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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Ninety-second Annual Report 1962/63 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1964]

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 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Ninety-second Annual Report
1962/63
By the Superintendent of Education
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1964
  The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C, LL.B., F.R.S.A., Minister of Education
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Ninety-second Annual Report of the Public
Schools of the Province.
LESLIE RAYMOND PETERSON,
Minister of Education.
January, 1964.
  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION,  1963
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C, LL.B., F.R.S.A.
Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education:
J. F. K. English, M.A., Ed.D., LL.D.
Assistant Superintendent (Administration):
G. W. Graham, B.A.
Assistant Superintendent (Instruction):
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.)
Chief Inspector of Schools:
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Paed.
District Superintendents, Superintendents, and Inspectors of Schools:
H. D. Abbott, M.A., Nanaimo.
K. F. Alexander, B.Sc., B.Ed., Mission City.
N. A. Allen, B.A., Kamloops.
J. E. Beech, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant, Surrey.
G. C. Bissell, B.A., B.Ed., Castlegar.
J. N. Burnett, M.A., E.D., Richmond
D. H. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Squamish.
D. G. Chamberlain, B.A., B.Ed., Port Alberni.
J.   Chell,  M.A.,  Assistant  Superintendent,
Victoria.
C. E. Clay, B.A., Penticton.
C. Cuthbert, B.S.Acc, B.Ed., Nelson.
H. C Ferguson, B.A., West Vancouver.
R. E. Flower, B.A., B.Ed., Dawson Creek.
W. B. Fromson, B.A., B.Ed., Revelstoke.
J. Gough, M.A., Victoria.
S. J. Graham, B.A., New Westminster.
J. V. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
W. H. Gurney, M.A., Qualicum.
R. M. Hall, B.A., B.Ed., Williams Lake.
R. R. Hanna, B.A., B.Ed., Quesnel.
A. E. Henderson, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector,
Vancouver.
F. L. Irwin, B.A., Vernon.
I. H. R. Ieffery, B.A., Haney.
G. E. Iohnson, B.A., B.Ed., Powell River.
A. D. Iones, B.A., Duncan.
J. G. Kirk, M.A., Chilliwack.
E. E. Lewis, B.A., B.Paed., Relieving Superintendent, Victoria.
W. J. Logie, B.A., Campbell River.
R. F. Lucas, B.A., B.Ed., Courtenay.
W. E. Lucas, B.A.,B.Pffid., North Vancouver.
J.I. Macdougall, M.A.,M.Ed.,D.Paed., Kamloops.
D. E. McFee, M.A., Kitimat.
D. B. Mackenzie, M.A., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
C. S. McKenzie, B.A., Trail.
D. H. MacKirdy, D.F.C, B.A., M.Ed.,
Smithers.
F. A. McLellan, M.A., B.Pasd., Sooke.
W. A. Marchbank, A.B., B.Ed., Oliver.
E. Marriott, B.A., Cloverdale.
L. A. Matheson, M.A., B.Ed., Kimberley.
F. T. Middleton, B.A., B.Ed., Kamloops.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., M.Ed., Abbotsford.
G. H. Nelson, B.A., B.Ed., Salmon Arm.
F. I. Orme, B.A., B.Pasd., Kelowna.
G. M. Paton, B.A., M.Ed., Prince Rupert.
J. Phillipson, B.A., B.Ed., Prince George.
R. S. Price, B.A., B.Com., Ladysmith.
D. L. Pritchard, M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
P. B. Pullinger, B.A., B.Ed., Cranbrook.
W. D. Reid, B.A., M.Ed., Ladner.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., Assistant Superintendent, Burnaby.
C. E. Ritchie, B.A., Courtenay.
R. F. Sharp, B.A., D.Paed., Vancouver.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., Langley.
R. B. Stibbs, B.A., New Westminster.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Burnaby.
R. F. Thorstenson, B.A., Hope.
D. P. Todd, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St. lohn.
F. M. Wallace, M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
C. C. Wright, B.A., Creston.
 W 8 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Special Services: W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment: P. I. Kitley, M.A.
Comptroller of Expenditures: S. E. Espley.
Supervisor of School Construction: H. Dickinson.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education: I. S. White.
Assistant Director of Technical and Vocational Education: T. A. Quayle.
Inspectors of Technical Classes: C. J. Strong, M.A., V. E. Rickard, B.Ed., and R. Smith.
Registrar: H. M. Evans, B.A.
Assistant Registrars: I. R. Hind, B.A., B.Paed., and P. E. Wilkinson, B.A., B.Ed.
Director of Home Economics: Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.S.
Inspectors of Home Economics:
Miss J. R. Irvine, B.Sc.(H.Ec), and Miss J. Campbell, M.A., B.Sc.(H.Ec), Dip.Ed.
Director of Community Programmes: I. H. Panton, B.A., M.Sc.
Director of Visual Education: J. R. Pollock, B.A.Sc.
Director of School Radio Broadcasts: Miss M. Musselman, B.A.
Director of Tests, Standards, and Research: C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed.
Director of High School Correspondence: Miss Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Director of Elementary School Correspondence: A. H. Plows.
Director of Textbook Branch: Basil R. Wilson.
Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (for the Deaf and the Blind):
C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., LL.D.
Director of Curriculum: J. R. Meredith, B.A., M.Ed.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Report of the Superintendent of Education  11
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Administration and School Board
Relations)  36
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Instructional Services)  38
Report of the Director of Curriculum  42
Report of the Co-ordinator of Special Services  45
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  47
Report of the Director of Home Economics  49
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
Secondary School and Vocational Courses  51
Elementary Correspondence School  5 5
Report of the Director of the Division of School Radio Broadcasts  57
Report of the Director of Visual Education  59
Report of the Director of the Textbook Branch  61
Report of the Chief Inspector of Schools  65
Report of the Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment  69
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education  71
Report of the Director of Community Programmes Branch  82
Report of the Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (Deaf and Blind School).__ 94
Report of the Registrar of Teachers and Examinations  96
Report of the Commission on Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act._ 106
Statistical Returns  107
Information re Examination Papers  155
 W 10 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Page
Number of Pupils Enrolled by Type of School  11
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  12
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils According to Different Classes of Schools 13
Teachers' Certificates  13
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  14
Number of School Districts  15
Number of Senior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  15
Number of Junior-Senior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils
in Each District  16
Number of Junior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  17
Number of Elementary-Senior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and
Pupils in Each District  18
Number of Elementary-Junior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and
Pupils in Each District  19
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  20
District Supervisory and Instructional Personnel  22
Summary of All Schools Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils__ 23
Number of Schools, Teachers, Pupils, and Average Daily Attendance in Each
Type of School  24
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  25
Classification of Teachers' Salaries  26
Expenditure for Education for the Calendar Year 1962  27
Costs per Pupil, Various Bases, Calendar Year 1962  27
Expenditure by School Districts for the Calendar Year 1962  28
Revenue for Education for the Calendar Year 1962 by School District  31
Summary of Enrolment by Schools in the Various School Districts  109
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades  154
 Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1962/63
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., January, 1964.
To the Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Ninety-second Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30, 1963.
ENROLMENT
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from
340,290 to 358,905, and the average daily attendance increased from 312,173 to
332,584.   The percentage of the regular attendance was 92.7.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown
hereunder:—
Type of School
Number of Pupils Enrolled
Municipal
Rural
Total
Senior secondary	
Junior-senior secondary..
Junior secondary..
Elementary-senior secondary..
Elementary-junior secondary...
Elementary 	
2,326
51,383
14,180
39,000
37,914
203,233
190
383
478
3,620
1,647
4,551
2,516
51,766
14,658
42,620
39,561
207,784
Totals..
348,036
10,869
358,905
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:—
In the High School Correspondence classes, regular students
(exclusive of the  6,481   officially registered in other
schools) 	
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular students 	
Under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, pupils receiving
instruction	
2,490
1,084
69
3,643
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme  7,5661
Night schools  70,405 2
Vancouver School of Art  232
Vancouver Vocational Institute  5,8143
High School Correspondence (adults only)   8,694
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only)  305
Carried forward        96,659
1 Day, 3,206;  night, 4,360.
2 Includes 56,008 non-vocational.
3 Day, 3,108;  night, 2,706.
11
 W 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,   1962/63
Brought forward
Adult education—Continued
Number of participants in recreational programme	
Vocational teachers-in-training (summer session)	
Victoria College, regular credit courses—
Arts, Science, Commerce  1,278
College of Education      571
Evening division :.___:      331
Summer session _-_    866
96,659
,197,9604
31
University of British Columbia
3,0465
4,8616
1,302,567
4 This figure does not include Vancouver.
5 This figure does not include an enrolment of 956 in the non-credit evening classes and 97 in the non-credit
summer session.
6 This figures does not include the following enrolments:   1962 summer session, 5,101;   1962/63 extra-sessional
classes, 1,421;   correspondence courses, 1,520.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade
for the school-year 1962/63:—
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total
Kindergarten   —  	
4,173
19,582
18,310
17,792
16,943
15,923
15,099
14,983
15,629
15,037
12,938
10,054
7,646
1,818
4,179
17,697
16,993
16,618
15,510
14,955
14,377
14,102
14,363
14,104
12,481
9,718
6,895
986
8,352
37,279
Grade II                 .         '           -  	
35,303
Grade III                      -	
34,410
Grade IV                                                         -	
32,453
Grade V
30,878
29,476
Grade VI	
Grade VII   	
29,085
Grade VIII 	
29,992
29,141
Grade IX     	
Grade X ~ 	
25,419
Grade XI     	
19,772
14,541
2,804
Grade XII	
Grade XIII	
185,927
172,978
358,905
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
W 13
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO
THE DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number of pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils
per teacher are shown in the following table:—
Number of Teachers
Total
Enrolment
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment
Average
Enrolment
per Grade
Teacher
Type of School
Grade
Teacher 1
Special
Instructor
Total
85                     2 3      j            108
1,667           '     639              2,306
482       1   :         176       1             658
2,516
51,766
14,658
42,620
39,561
207,784
—j 	
.70
14.42
4.08
29.60
Junior-senior secondary	
31.05
30.41
Elementary-senior secondary
Elementary-junior secondary
Elementary- .' 	
1,393
1,310
6,364
426              1,819
341      |        1,651
452      j        6,816
213                 213
11.88               30.60
11.02      j        30.20
57.90              32.65
       1
Totals -  	
11,301      !        2,270      1      13,571
1                      1
358,905
100.00      |        31.76
1
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
The following table shows the number of teachers employed and also the number with or without university degrees:—
Type of School
Number of Teachers
With
Degrees
Without
Degrees
Total
97
1,726
396     .
1,137     -■■
819
966
11
580
262
682
832
5.850
108
2,306
Junior secondary   - 	
658
1,819
Elementary-junior secondary __ " ____ __..
1,651
6,816
Unclassified  ,, _    '■    '.. 	
125        |             88
213
5266         1         8.30«i
13,571
 W 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE
FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for the various years since
1877/78 and also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year
Number
of
Teachers
Employed
Number
of
School
Districts
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Daily
Attendance
Percentage of
Attendance
Government
Expenditure
for
Education
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools
1877/78—
1882/83.._
1887/88—
1892/93....
1897/98-
1902/03._
1907/08..
1912/13....
1913/14	
1917/18	
1922/23	
1927/28....
1928/29—
1929/30....
1930/31—
1931/32—
1932/33—
1933/34-..
1934/35—
1935/36—
1936/37—
1937/38—
1938/39—
1939/40—
1940/41—
1941/42—
1942/43—
1943/44—
1944/45—
1945/46—
1946/47—
1947/48—
1948/49—
1949/50-..
1950/51—
1951/52—
1952/53—
1953/54—
1954/55—
1955/56—
1956/57—.
1957/58	
1958/59—
1959/60....
1960/61—
1961/62—
1962/63—.
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
,597
,859
246
,118
,668
,784
.854
948
959
912
,873
,942
,956
025
,092
,194
,220
248
,224
,055
,162
,354
,512
,833
,116
,496
,873
,272
,598
,105
.574
185
690
,474
,171
,839
.513
,137
772
,571
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
97
98
101
100
104
104
102
103
102
101
98
97
99
100
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
195,290
210,174
223,840
240,674
260,069
277,070
291,223
305,837
321,760
340,290
358,905
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
163,364
176,138
191,061
204,239
218,303
235,396
252,490
267,052
281,513
298,175
312,173
332,585
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
89.87
88.88
89.21
90.19
90.91
91.24
90.70
90.51
91.13
91.70
92.05
92.67
91.74
92.67
60
113,
174,
290.
473,
544.
1,663.
1,885.
1,653,
3,176,
3,532,
3,765,
3,743,
3,834,
4,015,
2,849.
2,611,
2,835.
2,972,
3,277
3,524
3,630,
3,585,
3,963,
4,028,
3,924,
4,244,
5,022,
5,765,
9,398
12,468,
17,363
22,809.
25,830,
26,885,
26,555,
24,060,
34,279.
41,067,
43,989,
50,861.
53,288,
59,472,'
70,174
77,632
83,782,
,411.141
,758.751
,679.361
775.43
.255.26
,802.29
,671.60
003.34
654.11
796.60
686.283
,518.953
920.693
.317.083
727.193
074.373
972.023
,937.803
,040.743
,385.043
660.233
962.693
670.783
769.003
848.243
397.883
243.533
898.823
,534.593
,205.503
,473.463
653.183
,430.943
,631.233
076.883
980.433
080.243
233.153
,302.273
,740.34*
,524.325
,473.636
028.947
055.068
,999.84
,903.48
121.79
!
$215,
425,
604,
1,220,
4,658,
4,634
3,519,
7,630
9,261
11,149
10,008
10,061,
9,719,
8,941,
8,213,
8,458
8,775,
9,593,
10,193,
10,640.
10,521
10,982
11,120
11,502
12,231.
13,683.
14,818,
] 20,176,
| 25,768,
| 35,538
47,726.
54,195.
57,881,
58,401,
70,791.
80,823.
69,314.
77,653,
90,483.
101,351,
115,941,
133,401,
145,535,
157,614,
,056.222
,555.10
,357.86
,509.85
,894.97
,877.56
,014.61
,009.543
,094.983
,996.273
,255.663
,387.993
,333.813
,497.343
,369.043
156.003
,353.783
,562.643
,367.083
,740.473
,684.923
,364.493
,801.943
,291.353
,029.353
,538.183
,625.813
,930.533
392.093
,079.883
750.373
,133.953
,559.483
121.153
844.253
263.713
181.24*
,192.325
765.636
107.947
018.068
622.849
,715.4810
783.79H
iThe
2 This
districts.
3 This
4 This
5 This
6 This
7 This
8 This
-This
10 This
11 This
total expenditure for public schools borne by the Government,
amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school
amount
amount
amount
amount
amount
amount
amount
amount
amount
includes the
on calendar
on calendar
on calendar
on calendar
on calendar
on calendar
on calendar
on calendar
annual grant from the
year 1955, exclusive of
year 1956, exclusive of
year 1957, exclusive of
year 1958, exclusive of
year 1959, exclusive of
year 1960, exclusive of
year 1961, exclusive of
year 1962, exclusive of
Government to the
capital expenditure
capital expenditure
capital expenditure
capital expenditure
capital expenditure
capital expenditure
capital expenditure
capital expenditure
Provincial University,
from by-law funds,
from by-law funds,
from by-law funds,
from by-law funds,
from by-law funds,
from by-law funds,
from by-law funds,
from by-law funds.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
W 15
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1962/63:—
Municipal school districts     74
Rural school districts     26
Total number of districts.
100
SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in senior secondary schools during the school-year was 2,516;
of this number, 1,583 were boys and 933 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1962/63 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
39. Vancouver    	
41. Burnaby  	
62. Sooke  „.         ..   _	
1
1
1
1
37
29
6
13
39
42
11
16
1,128
903
190
295
Totals   	
4
85
108
2,516
 W 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
JUNIOR-SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior-senior secondary schools during the school-year was
51,766; of this number, 26,687 were boys and 25,079 were girls. The number of
schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
year 1962/63 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2
4
2
2
5
2
2
7
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
27
13
21
27
8
34
16
39
7
10
11
14
31
51
52
18
19
5
13
31
49
89
43
49
248
41
86
21
73
48
21
14
12
9
16
12
8
10
25
17
24
135
8
12
16
15
39
36
16
18
10
37
20
28
35
9
47
21
54
12
13
17
23
49
69
74
24
28
7
19
41
72
121
59
68
350
57
107
29
96
69
26
20
16
14
22
16
11
13
38
25
31
187
10
15
23
18
53
49
25
25
14
793
458
642
771
180
11. Trail                    — 	
1,037
448
1,193
236
18   Golden                                       	
244
353
473
22. Vernon                	
1,020
1,463
1,607
540
23. Kelowna   —	
596
133
429
33. Chilliwack 	
902
1,634
2,866
1,221
1,598
8,151
1,364
2,545
661
2,212
36. Surrey      -
37. Delta                           _-_
38. Richmond                    	
42. Maple Ridge.,-  	
46. Sechelt _ _ 	
574
47. Powell River   	
415
314
467
54. Smithers   -	
340
57. Prince George   	
849
532
4,500
203
336
62. Sooke        ,	
68. Nanaimo _ __
70. Alberni 	
71. Courtenay  _ _	
1,221
1,162
508
527
78. Enderby 	
Totals  	
77
1,667
2,306
51,766
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
W  17
The enrolment in junior secondary schools during the school-year was 14,658;
of this number, 7,585 were boys and 7,073 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1962/63 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number ot
Pupils
11. Trail	
24. Kamloops...
33. Chilliwack...
34. Abbotsford.
36. Surrey	
41. Burnaby
42. Mapla Ridge	
44. North Vancouver..
52. Prince Rupert...	
57. Prince George	
62. Sooke _.
63. Saanich	
65. Cowichan	
70. Alberni 	
71. Courtenay 	
75. Mission 	
Totals	
1
1
1
2
7
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
2
1
~29~
19
19
19
35
106
89
12
24
21
16
16
21
26
22
22
15
482
29
28
25
49
145
121
15
32
29
24
20
28
36
28
29
_20_
~658~
596
612
558
1,108
3,261
2,640
346
704
687
540
478
612
748
656
649
 463
14,658~
 W 18 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-senior secondary schools during the school-year
was 42,620; of this number, 22,085 were boys and 20,535 were girls. The number
of schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the
school-year 1962/63 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
10.
11.
13.
14.
17.
18.
20.
21.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
32.
34.
39.
44.
45.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
53.
54.
58.
64.
65.
67.
69.
72.
73.
74.
76.
77.
79.
80.
81.
Fernie	
Windermere-
Creston 	
Kootenay Lake..
Nelson	
Slocan 	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan..
Princeton	
Golden __ 	
Salmon Arm— —
Armstrong-Spallumcheen-
Kelowna 	
Kamloops	
Barriere	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake..
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo-
Fraser Canyon.
Abbotsford	
Vancouver	
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver—
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls _
Queen Charlotte-
Portland Canal	
Terrace	
Smithers	
McBride	
Gulf Islands	
Cowichan _
Ladysmith	
Qualicum.-
Campbell River-
Alert Bay	
Quatsino	
Agassiz..
Summerland	
Ucluelet-Tofino..
Kitimat 	
Fort Nelson	
Unattached districts-
Totals .
2
2
2
1
10
2
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
5
3
1
1
1
1
2
2
83
43
21
34
15
11
18
3
21
11
24
22
5
17
12
15
15
9
9
10
12
30
24
23
24
518
43
49
8
6
31
19
3
12
8
14
12
27
16
17
31
31
23
18
21
9
27
8
 14_
1,393
52
24
44
19
15
20
3
29
13
31
27
6
20
18
21
19
12
12
15
15
35
27
27
31
725
58
65
9
7
40
20
3
14
9
17
16
34
23
24
41
34
25
22
25
11
34
10
18
1,819
1,276
561
982
456
284
409
68
588
317
774
714
123
493
395
429
451
315
255
329
316
785
697
695
748
17,331
1,354
1,561
219
123
862
490
72
334
236
372
388
761
439
482
986
765
681
585
589
284
685
222
339
42,620
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
W 19
The enrolment in elementary-junior secondary schools during the school-year
was 39,561; of this number, 20,550 were boys and 19,011 were girls. The number
of schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the
school-year 1962/63 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
3.
4.
6.
7.
10.
11.
13.
14.
15.
19.
20.
22.
23.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
33.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
47.
48.
50.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
64.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
74.
76.
79.
81.
82.
83.
Kimberley	
Windermere	
Kootenay Lake-
Nelson  	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail  	
Kettle Valley 	
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton	
Revelstoke 	
Salmon Arm... _.
Vernon	
Kelowna	
Barriere  _.
Birch Island	
Williams Lake..
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo..
Chilliwack	
Richmond „..
Vancouver	
New Westminster..
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge..	
Coquitlam.
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver-
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Queen Charlotte	
Terrace	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof-—
Prince George..
McBride	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Gulf Islands	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum..
Alberni	
Courtenay	
Campbell River..
Quatsino	
Agassiz..
Ucluelet-Tofino..
Fort Nelson...	
Chilcotin	
Portage Mountain.	
Unattached districtS-
Totals-
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
13
2
1
1
3
4
3
1
4
2
2
3
2
1
2
1
1
1
3
2
18
4
12
14
7
1
3
2
1
1
3
5
1
1
1
2
6
2
 9_
164
24
2
2
21
3
38
7
18
27
15
22
30
23
1
1
20
8
1
2
41
79
72
44
99
29
35
61
34
24
6
2
2
6
7
9
59
9
70
20
162
3
6
52
13
2
25
16
1
1
3
3
8
5
37
1,310
30
2
2
31
3
42
7
21
32
16
29
39
32
1
1
20
10
1
2
54
103
91
58
130
38
50
83
46
35
7
2
2
6
7
10
68
9
81
20
228
3
6
70
14
2
31
16
1
1
3
3
8
5
_39_
1,651
681
24
42
715
61
1,144
152
574
876
488
677
904
779
19
22
435
220
8
26
1,349
2,530
2,348
1,462
2,910
854
1,080
1,849
1,046
786
123
44
56
198
159
245
1,557
208
2,045
415
5,569
88
89
1,692
407
45
678
407
20
21
80
73
142
129
1,010
39,561
 W 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 207,784; of
this number, 107,437 were boys and 100,347 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1962/63 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
Fernie 	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere	
Creston	
Kootenay Lake
Nelson	
Slocan	
Castelgar  	
Arrow Lakes	
Tfail        	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan
Penticton  —	
Keremeos	
Princeton  „
Golden	
Revelstoke
Salmon Arm.
Armstrong-Spallumcheen.
Vernon  	
Kelowna —	
Kamloops	
Barriere	
Birch Island ...
Williams Lake.
Quesnel	
Lillooet 	
South Cariboo
Merritt 	
Fraser Canyon.
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta.	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster..
Burnaby  	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam
North Vancouver.
West Vancouver—
Sechelt —
Powell River	
Howe Sound 	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte -
Prince Rupert.—
Terrace	
Smithers	
Burns Lake —
Vanderhoof —
Prince George .
McBride 	
Peace River South-
Peace River North..
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Saanich	
. Gulf Islands	
7
7
7
1
14
10
12
4
10
2
5
2
7
3
3
5
7
13
1
12
24
26
6
7
22
23
4
6
7
6
23
28
25
47
13
27
59
7
33
19
23
21
10
12
12
9
6
2
7
11
4
9
7
32
4
22
18
36
10
13
1
14
58
45
18
37
1
65
20
48
16
84
21
10
22
52
14
3
24
22
43
13
77
113
145
8
12
66
66
9
18
50
25
125
105
96
383
84
197
1,147
93
389
95
208
282
101
39
64
29
14
2
57
48
18
28
24
137
7
79
58
398
61
66
1
14
63
46
18
39
1
71
20
51
17
91
22
10
23
56
14
3
25
23
45
14
81
123
158
8
12
69
68
9
18
57
26
130
107
101
406
87
211
1,298
104
417
95
218
302
112
44
67
29
14
2
62
48
19
30
25
146
7
84
62
423
62
66
1
386
1,978
1,346
532
1,188
10
1,974
430
1,445
442
2,569
755
209
703
1,774
424
41
727
645
1,330
477
2,491
3,660
4,458
131
284
1,947
1,959
168
561
1,160
785
4,319
3,255
2,862
12,625
2,714
6,554
38,613
3,297
13,509
2,819
7,126
9,746
3,599
1,095
1,907
744
281
37
2,033
1,471
566
723
734
4,554
129
2,407
1,805
15,168
1,905
2,044
10
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
W 21
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan..
67. Ladysmith	
68. Nanaimo 	
69. Qualicum —	
70. Alberni   „ —
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River..
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission   	
76. Agassiz
77. Summerland 	
78. Enderby _	
79. Ucluelet-Tofino.
80. Kitimat   	
81. Fort Nelson	
83. Portage Mountain —
—.   Unattached districts .
Totals 	
22
7
17
12
9
4
3
17
4
2
7
2
3
4
74
39
37
120
13
118
67
47
4
3
56
7
19
20
2
35
11
37
81
41
41
125
13
123
69
47
4
3
57
7
20
20
2
38
11
1
39
2,255
1,068
1,164
3,794
341
3,805
2,301
1,587
52
56
1,800
182
582
525
35
1,192
354
18
1,033
984
6,364
6,816   | 207,784
 W 22 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
DISTRICT SUPERVISORY AND INSTRUCTIONAL PERSONNEL
Number of
District Number and Name Teachers
2. Cranbrook  . . 1
3. Kimberley  2
7. Nelson   1
8. Slocan  1
11. Trail   2
12. Grand Forks    1
15. Penticton   1
19. Revelstoke   1
20. Salmon Arm  1
22. Vernon   4
23. Kelowna   2
24. Kamloops   4
27. Williams Lake  1
28. Quesnel  2
30. South Cariboo  1
31. Merritt  2
32. Fraser Canyon  1
3 3. Chilliwack   3
34. Abbotsford   5
35. Langley  6
36. Surrey  10
37. Delta  5
3 8. Richmond  7
39. Vancouver   37
40. New Westminster  2
41. Burnaby  17
42. Maple Ridge  5
43. Coquitlam  12
44. North Vancouver  11
45. West Vancouver  2
46. Sechelt   1
47. Powell River  2
48. Howe Sound  2
54. Smithers  1
56. Vanderhoof  1
57. Prince George   5
58. McBride   1
59. Peace River South  5
60. Peace River North  1
61. Greater Victoria  21
62. Sooke  3
68. Nanaimo  5
70. Alberni   5
71. Courtenay  4
72. Campbell River  4
73. Alert Bay  1
75. Mission  1
Total  213
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
W 23
The following table is a summary of all schools, showing number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
8
9
9
11
9
4
17
13
13
7
15
3
8
4
10
4
4
7
9
18
2
15
30
30
8
9
37
27
7
10
8
8
28
31
27
59
15
33
80
9
43
23
27
29
13
14
15
13
8
6
1
9
14
7
13
10
52
10
35
33
48
14
17
5
22
10
10
57
85
82
41
71
18
118
38
75
30
196
37
28
64
118
21
25
39
48
96
25
138
202
231
18
22
114
105
40
49
63
48
216
164
145
578
127
325
2,022
178
692
157
316
458
184
60
110
53
45
23
3
87
78
44
43
43
237
30
166
102
695
94
112
19
127
55
68
66
101
98
44
83
22
146
41
86
32
240
44
30
75
143
26
30
44
57
118
32
173
247
283
21
25
129
123
45
55
78
54
253
192
179
682
151
389
2,540
221
834
182
376
555
225
71
133
61
54
24
3
105
86
51
48
49
281
34
195
114
859
109
125
23
151
64
82
1,662
2,771
2,485
1,117
2,170
508
3,615
8. Slocan                                             	
839
2,216
751
11. Trail _
5,934
1,203
13. Kettle Valley                           	
678
14. Southern Okanagan	
2,051
3,843
660
755
18. Golden               	
1,094
1,486
2,973
872
4,415
6,331
7,128
465
561
3,251
3,091
29. Lillooet                          	
961
30. South Cariboo                                            	
1,417
31. Merritt   	
1,589
1,480
33. Chilliwack                                        	
7,128
34. Abbotsford -	
5,111
4,496
36. Surrey.  -
37. Delta     	
18,752
3,935
10,682
67,571
6,123
22,507
4,680
43. Coquitlam	
10,418
15,133
6,206
46. Sechelt 	
1,669
3,327
1,304
49. Ocean Falls -     -	
1,143
50. Queen Charlotte  	
51. Portland Canal          	
571
72
2,975
2,328
54. Smithers   -
1,340
1,103
1,260
7,500
58. McBride 	
709
4,984
2,971
25,237
62. Sooke	
2,864
3,287
64. Gulf Islands  	
487
65. Cowichan—	
3,764
1,504
1,952
 W 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
68. Nanaimo 	
25
9
20
18
16
9
7
19
6
8
4
4
6
3
20
211
43
178
130
94
35
27
89
26
40
30
14
62
22
8
6
88
253
51
207
158
108
39
29
103
30
45
34
16
72
24
8
6
96
6,707
1,230
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
5,668
4,136
2,980
73. Alert Bay	
817
757
75. Mission    	
2,790
788
77. Summerland —
78. Enderby    — 	
79. Ucluelet-Tofino	
1,171
800
399
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
1,877
649
82. Chilcotin    	
142
147
2,382
Totals	
1,341
11,301
13,571
358,905
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, PUPILS, AND AVERAGE
DAILY ATTENDANCE IN EACH TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number
of teachers employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance in each type of school for the school-year 1962/63:—
Number
of
Schools
Number
of
Teachers
Number of Pupils
Average
Total
Boys
Girls
Attendance
Senior secondary— 	
4
77
29
83
164
984
108
2,306
658
1,819
1,651
6,816
213
2,516
51,766
14,658
42,620
39,561
207,784
1,583
26,687
7,585
22,085
20,550
107,437
	
