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REPORT of the LANDS SERVICE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1963 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1964

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Hon. R. G. Williston, Minister E. W. Bassett, Deputy Minister of Lands
REPORT
of the
LANDS SERVICE
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1963
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1964
  Victoria, B.C., January 31, 1964.
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the British Columbia Lands Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources for the
year ended December 31, 1963.
R. G. WILLISTON,
Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources.
 Victoria, B.C., January 31, 1964.
The Honourable R. G. Williston,
Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the British Columbia
Lands Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources for the
twelve months ended December 31, 1963.
E. W. BASSETT,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
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  CONTENTS
Introduction by the Deputy Minister of Lands.
Accounting Division  	
Lands Branch—
Superintendent of Lands	
Land Inspection Division__..
Surveys and Mapping Branch—
Surveyor-General	
Legal Surveys Division-
Topographic Division.—
Geographic Division	
Air Division	
University Endowment Lands.
Land Settlement Board	
Personnel Office	
Page
.    9
_ 15
23
32
Mail and File Room
42
46
52
61
65
75
81
85
89
Cover photo:   Jordan River, Vancouver
Island—sorting and assembling log boom.
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 Report of the British Columbia Lands Service
E. W. Bassett, Deputy Minister of Lands
The buoyancy of the Provincial economy continues to have a beneficial effect
on the level of activity in the British Columbia Lands Service. The tables and figures contained in this Annual Report give clear evidence of the increase in effort
which was necessary to keep pace with Provincial development in 1963.
Revenues collected by the Accounting Division in 1963 totalled over $2,000,-
000. Annual receipts from land leases, rentals, and fees have more than tripled in
the 10 years since 1953, while returns from land sales increased 32.5 per cent during the same period. Revenues from maps and aerial photographs have expanded
2Vi times in the past decade.
The Lands Branch processed 7,011 applications for land in 1963, the highest
for any year to date. Leasehold applications have risen substantially in recent years,
primarily as the result of the policy of granting only leasehold alienation of Crown
land fronting on bodies of water and permitting, on the basis of two applications,
agricultural leases of up to 1,280 acres extent in the Peace River region. The 2,719
applications to lease received in 1963 represented a 21-per-cent increase over 1962.
Though there were 5 per cent more applications to purchase than in 1962, the number of land sales has tended to stabilize in the last decade. Illustrative of this levelling off of sales, it is noted that in 1954, 1,043 parcels of Crown land were sold,
while in 1962 and 1963 the figures were 1,106 and 934 respectively.
Two measures were taken to encourage more effective use of Crown land suitable for agriculture. Approximately 400,000 acres formerly held under reserve
north and east of the Beatton River were opened for settlement. Also, the flat-rate
system of rental for grazing land was examined, and, as a result, lease rental rates
were amended to make the rate commensurate with the grazing capacity of the land.
Industrial and transportation developments are notably increasing the number
and complexity of Crown-land alienations in Northern British Columbia. Outstanding among these are construction of the Peace River (Portage Mountain) hydroelectric complex, a rail-line to Fort St. James, a new pulp-mill at Prince George and
others proposed at Kitimat, Houston, and the Parsnip River, a mining boom in the
Endako-Francois Lake belt, major reconstruction of the Northern Trans-Provincial
Highway, and inauguration of an automobile-ferry service from Prince Rupert to
ports in the Panhandle of Alaska.
The policy of offering desirable parcels of Crown land for sale or lease by auction or tender was continued in 1963.   A total of 529 lots was so offered.
The Land Inspection Division recorded 4,235 inspections through headquarters in 14 centres. Twenty-eight per cent was related to Crown-land purchases, 46
per cent to land and foreshore leases, and 26 per cent to such purposes as land-use
permits, reserves, pre-emptions, subdivision planning, and inspections required under
various sections of the Land Act.
Many of the duties of a Land Inspector demand a high degree of competence
in evaluation and planning, and to this end seven Inspectors (including the Chief
and Assistant Chief) have achieved accreditation by the Appraisal Institute of Canada.   Ten others are in the process of completing the requirements for accreditation.
Under the direction of the Surveyor-General and Director of Surveys and
Mapping, the Legal Surveys, Topographic, Geographic, and Air Divisions continue
to supply the basic topographic, cultural, and cadastral framework so necessary for
orderly Provincial growth and development.
 DD 10     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
During 1963 the Legal Surveys Division issued 921 sets of instructions to surveyors and received 582 sets of field-notes covering the survey of 893 lots. The 210
Departmental reference maps showing the day-to-day condition of land status in
the Province were maintained, and 16 of them were renewed to replace those which
had deteriorated through constant use and handling. Land Registry Offices at Victoria, Kamloops, Nelson, and Prince Rupert submitted 1,558 plans for checking by
the Division with the electronic-computer procedure.
Field work accomplished by the Legal Surveys Division included restoration
of 350 old lot corners, erection of 205 new monuments, and integration to established survey control along a new electrical transmission-line from Seton Lake to
Prince George. A total of 66 rural home-sites was laid out in subdivisions at Lantz-
ville, Sproat Lake, Brackendale, Gambier Island, Spences Bridge, Apex Mountain,
and Fort St. John, while 139 lake-front lots were surveyed at Gun Lake, Charlotte
Lake, Norman Lake, Kimberley, Moyie Lake, Riondel, and Lac le Jeune. Park-
sites, public reserves, Forest Service access roads, survey of the Parliament Buildings precinct, and 55.9 miles of highway right-of-way were also included in a busy
survey programme.
Field crews from the Topographic Division completed ground control for 26
National Topographic map-sheets in the Chilcotin and Takla Lake-Bear Lake areas.
Working from the motor-vessel " B.C. Surveyor," another crew photo-identified 282
triangulation stations between Price Island and Gardner Canal. Further refinement
to the 1962 triangulation net was done in the Lower Fraser Valley, chiefly in Surrey
and Langley Municipalities. The purpose of this last-mentioned survey programme
is to enable cadastral surveys to be integrated with the North American Datum
(1927). This is facilitated by increasing the density of control monumentation.
Steel scaffolding frames were used very effectively to raise the line of sight through
level treed areas and a giraffe-type lift was employed to locate suitable tower-sites.
Other field work included commencement of a map revision on Southern Vancouver
Island.
The Topographic Division also worked on 18 National Topographic sheets and
on 15 plans ranging in scale from 40 to 1,000 feet to 1 inch. Cadastral detail was
draughted on 37 Federal sheets at 1:50,000 scale, while 23 Provincial topographic
manuscripts at 2-inches-to-l-mile scale were also completed.
The Geographic Division prepared and reproduced seven entirely new maps
and completely revised another five sheets. By the end of 1963, status-map coverage at 1:250,000 scale was nearly complete for coastal British Columbia. Status
maps at l-inch-to-2-miles scale were also progressing satisfactorily across the Southern Interior.
In co-operation with the Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical
Names, work began on revision of the Gazetteer of British Columbia. Since 1953
approximately 4,600 new place-names have been added to Geographic Division's
files, and these will be included in the revised edition of the Gazetteer.
Early in 1963 map prices were raised commensurate with the new rates being
charged by Federal mapping agencies.
The Air Division of the Surveys and Mapping Branch prepared 16,000 square
miles of l-inch-to-20-chains interim maps, of which 2,800 squares miles were
draughted for general distribution. As required by the Forest Service inventory
programme, revision began on 3,000 square miles of l-inch-to-40-chains maps.
The last Anson aircraft was retired from aerial photographic service in June
and was replaced by a converted Beechcraft D18 (Expediter). The Department
now operates two D18 photographic aircraft.   In spite of very unsettled weather
 INTRODUCTION DD  11
during the flying season, 23,450 prints were obtained, covering 23,000 square miles
and 6,395 lineal miles.
The continuing value of maintaining an instrument service centre was demonstrated by the ability of its personnel to design and construct new shutter blades for
the O.S.C. aerial cameras.   These were unobtainable on the commercial market.
One major administrative change occurred in the Service during the year.
Responsibility for the Land Settlement Board was returned from the Department of
Agriculture to the Lands Service in June. The Board had been administered by
the first-mentioned Department since April, 1956. In 1963 the Land Settlement
Board issued title deeds to 59 properties and recorded full repayment of eight mortgages.   Collections totalled approximately $44,000.
The University Endowment Lands issued building permits valued at $171,150
and recorded revenues of $144,516. In co-operation with the Greater Vancouver
Water District, new arrangements were made for water supply and storage in the
Endowment Lands.
In respect to personnel it is notable that Mr. S. C. Hawkins, of the Lands
Branch, retired after an enviable record of more than 50 years in the public employ.
In recognition of his meritorious service, the Honourable the Minister of Lands,
Forests, and Water Resources presented Mr. Hawkins with a gold watch and scroll.
I regret to report the death in service of three valued employees—Mr. G. T.
Foran, University Endowment Lands Fire Chief, after 17 years of service; Mr. C. C.
Green, of the Legal Surveys Division, after 19 years; and Mr. D. H. Stuart, of the
Lands Branch, who had been with the Department for 24 years.
The following pages of this Annual Report contain detailed descriptions of the
work of each administrative unit in the Lands Service during 1963 and further information in tabular form.
  ACCOUNTING DIVISION
  ACCOUNTING DIVISION
DD 15
ACCOUNTING DIVISION
M. B. Maclean, B.Com., Departmental Comptroller
Again in 1963 as in 1962 there was increased activity in the leasing of Crown
lands. The number of lease accounts has increased from 5,452 at January 1, 1963,
to 6,202 at December 31, 1963, a 14-per-cent increase. The greater interest in
leasing has been partially offset by a reduction in outright purchases. Purchase
accounts decreased from 1,874 at January 1, 1963, to 1,604 at December 31, 1963.
Effective January 1, 1962, a rental charge for air photos was introduced, as
well as a nominal counter charge for examination of air photos at the library.
Neither of these charges has materially affected interest in air photos by the public.
Because the Federal Government announced that effective January 1, 1963,
the price of all National Topographic Series maps would be substantially increased,
and because a large number of the maps sold by this Department are purchased
from the Federal Government, it was necessary to revise Provincial Government
prices. The new prices were implemented February 8, 1963, and have reflected a
substantial increase in revenue.
Table 1.—Summary of Lands Service Revenue Collections for the
Year Ended December 31,1963
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc.  $1,149,650.45
Land sales       787,184.11
Sale of maps and air photos  98,007.24
Total   $2,034,841.80
Table 2.—Comparison of Revenue Collections for 10-year
Period 1954-63, Inclusive
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
Total
$1,251,767.91
1,398,313.16
1,437,130.44
1,302,065.35
1,340,045.76
1,323,877.29
1,714,220.41
1,765,207.54
1,847,457.83
2,043,841.80
$15,423,927.49
Ten-year average, $1,542,392.75.
 DD 16     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 3.—Classification of Revenue Collections for the Year Ended
December 31,1963
Land sales—
Country lands  $652,943.59
Town lots     134,031.67
Surface rights, mineral claims  96.35
Indian reserve cut-off lands  112.50
      $787,184.11
Land leases, rentals, fees, etc.—
Foreshore leases—
Booming and log storage  $316,911.29
Commercial (marinas, etc.)      264,516.59
Oyster        9,839.12
Miscellaneous   (foreshore protection, etc.)         1,731.26
  $592,998.26
Land leases—
Grazing and (or) agriculture     $76,228.87
Quarrying   (limestone,  sand  and
gravel)        37,555.73
Camp-site (lodge, fishing)          6,749.71
Home-site         1,518.24
Miscellaneous (residential, etc.)     106,215.92
     228,268.47
Land-use permits        3,153.90
Licences of occupation         4,369.00
Royalty collections     100,534.35
Easement collections—
Annual rentals       $3,854.91
Outright considerations     106,112.33
     109,967.24
Fees—
Crown grant     $10,250.00
Assignment         2,220.00
Miscellaneous (lease, search, etc.)        6,602.00
       19,072.00
Sundry  collections   (occupational  rental,   survey
charges, etc.)       91,287.14
     1,149,650.45
Sale of maps and air photos—
Legal Division    $30,283.67
Geographic Division      34,598.72
Air Division       33,124.85
  98,007.24
Gross revenue for year  $2,034,841.80
 ACCOUNTING DIVISION
DD 17
Table 4.—Comparison of Land Leases, Rentals, Fees, etc., Revenue for
10-year Period 1954-63, Inclusive
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
Total
Ten-year average, $700,507.94.
$330,397.09
425,595.79
576,331.17
472,415.55
605,229.73
668,367.70
842,413.17
1,001,071.13
933,607.66
1,149,650.45
$7,005,079.44
Table 5,
1954 |
1955 |
1956 I
1957 l
1958 I
1959 I
1960 l
1961 i
1962 I
1963 |
-Comparison of Land Sales for 10-year Period 1954—63, Inclusive
mnnHB $488,303.49
wmmmmmmm^mamm 605,469.42
mmmmmmmmmmmamm 573,976.49
mmmmmmammmm^mm 522,825.65
wmmmmmmmmmmmmmam 677,036.15
wmmmmBmmmmmmmmm 589,975.24
mmmammmmmmmmmmmmm 806,723.54
wmmmmammmmmmmmmmmmmm 703,705.71
wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 836,270.32
wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 787,184.11
Total
$6,591,470.12
Ten-year average, $659,147.01.
  LANDS BRANCH
 THE LANDS BRANCH
At the time of the Fraser River gold-rush in 1858 the demand for land in British
Columbia was greatly intensified and pre-emptions predated surveys. Within four years
254 pre-emptors had taken up more than 50,000 acres of land. To facilitate the transfer
of real estate and provide for the registration of titles, the Land Registry Act was passed
in 1860. The Government of the Province of British Columbia was now in the real-
estate business in a big way; the more than 366,000 square miles of land and water that
constitutes British Columbia was the real estate in question.
With the entrance of British Columbia into Confederation in 1871, the demand for
land quickened to a rush, and over the next thirty years the land-settler (and the promoter) succeeded the gold-miner in importance. Railroads were built and land grants
passed, cities came into being, and companies became established. Land was at the core
of all developments.
The task of land administration became very heavy and necessitated the formation
of a Department of Lands in 1908. In 1912 a Forest Branch was included in the Department of Lands. Today the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources exercises
control of more than 90 per cent of the surface of British Columbia.
How does the Lands Branch fit into the total organization of the British Columbia
Lands Service of today? The relation may be expressed briefly. The Lands Branch
has jurisdiction in matters pertaining to the disposition of Crown land, and is
charged with so administering and disposing of the land that the general welfare,
present and future, of the Province must be protected at all times.
When an individual, or group, desires to purchase or lease Crown land, the application is directed to the Superintendent of Lands, head of the Lands Branch. His authority governs the following matters:—
Sale, lease, and pre-emption of Crown lands for such purposes as agricultural,
industrial, commercial, and home-sites.
Preparation and issuance of Crown grants under the Land Act and the Mineral
Act.
Preparation and issuance of right-of-way easements for power, telephone, pipe
lines, etc.
Reservation of suitable Crown lands and foreshore for national defence, use
and enjoyment of the public, forestry experimentation, fisheries research
work, highways, etc.
Granting railway rights-of-way under various Statutes.
Protection of historic sites from alienation.
Reservation and conveying of Crown lands for such purposes as school-sites,
cemeteries, and fair grounds.
Leasing of land and foreshore for such varied purposes as wharf-sites, booming-
grounds, canneries, oyster and other mollusc fisheries, and for boat-houses,
quarry-sites,  cattle-ranching, trappers' cabins,  ship-building,  and  aircraft
bases.
To perform these and other functions efficiently, the Lands Branch works in close
co-operation with a great number of other agencies, such as municipal and city administrations, town-planning authorities, the British Columbia Forest Service, the Water Resources Service, the Surveys and Mapping Branch within the British Columbia Lands
Service, and all the departments in the Government of the Province, notably Highways,
Education, Attorney-General, and Agriculture.
Outside the Provincial departments there is much business transacted with Federal
departments, such as the Department of National Defence, the Veterans' Land Settlement
Act administration, the Public Works Department, and the Indian Affairs Branch of the
Department of Citizenship and Immigration.
Direct service to the people of British Columbia is the first duty of the Lands Branch
and this takes the bulk of the time of the Lands Branch personnel. Associated with this
prime duty is the important function of the maintenance of the records, which in many
cases are the only ones in British Columbia showing the correct legal status of the surface of the Province.
 ca
  LANDS BRANCH
DD 23
LANDS BRANCH
D. Borthwick, B.S.A., B.Ed., A.A.C.I., Superintendent of Lands
The expanding industrial development of the Province has attracted new interest from prospective settlers in the rest of Canada and in the United States, and, as
a result, activities in the Lands Branch reached an all-time high in 1963. Applications received increased from 6,345 in 1962 to 7,011 in 1963, or an increase of
10.4 per cent. Land Act collections increased from $1,769,877 to $1,936,834 or
9.4 per cent. Incoming Lands Branch mail increased from 30,351 pieces in 1962
to 32,133 pieces in 1963. The acreage of land leased from the Crown increased
from 186,806 acres in 1962 to 341,770 acres in 1963.
The Peace River District has again proven to be the most active agricultural
settlement area in the Province. A large tract of land lying north and east of the
Beatton River and comprising approximately 400,000 acres which had formerly
been held under reserve was opened for settlement. The policy instituted last year
whereby prospective settlers could lease a maximum of 1,280 acres of predominantly
arable land for agricultural and (or) ranch headquarters purposes has met with the
general approval of most settlers. These leases will be reviewed in three years time
to ensure that the lessee is developing the land. It is hoped this policy will stimulate
bona fide land settlement and eliminate the practice of leasing large tracts of land
without following through with a concrete plan of development.
During the past year the Lands Branch has continued its policy of laying out
Crown subdivisions in the unorganized areas of the Province where public interest
in such lands for summer-home site purposes has become apparent. As in the past,
the subdivisions have been laid out by legal survey and the necessary access roads
constructed prior to offering the lots for lease by public competition. Subdivisions
of this nature were established at Norman Lake, Riondel, Gun Lake, and Lake Windermere.   Other subdivisions are now in the planning stage.
In the early part of 1963 Departmental officials undertook a review of the unit
rentals levied on grazing lands throughout the Province. It was noted that most of
the grazing land held under lease tenure fell in the third-class land category, on which
a flat per acre rental charge was levied, even though the grazing potential of the land
ranged from poor to excellent. In order to fix an annual charge commensurate with
the grazing potential of the land, the rentals were put on a sliding scale and related
to carrying capacity.
The establishment of a pulp-mill at Prince George dictated the need for an
accurate cruise of the standing pulpwood on Crown lands from Prince George south
to Soda Creek. In order that the Forest Service could have an opportunity to undertake this survey without having to deal with a constantly changing land inventory,
it became necessary to restrict the disposition of Crown lands in this region. It is
anticipated that the cruise will be completed and the results analysed by the summer
of 1964, at which time the policy with respect to land alienations in this area will
be reviewed.
During the past year the Department has continued its policy of revising and
rewriting the Land Series bulletins that have been published to acquaint prospective
settlers with pertinent features of various districts in British Columbia. The Fort
Fraser-Fort George bulletin was rewritten in order to keep abreast of this rapidly
developing area. In addition, the Peace River and Vancouver Island bulletins were
revised and brought up to date.
 DD 24     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
A brief summary of the activities of the various sections of the Administration
Division of the Lands Branch is set out hereunder:—
Lease Section.—The work load of this Section has increased sharply over
the past year. Lease applications rose from 2,246 in 1962 to 2,719
in 1963, or an increase of 21 per cent. It is anticipated that this
trend will continue in view of the Department's agricultural policy of
encouraging alienation by lease rather than purchase until the bona
fides of the applicant have been demonstrated through actual development of the land.
Purchase Section.—There was also an increase in the number of purchase
applications, although the increase was only 5 per cent. This increase would appear to be commensurate with the normal expansion
of the Province.
Crown Grants Section.—A decrease of about 3.6 per cent in the number
of Crown grants issued in the past year appears to be a direct reflection on the policy of encouraging lease tenure in the initial stages of
development of Crown lands. The number of Crown grants issued
last year was 1,042, as compared to 1,081 in 1962.
Pre-emption and Reserve Section.—The number of applications for preemptions and reserves dropped from 709 in 1962 to 594 in 1963.
However, the number of inquiries dealt with by this Section rose from
2,411 in 1962 to 2,571 in 1963.
Status Section.—The number of statuses completed by this Section decreased from 18,671 in 1962 to 17,710 in 1963. However, upon
reviewing the status work undertaken it was noted that many of the
statuses prepared involved extensive areas.
Easement Section.—The number of easements granted in 1963 increased
by approximately 12.5 per cent. It is anticipated that during the
coming year the activity of this Section will show a marked increase
as there is a backlog of one particular type of easement awaiting approval when the actual form on which they are to issue has been
resolved with the companies and agencies concerned.
General Activity.—During 1963 a total of 31 acreage parcels was offered
for sale by tender, of which 18 were sold, realizing the sum of
$21,031. Sixteen parcels of land suitable for agricultural purposes
were offered for lease by tender.
Nineteen public auction sales of Crown land were held during
the year. A total of 230 parcels was offered, of which 88 were sold
at the time of auction, realizing $84,965. Eleven public auctions of
leases were held, involving 233 waterfront properties and 19 agricultural parcels. At time of auction 132 parcels were leased.
The following tables indicate in detail the work carried out by the various sections of the Lands Branch.
Table 1.—Country Land Sales, 1963
Acres
Surveyed     85,994
Unsurveyed     29,442
Total  115,436
 LANDS BRANCH
Table 2.—Certificates of Purchase Issued, 1963
Land Recording District
Alberni                            ..   .               - -      	
DI
Total
       10
Atlin                                         	
Cranbrook                                          ..          - _      ..        .   .
