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DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1963 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1964]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1963
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1964
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual Report of the Department
of Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1963.
W. D. BLACK,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Victoria, B.C.
  Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs
Victoria, B.C., February 11, 1964.
The Honourable W. D. Black,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Annual Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1963.
The 1963 gross assessed value of land and improvements in city, district, town,
and village municipalities in British Columbia amounted to $4,062,459,644. The
percentage increase of only three-quarters of 1 per cent over 1962 values is the
smallest annual increase experienced in recent years. The dollar growth in the
municipal tax base over the last eight years is portrayed in the following table:—
Growth in Combined Assessed Values and Taxes in Municipalities
of British Columbia
Gross Assessed Values
Assessed Values Actually Taxed
Tax
Revenues
Year
All Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
1956	
$2,432,313,912
2,765,873,099
3,047,766,854
3,327,118,937
3,569,240,135
3,717,472,643
4,032,288,772
4,062,459,644
$2,035,542,999
2,315,295,651
2,569,271,281
2,805,547,214
3,015,844,390
3,142,969,534
3,407,538,034
3,433,937,080
$1,586,627,603
1,854,677,597
2,053,934,444
2,248,145,499
2,417,467,198
2,508,401,082
2,770,194,168
2,795,430,982
$1,238,390,209
1,415,935,241
1,562,991,738
1,721,746,974
1,843,967,404
1,920,101,216
2,182,411,559
2,224,805,763
$66,418,657
1957
1958
78,811,653
92,429,190
1959
104,819,992
1960
116,857,478
1961
122,272,311
1962...	
128,865,831
1963	
137,000,0001
1 Estimated.
The over-all increase in 1963 assessed values was in land assessments, while
the assessed value of improvements remained the same. A sufficient analysis has
not been made to determine the reasons for this sudden change in trend, although
it would appear that new construction was offset by depreciation of existing improvements, leaving appreciation of land responsible for the increase in total assessed
values. It is of interest to report that approximately 75 per cent of the value of
taxable properties in the Province as a whole is within municipal areas, even though
the total area of the municipalities represents less than one-half of 1 per cent of the
total land area of the Province.
The total assessed values actually taxed for school purposes in the Province in
1963 amounted to $3,647,914,966. Of this total, $2,795,430,982 or 77 per cent
represented values within the municipalities, approximately equal to the population
percentage between municipally-organized and unorganized areas.
During the year under review $14,581,915 in term borrowing by the municipalities was approved by the Inspector of Municipalities. Most of these borrowings
were supported by serial debenture issues, although a considerable amount was
financed on a short-term basis by way of bank loans and on a long-term basis
through the metropolitan water and sewer boards or the Central Mortgage and
Housing Corporation. Further details of financing through the Central Mortgage
and Housing Corporation under the provisions of the National Housing Act follow
in this Report.
5
 BB6
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Generally speaking, bond sales proceeded at an orderly pace during the year,
although some of the smaller municipal units experienced difficulty in disposing of
their issues. The backlog of issues resulting from by-law complications arising out
of financing through the Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation have now, for
the most part, been sold. New issues to be financed in part by this means or under
the provisions of the Municipal Development and Loan Act will be finalized more
promptly through use of a new innovation in by-law structure introduced into the
Municipal Act in 1962, whereby the issue of series debentures is greatly simplified.
This new method of processing series issues will prove its worth in the months ahead
with so many of the new projects requiring term borrowing, being financed under
the provisions of the Municipal Development and Loan Act.
The amount and purpose for which the borrowings were authorized are set out
below. Borrowings by the City of Vancouver and by the metropolitan water and
sewer boards are not subject to the approval of the Inspector of Municipalities and
therefore are not included in this table.
Distribution of Authorized Debenture Debt by Purposes
for the Year 1963
Purpose
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Local
Districts
Total
Sewers and drainage..
Waterworks	
Paving, streets, and sidewalks-
Hospitals	
Civic projects	
Consolidated local improvementS-
Electric utility -
$1,226,754
1,213,000
545,472
250,000
644,000
600,000
Parks and recreation-
Totals	
$2,634,053
892,216
1,399,500
1,470,000
200,000
759,366
62,000
$4,479,226
$7,417,135
$431,500
49,500
70,000
50,000
$1,307,554
649,000
110,000
$18,000
$5,599,861
2,821,716
2,054,972
1,790,000
844,000
759,366
600,000
112,000
$601,000
$2,066,554
$18,000
$14,581,915
Total debenture debt as at December 31, 1962, of all municipalities, including
the City of Vancouver, is shown by the following table. The debenture debt of the
metropolitan water and sewer boards is not included.