933
25,079
7,073
20,535
19,011
100,347
1,352.47
46,841.38
13,397.56
Elementary-senior secondary- —
39,091.17
36,986.62
194,915.70
Totals             	
1,341
13,571
358,905
185,927
172,978
332,584.90
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
W 25
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars
only) paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals, and special instructors. Teachers earning less than $1,000 are
excluded.
Grade Teachers
Type of School
Number
Employed
Low
Salary
High
Salary
Average
Salary
Senior secondary	
Junior-senior secondary-
Junior secondary ..
Elementary-senior secondary .
Elementary-junior secondary..
Elementary   	
85
1,667
482
1,393
1,310
6,364
$4,300
3,100
3,100
3,000
2,700
3,000
$10,587
13,532
9,340
10,608
10,538
11,315
$7,620
6,748
6,049
6,388
5,938
5,103
Supervising Principals
Senior secondary 	
Junior-senior secondary-
Junior secondary._
Elementary-senior secondary .
Elementary-junior secondary-
Elementary    _	
4
$10,587
$13,392
$12,159
69
1,387
13,676
11,308
27
9,383
12,976
10,996
58
7,050
14,007
11,131
51
7,550
13,176
11,260
155
7,160
11,845
10,232
Special Instructors
Senior secondary	
Junior-senior secondary-
Junior secondary ..
Elementary-senior secondary..
Elementary-junior secondary-
Elementary	
Unclassified 	
19
570
149
368
290
297
213
$4,640
1,554
2,200
1,628
1,410
1,200
1,250
$11,217
12,780
12,408
11,532
11,500
11,877
14,568
$8,515
7,270
6,814
7,103
6,996
4,766
6,119
 W 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
SALARY CLASSIFICATION
Distribution of teachers by $100 salary-groups, including principals, supervising principals, and part-time teachers:—
Number of
Teachers
.__ 230
Salary Range
Under $1,200	
$1,200-$ 1,299  4
1,300- 1,399   2
1,400- 1,499   7
1,500- 1,599   5
1,600- 1,699  5
1,700- 1,799  6
1,800- 1,899  10
1,900- 1,999  5
2,000- 2,099  5
2,100- 2,199  4
2,200- 2,299  12
2,300- 2,399  12
2,400- 2,499  10
2,500- 2,599  4
2,600- 2,699  6
2,700- 2,799  4
2,800- 2,899  15
2,900- 2,999  11
3,000- 3,099  108
3,100- 3,199  88
3,200- 3,299  87
3,300- 3,399  62
3,400- 3,499  47
3,500- 3,599  209
3,600- 3,699  308
3,700- 3,799  190
3,800- 3,899  277
3,900- 3,999  164
4,000- 4,099  348
4,100- 4,199  176
4,200- 4,299  273
4,300- 4,399  186
4,400- 4,499  338
4,500- 4,599  222
4,600- 4,699  293
4,700- 4,799  194
4,800- 4,899  432
4,900- 4,999  267
5,000- 5,099  304
5,100- 5,199  266
5,200- 5,299  237
5,300- 5,399  342
5,400- 5,499  331
5,500- 5,599  435
Number of
Teachers
- 593
Salary Range
$5,600 $5,699	
5,700- 5,799  ._ 351
5,800- 5,899  290
5,900- 5,999  172
6,000- 6,099 293
6,100- 6,199  371
6,200- 6,299  183
6,300- 6,399  208
6,400- 6,499  111
6,500- 6,599  133
6,600- 6,699  101
6,700- 6,799  108
6,800- 6,899  209
6,900- 6,999  185
7,000- 7,099  206
7,100- 7,199  95
7,200- 7,299  118
7,300- 7,399  87
7,400- 7,499  61
7,500- 7,599  118
7,600- 7,699  157
7,700- 7,799  199
7,800- 7,899  105
7,900- 7,999  114
8,000- 8,099  350
8,100- 8,199  91
8,200- 8,299  92
8,300- 8,399  148
8,400- 8,499  114
8,500- 8,599  118
8,600- 8,699  132
8,700- 8,799  255
8,800- 8,899  170
8,900- 8,999  103
9,000- 9,099  66
9,100- 9,199  54
9,200- 9,299  41
9,300- 9,399  72
9,400- 9,499  25
9,500- 9,599  34
9,600- 9,699  30
9,700- 9,799  15
9,800- 9,899  31
9,900- 9,999  27
10,000 and over  494
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT W 27
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1962
(Exclusive of Capital Expenditures from By-law Funds)
Total expenditure by school districts  $136,432,687.00
Add—
Department of Education expenditures for
administration, grants to University of
British Columbia and Victoria College, correspondence schools, adult
education,   vocational  and  technical
schools, services, etc  $17,000,924.02
Teachers' Pension Fund       3,595,571.11
Free textbooks, maps, etc   585,601.66
      21,182,096.79
Grand total expenditure  $157,614,783.79
COST PER PUPIL, CALENDAR YEAR 1962
Grand total cost of education  $157,614,783.79
Deduct—
Capital expenditure from current revenue    $1,049,741.00
Debt charges on school district debt     18,056,641.00
Department of Education expenditures,
grants to University of British Columbia and Victoria College, correspondence schools, adult education, vocational and technical schools, etc.      15,201,862.17
       34,308,244.17
Total operating cost  $123,306,539.62
Operating cost per pupil for year on daily average attendance of 332,585 __ $370.75
 W 28
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
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BUILDING FOR THE FUTURE
Every aspect of education, in a sense, is building for the future. In no case
is this more obvious than in the field of technical and vocational education. The
changing conditions of employment, technology, and production in our economy
have in recent years stimulated the expansion of technical and vocational programmes as never before. Everywhere at the present time our country is concerned
on the one hand about providing education and training for youth and adults that
will make them eligible for immediate employment and on the other for retraining
the present work force to cope with new conditions in the future.
To meet this challenge, education and training must be combined in a technological age. In the past, from our secondary schools there have been too many
drop-outs not adequately prepared for jobs and too few top students entering the
University. In today's world it would seem necessary to develop a new perspective
with a sound educational programme and an effective system of training appropriate
to the needs of all young people. Only in this way will the future needs of this
Province and the country as a whole be adequately fulfilled.
APPOINTMENTS
Three District Superintendents were appointed in May, 1963, one as a replacement and two as additions to staff, as follows: Mr. Charles Alfred Bruce, principal
of the Kelowna Senior Secondary School; Douglas Norman Weicker, principal of
the Duchess Park Junior Secondary School, Prince George; and Mr. Alexander John
Longmore, principal of the Summerland Senior Secondary School.
Other senior appointments made by the Department of Education included
Mr. J. H. Knight, formerly of J. Lloyd Crowe Senior Secondary School, Trail, as
principal of the British Columbia Vocational School at Nelson; Mr. William R.
Brown, formerly principal of Stanley Humphries Secondary School, Castlegar, as
principal of the British Columbia Vocational School in Kelowna; and Mr. George
Cook, formerly of the Penticton Secondary School, as principal of the British Columbia Vocational School at Prince George.
Mr. John Church and Mr. Larry Thomas, of the Vancouver and Burnaby
school systems respectively, have been seconded to the Department of Education to
assist in the work of curriculum development during the school-year 1963/64.
These two outstanding teachers succeed Mr. A. J. Longmore and Mr. R. B. Knowles,
who served most effectively in a similar capacity as curriculum consultants during
the school-year 1962/63.
DEPARTMENTAL CONFERENCE
A successful two-day Departmental conference was held during the Easter
vacation of 1963, mainly for the purpose of clarifying policies within the Department
of Education. Current matters relating to school reorganization and to legislation
formed the basis of the discussions. Once again the major responsibility for directing
this conference fell to the lot of Mr. E. E. Hyndman, Chief Inspector of Schools.
LEGISLATION
During the 1963 Session of the Legislature several Bills were presented for
enactment. These included amendments to the Public Schools Act, the most important of which provided for the establishment of district and regional colleges; the
new Universities Act created three public universities in the Province—The Univer-
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT W 35
sity of British Columbia, University of Victoria, and Simon Fraser University; a
new private university was constituted by special charter—the University of Notre
Dame at Nelson. These advances in the field of higher education were based upon
the recommendations of the Macdonald Report on Higher Education, published in
December, 1962. A Bill to amend the Victoria College Foundation Act was also
passed; the Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act was amended to provide
financial assistance in certain cases not previously covered.
RETIREMENTS
Mr. C. E. Clay, District Superintendent of Schools at Penticton, retired in June,
1963. Mr. Clay had a long and interesting career in the school system of the
Province as a teacher and later as a vice-principal and principal. He was appointed
to the Department of Education in 1946, serving at Grand Forks until 1958, when
he was transferred as District Superintendent to Penticton. Mr. Clay has always
shown a great interest in community affairs and was at various times a member of
the Rehabilitation Committee at West Vancouver, a member of the Consultive Committee on Doukhobor Affairs, secretary of the Board of Trade in Armstrong, and
president of the British Columbia School Superintendents' Association during
1960/61. He has been a worthy representative of the Department of Education
for many years. His outstanding leadership among teachers and colleagues throughout his career has been of the highest order. As he leaves us he carries the good
wishes of his many friends and colleagues for a long and happy period of retirement.
I should also like to record the retirement of Mr. T. Quayle and the transfer of
Mr. Howard Clement from the Provincial to the Federal service in vocational education. Both of these men are to be commended for the contribution they made to
industrial arts and to vocational education in this Province. (Details regarding their
work in the Department is provided in another section of this Report.)
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The school-year 1962/63, like the previous one, was an exceptionally busy
period, not only because the reorganization of the secondary-school programme was
continued, but in addition plans were laid for higher education both at the university
and at the junior college level. Important decisions were reached which will affect
secondary and higher education in this Province for many years to come. I am
deeply indebted to everyone in the Department for the immense amount of work
accomplished and for the co-operation which has been displayed by every member
of the staff.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. F. K. ENGLISH,
Superintendent of Education.
 W 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
REPORT OF G. W. GRAHAM, B.A., ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT
OF EDUCATION (ADMINISTRATION)
Provincial legislation places the operation and maintenance of the public
schools under the jurisdiction of the locally elected Boards of School Trustees of
the school district. There are 84 large school districts in the Province; these include
73 classified as municipal school districts because they include a municipality within
their boundaries, and 11 classified as rural school districts. In the more isolated
sections of the Province there are 17 small rural school districts commonly referred
to as unattached school districts. These small districts usually contain only one
school, and the administration is often under an official trustee who is appointed by
Order in Council.
A School Board may be composed of three, five, seven, or nine trustees, as
determined by the Minister of Education. There are at present 15 Boards with nine
trustees, 38 Boards with seven trustees, 28 Boards with five trustees, and 4 Boards
with three trustees.   A trustee is elected for a two-year term of office.
The election of trustees within a municipality is in accordance with the Municipal Act, and the election of trustees within the rural area of a school district is in
accordance with the Public Schools Act. This allows rural trustees to be elected at
large in the rural area of the school district or in an attendance zone, or to be elected
by representatives who were elected at annual meetings of attendance areas. There
has been no appreciable trend toward election at large, and, as in previous years,
the Minister of Education has been called upon to appoint many attendance area
representatives because of the failure of voters to elect representatives.
The new large School District No. 83 (Portage Mountain) was created in
November. It extends throughout the watershed of the Finlay and Parsnip Rivers,
from Sifton Pass (approximately 58° north latitude) to Tudyah Lake (approximately 55° north latitude), and eastward along the watershed of the Peace River
to Hudson Hope. While this is a large district in keeping with policy of establishing
large administrative units, at present schools are operating only at Hudson Hope,
the site of the hydro-power project.
The school construction continues throughout the Province on the trend which
has been established over the past decade.
The Province meets at least 50 per cent of the capital costs of that which it
considers as essential for school-sites, buildings, and equipment. While the essential
requirements for schools have been determined for the sharing of costs, a School
Board may, when planning its building, add features and details which the Department does not share in the additional cost due to such features. Because capital
funds are provided by the sale of school district debentures, two types of referenda
are submitted to the electors: those which are eligible for Government grant and
those which are not eligible for Government grant. Funds provided under the
resepective classification are commonly referred to as shareable and non-shareable
capital funds.
During the school-year, to provide capital funds for school construction, 20
school districts placed referenda totalling $12,000,000 before the electors. The
total of contracts awarded for school construction during the school-year was
$13,500,000. The majority of these contracts were awarded during the period of
March to August.
 ADMINISTRATION BRANCH W 37
School districts have become more conscious of the development of their school-
sites since the Government has shared in the cost of such development. Throughout
this year the expenditures for site and development have been approved as shareable
under two categories: one included the cost of clearing, grading, and ditching the
area of the site required by the school, and the other included an allowance of 4 per
cent of the construction cost of current building for playground development and
site beautification.
The School Planning Branch continues to provide Departmental plans for
elementary schools to those Boards which desire them; while the majority of these
schools are of wood construction, some are constructed of concrete blocks. The
contract amount of the work included in 44 projects planned by this division was
$1,900,000.
ASSISTANCE TO ISOLATED AREAS
All pupils who live in isolated areas where neither school accommodation nor
transportation is available may apply for correspondence work from the Correspondence Branch of the Department. In conjunction with the Correspondence Branch,
and under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, if four or more pupils in Grades I
to X, inclusive, are assembled for the regular school hours and are tutored by a
qualified instructor, the Province may make a grant of $15 per month toward the
salary of the instructor for each pupil doing satisfactory work. There were 13
classes enrolling 68 pupils in operation this year. While it is required that instructors
of elementary grades must have completed secondary school and instructors of
secondary grades must have a teacher's certificate or two years of university training,
it is very difficult to attain this standard.
 W 38
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1962/63
CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
Instructional Services
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed), ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION (INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES)
Instructional services include the work of the following divisions, each of which
has its own director and submits its own annual report: Curriculum; Tests, Standards, and Research; Secondary School Correspondence; Elementary School Correspondence; Visual Education; School Broadcasts; Home Economics; Jericho
Hill School; and the Textbook Branch. In addition, there are aspects of instructional services that do not readily fall under any of the above-named divisions; these
form the substance of this report.
Staff
Two changes have occurred in senior staff appointments. Mr. N. M. Henderson, Assistant Director of Visual Education, resigned to become Director of Curriculum for Vocational and Technical Education, and Mr. Ean Hay, Assistant
Director of School Broadcasts, resigned to enter private business. Both of these
gendemen had contributed greatly to the work of their respective divisions. The
former was replaced by Mr. Roger Kerkham, promoted from within the division;
the latter by Mr. A. L. Lazenby, whose experience in the field of television will be
of particular value.
Adult Education
On the interrupted general programme for adults, the offering of secondary-
school courses for credit was approved in various night schools and adult day schools
as follows:—
Year
School-Districts
Schools Courses
1962/63..
1961/62.-
25
27
27
29
221
226
Accreditation of Schools
The Accrediting Committee considered 82 applications for accreditation,
accrediting 31 schools as follows: 2 for four years, 8 for three years, 10 for two
years, and 11 for one year. Four schools were accredited for the first time, and
four were dropped from the accredited list. The total number of accredited secondary schools is 103, the same as in the previous year.
Teacher Qualifications
The shortage of fully qualified teachers at the senior level continues, but the
efforts to improve the situation are showing some limited success. The number of
persons with elementary certificates teaching academic subjects at the Grade X
level or higher increased slightly to 143, from 140 in the previous year, but of
these, 67 had elementary advanced certificates, as compared with 56 in the previous
 CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES W 39
year.   Of the 143, 109 had improved their university background within the last
five years while 63 had taken courses within the last year.
Grade VIII and the Occupational Programme
September of 1962 saw the introduction of both the new Grade VIII regular
programme and the first official year of the occupational programme. Some schools
continued experimentation into the second and third years of the latter.
As at September 30, 1962, reports on Form K showed 27,850 pupils enrolled
in the regular programme in Grade VIII and 2,457 on the first year of the occupational programme.
Since this is the first year of instruction in French at the Grade VIII level,
and since provision was made for exemption of certain students at the request of
their parents, it is interesting to note that 25,695 of the regular Grade VIII pupils
were registered for French 8.
Most Frequently Chosen Advanced Electives
The 10 advanced electives most frequently chosen by students were, in order
of rank, Biology 91, Mathematics 91, Chemistry 91, English 91, Physics 91,
Geography 91, English 93, History 91, Home Economics 91, and French 92.
Mathematics 91 and Chemistry 91 changed places since last year, as did English 93
and History 91, while French 92 got into the first 10 by pushing out Industrial Arts
91 from that position.   The last-named course dropped to 12th, behind Law 93.
Grade VII Departmental Examinations
Most school districts supplied their own examinations at the Grade VII level.
Voluntary use of examinations prepared for the Department by experienced teachers
and supplied on request to districts was greater than last year, except in social
studies and science.    Numbers of Departmental examinations written were as
follows: Number of Papers Written
Subject 1963 1962
English—
Reading and literature  9,718 7,765
Grammar, usage, composition   11,083 8,760
Vocabulary, dictation, word study  10,114 8,411
Mathematics—
Computation  11,103 8,062
Problems   10,255 8,033
Social studies   7,454 7,838
Science   7,532 8,210
Organization of Secondary Schools
1962/63 was the first year of the new secondary-school organization, to be
completed by 1967. As might be expected, many schools retained their old
organization temporarily; nevertheless, an encouraging number organized on the
new pattern completely or partially. Of 264 schools enrolling more than one
secondary grade, the distribution was as follows: Senior secondary, 4; secondary,
78 (43 enrolling Grades X to XII, 6 enrolling Grades IX to XII); junior secondary, 24 (6 enrolling Grades VIII and IX); elementary and secondary, 81 (34
enrolling Grades VII to XII, 1 enrolling Grades V to XII); elementary and junior
secondary, 77(16 enrolling Grades I to IX, 7 enrolling Grades I to VIII, 13 enrol-
 W 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1962/63
ling Grades VII to X, 24 enrolling Grades VII to IX, 1 enrolling Grades VI to IX,
1 enrolling Grades IV to VIII).
As new schools are built, the deviations from type shown in parentheses
should gradually disappear.
About 1 per cent of the Grade VIII pupils, 256 in all, were enrolled in small
elementary schools.
Of Grade VII, 12,902 pupils were still housed in secondary schools, a major
reduction from last year. The total number of elementary pupils housed in schools
also enrolling secondary pupils dropped to 26,647 from 30,652.
The hypothetical median secondary school of the Province enrolls 375 pupils
and has an instructional staff of 17. Corresponding 1955 figures were 268 and 12.
Secondary schools have grown in size, but the ratio of pupils to teacher has remained
approximately the same.
Grade XIII Enrolments
In September of 1962 the University of British Columbia ceased to enrol
students who had failed to complete their Grade XII in June, thus increasing the
number of students registering in Grade XIII classes. As at September 30th, there
were 2,732 pupils enrolled in Grade XIII, as contrasted with 1,974 in the previous
year.   Of these, 1,852 had full Grade XII standing.
Kindergartens
Growth in kindergarten enrolments was also evident. Figures reported in the
fall of 1962 as compared with the fall of 1961 are as follows:—
1962 1961
Number of districts        14 13
Number of schools with kindergartens        99 85
Number of pupils enrolled  7,206        6,276
Schools for Trainable Retarded Children
In spite of the increase in the number of special classes for trainable retarded
within the public schools, the number of children in schools operated by local
chapters of the Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia also
increased. Thirty-three districts operated 36 schools, enrolling 439 children for
whom grant was received and 43 others. In the public schools there were 332
children in special classes for the trainable retarded. The total in day schools,
public and association, was therefore 814, as compared with 684 in the previous
year.
Retention of Pupils
The steady increase in retention rates of the school systems continues. Expressing the number of pupils enrolled in Grade XII as a percentage of those in the
Grade VII class from which they came, the following are the comparable figures
since 1953/54:—
(1) Grade VII _J_ 1956/57 1955/56 1954/55 1952/53 1950/51 1948/49
(2) Grade XII _ 1961/62 1960/61 1959/60 1957/58 1955/56 1953/54
Percentage,
(2)of(l)_  63     61     58     53     52     48
 curriculum and general educational services
Special Classes in Public Schools
w 41
Enrolments as reported on September 30th are as shown in the following
table:—
Type of Class
Number of Teachers
1962
1961
Number of Pupils
1962
1961
Slow learnersi-
Remedial training.
Home instruction^..
New Canadians	
Rehabilitation centres..
Hospitals-
Visually handicapped..
Preventorium 	
Detention home	
Emotionally disturbed..
Mentally retarded	
Speech^..
Hard of hearing	
Pre-employment experimental!..
Totals  	
210
30
6
10
6
13
2
2
2
5
32
2
2
211
18
6
15
5
13
2
2
2
6
23
1
1
3
2,971
441
158
61
273
16
23
15
55
332
~~19
3,190
293
213
51
289
18
17
11
66
232
56
322
308
4,364
4,447
i Some of these classes were absorbed in 1962 into the Occupational Programme.
2 Enrolment varies.
School Population Growth
The percentage growth in school population in certain periods is shown
belOW: Period Percentage Growth
1956/57 to 1961/62  31
1955/56 to 1960/61   34
1954/55 to 1959/60  37
The 10 school districts showing the greatest percentage growth over the period
1956/57 to 1961/62 were: Muchalat, 131 per cent; Chilcotin, 119 per cent;
Peace River North, 114 per cent; Merritt, 106 per cent; Delta, 106 per cent; Fort
Nelson, 102 per cent; Coquitlam, 85 per cent; Golden, 79 per cent; Quatsino,
77 per cent; and Richmond, 70 per cent.
Local Supervisory Personnel
The following table shows the number of district teachers employed in supervisory and special capacities as at September 30th:— 1962
Directors of instruction  19
Supervisors of instruction  75
Teacher consultants   15
Special Counsellors  34
District teachers, other than relieving teachers  32
1961
12
68
22
33
31
Totals
175
166
Entitlement of Teachers
The total number of teachers within entitlement for purposes of grant, as at
Septemebr 30th, was 13,278.73, as compared with 12,442.8 in the previous year.
In addition, 237.27 teachers beyond entitlement were employed by school districts,
as compared with 273.3 in the previous year.   These numbers represent the total
 W 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
of all full-time and part-time teachers, not the actual number of persons engaged in
teaching as given elsewhere in this Report.
New Legislation Affecting Instruction
1. In addition to the new Universities Act, amendments to the Public Schools
Act made provision for the establishment of school district colleges under the direction of Boards of School Trustees and regional colleges under the direction of
Regional College Councils.
2. Amendments to the Rules of the Council of Public Instruction set up procedures for establishing these two-year colleges.
3. The teacher entitlement for Grade XIII classes was changed to correspond
to staff entitlement for the new colleges.
Additional Activities
1. Following extensive planning by the Profesisonal Committee on Secondary
Curriculum, a tentative "Administrative Bulletin for Secondary Schools—The Junior
Secondary Grades " was issued, establishing general procedures for the reorganized
junior grades of the secondary school.
2. Details of the school reorganization to the end of Grade IX were completed.
3. The second year of the Occupational Programme was outlined in a curriculum bulletin issued to schools.
4. Planning for the reorganization of senior grades of the secondary school was
continued.
5. General planning for new patterns of elementary education was continued
within the Professional Committee on the Elementary Curriculum.
Division of Curriculum
REPORT OF J. R. MEREDITH, B.A., B.Ed., DIRECTOR
The year 1962/63 was a year of intensive work in the revision and reorganization of the Provincial curriculum. As noted in the Report for 1961/62, most of this
work stems directly from recommendations which arose from the most comprehensive survey ever made of the schools in this Province.
Two special consultants, Mr. A. J. Longmore and Mr. R. B. Knowles, were
engaged on a temporary basis with the co-operation of the Boards of School Trustees
of Summerland and Kelowna. The two consultants gave invaluable assistance and
made it possible to extend revision work into fields of greatest need and to give more
thorough attention to all revisions. Details of particular curriculum changes may be
reported as follows:—
(1) A new course and text were prescribed in elementary-school arithmetic
for Grade IV as an extension of the revision in Grade III in 1962.
(2) A major revision was begun covering reading, writing, spelling, and composition in all elementary-school grades and including textbooks and
courses of study. Plans were made for work on this revision to be undertaken by a committee of experts on a full-time basis during the summer.
(3) A revision of the organization and administration of elementary schools
was begun.
(4) Work was continued on the preparation of a modified curriculum for slow-
learning pupils in elementary schools.
 CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES W 43
(5) A revision of the course and text in Grade IX mathematics was completed
as an extension of the Grade VIII revision.
(6) Revisions of the courses and texts in French and Latin were completed as
extensions of the revisions made in earlier courses in these subjects in
1962.
(7) A revision of the course and text in English for Grades VIII and IX was
completed in part as an extension of previous revisions.
(8) New courses were developed in the fields of industrial education and home
economics.
(9) A new course in botany was developed, which, along with zoology, enables
schools to offer Grade XIII pupils courses comparable to those in university.
(10) Work was continued on the development of the Occupational Programme
for pupils in secondary schools.
(11) Intensive planning was undertaken for the development of appropriate
vocational courses and programmes for pupils in senior secondary schools.
Details of this work were developed by a committee of experts working on
a full-time basis during the summer.
(12) Experimental work was continued in the fields of mathematics, science,
and French.
C13) A study of the place of history in the secondary-school curriculum was
undertaken.
(14) A study of the music programme in elementary and secondary schools was
begun, and sample lessons in the teaching of music were developed for
trial use in primary grades.
When they are considered together, all of these particular revisions make up a
significant programme of curriculum improvement.   Among the factors common to
all or most of them are the need for up-to-date and valid course content and Canadian texts, the need for an increased emphasis on the intellectual aspect of education,
the need for more attention to the fundamentals as preparation for continuous learning, and the need for more effective selection and organization of significant subject
material to meet the needs of today's world.
Acknowledgment
The programme reported above represents some very basic and extensive
changes. These could not possibly have been made without the assistance of a
great many individuals and groups. The importance of curriculum is attested to
by the fact that in one way or another all officials of the Department of Education,
including the Assistant Superintendent (Instruction), the Chief Inspector of Schools,
the District Superintendents of Schools, and the Directors of the various divisions,
have been directly concerned with the programme and have given invaluable direction and assistance to this Division.
The two Professional Advisory Committees organized on a trial basis in 1961
have more than justified their existence by the soundness of the advice they have
given on a whole range of curriculum matters. These Committees, under the chairmanship of the Assistant Superintendent (Instruction), were convened for 18 meetings during the year 1962/63. The agenda included such things as report cards,
examinations, school libraries, promotional policies, time allotments, subject requirements, and textbooks, as well as all the revisions in particular subject fields.
Grateful acknowledgment is extended to the members of these Committees and to
the groups of teachers, principals, superintendents, and university professors whom
they represent.
 W 44
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
In addition, sincere acknowledgment is extended to the more than 200 persons
who served on the Department's committees and undertook advisory work in egneral
fields and course revision work in particular subjects.
Related Services
In addition to the programme of curriculum improvement, this Division also
carried on certain related work, including the preparing and distributing of directives
and materials for schools, recommending of school library books, preparing and
presenting information to teachers and groups, and participating in educational discussions with Provincial organizations.
A significant and relatively new development is seen in the co-operation and
consultations with the curriculum branches of other Provincial departments of education. During the year the Department of Education was host at the annual
meeting of the Directors of Curriculum of the four Western Provinces. These
meetings are primarily devoted to an exchange of information and the planning of
co-operative projects designed to promote curriculum improvement in all Provinces
and a reasonable measure of curriculum uniformity. The problems of the " transfer
pupil" have occupied a considerable portion of the time of these meetings, and
certain practical steps have been taken to offset or at least alleviate these problems
for the pupils and their parents.
In summary, the year under review has been one of intensive activity. While
many problems remain to be solved, there is some reason to believe that considerable
progress has been made, and that the changes undertaken have done much to
increase general confidence in the strengths of the public school system in this
Province.
 SPECIAL SERVICES
W 45
SPECIAL SERVICES
REPORT OF WILLIAM A. PLENDERLEITH, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.,
CO-ORDINATOR OF SPECIAL SERVICES
The Conveyance of School-children
The following statistics indicate details connected with the conveyance of
school-children during the school-year 1962/63:—
Items 1962/63
1. Number of large school districts providing transportation  80
2. Number of unattached districts providing transportation  2
3. Total number of vehicles        557
(a) District-owned   412
(b) Contract   140
(c) Other (water taxis, etc.)        5
4. Total daily approved mileage  37,219
(a) Average distance per vehicle (miles)        66.8
(b) Average number of trips per vehicle         2.1
5. Total number of daily trips by all vehicles     1,151
Average distance per single trip (miles)        16.1
6. Total number of pupils carried daily  47,032
(a) Elementary   22,830
(b) Secondary   24,202
7. Average number of pupils carried per vehicle       84.4
8. Average number of pupils carried per route       48.6
Transportation Assistance
In addition to the operation of regular school transportation services, each
School Board is empowered to make a grant to parents who provide their own
transportation for their children. These grants are given in cases where there are
insufficient pupils beyond Departmental walk limits to establish a regular bus route.
During the school-year, 1,998 pupils from 68 districts utilized this means of
conveyance at a total cost of $306,346-
Table of Transportation Costs
The following table indicates the relationship between the total district
expenditure and the total conveyance costs over the past eight years:—
Calendar Year
Total District
Expenditures
Conveyance
Costs
Conveyance
Costs as a
Percentage
of District
Expenditures
19«
$62,238,464
69,234,423
80,966,873
91,279,662
105,044,901
118,269,991
127,616,486
136,432,687
$1,812,353
1,918,902
2,104,443
2,236,918
2,340,813
2,477,202
2,611,370
2,721,510
2.9
1956
2.8
1957	
2.5
1958
2.4
19*9
2.2
1960
2.1
1961     _	
2.0
196?
2.0
 W 46
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1962/63
School Dormitories
In many isolated rural sections of the large school districts it is impossible for
the School Boards to provide transportation services for secondary pupils who desire
to attend centralized secondary schools. In order to enable these pupils to attend
secondary schools that offer a full high-school programme, authority to operate
school dormitories is given to School Boards.
The following table provides data respecting the dormitories that were in
operation during 1962/63:—
School District
Capacity
Occupany,
1962/63
Staff
Grade Limits
Accommodated
Number and Name
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Full
Time
Part
Time
From
To
24. Kamloops	
27. Williams Lake	
28. Quesnel 	
29. Lillooet	
56. Vanderhoof.. _ 	
15
23
18
10
20
45
16
32
50
14
25
18
10
22
45
16
34
50
15
20
23
23
12
25
10
25
50
14
18
15
10
6
28
7
33
39
1
1
2
2
2
3
2
4
4
(i)
1
2
VIII
DC
VIII
VIII
VIII
VIII.2 DC
VIII
VIII
vni
XIII
XII
XII
XII
XII
XIII
58. McBride	
XII
XIII
XII
Totals (9) 	
229
234
203
170
21
8
VIII
XIII
i Four days.
2 Grade VIII special classes.
Boarding Allowances
For pupils who are unable to take advantage of transportation or dormitiza-
tion, the School Board is empowered to provide a boarding allowance. Under this
arrangement a pupil can receive up to $30 per month on a basis shared by the
Department of Education. During the past school-year (1962/63), there were
523 pupils from 52 school districts who received a total of $154,100 in such boarding allowances.
Jericho Hill School Advisory Board
This Board consists of representatives from the Deaf and the Blind Parent-
Teacher Association, the Vancouver School Board, and the Department of Education.
The Advisory Board met once each school month during 1962/63 and provided monthly reports to the Department respecting the operation of the Jericho
Hill School.
The accompanying report of Dr. C. E. MacDonald, the superintendent of the
Jericho Hill School, contains the pertinent statistics relating to the enrolment in the
school.
 DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH W 47
DIVISION OF TESTS,  STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.P/ed., DIRECTOR
The work of the Division during 1962/63 was primarily directed toward the
production and mechanical processing of large numbers of tests and examination
scores. Increases in total enrolment since the Division was established (from
135,000 in September, 1946, to 358,000 in June, 1963) and in the number of
matriculation examination papers scaled (from 26,000 in 1953 to 72,000 in 1963)
have made it imperative that steps be taken to mechanize procedures for handling
data. Unfortunately the experimental procedures designed for the 650 computer
during the past two years must now be revised to suit the 1620 and 1401 computers
that recently have been installed, and this project happens to coincide with the
tremendous upsurge in matriculation candidates expected in 1964 and 1965.
Programmes that were brought into operation during 1962/63 included the
following. All of them were the result of intensive effort, writing, testing, and
revising by Mrs. Janice Andrew, research assistant in the Division. Valuable
assistance in the processing and scaling of examinations also was given by Dr. J. I.
Macdougall and Mr. W. Burgess in July.
(a) An identification programme which converts pupils' and parents' birth-
dates into code numbers. For example, the letters and numbers punched
as Dec. 31, 1949, Jan. 23, Jun. 17 automatically become 049, 366, 023,
169. The purpose of this code is to trace the future progress of pupils
through the grades irrespective of division, school, and even name changes
that may occur. Over 600 transfers and additions occurred during the
Grade VII testing period in 1963, and out of 30,534 pupils, 252 twins,
3 triplets, and 12 unrelated duplicates were identified.
(b) Programmes to produce distributions of scores, chronological ages to the
nearest month, mental ages from test scores, and I.Q.s from age and
score tables.
(c) A 1401 programme to print test data and calculate averages for divisions,
schools, and school districts.
(d) A programme to determine eligibility for U.E. and S.M. scholarships,
select subjects meeting scholarship requirements and calculate their average, and one to tabulate results by scholarship area, school district, and
school.
The new school and district code was adopted by the Registrar in 1963 to provide a basis for the numerical identification of matriculation candidates and thus
eliminate a tremendous amount of hand tallying. Additional mechanization will
be necessary in 1964 and 1965.
 W 48
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1962/63
The Grade VII testing programme consisted of the following:—
Mean
Score
U.S.
Equiv.
Lorge-Thorndike Intelligence Test, Level 4, Form B (Feb. 13-15).
British Columbia Social Studies VII Test (Mar. 27-28)	
British Columbia Science VII Test (Mar. 28-29)..
Metropolitan Achievement Test, Advanced Partial, Form B (Mar. 25-27)-
Vocabulary  37.1 Reading	
31.6
Spelling.
Language (usage, punctuation and capitalization, kinds of sentences, grammar-
Language study skills (dictionary and sources of information)	
Arithmetic computation 32.6 Problem-solving and concepts  	
Social Studies study skills (sum of two scores)    	
54.3
30.9
28.8
39.8
52.9
18.2
31.3
25.8
110.1
(9.8
4 9.2
I 8.8
8.5
8.6
(8.7
| 8.6
10+
Tests were administered to Grade VII pupils in Indian schools, the Yukon
Territory, some private schools, and all British Columbia public schools, and
117,675 booklets produced by 30,534 pupils were marked. Forty-two markers
produced 579,633 sub-scores from 1,251,894 test pages (41 per pupil), and 17
clerks added, check-scored, entered, and proof-read over 2,284,000 data entries.
B.C. numerical equivalents were produced for mental ages, I.Q.s, and 10
achievement scores. Some 292,975 of these were tabulated by computer and
averaged by division, school, and school district. A mean equivalent was produced
for each of the 28,794 pupils who wrote five or more achievement tests. The value
of such Provincial norms in grading pupils recently has been verified experimentally
by Dr. Robin Smith, of the University of British Columbia.* Their value also is
emphasized by the apparent mean I.Q. of 110 and by the differences between the
B.C. grade level of 7.7 at which this year's tests were administered and the U.S.
grade equivalents averaging over 9.0 that were obtained. Increases in the differences between B.C. and U.S. norms which recently have become evident are very
gratifying, but may be quite misleading. Recent use of stratified census samples
in the United States include racial and economic groups that previously may have
been omitted. There is evidence that B.C. standards of achievement for Grade VII
are increasing, but perhaps not as rapidly as the comparison with U.S. norms would
indicate. The importance of Provincial standards, revised at periodic intervals,
with which current standards may be compared, is evident.
Data and estimates of emigration recently obtained from the Dominion Citizenship Branch have made refinements of estimates of child population possible. When
foreign emigration is subtracted from foreign and interprovincial immigration, it is
noticeable that the net gain, which has been very low during the past five years, has
again turned sharply upward. Although births have levelled off temporarily just
below the 40,000 mark, and emigration to the United States has increased, there
seems to be no end in sight for the expansion of our educational facilities.
Migration of Children Aged 0-15.99 to and from British Columbia
(Calendar Years)
1956
1958
1960
15-year
Average,
1946-60
1961
1962
Estimate,
1963
Net interprovincial immigration 	
Gross foreign—
9,831
4,187
2,040
11,978
—128
3,219
1,930
1,161
1,132
2,197
2,200
1,129
3,756
2,998
1,727
5,027
216
1,667
2,210
-327
2,891
1,745
2,200
2,436
4,000
1,700
2,200
3,500
• Smith, R. N.:   " Standards of Achievement in Local Examinations,'
search Council, Report No. 4, 1963.
British Columbia Educational Re-
 HOME ECONOMICS W 49
HOME ECONOMICS
REPORT OF MISS MILDRED C. ORR, B.A., B.S., DIRECTOR
The total number of pupils enrolled in Home Economics courses in the public
schools of British Columbia during the 1962/63 session was 38,335, showing an
increase of 2,263 pupils (6.3 per cent) over the total number enrolled the previous
year.
The enrolment by courses is as follows:—
Home Economics 8  13,011 Home Economics 32— 86
Home Economics 10     8,019 Home Economics 91     2,763
Home Economics 20     5,965 Home Economics 11—       105
Home Economics 21        596 Home Economics 23        329
Home Economics 22        233 Home Economics 24        555
Home Economics 30     4,820 Home Economics 26—       338
Home Economics 31        123
Occupational, domestic, and related skills  1,187
Vocational (tailoring)         87
Special, remedial, or slow learners        84
Jericho Hill School       34
In addition to the above, some senior Home Economics classes and some senior
individual pupils in public schools were enrolled in Secondary School Correspondence Home Economics courses.
In the reorganized Grade VIII programme, which came into effect in September, 1962, Home Economics remained a required subject for girls but on a reduced
time allotment. A new introductory and exploratory Home Economics 8 Course,
which had been prepared during the 1961/62 school-year by the Home Economics
Curriculum Revision Committee, was used.
This year additional school districts established the Occupational Programme,
and in many of those districts where this programme had been offered previously,
the second-year level was introduced. To meet the needs of the pupils taking this
programme, a second-year outline of the Domestic and Related Skills Unit was
included in the Secondary School Occupational Programme First and Second Year
(Preliminary Edition) bulletin.
The number of public schools in the Province with Home Economics departments (formerly referred to as Home Economics centres) increased from 204 in
1961/62 to 209 in 1962/63. Home Economics was offered for the first time at
Golden, Clearwater, and Fort Nelson.
A new Home Economics department was opened in each of the following
school districts: No. 15 (Penticton), No. 18 (Golden), No. 26 (Birch Island),
No. 36 (Surrey), No. 38 (Richmond), No. 39 (Vancouver), No. 43 (Coquitiam),
No. 45 (West Vancouver), No. 81 (Fort Nelson), and No. 62 (Sooke). Four
older Home Economics departments in School District No. 39 (Vancouver) were
closed, and their Home Economics classes were absorbed into Home Economics
departments in newer schools in the district. Two Home Economics departments
in School District No. 45 (West Vancouver) were amalgamated.
The total number of Home Economics rooms in use in schools was 403. The
Home Economics departments in operation varied in size from one to six Home
Economics rooms, the greatest number containing two Home Economics rooms.
4
 W 50
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1962/63
There were 370 teachers of Home Economics employed in public schools,
showing an increase of four over the total for 1961/62. The percentage of Home
Economics teachers holding degrees in Home Economics has increased slightly in
each of the past two years and was 58.3 per cent in 1962/63.
The need for fully qualified Home Economics teachers continues to exceed the
number available.
The Director and Inspectors of Home Economics co-operated with the Division of Curriculum by serving as consultants on the Home Economics Curriculum
Revision Committee, which was set up in September, 1961, and continued its work
throughout 1962/63. The revision of Home Economics courses to be introduced
in Grade IX in September, 1963, and in Grade X in September, 1964, was completed in June, 1963.
The use of group conference-workshops was resumed and increased in 1962/63,
one of the purposes being to orient teachers to the revised and updated philosophy
and objectives of the secondary-school Home Economics programme and to discuss
the implementation of and some ways of organizing the revised Home Economics 8
course. Conference-workshops were held for Surrey, Chilliwack, Coquitlam, North
Vancouver, Prince George and Vanderhoof, Dawson Creek, Prince Rupert, Courtenay, Trail and Castlegar, Kamloops, Nanaimo.
Several of the workshops were attended by a representative from local secondary-school administrative staffs and by girls' counsellors, as well as by Home
Economics teachers.
Besides those workshops initiated by the Division of Home Economics, members of this Division attended and participated in regional Home Economics workshops and conventions at Prince George, Abbotsford, and Langley, and in the Occupational Programme conferences held at Kamloops and Duncan.
The School of Home Economics and the College of Education, University of
British Columbia, continued to co-operate by offering emergency summer session
teacher-training for Home Economics graduates. In addition, the programme for
certificated teachers working toward their Bachelor of Education, major in Home
Economics, was continued at the summer session at the University of British
Columbia.
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
W 51
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
Secondary School Correspondence Rranch
REPORT OF DR. EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. es L., DIRECTOR
Enrolment
The total enrolment in the Secondary School Correspondence Branch during
the year 1962/63 was 17,665. This shows a decrease of 2,098 students or 10.6
per cent over 1961/62, when the enrolment was 19,763.
1. Number of Students.—The enrolment by age over the last four years and
the per cent increase in the total enrolment is shown in the following table:—
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
10,120
7,184
10,192
8,777
9,804
9,959
8,971
Adult (19 and over)  	
8,694
17,304
915
5.6
18,969
1,665
9.6
19,763
794
4.2
17,665
Increase by year—  	
2,0981
10.61
i Decrease.
2. School Students by Grade.—Students who could properly be called school
students (those registered in a school or taking a full grade by correspondence)
were classified by grade as follows:— Number Percent
Grade VIII (French 8)       184 2.9
Grade IX      866 13.4
Grade X  1,514 23.2
Grade XI  1,839 28.4
Grade XII  2,078 32.1
Totals
6,481
100.0
3. School Students Registered in a School.—A large number of school students
were registered in a school and took one or more courses by correspondence.
Number
Per Cent
Per Cent of Total
Enrolment
Small high schools (fewer than 140 students in Grades IX to XII)....
Large high schools (more than 140 students in Grades IX to XII)	
1,868
4,154
467
28.8
64.0
7.2
10.6
23.6
2.6
Totals                                   .                             	
6,489
100.0
36.8
Students registered in a school enrolled in correspondence courses for the following reasons:—
Course not offered in school ___	
Time-table difficulties.,-____ _; ;	
Failure in the course	
Continuing from previous year
Other reasons	
Number
Per Cent
3,433
52.8
999
.    i 15.4
793
12.2
1,262   •
19.6
2
	