     18
Fernie                                                    .       -             - — -
       7
Fort Fraser                 _     -       	
     81
Fort George                _ - -        -
     89
Fort St. John               	
  113
Golden ...                     ..   ... 	
       7
Kamloops                                	
     25
Kaslo _ _ .               .     	
       6
Lillooet —
     21
Nanaimo.                _ _       .   ■	
     17
Nelson
     29
New Westminster                                           -           -
12
Osoyoos .                                  	
       1
Pouce Coupe       .    .          ■        	
     84
Prince Rupert                                                  -                    .   -
32
Quesnel ...                               _ . 	
     43
Revelstoke       . . ~     	
       8
Similkameen              .        .
     23
Smithers _               _   _	
     50
Tel eeranh Creek     ..   _ _ __          __ _ 	
Vancouver        ■         ...   -..
     26
Victoria          	
       5
Williams Lake    ___- - - 	
     66
Total _     	
_      773
Table 3.—Town Lots Sold, 1963
Town                                                                                              Lots
Alberni ..                                _ _   ..      2
Value
$400.00
Barkerville                                                    -                    9
1,355.00
Barriere  _                                                                      2
490.00
Brighton                                                    . _   .               4
500.00
Chilliwack                                          2
71.00
Coalmont           .          20
1,390.00
Cumberland -                     1
50.00
Elko                                               4
120.00
Endako  125
Evelyn Station          21
5,440.00
1,050.00
Extension        _ -         ..     _   _ _    .      2
200.00
Fernie _ __                                   ,. „     ...       .    37
659.00
Fort Fraser  ____        __      30
2,340.00
Fort Nelson ,.    _    ,      .     ■     . ...      1
440.00
Fort St. James    .    _ __        1
10.00
Fraser Lake        ,      13
425.00
Golden        3
800.00
Graham Island   „                                          . .       22
765.00
Hazelton           1
40.00
 DD 26     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 3.—Town Lots Sold, 1963—Continued
Town
Hope 	
Hosmer Station
Houston	
Ladysmith
Midway      26
Moyie	
New Hazelton	
Port Clements	
Port Edward	
Port Simpson	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Princeton	
Queen Charlotte
Revelstoke	
Rosebery 	
Smithers 	
Sidney 	
Slocan	
South Fort George
South Wellington ...
Stewart 	
Summit Lake	
Telegraph Creek
Union Bay	
Vancouver 	
Vanderhoof	
Wells 	
Wilmer	
Windermere Lake
Winter Harbour ...
Miscellaneous	
Totals
Lots
Value
5
$750.00
3
100.00
6
1,100.00
1
50.00
26
2,750.00
4
310.00
59
3,500.00
1
50.00
3
725.00
2
180.00
47
40,740.00
13
4,135.00
1
270.00
159
6,215.00
24
5,700.00
23
635.00
6
975.00
6
10.00
2
60.00
7
3,650.00
2
250.00
21
3,995.00
1
515.00
1
50.00
9
1,480.00
1
6,000.00
2
140.00
10
1,400.00
21
630.00
1
710.00
22
2,275.00
92
15,934.00
881
$121,829.00
 LANDS BRANCH
DD 27
Land—
Agriculture
Table 4.—New Leases Issued, 1963
Number
      104
Hay and grazing (pasture and hay-cutting) 365
Quarrying (sand, gravel, limestone, etc.)  13
Homesite (section 78, Land Act)  5
Residential  328
Miscellaneous   (resorts,   service-stations,
camp-sites, mill-sites, etc.)  73
Foreshore—
Booming, log storage, log-dumping, etc  84
Oyster and shellfish  8
Industrial (canneries, mill-sites, wharves,
etc.)  10
Quarrying (sand, gravel from river-beds) 12
Commercial (boat rentals, marinas, marine
service-stations, etc.)  23
Miscellaneous   (private   wharves,   boat-
houses, etc.)   26
Totals   1,051
Acreage
46,819.97
284,205.84
1,229.41
120.74
570.21
6,187.50
1,517.56
104.75
108.58
201.28
131.46
573.50
341,770.80
Table 5.—Temporary Tenure Leases Renewed, 1963
Number
Acreage
125
18,146.64
Number
Acreage
Table 6.—Land-use Permits Issued, 1963
15
55.95
Number
Acreage
Table 7.—Licences to Occupy Issued, 1963
13
272.67
Table 8.—Assignments Approved, 1963
Leases, land-use permits, licences of occupation _'__.
408
 DD 28     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 9.—Easements Granted, 1963
Foreshore
Submarine cables..
Sewer pipe-line	
Totals	
Radio and television sites..
Pipe-lines (oil and gas)	
Pipe-lines and well-sites	
Compressor-station	
Water pipe-line	
Power-lines	
Ground-bed sites	
Railway spur-
Land
Gas pipe-line and flare-pit..
Radio-site and power-line _
Flare-pit sites	
Well-sites	
Radio-site and road-
Totals _
Licences of Occupation
Radio-sites (unsurveyed)  — 	
Grand totals  	
11
24
17
1
2
3
3
1
1
2
3
1
1
70
77
0.580
2.000
2.580
234.973
63.250
2.160
3.880
0.420
0.458
19.400
4.750
3.630
335.501
3.530
4.810
8.340
53.564
1,680.274
656.280
5.000
84.360
102.850
0.720
3.700
152.560
50.360
8.620
29.240
45.453
332.921        |   2,872.981
1.1101
2,882.431
1 Approximate.
In line with current Departmental policy, 66 letters of consent for the construction of access roads were
issued during the year.
Table 10.—Crown Grants Issued, 1963
Purchases (country lands)
Purchases (town lots) 	
Pre-emptions 	
Surface rights (Mineral Act)
Public Schools Act	
Veterans' Land Settlement Act
Home-site leases	
Pacific Great Eastern Railway .
Supplementary timber grants	
Miscellaneous 	
Total
685
255
36
3
10
6
9
11
2
25
Certified copies of Crown grants issued, 4.
1,042
 LANDS BRANCH
DD 29
Table 11.—Crown Grants Issued for Past Ten Years
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
Total.
1,276
1,498
1,518
1,426
1,043
1,471
1,399
1,074
1,081
1,042
12,828
Ten-year average, 1,282.
Table 12.—Total Area Deeded by Crown Grant, 1963
Purchases (country lands)
Pre-emptions 	
Surface rights (Mineral Act)
Public Schools Act	
Veterans' Land Settlement Act
Home-site leases	
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company
Supplementary timber grants	
Miscellaneous	
Acres
68,833.80
5,499.67
66.36
15.52
960.00
126.94
910.91
166.04
775.22
Total
> 77,354.46
 DD 30     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 13.—Pre-emption Records, 1963
Land Recording District
Pre-emptions
Applications
Received
Applications
Allowed
Cancelled
C. of I.
Issued
Alberni.
Atlta-	
Cranbrook..
Fernie —
Fort Fraser (Burns Lake)	
Fort George (Prince George)..
Fort St. John  	
Golden— 	
Kamloops   	
Kaslo  	
Lillooet (Clinton)
Nanaimo 	
Nelson 	
New Westminster	
Osoyoos (Vernon)..
Pouce Coupe	
Prince Rupert 	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Similkameen (Penticton)..
Smithers	
Telegraph Creek (Prince Rupert)
Vancouver 	
Victoria    _ _ 	
Williams Lake	
Totals..
5
30
37
4
1
57
1
10
147
1
9
18
49
2
79
1
6
21
40
4
1
1
74
1
2
17
32
Table 14.—Reserves, 1963
Applications
Received
Use, recreation, and enjoyment of the public  146
British Columbia Department of Highways (rights-of-
way, gravel pits, bridge-sites, etc.)	
Federal Government (defence purposes, wharf-sites, etc.)
British Columbia Forest Service (Ranger stations, grazing, radio-sites, reforestation, etc.)	
Miscellaneous (Game Branch, water-power projects, garbage dumps, school-sites, cemeteries, etc.)	
156
27
59
59
Reserves
Completed
208
145
47
57
71
Totals
447
528
 LANDS BRANCH
DD 31
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 DD 32     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
LAND INSPECTION DIVISION
L. D. Fraser, B.Sc.A., P.Ag., A.A.C.I., Chief Land Inspector
The year 1963 was one of great activity in the Inspection Division, and the
trend for increasing examination work continued. At the end of the year, 1,117
inspections were outstanding and are carried through to the new year. This carryover is a result of a record 4,781 examination requests received by this Division.
With this were 571 requests carried over from 1962. This Division's field staff
examined 4,235 requests, which was slightly more than last year, but represents a
probable maximum work load for the existing staff. Coupled with the increase in
applications is an increase in the size and complexity of the land to be examined.
For example, it has been ascertained in the Pouce Coupe district that the average
lease application encompassed 200 acres in 1958 and increased to 400 acres in 1962.
In the Prince George district the size of the average application increased from 90
acres in 1959 to 300 acres in 1962.
This Division again examined properties and submitted appraisal reports for
many other Government departments and agencies. The total number was somewhat less than last year, involving only 36 inspections. However, the hours of work
required for each examination were far above the average devoted to most inspections. This is due to the complexity of the appraisals concerned and the fact that
up to one or two weeks might be required to complete one report. Detailed appraisals were made for the Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company, Capital City
Planning Board, Department of Recreation and Conservation, Attorney-General's
Department, Department of Health and Welfare, Southern Okanagan Lands Project,
Land Settlement Board, and Veterans' Land Act.
A noticeable increase in activity in the Smithers district is due in part to a large
influx of American citizens, occasioned by the opening of the Prince Rupert-Alaska
ferry run. In addition, many applications have been submitted for grazing leases
by established ranchers in a desire to consolidate their holdings in the face of outside competition. It is also apparent that many speculative applications for land
are being received in anticipation of the possible establishment of a pulp-mill at
Houston.
A similar increase in activity in the Prince George district is due, in general, to
the continually expanding economy of this part of the Province. Specifically, however, the promise of a railway to connect to Fort St. James has undoubtedly been
responsible for increasing the interest in land in that vicinity. The Francois Lake
and Endako areas are experiencing a mining boom, with the resultant effect of demands for land.
An increase in the work load in the Kamloops district, amounting to 32 per
cent over last year, is largely attributable to an increase in grazing and home-site
purchases. In addition, policy changes affecting grazing lease rentals have resulted
in the necessity for examining a large volume of leases as they come up for review.
Both Land Inspectors in this district assisted in other areas in an effort to combat
the increasing backlog, but by so doing a backlog of inspections was allowed to
accumulate in the Kamloops district.
The anticipated increase in demand for land in the Nelson district materialized
to the extent of increasing the work load by 8 per cent over last year. There has
been a great improvement in the main highways in this region during the past two
years. The opening of the Golden-Revelstoke section of the Trans-Canada Highway, the completion of the Christina Lake-Kinnaird Provincial Highway, the com-
   LANDS BRANCH
DD 35
pletion of the Trail-Salmo Highway, and the improvement to the Nelson-Nakusp
Highway have all been of great importance to the economy of this district.
The opening of the Golden-Revelstoke Highway has also been responsible for
an increased activity in the Kelowna area. This activity has been evenly distributed
throughout the district, but foreshore and lake-front examinations continue to be
the most time-consuming type of inspection.
A new co-operative cattle market at Cranbrook is assisting this industry in the
East Kootenay. Creston is becoming increasingly important as a supply source for
grain and winter feed for the cattle industry. At present nearly all Crown range in
the Kootenays is stocked to capacity, requiring careful scrutiny of all applications
for land.
As mentioned last year, there is still a very definite trend toward the acquisition of both large and small ranches in the Williams Lake and Clinton areas, and
the lumber industry in the district is moving toward a higher utilization of wood
products by the installation of chipping-mills. At present one company is shipping
chips via the Pacific Great Eastern Railway to the Coast, and other similar installations are in the planning stage.
In the Peace River area most inspections require the examination of lands for
agricultural development. A large proportion of these applications are received
from local residents who desire to expand their existing holdings. However, many
new settlers, principally from Alberta, Saskatchewan, and the United States, are
becoming established here.
There is a noticeable increase in interest to lease or purchase summer-home
sites in the Peace River area. To meet some of this anticipated demand, consideration is being given to a Crown subdivision of home-site lots along the south shore
of Moberly Lake.
In the Courtenay district the trend is toward increased development of the north
end of Vancouver Island. The promise of improved and new roads has provided
the impetus for this activity. The number of applications for oyster leases has
increased in this district due to the large volume of mature " wild " oysters to be
found along our coast and the necessity of placing these oysters on a registered
lease before selling them.
The work load in the Vancouver area has remained relatively unchanged from
last year. The proposed Squamish-Pemberton Highway is still not completed, but
will undoubtedly have the effect of increasing interest in this area when the road is
completed. Little change is anticipated throughout the remainder of the Vancouver
district, and the concentration of work centred on home-site and foreshore applications.
Fifty per cent of applications in the Quesnel area were received from local
ranchers and farmers desiring to increase their holdings. Approximately 25 per
cent of all applications were from settlers coming into this area from other parts of
British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and California. Only 15 per cent of the
applications were from local residents acquiring farm land, and the remaining 10 per
cent were made up of applications for summer-cabin sites, land-use permits, rental
reviews, and reserves.   It is anticipated that this trend will continue.
STAFF
During the past year several changes were made in the location and employment of field staff. Mr. D. Havard, of Smithers, resigned, effective May 15, 1963,
and was replaced by Mr. H. Gavin as Land Inspector 2, effective May 13, 1963.
Mr. Gavin transferred to this Division from the British Columbia Forest Service,
 DD 36     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
where he had been employed as Forester 1. Mr. D. I. Snider, Land Inspector 2,
transferred from Prince George to Kamloops, effective March 1, 1963, to replace
Mr. G. Wilson, who had transferred to Vancouver the preceding November, 1962.
Mr. Snider was replaced in Prince George by Mr. G. A. Rhoades, Land Inspector 2,
who transferred from Clinton, effective March 7, 1963. The vacancy left in the
Clinton office was subsequentiy filled by the employment of Mr. M. F. Robson,
effective May 6, 1963.
This Division now has 18 Land Inspectors stationed in various districts. The
Assistant Chief Land Inspector is responsible for the field work in the Victoria
district.
Two staff changes occurred in the Victoria office. Mr. R. Goodchild was promoted to Clerk 3 and transferred to the Lands General Office, effective August 15,
1963. He was replaced by Mr. J. Dick, effective October 16, 1963. Mrs. E. Leask
left this Division in August of this year, to be replaced by Miss J. Knudson, effective
August 12, 1963.
TRAINING
Four Land Inspectors, together with the Chief Land Inspector and Assistant
Chief Land Inspector, are now accredited appraisers with the Appraisal Institute
of Canada.
One Land Inspector has completed all requirements but has not yet received
his accreditation. Ten Land Inspectors are in various stages of working toward the
completion of requirements. Three Land Inspectors have had no training in appraisal matters as yet, but it is hoped that these three can be started on the Appraisal
I Course next year.
One Land Inspector has successfully completed the Executive Administration
Course sponsored by the Civil Service Commission. Two are now in their second
year, and the Assistant Chief Land Inspector is now completing the third and last
year.
STATISTICS
Table 1 represents a comparison, on a year-to-year basis, of the volume of field
work completed by the Land Inspection Division for the years 1959 to 1963, inclusive. Table 2 presents a summary of the number and types of inspections completed
in the Province by this Division during 1963.
Table 1.—Land Inspectior
, 1959
-63
Land Inspection District
]
Examinations Made during-
Outstanding at End of-
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
259
187
428
154
216
201
175
304
382
141
225
184
112
276
59
249
219
435
163
226
221
164
330
395
205
215
258
119
280
85
234
199
580
229
198
290
133
436
503
195
217
287
129
389
56
186
187
584
277
160
211
177
512
474
218
290
219
100
457
98
139
212
593
329
166
252
110
513
480
213
279
240
216
421
72
31
29
52
12
39
54
8
42
66
23
33
12
11
50
28
40
63
10
24
38
2
4
51
28
33
16
3
121
41
18
60
8
25
19
1
44
67
24
66
11
2
68
16
33
100
22
13
42
12
30
73
43
116
19
3
49
48
Courtenay    	
Fort St. John          	
30
156
Kamloops  —
78
28
43
7
87
183
58
Smithers  	
Vancouver 	
Victoria 	
279
9
17
61
B C.F.S. and others     	
33
Totals..	
3,307
3,564
4,075
4,150
4,235
462
461
454
571
1,117
 LANDS BRANCH
DD 37
Table 2.—Types of Inspections, 1963
Purchases—
Agriculture (other than grazing) 	
Access (roads, etc.)
Commercial (resorts, service-stations, hotels, airfields, etc.)-.
Community (cemeteries, church-sites, parking areas, etc.).___
Grazing (pasture, range)	
Home-sites (permanent)
Industrial (mill-sites, power-sites, manufacturing plants, etc.)
Summer-home or camp sites	
Wood-lots or tree-farms	
Purchase Crown F.S.	
Leases—
Land—
Agriculture (other than grazing)
Commercial (resorts, service-stations, hotels, airfields,
etc.) 	
Community (parks, cemeteries, dump-sites, etc.)	
Fur-farming	
Grazing (pasture, range, hay-cutting, etc.) 	
Home-sites (section 78 of the Land Act) 	
Home-sites (permanent, other than section 78 of the
Land Act) 	
Industrial (mill-sites, power-sites, manufacturing plants,
etc.) 	
Summer-home or camp sites	
Quarrying (sand, gravel, limestone, diatomaceous earth,
etc.) 	
Reviews (rental and (or) diligent use) 	
Foreshore—
Booming and log storage or log-dumping	
Commercial    (boat   rentals,   marine   service-stations,
wharves, etc.) 	
Industrial (mill-sites, canneries, factory-sites, wharves,
etc.)  :	
Quarrying (sand and gravel from river-beds) _
Oyster and shellfish
Private (floats, boat-houses)
Reviews (rentals and (or) diligent use)
Land-use permits	
Licences of occupation	
Easements and (or) rights-of-way
Pre-emptions—
Applications
Annual inspections (including applications for Crown grant)
Subdivisions—
Valuations 	
Survey inspections	
Plans cancellation	
Proposals (lake-shore, residential, etc.)
480
13
72
10
206
307
31
70
1
3
467
38
24
398
17
71
11
209
35
245
109
57
26
5
22
13
191
42
15
7
47
167
26
5
2
18
 DD 38     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table 2.—Types of Inspections, 1963—Continued
Reserves—
Grazing   14
Gravel pits  1
Recreational   61
Others   5
Veterans' Land Act  2
Land Settlement Board—
Classifications  3
Valuations   4
Doukhobor lands  5
Southern Okanagan Lands Project  2
Pacific Great Eastern Railway  13
Department of Social Welfare      	
Other agencies—Capital City Planning Board, Department of
Recreation and Conservation, and Attorney-General's Department   4
Miscellaneous inspections—
Assignments   2
Delinquent accounts  19
Escheats Act  2
Lake reconnaissance  17
Land-use surveys  30
Land values (current market values)   37
Protests j  15
Section 53 (2) of Land Act (verifying improvements)   410
Section 65 of Land Act (free grants)       	
Section 78 of Land Act (re compliance with provisions of)  25
Section 130 of Land Act (lands vested in Crown under Taxation Act)   2
Section 131b of Land Act (cases of doubt regarding inclusion
of body of water in Crown grant)   8
Trespass (land)   15
Trespass (water)  48
Quieting Titles Act  23
Others—Land exchange, site improvement, bridge inspection 8
Total   4,235
Included in this table are 72 inspections completed by the British Columbia
Forest Service and Department of Finance in the more remote areas of the Province.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
 THE   SURVEYS   AND   MAPPING   BRANCH
The framework of maps and surveys so necessary for the orderly development and
settlement of British Columbia is provided through the Surveys and Mapping Branch.
That such scientific foundations were necessary even in the earliest days is shown by the
fact that in 1851 the position of Colonial Surveyor for the young Crown Colony of
Vancouver Island was created. In more than 100 years which have passed since loseph
Despard Pemberton was appointed first Surveyor-General, British Columbia has expanded
immensely in all spheres of human endeavour. Much of the foundation for the way of
life we have in British Columbia today rests on the reliability of our basic surveys. As
British Columbia has progressed through time, so the surveys and maps of the Province
have increased in magnitude and complexity.
It is the responsibility of the Surveys and Mapping Branch, through the Boundary
Commissioner, to establish and maintain co-operatively the boundaries between this
Province and the other adjacent Provinces and Territories of Canada. Within the Province, the Branch has established and is ever extending a basic network of triangulation
surveys which are fundamental to determining geographical locations and co-ordinating
property boundaries. The surveying procedures vary according to the intended purposes.
Topographic surveys are constantly improving the portrayal of various physical features.
Cadastral (legal) surveys, on the other hand, delineate the parcels of Crown lands subject
to alienation under the Land Act. Finally, it is necessary to show on published maps the
combined survey effort in order to give a visual account of the position of land alienation
and geographic features of British Columbia. Maps must satisfy a wide range of uses,
whether it be by the sportsman searching for an untapped valley or virgin lake, the homesteader seeking unsettled lands, or the industrialist planning new ways and new places to
develop the resources of this Province.
So much for the uses of maps and surveys and their necessity. Also interesting is the
great variety of techniques and equipment which must support our complex surveying and
mapping organization. This includes photography from aircraft using precise cameras
calibrated to less than a thousandth of an inch, modern optical surveyors' theodolites
which read directly to seconds of arc, other instruments such as the tellurometer (a
distance-measuring device which operates on a principal similar to radar), and plotting
devices which are capable of precise mapping directly from aerial photographs. Helicopters and other aircraft speed surveyors to the remotest locations. Surveying is also
expanding into the realm of electronic computers which can process the contents of field-
notes in seconds compared with hours by manual methods. In all these ways, the science
of surveying and mapping continues to serve the people by keeping pace with their needs
and with Ihe continual technological advances of our age.
