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Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1963 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1964

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1963
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31, 1963.
ROBERT W. BONNER, Q.C.,
Minister of Industrial Development, Trade,
and Commerce.
 The Honourable Robert W. Bonner, Q.C.,
Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31,
1963.
THOMAS L. STURGESS,
Deputy Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce.
 Report of the Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce
For the Year Ended December 31, 1963
FOREWORD
The improvement in economic conditions which developed during the latter
part of 1961, and continued in 1962, was maintained throughout 1963. Almost
every level of economic activity registered gains in 1963. The forest-based industries, mineral industries, and construction industries made the most outstanding
progress.
Favourable conditions in such export markets as the United States, the United
Kingdom, the Common Market, and Japan led to larger sales for most resource-
based industries, which in turn stimulated increased activity in tertiary industries,
such as transportation, finance, service, and retail and wholesale trade. The large
volume of wheat and other prairie grains shipped to Japan and mainland China
during 1963 made significant contributions to business activity in Vancouver, New
Westminster, and other British Columbia ports.
Prices at the consumer and wholesale level showed only moderate gains in
relation to the expansion of business activity and consumer income and expenditure
during the year. The labour force of the Province increased in 1963 by almost 3
per cent over 1962, while the numbers of employed persons grew slightly more than
3 per cent. The proportion of the labour force unemployed averaged 6.3 per cent
in 1963, compared with 6.8 per cent in 1962. Labour income is estimated at
$2,300,000,000 for 1963, compared with $2,100,000,000 in the year previous, indicating that wage-earners shared in the gains made in the Provincial economy. Retail
sales figures show that consumer expenditure was well above 1962 levels in 1963.
The 1963 value of retail sales is expected to reach $1,900,000,000, compared with
$1,800,000,000 in 1962.
Capital investment reflecting the purchases of new machinery and equipment,
the construction and repair of buildings, and the major repair of machinery and
equipment amounted to $1,400,000,000, a gain of 8 per cent over 1962. Major
areas of expenditure in 1963 were expansion of plant and equipment by the pulp
and paper industry, construction of the massive hydro-electric installation on the
Peace River, and a very high level of construction in housing, particularly apartment
blocks.
Agricultural conditions were favourable in 1963, with the largest and best
apple crop since 1956. Gains were also registered in the production and sale of
eggs, poultry, and small fruits.
The value of production of the Province's manufacturing plants in 1963 was
$2,200,000,000, a gain of 4 per cent over 1962. The forest industries provided
the major impetus, with lumber shipments up 7 per cent, plywood production up
6 per cent, and a general gain in pulp and paper production of about 3 per cent.
The mining industry made outstanding gains in 1963, with crude-petroleum
production increasing 44 per cent over 1962 and copper production up 14 per cent,
and most other sectors recording increases to bring the total value of mineral production 9 per cent higher than in 1962.
5
 S 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Fishing, while down from the near-record year of 1962, enjoyed an above-
average year in 1963. It is believed the final wholesale marketed value of fish
products will be close to $80,000,000 despite the loss of an important part of the
sockeye run during a strike in July.
Exports through British Columbia customs ports will exceed $1,300,000,000
in 1963, compared with $1,245,000,000 in 1962. This increase reflected gains in
almost every class of export, but particularly in forest, mineral, and grain products.
While all markets were good, a significant factor was the expanding Far Eastern
markets in Japan and mainland China.
The outiook for 1964 is excellent, with every indication of favourable export
markets and a high level of investment in the Province's forest, mining, and electric-
power generation industries. The Bureau of Economics and Statistics executive
opinion poll substantiates the good prospects for 1964, and indicates most business
activity sectors should show gains in the coming year.
Following in this Report are summaries of the activities of the various divisions
of this Department—namely, the Bureau of Economics and Statistics; the Industrial
and Trade Office; the Data Processing Division; British Columbia House, London,
England; and British Columbia House, San Francisco, Calif. The objectives and
organization of the British Columbia Research Council are recorded likewise.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1963
S 7
BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS
Before proceeding to review the work accomplished by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics during 1963, it may be useful to explain that the Bureau is a
fact-finding and advisory body. It has two primary functions: the first is to provide economic counsel and, when necessary, to conduct investigations into economic questions affecting the Province; the second function is to collect and compile economic statistics of interest to the Province.
To ensure technical proficiency, the Bureau has endeavoured to follow the
policy of building up a small corps of professionally trained persons who can be
relied upon to perform a variety of difficult economic analyses. It has also been
the policy to make the services of the technical personnel continuously available to
all other departments of the Government. A description follows of the various
services performed during the year.
ECONOMIC RESEARCH
One of the Bureau's functions is to provide economic counsel to the Government. Supplementary to this function is the preparation of a weekly report to the
Premier and to the Minister of each department. This report reviews and summarizes significant events and developments, in the field of economics, considered of
importance to British Columbia. As well, from time to time, technical assistance
is given to the various branches of the Government as it is requested. There are
many publications prepared to keep government and industry informed on current
business conditions. The two most widely distributed are the Monthly Bulletin of
Business Activity, containing a brief description of current changes in monthly
business indicators, plus statistical tables and charts, and the Annual Summary of
Business Activity, recording the past year's performance and including numerous
charts and historical series illustrating the economic position of the Province. In
recent years an executive opinion poll has been conducted at the end of each year
to gauge the outlook of the industry for the coming year.
Many requests are received for information dealing with the Provincial economy from private individuals, corporations, trade-unions, newspapers, business publications, and Boards of Trade. The Bureau's files and library contain much of the
information requested, but often special surveys and considerable research are
necessary.
The annual study of wage rates for selected occupations in the metropolitan
areas of Vancouver and Victoria and centres in northern and southern areas of the
Province was again prepared and published. The Civil Service Commission, as well
as other Government agencies and the public, was provided with these comparative
wage rates.
 S 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1961, 1962, and 1963
Unit or
1963
Base
1961
1962
Preliminary
Period
Estimates
$000
179,786
229,276
250,600
$000
45,371
51,356
51,800
$000
8,965
33,209
37,900
$000
42,314
34,537
36,000
$000
12,082
18,327
19,000
$000
12,927
14,283
16,200
$000
19,878
21,366
22,400
$000
2,711
17,617
25,400
$000
8,901
10,323
11,200
$000
688,000
800,000
850,000
M f.b.m.
6,875,000
7,918,000
8,600,000
M f.b.m.
5,620,000
6,254,000
6,700,000
Tons
2,256,000
2,410,000
2,450,000
Tons
1,136,000
1,200,000
1,250,000
$000
78,758
94,700
80,000
Cases
1,405,159
1,816,600
1,200,000
$000
137,204
151,087
154,000
$000
1,967,091
2,182,374
2,335,000
$000
1,080,751
1,244,712
1,300,000
$000
421,885
477,037
430,000
Gallons
336,808,000
359,403,000
381,000,000
000 kwh.
13,180,000
14,570,000
15,200,000
Tons
13,072,665
13,858,657
14,600,000
$000
395,040
404,520
450,000
$000
1,665,229
1,784,086
1,875,000
$000
257,387
307,899
340,000
$000
249,034
264,042
279,000
$000
1,240,900
1,271,800
1,400,000
$000
207,558
237,124
270,000
Units
11,167
11,920
14,000
$000
20,433,555
23,089,746
24,700,000
Number
588,000
613,000
623,000
Number
544,000
580,000
591,000
Number
44,000
33,000
32,000
1949=100
112.3
115.7
120.0
1949=100
116.8
121.1
124.5
1949=100
102.1
113.0
125.0
1949=100
118.6
122.6
128.0
1949=100
188.0
198.3
208.0
1949=100
71.1
76.6
83.2
1949=100
71.1
76.3
81.0
1949=100
113.4
114.2
114.4
1949=100
129.5
136.7
141.6
1949=100
97.0
100.9
103.0
$000
1,999,000
2,131,000
2,300,000
Mining—
Total value of production 	
Zinc  _   	
Copp er  - 	
Lead _ — —
Iron concentrates 	
Industrial minerals	
Structural materials  	
Petroleum, crude	
Natural gas   -
Forestry—
Total value of production 	
Timber scaled   	
Lumber production  _
Pulp production - 	
Paper production	
Fisheries—
Wholesale marketed value of production	
Pack of canned salmon	
Agriculture—Farm cash income  —
Manufacturing—Factory shipments	
External trade—
Exports through B.C. customs ports 	
Imports through B.C. customs ports	
Internal trade—
Gasoline consumed - 	
Electric power generated 	
Railway freight loaded and received in British
Columb i a - 	
Sales of life insurance 	
Total retail sales .  	