 W 52 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1962/63
4. Students Taking a Full Grade by Correspondence.—A total of 527 students
enrolled in a full grade by correspondence for the following reasons:—
Number Per Cent
Living too far from a school  337 64.0
Too ill to attend school  150 28.4
In receipt of social assistance  2 0.4
Needed at home  15 2.8
Other  19 3.6
Correctional institution  4 0.8
Totals -_      527 100.0
Classification of Students by Fees
Students may be classified by the fee they paid for each course.
1. School-age students charged no fees: Percentage of Total
Number Enrolment
Not in attendance at school—
Because of illness      309 1.8
Because of need at home        22 0.1
Because of distance factor      358 2.0
In receipt of social assistance        57 0.3
In correctional institutions      197 1.1
Unemployed         61 0.4
Other         76 0.4
Totals 	
2. Adult students charged no fees:
Because of illness	
Because in receipt of social assistance-
Because in a correctional institution	
Enrolled in preparation for Canadian citizenship
Unemployed 	
Totals 	
3. Students  attending  a   high  school   ($10  per
course) 	
4. Non-school students taking academic and technical courses ($15 per course) 	
5. Grade XIII students:
Attending school ($25 per course)      315
Not attending school (B.C.) ($30 per course)     632
Totals 	
1,080
6.1
115
165
580
194
237
0.7
0.9
3.3
1.1
1.3
1,291
7.3
4,773
27.1
3,975
22.5
315
632
1.8
3.6
947
5.4
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
W 53
6. Students resident outside British Columbia:
Number
Temporarily resident outside British Columbia
($15 per course)       104
Enrolled in courses under the Federal-Provincial Agreement ($15 per course)      227
Enrolled in courses not under the Federal-Provincial Agreement ($20 per course)     217
Enrolled in Grade XIII courses   ($35  per
course)         30
Percentage of Total
Enrolment
0.6
1.3
1.2
0.2
Totals
578
3.3
7. Students continuing courses from a previous year
(no fee)  5,906*
i This figure also includes some students who at the same time enrolled in and paid for new courses.
Completion of Papers
The number of papers marked over the last five years and the per cent increase
per year is shown in the following table:—
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
Number of papers marked	
Per cent increase (per year)..
178,246 196,618
12.7        I      10.6
199,802
1.6
217,314
8.7
203,513
-4.5
i Decrease.
Instructional Staff
An inside staff of 4 course-writers and an outside staff of 91 instructors were
employed during the year.   The outside instructors were paid on a piecework basis.
New and Revised Courses
New and revised courses offered during the year were as follows:   French 8,
Chemistry 101, and Latin 10.
 W 54
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
Courses
The number of students who enrolled in each of the high-school subjects during
the year was as follows:—
School Age
Adult
Total
English Literature 10, 20, 30, 40, 10O -
English Language 10, 20, 30, 31, 40, 101	
Social Studies 10, 20, 30, 32, 33  -	
Health and Personal Development 10, 20, 30 .
Mathematics 10, 20, 12, 30, 91, 101 	
Science 10, 20    —
French 8, 10, 20, 91, 92, 110, 120	
German 10, 20, 91, 92, 110, 90, 120 	
Latin 10, 20, 91, 92, 110, 120 —	
Spanish 10, 20, 91, 92, 110  - —
Agriculture 10, 20, 38, 39 	
Art 10, 20, 39   -	
Homemaking 10, 20, 30, 91 -	
Record-keeping 11  	
Typewriting 10, 20   — -	
Mechanical Drawing 10, 20— 	
Bible Literature 10, 20, 30, 40	
Extramural Music 11, 21 _.. 	
English and Citizenship 19, 29  _
Electricity 20 .._    	
Business Fundamentals 24—   _ _
Frame-house Construction 20 — -	
Auto Mechanics 20, 30  _ _..
Shorthand 21, 31 _  	
Bookkeeping 34, 91    -	
Economics 92    ...
History 91, 101, 102 .._ _ _ ..._ _
Geography 91  _ 	
English 32, 91, 93, 99 _   -
Radio and Wireless 30 _  	
Forestry 30    _  	
Biology 91   - —
Chemistry 91, 101    _	
Physics 91, 101 __ -   ~~
Home Furnishing 23  _ _ —
Secretarial Practice 92.  —
Diesel Engines 91.—   	
Law 93 	
Vocational Courses
Air Navigation I, II-
Dressmaking .
Electricity for the Building Trades..
Glove-making.
House Painting and Decorating..
Industrial Mathematics
Mathematics for Steam Engineering, Second Class.
Spherical Trigonometry_.
998
1,047
1,021
533
1,898
562
957
491
563
246
213
283
547
297
651
179
38
9
13
92
188
17
627
185
251
81
245
152
256
91
129
154
122
119
42
22
20
171
Steam Engineering, Fourth, Third, Second, First..
Steam Heating for Plant Operators	
Preparation for Citizenship 	
1,238
1,575
512
27
2,651
203
483
209
107
123
38
104
42
90
209
89
33
20
410
88
75
37
163
104
461
39
351
88
250
152
61
89
158
192
16
2
68
67
14
22
91
5
10
170
74
4
462
65
193
2,236
2,622
1,533
560
4,549
765
1,440
700
670
369
251
387
589
387
960
268
71
29
423
180
263
54
790
289
712
120
596
240
506
243
190
243
280
311
58
24
88
238
14
23
96
6
10
178
74
4
467
67
194
English for New Canadians
During the year this division supplied 1,100 students with new material from
our course in English and Citizenship I; 320 students were supplied with material
from the English and Citizenship II and 76 with English and Citizenship III; 194
students took the course in English 19 and 229 students took the course in English
29 by correspondence. In addition, 194 students were enrolled in the Preparation
for Citizenship courses. Classes in English were held in about 50 night-school
centres, and material was supplied for other classes and individuals in about 76
small isolated places throughout the Province. Since volunteer instructors no longer
make yearly reports, it is impossible to estimate how many students have been using
books already supplied.
 correspondence schools
Adult Education
Enrolment
W 55
Total enrolment .	
Adult enrolment (19 years and over)
Per cent adults	
1961/62
1962/63
19,763
17,665
9,959
8,694
50.5
49.2
Adult Students Completing on the Interrupted Programme
A total of 951 students was completing the University Entrance requirements
under the Interrupted Programme.
Enrolment in Courses
The number of adult students enrolled in each course will be found under my
report of High School and Vocational Courses.
Elementary Correspondence School
REPORT OF ARTHUR H. PLOWS, B.Ed., DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1962/63 there were 1,084 pupils enrolled in Elementary Correspondence School. Of these, 943 were enrolled at Victoria and 141 at
Pouce Coupe in the Peace River District.
ENROLLED AT VICTORIA
Month
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Grade
VIII
Total
September  .
88
67
73
82
87
41
69
71
578
October	
93
80
87
101
96
54
83
104
698
97
98
82
83
97
98
112
111
96
104
58
58
90
91
121
128
753
December..	
771
January  	
105
85
102
117
103
68
96
137
813
February	
111
90
107
120
103
71
102
148
852
118
119
93
94
107
111
126
124
107
111
71
72
106
110
155
165
883
April	
906
May   	
124
97
109
129
112
75
114
174
934
June  —	
125
94
109
131
119
72
117
176
943
ENROLLED AT POUCE COUPE (PEACE RIVER BRANCH)
September	
16
12
15
11
17
6
9
5
91
October	
19
15
17
17
20
7
13
8
116
November	
22
15
19
19
21
9
15
8
128
December	
23
15
20
20
21
9
15
10
133
January	
24
14
21
20
21
8
16
12
136
February 	
25
15
20
21
21
8
16
12
138
26
27
15
15
20
20
21
21
21
20
8
9
17
17
12
12
140
April	
141
May	
27
15
20
21
20
9
17
12
141
June	
27
15
20
21
20
9
16
13
141
The number of papers marked at these two centres was as follows: Victoria,
119,073; Pouce Coupe, 18,093; total, 137,166.
Adults enrolled in courses Grades III to VIII, inclusive, totalled 305, and
6,962 additional papers were marked.
 W 56
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1962/63
The average number of papers marked per instructor was 9,939. The average number of papers submitted per pupil was 133, as compared with an average
of 108 in 1961/62.
As additional services, kindergarten kits were supplied to 148 pre-school-age
children, and instruction kits for teaching illiterates were sent in 36 cases.
Authorized under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, correspondence instruction classes were established at 13 centres, with a total enrolment of 69 pupils.
During the year minor revisions were carried out in lesson material, and attractive covers were designed for instruction booklets.
The Victoria staff consisted of a Director, 13 instructors, and a clerical staff
of 5; at Pouce Coupe, 1 instructor and 1 instructor-clerk.
 DIVISION OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS W 57
DIVISION OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS
REPORT OF MARGARET A. MUSSELMAN, B.A.,
DIRECTOR OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS
Programmes Presented
Radio
Provincial programmes (planned, prepared, production supervised,
and results evaluated)   103
Western regional programmes (planned and prepared content, supervised production, and evaluated results)     32
Western regional programmes (analysed scripts and evaluated results)    36
National programmes (gave suggestions and advice in planning, and
evaluated results)     40
Total number of radio programmes made available for
classroom and home student participation  211
Television
Western regional (British Columbia was responsible for 5 of the 13
programmes)      13
National (assistance was given in advice, in distributing teacher guide
material, and in evaluating the programmes)     77
Total television programmes available     90
The number of radio programmes decreased because of the shorter broadcast
term enforced by changes in the network.   Television programming is increasing.
Manual and Guides (Prepared and Distributed)
British Columbia Teachers' Bulletins  10,000
Pictures in the Air     3,500
Junior music  25,000
Intermediate music  44,600
Ecoutez  12,000
Calling Young Canada (distributed only)     7,000
Increased supply of the above were again inadequate for the demand.
Demonstration Classes
Classes were conducted during winter and summer courses in the Victoria and
Vancouver Colleges of Education.
 W 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
Extent of In-school Participation in British Columbia
Number Per Cent
Schools reporting  1,221 88.67
Schools using radio broadcasts  787 64.45
Divisions using radio broadcasts  3,736 34.45
Students using radio broadcasts  115,764 33.86
Schools using television broadcasts  118 9.67
Divisions using television broadcasts  392 3.61
Students using television broadcasts  12,353 3.61
Increase in use from 1961/62 to 1962/63 is indicated as follows:—
Radio Television
Schools using .        55 56
Classes using      393 225
Students using  8,033 6,862
Award
The British Columbia Department of Education won a first award for " Pictures
in the Air," an art programme with social studies and language value. The Institute
for Education by Radio-Television, Ohio State University, rated this series the best
in-school educational radio programme on this continent.
 DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
W 59
REPORT OF J. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sc, DIRECTOR
Submitted herewith is the circulation report of the Division of Visual Education
covering the period September 1, 1962, to August 31, 1963.
District Number and Name
Motion Pictures
Filmstrips
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
336
197
541
878
88
26
868
315
119
292
412
222
208
229
412
122
145
301
387
911
235
591
1,158
1,783
132
235
995
788
288
276
283
1,096
2,053
1,071
831
1,058
264
1,968
1,676
1,068
2,930
1,418
1,424
550
708
505
1,949
337
684
697
231
711
652
379
727
53
959
170
214
99
356
409
52
15
459
197
62
130
250
92
92
151
282
75
76
160
204
489
119
361
515
962
54
136
453
428
133
158
116
500
1,234
557
542
515
126
961
1,252
605
1,505
714
754
406
323
167
1,046
179
298
373
88
272
286
160
335
21
556
65
82
170
775
323
64
59
1,083
188
517
10
158
72
143
383
236
44
666
470
1,710
483
1,437
1,563
965
431
124
728  '
552
292
168
506
1,188
927
985
214
3,651
294
1,448
367
769
1,204
1,414
3,266
114
184
1,016
1,825
171
701
50
58
257
113
330
298
99
935
45
64
108
633
183
58
35
806
125
409
9
105
39
103
308
210
25
496
323
1,086
313
989
938
743
225
90
412
393
226
131
286
741
669
711
202
2,786
168
980
317
509
910
979
2,118
99
115
682
1,317
130
439
36
39
166
75
167
209
73
711
17
5. Creston	
8. Slocan                                                                          	
9. Castlegar 	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks   	
13. Kettle Valley 	
16. Keremeos  	
18. Golden  	
22. Vernon 	
23. Kelowna	
26. Birch Island	
27. Williams Lake 	
28. Quesnel            .. „
29. Lillooet	
30. South Cariboo	
31. Merritt	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford  „._	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond 	
40. New Westminster 	
42. Maple Ridge 	
46. Sechelt     _	
49. Ocean Falls 	
50. Queen Charlotte           	
51. Portland Canal	
55,  Rums T nk<>
58. McBride	
 W 60
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1962/63
Motion Pictures
Filmstrips
District Number and Name
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
59. Peace River South	
1,211
229
4,039
597
680
180
1,094
322
567
815
368
586
543
1,366
164
489
799
237
218
192
34
327
520
118
3,692
327
350
73
578
85
291
547
207
342
244
692
123
167
546
117
107   •
118
5
142
1,876
30
637
488
235
1,510
341
120
243
438
407
216
876
212
259
766
279
162
160
34
204
863
453
1,073
19
62. Sooke   	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
453
319
180
1,065
231
67. Ladysmith	
77
217
317
70. Alberni ..	
311
71. Courtenay 	
72. Campbell River.	
169
569
73. Alert Bay  	
135
74. Quatsino _	
75. Mission   	
146
549
163
77. Summerland _	
78. Enderby 	
109
133
79. Ucluelet-Tofino	
17
80. Kitimat	
99
81. Fort Nelson	
18        1                9
82. Chilcotin   ■ '    	
1,413
736
697
443
642
400
Totals	
57,186
31,680
47,134
32,656
The library contains 3,456 motion pictures and 6,695 filmstrips.
One thousand one hundred and thirty-one out of 1,378 public schools in the
Province registered for service.
 TEXTBOOK BRANCH
W 61
TEXTROOK RRANCH
REPORT OF BASIL R. WILSON, DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1962/63, a total expenditure of $581,625.93 was
required to complete 5,047 requisitions for free books and supplies for students in
Grades I to VI in the elementary schools of the Province. Though the number of
requisitions increased by \Vz per cent, from 4,972 to 5,047, the value of books
supplied decreased by $48,978.96. The decrease can largely be attributed to the
exemption of the social services tax for prescribed school textbooks.
The number of purchase orders received during the year amounted to 22,605
orders received, valued at $1,045,860.95, a decrease of less than 1 per cent from
last year, when 22,932 purchase orders, valued at $1,052,841, were received and
serviced.
On the Rental Plan, 2,987 requisitions were received for textbooks to be issued
to students as required in Grade VII through Grade XIII, an increase in the number
of requisitions received and completed of 68 requisitions or 2.33 per cent over the
previous year.
Collections for rental fees, lost and damaged books paid for by students, and
remittances covering fire losses showed an increase of 5.74 per cent to $786,503.02
Rental refunds to students who left the British Columbia school system decreased to $9,062.45, which was 2.13 per cent less than the amount refunded to
students who left the British Columbia school system during the school-year
1961/62.
During the year the Library Service Division received and serviced 645 purchase orders for 28,267 library books, supplementary reading material, wall maps,
and globes. These orders were received from the various school districts throughout the Province. To carry out this part of the operation, four people are employed
on a permanent basis. These people are assisted by other members of the staff from
time to time and as conditions demand.
The Shipping Division employs four men on a permanent basis, who are assisted
by an additional 23 men employed during the peak periods.
The total weights and quantities shipped via various general shipping agencies
are shown on the following tabulation:—
Report
of Shipping Division
Freight
Express
Mail
Pieces
Weight
(Lb.)
Pieces
Weight
(Lb.)
Pieces
Weight
(Lb.)
July                   	
9,638
14,602
3,679
1,282
397
616
635
292
181
317
217
600
479,570
818,750
171,100
59,530
15,550
24,130
27,680
11,380
7,420
12,740
8,480
27,830
13
40
49
40
36
16
26
9
3
7
19
6
323
892
1,455
933
671
225
416
234
94
148
298
200
1,425
2,680
4,753
5,910
3,916
1,867
2,289
1,733
2,191
1,515
1,429
3,727
2,922
6,474
13,485
15,793
8,738
3,672
4,806
4,040
4,024
3,335
2,571
4,431
$438.27
968.05
2,022.73
October	
2,369.07
1,310.00
December   	
January 	
February	
553.85
720.88
596.68
593.52
500.21
May	
June  ,	
385.58
664.68
Totals ■	
32,456
1,664,160
264
5,889
33,435
74,291
$11,123.52
Total pieces, 66,155; total weight, 1,744,340 pounds; total cost of mail, $11,123.52.
 W 62
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
Each year, principals and teachers teaching in the schools of the Province are
encouraged to send in any books that are damaged or beginning to show signs of
wear, to be repaired. During the year 1962/63, books to the value of $390,060.71
were sent in on this programme, and of these, books to the value of $317,279.07
were recovered at a cost of $136,061.51, and were reissued to the schools.
Once again I wish to take this opportunity to express my sincere appreciation
for the willing co-operation that I have received from each member of the staff,
without which the Branch could not possibly maintain the reputation of efficiency
that it presently enjoys, and also I would like to express my thanks for the help and
consideration we have all enjoyed from school authorities throughout the Province.
Balance-sheet, March 31, 1963
Assets
Imprest Account—Cash on hand	
Inventory—Stock on hand .
Consigned textbooks  $2,094,447.19
Less depreciation1         981,557.16
$100.00
762,162.57
Accounts receivable	
Outstanding publishers' credit notes __.
1,112,890.03
9,922.01
9,478.10
$1,894,552.71
Liabilities
Customers' credit balances carried as back orders
Outstanding publishers' invoices
$342.73
8.48
100.00
Treasury advances for petty cash, Imprest Account	
Advances from Consolidated Revenue Fund     1,894,101.50
$1,894,552.71
1 Third-year depreciation on 1960/61 inventory, $246,096.02.
Second-year depreciation on 1961/62 inventory, $358,032.27.
First-year depreciation on 1962/63 inventory, $377,428.87.
 TEXTBOOK BRANCH W 63
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 31, 1963
Textbook Branch Operations—Sales
Revenue—Sales  $1,305,278.15
Less discount        250,315.73
Net sales  $ 1,054,962.42
Deduct cost of sales—
Inventory, March 31, 1962 -  $712,977.84
Purchases for year (cost, freight,
duty)      966,301.27
  $1,679,279.11
Inventory, March 31, 1963        762,162.57
Cost of sales         917,116.54
Gross profit      $ 137,845.88
Expenditure—
Salaries and wages        $39,000.41
Packing and general expense  4,601.58
Freight and delivery  11,828.96
Sundry expense  272.24
         55,703.19
Excess of revenue over expenditure for the fiscal year
ended March 31, 1963        $82,142.69
 W 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1962/63
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 31, 1963—Continued
Textbook Rental Plan Operations
Rental fees collected      $777,935.26
Opening rental inventory at March 31, 1962      $962,160.54
Plus purchases for year (cost, freight, duty)     1,132,286.65
$2,094,447.19
1962/63
Depreciation!
Inventory, March 31,
1961       $738,288.06
Less three years' depreciation at 33V3
per cent per annum       738,288.06 $246,096.02
Inventory, March 31,
1962  $1,074,096.79
Less two years' depreciation at 33VS per
cent per annum-        716,064.54    358,032.27
$358,032.25
Inventory, March 31,
1963   $1,132,286.65
Less one year's depreciation at 33^ per
cent per annum.        377,428.87    377,428.87
$754,857.78
Closing rental inventory, March 31,
1963   1,112,890.03
Total depreciation for year
1962/63    $981,557.16     $981,557.16
Add expenses—
Salaries and wages     $47,667.17
Packing and general expense         5,624.15
Freight and delivery       14,457.61
Sundry expense  332.73
  68,081.66
1,049,638.82
Excess of expenditure over revenue for the fiscal year
ended March 31, 1963     $271,703.56
i See footnote to balance-sheet.
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SERVICES W 65
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND  SCHOOL SERVICES
REPORT BY E. E. HYNDMAN, B.A., B.P/ed.,
CHIEF INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
From September, 1962, to July, 1963, there were 13,850 teachers under the
supervision of 53 Provincial District Superintendents of Schools, and six officers
of equivalent rank employed by the Vancouver School Board. These teachers
include aU employed in the public schools of this Province, as well as those in the
Indian day schools and some in Provincial institutions. In addition, a few teachers
in private schools were observed for purposes of certification. The number of
formal written reports issued was 3,652, resulting from 13,193 reported inspections.
Five District Superintendents were appointed to staff on August 1, 1962.
Two of these replaced Messrs. K. B. Woodward and C. J. Frederickson, who were
superannuated on July 31st, and three were additions to staff. All five appointments
were highly qualified by academic standards and by their successful experience as
senior principals or directors. Mr. R. E. Flower, principal of the Williams Lake
Secondary School; Mr. E. E. Lewis, principal of the Mission Secondary School;
Mr. D. E. McFee, principal of the Dawson Creek Secondary School; Mr. F. T.
Middleton, director of instruction in Kamloops; and Mr. D. H. MacKirdy, principal
of the Brooks Junior Secondary School, were assigned to positions in Dawson Creek,
Victoria, Kitimat, Kamloops, and Smithers respectively. Transfers of District
Superintendents to the larger districts were made only after consultation with the
School Boards concerned. These School Boards chose the District Superintendents
who were experienced in the more remote areas of the Province and had established
reputations in educational circles. It is this opportunity for promotion that encourages outstanding principals and directors to apply for appointment as District
Superintendents even though they may serve several years in remote parts of the
Province.
All the District Superintendents were appointed as executive officers by the
School Boards in accordance with section 11 of the Public Schools Act and received
administrative allowances. The duties assigned by the School Boards varied accord-
ling to the needs of the particular area. In many of the larger districts the
administrative assignments make it necessary to delegate many supervisory responsibilities to directors, supervisors, and consultants. In the rural areas the supervisory
and the administrative duties are carried out by the District Superintendent.
In-service Education
In no period in the history of this Province have there been so many changes
in the curriculum and in the organization of schools as during this past school-year.
These changes, all of which have been justified, have nevertheless placed extreme
demands on the resources in leadership of the professional organization of teachers
and the supervisory staff of both the districts and the Department. The ready
acceptance of change by teachers has been in a large measure the result of endeavours by the In-service Division of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation. At
the same time, members of the Department in curriculum and in supervision have
willingly shared in projects over the entire Province to bring understanding, appreciation, and even enthusiasm for the new developments, as follows:—
(1) The biennial conference for principals was held in August, 1962, under
the joint sponsorship of the Department of Education, the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, the British Columbia Trustees Association,
 W 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
and the College of Education. Since the theme of the conference was
" The Principal and the Developing Curriculum," there were major
addresses by several members of the Department of Education. The
conference was most successful in providing an understanding of the
new trends.
(2) The annual conference of the Department of Education was held in
April, 1963. The theme of the conference was the " Junior Secondary
School." This intensive study for two days prepared the District Superintendents more adequately for their duties in the districts and, at the
same time, brought an awareness of local problems to the Department.
(3) The zone meetings of District Superintendents held in six regions of the
Province provided a means for explanation and discussion on the changes
in curriculum and school organization. The District Superintendents
were thus better prepared to give the leadership which is so essential in
the modern interpretation of supervision. Representatives from headquarters attend these meetings to bring effective co-ordination of
endeavours.
(4) Fall and spring teachers' conventions provided opportunities for explanation and discussion of new developments. Members of the Department
played a significant role in these meetings.
(5) Conferences of principals and administrators held regularly in areas of
the Province asked for and received assistance from Department officials.
(6) In co-operation with the In-service Education Division of the British
Columbia Teachers' Federation and the publishers, institutes were arranged for teachers of Mathematics 8 in 10 regions of the Province.
Two of the text's authors, Professor Blumfiel and Mr. Eicholz, spent
afternoon and evening sessions explaining the programme to teacher
groups. This was the terminal event in a whole series of in-service
education projects introducing the new mathematical concepts. As a
result of these efforts, which were fostered jointly by the British Columbia Teachers' Federation and the Department of Education, the teachers