The following is a brief summary of the functions of the various divisions of the
Surveys and Mapping Branch:—
/. Administration.—General co-ordination of the four divisions of the Branch, being
Legal Surveys, Geographic, Topographic, and Air; delineation and maintenance of
boundaries under the Provincial Boundary Commissioner—namely, (a) Alberta-British
Columbia Boundary and (b) British Columbia-Yukon-Northwest Territories Boundary;
interdepartmental and intergovernmental liaison, such as the Fraser River Board.
//. Legal Surveys Division.—Regulations for surveys under the various Provincial
Acts, such as Land, Land Registry, Mineral, Petroleum and Natural Gas; instructions to
British Columbia land surveyors regarding surveys of Crown lands and subsequent check
of field-notes and plans of same; preparation and custody of official plans; preparation
and maintenance of Departmental reference maps, mineral reference maps, and composite
(cadastral) maps; processing for status of all applications concerning Crown lands; field
surveys of Crown lands, highway rights-of-way, etc.; preparation of legal descriptions;
operation of blue-print and photostat sections; computational scrutiny of certain land
registry subdivision plans; inspection surveys; restoration surveys.
///. Geographic Division.—Map compilation, drawing and negative engraving, editing, and reproduction; map checking, distribution, geographical naming—Gazetteer of
British Columbia; field and culture surveys for preparation of land bulletins and maps;
preparation of legal descriptions for and delineation of administrative boundaries; compilation and distribution of annual Lands Service Report; trigonometric computation and
recording of geographic co-ordinates; general liaison between this Department and Federal and other mapping agencies on exchange of survey and mapping data; checking well-
site survey plans under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act.
IV. Topographic Division.—Propagation of field survey control—namely, triangulation, traverses, and photo-topographic control; operation of Beaver float-plane and M.V.
" B.C. Surveyor "; helicopters on charter; compilation and fair drawing of manuscripts
for standard topographic mapping; special field control for composite and photogram-
metric mapping and other special projects; precise mapping from aerial photographs
through the use of the most modern plotting-machines.
V. Air Division.—Aerial photographic operations involving maintenance and operation of three aircraft; photographic processing, air-photo distribution, and Provincial airphoto library; compilation of interim base maps, primarily for the forest inventory;
air-photo control propagation; instrument-shop for the repair, maintenance, and development of technical equipment.
  DD 42     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
G. S. Andrews, M.B.E., B.Sc.F., P.Eng., B.C.R.F., B.C.L.S., F.R.G.S.,
Director, Surveyor-General, and Boundaries Commissioner
This report for the Surveys and Mapping Branch repeats the usual form of
detailed narrative and statistical submissions for each of the four divisions in following pages, from which the Deputy Minister has selected synoptic highlights for his
over-all review of the Lands Service. This arrangement leaves me free to deal here
with selected topics of special import in Branch activities, and the impact thereof on
the well-being of British Columbia.
INTEGRATION OF SURVEYS
A year ago the subject of survey integration was discussed at some length.
The advantages of co-ordinating all surveys to an accurate well-monumented control
network were mentioned—namely, the detection and remedy of old conflicting
survey evidence, the reliable perpetuation of the true positions of surveyed boundaries, and the gradual elimination of costly re-establishment operations where original survey markers have been lost or destroyed. In addition to remarks about the
operational aspects of setting up the control monuments for survey integration, the
need of statutory authority for it was indicated.
During the current year a field programme of control establishment in the
Lower Fraser Valley begun in 1962 was continued with good results, emphasis
being placed, for the time being, on the areas of Surrey and New Westminster, with
a view to early initiation of survey integration in these areas. The lack, due to short
supply, of new tellurometer (MRA 3) equipment, which facilitates measurements
of shorter distances (500 to 5,000 feet), prevented the full breakdown of control
into the ultimate density required. Anticipating the early availability of this new
equipment, it is hoped to finalize the control work in the said areas next year. Meanwhile the municipal administration of Surrey, through its engineering department,
has shown commendable participation by constructing some 200 control monuments
as a winter work programme. These monuments will be in readiness for precise
co-ordination during the next field season with the MRA 3 tellurometer.
Attention has also been given to the statutory aspects of survey integration.
With valuable suggestions from professional land surveyors, both in government service and outside, legal officers in the Attorney-General's Department, including the
Registrar of Titles, and with the support of the Honourable the Minister of this
Department, a draft amendment to the Official Surveys Act is in near final shape,
for presentation in Bill form to the next session of the Legislature. Rumours of
these activities have penetrated interested circles in Eastern Canada and have engendered interest to the point that the writer has been invited to present a paper on
the subject of survey integration in British Columbia to a joint convention of Ontario
land surveyors and the Canadian Institute of Surveying, in Ottawa during February,
1964.
ELECTRONIC DATA-PROCESSING
The installation of the 1620 I.B.M. computer by the Provincial Government in
place of the former 650 has improved the scope and efficiency of computational
operations of this Branch. Practically all our " Surmap " 650 programmes have
been revamped for the 1620, with the advantages offered by it.   A new programme
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH DD 43
for a more sophisticated adjustment of elevation data of our control net in Northeast British Columbia has been applied with good effect. A programme for application to hydraulic investigations by the Water Resources Service in the Okanagan
Valley has also been developed by our surveyor specialized in this field. Further
applications for the computer are foreseen.
A further expansion in the data-processing field was the installation of a Wild
EK 5 co-ordinate printer with hook-up to a Friden flexowriter for automatic derivation of machine x, y, and z co-ordinates on the Wild A 7 autograph precision airphoto plotter. This automation greatly accelerates co-ordinate extraction from the
plotter, and eliminates human fatigue and error in reading vernier scales. The
equipment, activated by a push button when the floating mark is positioned on any
required point in the stereo model, produces almost instantly both a tabular and a
punch-tape record of point identity and its co-ordinates.
BRITISH COLUMBIA-YUKON-NORTHWEST TERRITORIES
BOUNDARY
Field survey operations to locate and mark the British Columbia-Yukon-
Northwest Territories Boundary along the 60th parallel of north latitude terminated
in 1959, the westernmost boundary monument, No. 187, having been established
the previous year some AVz miles west of the Alsek River crossing. From Monument No. 187 west to its intersection with the International Boundary between
Canada and Alaska near Mount Jette, the 60th parallel traverses such rugged and
ice-bound terrain that further efforts to locate and mark it were considered neither
practical nor economic at this time (see frontispiece photo of this Annual Report).
Office work arising from the physical demarcation of this boundary has been
steadily in progress, but it comprises a voluminous and painstaking effort. An atlas
of 36 map-sheets at a scale 1:63,360 covering the whole length of the boundary as
surveyed was completed and bound during the present year, but must await publication until the formal report of the Boundary Commission has also been completed,
submitted to, accepted, and confirmed by the principals concerned, being the Federal
and Provincial Governments. Finalization of the Commission's report is anticipated
during the coming year, the draft being practically complete now. Only final editing, selection of illustrations, and printing remain to be done. One difficulty in this
task has been the necessity for the Commissioners, due to other official preoccupations, to delegate, on an opportunist basis, much of the work to their staff members,
who, in their turn, are under pressures of other urgent work.
THE DEVILLE AIR-PHOTO PLOTTER
The production in this Branch of a new simple stereoplotter for air-photo
mapping was reported a year ago, with reasons for naming it in honour of Dr.
Edouard G. Deville, Surveyor-General of Dominion Lands (circa 1885-1924) and
instigator of the science of photogrammetry in Canada. This instrument has now
had a year's operational trial, with generally gratifying results, which reflect credit
on the staff members responsible for its final design and.construction. In addition
to plotting the topography (drainage and contours) on several standard map-sheets,
it has been valuable for revision and gap-filling operations on maps previously made
in whole or in part with other equipment. Its capability of using normal non-
distortion paper prints, in place of expensive glass diapositives, has been a special
 DD 44     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
advantage. Like most infants, the new plotter has exhibited a few unforeseen characteristics, many good and some requiring correction. One of these is that its optical
normalization and calibration are quite critical, and, if not rigorously maintained,
may cause errors, especially in elevation. On the other hand, if these adjustments,
once adequately made, can be reasonably well stabilized, the accuracy of the instrument is very good. As was anticipated, large tilts in the photographs combined with
extreme elevation range in the stereo model make difficult the orientation of the
photos in the instrument. However, with modern flying procedures, excessive tilts
in the phography are rare. In summary the Deville plotter has proven a worthwhile adjunct to our photogrammetric practices. A valuable store of experience
with it is being accumulated, which will be useful in refining design of minor modifications to the present model or for a second unit, or both. A paper on the Deville
plotter, co-authored with Mr. A. D. Wight, B.C.L.S., of our staff, was presented by
the writer to the semi-annual meeting of the American Society of Photogrammetry
at Wellesley Island, New York, in September, 1963.
FRASER RIVER BOARD
There is considerable satisfaction in the debut of the final report of the Fraser
River Board coincident, for practical purposes, with the end of the year. It marks
the end of more than eight years' service as a Board member for the writer, and
parallel service as alternate member for Mr. A. H. Ralfs, B.C.L.S., D.L.S., Assistant
Director of this Branch. Whereas participation in the comprehensive analysis of
this great river's characteristics and potentialities, and the synthesis of a plan for
its regulation to effect flood control with production of hydro-electric power, has
been a unique privilege, it has nevertheless imposed a very real diversion of
attention and energy from responsibilities intrinsic to the Surveys and Mapping
Branch. Little of value can be had without cost. The price in this case has
been unavoidable neglect of certain Branch matters, offset to some extent by the
assumption of greater responsibility by the senior administrative staffs of the divisions. For example, preoccupation with Fraser River Board accounts very materially for the regrettable delay in finalizing the report of the British Columbia-Yukon-
Northwest Territories Boundary Commission.
In addition to provision of services as member and alternate, this Branch has
performed a substantial aggregate of special assignments in detail topographic mapping, including special air-photo cover, of the numerous reservoirs and dam-sites
required for the Board's studies. The precise determination of a critical elevation
on the Parsnip-McGregor divide at Arctic Lake offered a major feature in the
Board's planning for the diversion of the McGregor River waters into the Peace
River drainage basin. Here again these mapping activities have been done at the
expense of progress on the still gigantic task of completing the standard topographic
mapping and up-to-date air-photo cover of the Province.
Speaking for Mr. Ralfs and myself, it has been a stimulating and gratifying
privilege to serve on the Fraser River Board, to work with our opposite numbers of
the Provincial Water Resources Service, the Federal members of the Water Resources Branch, and the Department of Fisheries, as well as with the members of
the Board staff, in the study of one of British Columbia's most important and fascinating rivers, so vital to the welfare of this Province. It is also with no small
satisfaction that we may now contemplate a period of closer attention to the more
specific survey and mapping problems, nearer to the line of responsibility in this
Branch.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH DD 45
PERSONNEL
In my previous reports the benefits of automation and new techniques in the
perennial struggle to keep abreast of increasing demands for Branch services have
been emphasized, especially as helping to offset prevailing limitations on staff. The
point has now been passed, however, where technological advantages can counteract
the need for human beings. This Branch has excellent equipment and jealously
maintains its espousal of the most modern methods but is now in dire need of a
modest increase in personnel to give full effect to equipment and techniques now at
our disposal. The existing staff, reduced to a hard core of experienced, capable, and
conscientious people, is faced with formidable backlogs of work which can only be
reduced temporarily and partially by neglect of various internal but necessary maintenance operations, with the inexorable penalties. It must also bear the brunt of
complaints, sometimes petulant, for delay from customers, including the public, who
do not understand the difficulties faced. It is not enough to drape a near-skeleton
with elegant fabrics of modern methods and appendages of spectacular technical
equipment.   Some good warm human flesh and blood is sorely needed.
The Deputy Minister has paid tribute to the memory of Cyril G. Green, late
member of this Branch, whose death occurred November 24, 1963. " Cy," as he
was affectionately known, began his service as Junior Clerk in the File Vault in
October, 1944, transferring to the Legal Surveys Division of this Branch in November, 1946. His performance was of such high calibre that for health reasons he was
transferred, by special arrangement, to the Government Agent's office in Kamloops
from May, 1956, to March, 1958, after which we were pleased to have him return
to the Legal Surveys Division, where he remained until his untimely demise in his
40th year. In spite of his delicate health, he was a most diligent and conscientious
worker. His bright, kindly, and obliging personality, combined with his artistic
talents, endeared him to his colleagues in work and to a wide circle of friends in the
Government service. " Cy " Green's memory serves to enhance the mute bonds of
comradeship among us who survive him.
In concluding my report I wish to express my appreciation of the outstanding
industry, skill, and loyalty of all members of my staff, of the understanding support
of the Honourable Minister of this Department and his deputy, of the helpful cooperation of other Provincial and Federal agencies, of the land-surveying profession,
of the many industries and private citizens who find need for our services, and who
sympathize with our difficulties in trying to maintain top service at all times.
 DD 46     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
LEGAL SURVEYS DIVISION
D. Pearmain, Chief
The Legal Surveys Division, under the direction of the Surveyor-General, is
responsible for cadastral surveys of all Crown lands of the Province. This entails
the issuing of instructions to the land surveyors engaged to make each survey and
supplying them with copies of the field-notes and plans of adjoining or adjacent
surveys. After the completion of the survey, the returns are forwarded to this office
for checking and plotting. Included in the above returns are all right-of-way surveys, including those for highways, railways, and transmission-lines. During the
year 921 sets of the above instructions were issued.
In 1963, 582 sets of field-notes covering the survey of 893 lots were received
in this office and duly indexed, checked, plotted, and official plans prepared therefrom. This is an increase of 127 and 272 respectively over 1962. Of the above-
mentioned surveys, 881 were made under the Land Act and 12 under the Mineral
Act. At the present time there are approximately 97,920 sets of field-notes on
record in our vaults.
There were 579 plans received from land surveyors covering surveys made
under the Land Registry Act. These were duly indexed and checked, and certified
copies deposited in the respective Land Registry Offices.
Buttes caused by erosion along banks of St. Mary River
ty of Fort Steele.
In order that a graphic record may be kept of alienations of both surveyed and
unsurveyed Crown lands together with reserves, a set of reference maps, 210 in
number, covering the whole of the Province must be maintained. These show all
cadastral surveys which are on file in the Department, and are kept up to date by
adding new information as it accrues from day to day. Prints of them are available
to the public (see Indexes 1 to 7 in the envelope attached to the back cover of this
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH DD 47
Annual Report). It is unfortunate that through pressure of other work it has been
impossible to carry out the necessary renewing and redrawing of the reference maps,
which become worn through constant use and handling. Whereas the Division
should be renewing a minimum of 25 of these maps each year, only 16 could be
done in 1963, and these only by a makeshift mechanical process.
All applications to purchase or lease Crown lands or foreshore which are received by the Lands Branch and all applications to purchase Crown timber received
by the Forest Service are channelled through this Division for clearance. The
orderly processing of these applications requires that an exhaustive status be made
from the reference maps, official plans, and Land Registry Office plans. From the
reference maps, together with other information and facilities maintained by this
Division, it is possible to give an up-to-the-minute status on any parcel of Crown
land in the Province.
It was necessary during the year, for status and compilation purposes, to obtain
5,633 plans from the various Land Registry Offices.
This Division co-operates with the other departments of Government by preparing and checking legal descriptions which they require. Those assisted in this
way were the Attorney-General's Department (descriptions of Small Debts Courts),
the Department of Agriculture (descriptions of disease-free areas and pound districts), the Department of Municipal Affairs (descriptions for the incorporation or
amendment of municipal areas), the Forest Service (descriptions of tree-farm
licences and working circles), and the Lands Branch (descriptions for gazetted
reserves, etc.). During the year 158 of the above descriptions were prepared, and
this entailed 275 man-hours.
REPRODUCTION SECTION
The Legal Surveys Division, through this Section, continues to supply a service
to all departments of Government and to the public, as well as supplying all the
prints and photostats, etc., required by the Surveys and Mapping Branch. The total
number of prints made during the year was 222,057, in the preparation of which
156,810 yards or 89.1 miles of paper and linen were used. The number of photostats, films, and autopositives made was 104,973.
Of the 222,057 prints made, 79,404 were for the Surveys and Mapping Branch,
53,841 for other branches of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, 78,103 for other departments of Government, and 10,709 for the public.
Likewise, of the 104,973 photostats, films, etc., made, 32,757 were for the Surveys
and Mapping Branch, 51,012 for other branches of the Department, 14,555 for
other departments of Government, and 6,649 for the public.
The multilith machine turned out 300,415 copies during the year, compared
with 163,436 during 1962.
The Xerox 914 copier has been a real boon; it has speeded up the service,
given much more legible copies, and is much more economical to operate than the
machine previously used.
COMPOSITE MAP SECTION
This Section is responsible for the compilation and fair drawing of composite
maps, mostly at a scale of 500 feet to 1 inch, of the more densely subdivided areas
of the Province, and especially where they occur in unorganized territory.
During the year two sheets were completed covering the Village of Hope.
This Section was diverted from its usual work during the year and took over
the renewing and redrawing of some of the more dilapidated reference maps.   They
 DD 48     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
were responsible for the 16 reference maps which were renewed this year. It would
seem that with the very large amount of work going through the main draughting-
room, it will be necessary that the Composite Map Section be again taken from its
usual duties and assigned the responsibility of renewing more of our reference maps.
The tri-annual revision of the composite maps is presently under way.
LAND EXAMINATION PLANS SECTION
This Section is responsible for the preparation of plans for the use of the Land
Inspectors in their examination of applications for Crown lands. These plans are a
consolidation of all the information available in this Department and pertinent to
the applications requiring inspection. A synopsis of the work accomplished by this
Section during the past six years is as follows:—
Year
1958
1959
1960
Plans
Prepared
. 2,192
. 2,473
. 2,609
Year
1961
1962
1963
Plans
Prepared
. 2,660
. 2,941
. 2,944
LAND REGISTRY OFFICE PLAN CHECKING SECTION
This Section supplies a service to the Land Registry Offices at Victoria, Kamloops, Nelson, and Prince Rupert by giving a thorough mathematical check to plans
tendered for deposit in the said offices.
This check is accomplished through the electronic computer which is available to this Division.
During the year 1,558 plans received this check.
GENERAL
The receiving and distribution of survey-posts, which are stored at 859 Devonshire Road, has operated smoothly and efficiently. The following synopsis shows
the quantities of posts shipped during the past year and to whom:—
Standard
Pipe
Driveable
Pipe
Standard
Rock
B.C.L.S.
Bars
Purchased by private surveyors from headquarters -
Supplied to Departmental surveyors  _ 	
Shipped to Government Agents for resale	
Totals  _   	
372
120
500
465
801
2,554
228
190
784
992
3,820
1,202
50
1,783
1,550
3,383
Summary of Office Work for the Years 1962 and 1963,
Legal Surveys Division
Number of field-books received.
lots surveyed	
lots plotted	
lots gazetted	
lots cancelled	
lots amended	
mineral-claim field-books prepared _
reference maps compiled or renewed
applications for purchase cleared	
1962
455
621
447
418
16
163
22
13
2,465
1963
582
893
722
743
12
190
5
16
2,741
 surveys and mapping branch dd 49
Summary of Office Work for the Years 1962 and 1963,
Legal Surveys Division—Continued
1962 1963
Number of applications for pre-emption cleared  147 120
„        applications for lease cleared  3,193 3,837
„        water licences cleared  158 23
„        timber sales cleared  5,422 5,290
„        Crown-grant applications cleared  1,156 1,064
„        cancellations made  5,027 5,706
„        inquiries cleared  1,504 1,654
„        letters received and dealt with  6,019 6,195
„        land-examination plans  2,941 2,944
„        Crown-grant and lease tracings made  4,675 4,582
„        miscellaneous tracings made  10 35
photostats made  68,688 104,973
blueprints made  268,515 222,057
offset prints made  163,436 300,415
FIELD WORK
The field surveys carried out by Divisional personnel are mostly at the request
of various Government departments and follow the same pattern from year to year.
However, in the restoration of old surveys, which it is hoped may be increased
yearly, the opportunity is ours to select areas where it is known that monumentation
is in a deplorable state and where the expenditure of funds will do the most immediate good. Ideally these areas should also be near established Provincial control
stations so that all restored areas are integrated into the co-ordinate control network.
As the conduct of all surveys through Crown land is governed by regulation,
the opportunity arose on a large-scale transmission-line survey being carried out
during the past year by a private survey company to require some restoration of
old survey corners and regular ties to Provincial control along the route. By the
Department assisting with the extra costs involved and because of the excellent
co-operation of those carrying out the work, a very creditable, integrated survey
route will result from Seton Lake through to Prince George. The centre line and all
ties to established control are being made with a precise electronic distance-measuring instrument, and although the survey is still incomplete, at the present time there
have been 350 old corners restored by permanent monuments and 205 additional
permanent monuments set to mark the limits of the right-of-way, all of which can
be co-ordinated at any time by calculation from the plans.
The driveable pipe post mentioned in last year's report is being used extensively, but further modifications are needed before it is entirely satisfactory.
Subdivision of Crown Land
Subdivision of rural land providing home-sites with road access was carried
out at Lantzville, Sproat Lake, Brackendale, Gambier Island, Spences Bridge, at
Apex Mountain north of Keremeos, and at Fort St. John, for a total of 66 lots.
Surveys of waterfront property produced 139 lots located at Gun Lake, Charlotte
Lake, Norman Lake, Kimberley, Moyie Lake, Riondel, and Lac le Jeune. Acreage
lots were created at Kamloops for a hospital addition, at Skookumchuck in the East
Kootenay for home-site leases, at Fort Steele in connection with the restoration of
that historical area, and at Cultus Lake for an existing fish hatchery.