Total Authorized Debenture Debt as at December 31, 1962
Issued, Sold
and Outstanding
Unissued
and Unsold
Total
Cities (excluding Vancouver)-
Districts	
Towns	
Villages	
Local districts	
Totals-
Vancouver	
$47,181,574
51,089,325
3,585,192
6,058,761
57,000
$107,971,852
152,271,401
Grand totals..
$260,243,253
$10,687,728
9,122,442
1,264,000
1,742,000
$22,816,170
1,200,000
$24,016,170
$57,869,302
60,211,767
4,849,192
7,800,761
57,000
$130,788,022
153,471,401
$284,259,423
Provincial guarantees authorized under the provisions of the Municipalities
Assistance Act amounted to $2,305,600 during the year. Provincial guarantees
have been reduced in number over the past few years, partly as a result of the
increased participation in the field of municipal finance by the Central Mortgage
and Housing Corporation. It is not the practice for the guarantee to be offered for
this type of loan. The same policy applies to borrowings under the Municipal
Development and Loan Act, and, therefore, it is likely that while these two pro-
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1963
BB7
grammes are in effect, the amount of debentures guaranteed by the Province will be
substantially less than in the past. Borrowings which were guaranteed during the
year are summarized below. The City of Vancouver did not apply for a guarantee
during 1963.
Municipalities Assistance Act Guarantees Approved during 1963
Cities (excluding Vancouver).
Districts	
Towns	
Villages	
$1,667,000
156,500
142,000
340,100
Local districts-
Total..
$2,305,600
A summary of the amount of debentures guaranteed by the Province under
the Municipalities Assistance Act and under the Village Municipalities Assistance
Act outstanding as at December 31, 1963, is indicated below. No borrowings have
been guaranteed under the latter Act for a number of years as this legislation has
largely been replaced by the Municipalities Assistance Act.
Outstanding Debentures Guaranteed by the Province as at
December 31, 1963
Village
Municipalities
Assistance
Act
Municipalities
Assistance
Act
Total
Cities (excluding Vancouver)  	
$476,000
299,000
2,104,500
2,704,650
$13,162,000
9,445,707
691,000
2,674,600
55,000
$13,638,000
9,744,707
Towns      .   	
Villages _  	
2,795,500
5,379,250
55,000
Tntpls
$5,584,150
$26,028,307
18,023,000
846,000
2,080,000
171,000
21,505,000
$31,612,457
18,023,000
846,000
2,080,000
171,000
21,505,000
$5,584,150
$68,653,307
$74,237,457
It is conservatively estimated that the liability represented by guaranteed debenture issues is supported by the revenues of self-liquidating utilities or enterprises
with an appraised value in excess of $115,000,000. While the debt for such undertakings is met from the revenues of the undertaking, it is nevertheless a direct
liability of the issuing municipality or other authority.
In addition to the guaranteed debt recorded in the above table, there is also
outstanding under the Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District Act
debentures totalling $31,335,500.
The Department of Finance of the Federal Government has advised the Department that as at January 1, 1964, all semi-annual repayments have been met on
loans authorized under the provisions of the Municipalities Improvements Assistance
Act, 1938. This programme is nearing its conclusion, with the outstanding obligations reduced to $86,029.39 from a total of $2,146,759.70.
The scheme of financing for municipal sewage-disposal projects offered by the
Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation under the provisions of the National
 BB 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Housing Act has played an increasingly important role in municipal term financing
during the past year. This scheme, coupled with the new financial assistance programme authorized under the provisions of the Municipal Development and Loan
Act, will have an important effect on municipal borrowing in the coming years. It
is not possible to accurately gauge the impact of the Municipal Development and
Loan Act as yet, but it is significant to report that a large number of the municipalities and other authorities coming within the scope of the legislation have made
preliminary application to participate. Both this programme and the National
Housing Act scheme offer below-market interest rates for long-term borrowing, as
well as very attractive debt-cancellation features. Several major projects in the
range of one or more million dollars have been proposed by some of the larger
municipalities under the Municipal Development and Loan Act. These include
large-scale civic centre and recreation facilities which would likely have otherwise
been held in abeyance.
Another important feature of municipal term financing is the short-term capital
loan. These undertakings are normally by way of a direct bank loan, although one
or two have been arranged with the Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation
for sewage-disposal facilities. These short-term loans have proved most useful in
financing projects under $100,000. The maximum term of the loan is fixed at five
years, and the amount is limited by population. Borrowing under this provision
amounted to $202,625 during 1963. A large number of municipalities at one time
or another have made full use of their borrowing power under this provision for a
wide range of projects which otherwise would have had to be financed by way of
a debenture issue. One of the advantages of this provision is that minor capital
projects can be undertaken with a minimum of formality.
I have to report that it was found necessary during the year to hold one
inquiry into an application for a certificate of approval to a money by-law. A village municipality failed to meet certain statutory requirements in connection with
the holding of a vote of the owner-electors on a borrowing proposal. Since no
objections were lodged, the certificate was duly granted.