of the Province were quite adequately prepared to teach the new Mathematics 8 course.
(7) Workshops for the teachers in Occupational Programmes were held in
three areas of the Province—Kamloops, Burnaby, and Duncan. Each
of these drew teachers and administrators from a wide area and proved
the willingness of professional staff to spend time and effort to prepare
themselves adequately for new developments. So revolutionary are the
concepts of this new programme to teachers prepared under traditional
academic courses that it is a major challenge to bring understanding and
appreciation of the philosophy and procedures in the Occupational Programme. The influence of these workshops was significant, but there
remains much still to be accomplished.
(8) On request of the Secondary Professional Advisory Committee, an evaluation of the French 8 programme was undertaken co-operatively with
the In-service Education Division of the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation. Separate questionnaires were answered by District Superintendents, principals, and teachers of French 8 classes. They were then
compiled and statistically analysed by groups of teachers. In addition,
approximately 35 classes were visited for periods up to 1 hour. Two
very useful purposes resulted from this evaluation: it indicated, first,
that the new French 8 course was being well taught and well accepted by
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
W 67
principals and teachers; the second useful product of the evaluation was
its effectiveness in emphasizing to principals and teachers the objectives
of the course and the worth-while procedures in organization and instruction which were being developed in various centres.
(9) A team evaluation of the A. W. Neil Junior Secondary School was undertaken as a co-operative endeavour rather than as an exercise in inspection.
With the approval of the Alberni School Board and the full support and
assistance of Mr. R. W. Lawson, principal, a study in depth was made
of the school organization, the supervisory programme, and the instructional procedures. Seven District Superintendents each studied in his
own special area and discussed philosophy, instructional material, and
procedures with the administrators, the Department heads, and the
subject-area teachers. A final report was prepared jointly, with copies
to the School Board, the principal, and the Department of Education.
The exercise proved to be valuable to the District Superintendents who
participated, since it gave insight into significant elements of the new
school organization and programme. It was also useful to the principal
and his staff, who gained from their own participation and from discussions with other experienced specialists.
(10) As a result of a request by the Music Curriculum Committee, a district
evaluation of the music programme in both elementary and secondary
schools was made in School District No. 43 (Coquitlam) under the chairmanship of Mr. R. B. Stibbs, District Superintendent of Schools. Evaluation instruments were prepared jointly by members of the teaching staff
and the Curriculum Committee. The results of the evaluation were then
returned to the Music Curriculum Committee in the anticipation that
they would influence future curriculum development in this subject area.
Reports of District Superintendents
Local In-service Education Projects.—As would be expected, the reports submitted by the District Superintendents reflected the local interest in in-service
education programmes. It is without doubt that professionally minded educators,
in whatever capacity they are employed, have closed ranks to meet the challenge of
preparing for the new programmes. All reports indicate a variety of activities, but
some of the more unusual efforts included the teacher retraining and television
programmes in Vancouver, the Trail workshop in English, the off-campus University courses in Abbotsford and Burnaby, the Nelson workshop in physical
education, the resident professor in Prince George, the Campbell River workshop
in arts and crafts, and the educational television programmes by CKOK. In Richmond a successful programme functioned under the direction of a committee
composed of elected and appointed officers.
Non-academic Classes.—The reports this year reflected, as a significant trend
of education in the Province, an increased emphasis on special education, both
in the elementary and secondary schools. Most districts reported the establishment
of classes on the Occupational Programme, and many also initiated or extended
the organization of special classes in the elementary grades. Vancouver reported
classes on the Occupational Programme in 12 schools, whereas Burnaby reported
favouring the centralization of these classes in two schools. Districts reporting
the establishment of new or additional special classes included Surrey, Maple Ridge,
Mission, Chilliwack, Merritt, Terrace, Prince Rupert, and Delta.
Continuing Education.—Developments in adult education are described enthusiastically in the Vancouver report, but the spectacular expansion in this district
 W 68 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
is by no means an isolated incident. Significant expansion in adult education is
reported also by Burnaby, Chilliwack, North Vancouver, Victoria, Maple Ridge,
Vernon, Kelowna, Penticton, and Kamloops. Directors of adult education have
recently been appointed in Langley, Penticton, Courtenay, and Creston.
Experimental Projects
Even though the energies of teachers and administrators have been directed
toward the demands of the new programmes, there have nevertheless been several
significant experiments reported during the current year.   A few of these are:—
Internship.—The report for the Trail School District described an experiment
on the use of teacher interns.
Major Work Programme.—The Kelowna report commented favorably on a
project at the Grade V level.
Elementary Acceleration Programme.—-Chilliwack reported a project on continuous promotion without " skipping."
Programmed Learning.—Vancouver reported an extensive survey of teaching-
machines and programmed learning, of team teaching, and of the new experimental
courses in science.
Television.—Television sets have been purchased by the Langley School Board,
and an assessment of their use has been made during the past year.
Segregated Classes.—Burnaby District reported on an experiment with segregated classes for boys and for girls in Grade I.
Direct Classroom Supervision
As in previous years, opportunities were utilized to visit many classrooms in
various parts of the Province. In addition to the areas of special education, such
as provided by the Jericho Hill Provincial School, studies were made of the classes
on the Occupational Programme, the teaching of French 8, and the organization
for instruction in Grade VIII. While travelling extensively throughout the Province,
it was possible to attend a number of meetings with School Boards and many with
groups of teachers and principals. These direct lines of communication have served
a useful purpose, not only to bring a liaison between the Department and teachers,
but also to influence the decisions made by a number of committees, such as the
Professional Curriculum Advisory Committee, the Accrediting Committee, and the
Occupational Programme Curriculum Committee.
Two schools were examined thoroughly under the direction of this division
following complaints to the Superintendent of Education. In each instance constructive proposals were made which would improve the conditions in these
institutions.
Conclusion
To an even greater degree than in other years, this division is indebted to both
School Boards and to teacher groups for many of its achievements. During this
period of major changes in school programmes and organizations, all the energies
of supervisory officers have been directed toward bringing understanding and purpose to the teacher in her classroom. This has been possible to the degree in
which Boards and teachers have been willing to co-operate. There is a great satisfaction in reporting the interest, goodwill, and whole-hearted co-operation by those
responsible for education at the local level.
May I also express my appreciation for the many courtesies and kindnesses
by the teachers, the trustees, and District Superintendents during my visits in their
areas.
 TEACHER RECRUITMENT W 69
TEACHER RECRUITMENT
REPORT OF PHILIP J. KITLEY, M.A., CO-ORDINATOR
This Branch aims at the promotion of teacher recruitment and the co-ordination
of the efforts of all interested agencies toward this end. It has also the responsibility
of directing the guidance services of the Department of Education. In addition,
it takes care of the editing and distributing of all Departmental press releases.
Future Teachers Clubs
During the year there were 108 clubs operating in the senior secondary schools
of the Province, with a total membership of 1,826 members. This was slightly less
than the previous year, possibly a reflection of the population " plateau " in Grades
XI and XII. On the basis of incomplete annual reports from clubs, it can be
estimated that at least 72 per cent of the membership have made definite plans to
enter the teaching profession.
A revision of the Handbook for the Future Teachers Club was sent to all
clubs. This year for the first time a sponsor's kit, containing a variety of informative
and programme material, was compiled and sent to all club sponsors. In addition,
four newsletters were prepared and sent tp clubs. Another innovation this year
was the commencement of a small resource library from which clubs could borrow.
Talks were given to five clubs, and a number of others were visited. This
Branch also participated in two or three local conferences, including the Future
Teachers Conference at the University of British Columbia, and organized one or
two local conferences for sponsors.
Advisory Committee on Teacher Recruitment
This Committee held three meetings during the year, the last one in the new
Education Building at the University of British Columbia. Prominent among the
topics discussed were supply and training of specialist teachers and recruitment
projects.
Certification of Teachers
A survey of teacher certification revealed steady improvement in level of
certification, particularly in elementary schools. Some comparisons are given in
the following table:—
Certificate
EC 	
EB 	
EA 	
PC  (SC) 	
PB  (SB)  	
PA 	
Total Number in Active Use
1961/62                  1962/63
929
836
4,632
4,794
1,538
1,729
864
1,018
2,701
3,021
1,901
1,863
During the summer months the Co-ordinator was available for counselling
for several days at the University of British Columbia and at Victoria College.
Nearly a hundred teachers and teachers-in-training were interviewed, most of them
with problems in programmes or certification.
Promotional Activities
Addresses were given to various groups and conferences. At the University
of British Columbia 24 separate groups of Arts and Science undergraduates were
addressed on the subject of teaching as a profession.
 W 70 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1962/63
This office continued throughout the year to act as a source of general information for those inquiring about possibilities in teaching.
United Kingdom Recruitment
In co-operation with the Registrar's office, informational material was again
prepared for transmission to the United Kingdom relative to available teaching
positions in British Columbia.
Teachers' Scholarships
In the Minister of Education's continuing programme of scholarships for
teachers of distinction, the following were awarded: P. Butterfield, Henry Hudson
Elementary, Vancouver; Mrs. G. M. Dick, Eric Hamber Secondary, Vancouver;
G. Walsh, Hamilton Junior Secondary, North Vancouver; and, J. T. Walsh, Lord
Byng Secondary, Vancouver.
Provision of Guidance Material
Material concerning vocational and other aspects of guidance was provided
to secondary schools, 112 separate items being distributed. A new policy was
worked out with the Federal Department of Labour which will result in making
occupational information available to schools in larger quantities in future. A
mimeographed bulletin was prepared and sent to schools on four occasions.
Roughly 400 separate individual inquiries for vocational information were
dealt with.
Guidance Evaluation
During the course of the year, visits were paid to 20 secondary schools for
the purpose of discussing guidance and counselling programmes and procedures.
Addresses were given and discussions held with several groups of guidance teachers
and counsellors.
Guidance Records
With the assistance of a committee of guidance personnel, the set of record
forms in use now for over 15 years was completely revised.
Revision of Grade VII Guidance
As a result of the inclusion of Grade VII as an elementary-school grade, it
was felt that a revision of its guidance programme was needed. This was accomplished with the assistance of a teachers' committee.
Workshop
A summer workshop for those new to the guidance field was conducted during
two weeks in July at Victoria College.
Vancouver Board of Trade Projects
In co-operation with the B.C. Products Bureau of the Vancouver Board of
Trade and the Pacific National Exhibition, another job-study competition was
arranged, over a hundred final entries being received and judged.
Discussions were held with a view to developing a new kind of project which
will involve active co-operation of school and business personnel to effect more
complete liaison for purposes of vocational guidance.
The appreciation of this Branch is extended to all those who contributed so
well to the success of this and other of the year's activities.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION W 71
TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. S. WHITE, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND REGIONAL DIRECTOR FOR CANADIAN
VOCATIONAL TRAINING.
The rapidly expanding features of this branch of education as reported in previous years continued without any slackening of pace throughout this school-year.
School instruction, provision of equipment, operational expenses, and student
assistance necessary to provide the many and varied courses offered are met through
the Federal-Provincial Training Agreement.
Construction of several training centres reached various stages of completion
during the year and is outlined as follows:—
(a) British Columbia Vocational School—Prince George: First phase completed and courses in welding, auto mechanics, diesel mechanics, and
heavy-equipment operation commenced in the fall of 1962; addition to
open September, 1964.
(b) British Columbia Vocational School—Kelowna: To open September,
1963.
(c) British Columbia Vocational School—Nelson: To open January, 1964;
to incorporate the present Kootenay School of Art.
(d) British Columbia Vocational School—Nanaimo: The addition to this
school to open September, 1963.
(e) Vancouver Vocational Institute and School of Art: Additional units
opened in the spring of 1962.
(/)   British Columbia Institute of Technology:    Opening planned for the fall
of 1964.
(g) Additional vocational training facilities were completed at high schools in
Burnaby and Vancouver.   Further construction was in process at other
centres in Vancouver, and planning is under way for similar facilities in
Trail, North Vancouver, Penticton, and Vancouver.
Tourist Services Training
During the school-year a Restaurant Training Clinic was conducted at Lillooet;
5 Catering Management courses at Vancouver, Penticton, and Kelowna; 16 Waitress
Training courses at Victoria, Penticton, Kelowna, Vernon, Hope, Terrace, Vancouver, Nanaimo, Kamloops, and Duncan; and 5 Room Maid classes at Vancouver,
Victoria, and Penticton. A single course in Oriental Waiter training was offered in
Vancouver, and Career Expositions at Campbell River and Courtenay. Number of
persons trained: Waitresses, 155; room maids, 64; total, 219. Associations supporting and actively assisting: National Employment Service, British Columbia
Hotels Association, Canadian Restaurant Association, Auto Courts and Resorts
Association, British Columbia Government Travel Bureau, Department of Indian
Affairs, and School Boards of Vancouver, Penticton, Nanaimo, and Duncan.
Recruiting and Placement.—Victoria: Job placement here appeared very
limited, and as a consequence only one course in each category was conducted.
Vancouver:   No problems with either recruitment or placement.
Penticton, Nanaimo, and Duncan: As this was a trial programme in smaller
cities, courses were limited to the estimated number of jobs available.
 W 72 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
In general, all persons trained under the programme have been placed in either
seasonal or full-time employment. This programme appears to have gained complete acceptance by the industry.
Course Writing Workshop.—Revision was made of senior secondary schools'
General Programme for Grades XI and XII. Publications completed during the
year: "Quantity Recipes" for restaurant industry; "Catering Management
Manual "; " Cook's Course—Nanaimo," through Curriculum Development Division; " Waitress Training Manual," revision and reprinting.
Supervisory Training
Fundamentals of Management
Training in the management field has been offered to management supervisors
by the British Columbia Department of Education since 1957. The response from
industry and small individual companies has been excellent. Large corporations,
smaller companies, contractors, manufacturers, retailers, and service industries alike
have continued to send their key people for specialized training in Management
Communications, Human Relations, Accident Prevention, and Work Study.
All programmes continued to draw full registration for the one-week 40-hour
seminars, but the outstanding response was to the new programme, Work Study.
Over-registration occurred in each of the Work Study courses offered, and the results
obtained by represented companies was equally interesting. Some representatives
found they were able to make sweeping changes in the economy of operations, while
all in attendance found some immediate profitable use for the course and the principles of work study.
Work study is a combination of method study and work measurement and is
so flexible that it can be applied to a business of any size. The techniques are as
applicable to an office routine as they are to a production-line. The stress in this
course is placed on making more effective use of machines, materials, and manpower. It is not aimed at reducing staff, but in better and more profitable utilization
of present resources.
Summary of attendance for 1962/63 follows:—       Number of
Courses Attendance
Management Communications      5 107
Human Relations      4 130
Accident Prevention     5 104
Combination programme—three above courses in one _ ■  2 51
Work Study     6 160
Company-operated programmes  12 134
Totals   34 686
In addition to scheduled programmes, a number of short appreciation sessions
were held during the year.
A one-day seminar on Work Study was held for one of the largest complexes
in British Columbia.
It might be noted that some companies are setting up work study departments
of their own following these Provincial Government courses.
Municipalities, Provincial and Federal Governments continued to participate
in all Management Series training.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION W 73
Business Management Training Programme
An entirely new programme will be offered to businessmen in British Columbia
during the fall, winter, and spring of 1963/64. This programme will include four
courses: Keeping Records in a Business, Marketing and Sales, Merchandising and
Selling, and Management Accounting. The objective of this programme will be to
stress the financial side of business, with special emphasis on business failures and
ways of keeping a business solvent.
Courses under Development
Preliminary work was undertaken in the development of courses in rock drilling and diamond drilling, draughting, horticulture, and garment-manufacturing.
Vocational Instructor Training
A total of 31 vocational instructors attended the 1962 summer session operated
under the auspices of the Technical Branch, Department of Education. Two of
this number were from Alberta and one from Yukon Territory.
Course Enrolled Completed
Educational Psychology     23 22
Curriculum in Vocational Education     27 26
Supervisory Training     26 25
During the 1962/63 school-year, as a result of meetings between the University
of British Columbia and Department of Education officials, arrangements were concluded to offer the Vocational Instructor Teacher Education Programme under the
auspices of the College of Education.
Minor changes in the courses constituting the programme and an increase in
unit requirements from 15 to 18 were instituted, with July 1, 1963, being the official
date of the change. The outcome of the new programme will be that vocational
instructors who are qualified academically and wish to proceed to Bachelor of Education degree status will receive university credit for the courses they complete successfully. It would seem that this is the final act in bringing all technical and vocational teacher training under the auspices of the College of Education.
Report of Inspectors of Technical Classes
It should be noted that during this past year the term " Industrial Arts " was
changed to " Industrial Education."
New facilities for teaching Industrial Education have been provided in Slocan,
Golden, Birch Island, Kamloops, Surrey, Richmond, Saanich, Fort Nelson, Penticton, Williams Lake, Coquitiam, West Vancouver, Vanderhoof, Prince George, and
Vancouver.
Thirty-two qualified and five unqualified teachers were required to fill new
Industrial Education teaching positions. The increase in the number of occupational
classes is placing a severe strain on our teacher-training facilities. The amount of
shop time required by the occupational classes is going to tax our shop accommodation. Indications point to the need for shops designed to meet the needs of training
the occupational classes.
The revised Grade VIII course was late in reaching the schools, but the opinion
of experienced teachers favours the revision.
The total number of Industrial Education teachers employed to staff our schools
during the past year was 487.
 W 74 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
Automotive Air-brakes Course
In March, 1963, 25 mechanics successfully completed the Automotive Air
Brakes Course, sponsored jointly by the Department of Education and the Department of Commercial Transport. Certificates were awarded to graduates of the programme. This course was offered in the Department of Commercial Transport
offices in Vancouver under the instructorship of Mr. Kirkland.
Forest Rangers
Commencing April 1, 1962, a programme was arranged in co-operation with
the British Columbia Forest Service to train new Assistant Forest Rangers and to
upgrade Assistant Rangers to Forest Ranger category in the Forest Service.
The training was carried out at the forestry school at Green Timbers, North
Surrey. The arrangement made was that the Forest Service would provide buildings, heat, light, power, lodging, and transportation for the field trips.
The number of students trained was as follows: Two-month basic course, 40
students; one-week lookout course, 13 students; three-day course for Correctional
Officers, 30 students.
Kootenay School of Art
The Kootenay School of Art has already been in operation for three consecutive years, and our first diploma graduates are now leaving us to take up the pursuit
of art in their chosen fields.
At the original enrolment in 1960/61, we started with 10 full-time students.
Out of these, only four completed the first year (with one more student transferring to another art school and completing his training there afterwards).
In the second year of our operation, 1961/62, the four students who completed the previous year continued on, and two new students joined them in registering for second-year classes. There were also 18 new students for first-year courses.
Ten of the first-year students and all six of the second-year students completed their
courses (one of the latter is now working as an independent artist with her own
studio).
In 1961/62 our first-year enrolment was 10, and six of these have now completed the course. The 10 students who had successfully finished first-year classes
in 1961/62 registered for second-year courses, and one student transferred from
the Vancouver School of Art into this class. Of these 11, seven have completed
the year and have been awarded their immediate certificate.
Of the five third-year students in our diploma courses, one left in April as he
had obtained employment with a university department of fine arts in the United
States. The remaining four have now completed their diploma course and have
received their diplomas.
In the three years of work in these premises, the Art School has seen many
changes, and since its recognition and taking-over by the Department of Education,
it has received a number of transfer students from the Vancouver School of Art.
Some of our students have transferred to other schools in Canada, and one to the
art department of the University of Oregon. Another is continuing at the Ecole
des Beaux Arts in Montreal, and yet another is studying ceramics at a technical
institute in Germany.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
W 75
Student Enrolments, British Columbia Vocational School—Burnaby
Day Courses
Enrolment
m ON
«_,
IB
OS,
Pre-apprentice
Apprentice
Pre-employment
Upgrading
Course
■a
3
3
M
■a
T3
4)
£
0
O
U
O
•a
0
W
rt
■3
%
•3
0.
£
0
U
•a
0
c
W
a
rt
H
1
•a
E
0
0
73
0
rt
s
•3
0
a
M
p
rt
■0
&
1
-3
&
E
0
U
•a
u
11
5
10
4
32
29
18
27
14
16
30
27
18
8
13
14
12
44
28
16
2
11
7
4
2
4
2
2
3
6
9
2
5
8
9
2
-
28
15
14
16
12
12
24
20
15
2
4
12
10
27
18
14
I
1
30
18
26
17
7
17
223
1
8
11
8
24
5
	