Motor-vehicle dealers  —
Department stores 	
Capital investment—
Capital and repair expenditure	
Building permits issued  	
New residential units completed ~. 	
Finance—Cheques cashed	
Employment (June)—■
Labour force 	
Employed _.. -
Unemployed —~	
Employment indices (based on firms with 15 or
more employees)—
All employment  —
Manufacturing _	
Iron and steel products 	
Lumber and plywood  _—	
Pulp and paper	
Mining ._  	
Logging-  	
Transportation,   storage,   and  communication  	
Service  	
Construction	
Labour income „  	
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1963
Economic Indicators in British Columbia
BANK CLEARINGS                                                                                                                        BUILDING PERMITS
S 9
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
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220
200
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80
60
'40
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0
1
47        1949      1951      1953      1955      1957      1959       1961      1963
YEARS
100
AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGES
YEARS
60
3
LABOUR FORCE
J
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O
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W
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In
o
g    400
Z
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D
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H
100
8     40
20
y
1947        1949      1951      1953      1955      1957      1959       1961      1963
YEARS
RETAIL TRADE
1800
3
19'
7
1949       1951       1953       1955       1957       1959        1961       19
1600
1400
s
< 1200
J
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600
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13.5
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S   4.5
3.0
1.5
*=	
19
47
1949      1951      1953      1955      1957      1959       1961      1963                      1947       1949       1951      1953      1955      1957      1959       1961      19
YEARS                                                                                                                                        YEARS
63
 o
FARM CASH  INCOME  IN  B.C., YEARS   1928 TO  1963
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1963 S  15
TRANSPORTATION
During 1963 the transportation section of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics prepared a number of reports and submissions that affected the transportation
industry of the Province. One of the foremost reports dealt with the economic research undertaken on the proposed $18 million extension of the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway. The findings of this report were considered in the decision to build the
branch line from Summit Lake, on the main line, 100 miles north-west to Fort St.
James.
The Bureau maintained a watching brief and assisted Provincial counsel at hearings held by the Board of Transport Commissioners for Canada on the application
of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company to discontinue its passenger service on the
Kettle Valley line between Spences Bridge, B.C., and Lethbridge, Alta. Hearings
were held in Fernie, Nelson, and Penticton, with the Provincial statement being presented at Penticton.
The Bureau also attended a number of local meetings held by the Board's field
officer regarding the application of either the Canadian National or the Canadian
Pacific to remove its station agent at various locations throughout the Province.
Not all applications were accepted; for example, in the case of Falkland, B.C., the
Board recommended the retention of the agent.
Throughout the year the transportation section of the Bureau has been actively
preparing a submission to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Railways,
Canals, and Telegraph Lines regarding the anticipated legislation arising out of the
recommendations of the MacPherson Royal Commission on Transportation. While
the content of the actual legislation has not been revealed as yet, the original recommendations, which formed the basis of the legislation, were not entirely favourable to
British Columbia. The new year should bring the long-awaited legislation and one
of the major transport hearings for Canada.
Finally, in 1963 the Bureau continued to provide its usual service to other
Government departments, business, and industry in rate and developmental matters.
EXTERNAL TRADE
In addition to regular tabulation and presentation of import and export statistics,
three special studies in a series covering trade with the Pacific rim were released.
" Canada's Trade with Countries of the Pacific," a summary volume, was released
in January, followed by " The Pacific Rim of Latin America " and " Canada's Exports to Southeast Asia—A Trade and Transportation Study." The latter was prepared by Dr. W. Hughes, Chairman of the Transportation and Utilities Division,
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration, University of British Columbia.
Dr. Hughes is presently a visiting professor at the University of Malaya. Two further publications in this series will be released early in 1964. In addition, the annual
" Preliminary Statement of External Trade through British Columbia Custom Ports
—1962 " was distributed to over 600 interested parties.
Numerous requests regarding imports and exports of specific commodities were
received. Other activities included preparation of statistical and written material for
use in monthly and annual reports. Special studies were prepared for the members
of trade missions to Latin America, Great Britain, and Japan.
The table of exports for British Columbia products was revised in 1962 to conform with the export classification system established by the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, Ottawa, in January, 1961. It should be noted that these export figures
differ from the regularly published figures since they include exports of products
considered to be principally of British Columbia origin shipped through all Canadian
 S 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ports and exclude products originating in other Provinces exported through British
Columbia customs ports.
The import table shows imports through British Columbia customs ports and
includes products which are transhipped to other Provinces. These figures are similar
to regularly published figures but are the final revised values.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1963
S 17
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 S 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICS
The Bureau is responsible for the collection, analysis, interpretation, and publication of statistical information. In addition, it assists other departments in the
compilation of statistical information and in establishing uniform statistical methods
throughout the service. Following is a brief outline of the Bureau's activities in these
fields.
Co-operative Statistical Agreements
Since other Government agencies are also concerned with the collection of
statistics, a series of working agreements designed to prevent overlapping or duplication has been arranged in recent years between this Bureau and the Dominion Bureau
of Statistics, Ottawa, as well as with the Provincial Departments of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Labour, Provincial Secretary, Health Services and Hospital Insurance, and Social Welfare. During 1963 the essential statistical services performed
for the other Provincial departments as well as for the Department of Industrial
Development, Trade, and Commerce were maintained. Conferences between the
Provincial and Federal statistical bureaux are now held on a regular basis.
Forestry
The Bureau continued to collect, analyse, and disseminate information relating
to the economic aspects of the primary and particularly the secondary phases of the
forest-based industries of the Province. During the year a large number of requests
were received from industry, trade and other publications, labour organizations,
industry associations, and individuals. In addition, assistance was rendered to other
Government departments. Study of several forest industries and potential was undertaken for internal use, for other Government departments, and in response to other
requests. Early in the year a publication summarizing statistics relating to the forest
industries of the Province was produced. The Bureau participated in the first
Dominion-Provincial Conference on Forestry and Forest Products Statistics, held at
Ottawa in March of 1963.
The forest industries comprise the most important industrial group in the Province and, with a net value of production estimated to exceed $850,000,000 in 1963,
accounted for about 35 per cent of the net value of all commodity-producing industries and employed over 75,000 persons. In 1963 the British Columbia forest
industries accounted for over 65 per cent of the lumber produced in Canada, nearly
85 per cent of the plywood, 20 per cent of the pulp, and nearly 15 per cent of the
paper produced in Canada.
The British Columbia logging industry, the Province's most important primary
industry, cut 8.6 billion board-feet of timber in 1963, an increase of 9 per cent over
1962. From figures available to the end of October, log production on the Coast
was up by 5 per cent and log production in the Interior by 17 per cent.
Production of lumber up to the end of September, 1963, was 6.6 per cent above
1962. Lumber production for the year was estimated at 6.7 billion board-feet, 7
per cent above 1962 production. A regional breakdown for 1963 shows that Interior
sawmills now produce just over 50 per cent of the lumber sawn in British Columbia.
Lumber shipments by British Columbia sawmills were maintained at levels
10 to 12 per cent above 1962 throughout most of the year.
Plywood production for 1963 was estimated at 1.8 billion board-feet and
showed steady growth throughout the year.
Output in the pulp and paper industry was up in 1963, though not by as much
as in previous years.   Pulp production for 1963 was estimated at 2,450 thousand
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1963 S 19
tons, between 1 and 2 per cent above the previous year. The utilization of waste
wood by the pulp industry increased during the year, with further introduction of
barking and chipping equipment, especially in the Interior, and expansion of the
output of wood chips from sawmills and veneer-mills. In 1963 chips from waste
wood accounted for over 45 per cent of the wood consumption of the pulp industry.