 DD 50     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Public Reserves
In unorganized areas there is usually a steady demand for Crown land to be
set aside for sanitary reserves. Survey of these areas was required at Tulameen,
Osoyoos, Lower Nicola, Tappen, Chief Lake, and Savona. Recreational areas
not under the Parks Department were surveyed at Princeton, Lac le Jeune, and
Kimberley.
Park-sites
At Sproat Lake in the Alberni district, another 50 acres were surveyed as an
addition to the existing picnic and boat-launching site. A small 5-acre park at Seton
Lake was laid out and another existing park at Gardom Lake was resurveyed. The
survey of a very interesting park area to cover old fossil beds on Driftwood Creek
in the vicinity of Smithers was begun, but due to lateness of the season will be completed next year.
Forest Service Roads and Sites
Sites for lookouts and forestry buildings were surveyed at Cowichan Lake, at
Orford Bay on Bute Inlet, and at Grand Forks. Where Forest Service access roads
are through privately owned land, it is usual to survey these portions only. In this
connection a total of 7.8 miles was legally surveyed at Orford Bay, Enderby, and at
Cayoosh and Slok Creeks in the vicinity of Lillooet.
Repostings and Restorations
Restoration of old main lot and section corners in connection with highway
surveys was increased again this year to a total of 203 corners. The bulk of these
were in the Bulkley Valley, where a high percentage of old corners is completely
unmarked. A number of areas were given attention in the general programme.
Boundaries of six lots close to Victoria, dating to the earliest surveys in the district,
were remonumented. The work at Shirley was continued, where four more lots
were posted. Both these areas will continue to be expanded as the opportunity
arises. Four sections on Saltspring Island at St. Mary Lake were posted because,
although the land had been sold, it had never been surveyed. One lot each at
Sharpe Lake, Alert Bay, and Grand Forks were among the smaller jobs. The main
efforts in this programme were in the vicinity of Lumby, Buck Ridge, and McBride,
where 111 corners were permanently monumented. The grand total of all Departmental restorations was 393 corners.
A survey of the Parliament Buildings precinct area was carried out to determine the boundaries of Government-owned land within the area. This entailed fixing the alignment of 12 streets from a mass of cadastral survey evidence, and in the
process 12 old monuments set pursuant to the City of Victoria Official Map Act of
1880 were recovered. These, together with 13 additional permanent monuments
set on this survey, were tied into the local Provincial survey control network. The
co-ordinates of these 25 key monuments were tabulated on the face of the plan
which was deposited in the Land Registry Office. This permanently fixes these
cadastral corners with respect to all future surveys integrated into the common
datum.
The Department assisted in restorations on Hornby Island and in the Smithers
area by bearing part of the costs of very involved surveys caused by old corners
having been destroyed. There were also a number of minor cases of assistance in
various parts of the country.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
DD 51
Highways
In the Bulkley Valley, on the Houston-Telkwa section of the Northern Trans-
Provincial Highway there were 22.6 miles of highway surveyed. On the Trans-
Canada Highway, the remaining 6 miles at Blaeberry were completed, which finishes the Rogers Pass route from Sicamous through to Golden. East of Golden
another remainder of 4.9 miles was surveyed through to Yoho Park boundary. On
the Kootenay-Columbia route 7.1 miles from Radium north and 12.2 miles from
Fort Steele to Wasa were completed. On the Southern Trans-Provincial Highway
a small section of 3.1 miles from Goatfell to Yahk was filled in.
Work on the Kootenay-Columbia Highway and in the Bulkley Valley was tied
into the Provincial co-ordinate control system.
The total of 55.9 miles is less than last year due to the fact that no unsurveyed
land was encountered and all the areas were ones requiring a great deal of searching
for old evidence.
Inspections
Three requests for inspections of plans through the Land Registry Office involved surveys at Alberni, Haney, and Penticton. The presentation of an independent examination of all the evidence enables a solution to these troublesome matters
to be found, and consequently this continues to be a valuable service. Two inspections were initiated by this Division—one of a right-of-way in the Peace River District and the other centred around some sections of a very old township in the vicinity
of Salmo. In the latter case a very substantial error in the original survey was
proved, enabling the question of alleged trespass on Crown timber to be settled.
 DD 52     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
TOPOGRAPHIC DIVISION
A. G. Slocomb, B.C.L.S., Chief
The old saying that commences " The best laid plans of mice and men, etc.,"
could certainly be applied to this season's field operation. The original plan called
for a continuation north of the previous year's field work in the Takla Lake area as
the main effort, to be supported by the Department's Beaver aircraft and a four-
month helicopter contract. Upon learning that the Federal Government decided
to let a contract for high-altitude photography in the Chilcotin District, and that our
requirements would be given priority, our plan was changed to take advantage of
this opportunity. Work in the northern area was postponed so as to allow a programme of targetting positions prior to the anticipated Federal photography in Map-
areas 93b, 93f, and the North Half of 93c. The targetting was commenced on the
1st of June, using both the helicopter and the Beaver, and the personnel of two
survey crews. Although over difficult terrain, all went well till the 13th of June,
when we were informed that because of prior commitments the Federal programme
of photography had been cancelled. At that time, targets had been set covering
93b and the eastern edge of 93c. In order to salvage this work, the Air Division
was requested to extend an area that it was currently flying to include 93b. Photography commenced the following day, although a complication arose because the
original high-altitude photography had been planned for east-west flight strips from
an altitude of 30,000 feet, while Air Division photo cover was flown with north-
south strips from an altitude of 20,000 feet. This change in photographic specifications required modifications to the targetted network by additional targets set to
meet requirements of a block adjustment for the new photo cover. We were able
to complete the horizontal control for eight map-sheets and vertical control for three.
In an endeavour to make the best use of the helicopter contract, the remaining
vertical control was left to a later date and the survey crew moved north to the
Takla Lake area, where work commenced on the 15th of July, with the first camp
at Babine Lake supplied from a base established at Tyee Lake, near Telkwa (see
Fig. 1). The second camp was built at Bear Lake, near the site of the old Hudson's
Bay Company fur-trading post at Fort Connelly. Control was completed for 18
map-sheets and, coupled with the eight from the Chilcotin operation (see Fig. 2),
gave a season's total of 26 map-sheets covering approximately 8,700 square miles.
Poor weather, particularly in September, hampered operations. A check on
the helicopter diary shows 58 of the 122 days available were unproductive, of which
25 were in September, which was a very unstable flying-weather month. The total
flying-time on the contract was 338V2 hours, just lSVi above the minimum.
On the Coast, the motor-vessel " B.C. Surveyor " sailed approximately 5,200
miles to allow the crew to photo-identify 282 triangulation stations, which will be
used to control this area when renown by the Federal Government. Of these, 46
were new stations which were established by 162 miles of tellurometer traverse, the
balance being old Coast triangulation. Many of the old iron pins had rusted away,
which made the search difficult and, on occasion, impossible.
In addition, a park-site at Bella Coola was surveyed for the Legal Surveys Division, and its own personnel manned the ship for two separate trips. A Land Inspector also made a 10-day trip in May from Campbell River to Bella Bella, Smith Inlet,
and Alert Bay. The " B.C. Surveyor " performed to perfection during the whole
summer. The new manifold installed on its engine during the winter cured the overheating problem that had troubled us for several seasons.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
DD 53
In the Lower Fraser Valley, a further breakdown of the 1962 triangulation,
mainly in the Surrey and Langley Municipalities, was accomplished. This area is
relatively flat and tree covered, so that towers were erected to raise the line of sight.
They were built with standard steel scaffolding frames which were found to be ideal
127°
GEODETIC  TRIANGULATION {$>
PROVINCIAL TRIANGULATION    A
TELLUROMETER   STATIONS     •
Fig. 1.
for the purpose. Twelve towers, ranging in height from 20 to 106 feet, were fabricated. The inside observing tower was 3 by 5 feet at the base, and the outside tower
was 5 by 7 feet. Although both were guyed every 20 feet, the observer who had to
do the instrument work at the top of the highest one likened it to flagpole sitting.
In conjunction with the scaffolding towers, a giraffe-type lift was used for reconnaissance and location of tower-sites. Both were on a rental basis, with the giraffe
required for two days only, to locate all the sites.   These were mainly on private
 DD 54     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
property and not readily available for future work, so that pairs of monuments were
set in the centre of the adjacent public right-of-way to facilitate easy access for future
surveys. These monuments were set in concrete below road grade and capped with
a 4-inch circular metal service-box with a removable lid. Twenty-six pairs of these
monuments were set and tied in to the triangulation.
GEODETIC TRIANGULATION ®
PROVINCIAL TRIANGULATION A
TELLUROMETER  STATIONS     •
Fig. 2.
We had planned on using the latest model tellurometer—the MRA3—which
will read the required shorter distances to the prescribed accuracy, but unfortunately
it was not available till too late in the season. A private survey firm allowed us the
use of its pair of instruments for a day, which proved ideal for the purpose.
A programme of map revision was commenced on Southern Vancouver Island
early in the year, whenever the weather was suitable and personnel available. The
crews photo-identified the existing triangulation and traverse stations, and also
checked the vertical control, adding to it wherever required. The planimetry of
these southern sheets was completed in the early 1930's without the aid of modern
plotting-machines. Rather than try to improve the existing sheets, it was decided
that it would be quicker to replot them.
The Review and Edit Section handled six field projects, two of which were
control surveys completed while engaged on map checks in the vicinity.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
DD 55
Eighteen National Topographic Series map-sheets, totalling approximately
6,100 square miles, were completed in the Photogrammetric Section. In addition,
there were 15 large-scale projects ranging in scale from 40 to 1,000 feet to 1 inch.
These include one plot for road revision and one for reconnaissance purposes only,
as well as large-scale detailed plans of various Government buildings.
The Draughting Section reports the completion of 23 standard topographic
manuscripts at the scale of 2 inches to 1 mile, 72 large-scale mapping plans at
various scales, plus 7 large plans at 20, 40, 50, and 100 feet to 1 inch of the Legislative Precinct, the Kamloops Government Buildings, and the Brannan Lake School.
In addition, the plotting of the cadastral survey on 37 Federal Government 1:50,000
manuscripts was completed. Two mosaics were assembled and rephotographed to
the scale required by the Department involved for use in planning.
The Federal Government now has 78 of our 1:50,000 scale manuscripts on
hand for printing, which are in various stages of reproduction.
Copies of the photogrammetric large-scale mapping and the completed manuscripts as shown on the indexes following this report are available upon request.
 dd 56   department of lands, forests, and water resources
List of Large-scale Mapping
No.
Name
Available
Scale
Contour
Interval
No. of
Sheets
Date
XI
S.P. 1
Goldfields	
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
1"=800', 900',
1,000', 1,320'
1"=200', 600'
1"=1,000'
1"=1,000'
1"=20 ch.
1"=-   550'
l"=10ch.
1"=10 ch.
1"=10 ch.
1"= 1,30c
1"=13 ch.
1"=   100'
1"= 1,000'
1"=   50C
1"=   IOC
1"=1,000'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=1,320'
1"=   200'
1"=   200'
1"=   400'
1"=   400'
1"=   400'
1"=1,32C
1"=   40C
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=1,000'
1"= 1,320'
1"=   500'
V—   500'
1"=   500'
1"=1,000'
1"= 1,000'
1"=   500'
1"=1,00C
1"=   50C
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=   50C
1"=1,000'
1"=   SOC
1"=   50C
1"=   500'
1"=   300'
1"=1,000'
1"=   400'
l"=   200'
1"=   SOC
1"= 1,000'
1"=1,000'
1"=1,00C
V-   500'
1"=   500'
1"=   50C
1"=   600'
1"=1,000'
1"=   60C
1"=1,320'
1"=   200'
1"=   200'
\"=   50C
1"=2,640'
1"=   500'
1"=1,320'
IOC
Mosaic
5'-50' then 50'
5'-5C then 50'
20'
20'
IOC
50'
50'
50'
500'
5'
50'
20'-40'
5'
50'
1C-20'
20'-40'
50'
5'
Spot heights
5'-10'-25'
5'-10'-25'
Planimetric
IOC
2C-100'
20M0'
2C-40'
50'
50'
20'-4C
20'-40'
20'--H)'
50'
20'
20'
50'
20'-40'
10'
10'
10'
20'
5'-10'-15'
20'-4C
10'
S'-10'-20'
20'
10'
Planimetric
1C-20'
20'^tO'
2C-40'
2C-4C
20'
10'
10'-2C
20'
20'
20'
50'
5'
5'
50'
10C
20'
20'
18
20
(!)
13
1
1
38
8
6
13
ii
73
2
7
1
(27
11
12
8
6
6
1
1
26
5
48
8
23
11
5
2
7
7
20
8
ii
2
4
2
4
5
3
9
16
40
7
3
10
2
8
17
1
10
2
	
S.P.2
S.P. 3
1
Lower Fraser Valley —
Lower Fraser Valley	
1957
1958
1952
2
1951-52
3
1950
4
1951-52
5
1951
6
1952-53
7
1951
8
9
Moran Dam-site 	
1951-52
1952
10
1952
11
1952
13
14
Trout Lake..             	
1953
1951
15
1953
16
Gulf Islands
1953
17
1953
18
19   .
Delta Municipality—	
Doukhobor Lands—
1953-54
1953-54
Krestova, Raspberry, etc	
1953-54
1963
20
1953-54
21
1954
24
28
M2
Moran Pondage —
Clearwater-	
1954-55
M 3
1955
M4
1955
M5
1955
M6
1955
M7
1955-56
M8
1956
M9
1956-62
M 11
1955
M 12
1955
1954
M 14
1954
M 15
1954
M 16
1956
M 17
1954
M21
1955
M24
M26
San Jose   	
1956
M27
M2»
Peace River Pondage	
1958
1956
M30
1956
M34
1957
M36
1957
M37
1956-57
M38
1956-57
M39
1956-57
(1957)
M39
(1958)
M39
(1960)
M40
Dease-Stikine Dam-sites	
Dease-Stikine Dam-sites	
1959
1960
1956
M41
M42
M43
Summit Lake Diversion	
Peace River Dam-site	
Alert Bay	
1958
1957
1956
M44
1958
M45
M52
Prince George West  _
1958
1959
M54
Big Bar          	
1957
M56
1958
M59
1958
lOne (Map 5e).
2 See No. 17.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
List of Large-scale Mapping—Continued
DD 57
No.
Name
Available
Scale
Contour
Interval
No. of
Sheets
Date
M62
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Part
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Part
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
1"=   500'
1"=1,320'
1"=1,00C
1"=   400'
1"=   400'
1"=1,32C
1"=1,320'
1"=1,00C
1"=   500'
1"=   200'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"-=1,000'
1"=:     40'
1"=     40'
1"=   500'
1"= 1,000'
1"=   300'
1"=   50C
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=     50'
1"=   100'
1"= 1,000'
1"= 1,000'
1"=   500'
1"=   250'
1"=   500'
1"=     50'
1"=   100'
1"=1,000'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
1"=1,32C
1"=   100'
1"=   200'
1"=   500'
1"=     40'
1"= 1,000'
l"=rl,320'
1"= 1,000'
1"=   500'
1"=   500'
l"=rl,000'
1"=   400'
1"=     40'
1"=     40'
1"=   500'
1"=1,000'
1"=     40'
1"=   IOC
1"=     50'
1"=   100'
1"=     50'
1"=   200'
1"=   200'
1"=   500'
1"=-   600'
I"—   600'
1"= 1,000'
1"=     20'
V—     20'
1"=     20'
10'
20"
20'
10'
10'
20'
25'
20'
10'
10'
1C-20'
1C-2C
20'
2'
2'
10'
20'
5'
20'
5'
2C
10'
2'
Spot heights
50'
20'
Planimetry
5'
5'-10'
2'
2'
20'
10'
1C-20'
10'-20'
20'
2'
1C-20'
10'
2'
20'
5C-100'
20'
IV
25'
50'
10'
2'
10'
25'-5C
2'
10'
2'
1C-1C
2'-5'
2'
5'
20'
2C
20'
50'
2'
2'-5'
2'
2
98
5
10
4
3
10
48
5
1
25
20
17
4
5
11
5
14
15
11
4
4
2
6
5
12
4
8
2
3
68
7
7
4
9
3
3
1
6
4
4
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
8
1
1
8
2
5
1
1958
M63
(   1958-63
I   1961-63
1962
M63A
Parsnip River Pondage Addi-
M66
1958
M67
1958
M68
1958
M70
1958
M73
1959
M73
1959
M74
M75
M76
M77
Glinz Lake —  - —	
Duncan 	
Nanaimo  -—
1959
1959
1960
1960-61
M 83
Oakalla 	
1960
M84
Victoria University, Gordon
Head                    	
1960-61
M88
M88
M 89
South Okanagan  	
South Okanagan -	
1964
1960
M 89
1960
M90
M92
Similkameen —-	
1960
1962
M98
MlOO
MlOO
M105
M 107
Aberdeen-Haddo Lake	
Essondale   	
Essondale 	
Clearwater Lake-Azure Lake
1960
1962
1962
1962
1961
M 108
1961
Mill
M113
M 114
Clearwater River Dam-site
Nanaimo    _.
1961
1963
1962
M114
1962
M 117
1962
M 117
1962
M 118
1962
M121
M 122
Winfleld  	
1961
1962
M125
1962
M 126
1962
M127
M129
M130
M131
Parksville -   —	
Aleza Lake -   	
McGregor River Pondage
1962
1962
1962
M134
1962
M135
M136
M138
M139
Quesnel 	
Haney   ....
Hobson Lake Extension
1963
1962
1962
1962
M141
M141
Legislative Precinct, Victoria
Legislative Precinct, Victoria
1963
1963
M142
1963
M144
M145
M146
Marysvilie -  	
Kamloops Government
Buildings 	
1963
1963
1963
M146
1963
M150
1963
M150
1963
M151
1963
M152
1963
M155
Sechelt -	
1964
M158
1964
M 160
1964
M161
1964
Government House Grounds
Victoria University Campus ..
1959
1960
1963
 DD 58     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
List of British Columbia Manuscripts Showing Date Surveyed
Sheet
82F/3   	
82F/4 	
82K/11, W.
82K/12   	
82L/7  	
82L/10  	
82M/13	
83 D/4 ....—
83D/5 	
83 D/12	
83D/13.W.
92B/5
Date
92B/6.W. _
92B/U.W.
92B/12 	
92B/13  	
92B/14	
92C/8   	
92 C/9    	
92C/10	
92C/11	
92C/13	
92C/14	
92C/15   	
92C/16	
92E/1  	
92E/7   	
92E/8   	
92E/9	
92E/10	
92E/14 	
92E/16   	
92 F/l   	
92F/2
92F/3	
92F/4 	
92F/5 	
92F/6   	
92F/7	
92F/8	
92F/9	
92F/10   	
92F/11   	
92 F/12   	
92F/13   	
92F/14	
92 F/15, part
92 F/16, part
92G/4   	
92G/5	
92 G/7, part   .
92 G/10, part
92G/11	
92G/12	
92G/13	
92G/14  	
92 H/l   	
92H/2 	
92H/3 	
92H/4	
921/12 	
921/13 	
92 J/4, W.   ...
92 J/15 	
92 J/16   	
92K/l,part .
92K/2   	
92K/3   	
92K/4 	
92K/5	
92K/6 	
92K/7   	
92K/8, W.  _.
92 K/10, W.
92K/11   	
92K/12   	
..1951,
. 1944,
-1959,
.1937, 1938, 1955,
-1938,
1942,
1955,
1943,
  1937,
..1937, 1938,
 1937,
.1937,
..1937, 1938,
..1938,
-1943,
1946,
.1938, 1940,
..1938, 1940,
 1937, 1938,
.1937, 1940, 1941,
-1942,
-1942, 1943,
 1950,
— 1934,
-1936, 1937,
 1935,
-1942,
-1950,
.1950,
-1950,
-1920,
1923,
 1923,
-1924, 1931, 1948,
 .-1948,
-1948,
-1948,
-1961,
1960
1947
1952
1958
1958
1958
1959
1959
1959
I960
1960
1963
1955
1955
1963
1951
1951
1938
1963
1938
1938
1938
1938
1938
1942
1942
1946
1946
1947
1947
1948
1947
1942
1942
1941
1942
1943
1943
1943
1950
1950
1953
1935
1938
1936
1935
1950
1950
1943
1952
1940
.1940
1952
1952
1952
1952
1949
1949
1949
1956
1958
1958
.1962
1949
1949
1950
1962
1949
1949
1949
1949
1961
1962
1962
1962
1962
Sheet
92K/13   	
92K/14	
92K/15   	
92L/1	
92L/2 	
92L/3   	
92L/4 	
92L/6	
92L/7	
92L/8	
92L/10   	
92L/11   	
92L/12   	
92L/13   	
92M/2	
92M/3 	
92M/4   	
92M/5   	
92M/6 	
92M/11.W.
92M/12 	
92M/13	
92 M/14, W.
92 N/1   	
92 N/7   	
Date
-1931,
.1931,
-1931,
.1931,
1940,
-1935,
92 N/8	
92 N/9   	
92 N/10  	
92N/15   	
92 0/1   - 	
92 0/2	
92 0/3	
92 0/4	
92 0/5	
92 0/6   	
92 0/7   	
92 0/8	
92 0/9 	
92 0/10   	
92 0/11   	
92 0/12   	
92 0/16 	
92P/2  	
92P/3	
92P/4 	
92 P/5 	
92P/6  	
92P/7   	
92P/10  	
92P/11   	
92P/12   	
92P/13	
92P/14  	
92P/15 	
92P/16   -.