During 1963, 13 municipalities were granted either subsisting or provisional
certificates of self-liquidation in respect of 15 utility systems, sewerage systems, and
other municipal enterprises. Of these certificates, nine were subsisting and six
provisional. The provisional certificates are issued in respect of new undertakings
and will be replaced by subsisting certificates when the municipality has proved by
actual operation that the new utility or enterprise is on a self-liquidating basis. One
hundred and forty-six certificates of self-liquidation have been granted to date, 97
of which are subsisting.
Through a misunderstanding of intent, a subsisting certificate of self-liquidation
was issued to a municipality covering the operation of its sewer enterprise. It
eventually transpired that the Council did not propose to maintain this method of
operation, and the certificate was withdrawn. This marks the first occasion for such
action by the Inspector of Municipalities.
Reserve funds of the municipalities for various purposes amounted to
$14,122,812 at the close of 1962 in spite of expenditures for various purposes
during the year. This represents an increase of approximately 1.5 per cent or
$208,183 over the previous year.
In September the Minister of Municipal Affairs' annual shield awards to the
municipalities having the highest percentage turnout of electors at the annual elections were presented to the recipients at the Union of British Columbia Municipalities Convention at Dawson Creek.   The year 1963 was the fourth year of these
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1963 BB 9
awards. The municipalities receiving the awards for returns of the December, 1962,
elections in the three categories of the competition were: Cities and towns—Revelstoke, with a turnout of 76 per cent; districts—Kitimat, with a turnout of 72 per
cent; villages—Stewart, with a turnout of 85 per cent. Stewart has won the village
award three years out of a possible four, losing out to Natal in the returns for the
1961 election. It is felt that the awards are achieving their purpose of adding
interest to civic elections and thereby encouraging the municipalities to make an
effort to increase their percentage turnout of electors.
Members of the Department participated in two major British Columbia
municipal conferences during the year. The first was the Municipal Officers' Association Conference held in Victoria in May, and the second was the annual Union
of British Columbia Municipalities Convention held in the fall at Dawson Creek.
Members of the staff attended a number of regional municipal conferences also.
The undersigned, on behalf of the Department, met with senior officials of some of
the major investment firms in Eastern Canada. The purpose of these visits was to
acquaint eastern investors with the opportunities in the British Columbia municipal
investment field.
One community was incorporated as a municipality. This was the Village of
Clinton. A number of incorporation plebiscites had been held previously, all of
which failed to gain a sufficient majority. However, a successful plebiscite was held
in the early summer, and incorporation took place on July 16th. The population
of Clinton is 1,019, and the area comprises 225.35 acres. A number of small communities expressed interest in incorporation, but none had progressed to the point
of holding an incorporation plebiscite by the end of the year.
Two regional planning boards were established during the year—the South
Okanagan Regional Planning Board and the Central Okanagan Regional Planning
Board. The purpose of a regional planning board is to prepare land-use plans
applicable to its area. A number of other communities showed interest in establishing regional planning boards, and it is anticipated that several of these boards
will be established in the near future.
Seven local areas were established under the provisions of the Local Services
Act. The following table indicates the number, purpose, and date of establishment
of all existing local areas, including those established in 1963:—
Local Areas by Purpose Established under the Local Services Act
Name Date Established
A. Home nursing—
Campbell River  May 28, 1962.
Courtenay  July 23, 1957.
Glendale  December 14, 1961.
Grand Forks  June 6, 1961.
Koksilah Valley  August 9, 1960.
Ladysmith  January 8, 1963.
Malahat South  April 25, 1961.
Mission  December 23, 1963.
Nanaimo  May 28, 1962.
Nelson  April 25, 1961.
North Saanich  August 9, 1960.
Parksville-Qualicum  __ October 16, 1958.
Robson  February 1, 1962.
Simon Fraser  March 8, 1962.
Sooke  December 5, 1960.
 BB 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Name Date Established
A. Home nursing—Continued
South Fort George  May 28, 1963.
Sproat Lake  November 8, 1960.
Youbou  June 13, 1961.
B. Fire protection—
Burns Lake  November 13, 1963.
Huntingdon  November 1, 1960.
Phair Flats  November 23, 1961.
Red Bluff  June 21, 1963.
Spences Bridge  February 1, 1962.
Two Mile Flat  November 21, 1963.
Vanderhoof  March 26, 1962.
C. Ambulance service—Revelstoke  February 8, 1963.
D. Public comfort station—View Royal  April 19, 1962.
E. Community planning—Provincial Community
Planning Area  June 1, 1959.
The Provincial Community Planning Area includes the whole of the unorganized area of the Province but is active only where regional community planning
areas have been designated by the Minister of Municipal Affairs. Details of these
areas and of other planning activities are reported separately by the Director of the
Regional Planning Division.