Roughly half of the pulp produced in British Columbia was used within the Province
in the production of paper. Paper production in 1963 was estimated at 1,250
thousand tons, close to 3 per cent above 1962. The remainder of pulp production
was sold in Canada and on world markets. Pulp sales were maintained at levels
approximately 5 per cent above 1962 throughout most of the year.
At the beginning of 1963 capital investment intentions by the British Columbia
forest industries were estimated at $217 million, substantially above 1962. While
capital investments by all of the forest industries were up, the most impressive programme was that of the pulp and paper industry, which was estimated at $117
million. On the basis of expansion plans announced and under way, this level of
investment should continue through 1964 and 1965.
Mining
It is the responsibility of the Bureau to collect and compile the production
statistics on all minerals, with the exception of coal, natural gas, and petroleum.
These statistics are subsequently published in detail in the Annual Report of the
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
The value of mineral production in 1963 is likely to set a new all-time record.
The preliminary estimate indicates that it will be approximately $250,600,000,
roughly 9 per cent higher than 1962. The outstanding increases are for crude petroleum, with an increase of 44 per cent, and copper, with an increase of 14 per cent
over 1962. Nearly all minerals, except gold, are expected to have some increase
in value. The principal metals consisting of gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc
together contribute roughly 56 per cent of the total value of mineral production.
Zinc continues to be the outstanding contributor to the total value, being roughly
$51,800,000, followed by copper, valued at $37,900,000, and then lead at $36,000,-
000. Crude petroleum, with its value of $25,400,000, is followed by iron concentrates, $19,000,000; asbestos, $11,400,000; natural gas, $11,200,000; silver, $8,-
600,000; coal, $6,000,000; and gold, $5,700,000. Structural materials, consisting
of cement, clay products, lime and limestone, rock, sand and gravel, and stone will
equal $22,400,000.
The devalued Canadian dollar continued to assist the mining industry of British
Columbia as the prices received for B.C. metals are nearly all based on U.S. prices.
Labour
Periodic surveys relating to occupational wage and salary rates have in recent
years become increasingly valuable, to both employers and employees, as a source
of information to be used in labour negotiations and collective bargaining.
During 1963 a considerable amount of exploratory work was accomplished
in the labour section with a view to expanding the occupational coverage of the
existing surveys, and also to increase the accuracy of the job classifications used
in the questionnaires. It was found that a wide variation in salary rates often
occurred in the survey results due to inconsistencies in the classification of
workers, or inadequate definitions or job descriptions used in the inquiry. Considerable progress was achieved by direct approach to the employer in many
 S 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
instances where it was felt that information obtained from the questionnaires
was inconsistent with previous returns.
In this work, as in the field of organized-labour statistics, the close association of Provincial and Federal departments has been of great assistance in the
provision of reference sources necessary to the advancement of the survey
methods.
As in previous years, the Bureau of Economics and Statistics again completed
the statistical sections of the Annual Report of the Department of Labour, this
material appearing under the heading of " Statistical Report on Trades and
Industries " in the Annual Report of the Department of Labour for the current
year.
In conjunction with the Federal Government survey of labour organizations
in British Columbia, the Bureau completed a follow-up survey of non-responding
locals, and provided a complementary service in this regard to the Federal offices.
On the basis of information obtained jointly by both authorities, a current 1963
Directory of Trade-union Organizations in British Columbia was provided for
the British Columbia Department of Labour.
Projects completed during the year in the labour section included the
following:—
(1) The 1963 survey of British Columbia salary and wage rates.
(2) Statistical sections for the 1963 Annual Report of the British Columbia
Department of Labour.
(3) A survey of organized labour in British Columbia completed, together
with a directory of trade-unions and labour organizations, for the
Department of Labour.
(4) A survey of clerical salary rates in the Vancouver area, tabulated for
the Vancouver Board of Trade.
(5) A survey of working conditions in collective agreements, British Columbia, 1963, completed for the British Columbia Department of Labour.
(6) Preliminary tabulations and test runs relating to a study of wage and
salary rates in selected occupations for the Civil Service Commission.
And continuing maintenance of current labour statistics in use by the Bureau.
Recently revised totals shown in the following table represent the estimated
annual labour income in British Columbia for the years 1947 to 1963: —
Estimated Annual Labour Income in British Columbia
Year Annual Income Year Annual Income
1947  $641,000,000 1956  $1,649,000,000
1948  794,000,000 1957  1,765,000,000
1949  825,000,000 1958  1,763,000,000
1950  915,000,000 1959  1,873,000,000
1951  1,072,000,000 1960  1,959,000,000
1952  1,214,000,000 1961  1,999,000,000
1953  1,279,000,000 1962  2,131,000,000
1954  1,302,000,000 1963  2,300,000,000!
1955  1,426,000,000
i Preliminary estimate.
Source:   Estimates of Labour Income, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1963 S 21
MARKET RESEARCH
Keen interest is being shown by business and industry in the market potential
of the Province, and a large and varied number of requests is received for market
data and assessments of industrial and commercial opportunities.
The Bureau of Economics and Statistics is continually on the alert to detect
products which present a good opportunity for local manufacture, and in this
connection has prepared several industry studies. A systematic search and
analysis of the Bureau's extensive manufacturing data is currently under way to
assist in locating new opportunities.
Another aspect of market research which has continued to receive attention
relates to the study of specific areas of the Province.    (See under Publications.)
PUBLICATIONS
Periodical
Monthly Bulletin of Business Activity.—This publication contains special
articles of current interest and also incorporates a monthly review of current
changes in the principal segments of the Provincial economy.
Summary of Business Activity in British Columbia.—This publication is a
companion to the Monthly Bulletin, and is issued at the end of the current year.
It summarizes the current year's economic picture and presents historical series
relating to business activity in the Province.
Business Outlook.—This publication is issued at the end of the current year
and indicates business conditions during the past year and the outlook for the
coming year. It is based on a survey of 300 of the major companies in British
Columbia.
External Trade.—Statistics covering in detail all commodities imported or
exported through British Columbia customs ports having an aggregate value of
$50,000 and over.
British Columbia Facts and Statistics.—Portrays graphically some of the
salient features of British Columbia's economy and describes its geography, government, and judiciary and educational systems.
Salary and Wage Rate Survey.—This annual publication summarizes salary and
wage rates in selected clerical, professional, and trade occupations, in business and
industrial establishments for metropolitan Vancouver and Victoria, Southern Interior Centres, and Northern Centres.
Establishing a Business in British Columbia.—This publication gives to prospective investors information relating to the establishment of a business in British
Columbia.   A new issue was released in 1963.
British Columbia Regional Index.—This index contains available statistics on
a wide range of subjects covering all areas of the Province. It is in the course of
revision, and pending completion of the project as a whole, sections will be released
individually.   The East and West Kootenay section was released in 1963.
Special
British Columbia Forest Industries Statistics.—This publication was released
early in the year. It contains pertinent statistics of the forest-based industries of
British Columbia.
A List of Manufacturing Firms in British Columbia Segregated in Size Groups
According to Employment.—This publication was released in April, 1963.    It is
3
 S 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
supplementary to the British Columbia Trade Index. Only firms having 15 or more
employees are listed.
Population Maps of Census Divisions.—Published during 1963, these maps
show the 1961 population by enumeration areas, cities, towns, district municipalities,
villages, and certain communities. There are 10 maps making up the series, and they
are sold for $1 per map or $10 for the series.
Age Group Distribution of British Columbia's Population by School Districts.—
Published in July, 1963, this publication shows in summary and detail the age makeup of the population as of June, 1961.
A Manual of Resources and Development.—This publication was released in
March, 1963. It contains up-to-date information about the location and development of British Columbia's resources and is well documented with maps and
diagrams.
Materials and Components Used by British Columbia Manufacturers during
1958.—This publication was released in August, 1963, and lists many of the commodities used by the principal manufacturing industries in the year 1958.