93 A/1    	
93 A/2	
93 A/3	
93 A/4  	
93 A/5   	
93 A/6   	
93 A/7  	
93 A/8   	
93 A/9   _	
93 A/10    	
93 A/11   	
93 A/12  	
93 A/13   	
93 A/14   -	
93 A/15   	
93 A/16   	
93B/1   	
93B/6   	
93B/7	
93B/8  	
-1950,
-1936,
1959,
1959,
-1936, 1959,
 1959,
 1934,
 1933,
.1931, 1933,
.1933,
-1934,
1962
1962
1962
1932
1932
1948
1948
1934
1931
1932
1956
1940
1936
1936
1962
1959
1959
1959
1962
1962
1962
1962
1962
1958
1958
1958
1958
1958
1958
1950
1947
1958
1958
1958
1958
1958
1950
1951
1958
1958
1958
1951
1959
1959
1958
1958
1959
1959
1959
1959
1958
1958
1959
1959
1959
1959
1960
1960
1959
1935
1935
1960
1959
1960
1960
1934
1934
1934
1934
1960
1960
1951
1963
1963
1952
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
DD 59
List of British Columbia Manuscripts Showing Date Surveyed—Continued
Sheet
93 B/9   	
93B/10   	
93B/11   —
93B/12   	
93B/13   	
93B/14   	
93B/15   _
93B/16   	
93 C/5   	
93D/2  	
93D/3   	
93D/4  	
93 D/5	
93D/6  	
93D/7 	
93D/8
93 D/ll, E.
93 E/5, W.
93G/2   .	
93G/3   	
93G/4  .	
93G/5   	
93 G/6  	
93 G/7
93 G/10  	
93 G/ll   	
93G/12
93G/14
93 1/8  	
93 1/9   	
93 1/10 	
93 1/11  	
93 1/12
93 1/13  __
93 1/14 _	
93 1/15 	
93 1/16 	
93 J/2 	
93 J/3
93 J/5   	
93 J/6   	
93 J/11 —
93 J/12 —
93 J/13   .—
93K/1   	
93 K/2   ..—
93K/7   	
93K/8   	
93K/9   	
93 K/10 --
93K/11 ....
93K/12 —
93K/13 ....
93K/14 ....
93K/15 —
93K/16   —
93L/2  	
93L/7   	
93 L/8   	
93L/9   	
93 L/10 —
93L/11
93L/14  	
93 L/15 	
93L/16  ..._
93M/1  	
93M/2   ..._
93M/5   	
93 M/7 —
93 M/8 	
93 M/9 —
93M/10 --
93M/11 —
93 M/12 ...
93M/13 ...
93M/14   ...
-.1933,
Date
  1950
  1963
  1963
  1963
 1963
  1963
 1963
  1950
 1959
  1962
 1962
 1962
  1962
  1962
-1958, 1962
-1958, 1959
  1962
1963
1960
1960
  1960
  1960
 1960
-1933, 1960
  1960
  1960
  1960
  1948
 1956
  1956
  1956
  1957
  1957
  1957
  1957
  1956
  1956
  1949
  1949
  1961
  1961
  1961
 1961
 1961
  1946
 1946
   1960
  1960
  1960
  1960
 1961
  1961
 1961
  1961
 1961
  1961
 —. 1951
  1951
  1951
 1951
1951
1950
1950
1962
1962
1962
1963
1949
1963
1963
1963
1963
1963
1949
1963
1963
 1950
Sheet
93M/15   	
93M/16 	
93 N/1   	
93 N/2  -	
93 N/3   	
93 N/4	
93 N/5   	
93 N/6  	
93 N/7   	
93 N/8   	
93 N/9   	
93 N/10    -
93N/11   	
93 N/12   	
93 0/1    	
93 0/4   	
93 0/5   	
93 0/6   	
93 0/8 	
93 O/ll   	
93 0/12   	
93 0/13   	
93 0/14   	
93P/1   	
93 P/2   	
93P/3   	
93P/4  	
93P/5  	
93P/6  	
93P/7  	
93P/8 	
94B/4    	
94 C, part	
94D/1   	
94D/2   -	
94D/3   ._	
94D/4 	
94 D/5    -
94D/6   	
94D/7 _
94D/8   - _
94 E, part  	
94 F, part  	
94 L, part  	
94 M, part   -.
102 1/8	
102 1/9   	
102 1/15 	
102 1/16 	
102P/8, E. ..
102P/9, E. ..
102P/16  	
103 A/1   	
103 A/2, E.   ..
103 A/6   	
103 A/7   ..	
103 A/8 	
103 A/9
103 A/10   	
103 A/11 .—
103 A/13, E.
103 A/14   	
103 A/15	
103 A/16   	
103G/1,E. .
103 G/7, E.   .
103 G/8   	
103 G/9   	
103 G/10, E.
103 G/15, E.
103 G/16   —
103 H/l   	
103 H/2   	
103 H/3
103 H/4  .	
103 H/5   -	
Date
 1963
 1963
  1962
  1962
  1962
  1962
 1962
 1962
 1962
  1962
  1962
 1962
  1962
  1962
.  1957
  1961
  1961
 1957
 1957
  1957
  1957
  1957
  1957
  1956
  1956
  1957
  1957
-  1957
  1957
  1956
-1940,
-1935,
-1936,
   1956
-1939, 1957
  1939
  1963
 1963
 1963
  1963
  1963
  1963
  1963
  1963
1939
1939
1941
  1941
-1935, 1937
1936, 1937
  1937
1937
1961
1961
1961
1961
1961
1963
1963
1961
1961
1963
1963
1961
1963
1963
1963
1961
1961
1961
1961
1961
1961
1961
1963
1963
. 1961
. 1961
. 1961
 DD 60     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
List of British Columbia Manuscripts Showing Date Surveyed—Continued
Sheet
103 H/6	
103 H/7	
103 H/8   	
103H/10	
103H/15   	
103 1/2 	
103 1/7  	
103 1/10	
103 P/9  	
103P/10.E.	
103P/14, E.	
103P/15	
104 A/2, W.	
104 A/3   	
104 A/5, E.	
104 A/6	
104 A/11, W.	
104 A/12   	
104 A/13, W. 	
104B/16	
104 G/l   	
104 G/8   	
104 G/9   	
104 G/14  	
Date
1961
1962
1962
1962
1962
1949
1962
1947
1949
1950
1950
1950
1950
1950
1950
1950
1951
1951
1951
1951
1951
1951
1951
1951
Sheet
104G/15  .	
104G/16   	
104 H/12, W.
104H/13.W.
104 J/2, W.   ...
104 J/3   	
104 J/4   	
104 J/5 - _
104 J/12   	
104 J/13   	
104 K/16, E.
104 N/1	
104 N/2	
104 N/3, E.  _.
104 N/5	
104 N/6	
104 N/7, part .
104 N/11, W.  .
104 N/12	
104 N/13   	
104 P, part	
104P/15   	
104 P/16, part
Date
 1951
 1951
  1951
  1951
  1952
 1952
  1952
 1952
  1952
 1952
-1952, 1953
.1952, 1953
 1953
 1953
 1952
-1952, 1953
 1953
 1952
 1952
 1952
 1941
 1941
 1941
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH DD 61
GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION
W. R. Young, B.C.L.S., Chief, and Provincial Representative on
Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names
During 1963 steady advances were made in the Provincial mapping programme.
As outlined in the 1961 Annual Report, full-colour reprinting of 10 map-sheets
at 1:250,000 scale for Coastal British Columbia was nearing completion by the
end of the year. New seven-colour status editions of Maps 92j (Pemberton), 93d
(Bella Coola), 103b-c (Moresby Island), and 103f-g-j-k (Graham Island) were
released, while second status editions of 103i-j (Terrace) and 103p (Nass River)
had reached the draughting stage by December (see Tables G and I). Compilation
and draughting of three sheets at 1:250,000 scale to replace Pre-emptor's and Provincial Topographical Series sheets in the Interior of the Province was under way.
Three more are contemplated in the coming year.
The very popular l-inch-to-2-miles National Topographic Series continued to
replace the former Degree Series. Field culture checks have now been completed
for the five remaining sheets in South-eastern British Columbia, and all but one of
them were being compiled or draughted at the end of the year. Three new 1-inch-
to-2-miles maps—82G/SE (Flathead), 82 G/SW (Elko), and 82 K/SE (Lardeau)
—were published, thus raising the total Provincial output to date for this series
to 26 sheets. Because of public demand, several of these status maps have been
reprinted during the past few years, a situation which, though gratifying, has slowed
the production of new sheets. On the credit side, the reprintings have usually enabled the updating and revision of status and cultural detail.
One regional map-sheet at 1 -inch-to- 10-miles scale (South-western British
Columbia) was revised and reprinted in three editions in 1963. The landforms
edition of this map was partially revised and printed in the new " sand " colour.
To round out the Provincial mapping programme, one map of the Topographical Series at l-inch-to-4-miles scale, 5d (Revelstoke-Golden), and one of the Pre-
emptor Series, 3c (Stuart Lake), were reprinted because stocks had been depleted
before they could be replaced by new status sheets. A status overprint was done on
Map 3e (Peace River) because of the rapid extension of Crown land alienation in
the Peace River region.
The Army Survey Establishment at Ottawa printed 10 Provincial Government
topographic manuscripts at 1:50,000 scale; another nine sheets were reprinted
without revision (see Table H). An additional seven maps were compiled and
printed by the Army Survey Establishment, and major stocks of each of them were
sent to Victoria. Stocks of two maps at 1:250,000 scale which had been prepared
by the Army Survey Establishment were also received.
The Federal Department of Mines and Technical Surveys produced 52 full-
colour and 15 provisional (black and blue) National Topographic maps at 1:50,000
scale and 10 at 1:250,000 scale.
Good progress is being made on a manuscript for revision of the Gazetteer of
British Columbia. Only a few copies of this publication remain in stock in Victoria,
and, so far as is known, there are none in Ottawa. The task of adding some 4,600
new names is being done in co-operation with the Canadian Permanent Committee
on Geographical Names. There has been a steady demand for this useful volume,
and since 1954, 2,400 Gazetteers have been distributed from Victoria alone.
Fifty-nine charts, manuscripts, and maps were checked for place-names in
1963, and 375 new cards were added to the Gazetteer files (see Table C).
 DD 62     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
During the year 116,705 map-sheets were received into stock, compared with
130,420 for the previous 12 month period.
Effective January 1, 1963, the prices of all Federally produced maps were
doubled. Prices of comparable Provincial map series, which had been raised slightly in 1962, were increased proportionately. Though the total number of map-sheets
sold and distributed decreased by 21,159 (21 per cent) from 1962, the value of the
maps issued rose by 38 per cent to $48,674 (see Table D).
Revision and reprinting of Land Series bulletins continued apace. Bulletin
No. 11 (Acquisition of Crown Lands) was reprinted twice during the year, while
Bulletin No. 4 (Vancouver Island) and No. 10 (Peace River) were reprinted with
minor revision. Following a field trip to the Prince George area, a major revision
was completed on Bulletin No. 7 (Fort Fraser-Fort George). Besides working on
the bulletins, the research officer assisted in various inquiries and reports.
Eighteen special projects, with a value of $1,729, were undertaken on behalf
of other Government departments and the general public (see Table E). Among
these was publication of a second edition of the Air Facilities Chart of British
Columbia. The Cartographic Section of the Geographic Division also began to
prepare a special landforms sheet at l-inch-to-30-miles scale to accompany a forthcoming Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources bulletin.
The Trigonometric Control Section handled 341 requests relating to survey
control and examined 160 well-site plans surveyed under the Petroleum and Natural
Gas Act. The conversion of file cards from the Dominion Manual System of Rectangular Co-ordinates to the Polyconic Rectangular Co-ordinates system continued
throughout the year.   Other work done by this Section is shown in Tables A and B.
The following tables provide a numerical account of the activities of the Geographic Division in 1963. In some cases, comparisons with the previous five-year
period are given. Indexes 8 to 14 (Index to Published Maps) are contained in the
envelope attached to the back cover of this Annual Report.
STATISTICAL COMPUTATIONS
Table A.—Least-square Triangulation Adjustments Completed
Locality
Type of
Bearings
Number of
Triangles
Involved
Provincial  	
Canadian Hydrographic Service .
Lower Fraser Valley -
Kitimat Arm 	
True
Grid
40
7
Checking of petroleum and natural-gas well-site surveys totalled 160.
Table B.—Computations
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
562
918
22
378
1,173
1,297
27,462
397
542
806
24
133
1,563
945
29,025
383
543
891
73
174
251
1,419
551
30,444
349
182
168
201
113
128
1,930
149
32,374
333
171
14
89
10
42
917
9
33,291
417
47
Stations calculated from rectangular co-ordinates	
94
79
Ties to cadastral surveys   	
27
93
Index cards—
781
6
34,072
Requests for control attended to	
341
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH DD 63
Table C.—Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
49
4,698
278
51
6,321
372
41
4,949
322
74
7,837
360
35
7,168
215
59
Number of names checked  - - 	
6,821
375
Table D.—Map Stock and Distribution
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
Maps issued to departments and public   -
62,544
117.729
78,074
92.374
68,518
175,495
$24,378
87,198
126,502
$32,936
99,324
130,420
$35,391
78,165
116,705
Total value of maps issued   —	
$21,911  | $27,117
1
$48,674
Table E.—Geographical Work for Other Departments and Public
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
55
$1,447
20
$2,754
18
$1,370
22
$1,452
18
$1,708
18
Total value of work-  	
$1,729
Table F.—Letters
1958
1959
1960
1961    1     1962
1963
Letters received and attended to    :.
6,545
6,865
6,929
8,670
8,790
7,274
Table G.—Maps Prepared and Reproduced by the Geographic Division,
Victoria, during 1963
Map No.
Name
Scale
Remarks
Iel
IK
lKL
lKLS
3C
3E
5d
92j
93d
93k
103B-C
103F-G-J-K
82 G/SE
82 G/SW
82K/SE
South-eastern British Columbia, landforms 	
South-western British Columbia, planimetric	
South-western British Columbia, landforms -.
South-western British Columbia, landforms in brown
Stuart Lake	
Peace River     	
Revelstoke-Golden	
Pemberton (second status edition)....
Bella Coola (second status edition)_
Fort Fraser (second status edition)	
Moresby Island (first status edition)..
Graham Island (first status edition) _
Flathead (first status edition)	
Elko (first status edition)  _
Lardeau (first status edition)	
1 in. to 10 ml.
1 in. to 10 mi.
1 in. to 10 mi.
1 in. to 10 mi.
1 in. to 3 mi.
1 in. to 3 mi.
1 in. to 4 mi.
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1:250,000
1 in. to 2 mi.
1 in. to 2 mi.
1 in. to 2 mi.
Reprint, no revision.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
Complete revision.
Status overprint only.
Reprint, no revision.
New, seven colours, contoured.
New, seven colours, contoured.
Reprint, complete revision.
New, seven colours, contoured.
New, seven colours, contoured.
New, seven colours, contoured.
New, seven colours, contoured.
New, seven colours, contoured.
 DD 64     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table H.—Provincial Government Topographic Manuscripts Prepared and Reproduced at 1:50,000 Scale by the Canadian Government, Ottawa, during 1963
Map No.
Name
Map No.
Name
92C/15, E. &W.
92 F/2, E. & W.
92 F/4, E. & W.
92 G/7, E. & W.
92K/3.W.
104 A/2, W.
Nitinat (second edition reprint).
Alberni Inlet (second edition reprint).
Tofino (second edition reprint).
Coquitlam (second edition reprint).
Quadra Island (first edition reprint).
Kwinageese River (first edition).
104 A/5, E.
104 A/6, E. & W.
104 A/11, W.
104 A/12, E.&W.
104 A/13, W.
104 B/16, E.&W.
Bowser Lake (first edition).
Bell-Irving River (first edition).
Taft Creek (first edition).
Delta Peak (first edition).
Mount Alger (first edition).
Bob Quinn (first edition).
Table I.—Maps Being Prepared by the Geographic Division, Victoria, during 1963
Map No.
Name
Scale
Remarks
lJ
82m
82n
83c-D
93F
103I-J
103P
82 G/NW-NE
82J/SE-SW
82K/NE
82K/NW
82L/NE
British Columbia 	
Seymour Arm (first status edition).
Golden (first status edition) _.
Canoe River (first status edition)	
Nechako River (first status edition)..
Terrace (second status edition)	
Nass River (second status edition).—
Cranbrook (first status edition)	
Canal Flats (first status edition)	
Invermere (first status edition)	
Beaton (first status edition)	
Revelstoke (first status edition)	
1 in. to 30 mi.
250,000
250,000
250,000
250,000
250,000
250,000
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
in. to 2 mi.
Draughting completed.
In compilation.
In draughting.
In compilation.
In lithography.
In draughting.
In draughting.
In draughting.
In draughting.
In compilation.
In compilation.
In compilation.
Table J.—Provincial Government Topographic Manuscripts Being Prepared at
1:50,000 Scale by the Canadian Government, Ottawa, during 1963
Map No.
Name
Map No.
Name
82F/3, E. &W.
82K/11.W.
82K/12, E. &W.
82L/7, E. &W.
82L/10, E. &W.
82M/13, E. &W.
92 L/10, E. & W.
92 M/3, E. & W.
92 M/4, E. & W.
92 M/5, E. & W.
92 0/9, E. & W.
93 C/5, E. & W.
93 D/7, E.
93D/8, E. &W.
93 1/8, E. & W.
93 1/9, E. & W.
93 1/10, E.&W.
93 1/11, E.&W.
93 1/12, E. & W.
93 1/13, E.&W.
Salmo (second edition).
Trout Lake (first edition).
Beaton (first edition).
Lumby (first edition).
Mabel Lake (first edition).
Raft River (first edition).
Alert Bay (first edition).
Belize Inlet (first edition).
Cape Caution (first edition).
Goose Bay (first edition).
Dog Creek (first edition).
Atnarko (first edition).
Bella Coola (first edition).
Stuie (first edition).
Narraway River (first edition).
Belcourt Creek (first edition).
Wapiti Lake (first edition).
Monkman Pass (first edition).
Missinka River (first edition).
Sentinel Peak (first edition).
93 1/14, E.&W.
93 1/15, E. &W.
93 1/16, E.&W.
93 0/6, E. &W.
93 O/ll.E. &W.
93 0/12, E. &W.
93 0/13, E. &W.
93 0/14. E. &W.
93P/1.E. &W.
93P/2, E. &W.
93P/3, E. &W.
93 P/4, E. & W.
93P/5, E. &W.
93P/6, E. &W.
93P/7, E. &W.
93 P/8, E. & W.
94B/4, E. &W.
104K/16, E.
104 N/1, E. &W.
104 N/2, E. & W.
104 N/3, E.
Kinuseo Falls (first edition).
Kinuseo Creek (first edition).
Redwillow River (first edition).
Morfee Lakes (first edition).
Cut Thumb Creek (first edition).
Blackwater Creek (first edition).
Finlay Forks (first edition).
Point Creek (first edition).
Kiskatinaw River (first edition).
Flatbed Creek (first edition).
Bullmoose Creek (first edition).
Sukunka Creek (first edition).
Burnt River (first edition).
Gwillim Lake (first edition).
Sundown Creek (first edition).
Tupper Creek (first edition).
Wicked River (first edition).
Nahlin River (first edition).
Nakina Lake (first edition).
Nakina (first edition).
Sloko River (first edition).
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH DD 65
AIR DIVISION
A. C. Kinnear, B.C.R.F., Chief
MAPPING AND COMPILATION
Some 16,000 square miles of l-inch-to-20-chains interim mapping was undertaken during the year with about 2,800 square miles of final sheets completed and
available for all users. The balance of 13,000 square miles is in varying work
stages and will be available as principal-point lay-downs, in pencil form, as required
by Forest Surveys Division.
Since the l-inch-to-20-chains programme was started six years ago, only
10,150 square miles of final interim maps have been completed and are available
to other departments and the public from Surveys Branch. An additional area of
some 50,000 square miles of control and compilation is available, in pencil form, in
our draughting offices (see Index Maps Nos. 15 to 18, which are contained in
envelope attached to back cover of this Annual Report).
A revision area of some 3,000 square miles of l-inch-to-40-chains mapping
has also been undertaken for forest inventory requirements and will be completed
during 1964.
The special project for the Surveyor of Taxes, Department of Finance, in the
E. & N. Land Grant area, as reported last year, progressed as planned. Two-thirds
of the area has now been completed, and the balance will be photographed and
mapped in 1964.
The scribing method of draughting is being studied to determine its application
to use in this Division. If it is found acceptable and put into practice, it is hoped
that the production of final interim maps can be increased.
FLYING OPERATIONS
The last of the two Anson aircraft (CF-EZI), which have done such noble
work on air photography for this Division, was retired from service in June, 1963.
During the past 17 years these two Anson Mark V aircraft have flown a total of
7,152 hours (over a million miles) on Departmental business with only one minor
accident, and that occurred on the taxi strip at Patricia Bay, to mar a most impressive record of reliability. Credit at this time must be paid to the extremely capable
pilots and mechanics who have flown and maintained the aircraft during these
many years.
Modifications of the second Beech D18 (CF-BCD) were completed in early
summer, and the main bulk of the photography was accomplished with these two
aircraft. The first Beech D18 (CF-BCE), as reported in last year's Annual Report,
went into service in 1962. The change-over from Anson aircraft to Beech D18's
has provided this Division with excellent replacement equipment and made the
working conditions of the aircrew much more pleasant, but, as mentioned last year,
they have not appreciably increased the range, altitude, or pay load over the Anson
capabilities.
At the risk of becoming monotonous, this season's weather pattern was one
of the poorest on record. The mid-season was characterized by a total absence of
clear photographic conditions for 11 weeks in the southern half of the Province.
This in itself was a record. Even the usually reliable forecasting facilities were
often misleading throughout most of the summer, resulting in a " scrambly " type of
operation, in which the aircrew had to chase after good weather. This is both
frustrating and expensive.
 STEREOGRAMS
Stereograms may be viewed through a small magnifying pocket stereoscope
to obtain three-dimensional effect.
