who are in need because of lack of income or assets. The
programme extends beyond mere financial assistance. It includes rehabilitative services, enabling recipients to become self-dependent wherever feasible. Where self-
dependence is not feasible, services exist to prevent or to modify the many serious
social problems associated with poverty and public dependence.
During the fiscal year there was a total of 63,393 applications for assistance, a
drop of one-half of 1 per cent over the previous year. The case load as at March
31, 1965, stood at 28,848, as compared with 28,919 at March 31, 1964.
A change in method of reporting statistics was introduced at the end of March,
1965, and showed at that time single men accounted for 57 per cent of the actual
case load and for 69 per cent of all applications for assistance. In contrast, families
with children and both parents at home accounted for only 12 per cent of the case
load and only 12 per cent of applications for assistance. This corresponds with the
records of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics that show a low rate of unemployment
for married men contrasted with a relatively high rate of unemployment for single
men. Since the majority of these single men are over age 40, it would appear a more
unsettled way of living has contributed to a relatively higher degree of unemploy-
ability in terms of changed labour needs. One-parent families with children constitute 20 per cent of the case load.
There were approximately 625 children in the care of relatives, many of whom
would otherwise require care under child welfare provisions. Social assistance
recipients include over 25,000 children.
Over-all expenditure on the social assistance programme has increased by
approximately 1 per cent. This increase is more than accounted for by increase in
benefits combined with normal population growth. There has been marked increase
in the number of applications from persons from other parts of Canada attracted to
British Columbia in search of employment.
During the year as much emphasis as possible has been placed on meeting
actual need. This entailed closer examination of family expenditure and budgets to
determine costs. Where necessary special allowances were used to augment the basic
Social Allowance payable. During the year an additional provision was made
enabling payment of up to $10 per year per child attending school for help with the
cost of school-starting supplies. Thousands of children benefited from this addition.
In addition to the processing of applications, the social workers of the Department regularly carry out thousands of reviews of eligibility to ensure continued
entitlement for assistance. Contrary to popular opinion, there are relatively few
instances of fraud, and those that do occur are usually detected early and involve
comparatively small sums.
 G 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table I.—Number of Persons Assisted by Month for Fiscal Year 1964/65
Heads of
Families
Dependents
Single
Recipients
Total
April, 1964_
May, 1964_
June, 1964...
July, 1964-
August, 1964	
September, 1964_
October, 1964	
November, 1964_
December, 1964-
January, 1965	
February, 1965	
March, 1965	
11,653
11,569
11,421
10,966
10,542
10,521
10,404
10,929
11,540
12,348
12,004
11,523
34,738
33,637
32,994
31,145
29,970
30,174
29,823
31,541
33,469
36,833
36,137
34,359
16,638
16,578
16,490
15,788
15,915
15,297
15,542
16,289
16,806
16,944
17,021
17,325
63,029
61,784
60,905
57,899
56,427
55,992
55,769
58,759
61,815
66,125
65,162
63,207
Table II.—Comparative Figures of Cases Opened and Closed
March, 1963
March, 1964
March, 1965
Opened
4,446
4,796
5,261
Closed
4,673
5,318
5,594
Table III.—Comparative Totals by Region and Unorganized and Organized Territory of Recipients and Dependents in March, 1965, 1964, and 1963
PROVINCIAL
Region I—
Alberni _
Campbell River.
Courtenay	
Duncan	
Nanaimo	
Victoria	
Mar., Mar., Mar.,
1965 1964 1963
.    294 394 315     Alberni
.    450     	
.     588 1,065 1,165
.    230 242 341
.    785 1,081 1,000
.    463 546 528
2,810   3,328    3,349
Region II—
New Westminster .
Vancouver	
Westview	
19
446
73
63        65
384      470
74       105
538
521       640
MUNICIPAL
Mar.,  Mar.,  Mar.,
1965     1964     1963
Courtenay	
Central Saanich
Duncan	
Esquimalt  	
Ladysmith 	
Nanaimo	
North   Cowichan
Oak Bay	
Port Alberni	
Saanich	
Victoria ._	
Burnaby _
Coquitlam
Delta	
New Westminster 	
North Vancouver City
North Vancouver District 	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody 	
Powell River _______
Richmond	
Vancouver	
164
103
27
149
139
51
620
178
27
503
467
273
141
33
144
146
"651
231
44
594
535
2,608
651
330
1,416
598
183
100
37
135
132
"519
268
48
446
480
1,571 1,587 1,396
3,999 4,379 3,744
2,715
651
380
1,574
582
2,499
746
342
1,679
617
West Vancouver
6,809 7,707 7,093
_ 375  371 374
_ 303  260 261
_  176  174 163
_ 201  223 277
_ 584  627 660
_15,680 16,090 15,393
_ 151  106 98
23,073 23,753 23,109
23,611 24,274 23,749
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 35
Table III.—Comparative Totals by Region and Unorganized and Organized Territory of Recipients and Dependents in March, 1965, 1964, and 1963—Continued
PROVINCIAL
MUNICIPAL
Mar.,
Mar.,
Mar.,
Mar.,
Mar.,
Mar.,
1965
1964
1963
1965
1964
1963
Region III—
Kamloops
. _ 1,029
1,543
1,417
Armstrong
34
34
38
Kelowna
608
599
556
Enderby
47
39
33
Lillooet
341
361
424
Kamloops
733
627
638
North Kamloops	
     250
	
.	
Kelowna   	
516
391
418
Oliver
468
	
Merritt
115
	
	
Penticton
436
883
1,059
North Kamloops	
268
306
311
Revelstoke
228
——__
Penticton
792
659
883
491
613
546
Revelstoke
137
201
149
Vernon
633
500
592
Salmon Arm District.
186
199
209
Summerland
142
154
170
Vernon      	
376
434
411
4,484
4,499
4,594
3,346
3,044
3,260
Region IV—
Cranbrook 	
788
614
832
Cranbrook
313
239
271
Creston
596
701
783
Fernie.
184
217
119
184
141
133
Grand Forks
93
90
93
Grand Forks
258
238
255
Greenwood _
8
14
11
Nelson  	
788
797
809
Kimberley
.     153
154
176
239
269
249
Nelson                     _
414
377
419
Trail
465
581
524
Rossland
83
109
81
TraU
183
183
212
3,318
3,341
3,585
1,431
1,383
1,382
Region V—
Prince George
1,665
1,854
1,579
Prince George	
512
1,046
1,209
Quesnel
482
493
651
Quesnel
.     375
237
579
187
222
211
20
Williams Lake	
 571
600
634
2,905
3,169
3,075
907
1,283
1,788
Region VI—
Abbotsford
286
331
320
Chilliwack City	
472
485
566
Chilliwack
      543
601
714
Chilliwhack Township 1,322
1,158
1,118
Haney
118
106
107
Hope
92
	
	
164
127
151
Langley Township	
.    914
882
1,037
Maple Ridge
. 1,287
1,029
1,017
Matsqui
.     752
813
951
Mission District	
424
439
483
Mission Town
.    269
229
156
Sumas
153
171
190
Surrey
. 3,961
4,010
3,887
Whit'' Knrlr
300
379
310
947
1,038
1,141
10,110
9,722
9,866
Region VII—
Burns lake      .   ..
254
204
170
Kitimat
32
29
55
140
284
220
.    484
453
580
Smithers
699
632
556
Terrace
.     327
269
280
Terrace
123
120
104
1,216
1,240
1,050
843
751
915
Region VIII—
1,132
1,098
1,130
.    996
999
979
Fort St. John
650
718
606
Fort St. John
502
192
198
1,782
1,816
1,736
1,498
1,191
1,177
7,830   7,543   7,854
4,749   4,724   4,967
3,812   4,452   4,863
11,057 10,760 11,007
2,059    1,991    1,965
3,280   3,007    2,913
63,207 64,458 64,411
 G 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IV.—Expenditures by the Province for Social Allowances,
Medical Services, etc.
Fiscal Year
1962/63
Fiscal Year
1963/64
Fiscal Year
1964/65
Basic Social Allowances-
Repatriation, transportation within the Province, nursing- and boarding-
home care (other than tuberculosis), special allowances, and grants.
Emergency payments, such as where a family may lose its home by
fire or similar circumstances	
Municipal and Provincial cases—
(a) Tuberculosis, boarding-, nursing-, and private-home cases_
(6) Transportation of tuberculosis cases	
(c) Comforts allowance for tuberculosis cases	
Hospitalization of social assistance cases	
Gross Social Allowance costs as per Public Accounts..
Less municipal share of costs and sundry credits-
Net Social Allowances	
Administration and operation of New Denver Pavilion-
Medical services and drugs	
Totals-
$24,782,325
3,119,602
11,353
206,513
1,395
4,336
11,629
$25,756,670
3,'521,102
16,137
174,687
568
3,627
6,727
$28,137,153
3,081,288
$25,055,865
20,767
4,109,239
$29,185,871
$29,479,518
2,904,272
$26,575,246"
22,318
4,503,833
$31,101,397
$25,840,129
3,778,829
15,256
171,051
402
2,837
11,326_
$29,819,830"
2,999,753_
$26,820,077
22,746
4,507,215_
$31,350,038"
For the fiscal year 1964/65 the Province received from the Federal Government re—
Unemployment Assistance Agreement  $13,902,655
Sundry  5,181
Total.
$13,907,836
REHABILITATION
Services of a rehabilitative nature are provided for a variety of problems.
Greatest attention is focused on return to employment.
Popular conception has usually identified employability and unemployability
with health factors, advanced age, or the need of a mother to remain at home for
care of her children. On the other hand, social workers have long known that many
persons either could not obtain employment or could not hold employment because
of serious character problems or lack of ability, education, and skill, both of which
in turn usually come to be associated with factors of age and health. The increasing
shift in employment emphasis, requiring higher levels of education and training, has
increased the problem to such an extent that it is estimated that for practical purposes at least one-half of the persons considered as employable on a physical basis
are in fact excluded from any possibility of regular employment. For many of the
remaining persons, employment is dependent on the demand for labour. Each
month several thousand men and women are given help by way of counselling and
encouragement and other more intensive services. A substantial proportion of some
5,700 cases that are closed monthly are a direct result of the help given by the staff
of Provincial and municipal welfare offices, often in co-operation with other agencies
in the community. To be eligible for assistance, all employable persons must maintain a continuous registration for employment with the National Employment Service. Many referrals are made for educational upgrading and for vocational training.
During the school-year ending July, 1965, some 375 social assistance recipients
were accepted for training, and of these the majority are no longer in receipt of
assistance.
Large numbers of single men, including many from other parts of Canada,
move about the Province in search of work, and in doing so make repeated applica-
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 37
tions for assistance to social welfare offices located on major transportation arteries.
It has been found that one of the most effective means of helping these people has
been through establishment of hostels. This has been demonstrated in particular in
Prince George, where during the fiscal year no fewer than 800 men were enabled to
obtain employment on the basis of a stay in the hostel, averaging approximately one
week's duration. In Dawson Creek a similar hostel enabled 300 men to obtain
employment.
Emphasis is being placed on sorting out for rehabilitation services those who
appear most likely to achieve return to employment. Rehabilitation services are
provided for disabled persons in co-ordination with the Health Branch and the
National Employment Service. Rehabilitation Committees have been set up in 11
locations throughout the Province. It is hoped that when fully functioning each
will be able to help some 20 persons a year back to self-dependence.
For many persons in receipt of assistance, employment is not feasible. For
example, in the situation of the one-parent families, who represent about one-quarter
of the family cases, the mother's presence at home is usually desirable to provide
care and supervision for her children. It has been found that efforts made to assist
numbers of these mothers to employment by vocational training did not usually
produce the desired result because available earnings were not sufficient to provide
for housekeeping services and living costs. Many others require assistance because
of factors relative to age, chronic ill health, and severe social or mental disabilities.
Disabling health factors have been the usual basis for separating out the employable
from the unemployable. That this is inadequate is attested by the estimate that fully
one-half of the remaining persons are considered as not placeable in employment.
A variety of rehabilitative services are needed by unemployable persons. These may
include assistance to the aged persons in return to their home from chronic care
facilities, restoration of the broken families, and help in overcoming alcoholism.
When effort is directed toward resolving chronic personal problems, the rehabilitation process often requires an extensive service for the whole family.
PREVENTIVE SERVICES
The purpose of preventive services is to prevent development of social problems
amongst families dependent on assistance. Attention must be focused on the needs
of children in particular, since they are particularly vulnerable to the effects of
poverty and public dependence. Their minimum physical requirements must be
met, and as far as possible they must have opportunity for normal social and recreational outlets. Their parents frequently need assistance in coping with behavioural
and other problems. The children themselves need skilled counselling to help them
resolve their many personal problems and to plan adequately for their futures.
Social workers are rediscovering the children in their case loads, who were often lost
sight of in provision of assistance to adults. Efforts are being made to focus attention on the early identification of problems that have usually become evident only
after they have developed to a point at which they are either not responsive to help
or are in need of expensive and time-consuming service. Experience has established
this can only be accomplished on the basis of regular home-visiting. Help is provided in the resolution of marital problems and in the prevention of family breakdown that commonly result from economic stress. The effect of these disturbances
on family life is very apparent from recent findings that the majority of one-parent
families require extensive services to cope with problems of child development.
A project is being undertaken in one populated district to examine in a systematic
way the causative factors in desertion and separation, what is required in a preventive
 G 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
way, as well as what special services are needed by the children of these families.
The social worker is often involved in time-consuming efforts to obtain maintenance
from separated or deserting husbands, all too often with unsatisfactory results. It is
recognized that social responsibility is difficult to oblige by legal processes, and that
extensive social pressure on families under stress may result in permanent family
rupture.
Since the extent to which children thrive is related to their cultural environment
and the achievement of their parents, there is a need to strengthen this wherever
possible. One example of how this can be done is provided by an educational upgrading project carried out with a small group of Doukhobor women. Over a two-
year period, educational levels were elevated by several grades through night-school
sessions and the co-operation of the local social welfare office and interested schoolteachers. It is hoped in future ways can be found to undertake similar projects with
other groups of parents. In general, encouragement is given to anyone on assistance
who is interested in undertaking night-school or correspondence courses on their
own in order to upgrade their educational level.