	
12
9
13
11
14
7
19
23
6
5
4
1
10
28
18
3
6
16
102
80
1
6
2
6
15
96
78
Boatbuilding	
—
12
10
7
16
3
22
34
8
45
36
17
9
1
1
1
15
3
22
33
8
44
36
17
9
6
I
7
8
10
51.	
Painting and Decorating. —	
—-
—
'•■1       '
5|289
7
16
—■
—
	
6
|
56
Totals 	
10713461 78
243118314001   12
388
741  31
32
4312971     51294
56
1 Only 1 student of the first-year class withdrew, the other 6 students were second-year students who were
released before the end of the term but returned for examinations in June.
2 Of the 23 students completing, 17 first-year students are expected to return in September.
3 There were 1,115 welding tests.
SUMMARY
Pre-
apprentice
Apprentice
Pre-
employment
Upgrading
Number of Students as at July 1,
Total enrolment — —
Total withdrawn  _
Total completecL-
Total as at June 30, 1963..
84
346
78
243
109
400
12
388
7
74
31
32
18
16
297
5
294
14
 W 76                                  PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1962/63
Student Enrolments, British Columbia Vocational School—
Burnaby—
Continued
Night Courses
Course
Apprentice
Technician
Upgrading
•a
■o
c
a*
•o
0
a
C
■a
n
C3
I
xt
a
•a
fl
i
1
6
E
8
pa
fl
s
i
>.
8
£
o
0
£
6
Advance Gas 	
5
4
i
57
1
56
Airless Spray Gun Operation  .
30
30
Basic Gas
37
2
35
15
3
12
Boatbuilding  	
24
5
19
	
Carpentry   	
71
13
58
	
	
	
	
Controls 	
25
3
22
Electrical 	
111
25
86
9
9
38
10
28
42
42
Leadburning	
	
	
56
9
47
Mathematics for Industrial Gas	
	
	
79
2
77
New Plumbing Code	
	
	
	