Area Surveys.—These surveys place special emphasis on the present state of
commercial and industrial development, and on the favourable opportunities for
further expansion in the area. The following have been released to date: Hope and
District in 1959, Chilliwack and District in 1960, Kamloops and District in 1961,
Kelowna in 1962, and Fernie and District in October, 1963. Both the Kelowna and
Hope surveys were reprinted in 1963 at the request of local authorities.
Trade Studies.—These studies are designed to encourage British Columbia exporters and producers to examine more intensively the possibilities for expanding and
diversifying exports to the countries bordering the Pacific Ocean. The following
have been released to date: Canada's Trade with Countries of the Pacific in 1962,
United States Market Opportunities for British Columbia Businessmen in 1962,
Export Opportunities in the Far East in 1962, The Pacific Rim of Latin America in
1963, and Canada's Exports to South-east Asia—A Trade and Transportation Study
in 1963.
The Commercial Fisheries of British Columbia.—An industry study, the report
relates the industry to the Provincial economy and outlines how it functions as an
economic unit.
(Note.—A complete listing of Bureau publications is contained in the Department's List of Publications, obtainable free of charge.)
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1963 S 23
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE OFFICE
The main function of this office is to promote new industrial and commercial
enterprises throughout the Province, provide assistance when necessary to established
businesses, and develop the domestic and export trade. The office also provides
industry with data on location-sites, land-use maps, availability of raw materials, and
information on the services offered by the British Columbia Research Council on
matters concerning industrial and scientific research.
This work is carried out in co-operation with other Provincial Government
departments, Federal Government departments, Boards of Trade, Chambers of Commerce, the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association,
industrial commissions, railway industrial agents, and foreign trade representatives
in Canada and overseas.
BRANCH PLANT AND MANUFACTURING UNDER
LICENCE INQUIRIES
Many of the inquiries received during the year under review were the result of
our direct mailing campaign to selected firms. Several firms indicated that they
would be establishing branch plants in British Columbia in the future, and, at the
present time, firms in the chemical field, research, paper-manufacturing, and products
for the pulp industry are actively engaged in completing their plans for branch plants.
Numerous licence manufacturing proposals from the United Kingdom and the
Continent, United States, and Eastern Canada were handled by the Department during the year. Some of the items examined by British Columbia firms included a ski
lock which enables skis to be quickly folded for storage, a pile-driving apparatus
adaptable to any standard pile-driver for driving batter piles at selected acute angles,
an unsinkable circular life-saving raft, material-handling equipment, diaphragm
valves, pressure-packaged fire-tube boilers, exterior-wall panels of asbestos cement-
wood wool, corrugated boxes for display of perishable fruits, folding garage, small
industrial machine tools, building-walls construction, and illuminated safety cane
for the blind and handicapped.
COMPOSITE INDUSTRIAL MAPS OF THE FRASER VALLEY AREA
AND METROPOLITAN LOWER MAINLAND
The heavy demand for these maps from individuals, real-estate and business
firms continued during the year. Seven hundred and fifty copies of the Metropolitan
Vancouver map were used by the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority
for inclusion in its special deep-sea potential industrial-site study. A special order
for 300 copies of the same map was also received from the New Westminster National
Harbour Board.
The two maps cover an area extending from Burarrd Inlet and the mouth of
the Fraser River to Hope and indicate the zoned and potential heavy and light industrial areas, main highways, railway lines, natural-gas line, oil pipe-line, and other
facilities serving the area. Each of these maps may be purchased for $1 per copy,
which includes the 5-per-cent social services tax.
HANDICRAFT DIRECTORY
Copies of the 12th edition of this directory were distributed during the year to
retail and wholesale firms, to British Columbia Houses in San Francisco and London,
 S 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
to resorts and other outlets. The usual contact was made with Eastern Canadian
Provinces interested in handicraft development. The directory lists producers in
British Columbia who are interested in finding a market and who are in a position
to supply reasonable demands.
Show-cases of British Columbia handicrafts are still on display in the Empress
Hotel in Victoria, and a continuing series of regional displays was exhibited at the
Government Information Centre, 787 Hornby Street, Vancouver. Items exhibited
during the year included weaving, carving, ceramics, silver jewellery, copperwork,
and Indian crafts.
REGIONAL INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Demands for this survey were again so heavy that it was necessary to print a
revised edition during the year under review. The survey lists many investment
opportunities in the fields of hotel and motel requirements, housing developments,
warehousing, and wholesale and retail outlets. The suggestions were submitted by
Chambers of Commerce throughout British Columbia and have resulted in encouraging capital investment in many commercial enterprises.
CANADA-UNITED STATES DEFENCE PRODUCTION SHARING
During the year numerous British Columbia firms were contacted and provided
with information on how to bid on United States defence contracts. Mr. F. C. Mac-
Kay, Commercial Representative for the Department in San Francisco, continued
to work closely with Mr. R. Robinson, the Federal Government representative in
Los Angeles, on developing this programme.
BRITISH COLUMBIA INDUSTRIAL DESIGN COMMITTEE
Some of the activities of this Committee during the year included:—
(1) Revised and located the B.C.I.D.C. industrial design exhibition in a permanent location adjacent to the Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce exhibit in the British Columbia Building at the
Pacific National Exhibition.
(2) Organized and held the second British Columbia schools industrial design
competition in the auditorium of the T. Eaton Co. store. Followed up the
exhibition with the publication of 3,000 copies of the booklet " Design-62 "
and widely distributed same. Had a new 1962 student industrial design
award certificate designed and presented to award winners.
(3) Planned and proceeded with the preliminary work aimed at the production
of a B.C.I.D.C. photographic exhibition of well-designed B.C.-manufactured articles.
(4) Sponsored the second industrial arts teachers in training industrial design
competition, adjudicated same, and presented awards.
The Committee includes representation from the Federal Department of Trade
and Commerce; Provincial Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and
Commerce; Department of Education; University of British Columbia; Canadian
Manufacturers' Association; Vancouver Board of Trade; Vancouver School of Art;
British Columbia Research Council; Association of Professional Engineers of British
Columbia; Canadian Association of Consumers; Architectural Institute of British
Columbia; and Community Arts Council of Vancouver.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1963 S 25
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS' TRADE AND INDUSTRY COUNCIL
The Council members are official representatives of all the Provincial Governments' departments concerned with the development of trade and industry in
Canada.
The aims of the Council are: To provide interprovincial consultation and cooperation on matters of trade and industrial development; to supply traders and
manufacturers from Canada and abroad with a nation-wide Provincial service in
these fields; and to promote greater understanding throughout Canada of the economic conditions affecting the development of each of the Provinces and all of
Canada.
The 15th annual conference was held in Banff, Alta., where the delegates heard
an address by the Honourable Charles M. Drury, Minister of Industry, who outlined
the formation and function of the new Department of Industry to be established in
Ottawa.
Other topics discussed at the conference included: Foreign Investment in Canadian Industry; The Canadian Economic Situation; New Provincial Policies and
Programmes; National Economic Council and Provincial Economic Councils; Small
Business Management Programme; and Canadian World Exhibition at Montreal.
BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR
The third British Columbia International Trade Fair will be held at Exhibition
Park in Vancouver from May 13 to 23, 1964.
Already the largest event of its kind on this continent west of Chicago, the 1964
British Columbia International Trade Fair will be almost 50 per cent bigger than
the previous Trade Fairs.
The great majority of governments and companies who exhibited in 1958 and
1961 are returning in 1964, many with increased display areas, proving the importance and value placed on these successful trading events by those wishing to do
business throughout the entire Pacific Northwest.
The British Columbia International Trade Fair is sponsored by the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, and administered by a
capable volunteer group of leaders of British Columbia business and industry.
President and chairman of this board of directors is Mr. W. J. Borrie, chairman of
Pemberton Securities and a past president of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce
and the Vancouver Board of Trade. On loan from this Department, Mr. D. H.
Mollison will again manage the British Columbia International Trade Fair from a
Vancouver office.
During the year under review the president and general manager of the British
Columbia International Trade Fair separately visited some 20 different countries,
talking with government trade offices, Chambers of Commerce, and manufacturers.