.."'-::
iJiSz*. I..
#»*?
Shopping centre in West Vancouver.   Date of photography, April 28, 1963.
Scale, I inch to 1,000 feet.   BC 5059, Nos. 225 and 226 (portions only).
V,
^§M{
North end of Lions Gate Bridge, Vancouver.   Date of photography, April 28, 1963.
Scale, 1 inch to 1,000 feet.   BC 5059, Nos. 224 and 225 (portions only).
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH DD 67
Of 73 special requests from various Provincial departments for photography,
61 projects were flown satisfactorily, and the 19,000 square miles of forest inventory
cover is second only to 1960's record accomplishment. This effort was achieved
primarily by the vigilance and enthusiasm maintained by all members of the aircrew
in spite of the frustrating weather pattern. The particular projects are itemized in
detail and tabulated at the end of this report.
Some air time was lost due to camera unserviceability, but most of the trouble
was caused by worn-out components in the O.S.C. cameras. As new units are being
installed as replacements, we anticipate that a minimum amount of lost time will be
encountered in the future.
PROCESS LABORATORY
The production figure of 134,507 10- by 10-inch reprints is a slight increase
over the figure of 1962. As might be expected, contact 10- by 10-inch reprints are
increasing in numbers over the older projection 10- by 10-inch reprints due to the
fact that all new photography is being exposed on 9V4- by 9V2-inch film. While
contact printing is slower than projection printing, the total output of the Process
Laboratory is a creditable figure.
The production of enlargements, up to 40 inches in size, has been considerably
increased this year. As air photos are being used more extensively for administra-
tional purposes in many areas, the trend to an increase in requests for enlargements
will probably continue.
With air photos becoming such a useful tool to so many Governmental activities, the demand for larger-scale, better-quality prints is a natural sequence, and to
this end the Process Laboratory must be geared. As staff is a limited factor, it becomes necessary to install methods and equipment to ensure that the over-all output
will be maintained at a high standard. Considerable effort in time and money is
being expended in the laboratory to meet these requirements, and more features of
the automated age will be required to keep this section up to date.
Details of production will be found at the end of this report.
INSTRUMENT-SHOP
One of the original reasons for the establishment of an Instrument-shop was to
develop and build specialized equipment for use in the Surveys and Mapping
Branch. Again this year the Instrument-shop fufilled this duty by making shutter
blades for the O.S.C. air cameras after it was discovered they were unobtainable on
the private market. Special shutter steel was purchased from Sweden, and an
ingenious method of punching a blade with a hydraulic punch was developed.
These shutter blades have been given considerable shop tests, and they appear to
operate as well as the blades originally installed in the shutter at the time of
manufacture. Had the shop not been able to produce these shutter blades, a major
decision on replacement cameras would have been required.
Two new replacement epidiascopes were designed for the specific purpose of
transferring planimetric detail from air photos to the interim base maps. These
instruments, properly designed and constructed, enable the mapping technicians to
do their work more efficiently and with a considerable saving in time. It is expected
that both of these epidiascopes will be in operation early in the new year.
Some minor modifications were added to the Deville plotter prior to the instrument being used in its intended role of topographic mapping.
The shop continues to provide specialized services and facilities for an ever-
increasing number of Government departments.   Most of the technical maintenance
 DD 68     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
services required by this Division for equipment in the Process Laboratory, Mapping
Sections, and Flying Operations is handled by this shop.
AIR PHOTO LIBRARY
A slight increase over 1962 figures in the number of reprints distributed through
the library was recorded. Provincial Government departments, primarily the Forest Service, were supplied with a greater number of reprints, and there was a decrease
in the number of air photographs purchased by the Federal Government. The sale
of reprints to the public remained about the same.
The total number of loans has increased this year by some 33,000 prints, due
to the fact that previously considered mapping prints were made available for the
loan service. The public borrowed an additional 3,000 prints over 1962, and an
extra 30,000 were borrowed by Provincial Government departments.
Details of the reprint and loan traffic are tabulated at the end of this report.
Index maps for all previously flown special projects were revised during the
year, and this photography has now been separated from the normal forest inventory
photography. This is intended to make the selection of larger-scale special photography easier.
Stereograms of a few interesting features, seen on this year's photography, are
shown on page 66 of this report.
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
DD 69
Orders for Standard Prints (9 by 9 Inches) from
British Columbia Negatives, 1963
Reprints
Lo
ins
Requisitions
Number
Requisitions
Number
Public-
689
139
37
72
10
136
27
18
54
233
26
3,532
6,434
261
1,277
387
2,091
1,266
1,385
5,328
5,732
88
191
79
11
8
3,152
4,067
Schools      	
University of British Columbia and University of
64
857
38
5
2
35
142
22
645
17
Oil and natural gas	
56
902
2,684
124
Totals   	
1,441
27,281
533
12,568
Federal Government—
12
3
26
4
5
6
6
19
16
3,681
39
173
94
43
171
178
36
98
1
1
1
11
Department of National Defence -	
46
2
1
8
5
81
Miscellaneous	
9
122
Totals  	
97
4,513
21
267
Provincial Government—
280
50
32
1
57
149
34
14
20
7
23
4
5
14,204
3,894
490
1
1,424
77,631
2,267
597
1,340
43
567
13
242
832
30
68
2
189
391
3
2
27
16
135
5
29,589
217
1,084
9
2,527
20,076
14
15
505
British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority	
159
2,270
11
8
6
10
2
371
54
61
Miscellaneous  	
4
Totals           -
676
102,713
1,726
56,966
2,214
134,507
2,280
69,801
Public Loans and Reprints
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
13,981
45,644
11,840
49,627
13,399
34,659
9,960
28,226
12,568
Reprints 	
27,281
Totals           	
59,625
61,467
48,058
38,186
39,849
 DD 70     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Production Record to 1963, Process Laboratory
1946-60
1961
1962
1963
Grand
Total
Processing completed—
Air camera films—
O.S.C. and RC8         	
24
2,709
71
20.5
3
57
72
103
17
1
107
23
1
2
291
F24 and Eagle III	
2,821
73
Test rolls   	
22.5
Colour film - 	
1.5
400 ft.
30
1
960 ft.
71
5
75,344
5.5
70-mm. helicopter  	
1,360
3,733
32
3,866
K20-F24    (Dominion   Hydrographic,   H.M.C.
5
Printing completed—
Standard prints, 5 by 5 inches enlarged to 10
1,552,970
46,017
127,043
30
49,195
1,804,552
46,047
Kenora prints, 9 by 9 inches reduced to 5 by
4,132
85,312
229
1,286
194
6
103
366
397
2,373
4,132
8,066
3,244
21,189
21,428
372
6,993
22,777
133
1,345
410
56,682
122
952
263
172,837
3,728
24,772
22,295
378
635
70
352
2,627
320
204
597
1,923
8,051
640
Kelsh A7-A8 plates, miscellaneous copies (photos)
2,681
23,626
4,027
30,549
1963 Air Operations Cost Summary by Projects
1
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A. Basic vertical cover—
Hr.
Min.
3,265
1,560
2. Revision-
17
9
45
10
695
320
$2,954.88
1,525.99
$1,750.20
805.85
$4,705.08
South-west Vancouver Island	
2,331.84
26
6
55
05
1,015
312
4,825
$4,480.87
1,012.71
$2,556.05
785.70
$7,036.92
1,798.41
Totals                	
33
00
1,327
$6.66
4,825
$1.83
$5,493.58
$3,341.75
$8,835.33
Average cost —	
B. Basic tricamera cover—
New cover—
Canoe River-Columbia River
Rocky  Mountain  Trench-Peace
12
11
3
50
15
40
790
1,330
325
585
$2,136.40
1,872.82
610.39
$1,989.44
3,349.31
$4,125.84
5,222.13
	
	
610.39
Totals  	
27
45
2,120
$4.70
910
$10.94
$4,619.61
$5,338.75
$9,958.36
C. Triangulation control identification ....
D. Forest    inventory    cover    (approxi
mately 20 chains to 1 inch)—
1. New cover—
Blueberry S Y U
92
12
25
56
8
30
6
50
25
05
55
05
45
30
4,580
825
1,490
3,380
590
2,330
	
4,850
1,100
1,435
$15,454.19
2,067.03
4,175.68
9,475.05
1,345.65
5,119.02
1,082.07
$11,533.71
2,077.58
3,752.24
8,511.80
1,485.79
5,867.59
$26,987.90
Burns Lake S Y.U.
4,144.61
Cranbrook S Y U
7,927.92
Okanagan S Y U.
3,535
695
2,760
17,986.85
Ootsa S Y U
2,831.44
Parsnip S Y U                           	
10,986.61
1,082.07
232
23
35
00
13,195
750
14,375
3,800
$38,718.69
3,828.87
$33,228.71
1,888.71
$71,947.40
Hecate   S.Y.U.   (approximately
40 chains to 1 inch)	
5,717.58
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH DD 71
1963 Air Operations Cost Summary by Projects—Continued
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D. Forest inventory cover—Continued
2. Improvement flying, all districts  ~
Hr. Min.
3    50
185
$538.14
$465.88
$1,104.02
Totals
259    25
14,130
$5.57
18,175
$4.33
$43,185.70
$35,583.30[ $78,769,00
1
Average cost	
E, Forest engineering—
Bench Creek F.D.R.               	
1    00
40
5    55
25
1    30
1    10
4   20
9    15
1    20
1 25
2 35
1 30
2 00
30
23
120
3
30
16
105
650
6
50
26
32
23
27
15
83
1
21
11
80
490
1
38
20
23
20
$166.47
110.98
984.97
69.36
249.71
194.22
721.38
1,539.88
221.96
235.83
430.05
249.71
332.94
$75.55
57.92
302.19
7.55
75.55
40.29
264.42
1,636.89
15.11
125.91
65.48
80.58
57.92
$242.02
Canyon Creek	
168.90
1,287.16
76.91
East Barriere Lake	
Glenogle Creek	
Kettle River F.D.R.                	
325.26
234 51
985.80
Peace River Pondage 	
3,176.77
237.07
Sukunka River F.D.R.
361 74
Tulameen River F.D.R.	
495.53
Waitabit Creek -	
330.29
390 86
Totals                           	
33    05
1,114
$7.46
830
$10.01
$5,507.46
$2,805.36
$8,312.82
F. Precision mapping projects—
50
11    20
45
35
20
3   45
2   55
440
2
2
2
2
65
$138.72
1,886.69
124.85
97.10
55.49
624.28
485.55
$1,108.04
5.04
5.04
5.04
5.04
163.68
$138 72
	
740
1
1
1
1
33
2,994.73
129.89
Provincial Gaol, Prince George..	
Rodd Hill	
102 14
	
60.53
629 32
Shuttleworth Creek	
649.23
Totals                    	
20    30
513
$9.17
-    777
$6.05
$3,412.68
$1,291.88
$4,704.56
G, Special projects—
Assessment  Commission — Lower
14   40
2    00
19    05
1 15
2 40
25
1 10
50
2 55
40
40
40
30
1    00
50
7    25
1    00
3 45
30
50
5   50
3    05
1    50
1    55
30
2,205
72
685
45
23
45
42
18
15
16
38
5£
22
430
21
65
35
78
126
63
57
25
5
1,310
120
$2,441.60
332.95
3,176.86
208.09
443.92
69.36
194.22
138.72
485.54
110.98
110.98
110.98
83.24
166.47
138.72
1,234.68
166.47
624.27
83.24
138.72
971.08
513.29
305.20
319.07
83.24
$5,552.82
181.32
1,725.03
113.32
57.92
$7,994.42
514 27
Dyking Commission—Fraser River
Forest Surveys Division—Quesnel-
1,130
40
28
35
26
12
12
12
4,901.89
321 41
Geographic    Division — Highway,
Land Inspection Division—
501 84
Highway,  Brakendale  to  Pem-
113.32
307 54
Pitt Lake _. 	
138 72
105.77
45.33
37.77
40.29
95.69
146.06
55.40
1,082.86
52.88
163.69
88.14
196.43
317.30
158.65
143.54
62.96
12.59
591 31
Legal Surveys—
Highway, Fort Steele to Wasa ...
Highway, Sinclair Creek to Ver-
156.31
148 75
Highway,  Yoho  Park  to  Park
151 27
Highway, Houston to Telkwa
35
45
30
640
178.93
Surveyor of Taxes—
194 12
2,317.54
219 35
Water Resources—
7
34
11
20
68
105
83
28
2
787 96
171 38
335 15
Poukhobor lands	
1,288.38
671 94
448 74
95 83
 DD 72     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
1963 Air Operations Cost Summary by Projects—Continued
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Internal — Kootenay   River   trig.
Hr. Min.
2   25
57
45
$402.31
$143.54
$545.85
Totals   	
78    25
4,246
$5.59
3,878
$6.12
$13,054.20
$10,692.62
$23,746.82
Average cost	
H. Miscellaneous flying—
Highways Department—Adminis-
5    15
45
40
3 20
13    20
18    40
4 55
5 55
45
$873.98
124.85
$873.98
Public    Relations    and    Information—
124.85
Duncan Tree-farm obliques —	
Travel  Bureau — Photographic
flights
110.98
554.91
2,219.63
110.98
554.91
Internal—■
2,219.63
984.96
984.96
Totals
53    35 |    ...
	
1     -   -
$4,869.31
$4,869.31
	
505    45
23,450
23,000
6,395
$80,142.54
$59,053.66
$139,196.20
1 Cost of maintenance and training charged to all projects.
 UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
  UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS DD 75
UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
M. E. Ferguson, Project Manager
During the year 1963 there was no indication of any major development or
expansion, with the result the operations were, in the main, of a routine maintenance type.
The increased enrolment at the University brought a further increase in vehicles, which added to the traffic problem and the parking problem. Through the cooperation of the police and an enforcement of regulations, these problems were well
controlled. During the year, consideration was given to the need for a new access
road to the campus, and there will be further investigations at an early date to determine where such a road should be located to best serve the ultimate parking and
road plan of the campus.
The Erosion Committee did not have any meetings during the year pending
the submission of sub-committee reports and recommendations. There is little doubt
that any plan that may be adopted will be of the long-range type owing to cost and
scope. In the meantime the erosion continues in several locations, which will, no
doubt, require some steps be taken to at least control these areas in the very near
future.
The agreement with the City of Vancouver whereby special assistance was
provided in case of fire expired March 31, 1963. Following negotiations a new
agreement was reached whereby reasonable protection can be provided until more
permanent plans are made regarding future operations.
We were all shocked at the sudden passing of our Fire Chief, who suffered a
heart attack. A replacement is expected early in 1964 as the competition closed on
December 18, 1963, and applications are being considered at the time of writing
this report.
As mentioned briefly in the 1962 Annual Report, there was a growing need
for additional fraternity lots. Through the co-operation of the University a solution was found when property just east of the existing fraternities was deeded back
to the Endowment Lands from the University. This provided sufficient area for
eight new fraternity lots. It is hoped to have these lots serviced and available to the
fraternities during the early part of 1964. At present, water and sewer services have
now been laid and plans and specifications being prepared for the balance of the
services.
Probably the item of most significance for the year was the question of water
supply. As a result of many meetings and surveys over a considerable period, several factors were decided. Of first importance was the establishment of a reservoir-
site, which is leased to the Greater Vancouver Water District. Plans are presently
being prepared for the first of the pumping units, and it is planned to have these in
operation for the summer of 1964. The next stage will be to commence the first of
the actual reservoirs, which will be concrete with concrete covers to allow for recreational use, such as tennis-courts, when completed.
A joint water-supply and distribution line to serve the Endowment Lands and
the University is presently being considered, with the hope this will be constructed
by the spring of 1964, and which will give a new 12-inch service along University
Boulevard from Western Parkway to the Main Mall and replace the existing 4-inch
line along Western Parkway from University Boulevard to Chancellor Boulevard.
When completed this line should solve the low-pressure area as well as a means of
levelling off pressures in other sections of the present residential area.
 DD 76     DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Number and Value of Building Permits Issued during
the Calendar Years 1961, 1962, and 1963
1961
1962
1963
Number
Value
Number
Value
Number
Value
1
1
10
1
9
$150,000.00
1
11
1
1
14
1
6
3
$11,000.00
48,400.00
20,000.00
44,450.00
50,000.00
$60,000.00
39,125.00
17,400.00
Garages, etc - 	
Swimming-pools -.- 	
8,400.00
13,000.00
1,000.00
7,325.00
47,300.00
Totals -	
23
$285,850.00
13
$60,400.00
25
$171,150.00
 UNIVERSITY ENDOWMENT LANDS
DD 77
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  LAND SETTLEMENT BOARD
  LAND SETTLEMENT BOARD
DD 81
LAND SETTLEMENT BOARD
Clara Stephenson, Secretary
The Land Settlement Board was transferred from the Department of Agriculture to the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources in June, 1963.
During the year the sales made by the Board amounted to $68,212. Fifty-nine
purchasers completed payment and received title deeds, and eight borrowers paid
up in full and received release of mortgage.   Collections were as follows:—
Loans.
Land sales	
Foreclosed properties and areas—rentals, etc.
Total.
$8,085.22
34,809.52
1,041.75
$43,936.49
The above figures include collections from the sale of Doukhobor lands in the
amount of $23,201.76.
Activities of the Board were concentrated this year on the sale of Doukhobor
lands in accordance with the recommendations of the report of His Honour Justice
Arthur E. Lord, and good progress was made in that regard.
  PERSONNEL OFFICE
  PERSONNEL OFFICE DD 85
PERSONNEL OFFICE
J. H. Palmer, B.A., B.Com., Personnel Officer
Organizational changes within the Department in 1963 were minor. They
included the establishment of a position as Junior Clerk in the Accounting Division
on a permanent basis rather than the previous casual appointment and the conversion of a Field Survey Assistant position in the Topographic Division to that of a
Draughtsman.
From a total Civil Service and non-Civil Service staff averaging 304 persons
(excluding part-time and seasonal employees), the following separations occurred:
Resignations, 22; involuntary terminations, 1; retirements, 1; deaths, 3; transfers
to other departments, 3.
The retirement mentioned was that of Mr. Stanley C. Hawkins, who left the
position of Principal Clerk in charge of the Crown Grant Section of the Lands
Branch after more than 50 years of service. Mr. Hawkins joined the Government
service in May, 1913, two weeks before his 15th birthday. When he retired in June,
1963, he had established an enviable record of service to the Province under 10
Premiers. On leaving, Mr. Hawkins was presented with a gold watch and a scroll
for meritorious service by the Honourable Ray Williston, Minister of Lands, Forests,
and Water Resources, on behalf of the Provincial Government. Mr. Hawkins has
the best wishes of all his former colleagues.
The Department was grieved by the deaths at very early ages of three employees during the year. Mr. G. T. Foran, Fire Chief, University Endowment
Lands, died, aged 47 years, after 17 years of service; Mr. G. C. Green, Darkroom
Assistant, Legal Surveys Division, died, aged 39 years, after 19 years of service;
and Mr. D. H. Stuart, Administrative Officer, Lands Branch, died, aged 41 years,
after 24 years with the Department. These employees are all sadly missed by their
former associates.
During the year 12 promotions through Civil Service competitions were processed, and 17 reclassifications were implemented. Five transfers within the Department occurred, and 18 new employees were recruited for permanent positions.
Mr. J. S. Caldwell, Mapping Assistant 3, Air Division, was awarded a Diploma
in Public Administration following completion of the three-year study course under
the Executive Development Training Programme. Mr. F. M. Cunningham, Assistant Chief Land Inspector, and Messrs. J. G. Callan and T. F. Moore, Draughtsmen
4, Legal Surveys Division, completed the second year of this course, and Messrs. A.
Paulsen and H. R. C. Gavin, Land Inspectors 2, completed the first year's training.
Messrs. A. M. Barber, B.C.L.S., A. D. Wight, B.C.L.S., and A. P. McLaughlin,
B.C.L.S., of the Surveys and Mapping Branch, and Mr. R. P. Murdock, Senior
Clerk, University Endowment Lands, were enrolled in the first year of this course.
Revisions in salaries for the staff of the University Endowment Lands were
implemented as a result of direction from the Civil Service Commission following
submissions by staff representatives to that body. This was the first year in which
the non-Civil Service group at the University Endowment Lands dealt directly with
the Civil Service Commission in the matter of wages and conditions of employment.
  MAIL AND FILE ROOM
  MAIL AND FILE ROOM
DD 89
MAIL AND FILE ROOM
John A. Grant
Letters received in the Department during 1963 amounted to 250,164, compared to 228,015 in 1962, an increase of 22,149 or Wi per cent.
A total of 10,493 new files was created during the year, and consequently it
has been necessary to move many thousands of the less active files to the Topaz
Avenue vaults.
It is noted that, by actual count, reference was made to 2,540 reels of microfilm.
Letters Inward
Branch
1962
1963
10-year Average,
1954-63
Lands
45,514
137,979
24,150
20,372
48,504
154,178
26,463
21,019
40,429
126,979
23,639
Survey and Mapping
18,175
Totals
228,015
250,164
209,222
Letters Outward (Recorded)
Branch
1962
1963
10-year Average,
1954-63
Lands
Forests
17,374
2,045
2,275
17,685
1,565
2,491
12,644
2,756
1,928
Totals    .                       	