	
113
113
Oil Burner Service and Installa-
36
3
33
Plastic Laminate	
	
	
40
1
39
34
8
26
Plumbing and Steamfitting	
89
28
61
	
	
Refrigeration  ..
16
1
15
	
Remedial Mathematics for Indus
trial Gas	
	
	
8
8
.
8
1
7
43
15
28
Telecommunication 	
12
5
7
163
64
99
54
6
381
24
24
Welding	
35
10
25
—
334
17
317
Totals 	
464
107    |    347
163
64
99
981
73
908
i Total remaining in class as at June 30, 1963, 10.
SUMMARY
... 1,608
...     244
Total completed 	
1,354
Summary of Enrolment, July 1, 1962, to June 30,
1963
Total dav school    _ _       _ _        	
1,11'
1,601
1,11.'
7
?
J
Total night school .
Total welding tests _
Total
3,841
 technical and vocational education
W 77
Student Enrolments, British Columbia Vocational School—Nanaimo
Enrolment in Day Courses
Pre-employment
Pre-apprent
ce
Upgrading
Apprentice
Course
•a
o
o
u
C
W
rt
I
"3
OJ
a
E
o
U
•a
CJ
rt
s
•a
o
a
o
u
a
W
rt
-j
•3
fl
•a
u
u
ft
E
o
U
•a
5
E
"9
«
s
I
&
•O
5
•a
u
a>
ft
E
o
O
13
u
Q
E
4J
a
S
a
W
u
■a
1
U
"ft
E
o
0
4
2
16
32
21
36
46
11
5
i
3
2
3
10
1
2
1
15
21
19
33
36
10
5
1
14
4
16
31
32
1
23
58
1
2
23
54
20
51
53
11
2
2
51
9
—
116
102
1
Heavy Duty Pre-apprentice	
—
Pipeline Welding	
—
Timekeeping and First Aid 	
....
116
101
Diamond Drilling  	
Air Trac Operators 	
Totals         	
173
20
142
99
81
3
77
71
64
4
60
—
218
1
217
Welding tests, A.S.M.E., 68; pipe welding tests, 7; total, 75.
Placement figures are known placement; others may have found employment
and not notified the school. Heavy-equipment operators disperse across British
Columbia and Western Canada and do not always notify the school of placement.
British Columbia Vocational School—Prince George
General Review
British Columbia Vocational School—Prince George came to life during the
month of July, 1962. The principal, along with three service staff, reported to the
site for duty. On the 23rd of July a partial release was granted by the contractor
on the automotive shop, and equipment was removed from storage and brought to
the school for unpacking and sorting. The month of August was devoted to setting
up the shops and organizing the administration of the school.
The school officially opened its doors September 4, 1962, with a staff of nine,
and offered instruction in the following trades: Automotive Mechanics, Heavy Duty
Mechanics, and Heavy Equipment Operation.
On October 15th a small class in General Welding was started, in a section of
the Heavy Duty Mechanics shop, with an enrolment of six students.
April 22nd saw the permanent welding-shop ready for occupancy. Immediate
steps were taken to move out of the temporary quarters in the Heavy Duty Mechanics
shop.
On May 30th the administrative offices were moved to permanent quarters in
the administrative classroom block.
Public Relations
Speaking engagements (local)
21
5
Speaking engagements (outside areas)	
Conducted tours of school by groups  19
 W 78
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
Heavy Equipment Operators' Course Projects
1. Department of National Defence, R.M.R. firing range: Constructed two
roads, cleared out range area, and built up firing points.
2. Department of Highways, V.L.A. subdivision: Clearing of right-of-way,
grading and shaping of roadways.
3. British Columbia Forest Service, McBride Timber Reserve, forest access
road:   Clearing of right-of-way and moving of timber.
4. Prince George Rod and Gun Club, new range: Cleared, graded, and constructed firing points, cleared and graded parking areas and access road.
5. Retarded Children's School, new addition: Excavated and backfilled foundation.
Acknowledgments
I would like to take this opportunity to express my thanks and appreciation
to the members of the Technical and Vocational Branch, the administration of the
Vocational Schools at Nanaimo and Burnaby, and the staff of the Vocational School
at Prince George for their co-operation this past year.
Enrolment in Day Courses
Pre-employment
Pre-apprentice
Course
13
U
o
R
H
a
s
rt
*
■a
1
•a
OJ
"H.
E
o
U
a ca
55h
13
U
E
•o
0
c
W
c
a
•o
i
•a
CJ
aj
ft
E
o
u
4
a ^
55f-
13
rt
a.
Automotive Mechanics.— —
8
1
5
2
5
19
7
12
7
4
20
9
8
1
2
12
8
2
2
4
1
21
i
9
11
9
Heavy Equipment Operators 	
Totals   	
41
10
27
4
12
40
i
16
23
16
Trade Extension Night Classes
Enrolment
Stationary Engineer, Fourth Class and Heating (certificates awarded
—Fourth Class, 12; "A" Heating, 1;  "B" Heating, 1)  32
Class "A" chauffeur's licence  14
Total
46
 technical and vocational education
Vancouver Vocational Institute
Enrolment in Day Courses
W 79
1 Special vocational preparatory classes for unemployed held in Aberdeen School.
2 Special upgrading classes for fishermen held in the Vancouver Vocational Institute.
3 Special two-week emergency classes in Waitress Training.
Pupil Enrolment, July 1, 1962, to June 30, 1963
January  1,214
February  1,308
March  1,274
April  1,298
May  1,264
June  1,035
July	
August 	
September
October ___.
November
December.
Course
Instructor
Enrolled
Withdrawn
Completed
Full
Course
Completed
Upgrading
Students
in
Training
Students
Placed
1
2
1
5
2
3
4
4
2
3
3
3
5
2
1
2
1
5
1
2
5
1
1
1
1
32
57
37
238
77
81
355
175
50
93
61
87
694
26
52
267
55
222
27
89
216
13
11
14
79
6
1
33
12
13
45
30
6
11
8
299
4
23
15
41
4
12
90
2
18
22
24
116
30
37
190
145
24
42
30
41
207
14
17
96
30
84
12
53
126
13
11
14
77
5
25
17
8
1
22
9
19
12
64
18
31
112
20
39
31
38
188
12
9
148
10
107
11
24
14
10
17
112
50
42
147
70
24
38
27
41
30
14
37
Power Sewing	
25
84
Shoe Repairing	
6
20
Vocational Preparatory!	
Coastal Pilotage2	
31
Waitress Trainings	
73
Totals        	
61
3,108
655
1,473
78
902
912
763
685
1,152
1,200
1,177
1,126
Night-school Classes
Number of classes
Total enrolment
 W 80
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1962/63
Programmes 5 and 6
Programme 5
Course
In Training
as at
July 1,1962
Enrolled
during
Year
Completed
and (or)
Terminated
Training
during Year
In Training
as at
June 30,1963
Provincial Schools
Aeronautics.
Air Trac	
Art	
Auto Body	
Auto Mechanics..
Barbering.
Beauty Culture-
Boatbuilding	
Carpentry..
Chef Training-
Commercial ....
Diamond Drilling..
Diesel 	
Draughting	
Electrical 	
Electronics	
Engineering—
Advanced Technical-
Stationary and Marine.	
Heavy Duty Mechanics.	
Heavy Equipment Operation .
Machine Shop 	
Navigation..
Painting and Decorating-
Power Sewing .	
Practical Nursing-
Room Maid Training ..
Shoe Repairing	
Timekeeping.
Vocational Preparatory-
Waitress Training	
Welding—
General 	
Upgrading ..
Pipeline	
Totals.
Barbering.—
Commercial ..
Private Schools
Medical Records Librarian-
Radiography.-
Radio Communications.
Hairdressing .
Industrial First Aid	
Training on the jol>—
Appliance Repairs.
Sign Painting	
Totals	
1
3
7
1
7
7
25
7
4
6
7
3
4
1
5
90
2
1
13
210
197
14
69
1
2
2
2
13
20
159
11
7
17
15
19
21
1
17
7
2
2
19
144
91
7
31
167
146
45
31
1,017
1
444
1
1
1
14
34
282
496
7
1
4
4
9
3
13
17
126
1
10
10
7
11
3
20
1
14
8
1
2
15
142
91
6
32
180
146
43
33
3
964
411
1
15
83
28
1
1
540
7
10
58
10
4
11
14
15
4
4
1
4
92
263
1
230
1
238
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
Programme 6
W 81
Course
In Training
as at
July 1, 1962
Enrolled
during
Year
Completed
and (or)
Terminated
Training
during Year
In Training
as at
June 30, 1963
Provincial Schools
Adult Education..
Auto Mechanics ..
Barbering 	
Beauty Culture	
Chef Training	
Commercial	
Heavy Duty Mechanic-
Power Sewing	
Shoe Repair	
Sign Painting .
Vocational Preparatory-
Totals	
Private Schools
C.N.I.B. Home Teacher..
Commercial	
Developmental Reading, Mathematics, and English..
Hairdressing .
Hoffman Press Operator	
Insurance Agent's Course (two-year correspondence)-
Interrupted Programme for University Entrance 	
Library Science_
Medical Records Librarian .
Physical Education Instructor	
Radio Electronics (radio officer's training)..
Social Work	
Teacher Training	
Training on the job—
Engineering Aid.
Powersaw Mechanic-
Radio Electronics	
Totals.
12
22
11
21
25
1
10
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
25
Total Enrolment
Night Schools (Excluding Provincial Schools, Vancouver
Vocational Institute, and School of Art)
Commercial   5,741
Industrial  3,481
Agricultural _.       38
Total
High Schools—Day Courses
Commercial
Industrial	
Agriculture .
9,260
6,973
1,103
76
Total.
8,152
 W 82 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
REPORT OF J. H. PANTON, M.Sc, DIRECTOR
The first major organizational changes in the Community Programmes Branch
since its inception in 1953 were implemented in the fiscal year 1962/63. The
growth of Recreation Commissions was marked by extended programme rather than
numbers as we have reached the point where most of the communities in British
Columbia now have Recreation Commissions. A change in the boundaries of
regions was effected to provide better service in the northern areas and to equalize
the work load of the Community Programmes Branch field staff. All phases of
work in the Community Programmes Branch are steadily increasing as recreation
and adult education continue to evidence greatly increased interest and expanded
programmes.
Growth chart for Recreation Commissions in British Columbia to March 31,
1963, follows:—
1954    86 1959 266
1955 140 1960 281
1956 183 1961 307
1957 216 1962 332
1958 250 1963 3 51
Services extended by the Community Programmes Branch to British Columbia
communities are as follows:—
(1) Advice to public agencies and individuals on recreational matters by a
staff of regional recreation consultants.
(2) New office of fitness and amateur sports to provide special service to sports
organizations, communities, and schools.
(3) Adult Education Division—grants, consultation, clinics, and conferences
to School Board adult education divisions.
(4) Aid in recreation to the blind through White Cane Clubs organized by
staff member Mr. Joseph Lewis.
(5) Large and comprehensive library of books, booklets, films, and filmstrips
on innumerable recreation topics.
(6) Drama library—materials and advisory services.
(7) Leadership training through workshops, conferences, clinics, and regional
schools.
(8) Regular grants to Recreation Commissions who conducted summer swimming and playground programmes.
(9) Responsible for educational sessions and resource personnel at Annual
British Columbia Recreation Conference.
(10) Special grants to those Recreation Commissions who conducted summer
swimming and playground programmes.
Recreation Commissions
The following is a list of Recreation Commissions in British Columbia and the
annual Provincial Government grant allocated for the year:—
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
W 83
* Commissions receiving grants for directors' salaries.
t Inactive Commissions during year with actual amount received shown in parentheses.
Recreation Commission
Abbotsford	
Adams Lake	
Ainsworth	
*Alert Bay	
Alexandria	
Alexis Creek	
Annual
Grant
.      $480.00
300.00
300.00
.    1,200.00
300.00
240.00
300.00
600.00
180.00
240.00
300.00
240.00
540.00
420.00
Barnhart Vale        240.00
Barnston Island   No grant
Argenta-Johnsons Landing
Armstrong
Arrowhead-Sidmouth
Arrow Park West	
Ashcroft 	
Avola	
Balfour .	
Bamfield 	
Bear Creek
Beaver Creek
Beaverdell 	
Birch Island __.
Black Creek...
Blue River	
Bonnington-Corra Linn
Boston Bar	
Boswell	
240.00
480.00
240.00
240.00
480.00
144.00
240.00
300.00
420.00
180.00
240.00
600.00
240.00
180.00
480.00
300.00
240.00
3,600.00
480.00
240.00
*Campbell River     1,800.00
Bouchie Lake ....
Bowen Island	
Bralorne-Pioneer
Bridesville 	
Brisco	
Britannia Beach
Brocklehurst 	
Brookmere	
* Burnaby	
Burns Lake	
Burton 	
Canal Flats .
Canyon 	
Cape Mudge
Cawston 	
Cedar 	
  300.00
  300.00
  420.00
  360.00
  420.00
  480.00
  300.00
  420.00
  240.00
  540.00
  480.00
300.00
  300.00
  300.00
  300.00
  420.00
  180.00
  240.00
*Courtenay    1,800.00
Cowichan Indian Band  540.00
*Cranbrook     2,100.00
Crawford Bay  300.00
Central Saanich	
Chase	
Chehalis Crossing .
Chehalis Reserve _.
Cherry Creek	
Cherryville	
Chetwynd
tChristian Valley.
Christina Lake ...
Clearwater 	
Clinton 	
Comox Community
Connought Heights .
Coombs	
Annual
Grant
.   $360.00
900.00
480.00
600.00
600.00
600.00
300.00
300.00
- Delta   1,020.00
Recreation Commission
Crescent Valley	
*Creston 	
Cultus Lake	
Cumberland 	
Comox 	
Dawson Creek
Decker Lake ...
Deep Cove
Denman Island
Departure Bay .
Deroche 	
Dewdney
-District of Coquitlam .
District of Matsqui _
District of Mission	
District of Salmon Arm
Doe River	
tDragon Lake 	
Eagle Valley	
East Kelowna	
East Wellington	
Edgewater 	
Elko	
Elk Valley 	
Emerald Mines
Enderby 	
Erickson 	
Errington	
*Esquimalt	
Falkland	
Fanny Bay 	
Ferndale 	
Field 	
Forest Grove	
Fort Fraser	
Fort St. John ...
Francois Lake _
Franklin River
tFraser Lake ....
Fruitvale	
Gabriola Island .
Galloway	
Genelle	
Gibsons	
Gillies Bay	
tGiscome  	
Glenmore 	
Glenora 	
Golata Creek
Golden	
Grand Forks .
Great Central
Greenwood
Gray Creek ...
Grindrod 	
Groundbirch ...
Haida Masset	
Halfmoon Bay	
Happy Valley-Glen Lake
300.00
420.00
360.00
420.00
1,800.00
600.00
480.00
600.00
240.00
240.00
420.00
420.00
420.00
180.00
240.00
180.00
300.00
420.00
300.00
900.00
300.00
480.00
300.00
600.00
300.00
300.00
420.00
300.00
300.00
480.00
360.00
600.00
540.00
420.00
300.00
360.00
420.00
180.00
600.00
600.00
300.00
420.00
240.00
300.00
300.00
240.00
300.00
300.00
 W 84
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
Recreation Commission
Harrison Hot Springs —
tHarrop.
Hatzic Prairie
Hazelton	
Hedley	
Hixon	
Holberg 	
Hope
Hornby Island.
Horsefly	
Houston	
Inonoaklin	
Invermere
loco 	
Jeune Landing.
Jordan River ...
Kaleden	
Kaslo 	
♦Kelowna	
Kent	
Keremeos
Kersley
Kettle Valley...
Kilkerran	
* Kimberley	
Kingfisher.
Kitwanga Valley.
tKootenay Bay	
Kyuquot 	
Lac la Hache	
Ladysmith 	
La France	
tLaidlaw	
Lakeview Heights
Langford 	
*Langley 	
Lantzville	
Lardeau	
Lavington-Coldstream
Lillooet	
Lister 	
Little Fort	
tLone Butte	
Lumby	
Lund	
Lytton	
Mahatta River.
Mahood Falls .
Malaspina.
Maple Ridge
Mara	
Marysvilie —
Merritt	
Metchosin 	
Michel 	
Midway
t Minstrel Island.
Minto	
Montney	
Moose Heights .
Mount Currie ...
tMud River	
McConnell Creek
Annual Annual
Grant                         Recreation Commission Grant
$480.00 McBride  $360.00
  McLeese Lake  300.00
300.00 Nakusp  600.00
300.00 *Nanaimo   2,100.00
240.00 Nanoose  420.00
420.00 Naramata  300.00
300.00 tNarcosli Creek  	
600.00 Natal  360.00
300.00 Nazko    240.00
300.00 *Nelson  1,200.00
300.00 New Denver  240.00
300.00 New Hazelton  360.00
300.00 New Masset  180.00
480.00 New Westminster  No grant
300.00 Nicomen Island  360.00
480.00 Noralee-Clemretta-Colleymount. 360.00
300.00 North Bend  480.00
420.00 North Cowichan  600.00
2,100.00 Northfield  420.00
480.00 North Kamloops  600.00
240.00 North Shore (Nelson)   480.00
300.00 North Shuswap  360.00
240.00 tNorth Vancouver    	
240.00 Oak Bay  600.00
1,200.00 tOkanagan Centre  	
300.00 Okanagan Falls  240.00
300.00 Okanagan Indian Band  300.00
  tOkanagan Mission    	
360.00 Oliver  300.00
300.00 100 Mile House  No grant
540.00 150 Mile House  240.00
240.00 Osoyoos  360.00
  Oyama  300.00
300.00 Palling  360.00
480.00 Parksville  600.00
1,200.00 Paul Creek    240.00
600.00 Peachland  300.00
300.00 Pemberton Valley  300.00
600.00 Pender Harbour  300.00
240.00 Pendleton Bay  180.00
480.00 Penticton   600.00
300.00 tPitt Meadows  	
  Pleasant Valley  420.00
300.00 Popkum  360.00
420.00 Port Alberni  600.00
420.00 Port Alice  420.00
300.00 Port Clements  216.00
180.00 Port Coquitlam  600.00
300.00 Port Mellon  600.00
600.00 Port Moody  600.00
240.00 Port McNeill  540.00
300.00 Port Renfrew  420.00
300.00 Pouce Coupe    300.00
480.00 Powell River  480.00
240.00 *Prince George  1,500.00
300.00 *Prince Rupert  2,700.00
  Princeton  420.00
240.00 Procter   480.00
300.00 Progress  300.00
180.00 Quadra Island  480.00
360.00 Qualicum Beach  300.00
  Queen Charlotte  180.00
240.00 tQuesnel     	
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
W 85
Recreation Commission
Radium Junction	
Red Bluff	
Redwell 	
Reid Lake	
Revelstoke	
♦Richmond	
Riondel	
Riske Creek....
Riverside	
Roberts Creek
Robson	
Rock Creek	
Roe Lake	
Rose Lake	
Round Lake	
Royston	
Rutland	
Saanich Indian.
Salmo	
Salmon Arm	
Saltspring Island
Saltair	
Sandspit	
Savona 	
Sayward	
Sechelt	
70 Mile House and Watch Lake..
Shalalth 	
Shawnigan Lake
Shirley ...
Sidney .
Silver Creek
Silverton	
Skidegate Mission
Slocan 	
tSmithers	
Soda Creek	
Songhees Indian.
Sooke	
Southern Cortez ..
South Hazelton	
f South Kelowna	
Southside	
South Slocan	
South Taylor	
South Wellington
Sparwood
Spences Bridge .
Sproat Lake	
Squamish .
Squamish Indian Band	
tStikine (Telegraph Creek)
Annual
Grant
$360.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
480.00
2,700.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
600.00
240.00
360.00
300.00
240.00
360.00
300.00
600.00
600.00
600.00
600.00
420.00
180.00
300.00
480.00
300.00
180.00
180.00
480.00
240.00
540.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
360.00
240.00
480.00
540.00
420.00
360.00
360.00
420.00
240.00
360.00
240.00
180.00
420.00
480.00
No grant
Recreation Commission
Straiton 	
Sumas	
Summerland .
Sunnybrae
Sunrise-Two Rivers
Sunset Prairie	
tTappen
Tarrys and District.
Tatla	
Annual
Grant
       $360.00
600.00
480.00
     1,580.00
180.00
240.00
~Z "300.00
420.00
120.00
300.00
240.00
300.00
600.00
540.00
240.00
    3,300.00
       300.00
..     1,500.00
        480.00
   No grant
       360.00
       360.00
♦Vancouver Board of Parks    7,800.00
Tatlayoko Lake...
Tchesinkut Lake
Telkwa	
Texada	
Terrace	
Tofino	
Topley 	
♦Trail-Tadanac
Tulameen	
♦Ucluelet	
Union Bay	
University Hill
Valemount	
Valleyview .
Vavenby
Vernon...
View Royal	
Village of Mission
Wardner 	
Warfield	
Wellington	
Westbank	
West Bench ...
Westbridge 	
West Creston.
Westsyde .
*West Vancouver .
Whaletown	
White Lake	
Williams Lake	
Willow Point	
Willow River	
Wilson Creek	
Windermere 	
Winfield	
Winlaw 	
Wistaria	
Woodfibre 	
Wynndel	
Yale 	
Ymir	
Zeballos	
240.00
600.00
540.00
600.00
300.00
600.00
420.00
420.00
300.00
300.00
180.00
240.00
2,400.00
360.00
300.00
300.00
480.00
240.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
360.00
240.00
480.00
300.00
180.00
300.00
420.00
Three Commissions became totally or partially inactive during the year. A
Commission usually becomes inactive due to poor leadership; however, in most cases
they return to regular activity. Very often inactivity is the result of lack of interest
in seasonal activities or heavy seasonal work on farms and orchards.
The information taken from Recreation Commissions quarterly reports indicates the magnitude of energy and expense which goes into community recreation in
British Columbia. The figures below are not a picture of all recreation in British
Columbia as they do not include private agencies, clubs, commercial recreation, and
 W 86 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
all activities not under the jurisdiction of Recreation Commissions; these run into
many millions. The number of participants is also misleading as this includes many
who participate in several activities, where they are counted each time. Although
we realize there are many discrepancies in reporting, the over-all picture does
emphasize the importance of community recreation and the necessity for good
organization and administration on the municipal level.
Number of activities reported 6,931
Total number of participants 1,197,960
Income of Recreation Commissions $958,355.84
Expenditure of Recreation Commissions $988,790.75
Twenty-two Recreation Commissions applied for and received increased grants
during the year. Twenty-one new and reactivated Commissions applied for and
received grants.
Community grants are based on such factors as size of community, type of
programme, activity of the Recreation Commission, and financial contribution by
the Recreation Commission.
Staff
The Community Programmes Branch professional staff was increased by one
and the clerical staff by two during the year. Two new positions were established as
Assistants to the Director: Adult Education—Mr. A. L. Cartier, office in Victoria;
Physical Recreation—Mr. K. K. Maltman, new office at 501 West 12th Avenue,
Vancouver.
The field staff of seven recreation consultants underwent several changes.
Mr. J. M. MacKinnon moved from Cranbrook to Kelowna.
Mr. R. C. Davis was appointed to Quesnel in November, and Mr. D. J. Gillies
was appointed at the same time to Nelson to serve the combined Kootenay regions.
Mr. Gillies resigned in March.
During the year the Kootenays were unfortunately subjected to several changes
due to staff resignations; this made it very difficult to maintain adequate service
for several months.
Mr. D. M. McCooey was transferred from Quesnel to a new office in Smithers,
and the north region was divided into the north-east and north-west regions. The
new office in Smithers will enable the Branch to give much better service to the
northern half of British Columbia.
The regional areas of the Community Programmes Branch have now been
equalized so that each recreation consultant has a similar number of Commissions.
In the North great distances are compensated for by fewer Commissions to serve.
The seven members of the field staff of the Community Programmes Branch
cover large areas. Their duties require many week-end meetings and much night
work. A recreation consultant is required to travel considerable distances, and the
growth of Community Programmes Branch services is a tribute to the effective way
they are discharging ever-increasing duties.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH W 87
The Community Programmes Branch staff and their locations are as follows:—
Consultant
Office
Region
Victoria   .
Vancouver _	
Victoria  	
Abbotsford _
Adult Education
K. K. Maltman _ _	
Fitness and Sports
Drama
Field Staff
T. Ruben   .           _
Fraser-Sechelt
Central British Columbia
G. J. Pynn	
Vancouver Island
North-west British Columbia
Kelowna   	
Quesnel
Nelson	
Okanagan-Similkameen
R. C. Davis 	
North-east British Columbia
D. C. Gillies (resigned March 15th)	
Kootenays
Leadership
The Community Programmes Branch provides its most important service
through leadership activities. This was greatly expanded through the Adult Education and Fitness and Sports offices (see report p. 89). The necessity for skilled
leaders, both volunteer and paid, cannot be overemphasized. The Branch has
developed a Provincial system of regional workshops and clinics; there are
numerous local clinics and conferences designed to discuss and promote leadership.
During the 1962/63 year it was decided that the Branch should sponsor a Provincial Summer School for Recreation Leadership. Assistance was again given
to the in-service training course for recreation leaders in Greater Vancouver.
Recreation leadership training is the most important area of Branch responsibility, and it requires the attention of governments at all levels. The Community
Programmes Branch continued to give priority to the development of these services.
Workshops
Number
Attending
Number of
Commissions
Represented
Number of
Courses
Given
Cost
96
100
57
92
24
16
25
13
25
7
5
7
8
10
9
$673.30
511 00
443.50
738.62
501.40
Totals 	
369
86
39
$2,867.82
Statistical Analysis, 1962/63
Clinics
Conferences
Leadership
Workshops
Regional
103
4,294
313
10
492
120
30
646
214
3
1541
671
4
369
86
Provincial
Number.     _   	
Number of Commissions attending -	
1 One conference.
Special grants to communities conducting playground programmes and swimming instruction and water safety totalled $11,570. One hundred and forty-two
communities received this aid.   One hundred and thirty-three aquatic and 36 play-
L_
 W 88 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
ground programmes were assisted. These grants are provided to encourage community activity in these extremely important aspects of recreation.
The Nelson Summer School of Fine Arts received a grant of $200. This
aid is an effective way to ascertain where the Branch can procure future leaders
in the fine arts.
The Annual Provincial Recreation Conference is also a major project for the
Community Programmes Branch. The Branch is responsible for the educational
sessions and the resource personnel. The conference is also part of the B.C.R.A.
annual meeting and provides excellent learning opportunity for professional people,
Recreation Commission personnel, and municipal Councillors with recreation
responsibilities. The 1962 conference was held in Vancouver as part of the
National Recreation Association's Pacific North-west Conference.
Library Services
The film library is now located in Vancouver, and this move has resulted in
a much more efficient service to communities and excellent maintenance by the
Visual Education Division.   The book library was kept up to date with 250 new