To date the following countries have contracted for exhibition space: Australia,
Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, France, India, Italy, Japan, The Netherlands, New
Zealand, Republic of China, United Kingdom, and West Germany.
Negotiations are in an advanced stage with several other governments. Manufactured goods from many other countries will also be displayed in the Halls of
Industry, Commerce, and Machinery.
The British Columbia International Trade Fair, in addition to expanding British
Columbia's import and export trade, also widely publicizes the growth and potential
for industrial development in this Province.
 S 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR IN LIMA, PERU
The Department, in co-operation with the British Columbia International Trade
Fair management, organized and participated in a composite exhibit of government
and industry displayed in Lima, Peru, from October 26th to November 1 Oth. The
British Columbia Government exhibit featured a pictorial and statistical display
(see illustration) and emphasized foreign participation in the British Columbia International Trade Fair. British Columbia firms located in the composite exhibit space
were Boyles Brothers Drilling Company Limited, Canada Western Cordage Company, Scott Plastics Limited, and Western Canada Steel Limited. Ekolite Limited
and Canadian Pacific Air Lines also exhibited but were located in separate booths.
As a growing and promising market exists in Peru and other South American countries, it is hoped that through participation in this trade fair the exhibitors will be
successful in developing new export markets.
REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
As in the past years, the regional development work of the Department was
carried on extensively during 1963. This office continues to work closely with industrial establishments, Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce, research organizations, Federal Government officials, and all other groups interested in or actively
engaged in the industrial development of the Province of British Columbia. The
continued close co-operation between these groups and the Department is a vital
factor in the continued expansion of our existing industries and the promotion of
new industries.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1963 S 27
Various Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce were visited by members
of the Department and assisted in their effort to locate new industries and commercial enterprises for their respective areas. Periodic field trips were made by the
Industrial Commissioner and the Public Information Officer, in the course of which
they maintained the close liaison of past years with all regional groups, including
transportation and utility companies, bank branches and departments, and municipal
officials.
Many inquiries received from companies and individuals were dealt with by
this office, and a great deal of general and specific information about the industrial
opportunities in British Columbia was forwarded to them. Close contact was maintained with the British Columbia Research Council, and numerous inquiries and
problems were referred to that organization.
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSING MISSION TO THE UNITED KINGDOM,
OCTOBER 26 TO NOVEMBER 16, 1963
A Government-sponsored Housing Mission, led by the Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C., recently returned from the United Kingdom after a three-week informative visit with housing and building officials both in England and in Scotland.
The delegation, composed of leading commercial and technical representatives
of our timber and housing industries, was a fact-finding team whose role was part
of a continuing programme to expand opportunities for increasing our trade in timber and plywood through the medium of timber-frame housing. It also afforded an
opportunity of renewing acquaintanceships established during the recent tour of
Canada this summer by a United Kingdom Housing Mission.
During its tour of the United Kingdom, the Mission visited London, Leeds,
Manchester, and Glasgow to talk with importers, shippers, builders, engineers,
architects, officials of local councils and mortgage and insurance firms. Leaders of
the building industry there were extremely open minded on the prospects of adopting Canada-style frame construction methods, with some firms already actively experimenting in the Canadian system.
As a result of this mission, it is anticipated that export of British Columbia
lumber and plywood to the United Kingdom will increase materially in the near
future.
DEVELOPMENT OF EXTERNAL TRADE
The Trade Office continues its close co-operation with the regional offices of
the Department of Trade and Commerce in Vancouver, the B.C. Products Bureau
of the Vancouver Board of Trade, members of the Vancouver consular corps, and
other organizations interested in the development of British Columbia's external
trade. Officials of this Department have continued their visits to secondary industries of the Province to ascertain what products could be exported to foreign markets, and this programme will be accelerated in the coming year. New overseas
markets for numerous products have been found, and many additional firms have
been included in the Canadian Exporters Directory. In co-operation with the Canadian Trade Commissioners Service, this office was visited by groups of Assistant
Trade Commissioners prior to their postings to various foreign countries. Detailed
information was given as to British Columbia's products and export potential, also
the various services offered by this Department.
In September, during New Zealand's first major trade mission to North America,
this Department tendered a reception in honour of the group, which included prominent businessmen from New Zealand. This reception was attended by leading British Columbia industrial and commercial representatives.
 S 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TRADE AND INDUSTRY BULLETIN
During 1963 the Bulletin completed 14 years of continuous publication, listing
trade inquiries, export opportunities, manufacture under licence agreements available to British Columbia firms, notices of tenders, and news of general commercial
interest. The increased use of the Bulletin by the trade representatives of other
nations bears out the importance of this publication to the commercial and industrial
organizations in Western Canada. The circulation of the Bulletin has increased to
1,000 copies per month.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1963 S 29
OFFICE OF THE AGENT-GENERAL FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA,
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, LONDON, ENGLAND
GENERAL
Liaison with banking, trust investment, mercantile, and general investment
organizations in the United Kingdom and Continental Europe was broadened greatly,
and, as a result, interest in capital or development ventures in British Columbia has
increased appreciably. This interest is reflected by many millions of dollars worth
of risk capital which has been diverted into a new or profit-participating investment
in industrial ventures within the Province.
Large pools of equity and profit-sharing capital are available for imaginative,
progressive, and responsible ventures, regardless of size and character. Investor
interest has been stimulated by impressive Provincial economic growth, economic
trends and achievements, enviable economic potentials, as well as strategic geographic advantages.
A survey of trade relations between British Columbia and the United Kingdom
reveals a disturbing imbalance. British Columbia enjoys a heavy trade surplus, and
British exporters complain bitterly that a number of trade barriers make Canada
the most difficult Commonwealth market in which to trade. These conditions were
drawn to the attention of the Honourable the Premier and the Honourable the Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce during their visits to London.
The purchasing power of European countries is increasing steadily, and trade
potentials are improving constantly. We again urge strongly more intensified and
aggressive salesmanship in Continental Europe by British Columbia producers.
Visits by the Lieutenant-Governor, Maj.-Gen. the Honourable George R.
Pearkes, V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.; by the British Columbia Housing Mission
(under the general leadership of the Honourable R. W. Bonner, CD., Q.C., and
Maj.-Gen. B. M. Hoffmeister, C.B., C.B.E., D.S.O., E.D., president of the council
of the Forest Industries of British Columbia); as well as by members of the Vancouver Board of Trade on their 11th Annual Trade and Goodwill Mission, assisted
greatly in promotion of trade, the sale of British Columbia products, and a better
understanding between Commonwealth people affected. As a timely interjection,
it should be noted that responsible technical authorities in Great Britain hope sincerely that as a vigorous follow-up to the British Columbia Housing Mission's efforts
in Great Britain positive action will be taken to ensure the training of the local
labour force in mass-production methods or automation, and that appropriate stockpiling will be provided to facilitate timber house construction throughout Great
Britain. New houses, renewals, and housing improvements in vast numbers are
essential to public welfare, and the opportunity for the use of British Columbia timber products is considered immense.
During the year constant efforts were made further to improve public, economic,
and cultural relations, and high commendation repeatedly has been had concerning
our success in efforts of this nature.
SETTLEMENT
Inquiry respecting settlement in the Province has decreased since last year,
although general inquiry has considerably increased. The staff attended to some
560 pure immigration inquiries, exclusive of teachers, and in addition some 990
general inquiries were made, including tourist and educational.
 S 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
SCHOOL-TEACHERS
The facilities of the office were again placed at the disposal of the Department
of Education during the spring months in the recruitment of school-teachers. Some
212 requests for application forms were received as a result of the advertisements
placed by that Department.
STAFF
The staff situation remains static, except for one resignation. Although additional responsibilities have been allotted, it is hoped to carry the work without a
replacement.
VISITORS
Some 3,640 visitors from British Columbia registered at British Columbia
House, and at the same time some 17,000 pieces of mail were handled on their
behalf. A healthy desire for young people to see the world was evidenced by the
large proportion of younger-aged visitors using our facilities.