Other services have included assistance to many aged persons. For those
unable to continue in their own homes, alternative living arrangements must be
made. Others are enabled to remain at home by provision of housekeeping services.
One municipal office is experimenting with a " meals on wheels " programme providing daily home delivery of a hot meal. When care is provided in chronic homes,
the social worker co-operates with the local public health service in encouraging
development of activation programmes designed to prevent loss of bodily functions
that may result from lack of physical activity.
Often ill health or other factors temporarily prevent a mother from looking
after her children. When there is insufficient income to provide for this, the social
worker arranges for housekeeping or homemaking services or, if this is not possible,
for other care for the children.
In addition to those families recorded statistically as receiving services, many
other persons who have applied for help have been enabled to resolve their problems
as a result of counselling provided by the social worker in the initial interview. In
these and many other ways the skills of the social workers are daily stretched to a
maximum.
GENERAL
Because of a critical continent-wide shortage of university-trained social workers, services are being broken into two groupings. Applied to the social assistance
programme, family situations involving treatment of complicated social problems
will constitute one grouping and situations involving mainly effective administration
of assistance, counselling, and supportive services will make up the other. Available staff will be divided between these functions in accordance with training, skills,
and interest.
At a community level there is public concern about the many products of poverty in the way of crime, delinquency, alcoholism, and broken homes. National
concern is directed to the contradiction posed by poverty amidst affluence. The
social assistance programme has provided the basic income for those whose wants
could not be met by other measures. Strengthened provisions for dealing with poverty will hopefully assist in reducing the numbers of persons otherwise requiring
public assistance. It is anticipated social assistance services will be strengthened
not only to provide greater individual help in utilization of available opportunities,
but to provide for increased co-operation and co-ordination with other agencies of
government and with community resources.   Present efforts to strengthen services
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 39
therefore include striving for co-operation and co-ordination with other departments
of government and review of possibilities for increased community involvement.
In other development, a research project is at present under way that it is
anticipated will yield helpful information as to the effectiveness of present services
and how they can be made more effective.
BOARDS OF REVIEW
During the year 34 Boards of Review were held, of which 28 were in favour
of the applicant.
CONCLUSION
The Division extends its sincere thanks to the staff of social welfare offices and
other departments of government, as well as to the many private persons who have
contributed services to the programme.
 G 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
CHILD WELFARE DIVISION
T. B. Bingham, Superintendent
The family remains as the most effective established institution in our present-
day society for the security and maintenance of society itself and for the nurturing
and development of its children—" the future society."
The community, as an extension of the family, offers the forces of concern,
interest, and active regard which can preserve and strengthen the capacities of each
of its members toward a fuller expression of life. The community as a mirror of
the family reflects the vigour of the weak and the strong, and its commitment to its
own preservation must encompass opportunities that offer themselves equally to
every member of the community.
The needs of the community must be in harmony with the needs of the family
so that the family may, in its striving for its own integrity, contribute to the abundance of the larger family of man.
Today this endeavour of concern and regard by community is seen to be moving forward in many spheres of action and involvement in British Columbia.
A most gratifying trend is evident throughout the Province whereby communities and groups within communities are increasingly concerning themselves with the
well-being of children and youth. The pattern that invariably is followed is that
an individual, group, or community becomes acutely interested in the problems
posed by the younger members of the community. Interested persons band themselves together and critically appraise the community and social problems and the
resources needed to solve the problems. A course of action gradually emerges and
a programme is born.
These community programmes that are developing so well serve a variety of
needs resulting from social problems, which may include delinquency, the increasing
incidence of out-of-wedlock births, the struggle of young people to find jobs, school
drop-outs, retardation, the increasing number of children requiring the help of child
care or treatment agencies, or emotional disturbance.
Various special-interest groupings or organizations are evident, including associations for the retarded and emotionally disturbed and associations of foster-parents
and child-care workers. Non-profit societies, incorporated under the Societies Act,
are providing resources for children. Family and Children's Court Committees are
also increasingly active in examining the resources of the community for family and
children's work. Service clubs have been most helpful, too, in identifying needs and
mobilizing their strong resources to meet these needs.
SERVICES TO FAMILIES
As a result of the varied activities in local communities, our staff are devoting
an increasing amount of time to working with communities to solve, at the community level, problems encountered by families and children. Children belong to their
families, but also to their communities. If the family has difficulties, it can best be
helped by its friends and neighbours as well as the agencies which have special services to offer. It has been the growing emphasis of the family and child welfare
programme, for which the Child Welfare Division assumes responsibility, to assist in
the mobilization of a variety of family and children's services within each community.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 41
SERVICES TO CHILDREN IN CARE
The number of children requiring the care provided by the Children's Aid
Societies and Department of Social Welfare during the year exceeded 10,000 {see
Table IV).  This is a number from which no one can derive satisfaction.
The reasons why children are admitted to care (Table IX) are showing some
changes. Fewer children (411 compared to 546) were admitted because of neglect.
Children admitted to care while awaiting adoption placement have more than doubled
in three years (465 as compared to 202 in 1961/62). Children admitted to care
because the parents cannot handle the child's problems of adjustment or preparations
for life increased to 177 from 65 the previous year.
Foster Homes
The basic placement programme for caring for children is the foster home.
Outstanding work in helping foster-children has been achieved by foster-parents,
whose efforts, skills, and patience go largely unnoticed in our society.
Group-living Homes
There has been a gratifying increase in the number of residential placement
resources (Table XIII) (accommodation for 264 children from 146) and particularly group-living homes (accommodation for 194 children from 74). While group-
living homes are exceedingly important, particularly for the adolescent group, they
are not an answer in themselves, but are one impportant part of a total spectrum of
resources which are being developed.
MAINTENANCE COSTS
The gross maintenance costs for children continue to rise, and will continue
until such time as we can greatly reduce the number of children who must be cared
for outside their own homes.
Gross expenditure for the year was $5,556,706, an increase of $649,319.
SERVICES TO CHILDREN BORN OUT OF WEDLOCK
The increase in out-of-wedlock births (Table XVI) of 384 over the previous
year is one of the most complex issues facing those who endeavour to plan and
design programmes to prevent social problems. As noted last year, community
concern is increasing.
Because of the relative shortage of adoption homes—a trend that probably will
continue—our society will have to increasingly concern itself with services designed
to especially assist the mother who, through her own wish, decides to assume the
responsibility of caring for her child. Like other social situations, this is a community responsibility and one which, if the out-of-wedlock child is to be adequately
protected, will need the understanding support of the entire community.
ADOPTION SERVICES
Recruitment
The emphasis on recruitment of adoption homes, started in the previous year,
was intensified during the year under review. Again community groups assisted in
making known the needs for adoption homes.
 G 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Placements
As a result of the effort of all agencies, an increase of 267 adoption placements
resulted {see Table XIX). Every agency except the Family and Children's Service,
Victoria, showed an increase in placements, with 197 of the increased homes being
attributable to the Department of Social Welfare.
The child with special needs continues to require particular emphasis. It is
most gratifying to note that so many families in our Province have hearts and homes
large enough to provide a home for children of interracial origin or children with
health problems. An increase of 263 special placements from 155 the previous year
is most remarkable {see Table XXIII).
Adoption is a wonderful and unique experience for a couple even if they have
children. An increasing number of families with children are choosing adoption as
the way to increase their families. This we welcome, recognizing that adoption continues to be the very best plan for a child who cannot five and grow up with the
parents who brought him into the world.
Adoption Court Orders
The 1964 amendment to the Adoption Act, which shortened the probationary
period requirement to six months, has met our anticipated expectations and has
resulted in a better service to all adopting parents and children.
The increase in placement is followed by the services to adopting parents and
the Supreme Court in order to facilitate the processing of the adoption order.
A total of 1,766 adoption orders was granted during the year, an increase of 308
over the preceding year {see Table XXIV).
The difference in the number of adoption placements and the legally completed
adoption is largely made up of the group of step-parent and relative adoptions. It
is gratifying to note that in the past five years the number of private adoptions has
decreased from 120 in 1961 to 74 in 1965. In the last three years there appears to
be a levelling-off in spite of such factors as increasing population, etc. We continue
in the belief that a child for whom adoption is the chosen plan can best be protected
by placement through a social agency. Our experience in the completion process
of privately arranged placements indicates that there can be many obvious pitfalls
that a child-placing agency is geared to prevent.
STAFF
Miss Mary K. King, Superintendent of Child Welfare from January 1, 1961,
retired at the end of December, 1964. Miss King, in her life work as a social worker
in this Province, will be remembered for her determination to improve the well-being
of families and children. Among her major contributions to the child welfare programme was the development of closer liaison and improved financing arrangement
between the Children's Aid Societies and the Department of Social Welfare and
establishment of a media for a fuller working relationship between this Department
and Mental Health Services through the Case Review Committee. Miss King's deep
sense of dedication to the principle of strengthening and maintaining good standards
of practice and service has had the remarkable effect of increasing public awareness
to the needs of children and their families. Her devotion to the cause of children
and families in our society has stimulated those who worked closely with her to
further the purposes and aims of child and family betterment.
Mr. T. D. Bingham, Deputy Superintendent of Child Welfare for the past four
years, assumed the office of Superintendent of Child Welfare on January 1, 1965.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 43
Mr. V. J. Belknap, formerly of the Abbotsford office, was named Deputy Superintendent of Child Welfare.
Sincere appreciation goes to senior administration, Divisional personnel, field
staff, other members of the Department, and other departments of government, as
well as to the multitude of friends of the child welfare programme.
CONCLUSION
Our emphasis will continue to be on assisting communities, as well as families
and individuals, in providing answers to social difficulties.
Communities will be encouraged to continue in their efforts and in co-operation
with the various departments of government to provide needed services at the
local level.
In a society where an increasing number of mothers find it necessary to work
outside the home, the need for day-care programmes for children must be stressed.
Homemaker and housekeeper services are proven to be invaluable in times of family
stress, and these, too, will be stimulated.
Children sometimes must be cared for outside their homes because of neglect,
desertion, illness, or behaviour problems. Children have a right to services appropriate to their needs. Thus a variety of resources will be necessary to meet needs
as they arise.
There is increasing expectation by every person in our Province that welfare
services for children will keep improving. However, without the willingness of each
and every member of our society to participate and interest themselves in the needs
of our young, these expectations cannot be quickly achieved. With the help of every
person in the Province, those social "utilities" of staff, resources, individualized
concern and service will come to be available and be recognized in the same way as
we now recognize the basic public utilities of power, roads, and communications.
With the splendid teamwork as between Departmental staff and the communities and persons served, the well-being of families and their children cannot help
but be enhanced.
 G 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICAL TABLES
List of Tables
Table I.—Family Service Cases.
Table II.—Services Related to Protection of Children.
Table III.—Requests Received from Family Allowances Division.
Table IV.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies.
Table V.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status, Regions, and Societies.
Table VI.—Number of Children Who Are the Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies.
Table VII.—Children in Care by Age-group.
Table VIII.—Number of Children Admitted to Care by Legal Status.
Table IX.—Reasons for New Admissions to Care.
Table X.—Number of Children Discharged from Care by Legal Status.
Table XI.—Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care.
Table XII.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies by Type of Care.
Table XIII.—Children Receiving Institutional Care.
Table XIV.—Maintenance Costs.
Table XV.—Number of Unmarried Mothers Served by Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies.
Table XVI.—Number of Children Born Out of Wedlock in British Columbia.
Table XVII.—Number of Adoption Homes Awaiting Placement, Homes in Which
Placement Made, and Homes Closed.
Table XVIII.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Social
Welfare by Type of Placement and by Regions.
Table XIX.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies.
Table XX.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Social Welfare by Religion of Adopting Parents and by Region.
Table XXI.—Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies.
Talbe XXII.—Children of Interracial Origin and Origin Other than White Placed
for Adoption.
Table XXIII.—Number of Children with Special Needs Placed for Adoption.
Table XXIV.—Number of Legally Completed Adoptions.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 45
Table I.—Number of Family Service Cases (Not in Receipt of Financial Assistance
from Department of Social Welfare) Served by the Department of Social
Welfare during the Fiscal Year 1964/65.
Total at
Beginning
of Month
Opened
Closed
Total at
End of
Month
Total at
End of
Same
Month
Previous
Year
April, 1964-
May, 1964-..
June, 1964—
July, 1964.
August, 1964	
September, 1964_
October, 1964	
November, 1964_
December, 1964—
January, 1965	
February, 1965	
March, 1965	
1,671
1,645
1,686
1,681
1,657
1,607
1,553
1,616
1,621
1,619
1,692
1,685
198
210
223
238
199
275
319
202
168
216
215
223
224
169
228
262
249
329
256
197
170
143
222
228
1,645
1,686
1,681
1,657
1,607
1,553
1,616
1,621
1,619
1,692
1,685
1,680
1,605
1,611
1,584
1,607
1,665
1,641
1,685
1,689
1,678
1,694
1,688
1,671
Table II.—Cases1 Receiving Services from Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies2 Related to Protection of Children, by Type of Service,
for the Fiscal Years 1963/64 and 1964/65.
Type of Service
Opened during
Year
Carried during
the Year
Incomplete at
End of Year
1963/64
1964/65
1963/64
1964/65
1963/64
1964/65
C.nstodv
89
208
72
74
260
65
128
222
90
21
124
283
88
17
50
23
23
33
16
76
18        |         11
6        |           3
Totals
387         I1        410
461
512
102         1           78
i Cases are the number of family units receiving services on behalf of their children.
2 Chilydren's Aid Societies are Vancouver Children's Aid Society, Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, and Children's Aid Society of Victoria.