additions.
Library Statistics
New books purchased  250
New films purchased     55
Number of books circulated  682
Number of films circulated  300
Publications
The Community Programmes Branch bulletin, which is published quarterly,
has become an important reference source and provides a very good medium of
communication with Recreation Commissions. Six hundred copies of each issue
are published and distributed to each Recreation Commission, School Superintendents, Adult Education Directors, and a mailing list of over 75.
There were no new publications or revisions of old ones during the year.
Provincial Advisory Board
The members of the Provincial Advisory Board on Adult Education and
Recreation are as follows: Mr. B. W. Baker, Kelowna (Chairman); Dr. B. E.
Wales, Vancouver; Mr. A. T. Alsbury, Vancouver; Mrs. W. Saxton, Ucluelet;
Dr. A. W. Mooney, Vanderhoof; Mr. P. F. Mclntyre, Victoria; Mr. L. J. Wallace,
Victoria; Mr. R. H. Reeve, Victoria; Prof. R. F. Osborne, Vancouver; Mr. E.
Whitehead, Vancouver; Dr. J. F. K. English, Victoria.
The Board was appointed by the Minister in May of 1962 and met three
times during the fiscal year—on July 12th, September 27th, and March 22nd.
The Board was appointed to act in an advisory capacity to the Department of
Education concerning policy and procedure as related to the Community Programmes Branch. The Board meets periodically to hear reports from the Community Programmes Branch, which outlines problems and requirements, and the
Board then discusses any aspect of the Branch it deems necessary and submits
recommendations to the Deputy Minister.
Drama
The drama services of the Community Programmes Branch continued to be
taxed to the limit. Between eight and nine thousand books, including plays,
pamphlets, magazines, etc., were sent out to interested groups, schools, teachers,
etc. Equipment, including curtains, lights, and rheostats, was in constant demand
for productions, concerts, special events, and festivals of all kinds.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH W 89
Over 200 active drama groups with a minimum of 15 members produced
from one to five full-length plays during the season, with one-act and workshop
plays completing the programme. Play-reading groups, as well as night-school
courses on drama, show an increase.
Drama festivals play a major role in the cultural life of British Columbia. Last
spring 31 drama festivals were held throughout the Province. Of these, 9 were for
schools only, 10 for adults only, 1 included both school and community groups, 4
combined drama with speech arts, and 7 contained music, dancing, drama, and
speech arts.
Kamloops played host to the British Columbia region of the Dominion Drama
Festival. Entries came from Victoria, New Westminster, Williams Lake, and Kamloops. Prince George unfortunately had to withdraw at the last moment. Adjudicator Essee Ljungh, of Winnipeg, chose Kamloops to represent British Columbia at
the Dominion Drama Festival finals in Kingston. Their play, " A Taste of Honey,"
was directed by Mr. Tom Kerr.
The One-act Final Festival took place in Penticton, with Mrs. Norma Spring-
ford, of Montreal, adjudicating. Eight regional festival winners plus Penticton competed, and first-place honours went to the Emerald Players of Vancouver for their
presentation of " The Moon Shines on Kylenamoe," directed by Miss Christine Best.
The Community Programmes Branch appointed adjudicators for the festivals
exclusive of the Dominion Drama Regional, as well as providing assistance, financial
and otherwise, to the committees in charge. Workshops continued to be important
to the groups, and the Branch provided leadership and other financial assistance.
The British Columbia Drama Association elected Mr. W. J. Zoellner, vice-
principal of the Grand Forks Secondary School, as president. The association is the
parent body of all drama groups in the Province. Our Drama Adviser, Miss Anne
Adamson, in her capacity of corresponding secretary, gave invaluable assistance to
drama groups throughout the Province.
Adult Education Division (Night Schools)
(A.L.Cartier,M.A.)
The enrolment in public school adult education classes increased during the past
year from 46,548 to 70,405, which amounts to an increase of 51 per cent. This
increase is due to a number of changes that have taken place during the year. The
appointment of an Assistant Director in Charge of Adult Education has made
possible numerous regional conferences for directors of adult education, in which
ideas and techniques were developed for identifying local educational needs and for
building programmes to meet these needs. Another important factor has been the
decision of nine school districts to appoint full-time directors, who now have the time
to exercise their organizing skills. Finally, there has been a growing concern upon
the part of the public of the need for continuing education in a world that puts a
premium on mental skills.
Besides regional conferences for directors in the Kootenays, the Okanagan, the
Central Interior, the North-west, the Fraser Valley, and Vancouver Island, a week-
long workshop for directors was held this spring at the University of British Columbia under the joint sponsorship of the University, the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation, and the Department of Education. Forty-four directors attended this
workshop, and we may expect its fruits to be borne next year in the form of better
programmes and increased enrolment.
During the past year the areas of greatest development have been in liberal
and academic studies, where the increase has been from 12,000 to 18,000. Vocational enrolments have also increased from 9,000 to 14,000. Another interesting
development this year has been in parent education.   Over 3,000 parents have en-
 W 90
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
rolled in courses designed to help them understand the new curriculum changes
and to help them to provide a better learning environment for their children.
Adult Day Schools
The Vancouver School Board has been operating day classes in community
centres.   This year the King Edward Continuing Education School was successfully
started.   A similar day school for adults was also started at Kamloops.   Day schools
for adults have also opened at Penticton and Victoria.
Adult Education Statistics
(a) Enrolment by school district was as follows:-
Abbotsford ...
Alberni 	
Alert Bay	
Arrow Lakes
Birch Island _
Burnaby
Campbell River
Castlegar 	
Chilliwack	
Coquitlam 	
Courtenay 	
Cowichan 	
Cranbrook 	
Creston	
Delta	
Enderby	
Fernie	
Fort Nelson	
Fraser Canyon
Golden	
Grand Forks ...
Gulf Islands	
Howe Sound ...
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Kimberley 	
Kettle Valley __
Kitimat	
Ladysmith
Lake Cowichan.
Langley 	
Maple Ridge	
Mission	
Nanaimo 	
541
1,142
15
33
162
3,650
254
182
954
752
896
302
273
355
374
16
142
35
99
90
240
100
159
1,405
1,043
171
50
450
245
241
1,463
881
258
1,190
Nelson
505
New Westminster     1,419
North Vancouver
Ocean Falls	
Peace River North .
Peace River South .
Penticton 	
Powell River	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Princeton	
Qualicum 	
Revelstoke	
Richmond	
Saanich	
Salmon Arm	
Sechelt	
Sooke 	
South Cariboo	
Southern Okanagan
Summerland	
Surrey	
Terrace 	
Trail 	
Ucluelet	
Vancouver _
Vanderhoof
Vernon 	
Victoria 	
West Vancouver
Windermere 	
Williams Lake	
Total
2,131
21
193
347
1,103
507
615
271
95
27
81
1,789
353
498
95
172
193
211
142
517
230
235
73
32,262
67
784
6,479
237
240
335
70,405
(b) The following summary shows trends in number of school districts, instructors, and classes:—
Year
Number
of School
Districts
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
1953/54..
1954/55-
1955/56..
1956/57-
1957/58-
1958/59..
1959/60-
1960/61-
1961/62-
1962/63...
49
55
57
60
62
64
58
64
65
19,969
22,280
29,335
33,565
36,611
39,108
40,867
40,917
46,548
70,405
842
948
1,186
1,328
1,401
1,578
1,796
1,945
2,273
2,949
1,578
2,220
2,219
3,070
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
VOCATIONAL PROGRAMME
W  91
Year
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
1955/56      -
9,040
11,582
11,118
10,761
13,539
12,530
9,783
14,317
357
440
477
454
540
552
518
685
1956/57      	
1957/58   	
1958/59     .. . —
1959/fiO
322
1960/61 —	
552
1961/62
512
1962/63 -	
681
NON-VOCATIONAL PROGRAMME
1955/56
20,291
21,983
25,493
28,427
27,328
28,387
36,765
56,008
829
888
924
1,124
1,256
1,393
1,755
2,264
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59       .
1959/60
1,256
19fi0/fi1
1,648
1961/6?
1,707
1962/63	
2,389
(c) The following table shows the classification of courses and enrolment:—
NON-VOCATIONAL PROGRAMMES
Number of
Classes
Number of
Instructors
Enrolment
Academic (for credit) .„.
English and Citizenship-
Liberal Studies (non-credit)..
Fine Arts 	
Domestic Arts_ 	
Hobbies and Crafts -
Parent Education.	
Miscellaneous	
397
97
250
172
474
382
103
514
Totals-
2,389
396
96
268
165
400
331
105
503
2,264
11,081
2,006
6,064
3,307
8,562
6,970
3,218
14,880
56,088
1963 enrolment increase, 52.8 per cent.
VOCATIONAL PROGRAMMES
Commercial-
Automotive...
Machine Shop	
Construction Trades-
Electronics	
Lumbering and Forestry-
Engineering  —
Service Trades	
Agriculture-
Vocational Preparatory-
Miscellaneous 	
Totals..
308
42
43
37
43
39
36
41
9
4
79
681
291
42
40
36
45
30
40
45
36
4
76
685
6,325
853
609
633
1,079
1,164
607
902
244
110
1,791
14,317
1963 enrolment increase, 46.8 per cent.
 W 92 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
Cost of Operating the Adult Education Programme
Since existing facilities are used, there are no capital costs. In the table below
we have not included costs of materials, extra janitor services, advertising, and
clerical help because such information is not available. However, the table does
show that a large programme is nearly self-sustaining.
(a) Tuition fees and salaries for the whole Province in school-year
1962/63—
Instructors' salaries  $699,358.25
Administrative salaries     190,146.95
Total salaries  $889,505.20
Less tuition fees     723,002.86
Deficit before grants  $166,502.34
(b) Grants-in-aid for the school-year 1962/63—
Vocational   $108,805.37
Non-vocational   118,017.71
$226,823.08
The adult education programme is operated at an average annual cost of just
under $13 per enrollee. It is subsidized by the Department of Education to the
extent of under $3 per student. Whereas enrolment has increased by over 50 per
cent, costs have risen by only 25 per cent. This means that more skilful organization techniques have resulted in larger classes which can operate at a smaller per
student cost.
There is every indication that improved programmes, the growing demand
for more highly educated work force, and a growing interest in education upon
the part of the public will result in the continuous growth of public school adult
education.   -
Physical Recreation
(K. K. Maltman, B.P.E.)
During the first nine months of operation, the Sports and Fitness office of the
Community Programmes Branch accomplished the following:—
1. Communications.—A system of communication was established between
the Community Programmes Branch, Sports and Fitness Division, and a majority of
the sports groups in British Columbia; this was accomplished as follows:—
(a) A Provincial Sports and Fitness Conference held February 9, 1963,
which was attended by most major sports groups and agencies in the
Province.
(b) A sports and fitness survey was conducted through questionnaire with
the aid of the Community Programmes Branch regional recreation
consultants.
(c) Had extensive mailing programme to acquaint sports bodies with Bill
C-131 and Provincial services.
(d) Attendance at 70 sports meetings.
2. Clinics.—Short leadership training programmes were run in conjunction
with the respective Provincial sports bodies concerned. A total of eight clinics
was conducted during the period July 1st to March 31st—field hockey, football,
wrestling (two), gymnastics (two), lacrosse, and creative fitness. Total attendance
at these clinics amounted to 700. The clinics were run in Greater Vancouver,
Victoria, and the Okanagan Valley.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
W 93
3. Leadership Training.—Two projects were assisted—(a) Vancouver
Y.W.C.A. leadership training study and (b) Greater Vancouver fitness project at
Richmond High School. Number of leaders participating in these all-winter
leadership schools amounted to 30 in each project or a total of 60 candidates.
4. Conference.—A Provincial Sports and Fitness Conference was held on February 9, 1963. Total attendance was 250. This conference brought together a
majority of the sports leaders in the Province and enabled the Community Programmes Branch to establish communication with many organizations and to study
and discuss many problems relative to this work.
5. Films.—At the request of the Provincial sports body concerned, special
sport films were purchased in gymnastics, swimming, and wrestling.
6. Books.—An excellent start on purchasing books for physical fitness research
study was made.
7. Equipment.—A limited amount of sports equipment was purchased to assist
leadership training programmes. The sports affected were track and field, gymnastics, and wrestling. Policy for allocation of this equipment for leadership training
purposes was established and forwarded to Provincial sports bodies concerned.
8. Office Assistance.—This service was provided for football, wrestling, track
and field, gymnastics, British Columbia Recreation Commission, floor hockey,
British Columbia Youth Hostels Association, Y.W.C.A., and weight training.
Mimeograph aid was provided for the Victoria Community Programmes Branch
office.
9. Research.—Efforts in connection with fitness research have been directed
toward working with the University of British Columbia School of Physical Education and Recreation, plus other Provincial agencies and organizations or individuals
demonstrating a desire to co-operate in fitness research. Two fitness research projects were proposed and planned:—
(a) Fitness testing programme at the secondary-school level contrasting two
schools.   Action on this project slated to begin in September, 1963.
(b) A long-term multi-disciplinary research study programme aimed at the
elementary-school level.
10. Policy.—The Sports and Fitness office of the Community Programmes
Branch, Department of Education, used as its base policy the proven policies and
practice of the Community Programmes Branch. To these policies have been
added the evolutionary changes necessary to work with all Provincial sports and
fitness groups, agencies, and organizations.
11. Disbursement of funds made available via Bill C-131:—
Project   1—Field hockey	
2—Wrestling 	
3—Football	
4—Gymnastics 	
Project
Project
Project
Project
Project
Project
Project
Project
5—Wrestling (Victoria)
6—Films 	
7—Books 	
8—Equipment	
9—Fitness and Sports Conference	
Project 10—Y.W.C.A. 	
Project 11—Leadership Workshop (Richmond).
$280.54
236.00
820.04
199.00
30.00
2,300.00
998.22
6,331.08
2,425.08
262.00
300.00
Total
$14,192.80
 W 94
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
JERICHO HILL SCHOOL
(A Special School for Aurally or Visually Handicapped Children)
REPORT OF C. E. MacDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D., SUPERINTENDENT
The total enrolment for the 1962/63 school-year was 311. Of this number,
16 blind pupils were from the Province of Alberta, 3 deaf Eskimos were from the
Northwest Territories, and 1 other deaf girl came from the Yukon Territory. The
attendance was distributed as follows:—
Day
Resident
Total
43
5
86
59
118
102
5
204
Totals	
134
177
311
General Remarks
This
The resident children have been in excellent health over the past year,
has contributed considerably to making it a successful year.
Through the co-operation of the Metropolitan Health Services, new children
were routinely examined and others re-examined as required, along with immunizations. All the pupils were examined by the Dental Health Services and given treatments as required. The Children's Health Centre provided valuable assistance in
the assessment of all new candidates for admission. The Canadian National Institute for the Blind has rendered valuable assistance in the counselling of parents of
pre-school blind children and of teen-age blind students within the School. I am
most appreciative of the splendid co-operation afforded us by these organizations.
They, too, have contributed to make it a successful school-year.
Miss Valerie Kinney, Henry Vlug, and Wayne Sinclair were accepted by
Gallaudet College to full freshmen standing in September, eliminating the usual
preparatory year on the basis of achievement tests. Two of these students made
the Dean's List at the mid-year, and two others again at the year's end, with averages
around 90. Another of our students, Miss Ellen Hughes, successfully passed the
entrance examination to Gallaudet College this spring.
Mr. Victor Rickard completed a survey of vocational courses deemed suitable
for the deaf in a proposed vocational centre for certain types of handicapped persons.
Six of our teen-age deaf boys built a 9^-foot " cadet" sailboat in the shop
during the year. A second boat is under construction. This project fits in well with
the swimming and water safety programme, and the boys have taken a keen interest
in sailing on English Bay.
Our Blind Department has had a 31-piece band, with Mr. Cliff Bryson as part-
time director. They have played at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre and with the
Regina Junior Symphony, amongst other notable engagements. Through the generosity of the Kiwanis Club of Vancouver, the band was smartly uniformed with
red blazers and white slacks or skirts.
Through the co-operation of the Transcribers Guild, the production of Braille
texts for students attending sighted secondary schools has proceeded satisfactorily
for all concerned.
 IERICHO HILL SCHOOL
W 95
The School undertook during the year to instruct parents of blind children
in travel techniques employed by the blind. Pamphlets on the subject and demonstrations were arranged for all those desiring assistance.
During the Easter holiday period, Mrs. Corrigan observed the programme for
deaf-blind children at the Washington School for the Blind. It afforded an excellent opportunity to discuss our special problems with experienced teachers in the
deaf-blind field there.
Work commenced March 11th on the long-awaited and much needed intermediate-senior deaf boys' residence. When completed it will have sleeping accommodation for 60 boys and 6 staff, along with activity rooms and play areas.
During the last week of June, Mrs. MacDonald and I were privileged to attend
the International Congress of Education of the Deaf, held in Washington, D.C. It
was a most pleasant and profitable experience, with over 1,500 representatives of
51 nations participating.
In concluding this report, I wish to express my sincere thanks to the Department of Education, the Advisory Committee, and all members of the staff for their
generous and unfailing support.
 W 96
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1962/63
OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION
OF EXAMINATIONS
REPORT OF HARRY M. EVANS, B.A., REGISTRAR
For reference convenience this report includes data covering a number of years.
Teacher Registration and Certification
I. Each teacher employed in the public schools must hold a valid certificate,
and this office must establish certification and classification, maintaining an individual record for each person, including teaching service. The following chart shows
developments in the past 10 years, and indicates that the number of individual service
records to be maintained has increased by over 91 per cent in this period.
1	
1952/53
1953/54
1
1954/5511955/56
1
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/6211962/63
I
2a	
7,116
158
494
7.5
829
12.5
7,560
154
444
6.2
965
13.6
1,409
19.8
8,223
229
663
8.8
974
12.9
8,757
176
534
6.5
(?)
(?)
287
(?)
(?)
9,482
221
725
8.3
1,135
13.0
310
1,860
21.2
10,119
297 '
637
6.7
1,165
12.3
313
1,802
19.0
10,856
332
737
7.3
1,270
12.6
348
2,007
19.8
11,547
369
691
6.4
1,357
12.5
388
2,048
19.0
12,148
327
601
5.2
1,356
11.7
317
1,957
16.9
12,815
254
667
5.5
1,503
12.4
385
2,170
17.9
13,624
2b	
2o	
2d	
336
809
6.3
3a	
1,562
3b	
4
12.2
418
5a	
1,323
20.0
1,637
21.7
2,371
5b
18.5
1. School-year.
2a. Teachers employed, as at October, from district nominal rolls. Includes regular staff of Vancouver
Vocational Institute, Vancouver School of Art, and, up to 1955/56, a portion of Victoria College. Includes
supervisors, consultants, relieving teachers, etc.
2b. Numbers with temporary certificates or letters of permission for lack of qualifications, or qualified but
over age, included in 2a.   A change in age regulations occurred for 1955/56 and continued thereafter.
2c. Increase in teachers employed,
2d. Percentage increase in teachers employed.
3a. Numbers who were teaching as at June 30th in previous school-year, not teaching in November of year
shown;  that is, drop-outs.
3b. Drop-outs as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
4. Numbers who left positions during the school-year shown.
5a. Numbers of teachers needed in September of year shown to staff new positions and replace drop-outs
from June previous; that is, teacher demand. This does not include replacements for staff changes during the
school-year.
5b. Teacher demand for September as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
In 1962/63 there was an increase in the number of temporary certificates or
letters of permission issued. The number of drop-outs rose to its highest point, but
in percentage was less than the previous year. The increase in teachers employed
rose significantly.
II. During the period up to the end of 1955/56, teacher-training was carried
out in normal schools or in the one-year course for graduates at the University.
Enrolments, therefore, in such one-year courses were easy to determine. Since
1956/57 such training has been in the College of Education, and enrolment figures
are more difficult to relate to completion of a basic teacher-training programme as
enrolments cover all years of training. The following charts, however, covering
some 13 years, permit of useful comparisons.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
W 97
1949/50
1950/51
1951/52
1952/53
1953/54
1954/55
1955/56
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
la	
lb 	
lc	
Id 	
2a	
2b	
175
109
54
338
152
96
44
292
36
259
128
423
32
249
117
398
211
368
182
761
184
345
161
690
170
124
79
473
137
110
66
313
9
2
2
13
300
35
251
162
448
30
239
149
418
2
2
6
10
408
205
375
241
821
167
349
215
731
11
4
8
23
70S
102 39
108 228
33 136
243 403
88 35
96 214
24 124
208 373
13 2
10 12
   1
23 15
184 358
141
336
169
646
123
310
148
581
15
22
1
38
543
77
116
48
241
67
102
44
213
5
3
1
9
204
35
284
156
475
35
271
149
455
1
6
3
10
445
112
400
204
716
102
373
193
668
6
9
4
19
649
86
114
40
240
71
100
37
208
8
5
1
14
194
22
219
125
366
20
206
119
345
13
4
17
328
108
333
165
606
91
306
156
553
8
18
5
31
522
91
204
90
385
74
185
83
342
2
2
4
338
22
342
155
519
17
322
150
489
8
3
11
478
113
546
245
904
91
507
233
831
2
10
3
15
816
72
196
99
367
55
177
93
325
3
12
6
21
304
50
393
228
671
44
369
222
635
2
11
6
19
616
122
589
327
1,038
99
546
2c.  	
2d
315
960
3a	
%
3b...
71
3c
12
3d-	
40
4 	
920
References:  M.=male;  F.=female; T.=total;  a=University of British Columbia;  b=Vancouver Normal;
c=Victoria Normal.
1. Enrolments in teacher-training as at Ocober.
2. Number graduating as at June of the school-year, available for September following.
3. Number graduating as at June of the school-year who were not teaching in November following.   Some
entered teaching in later years.
4. Number graduating as at June of the school-year who were teaching in November following;  that is, supply from training institutions.
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
la  	
766
378
1 144
	
377
9
386
34
102
136
985
410
1,395
716
135
851
657
119
776
589
16
605
46
125
171
279
18
297
39
19
58
508
28
536
60
95
155
1,353
523
1,876
967
177
1,144
835
199
1,034
787
46
833
99
114
213
	
	
1,635
666
2,301
—
	
2,006
798
2,804
1,416
257
1,673
1,258
266
1,524
1,009
57
1,066
154
326
480
401
28
429
70
136
206
618
35
653
111
285
396
2,127
855
2,982
1,506
266
1,772
1,371
284
1,655
1,019
63
1,082
181
421
602
—
2,021
lb.
957
lc. - .
2,978
2a 	
5491	
131|	
680!
338
12
350
46
51
97
555
35
590
99
135
234
1,149
200
1,349
1,026
216
1,242
893
47
940
145
186
331
z,:.
-	
	
1,451
2b	
285
2c-         	
1,736
3a -	
487
120
607
?
?
525
?
7
?
159
7
166
12
23
35
392
29
421
57
90
147
617
28
645
97
236
333
3b	
	
—
3c  .
4a  .    	
	