FILMS AND PUBLICITY
The number of film screenings and the size of audiences have declined in the
year ended December, 1963. This year 315 films were sent out and catered to an
audience totalling 20,657. This is a highly popular form of learning about distant
lands and is becoming increasingly competitive. With the opening of the Canadian
Government Travel Bureau in London this year, no doubt some " siphoning off "
has affected our own inquiries. This is all in the general good, as a fair proportion
of films distributed by the Canadian Government Travel Bureau contains British
Columbia material in company with the other Provinces. We have managed to
obtain some new films and continue to press forward with this form of publicity.
The News Letter continues to disseminate business, economic, and cultural
information about the Province. From reports received, the information given continues to be read and appreciated. Our attempt to enter Continental countries,
however, was not too successful, no doubt because the News Letter was printed in
English and not in foreign languages. To print foreign-language editions for Germany, France, and Italy, however, would be far more costly than the English edition,
and involve a substantially larger appropriation.
RENOVATIONS
It was pointed out in our last year's Report that certain renovations had been
effected to provide a large exhibition hall to be placed at the disposal of British
Columbia industry, free of charge. It was hoped that many firms would take the
opportunity of displaying their goods in'this room in the heart of London, but,
although the fact of its availability was promulgated throughout the Province, the
response has been most disappointing. The room is still available, and it is hoped
that industry will take this matter seriously. Other Provinces are making concerted
efforts to enter the selling market in the United Kingdom, and doing this, in some
instances, quite successfully.
Mention was made in last year's Report that plans were being drawn to modernize and improve the front entrance hall of British Columbia House, incorporating
a mezzanine floor. Work is now completed, and arrangements are being made to
move part of the staff to the ground floor, where they will be more readily available
to answer queries and give help to the public. This will obviate the necessity of
people having to make their way to the first-floor offices, and it is felt that consider-
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1963 S 31
able improvement may be effected in our services to the public thereby. This change
includes a Regent Street window, enabling us to display suitable British Columbia
themes in the interest of general publicity.
TOURISM
There is a growing interest in travel to North America, and every effort is made
to ensure that British Columbia be included in itineraries, but much more could be
done in this field. Both the United States and Canadian Government Travel Bureaux report increasing inquiry, which, when backed by cheaper air fares, must result
in a continually increasing flow of tourists to North America. Our new premises
on the ground floor should give us a greater opportunity of selling British Columbia
as a good place in which to live, work, and play.
ADMINISTRATION
We are pleased to report that certain leases have been renewed and new tenants have taken space during the year, resulting in quite substantial increases in rental
fees. It is considered that these new leases have been effected at the highest level
of rents to be obtained anywhere in London. There is no doubt that many people
find British Columbia House a good address and seem willing to pay top prices for
their office space.
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE OFFICE
During 1963 Canadian exports to the United Kingdom increased by $100
million. Trade with the countries of Western Europe also increased considerably.
All indications are that Canada's trade with Great Britain and Europe will continue
to expand in 1964.
The number of inquiries from British Columbia manufacturers and producers
showed a slight increase. These inquiries concerned the prospects of selling in the
United Kingdom and Europe.
The Canadian Government sponsored a number of selling missions, some of
which included British Columbia members. The main bulk of inquiries, however,
came directly to this office.
We feel strongly that a more determined effort should be made to sell British
Columbia goods abroad by manufacturers and producers. Sales representatives
should be appointed, both in the United Kingdom and Western Europe, and in many
cases business prospects would warrant the establishment of a permanent sales office.
TRADE FROM BRITISH COLUMBIA
During the first 11 months of 1963, 80 companies made inquiries through this
office. In most instances this office was able to assist by initial publicity and suggesting sales prospects. Where catalogues, brochures, and sales literature were received,
these were sent out to what were considered to be the best contacts.
TRADE INQUIRIES FROM EUROPE
During the first 11 months of 1963 the following number of inquiries were
received from the United Kingdom and Western Europe:—
United Kingdom  267
Austria       3
Belgium      13
France      19
 S 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Germany  53
Italy  14
The Netherlands  15
Portugal  4
Scandinavia  34
Spain  3
Switzerland  14
Other countries  9
Total  448
These inquiries included a wide variety of products, and firms wishing to sell in
Western Canada, establish branches, or import from British Columbia producers.
As a result of these inquiries during the year, 11 United Kingdom firms appointed agents in British Columbia, as did two from Norway and one each from
Denmark, Sweden, and Germany.
BRITISH COLUMBIA COMPANIES ESTABLISHING IN EUROPE
Six British Columbia companies established agencies or sales offices in the
British Isles and on the continent of Europe.
LICENCE MANUFACTURE
European and British firms are still making inquiries about the prospects of
having their products manufactured under licence, partially manufactured, or assembled in British Columbia. This would seem to be an excellent method of taking up
the spare plant capacity in the Province and, at the same time, bring into being
secondary industries. This office, therefore, is interested in hearing from factories,
machine-shops, and machinery depots of the details of what surplus plant capacity
is available and what type of products they would be interested in manufacturing
and distributing.
INVESTMENT
The most significant development of the year regarding investment in British
Columbia was the announcement by the Reed Paper Group of London that, in
conjunction with Canadian Forest Products Limited, a new pulp and paper mill
would be established near Prince George. Twenty-five million dollars is to be Reed's
share in this investment.
Considerable funds are available, both from British and European sources, for
investment in British Columbia. The office finds itself in the peculiar position of
having very few definite proposals from British Columbia about new industries that
could be established and require capital. Groups or individuals in the Province who
wish to avail themselves of such capital in the development of primary or secondary
industries are therefore urged to send to this office complete details, which must
include not only a prospectus of the new industry or business, but also a market
survey, details of finance, expected profits, location of the new enterprise, etc., so
that a complete brief can be presented to the financial houses and merchant banks
with which this office is in contact.
BUSINESS EMIGRATION
Inquiries continued from businessmen, both small and large, who contemplated
establishment in the Province.   The majority of these inquirers are from the United
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1963
S 33
Kingdom, but there is also a good number now from parts of Africa. Some of these
inquirers have considerable capital which they wish to transfer; others have limited
funds. However, they all bring with them their skills and experience into the Province, and, therefore, introductions are arranged so that their advent into the business
life of the Province can be facilitated.
GROUP VISITS TO THE UNITED KINGDOM AND EUROPE
During the year the following groups visited Europe: Vancouver Board of
Trade Mission, April and May, 1963; Okanagan Fruit Growers' Delegation, April,
1963; City of Vancouver Mission (Mayor Rathie and Mr. G. Sutton Brown), June,
1963; British Columbia Housing Mission, October and November, 1963. This
last-mentioned mission was of special importance, being led by the Honourable
R. W. Bonner, Q.C., Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce.
The success of the mission is now being shown by the number of inquiries being
received concerning timber homes from all parts of the British Isles.
1964 BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR
Following the Premier's visit to London, special efforts were made by this office
to secure British exhibitors at the Trade Fair. Two thousand firms have been contacted by letter, and wherever interest has been shown, this has been followed up by
personal visits and the B.C.I.T.F. office in Vancouver so advised. It is to be hoped
that in addition to the United Kingdom's exhibit in the Hall of Nations, which is
being arranged by the Board of Trade, London, many British firms will exhibit on
their own. The response has not been as enthusiastic as we had hoped, but all possible leads are being followed up.
VISIT OF THE INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE COUNSELLOR
TO BRITISH COLUMBIA
In April the Industrial and Trade Counsellor paid a short visit to the Province,
during which time he made many contacts in the Vancouver and Lower Mainland
area, to which this year's visit was confined.
 S 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER FOR TRADE AND TOURISM
FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE,
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.
In 1963, the second full year of operation by British Columbia House, San
Francisco, a substantial increase in trade and industrial development activity was
recorded. This increase proved to be a two-way increase, with more United States
individuals and companies requesting information on the industrial growth and economic expansion taking place in British Columbia, and an even greater increase
was noted on the part of British Columbia firms interested in obtaining market information on California, now the most populous State in the United States of America.