Table HI.—Requests Received from Family Allowances Division,
April 1, 1964, to March 31, 1965
Received during fiscal year  19
Referrals pending April 1, 1964     7
Total number of requests referred
Referrals completed 	
26
17
Referrals pending March 31, 1965     9
 G 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IV.—Number of Children in Care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and
the Children's Aid Societies during and at the End of the Fiscal Year 1964/65
During At Mar. 31,
1964/65 1965
Superintendent of Child Welfare  6,384 4,436
Vancouver Children's Aid Society  2,221 1,499
Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver   1,135 895
Victoria Children's Aid Society      690 427
  4,046          2,821
Totals  10,430 7,257
Table V.—Number of Children in Care1 of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and
of the Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status, Regions, and Societies as at
March 31, 1965.
P.C.A.
Wards
Before
Court
J.D.A.
Wards
Other
Agency
Other
Non-
Pro
Non-
wards,
vincial
wards
Wards,
Wards
and
Before
Court
Total
Superintendent of Child Welfare
Region L—
Region II	
Region III-
Region IV—
Region V	
Region VI—.
Region VII..
Region VIIL.
S.C.W. and agency wards supervised by another
Province  	
Total children in care of Superintendent of Child Welfare	
Vancouver Children's Aid Society
Children in care	
Catholic Children's Aid Society, Vancouver
Children in care  	
Victoria Children's Aid Society
Children in care-
Total children in care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and three
Children's Aid Societies	
446
582
629
226
402
527
325
157
111
3,405
1,169
741
202
5,517
49
73
34
30
20
40
10
16
272
19
92
10
393
52
24
21
22
15
22
9
8
2
11
15
2
2
15
1
4
182
13
52
52
256
63
64
85
56
18
36
90
13
20
382
208
12
97
699
22
24
13
13
11
16
7
2
143
85
37
64
329
635
799
768
311
486
710
365
207
155
4,436
1,499
895
427
7,257
l " In care " is defined as the actual number of children being cared for by the agency regardless of which
agency has legal responsibility for the child.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 47
Table VI.—Number of Children Who Are the Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and of the Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status,
by Regions and by Societies, as at March 31, 1965.
P.C.A.
Wards
Before
the
Court
J.D.A.
Wards
Other
Provincial
Wards
Non-
wards
Total
Superintendent of Child Welfare
446
582
629
226
402
527
325
157
161
111
49
73
34
30
20
40
10
16
1
52
24
21
22
15
22
9
8
8
9
2
11
15
2
2
15
1
4
13
64
85
56
18
36
90
13
20
24
613
775
755
298
475
694
-pginn VTT
358
Region VTTT
205
207
120
Total number of children who are  the legal
responsibility of Superintendent of Child Welfare ..      	
3,566
273
190
65
406
4,500
Vancouver Children's Aid Society
Vancouver  C.A.S.   children  in   own  care   	
Vancouver C.A.S. children in S.C.W. or other agency
1,169
46
19
13
208
1,409
46
Total number of children who  are the legal
responsibility of Vancouver Children's Aid
1,215
19
13
208
1,455
Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver
741
68
92
1
9
12
854
C.C.A.S. Vancouver children in S.C.W. or other agency
69
Total number of children who  are the legal
responsibility of Catholic Children's Aid So-
809
93
9
12
923
Victoria Children's Aid Society
202
32
10
52
1
97
361
Victoria C.A.S. children in S.C.W. or other agency care1
33
Total number of children who are the legal
responsibility of Victoria Children's Aid So-
234
10
53
97
394
Total number of children who  are the legal
responsibility   of   Superintendent   of   Child
Welfare and three Children's Aid Societies
5,824
395
265
65
723
7,2722
1 The Children's Aid Societies children in another Province are included in section "(Vancouver, Catholic,
and Victoria) Children's Aid Societies children in Superintendent of Child Welfare or other agency care."
There are a total of 52 of these children (.see Table V).
2 The total number of children for whom each agency has legal responsibility should be equal to the number of children in care. However, in the process of amalgamating the reports of the Children's Aid Societies
and Superintendent of Child Welfare it has not been possible to achieve complete statistical accuracy.
 G 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VII.—Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's
Aid Societies by Age-group at March 31, 1965
Age-group
Superintendent of Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
892
i529       1
1,1164
905
511
435
449
152
277
269
162
190
24.2
61
1,644
849
132                  36
211                 113
127       {         91
94                  69
89                  57       I
6-11    „
1,765
112-15    „
1,392
16--7    „	
836
1*-7<1    „
771
Totals	
4,436
1,499
895
i
427
7,257
Table VIII.—Number of Children Admitted to Care of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status during the Fiscal Year
1964/65.
Legal Status
Superintendent of Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Apprehended under Protection of Children Act-
Committed under Juvenile Delinquents Act	
1,225
52
732
25
2,034       1
326
203
8
468
679
171
306
4
47
357
48
85
16       •
132
233       1
40
1,819
1            80
1,379
25
3,303
Transfer of supervision
585
Total of new admissions and transfers-
2,360
)850
I
405
273
3,888
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65
G 49
Table IX.—Reasons for New Admissions of Children to the Care of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare during the Fiscal Year 1964/65
Reason
Neglect	
Parental failure to provide needed medical treatment or prevention
Desertion or abandonment	
Parent's illness	
Awaiting adoption placement	
Removed from adoption placement	
Inability of family to provide needed education and training	
Rehabilitation plan for parents	
One parent deceased	
Physical handicap or mental retardation	
Behaviour	
Transient  	
Marital problem	
Unmarried motherhood	
Admission on transfer of guardianship	
Requested by another Province	
Number of
Children
411
19
111
261
465
1
52
177
18
47
122
80
137
47
61
25
Total new admissions  2,034
Transfer of supervision from other agencies      326
Total new admissions and transfers  2,360
Table X.—Number of Children Discharged from the Care of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status during the
Fiscal Year 1964/65.
Legal Status
Superintendent of
Child Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid Society
Catholic
Children's Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's Aid
Society
Total
Protection of Children Act wards
489
54
348
139
579
14
|          214
1
27
8
|          309
99
2
48
6
35
57
7
49
83
859
64
472
Aprehended but not presented	
153
1,006
14
Total direct discharges from
1,623
325
|          559
|          163
190
104
196
59
2,568
651
Total direct discharges and
1,948
|          722
1
294
255
3,219
 G 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XI.—Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies for the Fiscal Year 1964/65
Reasons for Discharge
Superintendent of
Child Welfare
Vancouver
Children's Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's Aid
Society
Total
Wards
106
34
7
168
1
14
227
53
8
29
65
60
18
3
3
18
59
6
6
1
16
12
23
183
51
Deceased	
11
231
78
14
369
557
215
101
64
937
Before the Court (Protection of
Children Act)
Withdrawn from Court _ —
Order under section 8  (6)   (a),  (b)
and (4)                      	
190
152
5
1
139
27
8
49
5
8
41
274
193
5
1
152
Sub-totals	
487
35
54
49
625
Non-wards
Twenty-one years of age 	
2
2
4
418
153
3
1
2
202
101
33
2
67
16
5
3
6
To parents or relations.    	
720
272
Other
Sub-totals	
579
309
35
83
1,006
1,623
325
559
163
190
104
196
59
2,568
651
Transfer of supervision	
Total   of   direct   discharges
1,948
722
294
255
3,219
Table XII.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies by Type of Care as at March 31, 1965
Type of Care
Superintendent of
Child Welfare
Vancouver
Children's Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's Aid
Society
Total
Paid foster-home care	
Boarding home, child maintaining self.
Free  home  and  free  relatives'   (or
3,148
213
280
348
400
47
1,137
85
47
74
146
10
639
53
27
83
89
4
251
27
47
17
83
2
5,175
378
401
Adoption home	
Institutional	
A.W.O.L	
522
718
63
Totals	
4,436
1,499
895
427
7,257
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 51
Table XIII.—Children Who Are the Legal Responsibility of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies Receiving Institutional Care as at
March 31, 1965.
Institution
Superintendent of
Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Health Institutions
16
1
1
43
8
21
9
1
16
1
6
33
1
1
2
Woodlands and Tranquille Schools and other mental
86
Totals...	
61
29
26
7
123
Educational Institutions
4
4
64
2
3
3
1
4
1
3
2
9
11
67
4
Totals	
74
6
5
6
91
Residential Institutions
St. Christopher's School	
12
7
2
128
10
1
5
.._
4
2
1
36
1
4
2
1
3
13
1
6
1
17
21
6
14
Y.W.C.A. and Y.M.C.A	
5
7
4
Own agency group and receiving homes ..._
194
12
Victoria Children's Aid Society group home.	
1
Totals	
160
54
26
24
264
Treatment Centres
Children's Foundation...  	
9
12
12
8
4
4
14
2
1
2
10
15
29
22
8
4
Totals	
45
18
3
12
78
Correctional Institutions
31
24
42
1
7
5
13
1
3
4
6
1
1
9
1
3
4
50
34
City   and   Provincial  gaols   and   related   correctional
64
5
3
Totals	
98
26
15
17
156
438
133
75
66
7121
1 The total of this table should agree with the total for institutional care in Table XII. However, in the
process of amalgamating the reports of the Children's Aid Societies and Superintendent of Child Welfare, it has
not been possible to achieve complete statistical accuracy.
 G 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XIV.-—Cost of Maintaining Children in Care of the Superintendent of Child
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies
Gross cost of maintenance of children in Child Welfare Division foster homes  $2,539,593
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance of children in care of Children's Aid Societies     2,843,663
Gross cost of transportation of children in care of Superintendent  33,948
Gross cost of hospitalization of newborn infants being permanently planned for by Superintendent  68,402
Grants to sundry homes  71,100
Gross expenditure  $5,556,706
Less collections     1,152,029
Net cost to Provincial Government as per Public Ac
counts.
$4,404,677
Table XV.—Number of Unmarried Mothers Served by the Department of Social
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies for the Fiscal Year 1964/65
Number at
Beginning
of Fiscal
Year
Number
Opened
during
Fiscal Year
Number
Served
during
Fiscal Year
Number
Closed
during
Fiscal Year
Number
at End of
Fiscal Year
Superintendent of Child Welfare..	
Vancouver Children's Aid Society.	
Catholic Children's Aid Society, Vancouver.
Victoria Children's Aid Society	
Totals	
534
532
124
94
1,103
842
245
192
1,637
1,374
369
286
1,284
2,382
3,666
1,026
798
260
155
2,239
611
576
109
131
1,427
Table XVI.—Number of Children Born Out of Wedlock in British Columbia by
Age-group of Mother during the Fiscal Years 1963/64 and 1964/65
Age-group of Mother
Fiscal Year
Under 15
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40 Years
and Over
Total
1963/64 	
1964/65   	
Percentage  increase or  decrease
24
23
—4.2
990
1,222
23.4
1,056
1,120
6.1
461
516
11.9
483
513
6.2
69
73
5.8
3,083
3,467
12.5
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 53
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 G 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XVIII.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by the Department of Social
Welfare by Type of Placement and by Regions for the Fiscal Year 1964/65
Type of Placement
Direct Placement
Foster Home to Adoption
Region
One-year
Probation
Long-term
Probation!
Within
Same
Home
In Another Home
Total
One-year
Probation
Long-term
Probation!
I                     	
32
99
21
22
12
48
7
8
18
12
11
4
12
12
10
20
2
77
110
53
44
31
61
22
30
10
2
7
4
5
1
3
......
129
II     .	
Ill 	
228
89
IV_ _	
V    ...
VI    .   .
75
56
124
VII	
39
VIII.                           '
58
12
Totals	
249
I         101
438
22
810
1 These are placements of children with health or other problems requiring a longer period of probation.
Table XIX.—Number of Children Placed for Adoption by the Department of Social
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies for the Fiscal Years 1963/64 and 1964/65
1963/64
Regions  613
Vancouver Children's Aid Society  194
Catholic Children's Aid Society     54
Victoria Children's Aid Society  103
  351
Totals
964
1964/65
810
251
86
84
  421
1,231
Table XX.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by the Department of Social
Welfare by Religion of Adopting Parents and by Region for the Fiscal Year
1964/65.
Religion
Region
Protestant
Roman
Catholic
Hebrew
Buddhist
Total
I                                               ...	
109
202
71
56
43
115
34
50
8
20
26
18
17
13
9
5
8
....
2
3
1
129
II	
Ill                                                              	
228
89
[V                                               	
75
V	
56
VI      	
124
VII                                             	
39
VIII                      	
58
12
Totals 	
688
116
5
1
810
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 55
Table XXI.—Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Department of Social
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies during the Fiscal Year 1964/65
Ages
Birth up to to but not including 15 days._	
15 days up to but not including 1 month	
1 month up to but not including 3 months .
3 months up to but not including 6 months
6 months up to but not including 1 year	
1 year..   	
2 years    	
3 „     _ 	
4 „   	
5 „      	
6 „       	
7 „         .....    	
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
Totals-
Number of Children
Superintendent of
Child Welfare
Regions I
to VIII
Outside
Province
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
206
92
121
105
98
76
25
11
17
12
8
5
6
2
1
6
2
2
1
1
798
12
,   1341
(      7
1     11
34
20
34
20
17
12
12
7
2
3
6
1
6
2
1
1
1
_..
1
1
1
—
2
	
1
251
86
4
45
7
4
9
84
i Vancouver Children's Aid Society groups the numbers of its children placed from '
and " 15 days   .   .   .   month " together.
birth
15 days'
Table XXII.—Children of Interracial Origin and Racial Origin Other than White
Placed for Adoption by Department of Social Welfare According to Sex of the
Child and Religion of the Adopting Parent during the Fiscal Year 1964/65.
Sex of Child
Religion of Adopting Parent
Male
Female
Totals
Protestant
Roman
Catholic
Buddhist
Totals
56
2
3
2
1
1
2
40
3
4
3
1
3
8
2
1
3
96
5
7
5
1
1
3
9
2
1
3
2
78
4
4
1
1
3
I
1
2
2
18
1
3
1
1
96
5
7
5
1
1
3
9
2
1
East Indian and white 	
3
lapanese 	
2
Totals...
67
68
135
111
23
1
135
 G 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XXIII.-—Number of Children with Special Needs Placed for Adoption by
Department of Social Welfare during the Fiscal Year 1964/65.