4b	
4e	
5a	
	
5b  	
•ir-:
	
References: M.=male; F.=female; T.=total.
1. Teacher-training enrolments, in all years;  (a) elementary training, (b) secondary training, (c) total.
2. Enrolled in training programmes likely leading to a certificate at end of year. (This base changed from
previous reports.)
3. Listed by training-college at close of year, and teaching considered likely (includes those who may be
considered for temporary certificates, but not those who failed the year or failed practice teaching and a limited
number of special cases) prior to summer session and supplementals.
4. Number of those listed in 3 who were teaching as at November in school-year following training;
(a) numbers with regular certificates, (b) numbers with temporary certificates, (c) total—after summer session
and supplementals.
5. Numbers of those listed in 3; (a) not teaching as at November but certificates issued, (b) not teaching
and no certificate issued or requested, (c) total not teaching.
Note.—The above do not include those taking emergency Industrial Arts and summer session Home Economics training programme. The discrepancy between the total of 3c and totals of 4c plus 5c arise from the
fact that some not included in 3c passed further work to be included in 4c plus 5c.
 W 98
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1962/63
III. The following table shows the certificate classifications awarded those in
the training-college in the year shown, who were teaching in November of the year
following; that is, actual supply from the training-college. Note that E-C supply
dropped from 211 in 1959 to 129 in 1962, whereas E-B and E-A supply rose respectively from 292 and 68 to 435 and 132. Similarly, P-B supply rose from 155 to
234. (It should be noted that these figures include certificated teachers who may
have left teaching to return for further winter session training in the Faculty of
Education in the year shown.)
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
M.
F. 1 T.
1
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
E-T 	
17
61
54
32
1
20
110
2
28
150
238
36
38
45
1
45
211
292
68
1
58
155
3
10
58
92
56
2
15
109
8
34
128
295
45
1
40
46
1
44
186
387
101
3
55
155
-
21
64
111
37
8
38
138
4
27
123
327
42
1
54
68
3
48
187
438
79
9
92
206
7
21
34
117
46
7
40
161
3
32
95
318
86
3
44 '
73
2
53
E-C  	
E-B 	
F-A
129
435
132
S-T..       	
10
PC     	
84
PR
PA
234
5
Total*
297
536
833
350
590
940
421
645
1,066
429
653
1,082
IV. The following chart shows the certificate classification of those in the
training-college in the year shown, who were not teaching in November following.
E-T and S-T indicates that had the individual taught, a letter of permission would
have been required. The figures do not include those who would not have received
a certificate or been considered for a letter of permission nor those in programmes
not normally leading to certification; for example, first-year elementary, various
years secondary. Note that the numbers of persons eligible for certificate who did
not enter teaching the September following rose from 201 in 1959 to 452 in 1962,
and that in the same period the level of certificate classification of these individuals
rose significantly. The figures reflect the decision of trainees to undertake extended
training for higher qualifications before commencing teaching, evident in other
figures available. The process, temporarily at least, is aggravating numerical supply
in terms of demand, but fortunately is creating a pool of longer-trained persons who
may be expected to enter teaching within the next year or two, thereby increasing
numerical supply and quality supply.
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M. ! F.
1
T.
E-T                	
1
11
22
10
1
2
11
10
45
59
20
8
12
1
11
56
81
30
1
10
23
1
26
17 '
25
16
3
2
7
1
69
41
58
33
1
16
16
95
58
83
49
4
18
23
1
31
34
49
12 '
4
6
11
97
64
108
36
3
10
15
128
98
157
48
7
16
26
56
46
59
14
6
8
17
85
84
137
59
3
11
17
141
E-C	
E-B
130
196
E-A   .. _  -
73
S-T
9
P -C
19
P-B                - ..
34
P-A
 1 	
Totals	
Total eligible for certificate— —
58
56
2
155 •
145
213
201
97
68
234
164
331
232
~99
147
112
333
233
480
345
206 | 396
144 j 308
602
452
Totals, ET-ST	
10
12
29
70
35 '
100
135
62 1 88
150
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
W 99
V. From the preceding tables can be calculated supply from the training-
colleges as a percentage of demand:—■
-,
t-
00
Os
o
tM
C-l
tn
Os
CD
tn
Os
C\
as
Os
rH
'~H
Tt
1-1
r"'
***
la 	
731
581
668
553
831
960
607
lie
1,034
1,242
1,524
1,655
lb.  -	
708
543
649
522
816
920
525
605
833
940
1,066
1,082
2      . 	
1,267
1,323
1,409
1,637
(?)
1,860
1,802
2,007
2,048
1,957
2,170
2,371
3a	
57.7
43.9
47.4
33.8
(?)
51.6
33.7
38.7
50.5
63.5
70.2
69.8
3b	
55.9
41.0
46.1
31.9
(?)
49.5
29.1
29.9
40.7
48.0
49.1
45.6
la. Numbers in training-college listed in June previous as likely available to teach in September of school-
year shown.
lb. Numbers in training-college in June previous actually teaching in October of school-year shown.
2. Numbers needed in September to staff new positions and replace drop-outs from June previous; that is,
teacher demand.   This does not include further replacements required during the school-year.
3a. Numbers listed in training-college in June, as a percentage of demand;  that is, la as a percentage of 2.
3b. Numbers from training-college who taught, as a percentage of demand; that is, lb as a percentage of
2—actual training-college supply as a percentage of demand.
VI. The employment of teachers with temporary certificates in 1959/60, as at
October 31st, was as follows:—
Temporary Elementary
Temporary Secondary
E-T
E-C
Total
S-T
S-C
S-B
VC
Total
127
82
13
1
140
83
9
83
2
8
2
8
11
101
209
8
14
223
8
92
10    1        2
3
8
23
112
3
Vancouver Vocational Institute - ~
23
7.17     I       14     I     231
92
13    |        2    |      31    ■
138
~
"
—
	
......
369
Of the 369 persons with temporary certificates (letters of permission) in
1959/60, 335 were in regular public schools. In 1960/61 the total was 327, with
285 in public schools; in 1961/62 the total was 254, with 228 in public schools;
and in 1962/63 the total was 336, with 312 in public schools.
VII. Since 1955 the Department of Education has co-operated with School
Boards to obtain teachers from the United Kingdom, and in 1955 to 1960, inclusive, sent an interviewing officer in the early spring to select and recommend individuals for appointments. The procedure changed in 1961, and no interviewing
officer proceeded overseas. An extensive file of material is provided to each applicant, with information concerning specific vacancies. Certification and experience
are recorded and assistance given to applicants and Boards to assist in appointments.
The numbers who have arrived under the immigration plan have been as follows:—
School-year
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
Elementary  	
Secondary 	
21
41
30
35
48
33
61
30
33
35
35
27
20
9
19
15
Totals	
62
65
81
91
68
62
29
34
 W 100
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
VIII. Teacher-exchange applications proceed through this office. The numbers of applications from British Columbia teachers annually exceed the exchange
positions available.   Exchanges in recent years were as shown:—
School-year
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
United Kingdom 	
22
4
3
22
4
5
23
1
1
26
2
1
26
2
28
1
1
23
1
1
22
1
Elsewhere  „	
1
Totals	
29
31
25
29
28
30
25
23
IX. Annually several thousand teachers' certificates have been issued to new
teachers and to those who have qualified for permanent certificates or for higher
certification. Evaluations are completed for many teachers from other Provinces
or countries who have submitted credentials for this purpose; a goodly number do
not arrive. General inquiries are considered from outside teachers, numbering in
the thousands. In addition, there are many inquiries from British Columbia teachers
for evaluations, certification or experience changes, and assistance in learning of
specific requirements or suitable training programmes.
Since 1958 an individual teacher-docket system has been possible, leading to
significant improvement in correspondence handling. There is difficulty in keeping
up with significant annual correspondence volume increase.
Division of Examinations
I. There has been a significant increase in examinations over the years. This
Division has arranged for the preparation, printing, and distribution of the June
University Entrance (Grade XI-XII) and for the June and August Grade XIII
examinations. Considerable administrative time is involved. It is also responsible
for arrangements for marking, tabulating, and releasing results, appeals, and maintenance of records.   The following tables give significant data:—
Number of Markers
1952/53
I                 I
1953/54  1954/551 1955/56
1956/57
1957/58  1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
June—   .
193
34
210          220|         234
331          42|           39
243
41
246|         290
441           48
301
50
343
61
395
61
439
19
Totals	
227|         243|         262|         273
284]         290l         338l         351
404
456]         458
Approximate
$81,700   $88,400
$90,000
$96,000
1
$113,000 $123,000
$153,000
$168,000
$179,000
$212,500
$210,000
Number of Candidates (June)
-
University
Entrance
Grade XIII.....
9,048
1,336
7,985
1,375
9,159      9,418
1,653|      1,765
1               1               1
10,924     13,014|    14,933|    16,786
1,565|      1,797]      2,204      2,673
19,113
3,253
20,103
3,597
22,411
4,044
Totals	
10,384
9,360
10,812|    11,183
1
12,4891    14,811|    17,1371    19,459
1               1               1
22,366
23,700
26,455
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS        W 101
Number Completed in June
1952/53
1953/54
1954/55
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
University
Entrance	
Grade XIII	
2,328
269
2,594
304
3,139
399
3,160
410
3,433
383
4,025
341
4,215
464
4,720
587
5,651
620
5,779
659
6,827
840
Totals	
2,597
2,898
3,538
3,570
3,816
4,366
4,679
5,307
6,271
6,438
7,667
Papers Marked in June
University
16,399
20,311
5,669
21,042
6,028
24,024
5,647
29,765
6,388
36,236
8,055
41,963
9,751
46,227
11,974
49,318
13,812
54,488
Grade XIII—
4,516
_	
■
15,649
Totals.
20,915
23,280
25,980
27,070
29,671
36,153
44,291
51,714
58,2011    63,130|    70,137
1               1
Papers Marked in August
University
1
6,844|      8,931
1,7271      1,869
9,236
2,489
8,569
2,192
Grade XIII	
       i
1,943
Totals	
5,134
4,663
4,914
5,185
5,789
7,031
8,571|    10,800
1
11,725
10,761
1,943
Number of Candidates (August)
Year
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
4,178
1,164
5,985
1,262
6,245
1,537
5,878
1,434
Grade XIII -	
1,315
Totals _	
5,342
7,247
7,782
7,312
1,315
Number Completed in August
1
534                 882
132               161
993
210
712
172
Grade XIII— _  	
189
Totals  _   	
666             1,043
1,203
884
189
Total University Entrance and Grade XIII papers for June and August,
1952/53 to 1961/62, were as follows:    1952/53, 26,049;   1953/54, 27,943
1954/55,   30,894;    1955/56,   32,255;    1956/57,   35,460;    1957/58,   43,184
1958/59, 52,862;    1959/60,   62,514;    1960/61,   69,926;    1961/62,   73,891
1962/63, 72,080 (with University Entrance August examinations discontinued).
II. For 1962/63, examinations were prepared for June in 21 University
Entrance subjects and for June and August in 18 Grade XIII subjects. In June,
1963, 193 examination centres were established in the Province and 49 outside
British Columbia, with the farthest-removed centres being in Australia and
Scotland.
II. There has been a very heavy increase in the number of requests for evaluations of academic standing from those who wish to enrol in British Columbia high
schools or to take night-school or private-study courses to complete requirements,
as well as from those who wish to undertake nurse's training or enter similar professional courses.    A very large number of persons has sought evaluations and
 W 102
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
permission to follow the Interrupted Programme for Adult Students. These numbers are increasing rapidly every year, with expansion in the number of areas offering academic courses through night schools.
IV. Scholarship Awards, 1963
University Entrance.—The 15 General Proficiency Scholarships, each of $500,
awarded jointly by the University of British Columbia and the Chris Spencer
Foundation, were won by the following:—
Place
Name
School
Per Cent
1st in B.C. _
2nd in B.C..
Area 1	
Area 2	
Area 3	
Area 4	
Area 5	
Area 6	
Area 7	
Area 8	
Area 9 -
Area 10	
Area 11	
Area 12	
Area 13	
Deborah Marjorie James..
Joost Blom 	
Monica Frances Nasmyth-
Paul Julian Roberts	
Judith McDonald Cleaver-
Christopher Paul Bates	
Howard Clark Weaver.	
Heinrich Pold	
Carolyn Laura Tate	
Ellen Gale Gordon - 	
Sylvia Mary Gloria Wallace-
Ethel Ann Thomas	
Robert Bruce Montador _
Julia Ann Oxendale	
Magee Secondary	
St. George's Private	
Mt. Sentinel Secondary	
Southern Okanagan Secondary	
Kelowna Senior Secondary	
Kamloops Secondary	
Delta Secondary  	
Vancouver Technical	
Sir Winston Churchill Secondary..
Magee Secondary .
Burnaby North Senior Secondary..
Argyle Secondary...
Eleanor Barbara Wilkinson-
Mount Elizabeth Secondary ...
Esquimau Senior Secondary-
Milnes Landing Secondary	
94.750
94.125
90.750
90.625
86.125
93.500
92.625
93.750
90.625
93.250
89.500
90.500
88.125
93.875
92.375
The Governor-General's Silver Medal for the highest standing in the University Entrance examinations was won by Deborah Marjorie James. The Governor-
General's Bronze Medal for the second highest standing was won by Joost Blom.
Grade XIII.—The six Royal Institution Scholarships, each of $200, awarded
by the University of British Columbia for general proficiency, were won by the
following:—
Name
School
Per Cent
Dianne Myrtle Skapple	
Howard Wright Spence _
Terrence John Metcalfe 	
Douglas Charles Townsend..
Roderick William Brookes.-
William Wilfred Wadge	
L. V. Rogers Secondary.. 	
Salmon Arm Senior Secondary-
Langley Secondary	
North Surrey Secondary	
Langley Secondary	
Penticton Secondary	
91.2
88.1
87.3
87.1
87.0
86.0
Financial Assistance
I. In 1959, for the first time in British Columbia, the Government entered the
field of extensive scholarship awards to high-school graduates, Grade XIII students,
and to students of the University of British Columbia and Victoria College. To
qualify to receive an award in 1963, candidates must be domiciled in the Province,
are required to apply, and must undertake a full-year winter session undergraduate
programme at the University of British Columbia or University of Victoria or in
Grade XIII in public secondary schools of the Province, or approved full-year winter
session undergraduate programmes at the Notre Dame University of Nelson entering from Grade XII or XIII. Selection of winners is made on the basis of the final
Grade XII or Grade XIII or University of British Columbia or Victoria College
examinations. There are two awards—first class, for all students who obtain an
average of 80 per cent or higher based on a full year's programme, and second class,
available for up to 2,500 top-ranking students with high second-class standing.   The
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
W 103
second-class awards are divided among Grade XII (University Entrance), Grade
XIII, University undergraduate students, and Victoria College undergraduate students, and among the various faculties and groups roughly proportionate to enrolment. First-class awards amount to one-half the tuition fee of the next year of
undergraduate study, and second-class awards similarly to one-third the tuition fee.
An average of at least 70 per cent, subject to minimum adjustment for certain groups,
is required for a second-class award. Awards vary in amount, depending on the
institution and faculty attended.
The plan commenced with those writing examinations at the end of 1958/59,
with awards being made to those who would undertake training in 1959/60, and
has continued similarly annually with an increase from 2,000 to 2,500 for second-
class awards and the new provision for awards for study to be taken at Notre Dame
University made this year.
Candidates writing University Entrance or Grade XIII examinations apply
through the Division of Examinations, University of British Columbia students
through the University, and Victoria College students through that institution. All
applications are then considered by the Scholarship Selection Committee, representative of the University of British Columbia, Victoria College, and the Department
of Education, chaired by the Registrar. Notification to all candidates is made from
the Registrar's office, with cheques issued through the Departmental Comptroller.
Figures covering Government of British Columbia scholarships follow, based on
applications received:—
Examination
Year
Original Applications
Final Awards
Number
Received
Eligible
First
Class
Second
Class
Total
First
Class
Second
Class
Amount
1958/59 - 	
1959/60   .. -
1960/61	
2,703
3,466
4,223
4,488
4,929
1,860
2,300
2.557
552
635
703
1,308
1,665
1,854
2,100
2,314
1,782
2,192
2,437
2,727
531
612
677
739
1,251
1,580
1,760
1,988
$229,175.16
276,513.32
304,117.00
1961/62 	
2,871    |       771
3.210    1        896
336,472.00
1962/63 —	
UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS
1958/59 I  1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
First class (80 to 100 per cent)       	
268     |        298
337    |       492
271    |       403
313
554
506
354
550
383
399
Second class (70 to 79.9 per cent)   	
557
Ineligible _	
458
876    1    1,193
1
1,373
1,287
1,414
GRADE XIII EXAM]
NATIONS
First class (80 to 100 per cent)	
Second class (70 to 79.9 per cent)         	
26
104
100
37    |
133    |
170    |
33
169
271
37
213
279
51
173
261
230
340    1
I
473
529
485
To assist local school authorities, complete tabulations showing schools concerned and final academic averages obtained by all Provincial Grade XII and Grade
XIII scholarship candidates were provided to the District Superintendents of Schools.
In 1963, using I.B.M. tabulations, lists were distributed showing all scholarship
candidates in the school district, arranged by schools. Successful candidates were
arranged in academic rank and non-successful candidates alphabetically.
 W 104
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
II. The Provincial Government, with some assistance from the Federal Government, annually provides Government bursaries to assist students to undertake
further training. An average of 65 per cent is required, together with evidence of
financial need. Assessment is based on the last academic studies undertaken.
Awards vary from $50 to $300, depending on academic standing and need, with
most awards in the range $100 to $150. These awards may be made available to
those undertaking University of British Columbia or Victoria College undergraduate
study, recognized nurse's training in the Province, and for recognized university
study outside British Columbia in undergraduate courses of training not available
in this Province; for example, dentistry, veterinary. In 1963 the awards also became available for certain studies at Notre Dame University.
All bursary applications proceed through the Registrar's office, and Bursary
Selection Committees, representative of the University and of Victoria College and
chaired by the Registrar, determine awards. Notification to all candidates is made
from this office, with cheques issued through the Departmental Comptroller.
Figures covering Government bursaries follow, based on applications received
by the deadline. A relatively large number of applications cannot be considered
because of late submission.
Original Applications
Final Awards
Year
Number
Received
Eligible
Number
Amount
1959    '.  	
I960
821
1,071
1,395
1,426
1,886
693
904
1,171
1,199
1,619
653
865
1,125
1,168        1
$82,650
113,465
1961   	
1962...               ...
133,145
140,285
1963 ,.	
III. In 1959 a significant change was made in respect of loan assistance. By
amendment to the British Columbia University Act, authority was given for establishment of the Student Aid Loan Fund of up to $2,000,000. A joint committee
composed of two representatives of the University and two representatives of the
Department of Education (at present the Registrar and the Departmental Comptroller) authorizes loans. The Department of Education no longer provides loans.
Loan assistance may be provided to undertake undergraduate training at the University of British Columbia, Victoria College, the Vancouver School of Art, or
recognized university undergraduate training outside the Province when such training is not available in British Columbia.   Loan awards have been as follows:—
Number of
For Year Awards Amount
1959/60   843 $397,570
1960/61   842 435,130
1961/62  875 475,186
1962/63 __: .  694 389,378
Totals  .  3,254 $1,697,264
Strathcona Trust
For many years the Province has participated in the Strathcona Trust. An
annual grant has been received, in recent years approximating $1,600, with the
moneys to be utilized to encourage physical fitness in the schools and cadet-training
and rifle shooting.   Cadet awards have been made to the four leading corps for pro-
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
W 105
ficiency, to the National Cadet Camp, to the annual Cadet Trades Training Camp
at Vernon, for cadet rifle-shooting competition, and to British Columbia cadets
attending Bisley.
Physical Education Shield awards have been provided for each district super-
intendency, with four in Vancouver and two in Victoria, for presentation to the
schools showing the greatest proficiency or the most significant improvement. These
awards were discontinued at the end of 1959/60, with the shield to be retained by
the winning school and utilized for internal competition within the school.
To recognize and encourage physical education, Strathcona Trust bursaries
have been provided in recent years to teachers wishing to undertake further undergraduate course work in physical education. These bursaries recently have been
$125 in value. Five awards were made on 1958/59 standings, five on 1959/60,
six on 1960/61, five on 1961/62, and five on 1962/63.
The Local Committee, Strathcona Trust for British Columbia, administers the
moneys received, and consists of military representatives and representatives of the
Department of Education. The Registrar has continued as Secretary, Local Committee, for some years and is British Columbia representative on the Executive
Council, Strathcona Trust Fund.
Certification of Professional Librarians
New regulations for the certification of professional librarians became effective
in November, 1954. The Registrar acts as Secretary, Board of Examiners for Certification of Professional Librarians, maintains records, and issues certificates authorized. Since new regulations were introduced, the numbers of certificates issued
were as follows: 1955,57; 1956,62; 1957,16; 1958,18; 1959,10; 1960,17;
1961, 10; 1962,40.
 W 106 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1962/63
EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT
REPORT OF MRS. FREDA KINSMAN, SECRETARY
OF THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1962/63 a total of 319 applications was considered by
the Commission. Of these, 76 were turned down, the chief reason being that family
income was higher than that set by the Commission for grant purposes.
Two hundred and forty-three applications were approved for grants. Students
were distributed by grades as follows: Grade IX, 65; Grade X, 75; Grade XI, 61;
Grade XII, 42. During the year 17 students dropped out and grants were discontinued.
The students in the greatest financial need received $92.25 for the year; the
balance received $77.25. In addition, 18 students who showed outstanding ability
were granted a bonus of $20.
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
  STATISTICAL RETURNS
W 109
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 W 110
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s
imO
 EXAMINATION PAPERS
Separate booklets of examination papers for University Entrance and
Senior Matriculation, including complete sets of papers for each year, may be
obtained from the Director, Textbook Branch, Parliament Buildings, Victoria,
B.C.
Prices for booklets that are STILL AVAILABLE are as follows:—
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1952.    Price, 74 cents.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1960.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1961.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1962.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1963.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1952.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1953.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1960.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1961.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1962.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1963.
Price, 74 cents.
Price, 74 cents.
Price, 74 cents.
Price, 37 cents.
Price, 53 cents.
Price, 53 cents.
Price, 53 cents.
Price, 53 cents.
Price, 53 cents.
Price, 32 cents.
Note.—The above prices include the 5-per-cent social services tax.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1964
4,260-164-3489
     

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