21,694
21,741
17,328
Miscellaneous Reports
Designation
1962
1963
10-year Average,
1954-^3
5,551
13,724
4,134
2,473
2,345
15,704
4,235
3,285
5,081
15,153
3,212
Totals
25,882
25,569
23,446
New Files Created
Designation
1962
1963
10-year Average,
1954-63
"0" files
7,404
1,450
2,520
6,700
1,513
2,280
5,238
1,395
3,225
Totals
11,374
10,493
9,858
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1964
1,060-464-5465
    1964
INDEXES  1  TO 7
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND  WATER  RESOURCES
LANDS SERVICE
HON. R. G. W1LLIST0N -    -    MINISTER
E. w. bassett, deputy minister of iands
INDEX TO DEPARTMENTAL REFERENCE MAPS AND MANUSCRIPTS
DECEMBER 31st,  1963
EXPLANATION OF THE VARIOUS MAP SERIES
Most of the maps listed in this index were prepared originally for Departmental
use, and, having proved of value to the public, copies of same are for sale. As the
originals of these maps are on tracing-linen or paper-backed manuscript, the copies are
available only in white print or ozalid print form, which shows the map detail with
dark-blue or black lines on a white-background paper.
The topographic manuscripts shown on Index 4  are being published on a  scale
of   1:50,000.     Index 14, showing the progress of this programme is available on
request.
Address all orders and inquiries to:—
Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch,
Attention: Legal Surveys Division,
Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources,   Victoria, B.C.
Applicants are requested to enclose the correct payment with their
orders as Government Publications must be paid for in advance. Orders
to points within Canada may be sent C.O.D. upon request. For orders
to be delivered within the Province 5-per-cent social services tax must
be added. Cheques or money orders should be made payable to the
Minister of Finance for British Columbia.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND SERVICES AVAILABLE
FIELD-NOTES.—Prints or photostat copies of original survey notes of District Lot
Divisions are obtainable, cost depending on the size of the original. Prices on
request
TOWNSHIP PLANS.—Prints are obtainable of most of the townships within the old
Dominion Railway Belt and Peace River Block within British Columbia. Price,
30 c1 per print.
LAND REGISTRY PLANS.—Inquiries regarding Land Registry plans of subdivisions
of district lots should be addressed to the Land Registry Office in the district
concerned.   The districts and offices are as follows:—
Kamloops.
Prince Rupert.
Nelson.
Vancouver.
New Westminster.
Victoria.
(See also Index 3 for composite maps of L.R.O. plans.)
To avoid misunderstanding, applicants are requested to state the map number and
index map of sheets required. Maps supplied from these indexes are not kept in stock
but have to be printed especially to fulfil each individual request. As we have no
way of making use of same once they have been printed, they have no returnable value.
LAND   BULLETINS
The Land Bulletins listed below give information both on the agriculture potentialities and general economy of the various districts to incoming settlers.
LAND BULLETINS
Date of Issue
No.   1
3
4
5
6
7
li
9'
10
11
Kootenay Bulletin Area  - —1962
Okanagan Bulletin Area ! 1961
Lower Coast Bulletin Area  . 1962
Vancouver Island Bulletin Area    - 1963
Ouesnel-Lillooet Bulletin Area  1961
Kamloops Bulletin Area  _  1960
Fort Fraser—Fort George Bulletin area 1964
Prince Rupert-Smithers Bulletin Area 1961
Atlin Bulletin Area  1964
Peace River District - 1963
Acquisition of Crown Lands in British Columbia — 1964
Forest Seevicb
" How to Obtain a Timber Sale."
Grazing Regulations	
F.S. 223-
.1960
■ 1960
PHOTOSTAT REPRODUCTIONS.—Photostat copies of survey plans, maps, documents, etc., recorded in the Department, can be supplied to any size or scale—
enlargement or reduction.   Price:—
One sheet 18" X 24", $1.15   per photostat.
One half-sheet 12" X18", 601 per photostat.
PU1IL1SHED MAPS—A separate Index to Published Maps will be supplied upon request,
showing the various types of maps covering the Province.   Series are as follows:—
General Maps  -    Index 8
Regional Maps  ~.~ Index 9
National Topographic Maps on the scale of:
1 inch to 2 miles Index 10
1:250,000 and 1 inch to 4 miles  Index 11
1 inch to 8 miles  Index 12
1:1,000,000  -- „-  Index 13
1:50,000 and 1 inch to 1 mile Index 14
AIE| PHOTOGRAPHS—Prints of British Columbia Government air photographs are
available to the public. Indexes 15, 16, 17, and 18 show photographs taken at
various altitudes.      Prices will be supplied on request.
DEPARTMENT OF MINES
I PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS LOCATION MAPS.—Prints of these
maps showing permits and licences are available to the public. Price, $3.45
per print.   An index to areas covered by location maps will be supplied on request.
MINERAL CLAIMS AND PLACER LEASES,—Prints showing the approximate
locations of staked mineral claims and placer-mining leases are available to the public.
These maps conform in geographical detail, size, and number to the reference maps
shown on Index 1 and mineral reference maps shown on Index 2.   Price,   $1.15 per
print.
Address all inquiries to:— Chief Gold Commissioner, Victoria, B.C.
Mineral reference maps are prepared to show Departmental inform
ation, particularly surveyed mineral claims and placer - mining   leases.
They are compiled from all available data, and    prints on the scale of
1 inch to 1,500 feet, except where otherwise noted, are obtainable for
$ 1.15    per copy.    Orders or inquiries should quote map numbers.
n
  1964
INDEXES 8 TO  14
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF  LANDS,  FORESTS, AND  WATER   RESOURCES
LANDS SERVICE
HON.   R. G. WILL1ST0N MINISTER
E. W. BASSETT    DEPUTY MINISTER OF LANDS
INDEX   TO   PUBLISHED   MAPS
EXPLANATION OF THE VARIOUS MAP SERIES
The Pre-emptor and Degree Series of regional maps (Index 9) are gradually
being replaced by the National Topographic System maps on the l-inch-to-2-mile
and 1:250,000   (approx. 1 in. to 4 mi.) scales.
The latter system is a series of map sheets on the following scales designed
to cover Canada in a regular manner using lines of latitude and longitude
for the borders.
1 inch to 2 miles   See Index 10
1:250,000 (approx. 1 in. to 4 mi.)   „      „     II
1 inch to 8 miles .    „      „    12
1:1,000,000 (approx. 1 in. to 16 mi.)_  „      „    13
1:50,000 and 1 inch to 1 mile See  Index 14     (on reverse)
GENERAL   MAPS
INDEX 8
Map
No.
Address all orders and inquiries to:—
Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch,
Attention:   Geographic Division,
Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources,      Victoria, B.C.
Applicants are requested to enclose the correct payment with their
orders as Government Publications must be paid for in advance. Orders
to points within Canada may be sent C.O.D. upon request. For orders
to be delivered within the Province 5-per-cent social services tax must
be added. Cheques or money orders should be made payable to the
Minister of Finance for British Columbia.
ICR
1J
t  1JB
t   1JC
I Ijd
i  1JE
t  1JF
t   lJO
1  1JH
i 'jj
i i.ik
t   IJL
t  1JNT
lJR
US
Year of
Issue
To avoid misunderstanding, applicants are requested to state the map
number and index map of sheets required.
Government Agents throughout the Province stock copies of maps available
within their districts for over - the - counter sale
Unless otherwise requested, maps will be sent folded.
LAND   BULLETINS
The Land Bulletins listed below give information both on the agriculture
potentialities and general economy of the various districts to incoming settlers.
LAND  BULLETINS Date of Issue
No.  1. Kootenay Bulletin Area	
2. Okanagan Bulletin Area 	
Lower Coast Bulletin Area 	
1953
Year of
Issue
1938
1951
1961
1964
1957
1957
1957
1957
1957
1957
1957
1957
1957
1957
1957
1960
1945
Title of Map
Wall Map of British Columbia.   In two sheets.   Roads, trails,
railways, etc. When joined—
•Tentative Range Map..
-Mining Divisions   ■ '■
British Columbia-
Ditto
British Columbia.   In one sheet.   Showing post offices, railways,
htain roads, trails, parks, distance charts, etc. '    ; -.
HC. Land Districts '  .	
B.C. Land Recording Districts (revised. I960)...	
B.C. Mining Divisions (revised. 1958) .	
B.C. Assessment and Collection Districts (revised, 1960) "■
B.C. Electoral Districts (redistribution, 1938) (revised, 1955)	
B.C. Counties (Revised Statutes. I960) and Sheriffs' Districts	
B.C. School Districts (revised. 1963)	
B.C. Forest and Grazing Districts (revised, 1964)    ',.•■*-* 	
B.C. Registration Districts. Bills of Sale (revised. 1950)__	
B.C. Land Registration Districts (Revised Statutes, 194H) »*'■■"'■
B.C. Showing N.T. System   :_^_-_
B.C. Relief Map—Layer Colours (precipitation inset)	
BlC. Census Divisions , f^, ; t^_>	
Size of
Sheet (in
Inches)
57X71
17X22
17X22
30X38
30X39
30X38
30X38
30X38
30X38
30X38
30X38
30x38
30X38
30x38
30X38
30X38
32X41
1:1,000,000 or
1 in. to 15.78 m.
1 in. to     55 m.
1 in. to      52 m.
Reports
Geographical Gazetteer of British Columbia—Contains recorded geographical names of cities, villages,
post offices, railway stations, rivers, creeks, lakes, islands, mountains, etc_    	
t Prints only availableJ
$ 3.45
Free
Free
Per
Copy
1.15
»In course of compilation
Vancouver Island Bulletin Area—
Quesnel-Lillooet Bulletin Area	
 1962
 1961
 1962
 1963
 1961
Kamloops Bulletin Area   - ' ■ 60
Fort Fraser—Fort George Bulletin area 1964
Prince Rupert-Smithers Bulletin Area — - -.1961
Atlin Bulletin Area    1964
 1963
 1964
10. Peace River District- 	
11. Acquisition of Crown Lands in British Columbia	
(Status maps showing vacant Crown land will be found on Indexes 9, 10, and 11.)
Certain departmental reference plans and manuscripts are available to the public in ozalid or
photostat form. Indexes of the following, showing scales and prices, will be supplied on request:—
Index 1 — Departmental Reference Maps showing all land surveys, leases, applications, etc., to
datt of order (I in. to 1 mi. except where noted on index)
Index 2—Departmental Mineral Reference Maps showing surveyed mineral claims, placer mining
leaks, etc. (1 in. to 1,500 ft.).
Index 3 — Composite Maps showing subdivisions (1 in. to 500 ft.) (1 inch to 300 ft ).
Index 4 —Topographic Survey Mapping showing lots and contours (2 in. or 1 in. to 1 mi.).
Index 5 — Interim Mapping (2 in. to 1 mi.) showing planimetry compiled from air photos.
Index 6 -Large Scale Mapping (1 in. to 100 ft.) to (1 in. to 1,320 ft.).
Index 7 — Interim Mapping (4 in. to 1 mi.) showing planimetry from air photos.
Indexes 15, 16, 17, and 18 show   British Columbia Government air photographs   taken at
various altitudes.
Forest Service
" How to Obtain a Timber Sale.'
Grazing Regulations	
F.S. 223-
..1960
J 960
Detailed topographic maps are also available of the B.C.-Alberta Boundary,
B.C.-U.S.A. Boundaries, of the 1:25,000 series, Victoria-Vancouver area, and the
valleys of the Columbia River Basin. Indexes will be supplied on request.
For forest cover maps.lwrite to Surveys and Inventory Division, British Columbia Forest Service, Victoria.
For marine charts, wrr.e to the Canadian Hydrographic Service, Department of Mines and Technical Surveys, Victoria,
B.C., or Ottawa, (Ont.
For aeronautical chars, write to Map Distribution Office, Department of Mines and Technical Surveys, Ottawa, Ont.
For published soil maps, write to Department of Agriculture, Victoria, B.C.
For staked mineral claim, placer lease maps, also petroleum and natural-gas location maps, write to Chief Gold
Commissioner, Victoria, B.C.
REGIONAL   MAPS
INDEX  9
Map
No.
1
3*.
3c
3e
3f
3o
3h
3 J
$4c
4o
J4e
4f
J4g
Year of
Issue
1960
1963
1960
1950
1949
1958
1952
1936
1957
1925
1956
1956
Title of Map
LAND SERIES
Northerly Vancouver Island..
PRE-EMPTOR  SERIES
Fort George 	
Stuart Lake   v--t-.„	
Peace River (contoured) (Revised status 1963)„
Chilcotin (Revised Status    1958). „'>>,'
Quesnel (contoured) (Revised Status 19571	
T6te Jaune   ;	
North Thompson (contoured) c'.-
DEGREE SERIES
Cranbrook ..	
Fernie. .   .	
Upper Elk River. 	
Lardeau  	
Windermere .  - ";-,-
t Prints only available.
138°        137*        136'        135'       134'
Size of
Sheet (in
Inches)
28X42
28X42
28X42
28X42
28X42
28X42
28X42
28X42
24X40
28x39
22X32
25X42
25X42
Scale,
Miles, etc.
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
3 m.
3 m.
4 m.
3 m.
3 m.
3 m.
3 m.
2 m.
2 m.
2 m.
2 m.
2 m.
Per
Copy
Map
No.
.90
.60
.60
.60
.60
.60
.60
.60
.30
.30
.30
.30
.30
5Bs
5Bn
5c
5o
5e
MRMl
MRM2
mrm3
mrm4
mrm5
mrm6
mrm7
mrm8
Yelr of
Issue
1629
1929
1829
"1953*
1952
1927
1928
1928
1929
1929
1932
1934
1935
Title of Map
TOPOGRAPHICAL SERIES
Howe Sound-Burrard Inlet (contoured), South	
„ „ „ North	
Stikine River (contoured) -	
Revelstoke-Golden (Big Bend-Columbia River) (cont.)..
Lower Squamish Valley (contoured) —_	
MINERAL REFERENCE MAPS   printed
Slocan, Slocan City, Ainsworth, and Nelson.-
Trout Lake, Lardeau, and Ainsworth.	
' Ainsworth, Trout Lake, and Slocan	
Nelson and Trail Creek (Ymir) 	
Trail Creek and Nelson (Rossland) 	
Grand Forks, Greenwood, and Trail Creek-
Greenwood and Osoyoos . „_—
Barkerville and Lightning Creek	
Size of
Sheet (in
Inches)
Scale,
Miles, etc.
28X42
28X42
28X42
28X38
25X40
32X44
28X43
22X32
24X42
22X42
22X43
22X42
32X44
2 in. to
2 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
4 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
1 in. to
Per
Copy
available survey data and show lot surveys in
The maps listed above are compilations of al
addition to general geographical detail.
« The Land and Pre-emptor Series show vacant Crown land to the date of issue.
10 and 11 for additional maps showing land status.
Year of
Issue
TWe of Map
North Western British Columbia
North Western British Columbia
North Western British Columbia
North Eastern British Columbia-
North Eastern British Columbia-
North Eastern British Columbia-
South Eastern British Columbia-
South Eastern British Columbia-
South Eastern British Columbia-
West Central British Columbia—
West Central British Columbi
West Central British Columbia—!
East Central British Columbia—
East Central British Columbia—
East Central British Columbia—
South Western British Columbia'
South Western British Columbia
South Western British Columbia
See Indexes
Size of
Sheet (in
Inches)
-Planimetric.
-Landforms..
-Special	
-Planimetric.
-Landforms..
■Special	
Planimetric-
Landforms...
■Special	
Planimetric...
Landforms	
Special-...-	
Planimetric....
Landforms	
Special	
—Planimetric
—Landforms-
—Special	
30x38
30x38
30x38
30x38
30x38
30x38
28x38
28x38
28x38
30x38
30x38
30x38
30x38
30x38
30x38
30x38
30x38
30x38
Scale,
Miles, etc.
1 in. to 10
1 in. to 10
1 in. to 10
1 in. to 10
1 in. to 10
1 in.to 10
1 in. to i'O
1 in.to 10
1 in.to 10
1 in. to 10
1 in. to 10
1 in. to 10
1 in. to 10
1 in. to 10
1 in. to 10
1 in. to 10
1 in.to 10
1 in. to 10
Per
Copy
1B,1D, IE, IF. 1G. IK show water features, place-names, railways, roads, airports, parks, etc.
1BL.1DL,1EL   1FL   IGL, 1KL show, in addition, relief in grey. (1BL,1EL,1KL also available in sand.
1BLS. 1DLS, 1ELS, 1FLS, 1GLS, 1KLS show only water features and relief in brown.
The above sheets were compiled from air photographs.
PROVINCIAL PARK MAPS—ADVANCE PRINTS ONLY
Map No.
Title of Map
Scale
Per
Copy
P.S.G. 1
Garibaldi Park—planimetric ...
1 in. to 4 m.
$0.30
P.S.G. 2
Garibaldi Park—contoured __
1 in. to 2 m.
.60
P.S.G. 3
Western Garibaldi—contoured
1 in. to 1 m.
.30
P.S.T. 1
Tweedsmuir Park—planimetric
1 in. to 8 m.
.30
P.S.T. 2
Tweedsmuir Park—planimetric
1 in. to 4 m.
.60
P.S.W. 1
Wells Gray Park—planimetric
1 in. to 4 m.
.30
P.S.W. 2
Wells Gray Park—contoured
1 in. to 2 m.
.60
For  Vacation  and Tourist Information,  write
to: —
The British Columbia Government Travel Bureau,
Victoria, B.C.
Map No.
•82 E/SW
*S2 E/NW
•82 E/SE
•82E/NE
*82 F/SW
•82F/NE
•82F/NW
* 82F/SE
* 82G/SW
•82 G/SE
82 J/NE, NW—
Dateed
S L 1960
S L 1960
S L 1959
S L 1957
S L 1959
SL 1961
SL 1962
S L 1962
SL 1962
SL 1963
58
•82K/SE
82 K/NW
•82 K/SW
•82 L/SE
82 L/NE
•82 L/NW
•82 L/SW
82 N/NE
82 N/SE
82 N/SW
•92 B/NW, SW Parts of SL 1958
Parts of      1923
SL 1963
L 1956
SL 1961
SL 195657
L 1950
SL 1959
SL 1957
1931
L 1932   .
L 1955 ^
•92 G/SE
•92G/SW
•92 H/NE
•92 H/NW
•92 H/SE
•92 H/SW
•92 I/SW
•92 I/NW
• 92 I/NE
•92 I/SE
•93 P/NE
•93 P/NW
•94 A/NW
•94A/SE
"94 A/SW
•94 A/NE
SL 1958
SL 1959
SL 1958
SL 1957 55
SL 1958
SL 1960
SL 1958
SL 1958
SL t959,
SL 1961
PL 1951
PL 1951
PL 1951
PL 1953
PL 1954
PL 1951
* denotes sheets which were compiled with the use of air photographs.
L denotes sheets on which lot surveys are shown.
P denotes preliminary maps without contours.
S denotes maps showing land status.
TErtMBAP , c-f-
-104*J-
«\
-,"
-10.
"$
",0?li
gjptr.nurag-^   ■
o
V
103 B
4-
102O
,&1»
INDEX  U
NATIONAL
TOPOGRAPHIC SERIES
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Showing Maps Published   ~"jS
SCALE   1:   1,000,000
LEGEND
Sheets published shown thus
Price 60 ( per copy
Layer Colour Contours
Size of sheets: 25 in. x 30 in.
=-.I28"
112°
60"
^BEATTCiN
:<C
'■"■■sal
PARSNIP IJiVEH
52
120°
—102 P-
IARLOTTL    1
INDEX 10
NATIONAL TOPOGRAPHIC SERIES
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Showing Maps Published on Scale
1    INCH   TO   2   MILES
SCALE
10  0        25        50 IM 150 200
LEGEND
Sheets published shown thus:-
Provincial Government
Price 60 # per copy
Canadian Government
Price 60 $ per copy
Advance ozalid prints
Price, 30<< per copy.
When ordering Maps show:—
Index No 82 L
Sheet quarter SW
e.g. Vernon 82 L/SW
-103 Ac
130" 129' 128" 127" 126" 125" 124" 123" 122' 121" 120" 119° 118" 117" 116°        i     115"
Explanation:   The maps published on this scale, will show:   water features in blue; relief features (if available)
with brown contour lines and cultural features, such as place names, roads, railways, and boundaries, in black.
Road classification is shown in red. Provincial maps show vacant Crown land to the date of issue.
Contour Interval:   100 and 200 feet.
Size of sheet:  24in.x30in.
INDEX 11
ONLY   SHEETS   SHOWN   IN   RED   ARE   PUBLISHED
139°
*u*j t""ir'-""^i'*
wmmllm
'1P4J."~
19BSi
Srtgppl
m
I9/S4
123*       122°       121°
HP*Ei'rt"rt-
K-   .   L     '
i.94L ij,'
1952.
■ IQ4H--
'U954J I
"f
m
m li   si
94D
INDEX 12
SHg60°   NATIONAL TOPOGRAPHIC   SERIES
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Showing Maps Published
1    INCH   TO   8   MILES
LEGEND
Sheets published XWWMM
shown thus \WmSk
Price 60tf per copy
Layer Colour Contours
Size of sheets:
24 in. X 30 in.
mm
56   EXPLANATION:
The maps published on this scale, on the index to the left,
will show:  water features in.blue; relief features (if available) with brown
contour lines and cultural features, such as place names, roads, railways,
55"   and  boundaries,  in  black.    On   provisional   editions  water  features  and
contours are also shown in black.   Canadian Government series  showing
wooded areas,  if  available,   will   be   supplied   if  specif-
ii8° |j       ically  requested. Provincial maps show vacant Crown land
to the date of issue.
Contour Interval:  500 feet.
",7'      "f -j        Size of sheets:  24 in. x 30 in.
102O
I     |
INDEX 11
NATIONAL TOPOGRAPHIC SERIES^
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Showing Maps Published
SCALE   1:   250,000   (Approx. 1 in. to 4 mi.)
SCALE
10   0 25        50    I 100 150 200
LEGEND
Sheets published shown thus:—
Provincial Government
Price 60 «■ per copy
Canadian Government
Price 60 4 per copy
Order by Map No., e.g.—92 G
1ARLOTTE
jj§ S
102 I,
1954
8®
-92J
113°   52
1952—denotes date of publication.
C —denotes   sheets  showing
contours.