Interracial origin and origin other than white
Health problems
135
79
Over 1 year of age1     49
Total
263
1 Children over 1 year of age who are of interracial origin and origin other than white or have a health
problem have been shown in either of these two categories and are not shown in the category " over 1 year of
age."
Table XXIV.—Number of Legally Completed Adoptions by Type of Placement, by
Regions and Children's Aid Societies, during the Fiscal Year 1964/65
Type of Placement
Region and Societies
Agency
Relative
Private
Total
Stepparent
Other
I    	
144
222
73
54
43
136
39
29
77
9
4
13
8
6
4
11
3
3
234
II                        .
144
49
21
26
57
18
13
8
3
2
5
7
2
2
387
Ill                                                       	
133
IV _                             	
83
V 	
78
VI.   	
211
VII                                	
62
VIII             	
47
740
405
38
52
1,235
211
111
54
56
43
19
4
7
4
16
5
1
287
166
78
Sub-totals                                                 	
376
118
15
22
531
1,116
523
53
74
1,766
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 57
MEDICAL SERVICES DIVISION
P. W. Laundy, M.D., Director
Upon reviewing the past year of operation, we find that our statistics once
again indicate a further increase in most services provided under the Department's
medical assistance programme to those in receipt of welfare benefits. Our efforts
continue to be directed toward providing a high quality of service.
The task of providing an equitable standard of medical services to eligible welfare recipients in a Province of this size constitutes somewhat of a problem because
of the concentration of population chiefly in the lower western corner. Medical
specialists' centres tend to locate in areas of population concentration, which holds
true for the Lower Mainland area of British Columbia. However, we are happy to
report that considerable improvement has occurred within the past year in this
respect. An increase in medical specialist resources has developed in the northern
areas of the Province, particularly in the Prince George area and, to a lesser degree,
in Kamloops.
With the growth of these northern centres, a considerable change has been
noted in the pattern of medical referrals. Many clients who live in the northern
areas of the Province are being referred by their physicians to these local centres.
Needless to say, this has resulted in savings in time and money formerly required to
bring these people to the Lower Mainland area. In addition, it has decreased the
pressure on the already heavily taxed hospital resources of the metropolitan Vancouver area. Too, it has served to lessen the dislocation and inconvenience to the
individual patient involved.
The volume of dental services provided through Medical Services Division continues to rise, with a recorded increase of approximately $50,000 in the past fiscal
year. This year the Division added an additional dental consultant in order to
provide a better screening method and to speed the processing of referrals for special
dental care. Although this has helped greatly, the Dental Committee is still taxed
to cope with the volume of referrals for this service.
Through the use of the statistical and data-processing resources of our Department in Victoria during the past year, still greater improvement should occur in the
processing of dental accounts.
As noted in the statistical tables, the drug programme continues to account for
a large portion of our annual budget.
The capable Drug Advisory Committee, which includes practising physicians,
pharmacists, university staff, and representatives of the medical and pharmaceutical
professional associations, has been working long hours on a new drug programme.
It is anticipated that a completely revised method designed to facilitate the
provision of all necessary drugs will be instituted in the coming year.
This Division, together with the Child Welfare Division and the Children's Aid
Societies, is co-operating with the British Columbia and Canadian Medical Associations toward the development of a completely new medical-record form to be used
for children in care. It is hoped that this permanent record may be used throughout
Canada.
Once again we would like to extend our appreciation to all those organizations
and individuals working in the health field who have so willingly co-operated with
us in our efforts to effectively administer the Social Welfare Department medical
programmes. These include the various hospitals, medical centres, and other
departments of government, professional associations in the health field, and our
own hard-working staff within the Department of Social Welfare.
 G 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICAL TABLES
Table I.—Gross Costs for the Fiscal Years 1960/61 to 1964/65
Fiscal Year
Medical
Drugs*
Dental
Optical
Transportation
Other
Total
1960/61
$2,120,499
2,085,017
1,919,185
2,015,598
1,970,136
$1,704,222
1,758,768
1,937,506
2,157,448
2,204,123
$508,392
548,974
513,762
534,820
588,500
$93,875
95,768
92,192
104,671
104,057
$97,832
99,311
108,482
116,709
133,268
$30,330
33,176
39,165
35,698
34,986
$4,555,150
1961/62
4,621,014
1962/63 	
1963/64
4,610,292
4,964,944
5,035,070
1964/65	
i Not included in these figures is the cost of drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare institutions.
Table II.—Payments to British Columbia Doctors (Gross Costs)
Fiscal Year
Medical
Agreement
Immigrant
Other
Total
1960/61
$2,114,034
2,072,721
1,912,970
2,009,854
1,965,208
$226
$6,239
17.796
$2,120,499
1961/62
7 085.017
1962/63
1963/64
1      6,215    |    1,919,185
5.744    1     2.015.598
1964/65
	
4,928
1,970,136
Table III.—Categorical Breakdown of Medical Coverage with Average
Numbers of Persons Eligible
Fiscal Year
Social
Allowance
Child
Welfare
Division
O.A.S. Supplementary Social
Allowance and
Blind
Old-age
Assistance
Disabled
Persons'
Allowance
Total Average
Monthly
Coverage
1960/61..
1961/62_
1962/63..
1963/64..
1964/65-
33,751
36,097
32,527
34,388
35,016
4,194
4,462
4,813
5,359
5,953
35,772
34,282
30,152
28,522
26,347
7,216
6,899
6,746
6,259
5,863
1,999
2,123
2,155
2,214
2,215
82,932
83,863
76,393
76,742
75,394
Table IV.—Drug Costs
Fiscal Year
Number of Prescriptions
Provincial
Pharmacy
Drug-stores
Total
Costs of Medicines
Provincial
Pharmacy!
Drug-stores
Total
1960/61-
1961/62-
1962/63-
1963/64-
1964/65-
43,437
31,969
25,436
21,055
19,665
621,973
649,746
696,364
689,038
703,071
665,410
681,715
721,800
710,093
722,736
$189,621
153,451
171,143
190,911
226,291
$1,514,601
1,605,317
1,766,363
1,966,537
1,977,832
$1,704,222
1,758,768
1,937,506
2,157,448
2,204,123
i Not included in these figures is the cost of drugs or the number of prescriptions provided by the dispensary
for welfare institutions.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 59
Table V.—Dental Expenses
Fiscal Year
Prophylaxis
Extractions
Dentures
Total
1960/61
$199,687
227,033
229,099
264,977
310,009       i
$65,078
74,340
64,317
64,120
61,700
$243,627
247,601
220,346
205,723
216,791
$508,392
1961/67.
548,974
1967/63
513,762
1963/64
534,820
1964/65
588,500
Table VI.—Optical Costs
Fiscal Year
Optometric
Examinations
Glasses
Total
1960/61-
1961/62-
1962/63-
1963/64-
1964/65-
$19,253
19,496
19,362
20,803
20,268
$74,622
76,272
72,830
83,868
83,789
$93,875
95,768
92,192
104,671
104,057
 G 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
OLD-AGE ASSISTANCE, BLIND PERSONS' ALLOWANCES, AND
DISABLED PERSONS' ALLOWANCES BOARD
E. W. Berry, Chairman
GENERAL
The Provincial authority for the administration of the Old-age Assistance Act,
the Blind Persons Act, and the Disabled Persons Act is a Board within the Department of Social Welfare consisting of three members appointed by the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council. Besides the Chairman, present members are Mr. J. A. Sadler
and Mr. H. E. Blanchard.
In addition to being charged with the administration in British Columbia of the
above three Acts, including the consideration of applications for and the payment of
assistance or an allowance, the Board is the central agency for the processing of all
applications within the Province for Supplementary Social Allowance and related
health services, and grants these additional Provincial benefits where applicable.
Social workers attached to the Board complete applications in the home where
necessary and otherwise at the Board office for those clients living in the City of
Vancouver who wish to apply for the categorical allowances and for Supplementary
Social Allowance. Welfare workers from the Board also make annual visits within
the city and throughout the Province, where feasible, mainly in connection with the
Supplementary Social Allowance programme.
Of the 27,130 annual visits made in the 1964 calendar year, representing approximately 80 per cent of the total case load, 14,808 field service reports or 55 per
cent were completed by the social workers and welfare officers attached to the Board;
the remainder of 12,322 reports, or 45 per cent, were completed by the district and
municipal offices.
Each report was examined individually for any change in the recipient's circumstances, and generally as a result of this individual review 10,026 payments were
increased and 1,322 payments were decreased.
On January 1, 1965, the maximum monthly payment of Supplementary Social
Allowance was increased from $24 to $25, and on February 1, 1965, a further increase of $5 brought the maximum to $30. These adjustments in rates were made
with dispatch, and no delay in receiving the increase was experienced by the clients.
The changes in rates mentioned above in the fiscal year under review are two
more to be added to the many which have occurred in the past few years, and to
summarize these changes the table on the following page shows the various monthly
rates and the dates when they were put into effect and other pertinent information.
The client's " need " for Supplementary Social Allowance continues to be the
basis on which payments are made to him. His " need " or budget deficit is arrived
at by determining what additional amount up to $30 a month he requires above his
available monthly income to meet his monthly total of the everyday items of maintenance. A fixed amount or predetermined budget is allowed to cover such items as
food, clothing, household operation, and miscellaneous expenses. His actual expenses for shelter and utilities are added to this fixed amount to arrive at his total
monthly budget. The fixed amount or predetermined budget is allowed all clients,
however, on an individual basis because costs for shelter and utilities vary from
person to person; payments made may be any amount up to and including $30 a
month. Married couples receive up to $60 a month, depending upon their need
as a couple.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65       G 61
The elderly citizen continues to be quite mobile in so far as living arrangements
are concerned. The Board recorded 11,061 changes in address during the fiscal
year. The majority of these occurred among the clients using rental type of accommodation; however, a large percentage of home-owners continue to sell and purchase accommodation more suitable to their needs.
 G 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65
STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1965
Old-age Assistance
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
G 63
New applications received
Reapplications 	
Applications granted
Applications not granted (refused, withdrawn, etc.)
i Includes some left over from previous year.
Table II.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Not of age	
Unable to prove age	
Not sufficient residence	
Income in excess	
Unable to prove residence	
Transfer of property	
Receiving War Veterans' Allowance
Information refused	
Applications withdrawn	
Applicants died before grant	
Whereabouts unknown	
Over 70 years of age	
Assistance from private sources	
Receiving Old Age Security	
Miscellaneous 	
Totals	
322
2,272
133
l,922i
322
iber
Per Cent
68
21.1
1
0.3
3
0.9
66
20.5
1
0.3
4
1.2
14
4.3
26
8.1
87
27.0
27
8.4
10
3.1
8
2.5
4
1.2
1
0.3
2
0.6
100.0
Table III.—Sex of New Recipients
Male —
Female
Totals
Number
Per Cent
983
49.3
1,009
50.7
1,992
100.0
Married
Single —
Widowed .
Separated
Divorced .
Table IV.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Totals
Number
Per Cent
800
40.2
329
16.5
493
24.7
291
14.6
79
4.0
1,992
100.0
 G 64 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table V.—Ages at Granting of Assistance
Men Women
Age 65  620 670
Age 66  148 125
Age 67     91 89
Age 68     66 68
Age 69     58 57
Totals	
Table VI.—Forms by Which Age Proven
Number
Per Cent
1,290
64.8
273
13.7
180
9.0
134
6.7
115
5.8
1,992
100.0
Birth certificates	
Baptismal records	
Census records alone	
Men
554
101
       8
Women
706
84
6
1
212
Number
1,260
185
14
13
520
Per Cent
63.3
9.3
0.7
Tribunal.    ,,.    	
Other records	
12
  308
0.7
26.1
Totals	
  983
1,009
1,992
100.0
Number
Per Cent
248
12.4
463
23.2
211
10.6
382
19.2
8
0.4
680
34.1
1,992
100.0
Table VII.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Men Women
British Columbia  118 130
Other parts of Canada  221 242
United States of America     84 127
British Isles  122 260
Other parts of British Commonwealth        3 5
Other foreign countries  435 245
Totals	
Table VIII.—Where New Recipients Are Living
Men Women Number Per Cent
In own home  322 465 787 39.5
In children's home  60 164 224 11.2
In home of other relatives  32 28 60 3.0
In rented house  183 104 287 14.4
In rented suite  74 117 191 9.6
In housekeeping room  203 77 280 14.1
In single room (eating out)   53 7 60 3.0
Boarding  22 16 38 1.9
In public institutions  22 18 40 2.0
In private institutions  12 13 25 1.3
Totals  983 1,009 1,992 100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 65
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Men Women
Living alone  435 317
Living with spouse  343 371
Living with spouse and children    56 30
Living with children      49 187
Living with other relatives     30 37
Living with others     70 67
Totals 	
Number
Per Cent
752
37.8
714
35.8
86
4.3
236
11.8
67
3.4
137
6.9
1,992
100.0
Table X.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a) Holding personal property with cash value—
Men
  530
  220
$251 to $500     80
$0 	
$1 to$250..
$501 to $750.	
$751 to $1,000.__.
$1,001 to $1,500.
$1,501 to $2,000.
$2,001 and up	
42
38
33
11
29
Women
402
260
141
61
35
46
20
44
Number
932
480
221
103
73
79
31
73
Per Cent
46.8
24.1
11.1
5.2
3.7
4.0
1.6
3.7
Totals.
1,992        100.0
(b) Holding real property with assessed value—
$0 	
$1 to $250	
$251to$500_...
$501 to$750_
$751 to $1,000.
  637
  9
  26
  29
  30
$1,001 to $1,500  71
$1,501 to $2,000  64
$2,000 and up  117
521
6
8
21
28
78
81
266
1,158
15
34
50
58
149
145
383
58.1
0.8
1.7
2.5
2.9
7.5
7.3
19.2
Totals.