Throughout 1963 the Commercial Representative carried out a continuous
programme of contacting California and United States companies both by personal
calls and by direct mailings. During the year a general questionnaire was mailed
to more than 1,500 firms in California. The questionnaire was designed to determine the extent of their interest in locating branch plants in British Columbia, in
arranging licence manufacture agreements with British Columbia manufacturers, in
establishing sales offices in British Columbia, or in appointing an agent to represent
the firm in British Columbia and the Canadian market. While response to this
questionnaire was somewhat less than had been anticipated, nevertheless it was again
demonstrated that there is a great deal of interest in British Columbia as a future
site for profitable expansion into the Canadian market. With every mailing an insert
in connection with the 1964 British Columbia International Trade Fair was included.
With the acceleration of industrial development and trade inquiries over the
previous year, it was not possible for the Commercial Representative to devote as
much time to seeking out suitable items for bid by British Columbia firms under the
Canada-United States defence production sharing programme as he had in 1962.
However, continuous liaison was maintained with the Canadian Department of
Defence Production Liaison Officer stationed in Los Angeles. An additional field
representative was appointed to the staff of the Los Angeles office, and consequently
British Columbia manufacturers, along with those in other Provinces of Canada, are
receiving excellent coverage on invitation to bid and requests for proposals under
the defence-sharing programme. British Columbia House co-operated with the
Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce and the Canadian
Manufacturers' Association in Vancouver to have the California representative of
the Department of Defence Production speak to British Columbia manufacturers on
the defence-sharing programme. The Commercial Representative continued to
make periodic calls at the procurement offices of the United States Army, Navy,
and Air Force in San Francisco, and a number of biddable items were referred to
British Columbia companies.
Continued co-operation was enjoyed with other Canadian business development
agencies located in California, including the representatives of five Canadian banks,
Canadian transportation companies, and the officials of the Federal Department of
Trade and Commerce. This type of co-operation lead to the highly successful
sample show held in Vancouver in October, 1962. As a result of this show, a
number of British Columbia firms were successful in establishing outlets for their
products in the California market during the early part of 1963. Products of British
Columbia manufacture now established in this market include wearing-apparel, food
items, giftwares, hardware, sporting goods, and electronic equipment.
British Columbia House participated in the Los Angeles-Long Beach International Trade Fair during the period from May 17 to May 26, 1963. This Trade Fair
was held in the new Long Beach Auditorium and Convention Hall, a part of the
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1963 S 35
new Long Beach Harbour complex and proposed site of the 1967/68 Long Beach
World's Fair. The exhibit consisted of six panels depicting the major industries of
British Columbia, their growth and development over the past 10 years, and the
general industrial expansion of economic growth of the Province. It was unfortunate that two of the major participants in the Trade Fair withdrew their exhibits just
prior to the opening of the fair, thus lowering the over-all calibre of this show. In
spite of this setback, over 180,000 persons attended and the British Columbia exhibit
received many favourable comments. The Commercial Representative was kept
busy replying to inquiries on emigration from the United States to British Columbia,
employment opportunities, land settlement, industrial and investment opportunities,
and general questions regarding travel in British Columbia and Western Canada.
An officer of the Canadian Immigration Service from San Francisco assisted on two
occasions at this exhibit and was a great help to the Commercial Representative.
At the end of 1963, plans were being formulated to encourage participation of
British Columbia firms in the vertical trade shows to be held in California in 1964.
In co-operation with the Federal Department of Trade and Commerce, British
Columbia House is working toward increased activity by British Columbia firms
in this second-largest United States market. During 1964, space will be available
in a giftware show, a metal and machinery show, a lumber show, a fine-food and
beverage show, an electronics show, and a sporting-goods exhibition. These shows,
open only to the trade, are excellent vehicles for the promotion of the sale of Canadian and British Columbia products, in particular, in California. It is hoped that
many British Columbia firms will avail themselves of this opportunity to determine
the acceptability of their goods in this region.
Market surveys were carried out by British Columbia House in connection
with a wide range of products from British Columbia. These products include
electronic communications equipment, minor products of the Province's forest industry, men's and women's apparel, fertilizers and other chemical products, metal and
machinery products, and numerous miscellaneous items. In several cases, agents
have been appointed to represent the British Columbia manufacturer in the California market.
In the general field of capital investment, a number of individuals and investment companies have contacted British Columbia House requesting information on
business opportunities in the Province. Suggestions have been offered, and in a
number of cases the investment of substantial amounts has been finalized.
 S 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
DATA PROCESSING DIVISION
The Data Processing Division is currently going through the process of converting from unit record punched-card equipment to stored programmed systems.
With the installation of the computer systems, the Division will be able to fulfil its
role as a data-processing centre for the Government service in a much more efficient
manner as the new and more powerful equipment will provide faster service and
open up many new fields previously beyond the scope of the machines installed.
To meet the diversified needs of the service, an I.B.M. 1401 system has been
installed to handle the data-processing applications, and an I.B.M. 1620 computer
has replaced the 650 used to handle the computing problems of the engineering type
of applications. Both systems are rented on a monthly basis, and although no charge
is made to the departments using the systems, accurate job-cost records are maintained through a time-card system, enabling the Division to assess the value of work
done for each department, study machine utilization, and check operating efficiency
of operators and equipment.
For operating purposes the Division is divided into seven sections, with a senior
machine operator in charge of each. These sections have been established according
to the volume and nature of work involved. At present the following sections are
in operation: General Statistical, Liquor Control Board, Forest Service, Health and
Welfare, Semi-annual and Annual Reports, Computing, and Key Punching. In addition to the above sections, the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service and the
British Columbia Forest Service maintain key-punch sections, the output from which
is processed in this Division. Similarly, a large volume of punched cards is received
from the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, for the preparation of monthly and
annual reports on external trade and Provincial employment.
On completion of the change-over, the Division will be equipped with the 1401
and 1620 systems and two alphabetic printers, five sorters, one alphabetic collator,
one end printing document originating machine, one reproducer, one alphabetic
interpreter, one facsimile poster, eleven key punches, six verifiers, and a forms
burster.
To operate the equipment, a well-trained staff has to be maintained. At present
the staff consists of a supervisor, an assistant supervisor in charge of the Data Processing Section, and a chief clerk in charge of the Computing Section, six senior
machine operators, one console operator, five machine operators, one senior keypunch operator, thirteen key-punch operators, and one senior clerk-stenographer.
In addition, three members of the Liquor Control Board staff are attached to the
Division to handle clerical functions necessary to the processing of their work.
With the conversion to the new systems, the duties of the senior machine operators have changed considerably as they are now called upon to programme and
debug the various jobs in their section, with the result a reclassification of their positions is inevitable.
In preparation of their new duties, a fairly concentrated training programme
was undertaken for the staff, and during the year 12 members of our staff and 25
of other departments attended seminars conducted by the manufacturers of the
equipment.
Since no charge is made for the work done for the various departments, control
is maintained by submitting all requests for new work to the Electronic Data Processing Committee, for approval or rejection.
The preparation of programmes for the data-processing jobs is handled by our
staff, while those for the computer are in many cases handled by the engineering staff
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1963
S 37
of the departments concerned and are tested and debugged with the assistance of
our programming staff.
Details of the work done for each department and by each section are outlined
in the following tables. These figures are, of course, for the past year and represent
work done on the old system, all of which are being converted to take advantage of
the stored programme equipment.
 S 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Comparative Cost Statement
Department and Branch
Agriculture—
Horticultural Branch.
Herd Improvement Branch .
Totals _.	
Attorney-General—
Credit Union	
Eire Marshal Act...
Official Committee	
Motor-vehicle Branch-
Liquor Control Board.
Totals 	
Education-
General Administration.
Tests, Standards, and Research-
Adult Education	
High School Correspondence	
Inspector of Schools and School Services
Totals  	
Finance-
Minister's Office...
Mechanical Tabulation-
Totals-
Forest Service—
Engineering Service..
Forest Surveys	
Forest Management .
Forest Research	
Scaling Fund	
Totals 	
Health Services and Hospital Insurance—
Vital Statistics _   	
Hospital Insurance Service 	
Totals  	
Highways—
Bridge Engineering Branch-
Locations Branch 	
Research and Development -
Totals	
Industrial Development, Trade, and Com-
Bureau of Economics and Statistics -
Data Processing Division	
Totals	
Labour—General Administration 	
Lands—
Surveys and Mapping, Legal Surveys -
Geographic Division-
Water Rights Branch Administration.