I—denotes sheets on which
lot surveys are shown.
All published Provincial
maps show land status.
£—denotes   provisional
maps.
A—denotes Advance ozalid
prints only, no contours.
**'   Price, 30^ per copy.
■E22H
a   m
s@    11
13    IB
 139°
138*
J37
136c
135"
134°
133°
132°
ONLY SHEETS SHOWN IN RED ARE PUBLISHED
131° 130° 129° 128° 127° 126° 125° 124°
123°
122°
121
120°
119°
LIST   OF   PUBLISHED   MAPS
INDEX 14
55°
54°
521
The topographic maps published on the scales
listed below will show water features in blue;
relief features with brown contour lines; and
cultural features, such as place-names, roads,
railways, and boundaries, in black. On maps
containing further information, lot lines are
shown in black and additional colours are used,
such as red for road, classification, green for
wooded areas. Maps showing wooded areas,
if available, will be supplied if specifically
requested.
Provisional maps are contoured sheets either
printed from the compilation stage or converted
from existing   I inch to I mile maps.
The list to the right gives the latest edition date
and also indicates the maps which show lot surveys.
Size of sheets:
1:50,000—each half—22 X 29
1 inch to 1 mile (1:63,360)—24 in.X30 in.
Contour Interval:   100 feet.
I
137°
Date
P 1940
SCALE:
Map. No.
92C/9
92C/10
92 C/l 1 E
92C/I3E
92C/14
92C/15
92C/16
92E/1 E
92 E/7 E
92E/8
92E/9
92E/10
92E/U
92E/I5
92E/16
92F/1
92 F/2
92F/3
92 F/4
92F/5
92F/6
92 F/7
92F/8
92F/9
92F/10
92F/1I
92F/I2
92F/13
92F/U
92 G/1
92G/2
92 G/3 E
92 G/4
92G/5
92G/6
92 G/7
92G/8
92G/9
92G/I1
92G/12
92G/13
92G/14
92H/1
92H/2
92H/3
92H/4
92H/5
92 H/6 W
92H/11 W
92H/12 E
92H/12 W
92H/13 E
92H/14 W
92 1/3. W
92 1/4, E
92 1/5, E
92 1/6
92 1/9
92 1/10
92 1/11
92 1/14
92 1/15
92 1/16
92 J/14,15
92K/3
92 K/4
92K/5
92 K/6
92L/1
92L/2
92L/3
92 L/4
92L/5
92L/6
92L/7
92L/8
92L/11
92L/12
92L/13
92L/14
92 0/1
92 0/2
92 0/8
92 0/9
92 0/16
92P/1
92P/8
: 50,000
Date
L 1958
L 1955
L 1954
L 1955
L1956
L 1955
L1955
L 1956
L 1955
L 1955
L 1955
L 1957
L 1957
L 1958
L 1955
L 1958
L 1955
L 1956
L 1956
L 1955
L 1955
L 1956
L 1955
L 1955
L 1956
L 1956
L 1957
L 1958
L 1957
1949
L1962
L 1961
L 1955
L 1955
L196
L 1958
L 196
L1962
L1957
L 1958
L 1957
L 1960
L 1960
L1960
L 1960
L 1959
L 1958
L 1957
L 1957
1955
L 1960
L 1956
L 1957
L 1957
L 1958
L 1958
L 1958
L 1960
L 1958
L 1958
L1958
L 1958
L 1957
P 1940
L 1956
L 1955
L 1957
L 1955
L 1957
L 1957
L 1957
L1960
L1961
L 1956
L 1956
L 1955
L 1958
L 1958
L 1958
P 1959
L 1960
L 1954
L 1960
L 1964
L 1958
L 196
L 1961
INDEX 14
NATIONAL TOPOGRAPHIC  SERIES
BRITISH COLUMBIA
1:50,000(i
Showing maps published on
mi)  and  1    INCH
Scale
MILE (1:63,360)
Provincial Government Surveys published.
Scale:   1:50,000 (E Vi & W 1/2)
Provisional      1:50,000
Canadian Government Surveys published.
Scale:   1:50,000 (E Vi & W Vi)
Scale:   1 inch to
Provisional
: 50,000
Scale:
Scale:
Prices
1:50,000 (E '/2 & W Vi)
1 inch to 1 mile —	
60^ ea. half
60tf per copy
When ordering Maps, show:
Index No.  92 Advance ozalid prints
Alphabet letter  G Scale: 1:50,000
Sheet No 4
State if only East"or West"haff is * Price- 30# each half
required, e.g., Nanaimo,—92 G/4 W Vi.
Note:   Prints of manuscripts of this series not yet published are shown on Index 4,
which is available on request.
(TWO SHEETS  EACH  UNLESS
Map. No.
94G/15
94 G/16 (1 sheet)
94 H/1 (I sheet)
94 H/2 (1 sheet)
94H/3
94 H/4
94H/5
94 H/6
94 H/7 (1 sheet)
94 H/8 (1 sheet)
94 H/9 (1 sheet)
94 H/10 (1 sheet)
94H/11 (1 sheet)
94 H/12 (1 sheet)
94 H/13 (1 sheet)
94H/14 (1 sheet)
94 H/15 (1 sheet)
94H/16 (1 sheet)
94 1/1
94 1/2
94 1/3
94 1/4
94 1/5
94 1/6
94 1/7
94 1/8
94 1/9
94 1/10
94 1/11
94 1/12
94 1/13
94 1/14
94 1/15
94 1/16
94 J/1
94 J/2
94 J/7
94 J/8
94 J/9
94J/10
94 J/11
94J/12
94J/13
94 J/14
94 J/15
94 J/16
94 K/9
94K/10
94 K/ll
94 K/12
94K/13
94 K/14
94 K/15 W
94M/1 E
94 M/7 E
94M/8
94 M/9
94 M/10
94 M/l 1
94 M/12
94 M/l 3
94M/14
94 M/1 5
94 M/l6
94 N/4
94 N/5
94P/1
94P/2
94 P/3
94 P/4
94P/5
94 P/6
94 P/7
94 P/6
94 P/9
94 P/10
94 P/ll
94P/12
94 P/13
94P/14
94 P/15
94 P/16
102 1/8 E
102 1/9
102 1/16
102 0/14 E
103 B/2 W
103 B/3
03 B/5 E
03 i
103 B/ll W
03 B/12
103 B/13
103C/9E
103 C/l6
103 F/l
103 F/2 E
103 F/7
103 F/8
103 F/9
103F/10
03F/14E
103 F/l 5
103 F/16
103 G/4
Map. No.
Date
92 P/9
L 1960
93 8/1
L 1958
93 B/8
L 1960
93 B/9
L 1955
93 B/16
L 1955
93C/1
L 1962
93C/2
L 1960
93C/7
L 1960
93C/8
L 1960
93G/8
L 1961
93G/9
L 1960
93G/13
L 1960
93G/14
L 1952
93G/15
L 1960
93G/16
L 1961
93H/1
L 1961
93 H/2
1961
93H/3
L 1962
93 H/4
L 1961
93 H/6
L 1961
93H/11
L 1960
93 H/12
L 1960
93 H/13
L 1961
93 H/14
L 1960
93 1/4
L 1961
93 J/1
L 1961
93 J/2
L 1954
93 J/3
L 1953
93 J /4
L1961
93 J/7
P 1957
93 J/8
P 1958
93 J/9
P 1958
93 J/10
P 1957
93 J/14
P 1957
93 J/15
P 1958
93 J/16
P 1958
93 K/l
L 1956
93 K/2
L 1956
93 K/3
L 1961
93 K/4
L 1960
93 K/5
L 1960
93 K/6
L 1960
93L/1
L 1961
93L/2
L 1956
93 L/7
L 1955
93 L/8
L 1955
93L/9
L 1955
93 L/10
L 1956
93L/11
L 1995
93 L/14
L 1955
93 L/15 W
P 1923
93 M/3
L 1961
93M/5
L 1953
93 M/6
L 1961
93 M/12
L 1953
93 0/2
L 1960
93 0/3
L 1958
93 0/7
L 1958
93 0/9 E
P 1944
93 0/9 W
L 1958
93 0/10
L 1959
93 0/15
L 1960
93 0/16 E
P 1944
93 0/16 W
L 1960
93 P/8 E
L 1952
93 P/9
L 1953
93 P/10
P 1959
93 P/ll
P 1959
93 P/12W
P 1944
93 P/12 E
P 1959
93 P/13
P 1958
93 P/15
L 1953
93 P/16
L 1952
94 A/1
L 1960
94 A/2
L 1956
94 A/3
L 1956
94 A/4
P 1957
94 A/5
P 1957
94 A/6
L 1956
94 A/7
L 1956
94 A/8
L 1961
94 A/9
L1961
94 A/10
L 1961
94 A/11
L 1955
94 A/12
L1955
94 A/13
1955
94 A/14
L 1955
94 A/1 5
L 1961
94 A/16
L 1961
94 B/l
P 1944
94 B/2
L 1961
94 B/3
L 1961
94 B/7
P 1958
94 B/8
P 1958
94 B/9
L1960
94 B/10
P 1958
94 B/l5
L 1961
94 B/16
L 1954
94G/1
L 1954
94G/2
L1963
94 G/7
L 1953
94G/8
1960
94G/9<] sheet)
P 1959
94 G/10
L 1953
94G/11 E
1953
NOTED)
Date
L 1953
P 1959
P 1959
P 1959
1955
955
L 1960
L1955
P 1959
P 1959
P 1960
P 1959
P 1959
P 1959
P 1959
P 1959
P 1959
P 1959
P 1960
P 1961
961
P 1960
P 1961
P 1961
1961
961
P 1961
1962
P 1961
196
P 1963
P 1961
P 1960
P 1961
P 1961
L 1954
L 1955
P 1961
P 1961
L 1955
1955
L 1955
L 1955
L 1955
955
1955
1954
L 1954
1953
1953
L 1953
L 1954
954
1954
1954
L 1954
1955
L 1956
L 1955
1955
L 1954
1953
1956
1957
L 1954
1954
P 1962
P 1961
P 1961
P 1962
P 1961
P 1961
P 1961
P 1961
961
P 1961
P 1961
961
P 1962
P 1961
P 1961
P 1963
L 1957
L 1957
L 1955
L 1961
P 1957
957
P 1957
P 1957
L 196
P 1957
P 1957
P 1957
P 1957
P 1957
P 1957
P 1958
P 1958
P 1958
P 1958
P 1958
P 1958
P 1958
P 1957
Map. No.
103G/5W
103G/12W
103G/13
103 H/11
103 H/12
103 H/13
103 H/14
103 1/2
103 1/3
103 l'4
103 1/5
103 1/6
103 1/7
103 1/9
103 1/10
103 1/16
103 J/l
103 J/2
103 J/4
103 J/7
103 J/8
103 J/9
103 J/10
103 J/15 E
103 J/16
103 K/l
103 K/2
103 K/3 E
103 P/9
103 P/10E
103 P/13 W
103P/14E
103 P/15
104 A/2 W
104 A/3
104 A/4 W
104 A/5 E
104 A/6
104 A/9
104 A/I I W
104 A/12
104 A/13 W
104 B/16
104 G/I
104 G/8
104 G/9
104 G/14
104 G/15
104 G/16
104 H/1
104H/12 W
104H/13W
104 1/4 W
104 1/5W
104 1/12 W
104 1/13
104 J/l
104 J/2E
104 J/2W
104 J/3
104 J/4
104 J/5
104 J/7 E
104 J/8
104 J/9 E
104 J/12
104 J/13
104 J/16 E
104 M/9
104 M/10
104 M/l 1 E
104M/14 E
104M/l 5
104 M/l6
104 N/5
104 N/6
104 N/7 W
104 N/11 W
104 N/12
104 N/13
104 N/16
104 0/13
104 0/14
104 0/15
104 P/3 {1 sheet)
104 P/4 (1 sheet)
104 P/5 (1 sheet)
104 P/6(1 sheet)
104P/12 W
104 P/15
104 P/16
114 P/9W
114 P/10E
114P/15
114P/16 W
Date
P 1958
P 1958
P 1958
L 1961
L 1962
L1961
L 1961
L 1957
L 1961
L 1961
L 1962
L 1961
L 1958
L 1960
L 1958
L 196
L 1954
L 1954
L 1960
L 195S
L 1955
L 1960
L 1960
P 1958
L 1958
L 1960
L 1960
L 1960
L 1955
L 1955
P 1929
L 1955
L 1955
196
L 1955
P 1929
1963
L 1963
L 1954
1963
1963
1963
1963
1955
1957
1955
L 1958
L 1958
L 1958
L 1953
1960
1960
P 1959
P 1959
P 1959
P 1959
P 1959
P 1959
L T958
L 1958
L 1957
L 1959
P 1959
P 1959
P 1959
L 1958
1958
P 1959
1960
1960
1960
L 1960
L 1960
1960
L 1957
1955
1956
L 1956
L 1956
L 1956
L 1954
1954
1955
1955
P 1959
P 1961
P 1959
P 1959
P 1961
L 1956
L 1956
L 1960
L 1960
P 1959
P 1959
SCALE:
INCH  TO  1   MILE
^
ADVANCE
OZALID
PRINTS
Map. No.
82F/3
82 L/7
82L/10
82M/13
92 F/16 E
92L/10
92 M/3
92M/4
92M/5
92N/1
92 N/7
92 N/8
92 N/9
92 N/10
92 N/15
93C/5
93 D/7 E
93 D/8
93 1/8
93 1/9
93 1/10
93 1/11
93 1/12
93 1/13
93 1/14
93 1/15
93 I /16
93 0/1
93 0/6
93 0/8
93 0/11
93 0/12
93 0/13
93 0/14
93P/1
93 P/2
93 P/3
93 P/4
93 P/5
93 P/6
93 P/7
93 P/8 W
94 B/4
Date
L P 1960
LP 1958
L P 1958
LP 1959
LP 1957
LP 19S6
LP 1959
L P 1959
LP 1959
P 1958
P 1958
L P 1958
LP 1958
L P 1958
LP 1958
L P 1959
LP 1959
LP 1959
P 1956
P 1956
P 1956
P 1957
P 1957
P 1957
P 1957
P 1956
LP 1956
P 1957
L P 1957
P 1957
P 1957
P 1957
LP 1957
P 1957
LP 1956
P 1956
L P 1957
LP 1957
P 1957
LP 1957
LP 1956
LP 1956
LP 1957
52°
1
51°
50°
49°
40"
130°
129"
128° 127° 126° 125" 124°" 123°
ONLY   SHEETS   SHOWN   IN   RED   ARE   PUBLISHED
122
121
120
119
m
117°
116°
115"
 1964
INDEXES 15  TO 18
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND  WATER  RESOURCES
LANDS SERVICE
HON. R. G. WILLISTON -    -    MINISTER
E. W. BASSETT   DEPUTY MINISTER OF LANDS
DECEMBER 31st,  1963
AIR PHOTO COVER
EXPLANATION
The Federal Government and the Provincial Government are the main sources of air
photographs covering the Province. Negatives of the photography taken by the Federal
Government are held in Ottawa; negatives of the photography taken by the Provincial
Government are held in Victoria.
Photographs are taken from various altitudes with various cameras, and provide overlapping or " stereo " cover of the ground. The scale of photography varies, depending
upon the height of the aircraft above ground, the focal length of the camera used, and the
size of the photographic print.
Indexes IS, 16, 17, and 18 show the air-photo cover of British Columbia as follows:—
Index 15: Tri-camera photography and 80-chain vertical photography.
Index 16: 40-chain vertical photography.
Index 17: 20-chain vertical photography.
Index 18: Special projects.
The vertical photography shown on Indexes IS, 16, and 17 consists of a series of
parallel, overlapping strips covering large block areas; tri-camera photography is taken
in single strips, usually along prominent geographical features such as valleys, coastlines,
and highways.
AIR PHOTO INDEX MAPS
For ease of reference, photographs are keyed as accurately as possible on appropriate
maps, copies of which are available at a nominal charge. These are indexes to the location of air photographs only; for maps compiled from air photographs, refer to Indexes
4,5,6,7, 10, 11, and 14.
TRI-CAMERA PHOTOGRAPHY (INDEX 15)
The term " tri-camera " refers to single runs of photographs using an assembly of
three cameras. One camera points straight down, while the other two point one to the
right and one to the left. The three cameras are exposed simultaneously so that a tri-
camera set consists of three photographs—two obliques and one vertical—that cover the
ground from horizon to horizon. Any of the three photographs may be ordered individually.
Each tri-camera strip is identified by a number prefixed by the letter " X." Within
these strips the left oblique, right oblique, and centre vertical photographs are distinguished
by the prefixes " XL," " XR," and " XC," respectively.
80-CHAIN VERTICAL PHOTOGRAPHY (INDEX 15)
This small-scale air-photo cover was flown by the Federal Government. The photographs were taken from an altitude of 35,000 feet above sea-level with a 6-inch focal-
length camera and are at a scale of approximately 1 mile to 1 inch for a standard 9" x 9"
print.   Each photograph covers approximately 80 square miles.
40-CHAIN VERTICAL PHOTOGRAPHY (INDEX 16)
These photographs were taken from 18,000 to 21,000 feet above sea-level (roughly
15,500 feet above average ground elevation). Over mountainous terrain the scale varies
considerably within each photograph but averages about 2,640 feet to 1 inch for a standard
9" x 9" print.   Each photograph covers approximately 20 square miles.
20-CHAIN VERTICAL PHOTOGRAPHY (INDEX 17)
These photographs were taken from roughly 15,500 feet above average ground elevation with a 12-inch focal-length camera. The scale is approximately 1,320 feet to 1 inch
for a standard 9" x 9" print.   Each photograph covers approximately 4 square miles.
SPECIAL PROJECTS (INDEX 18)
Special, mostly large-scale, photography is taken to supplement standard air-photo
cover as required. These projects may consist of an entire block of several hundred photographs or as few as a single overlapping pair.
Index 18 is only a general guide to special photography; more detailed information
of special projects or areas is available upon request.
B.C. PROVINCIAL AIR PHOTO LIBRARY
The Air Division, Surveys and Mapping Branch, maintains a library of air photographs taken by the Provincial and Federal Governments. These library prints are available for reference and may be viewed or taken out on loan at the following rates: Service
charge for viewing prints in the library, 50 cents (minimum); loan service charge, $1 for
five prints (or less) and 10 cents for each additional print.   Loan requests must be prepaid.
The time-limit for loans in the Victoria-Vancouver area is two weeks; elsewhere,
three weeks.   Photographs are available on loan in Canada only.
PURCHASING INSTRUCTIONS
Reprints or enlargements of air photographs taken by the Provincial Government may
be ordered at the prices noted below. The exact photo number and roll number may be
ascertained from an index map of the area; otherwise, it is necessary to specify precisely
the area for which photographs are required.
The prices of reprints and enlargements are as follows:—
Size
9"X    9"
Price per Print
$0.70
18"xl8"
4.60
30" x 30"    _         	
    8.30
30" x 30" ("retouched"!
.     12.00
Address all orders and inquiries to:—
Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch,
Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources,
Victoria, B.C.
Attention: Air Division.
Government publications must be paid for in advance. Cheques or
money orders should be made payable to the Minister of Finance for
British Columbia. For orders to be delivered within the Province add
5 per cent social services tax.
Orders to points within Canada may be sent C.O.D. upon request.
Further information regarding Federal Government photographs and prices may be
Obtained by writing direct to:—
National Air Photo Library,
Department of Mines and Technical Surveys,
Ottawa, Ont.
139*     i3sr     ar     136*     135°     13a*     133*    13a*     ur     13 o"    129*     rear     127°    tze    ies"     12a'    123'     122°     121*     120"
INDEX 16
40-CHAIN VERTICAL PHOTOGRAPHY
These photographs are indexed on 4-miles-
to-1-inch maps. Each index sheet is shown
on this key by a number and a letter; e.g.,
Sheet 92o (for the Vancouver area).
Prints of these index sheets are available
at a nominal charge.
LEGEND
Provincial Governments 1937-62       HH
Federal Government 1933-50
Provincial Government 1963
NATIONAL TOPOGRAPHIC SERIES
BRITISH COLUMBIA
SCALE
10   0 25        50 100 150 200
130" 129° 128° 127° 126" 125° 124" 123° 122° 121* 120° 119° 118* 117° 116° 115"
139"        138"        137"        136*        135"        134"        133°       132"        131" 130"        129*        128"        127"        126°       125"        124°       123°        122*        121" 12Q°
NATIONAL TOPOGRAPHIC SERIES
BRITISH COLUMBIA
SCALE
10   0 25        50 100 150     200
INDEX 17
20-CHAIN VERTICAL PHOTOGRAPHY
58 These photographs are indexed on 2-miles-
to-1-inch maps. Each index sheet is shown
on this key by a number and a letter, and, in
addition, is divided into east and west halves;
e.g., Sheet 82e West (for the Penticton area).
Prints of these index sheets are available
at a nominal charge.
LEGEND
Provincial Government 1956-62
Provincial Governments 1963     f/fj
114' 113°   52°
130' 129° 128° 127° 126° 125° 124 123° 122* 121° 120° 119" 118* 117° 116° 115*
 139°        138.
137°
136°
135°        134°        133°       132°
131°
13 O0       129°       128- 127°       126°
125°
124°       123°        122°        121°
120°
119°
INDEX   18
SPECIAL PROJECTS
Special air-photo cover is indexed on a variety of key maps, depending upon the scale of the photography.
Indexes of special projects may be obtained by geographical reference or description of the area concerned. Prints of these index sheets
are available at a nominal charge.
This photography is available FOR PURCHASE ONLY—not on
LEGEND
Provincial Government 1946-62
Provincial Government 1963
130
129c
128°
127
126°
125°
124°
123°
122"
121°
120°
119°
118°
117c
116°
115°

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