1,992
100.0
 G 66 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XI.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31,1965,
Whose Assistance Is Paid by British Columbia
Alberta   3 6
Saskatchewan  14
Manitoba  12
Ontario  19
Quebec     6
New Brunswick  	
Nova Scotia     2
Yukon Territory     1
Prince Edward Island	
Newfoundland      1
Total  91
Table XII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the
Amount of Assistance Received (Basic Assistance, $75)
Amount of Assistance Per Cent
$75   85.0
$70 to $74.99  2.7
$65 to $69.99  2.5
$60 to $64.99  1.8
$55 to $59.99  1.4
$50 to $54.99  1.5
$45 to $49.99  1.2
$40 to $44.99  1.0
$35 to $39.99  0.5
$30 to $34.99  0.7
$25 to $29.99  0.5
$20 to $24.99  0.3
Less than $19.99  0.9
Total	
Table XIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Age 65
Age 66
Age 67
Age 68
Age 69
Totals.
- 100.0
h
Number
Per Cent
25
11.5
44
20.2
39
17.9
50
22.9
60
27.5
218
100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 67
(a)
Table XIV.—Miscellaneous
British Columbia recipients—
Returned to British Columbia        26
Reinstated      211
Suspended
Deaths	
{b)
Transferred to other Provinces	
Transferred to Old Age Security	
Total number on payroll at end of fiscal year.
Other-Province recipients—
New transfers to British Columbia	
Transferred to British Columbia	
Reinstated	
Suspended 	
Deaths	
(c)
Transferred out of British Columbia.
Transferred to Old Age Security.
Total number of British Columbia and other-Province recipients on payroll at end of fiscal year	
347
219
70
1,737
6,584
110
6,829
Blind Persons' Allowances
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received.
Reapplications
Applications granted	
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc.
41
5
50
11
Table II.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Number
Not blind within the meaning of the Act     5
Income in excess	
Applications withdrawn
Died before grant.
War Veterans' Allowance
Information refused	
Whereabouts unknown	
Other	
Per Cent
45.5
9.1
9.1
9.1
27.3
Totals
11
100.0
Table III.—Sex of New Recipients
Male .-
Female
Totals
Number
_ 26
- 24
__ 50
Per Cent
52.0
48.0
100.0
 G 68
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IV.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Married   	
Number
17
Per Cent
34.0
Single    _
23
46.0
Widowed  	
5
10.0
Separated   _ __    _ _	
                      5
10.0
Divorced  	
  50
Totals 	
100.0
Table V.—Ages at Granting of Allowance
Men Women
Age 18     2 6
Ages 19 to 21     3 1
Ages 22 to 30     2
Ages 31 to 40     6 2
Ages 41 to 50     4 3
Ages 51 to 60     4 5
Ages 61 to 69     5 7
Totals 	
Number
8
4
2
8
7
9
12
50
Per Cent
16.0
8.0
4.0
16.0
14.0
18.0
24.0
100.0
Table VI.—Forms by Which Age Proven
Birth certificates	
Baptismal records	
Census records alone .
Tribunal	
Other records
Totals
Men
Women
Number
Per Cent
21
21
42
84.0
2
—
2
4.0
3
3
6
12.0
26
24
50
100.0
Table VII.—Birthplace of New Recipients
British Columbia	
Other parts of Canada ____
United States of America
British Isles	
Other parts of British Commonwealth.
Other foreign countries	
Totals 	
Men
Women
Number
Per Cent
9
9
18
36.0
13
6
19
38.0
1
1
2
4.0
1
3
4
8.0
1
1
2.0
2
4
6
12.0
26
24
50
100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 69
Table VIII.—Where New Recipients Are Living
In own home	
In children's home
In parents' home.
In home of other relatives
In rented house	
In rented suite	
In housekeeping room	
In single room (eating out)
Boarding
In public institutions .
In private institutions
Totals 	
en
Women
Number
Per Cent
7
6
13
26.0
1
2
3
6.0
3
7
10
20.0
1
1
2.0
4
5
9
18.0
2
2
4.0
1
1
2.0
2
2
4.0
1
	
1
2.0
3
1
4
8.0
3
1
4
8.0
.6
24
50
100.0
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Men Women       Number
Living alone	
Living with spouse	
Living with spouse and children
Living with children	
Living with parents
Living with other relatives
Living with others	
5
6
1
2
7
10
13
4
3
10
10
Per Cent
20.0
26.0
8.0
6.0
20.0
20.0
Totals
26
24
50
100.0
 G 70
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table X.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a) Holding personal property of value—
$0	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500-	
$501 to $750	
$751 to $1,000 -__
$1,001 to $1,500.
$1,501 to $2,000.
$2,001 and up	
Totals
{b ) Holding real property of value—
$0	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500	
$501 to $750	
$751 to $1,000 _
$1,001 to $1,500
$1,501 to $2,000
$2,001 and up	
Totals
Men
Women
Number
Per Cent
9
14
23
46.0
4
6
10
20.0
4
—
4
8.0
1
2
3
6.0
2
2
4.0
2
1
3
6.0
4
1
5
10.0
26
24
50
100.0
19
18
37
74.0
1
1
2
4.0
1
1
2.0
1
1
2
4.0
4
4
8
16.0
26
24
50
100.0
Table XI.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31,
1965, Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Alberta      5
     2
Saskatchewan
Manitoba	
Ontario 	
New Brunswick
Totals
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 71
Table XII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to
the Amount of Allowances Received (Basic Allowance, $75)
Amount of Allowance Per Cent
$75   91.9
$70 to $74  2.0
$65 to $69.99  0.4
$60 to $64.99  1.6
$55 to $59.99  0.7
$50 to $54.99  0.5
$45 to $49.99  0.2
$40 to $44.99  0.4
$35 to $39.99  0.4
$30 to $34.99  0.5
$25 to $29.99  0.7
$20 to $24.99  0.2
$19.99 and less  0.5
Totals   100.0
Table XIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number Per Cent
Ages 18 to 29     __
Ages 30 to 39	
Ages 40 to 49	
Ages 50 to 59	
Ages 60 to 69	
2
22.2
1
11.1
3
33.3
3
33.3
Totals      9 100.0
Table XIV.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended  40
Reinstated  22
Transferred to other Provinces  8
Returned to British Columbia  4
Transferred to Old Age Security  15
Deaths   12
(b) Other-Province recipients—
New transfers to British Columbia  4
Retransferred to British Columbia    	
Reinstated     	
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended    	
Deaths     	
Transfers to Old Age Security    	
Suspended.
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia  513
Other Province    43
 G 72
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Disabled Persons' Allowances
Table I.—Disposition of Applicants
New applications received
Reapplications 	
Applications granted
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc.
1 Includes some left over from previous year.
Table II.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Not 18 years of age	
Too much income	
Refused information	
Whereabouts unknown	
Unable to meet medical test
Mental hospital	
Hospital 	
Nursing home	
Application withdrawn	
Died before grant	
Not sufficient residence	
War Veterans' Allowance	
Allowance under Blind Persons' Allowances Act
Receiving Old Age Security	
Referred for rehabilitation	
Institutions	
Totals	
1
2
229
360
53
1651
229
Number
Per Cent
13
5.7
8
3.5
3
1.3
176
76.9
4
1.7
3
1.3
2
0.9
15
6.6
2
0.9
0.4
0.9
100.0
Table HI.—Sex of New Recipients
Male _
Female
iber
Per Cent
75
45.5
90
54.5
Totals
165
100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 73
Table IV.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Married _.
Single	
Widowed .
Separated
Divorced .
Totals
Number
Per Cent
26
15.8
108
65.5
12
7.3
18
10.9
1
0.6
165
100.0
Table V.—Ages at Granting of Allowance
Ages 18 to 19 __
Ages 20 to 24 __
Ages 25 to 29        2
Ages 30 to 34	
Ages 35 to 39	
Ages 40 to 44	
Ages 45 to 49	
Ages 50 to 54	
Ages 55 to 59	
Ages 60 to 64	
Ages 65 to 69	
Ages over 70	
Totals
Men
Women
Number
Per Cent
23
22
45
27.3
5
12
17
10.3
2
6
8
4.8
3
4
7
4.2
8
7
15
9.1
4
6
10
6.1
5
4
9
5.5
8
6
14
8.5
10
9
19
11.5
7
14
21
12.7
165
100.0
Table VI.-
Birth certificates   - 	
—Forms by V
Men
     60
'hich Age
Women
76
5
1
8
Proven
Number
136
8
1
20
Per Cent
82.4
Baptismal records  	
       3
4.8
Census records alone	
Tribunal    .. _.._   	
0.6
Other records 	
     12
12.1
Totals     .
      165
100.0
i 1—
 G 74
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VII.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Men Women
British Columbia     34 49
Other parts of Canada     26 23
United States of America       2 4
British Isles       4 6
Other parts of British Commonwealth        1 1
Other foreign countries       9 7
Totals
Number
Per Cent
83
50.3
49
29.7
6
3.6
10
6.1
2
0.6
16
9.7
165
100.0
Table VIII.—Where New Recipients Are Living
In own house	
Men
10
_      2
8
40
4
Women
14
2
9
45
3
11
1
1
1
3
Number
24
4
17
85
7
11
3
3
5
6
Per Cent
14.5
In children's home ._     _..
2.4
In home of other relatives
In parent's home	
In rented house        -  .
10.3
51.5
4.2
In rented suite
6.7
In housekeeping room	
In single room (eating out)
In boarding home	
In private institutions	
2
2
__      4
.      3
1.8
1.8
3.0
3.6
Totals    	
,..     165
100.0
Table IX.—With Whom Recipients Live
Men Women
Living alone   5 8
Living with spouse   10 12
Living with spouse and children 4            	
Living with children  9
Living with parents  40 46
Living with other relatives  9 11
Living with others  7 4
Totals	
Number
Per Cent
13
7.9
22
13.3
4
2.4
9
5.5
86
52.1
20
12.1
11
6.7
165
100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 75
Table X.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a) Holding personal property of value—
Men
61
4
$0	
$1 to $250 	
$251 to $500	
$501 to $750       3
$751 to $1,000       2
$1,001 to $1,500	
$1,501 to $2,000	
$2,001 and up       5
Totals	
Women
57
17
5
2
3
1
1
4
Number
118
21
5
5
5
1
1
9
165
Per Cent
71.5
12.7
3.0
3.0
3.0
0.6
0.6
5.5
100.0
(b) Holding real property of value—
$0      63 77
$1 to $250       1
$251 to $500  2
$501 to $750  1
$751 to $1,000       1 1
$1,001 to $1,500 __-.      3 1
$1,501 to $2,000 ....      1 2
$2,001 and up       6 6
Totals	
140
1
2
1
2
4
3
12
165
84.8
0.6
1.2
0.6
1.2
2.4
1.8
7.3
100.0
Table XI.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31,
1965, Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Alberta   12
Saskatchewan  9
Manitoba   8
Ontario   15
Quebec  2
New Brunswick	
Nova Scotia  1
Yukon  1
Northwest Territories  1
Total  49
 G 76 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the
Amount of Allowance Received (Basic Allowance, $75)
Per Cent
$75   94.4
$70 to $74.99   1.3
$65 to $69.99   0.9
$60 to $64.99   0.7
$55 to $59.99  0.7
$50 to $54.99  0.6
$45 to $49.99  0.5
$40 to $44.99  0.3
$35 to $39.99 	
$30 to $34.99   0.1
$25 to $29.99   0.1
$20 to $24.99  0.1
$19.99 and less .  0.3
Total  100.0
Table XIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number Per Cent
Ages 18 to 19      	
Ages 20 to 24  4 7.0
Ages 25 to 29  2 3.5
Ages 30 to 34    .
Ages 35 to 39	
Ages 40 to 44	
Ages 45 to 49	
Ages 50 to 54	
Ages 55 to 59 _	
Ages 60 to 64	
Ages 65 to 69	
Ages over 70	
3
5.3
3
5.3
6
10.5
2
3.5
14
24.6
15
26.3
8
14.0
Totals        57 100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 77
Table XIV.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended  185
Reinstated  108
Transferred to other Provinces  28
Returned to British Columbia  12
Transferred to Old Age Security  22
Deaths  57
(b) Other-Province recipients—
Suspended    	
New transfers to British Columbia  21
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended    	
Reinstated   	
Deaths    	
Transferred to Old Age Security    	
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia  2,191
Other Province       145
  2,336
Table XV.—Primary Causes of Disability on Accepted Cases
Number Per Cent
Infective and parasitic diseases  7 4.2
Neoplasms .  4 2.4
Allergic, endocrine system, metabolic, and nutritional
diseases '.  3 1.8
Diseases of blood and blood-forming organs      	
Mental, psychoneurotic, and personality disorders  78 47.3
Diseases of the nervous system and sense organs  39 23.6
Diseases of the circulatory system  6 3.6
Diseases of the respiratory system  3 1.8
Diseases of the digestive system     	
Diseases of the genito-urinary system      	
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissues    	
Diseases of the bones and organs of movement  14 8.5
Congenital malformations  2 1.2
Symptoms, senility, and ill-defined conditions      	
Accidents, poisoning, and violence (nature of injury) 9 5.5
Totals _:.._.:_ _  165 100.0
 G 78 BRITISH COLUMBIA
General Information re Old Age Security Category
Disposition of Applications
New applications received   756
Reapplications received   221
Applications granted  609
Applications not granted (refused, withdrawn, dead, etc.)  357x
i Does not include pending cases.
Total Number in Receipt of Supplementary Social Allowance
as at March 31,1965
British Columbia cases  22,429
Other-Province cases         619
Total   23,048
Annual Investigations Completed in Calendar Year 1964
as at December 31,1964
Number of Per Cent
Number on Reports Completed of
Payroll Completed       Total Case Load
Old-age Assistance     6,656 5,254 78.9
Blind Persons' Allowance        555 360 64.9
Disabled Persons' Allowance     2,305 1,664 72.2
Supplementary Social Allowance  24,281 19,852 81.8
Totals   33,797 27,130 80.3
Completed by Old-age Assistance Board office  14,808
Completed by field offices  12,322
Total completed  27,130
Change during Fiscal Year 1964/65
Changes in address  11,061
Increases in cheque amounts  10,026
Decreases in cheque amounts     1,322
CONCLUSION
In concluding this report the Board wishes to express its sincere appreciation
for the loyal and efficient work of the office and field staffs throughout the year and
for the continued co-operation of other departments of government and many outside agencies.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 79
PART IV.—INSTITUTIONS
BRANNAN LAKE SCHOOL FOR BOYS
F. G. Hassard, Superintendent
The following table shows the statistics for the fiscal years  1955/56 to
1964/65:—
Fiscal Year
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Number in School, April 1st 	
Number A.W.O.L., April 1st...	