Hydraulic Investigation	
Totals	
Provincial Secretary-
Queen's Printer-
Superannuation Branch	
Civil Service Commission.
P.S. Medical Plan	
Totals _ 	
Recreation and Conservation-
Fish and Game Branch	
Parks Branch	
Totals 	
Social Welfare—Accounts Division _ _
Municipal Affairs—Regional Planning	
Commercial Transport—Industrial Transport  _ 	
Water Resources—Water Rights .
Other—B.C. Power Commission,
Grand totals	
1958/59
$6,007.51
1959/60
$1,662.62
8,078.91
$6,007.51
1,741.53
$1,184.86
183.66
7,338.24
26,748.51
$553.94
851.66
327.42
9,740.77
30,269.84
$35,455.27  |    $41,743.63
$1,349.43
5,035.64
1,393.93
$3,672.38
7,378.33
1,123.76
$7,779.00 |    $12,174.47
$117.90
30,804.47
162.10
$3,102.63
28,632.44
$31,084.47 I    $31,735.07
$23,364.74
$601.96
21,780.58
$23,364.74
$22,382.54
$275.03
$275.03
$14,869.98 1  $8,153.18
$14,869.98 |  $8,153.18
$4,016.77
$654.55
$7,983.75
$25.22
13,062.73
$7,983.75 |    $13,087.95
$10,593.36
3,049.54
5,797.66
$12,050.62
1,649.42
5,634.42
$40.03
$164,761.00 | $178,845.05
1960/61
$3,649.45
1961/62
$3,948.16
1962/63
$4,850.32
$3,649.45 I      $3,948.16
$4,850.32
$1,389.90
1,249.51
245.31
7,712.19
33,025.47
$1,061.39
892.07
26.63
7,288.62
30,414.67
$3,030.10
1,346.05
19.46
6,635.28
38,487.67
$43,622.38 |    $39,683.38 |    $49,518.56
$1,497.93
8,199.65
1,138.54
$1,236.75
10,914.06
1,060.66
2,942.81
$1,901.38
20,244.56
2,221.62
1,254.05
1,525.40
$10,836.12 |    $16,154.28 |    $27,147.01
$1,308.39
922.22
$2,230.61
$3,227.54
64,380.45
281.66
$1,479.73
60,932.19
1,056.01
685.90
$2,371.63
31,903.67
4,182.21
1,442.06
660.62
$67,889.65 |    $64,153.83 |    $40,560.19
$39.06
19,616.98
$8.39
22,518.09
$51.45
24,940.93
$19,656.04 |    $22,526.48 |    $24,992.38
$1,638.29
1,577.90
137.48
I
$2,030.14 j    $14,351.00
15,103.09 |      13,491.97
37.12 |        2,851.34
$3,353.67  |    $17,170.35 |    $30,694.31
$7,031.32
$7,032.74
$8,214.84
12,141.13
$7,031.32 |      $7,032.74 |    $20,355.97
$768.59 | $452.88 |      $1,227.51
$8,832.13
15.05
10,143.23
4,154.73
$23,145.14
$10,355.73
6,787.40
4,048.60
$16,954.04
6,635.54
3,427.11
$18,698.78
12.49
7,124.68
2,890.02
$27,016.69 |    $28,725.97
$8,821.04
2,513.35
3,452.38
10.84
$8,674.62
1,779.58
3,608.22
86.47
$19,440.56
$19,334.46
$21,191.73
$14,797.61
$14,148.89
	
$1,802.84
$464.67
$4,583.06
63.71
  |   $464.67
$4,583.06
$1,866.55
$14,576.99
$19,057.94
$23,948.08
$17,277.51
$24,577.70
1
$561.37
  | 	
$181 96
1 	
	
	
$669.90
$1,860.04 |  $1,012.10 |
$229,744.19 | $235,809.07 | $269,335.26
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1963
S 39
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 S 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1963 S 41
PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF WORK DONE ON THE
650 COMPUTER FOR THE VARIOUS DEPARMENTS
PERCENTAGE OF POSSIBLE HOURS
 S 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL
The Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce is ex officio
chairman of the board of management of the British Columbia Research Council,
and presided at regular meetings of the board throughout the year. The laboratories
and offices of the Research Council are located on the campus of the University of
British Columbia in Vancouver.
The broad objectives of the British Columbia Research Council are to provide
scientific and technical services not ordinarily available to the industry of the Province, and to conduct basic studies leading to the establishment of new industries and
the development of the natural resources of British Columbia. In order to meet
these objectives, the Research Council, through its professional staff and laboratories,
provides a wide range of free and contract services and facilities to industries of all
types.   The work carried out generally falls into one of the following categories:—
(1) Product and Process Research and Development.
(2) Fundamental or Basic Research.
(3) Industrial Trouble-shooting.
(4) Specialized Testing.
(5) Approvals Testing.
(6) Operations Research.
(7) Economics and Industrial Market Research.
The Research Council was established in 1944 with a few employees working
in provisional quarters in University buildings. Because of industry's demand for
research services, the staff now numbers over 70, working in a modern three-story
laboratory building containing equipment valued at more than $300,000.
The growing scope of the Research Council's services is illustrated by the fact
that annual income from sponsored projects during 1963 exceeded half a million
dollars for the first time, representing an increase in dollar volume of about 30 per
cent over 1962. With its increasing competence and reputation in many scientific
fields, demands for the Council's contract services are becoming more frequent from
both private and public sources far beyond the borders of the Province.
In addition to its sponsored project work, the Research Council receives a substantial portion of its annual budget—$250,000 in each of the last four years—from
the Government of British Columbia through the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce. It also receives a limited amount of financial assistance from the National Research Council and other organizations. It is thereby
possible to extend to industry in the Province many additional services, such as free
technical information, and to carry out some investigations of importance to the
Provincial economy. Through a continuing programme of contacts throughout British Columbia, the Research Council brings the fruits of research a little closer to
industry's door.
During 1963 the board of management of the Research Council consisted of the
following:—
The Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C., Attorney-General and Minister of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.
F. E. Atkinson, Assistant Director, Canada Agriculture Research Station,
Summerland, B.C.
E. W. Bassett, Deputy Minister of Lands, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Dr. J. J. R. Campbell, Department of Dairy Science, University of British
Columbia.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1963 S 43
Dr. J. A. Gower, District Geologist, Kennco Explorations Western Limited,
1030 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.
E. L. Harrison, Vice-President, B.C. Packers Limited, foot of Campbell Ave
nue, Vancouver 4, B.C.
G. H. D. Hobbs, President, Western Canada Steel Limited, 450 South-east
Marine Drive, Vancouver 15, B.C.
R. M. Hungerford, President, Clayburn-Harbison Limited, 1690 West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
J. E. Liersch, Vice-President, Canadian Forest Products Limited, 999 West
Pender Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
F. D. Mathers, President, Royal City Foods Limited, 12 Front Street, New
Westminster, B.C.
Dr. D. M. Morrison, 3666 Marine Drive, West Vancouver, B.C.
P. J. Mulcahy, Deputy Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Dean D. M. Myers, Faculty of Applied Science, Univeristy of British Columbia.
C. H. McLean, Chairman of the Board, British Columbia Telephone Company,
768 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
Dr. G. L. Pickard, Director, Institute of Oceanography, Vancouver 8, B.C.
H. B. Simpson, President, S. M. Simpson Limited, Kelowna, B.C.
The Honourable J. Sinclair, President, Lafarge Cement of North America
Limited, 1051 Main Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.
T. L. Sturgess, Deputy Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Dr. J. P. Tully, Scientific Director, Pacific Oceanographic Branch, Fisheries
Research Board of Canada, Nanaimo, B.C.
H. Wright, Commissioner, Workmen's Compensation Board, 707 West 37th
Avenue, Vancouver 13, B.C.
Dr. P. C. Trussell, Director, British Columbia Research Council, Vancouver
8, B.C.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1964
710-164-2956
 

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