131
9
19
33
129'
1
17
152
2
3
164
_■
1612
5
1175
1'
188'
3
1
173
4
3'
1
190
1
1
60
193
1
1
Number in Riverview Hospital, April
1st
1
14
27
240
52
292
17.8
283
5
34
49
43'
1
33
Number on provisional release, April
1st             --	
143
24
167
14.4
212
1
17
210
75
285
26.3
265
1
27
3.13
85
398
21.4
387
3
1
107
Number of new admissions.—	
222
40
262
15.3'
237
3
1
14
284
82
366
22.4
342
250
94
344
27.3
366
4
3
307
103
,    410
25.1
372
1
357
'     103
460
22.4
410
1
1
107
3612
123
485
Percentage of recidivism      _ .
25.4
329
Number A.W.O.L., March 3)lst.. 	
2
Number on special leave, March 31st...
Number on provisional release, March
list
34
1
49
43
1
33
60
263
	
1
1
1
Number in Riverview Hospital, March
31st
4
Number in Woodlands School, March
31st          	
15-
144
52,576
7.7
166
■
1
129
137.6
50,371
8.3
124
164
■     152
!55,516
6
m
162
159
58,079
6
105
175
173
63,233
5.8
61
188
il81
65,927
5.1
77
173
185
67,473
5.7
62
190
185
67,392
5.5
80
193
181
66,006
5.3
117
188
176
64,196
Average length of stay in months..	
Total A.W.O.L. during the fiscal year-
4.51
1082
1 Sixty-nine of the 329 releases were discharged for various reasons within a week to two months following
their committal.
2 Involving 66 boys.
During the fiscal year there were 362 admissions and 123 recidivists, making
a total of 485 admitted to the School. There was a 25.4 percentage rate of recidivism; 23 of the recidivists were committed for the third time and 1 for the fourth
time. Three hundred of the boys admitted were Protestant, 180 Roman Catholic,
and 5 of other religion. Fifty-six of the total number of boys admitted during the
year were of native Indian status.
Range of Age upon Admission
Age in Years Number of Boys Age in Years Number of Boys
9 years       1                14 years  100
10 „           1                15    „      133
11 „           4                16    „      113
12 „         25                17    „      60
13 „         46                18    „      2
Average age on admission was 14.9 years.
 G 80
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Supervising Agencies of Boys Admitted
Provincial Probation Branch	
Department of Social Welfare	
Vancouver Probation Service 	
Family and Children's Court, Victoria
New Westminster Police	
Children's Aid Society	
Catholic Children's Aid Society	
Family and Children's Service	
Indian Affairs Branch	
Royal Canadian Mounted Police	
Manitoba Provincial Probation Service	
Vancouver Probation Service and Children's Aid Society
None 	
Number
of Boys
. 229
_ 72
_ 75
._ 43
_ 6
. 16
_ 4
_ 4
. 28
. 1
_ 1
1
_ 5
Of this number, 47 were wards of the Superintendent of Child Welfare, 10 of
the Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, 4 of the Catholic Children's Aid Society
of Vancouver, and 6 of the Family and Children's Service, Victoria.
Four hundred and eighty-five boys were committed from the following Juvenile
Courts:—
Number Number
Abbotsford	
Alert Bay	
Armstrong	
Boston Bar     1
of Boys
2
5
2
  26
  1
  6
  1
  1
  7
  25
  5
  5
  6
  2
  4
  1
  5
  3
  4
  1
  3
  4
Hazelton  7
Burnaby	
Burns Lake	
Campbell River
Cassiar	
Chemainus 	
Chilliwack	
Cloverdale	
Coquitlam	
Courtenay 	
Cranbrook 	
Creston	
Dawson Creek __
Duncan 	
Fort Nelson	
Fort St. James
Fort St. John _
Golden	
Grand Forks __.
Haney.
  4
  6
  9
  1
  3
Ladner  3
Hope	
Kamloops .
Kelowna ...
Kimberley
Kitimat -	
of Boys
Ladysmith     1
Lake Cowichan     3
Langley
Lumby ,
Lytton J
Masset __
Matsqui
Merritt _
     1
     1
     3
     6
     4
     5
Nanaimo    17
Nelson     2
New Westminster  14
North Vancouver  19
Ocean Falls     2
100 Mile House     1
Oliver     1
Pemberton     3
Penticton     5
Port Alberni  10
Port Coquitlam     2
Port Moody     1
Powell River     1
Prince George  18
Prince Rupert     8
Princeton     1
Qualicum Beach     2
Richmond   19
Salmo     1
Salmon Arm     5
Sidney     2
Smithers     4
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 81
Number
of Boys
Sooke  1
Squamish  3
Sumas  2
Summerland  1
Terrace  9
Tofino   2
Trail ._„ 3
Ucluelet  1
Number
of Boys
Vancouver  86
Vanderhoof  1
Vernon  3
Victoria  53
West Vancouver  2
White Rock  2
Zeballos  1
Of the 485 boys committed to the School during the year, 395 were committed
for offences against property, 17 against persons, and 73 for other offences which
included incorrigibility. There were 329 boys released from the School during the
year. The average length of stay of boys in the School was 4.5 months. When considering the average length of stay of boys in our School, it must be taken into
account that 69 of the 329 boys released during the year were returned to the community for various reasons within two months, and this does reflect on the average
stay of all boys.
Sixty-six boys accounted for 108 A.W.O.L.s The difference in the figures is
due to the fact that some of the same boys went A.W.O.L. two or more times during
the year.
Seven hundred and eighty-seven individual boys were worked with during the
fiscal year.
Medical and Dental Treatment
Extractions
X-rays 	
Fillings
  228
     57
  972
Partials repaired     15
       1
       4
       5
       4
       1
       2
Examination
Prophylaxis
New partial plates
Dressings 	
Trim 	
Scaling 	
One hundred and eighty-four boys received the above dental work, the cost of
which was $6,061.50.
There were the usual number of accidents, none really serious. We have been
fortunate in having no epidemics of any magnitude.
Five hundred and two boys were tuberculin-tested, of whom 44 were positive;
however, X-rays proved that none of them had tuberculosis.
Impetigo and scabies have been quite prevalent amongst those admitted.
 G 82 BRITISH COLUMBIA
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1964/65
Salaries  $316,803
Office expense  2,928
Travelling expense  217
Office furniture and equipment  77
Heat, light, power, and water  28,203
Medical and dental services  12,372
Clothing and uniforms  12,359
Provisions and catering  63,618
Laundry and dry-goods  13,452
Equipment and machinery  1,887
Medical supplies  1,194
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  7,006
Maintenance and operation of equipment  2,226
Transportation  5,349
Incidentals and contingencies  3,401
Repairs to furnishings and equipment  1,124
Training programme expense  4,120
Less—
Board  $2,355
Rentals   3,171
Sundry  2,559
$476,336
8,085
Less increase in inventory—■ $468,251
At March 31, 1965  $20,806
At March 31, 1964     16,606
         4,200
Add Public Works expenditure  $55,014
Less rental credit  912
$464,051
54,102
$518,153
Per capita cost per diem:   $518,153-^64,196=$8.07.
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts  $452,647
Add—
Maintenance receipts     $2,992
Salary adjustments     12,612
Public Works expenditure  $55,014
Less rental credit  912
54,102
69,706
$522,353
Less increase in inventory         4,200
$518,153
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 83
There are many reasons why boys become involved in delinquencies: the relationship between a boy and his parents or guardian, lack of parental control, example
set by adult behaviour, environmental influences within the community are some of
these. The support a youngster receives from his parents, the field agencies, local
school authorities, and community acceptance in general—not rejection—determines to a great degree as to whether a boy, on returning home, makes good or not.
The boy requires support and supervision as well as understanding. The percentage of recidivism is not necessarily related to the period of time boys spend in the
training-school.
Training-schools should only be considered as supplementary to home and
community services. No institution, regardless of how satisfactory it may be, can
ever be an adequate replacement for a home.
We have continued to enjoy the closest co-operation and help from the various
church and service club groups of Nanaimo, also civic authorities and the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police.
I wish to thank clergymen, service clubs, civic officials, members of both the
Federal and Provincial departments of government, private agencies, and School
staff members who have assisted in the rehabilitation of boys. Their assistance has
been appreciated by the School administration.
 G 84
BRITISH COLUMBIA
WILLINGDON SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
Miss Winifred Urquhart, Superintendent
The following table gives the comparison of movement in the general population for the last 10 years. It is followed by tables showing the age range of this
year's admissions, Court charges, and the Courts from which the girls were sent to
the School. These figures, while they undoubtedly have some administrative value,
tell nothing of the human aspects—the loss of home and family, or self-respect, or
mental cruelty—which lie behind the symptoms that brought each of this year's
134 girls to our gate.
Fiscal Year
VD
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43
7
12
47
12
62
13
58
7
66
9
91
5
77
11
82
11
87
17
88
Number A.W.O.L., April 1st 	
18
Number elsewhere, other institutions,
3
96
10
106
9.4
79
5
9
81
13
94
13.8
100
11
Number on provisional release, April
1st 	
59
7
66
10.6
75
7
4
66
15
81
18.5
72
9
11
84
19
103
18.4
87
11
22
94
7
101
6.9
99
17
1
12
102
15
117
12.8
113
19
13
Number of new admissions	
66
14
80
17.5
70
12
2
1
60
11
71
15.5
55
13
119
15
134
10.4
79
Number A.W.O.L., March 31st	
14
Number elsewhere, other institutions,
3
11
77
74.0
26,994
10.3
210
Number on provisional release, March
31st  	
4
58
51.6
18,851
12.4
187
3
66
51.4
18,765
10.6
124
9
91
76.5
28,010
10.4
147
22
82
73.4
26,783
11.4
213
12
87
80.0
29,216
12.5
195
12
88
86.7
31,735
10.8
186
55
Number in School, March 31st	
47
41.1
15,036
8.5
232
62
46.2
16,871
11.6
187
97
89.1
32,524
Average length of stay (months) —   .
Total A.W.O.L. during fiscal year.	
9.2
164
This table shows only a slight increase in the average daily population, but
although our numbers did not soar quite as high as in the previous year, they remained generally high throughout the year. It is unfortunate we have to report the
increase in native Indian girls admitted, which accounts for approximately 44 per
cent of the total admissions. In the past our Indian population has remained fairly
constant at about one-quarter.
Provisional release is making possible a shorter stay for some girls and more
quickly bringing others back for further treatment. One hundred and twenty-nine
girls were tried out on Provisional release, and 25 were brought back for varying
periods during the year. A slight decrease in the average length of stay is noted;
however, of the 79 fully released with an average length of stay of 9.2 months 9
were in over 18 months and 24 under 6 months.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 85
Range of Age upon Admission
Age
11 years
12 „
13 „
14 „
Number
of Girls
__      1
__ 5
rt, 10
__ 25
Age
15 years
16 „
17 „
Total
Charges were as follows:—
Unmanageable or incorrigible :	
Intoxication and other infractions of Government Liquor Act
Broken probation	
Theft	
Sexual immorality	
Infraction of Motor-vehicle Act (driving without licence)
Truancy 	
Possession of stolen goods	
Assault	
Possession of offensive weapon	
Possession of breaking and entering tools
False pretenses	
Wilful damage	
Causing a disturbance	
Loitering
Inmate of a common bawdy house
Criminal negligence 	
Attempted suicide
Defrauding (Social Assistance Act)
Breaking and entering	
Number
of Girls
41
33
19
134
58
20
15
15
8
3
2
2
10
144
In the total of 144 charges, six girls had two charges each and one girl had
five charges. In addition to the above, one girl had two charges of breaking and
entering while A.W.O.L., and a second girl on A.W.O.L. received 25 charges of
forgery.
The 134 girls were committed from the following Courts:—
Number
of Girls
Abbotsford     1
Agassiz     2
Alberni
Alert Bay __
Armstrong ._
Bella Coola
Burnaby 	
Campbell River
Chase	
Chilliwack	
Cloverdale	
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
Courtenay	
Cranbrook ___.	
Dawson City, Yukon
Dawson Creek	
Duncan 	
Number
of Girls
_ 4
. 1
_ 1
. 3
_ 2
Fort St. James     3
Fort St. John
Golden	
Hazelton	
Hope	
Invermere 	
4
1
4
1
1
 G 86 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Number
of Girls
Number
of Girls
Kelowna	
       3
Prince Rupert	
     2
Kitimat	
       1
Quesnel	
     1
Ladner    	
       1
Richmond	
     4
Lytton	
     5
Smithers 	
     3
Masset  _   _ _ -
  11
Terrace 	
3
Merritt	
     3
Trail 	
     1
Mission City	
     1
Vancouver    	
  25
New Westminster __
     2
Vanderhoof 	
     2
North Vancouver	
     1
Vernon  _
     2
Port Alberni __       __
     3
Victoria _        _   _
West Vancouver	
9
Port Coquitlam	
     2
     1
Port Hardy 	
     1
Whitehorse, Yukon
1
Prince George	
    4
It is pleasing to note a drop from 12 to 3 in committals from Alert Bay, where
there is now an active community committee operating.
We have continued to provide an active, interesting, and constructive programme in which every girl has an opportunity to learn new skills and prepare herself for further training or education, or to enter into employment when she returns
to the community. There have been no major changes made in the general activities
during the year. The annual gymnastic display continues to be a popular event
both with girls and patrons. The academic classes operated at near capacity
throughout the year. The changes and new developments in the general school
system are making it increasingly more difficult to provide academic teaching in our
institution, where the children arrive at any time during the year, from all areas of
the Province, and may have been absent from classes for varying lengths of time.
Added to this, all school districts do not change at the same time to new courses,
and in the Occupational Course each seems to work out their own programme
according to local resources. This places a heavy burden and considerable strain
on our two academic teachers, who, fortunately, are young, full of enthusiasm, and
very well liked by the girls. It would appear that our greatest responsibility in this
area is to awaken a desire for further education and help the child over the difficulties
she has encountered in her studies in the past. The supervisors from the Burnaby
School Board have given valuable, though limited, direction and encouragement to
our teachers, and we are grateful for their support.
Two of our cottage supervisors retired during the year, and two new appointments were made. We welcomed two new social workers to staff, to replace one
who transferred to another division and one who took educational leave. I believe,
although staff morale has generally been good, we are now working at a much
higher level, with lay and professional members pulling together as a team.
We still continue to receive the excellent services of Dr. T. C. MacKenzie, who
brings much understanding to his work with the girls, some of whom can dream
up more aches and pains than they have bones in their body in their starved need
for attention. There have been no major illnesses. Dental work is taken care of
by the Out-patient department at the Vancouver General Hospital, and emergencies
and special work by Dr. E. Nikolai, a local dentist. The Mental Health Clinic
continues to provide valuable, albeit limited, psychiatric services. Its team of Dr.
R. Davis and Mrs. M. Reid maintain a close working relationship with our social
workers, and, along with a diagnostic service through conferences, bring out information and a better understanding of the girls.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 87
We still have many good friends from the field of volunteers. Particular mention is made of Mr. M. J. Airth from the Four Square Pentecostal Church, a layman
who for 14 years has been a real friend to our girls. Space here does not permit
telling of all his activities with us, but of special note is the fact that during the last
year he has arranged for teams of young adult boys and girls to come to the School
one night a week to play games with our girls. Friendships developed have carried
on and supported our girls when released. Father Gallow faithfully continues to
hold mass for our Roman Catholic population every Sunday. The Anglican Church,
Salvation Army, Pentecostal Church, and Gideons continue to hold Protestant services and to visit with the girls in an informal way during the week. The Elizabeth
Fry ladies have held monthly parties, which are always looked forward to with much
anticipation, and they also visit the girls whose parents are unable to visit because
of distance. There have been a variety of evening programmes provided by bands
and concert groups during the year. We would like to express through this report
our sincere appreciation to all these good friends who do so much to keep the school
a part of the community.
Perhaps the most significant development in this past year has been the recognition of Willingdon School by the School of Social Work at the University of British
Columbia for a student-placement unit. We welcomed this as a symbol of our
maturity as an agency in the community. This experimental year proved successful, not only as a field placement for the students, but in dividends gained by the
School by increased casework services, and seven social workers and their supervisor moved out into the community with an improved image of Willingdon School.
Twenty-three groups toured the School during the year, including eight from
our Department of Social Welfare training division, three groups of nurses from
the Provincial Mental Hospital, three groups of student nurses from Vancouver
General Hospital, two groups of student teachers from the College of Education
at the University of British Columbia, two groups from the School of Social Work
at the University of British Columbia, and five miscellaneous groups.
I take this opportunity to express my appreciation to the social workers of all
the agencies and the volunteers who have co-operated with us during the year in
carrying out our programme, also to senior administration for their constant support,
and to all the members of my staff, who have worked so faithfully, giving much of
themselves and their time to our girls.
^^
 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
FINANCIAL STATEMENT,  1964/66
Salaries   $223,793
Office expense  2,558
Travelling expense  1,624
Heat, light, power, and water  27,033
Medical and dental services  4,592
Clothing and uniforms  5,997
Provisions and catering  39,738
Laundry and dry-goods  209
Good Conduct Fund  1,759
Equipment and machinery  1,771
Medical supplies  1,877
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  3,057
Maintenance and operation of equipment  1,368
Transportation  4,433
Vocational and recreational supplies  2,478
Motor-vehicles and accessories  2,037
$324,324
Less—
Board  $ 1,725
Rentals     2,160
3,885
$320,439
Add decrease in inventory—
At March 31, 1964  $9,672
At March 31, 1965     8,971
701
$321,140
Add Public Works expenditure       36,198
$357,338
Per capita cost per diem: $357,338-^-32,524=$10.99.
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts  $307,865
Add—
Maintenance receipts  $5,326
Salary adjustments     7,248
Decrease in inventory        701
Public Works expenditure  36,198
       49,473
$357,338
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 89
PROVINCIAL HOME, KAMLOOPS
G. P. Willie, Superintendent
The following is the annual report for the Provincial Home for the Aged and
Infirm, Kamloops, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1965.
The year saw a trend to a younger, more capable applicant being admitted, and
some remained for the duration of the winter months only, when employment is most
difficult to find for the over-65's, and then returned to their previous domiciles. The
year shows a gain of 19 residents, with 77 being admitted, 38 taking leave of absence, and 20 expiring, thus increasing the inmate-days and reducing the per capita
cost by 17 cents from the previous year.
Old age is usually embittered by poor health. A continued effort is maintained
to increase the comforts of the residents during their stay. Medical services are
supplied by the Irving Clinic and specialists outside its clinic. Psychiatry has also
been used with success. Twenty triple-top bedside cabinets, an exercise bar with
adjustable trapeze, a chair-model security vest, and heating-pads have been placed
in the hospital ward.
Physiotherapy in the Home continues, with the physiotherapist from CARS
administering. New equipment added to this department are a bike exerciser, a row
exerciser, and a four-tipped cane glider.
Food plays a very important part in the life of old people, both physically and
psychologically. After admission to the Home, some are getting a balanced diet for
the first time in a long while. Good food helps to reduce upset at displacement,
build up a sense of security, and reduce sporadic ills. Food preferences of aged
persons are an interesting problem. The menu is uniform for all diners, but varied
from day to day, and is served family style or on a semi-cafeteria basis as some residents are too handicapped to manage self-service.
The more able men are encouraged to help in the Home, as this gives them a
sense of independence and pride in their accomplishments, thus helping to make
them more active and mentally alert.
The outside of the institution was painted a pale pink with a green trim. Some
repairs were made inside the Home, chiefly to the floors in the bathrooms of Wards
3, 5, 7, and 13. A large amount of the furniture was repaired, reupholstered, and
painted.
Entertainment and recreation facilities are important but limited for the aged.
A new set of Encyclopedia Britannica was donated for the library. A special effort
is made at Christmas for the enjoyment of the residents. Religious denominations
continue to fulfil the men's needs with services, choirs, and visiting.
During the year four men were transferred from the Tranquille School. These
men are 53, 57, 59, and 66 years of age, and after a short adjusting period have
blended in with the other residents quite well and appreciate the care and privileges
provided.
The staff and the Home try to provide comfort, safety, and security, along with
convenience, with few restrictions for the residents during their stay. We feel we
have done well, we desire to do better!
I wish to thank all who have assisted during the past year.
 G 90 BRITISH COLUMBIA
INMATE-DAYS
Inmates in the Home, April 1, 1964  114
Inmates admitted during the year     77
Inmates discharged     38
Inmates deceased     20
191
58
Total number of inmates, March 31, 1965  133
Total number of inmate-days 44,403
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1964/65
Salaries   $ 121,752
Office expense  423
Travelling expense  53
Medical services  11,028
Clothing and uniforms  756
Provisions and catering  32,597
Laundry and dry-goods  7,084
Equipment and machinery  2,297
Medical supplies  3,466
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  1,007
Maintenance and operation of equipment  590
Transportation   367
Burials    1,350
Incidentals and contingencies  2,932
$185,702
Less—
Board   $396
Rentals      300
  696
$185,006
Add Public Works expenditure       12,170
$197,176
Per capita cost per diem: $197,176-^44,403=$4.44.
Pensions paid to Government Agent, Kamloops, $98,607.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 91
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts     $29,263
Add—
Maintenance receipts—
Pensions   $98,607
Municipalities       3,285
Transfers from Provincial Home Trust Account      10,114
Miscellaneous revenue       1,329
Receipts   from   Government  of   Canada
under the Unemployment Assistance
Agreement    44,133
Salary adjustments      7,848
     165,316
$194,579
Add Public Works expenditure       12,170
$206,749
Less—
Pensioners' comforts     $9,090
Proportion of excess of disbursements over
receipts for Tranquille Farm         483
        9,573
$197,176
 G 92 BRITISH COLUMBIA
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS BOARD
A. A. Shipp, Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions
I submit herewith the annual report of the Welfare Institutions Licensing Act
for the year 1964. As licences are issued on the basis of the calendar year, this
report covers the period from January 1, 1964, to December 31, 1964.
LICENCES
A total of 969 licences was issued during the year, of which 812 were renewals
and 157 were new licences. Of the licensed institutions, 106 were either closed or
changed ownership, requiring new licensing. There were 258 new applications, and
250 pending applications were closed.
Case load at December 31, 1964, totalled 1,081, of which 863 were licensed
institutions and 218 files pending. It is noted that in the four years from December 31, 1960, to December 31, 1964, case load has increased from 819 to 1,081,
or 32 per cent.
BOARD MEETINGS
Ten regular Board meetings and two special meetings were held during the
year. Mr. Eric Berry, Chairman of the Old-age Assistance Board, was appointed
to the Board, bringing Board membership to a total of seven, as provided in the
Welfare Institutions Licensing Act.
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS FOR CHILDREN
A. Full-time Care of Children
Institutions for Child-care
There are 11 institutions licensed for the care of children, 2 giving boarding-
home care, the other 8 giving specialized services. One institution was closed during the year, leaving 10 institutions as of December 31, 1964.
Number of institutions licensed in 1964  11
Number of children cared for        338
Total days' care  62,022
Private Boarding Homes
There were 16 licensed boarding homes for children as of December 31, 1963,
and 4 homes were in process of licensing. Two new licences were issued during the
year and 3 files were closed, leaving 15 licensed homes as of December 31, 1964.
Number of children's boarding homes licensed in 1964  18
Number of children cared for  66
Total days' care  14,068
B. Day Care of Children
Foster Day Care
During the year 57 new applications for foster day care were received. Many
of these homes were found to be unsatisfactory, and 39 pending cases were closed.
Eleven homes which had previously been licensed were closed, leaving a total of
32 licensed homes as of December 31, 1964.
Supervision of these homes in the Vancouver area continues to be shared by
the Child Care Centre and the Welfare Institutions Division, since there are still
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 93
some of the day-care foster-mothers who do not wish to work through the private
agency.
Number of foster day-care homes licensed in 1964  43
Number of children cared for        364
Total days' care ..-  37,752
Kindergartens, Play-schools, etc.
In spite of a continuing increase in the number of kindergartens operating in
the public schools, there is still a growth in the number of privately operated and
co-operative kindergartens. A total of 354 licences was issued during the year,
with 30 licences being cancelled for various reasons. Fifty-nine new applications
were received, and 71 pending files were closed.
There is a growing tendency for kindergartens to give full day care, and this,
together with a trend toward group day-care facilities for pre-school children, caused
the Superintendent of Child Welfare to set up a committee to study the needs of
pre-school children, and to set up standards of care. This committee is composed
of representatives from Child Care Centre, Gordon House, Alexandra House,
Metropolitan Health Department, and welfare institutions.
Another committee to study the need for this type of care is composed of representatives of the Vancouver City Social Service Department, University of British
Columbia, Vancouver Community Chest and Council, Child Care Centre, and
Children's Aid Societies.
It is expected that these committees will bring in their reports early in 1965.
Number of pre-school centres licensed in 1964  354
Number of children registered        17,769
Total days' care  1,597,324
Schools for Retarded Children
A total of 35 licences for schools for retarded children was issued during the
year, with 5 licences being cancelled. Eight new applications were received, and
5 pending files closed.
Number of schools licensed in 1964  35
'■,      Number of children registered        708
Total days' care  83,881
MATERNITY HOMES
There was no change in the status or programme of the three licensed maternity
homes.
Number of homes licensed in 1964  3
Number of mothers cared for        471
Total days' care .  28,710
AGED-CARE
Proprietary Institutions
A total of 321 proprietary institutions was licensed during the year, with 51
licences being cancelled, leaving a total of 270 licensed at the end of the year.
One hundred and three new applications were received, and 111 pending files
closed, leaving 84 cases pending. Many of these applications were for new establishments, and the balance were due to change of ownership.
 G 94 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Number of proprietary institutions licensed during 1964  321
Number of persons cared for       5,012
Total days' care  965,344
Non-profit Institutions
A total of 38 non-profit institutions for the aged were licensed, and 1 was closed.
Number of non-profit institutions licensed during 1964  38
Number of persons cared for       2,584
Number of days' care  757,223
UNEMPLOYED ADULTS
One new licence was issued in this category during the year, and 3 new applications were received.
Number of homes licensed during 1964  7
Capacity         214
Number of persons cared for     5,579
Total days' care  40,337
ADULT MENTALLY DISABLED
Six new licences were issued during the year, bringing the total number of
homes licensed for the care of the mentally disabled to 11. There were 8 new applications, and 7 pending files were closed.
Close liaison is maintained with Mental Health Services, and this programme
appears to be serving a very useful purpose.
Number of homes licensed during 1964  11
Capacity          71
Number of persons cared for  85
Total days' care  18,992
SUMMER CAMPS
Camping continues to show increases, in spite of poor weather and family
camping.
A total of 98 camps was licensed during the year, and 4 were closed.   There
were 14 new applications, and 9 pending files were closed.
Number of summer camps licensed in 1964  98
Number of persons attending     29,821
Number of attendance days  285,614
CONCLUSION
Sincere thanks and appreciation are extended to all who helped with the
administration of this Act.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 95
STATISTICAL INFORMATION
Table I.—Showing a Comparative Summary of Information Regarding
Licensed Welfare Institutions
1961
1962
1963
1964
Children—Total Care (Excluding Summer Camps)
Number licensed—
Institutions	
Boarding homes..
Capacity—
Institutions	
Boarding homes_
Number of children under care—
Institutions	
Boarding homes_
Number of days' care—
Institutions	
Boarding homes..
Summer Camps
Number licensed-
Capacity-
Number of persons attending-
Number of attendance days	
Children—Day Care
Number licensed—
Kindergartens	
Schools for retarded children-
Foster day care	
Capacity—
Kindergartens-
Schools for retarded children-
Foster day care-
Number of children enrolled-
Kindergartens..
Schools for retarded children-
Foster day care-
Number of attendance days-
Kindergartens..
Schools for retarded children-
Foster day care	
Adults—Infirm and Unemployable
Proprietary institutions—
Number licensed	
Capacity-
Number of persons cared for..
Number of days' care	
Non-profit institutions-
Number licensed	
Capacity-
Number of persons cared for~
Number of days' care	
Adults—Employable
Number licensed-
Capacity-
Number of persons under care-
Number of days' care	
Women—Maternity
Number licensed-
Capacity-
Number of persons under care—
Mothers	
Infants	
Number of days* care..
Adults—Mentally Disabled
Number licensed-
Capacity-
Number of persons under care-
Number of days' care.	
9
30
243
76
287
75
67,343
18,308
77
5,750
26,023
248,295
265
31
28
7,764
695
135
13,614
630
302
1,121,022
76,034
21,237
2115
3,368
4,710
'992,824
9
20
239
60
265
63
60,178
13,764
83
6,324
26,897
351,298
291
28
32
8,383
618
98
14,226
5.16
157
1,215,154
65,216
14,898
288
4,294
5,860
1,246.891
6
171
5,502
40,368
3    I
125   i|
394   ,
191    ]
31,263
6
171
5,958
32,867
3
125
489
13'
29,013
4
31
34
10,093
9
19
250
60
306
55
65,657
10,664
93
6,856
29,106
236,768
311
30
33
8,919
661
103
15,720
610
192
1,349,595
81,576
15,529
325
4,843
6,776
1,481,205
6
169
16,349
46,201
3
81
433
26,049
5
36
37
11,410
9
17
250
61
338
66
62,022
14,086
94
7,093
29,821
285,614
324
311
32
9,639
727
139
17,769
708
364
1,597,324
83,881
37,752
321
3,516
5,012
965,344
38
1,980
2,584
757,223
7
214
5,579
40,337
3
87
471
28,710
11
71
85
18,992
 G 96
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Case Load Showing the Total Number of Licensed Institutions and
Pending Applications, 1964
LICENSED
Jan. 1,
1964
New
Licences
Closed
Carried
Forward,
Dec. 31,
1964
Children—total care-
Boarding homes-
Institutions	
Camps.
Children—day care—
Kindergarten-
Schools for retarded children-
Foster day care	
Aged—
Boarding homes	
Institutions —! :
Adults—employable !	
Homes—maternity.
Provincial Mental Hospital dischargees-
Totals :	
16
10
93
303
29
32
278
37
6
3
5
812
2
1
5
51
6
11
71
3
1
157
3
1
4
30
5
11
51
1
106
15
10
94
324
30
32
298
39
7
3
__U_
863
PENDING
Jan. 1,
1964
New
Cases
Closed
Carried
Forward,
Dec. 31,
1964
Children—total care—
Boarding homes	
Institutions	
Camps.
Children—day care—
Kindergartens..
Schools for retarded children-
Foster day care	
Aged—
Boarding homes	
Institutions	
Adults—employable	
Homes—maternity..
4
~25
65
~16
92
2
1
Provincial Mental Hospital dischargees..
Totals	
210
5
14
59
8
57
103
1
3
258
5
_.._
71
5
39
111
3
7
~250^
4
30
53
3
34
84
4
..__
~218~
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1964/65        G 97
PART V.—MEDICAL SOCIAL WORK SERVICES
DIVISION OF TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL AND
PEARSON POLIOMYELITIS PAVILION
Mrs. M. Titterington, Supervisor
As this is the last report from this department, in view of the transfer of staff
to the Health Branch, I shall try to clarify the changes that have taken place during
the past year and indicate the present use of hospital facilities.
In May, 1964, 28 of the 29 patients at Allco Hospital, Haney, who were
admitted under the Provincial Infirmaries Act, were transferred to Pearson Hospital.
One patient decided to try boarding in a private home, and was therefore referred
for social assistance and has continued to live outside the hospital. During following months, new male infirmary patients were admitted as accommodation became
available, and by the end of the fiscal year all female tuberculosis patients were
transferred to Willow Chest Centre, leaving only two wards for male tuberculosis
patients at Pearson and making it possible for all of the patients at Marpole Infirmary
to be transferred to Pearson early in the next fiscal year. It has been decided to call
this section of the hospital the Continued Care Unit. Plans for a new day building
have been completed, and the work has started. The building will be used for occupational therapy and physiotherapy, as well as for recreational purposes.
Using fewer beds for tuberculosis patients means that the periods of hospitalization are shortened and there is greater turnover of patients, as well as more patients
being treated on an out-patient basis. However, there was little variation in the
number of admissions of tuberculosis patients to Willow Chest Centre and Pearson,
as they totalled 385 in the calendar year 1964, compared with 384 in the calendar
year 1963, but there were 437 discharges in 1964, compared with 391 in the
previous calendar year.
The occupancy of the Polio Unit remains fairly constant, around 40 patients,
about half of whom are able to go home for either brief or fairly long periods of
time. While there have been no new cases of poliomyelitis admitted during the past
fiscal year, other types of cases have been admitted, requiring similar type of physical
care.   Three of these have been automobile accident cases.
The fight to eliminate tuberculosis continues. Even the most advanced countries have not reached their goals in controlling the disease, and reports indicate that
half the world's population is infected with tuberculosis. With the increase in world
travel, the prevalence of disease in other parts of the world may spread the disease.
Even the advanced countries and provinces have pockets of poverty and high-
incidence areas that nurture tuberculosis. The Division of Tuberculosis Control
is continuing with mobile surveys, " Operation Doorstep," in which the British
Columbia Tuberculosis-Christmas Seal Society co-operates in the organizational and
promotional aspects. As over half of the tuberculosis cases are found in people
over 50 years of age, a special survey of rest homes and senior citizens' housing
units was commenced in Vancouver during the past fiscal year. For this survey, the
society provided the operators of the unit and the Division provided the medical and
other services necessary. Due to weather conditions and the need for a portable unit
to examine those who could not get out to the mobile unit because of physical incapacity, the completion of the survey has been delayed for a few months.   However,
 G 98 BRITISH COLUMBIA
over 1,000 senior citizens were tested, and of these only 44 were referred for further
investigation. Six of these were known inactive tuberculosis cases, one was a suspect, and the others showed a variety of conditions; for example, old pleurisy and
various areas of fibrosis. Known cases of tuberculosis in the Province amount to
about 1.2 per cent of the population of the Province, but only 9 per cent of these
are active cases. Among the senior citizens surveyed, known cases amounted to
about 0.6 per cent, and none proved to be active. If these results are maintained
when the survey is completed, it would appear that the senior citizens who are well
cared for are not the ones who will be coming into hospital for treatment of
tuberculosis.
The British Columbia Tuberculosis Society in the past few years commenced
contributing financially to research in respiratory diseases by assisting in the support
of a senior specialist in the field of respiratory diseases in the Faculty of Medicine at
the University of British Columbia. It was agreed that the work of this specialist
would include research, particularly regarding clinical problems, as well as educational activities. Dr. Stefan Grzybowski was appointed. One piece of research that
he is carrying on might be of interest to our department. It has been found that
cases treated prior to the advent of drug therapy in 1950 became activated 5 to 25
times more frequently than cases treated with drugs after 1950. Therefore, 1,800
people who have had active tuberculosis prior to 1950 have been selected for drug
therapy on a prophylactic basis. It will, of course, be some years before the value
of this treatment can be evaluated. Whether or not people who have had tuberculosis but feel well will submit to the drug therapy for the required period of time
is another question. Social workers who come in contact with these patients should
encourage them to co-operate in view of the rate of breakdown.
The Social Service Department has had an exceptionally busy year. With the
change in function of the Pearson Hospital and the publicity given it, there has been
a constant stream of inquiries from social and health agencies and from families
regarding eligibility for admission and interpretation of the financial aspects. In
addition, there has been more demand for service from the patients admitted to the
Continued Care Unit than was expected. Personal and family problems were foremost, but many require continued emotional support and stimulation to make use of
the services available, and many require help in overcoming their feelings of rejection
by their own relatives.
The social service statistics covering the various units of service are integrated.
Six hundred and eighty-seven different patients were helped, directly or indirectly,
with a wide range of problems, involving 2,133 interviews with the patients and (or)
their relatives and 3,756 collateral interviews, as well as 657 letters. One of the
most time-consuming problems is obtaining suitable housing or other accommodation for paraplegic or quadriplegic patients who are able to live outside the hospital
and some of whom are able to work. One poliomyelitis patient who had been in
hospital for nine years became very anxious to spend a month's holiday with his
family, who lived on one of the Gulf Islands. Through the co-operation of many
people and agencies, such as the British Columbia Poliomyelitis and Rehabilitation
Society and a district office of the Social Welfare Department, the holiday was
accomplished and was of great benefit to the patient psychologically. Patients in all
units who have families suffer from the temporary or permanent isolation from their
families and, if the patient is the bread-winner, the deterioration of their economic
position. Many of the patients with tuberculosis have worked in heavy industry
and, while they may have earned high wages, their education is often limited. This
is particularly applicable to those who have worked in the mining industry.   Often
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65        G 99
they feel unable to upgrade their education to be eligible for courses available. This
is especially true when they are not clear what courses are available to them. Even
when they have the educational background necessary, the fact that they have to
wait for several months after discharge before entering a course presents another
hurdle.
Comforts allowances granted during the past fiscal year amounted to $3,728.50,
and in addition $569.84 was provided through voluntary funds. The voluntary
funds were granted by the British Columbia Tuberculosis Society and the Municipal
Chapter of the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire. We are indebted to these
groups, as well as to the Marpole Auxiliary and the British Columbia Poliomyelitis
and Rehabilitation Society, for their special consideration and help for individual
patients. In addition, the Women's Auxiliary to the Paraplegic Association and the
Three R's Club assisted in providing individual gifts for patients and their families
at Christmas.
As in former years, staff members have assisted in the educational programme
of the nursing students that come to the Division for the tuberculosis affiliation programme, as well as other special students who were assigned to Pearson Hospital or
Willow Chest Centre from time to time.
I also wish to thank all the private and governmental agencies who have cooperated so well in helping our patients.
 G 100
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PART VI.—ACCOUNTING DIVISION
J. McDiarmid, Departmental Comptroller
The Department of Social Welfare expenditure for the period April 1, 1964, to
March 31, 1965, increased $2,177,000 over the previous fiscal year, the main
increases having taken place in direct services and payments to provide for the
maintenance of dependent children, Old-age Assistance, Blind, and Disabled Persons' Allowances, and Social Allowance cases.
Viewing the 1964/65 table of total gross welfare expenditures, it is interesting
to note that 76 per cent of the $61,393,400 was expended in direct payments providing monthly allowances or care for these welfare cases. The expenditure within
the section of the table shown as administration, institutions, and field service has
increased in dollars by reason of general salary increases and employment of additional staff.
Main Service
Proportion of Total Gross Welfare Expenditure
1963/64
Value
Per Centl
1964/65
Value
Per Centl
Administration-
Institutions 	
Field service	
Maintenance of dependent children-
Medical services, drugs, optical, etc...
Social Allowances, etc..
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowance, Disabled   Persons'   Allowance,   and   Supplementary
Social Allowance for the aged and handicapped	
Totals      -
$689,200
997,000
1,951,200
4,907,400
4,962,800
29,614,100
16,094,700
1.2
1.7
3.3
8.3
8.4
50.0
27.2
$768,300
1,048,300
2,322,000
5,566,700
5,035,100
29,954,700
16,698,300
1.3
1.7
3.8
9.1
8.2
48.8
27.2
$59,216,400
100.0
$61,393,400      |      100.0
 1
l Percentages may not add to 100 due to rounding.
The Accounting Division has experienced an increase in work volume and
duties; however, with the greater use of machine work and a constant review of
methods, no staff increase has been made in the last 10 years.
The Accounting Division, with the assistance of the personnel from the Data
Processing Division, Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce,
is in the process of establishing methods of checking of accounts by electronic
data-processing equipment. This will be a major step in the welfare accounting
toward a complete machine operation.
A new system of cash allowances for clothing to be paid to foster-mothers in
place of charge accounts has been operated on a trial basis in Region I with considerable success, and the Division is presentiy in the process of extending this
method throughout the Province, which will result in saving of staff time within the
Accounting Division as well as the field offices.
The Research and Statistics Section of the Accounting Division summarizes
monthly case-load statistics from all Provincial and municipal social welfare offices
in British Columbia. These summaries are distributed to senior personnel in the
Department, to Regional Directors and district supervisors, and to municipal offices.
In addition, a monthly report on Social Allowance case load and dependents is
prepared under supervision of this office. This report shows numbers and costs
by administering offices throughout the Province, with a further division between
organized and unorganized areas.   Besides these and other continuing programmes,
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1964/65      G 101
this office is concerned with developing new statistics as they become necessary and
useful, and in improving existing programmes. Examples of this now in progress
are:—
(1) In co-operation with the Director of Medical Services and others, the
complete revamping of the statistical recording of the drug programme of
the Department of Social Welfare. This will provide information on prescriptions by type of drug, size of prescription, cost, supplier, physician,
location, etc.
(2) The establishment of a completely revised and improved system of
recording statistics on the dental programme of the Department. This
will provide information by age of patient, location, dentist, work performed, cost, etc.
(3) The complete changing of the system in use by the Child Welfare Division
for producing bi-monthly and annual statistics on the Division's foster-
home programme.
All three of these extensions and improvements to the Department's statistical
records involve the use of electronic data-processing equipment, and this will continue as other plans develop.
The Accounting Division acknowledges the excellent co-operation and assistance shown by all divisions of the Department of Social Welfare, the office of the
Comptroller-General, and the Data Processing Division, Department of Industrial
Development, Trade, and Commerce.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1966
1,560-1165-9566
 

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