The Campbell River Local Area, established for the purpose of providing
garbage collection and disposal services in the unorganized area surrounding the
Village of Campbell River, was disestablished before commencement of the service.
This was recommended upon evidence that an industrial complex located within
the area would be paying by far the major share of the cost without benefiting from
the service. Lacking the industrial assessment, the provision of service was found
to be economically unsound, and the local area was accordingly disestablished.
Two Boundary Commissions heard evidence respecting the extensions of area
of the Town of Fort St. John and the Village of Sidney. The membership of the
Commissions was made up of staff from the Department. The Fort St. John
Boundary Commission recommended that the boundary be fixed as petitioned for
by the Council. A minor adjustment was recommended by the Sidney Boundary
Commission. The legislation providing for the establishment of Boundary Commissions was introduced into the Municipal Act in 1961 and has proved to be a very
workable means of dealing with problems arising from a petition of Council to
extend the area of a municipality.
During 1963, extensions of areas were granted to the City of Dawson Creek,
the District of Coldstream, the Towns of Fort St. John and Quesnel, and the Villages of Lillooet and Sidney (twice). In addition, the City of Grand Forks applied
for and received a reduction in its area. This was to accommodate residents isolated
from the main part of the municipality.
The following table shows the adjustment in area as well as the alteration in
population:—
 report of department of municipal affairs, 1963        bb 11
Adjustments in Area and Population, 1963
Area (in Acres)
Population
Municipality
Before
Extension
of Area
Contained
in Area
Added
After
Extension
of Area
Before
Extension
of Area
Contained
in Area
Added
After
Extension
of Area
Cities
3,660.00
1,539.00
18,758.00
1,329.10
1,581.00
306.00
855.50
901.70
308.00
637.00
4,297.00
10,946
2,347
2,161
3,619
4,673
1,304
1,874
1,930
386
4
— 17
6
228
43
56
549
10,950
—98.00
1.441.00
2,330
Districts
109.00      [ 18,867.00
563.54      !    1.892.64
2,167
Towns
Fort St. John 	
3,847
626.00
10.52
46.20
862.00
6.90
2,207.00
316.52
901.70
1,763.70
314.90
4,716
Villages
Lillooet	
1,304
1,930
Sidney    -_ .   _	
Local Districts
2,479
386
i Reduction of area.
The populations shown are the 1961 Census adjusted for extensions or reductions of boundaries to December 31, 1963.
Upon petition the membership of the Council of the District of North Cowichan was increased from four Councillors to six, exclusive of the Reeve. This was
undertaken by supplementary Letters Patent.
The training programme in municipal administration provided by the University of British Columbia under the sponsorship of the Department continues satisfactorily compared with other years. Current enrolment is as follows: First year,
38; second year, 25; third year, 18; and fourth year, 14. In addition, five students are enrolled in the Assessors' Course.
In 1963 the University granted diplomas in municipal administration following
examinations in May, as follows: 19 Junior diplomas, 11 Senior Administration
(Law), and 10 Senior Accounting (Finance), a total of 40 in the year.
During the year the Board of Examiners granted 36 certificates of proficiency.
The following table illustrates the classification of the certificates issued during
1963 and indicates the number and classification of certificates issued by the Board
to date. Certification is evidence in the opinion of the Board that the person
applying is qualified to perform a particular municipal office and possesses the
required academic training and experience.
Certificates of Proficiency Issued by the Board of Examiners
Type of Certificate
Junior	
Senior—Administration-
Senior—Finance	
Property Appraisal	
1963
To Date
6
40
3
57
6
63
21
27
Totals  36
187
The Municipal Act was not opened at the 1963 Session of the Legislature,
although amendments through the Statute Law Amendment Act were necessary to
 BB 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
correct a faulty reference and to rectify administrative procedures in the commercial-
vehicle licensing programme, which had been initiated the year before. However,
a number of amendments were made to other Acts which affect municipalities.
Some of the more important Acts which were amended included the Municipalities
Aid Act, the Motor-vehicle Act, and the Municipal Superannuation Act. The
amendments to the Municipalities Aid Act require special mention. Under this
amendment the Province grants to municipalities with specified land and improvements held by the Province a sum equal to the product obtained by multiplying the
full assessed value of Provincial land as denned by the Act and three-quarters of
the full assessed value of improvements on Provincial land by 15 mills. This provided a very welcome additional source of revenue for municipalities with Provincial
property within their boundaries, particularly those municipalities which are Government service centres or are the sites of valuable Provincial properties.
The Juvenile Courts Act was repealed, and the Family and Children's Court
Act was enacted in its place. An additional responsibility beyond that of providing
facilities for the Court within the municipality and providing children's homes is
that each city and district is now required to appoint a Family Court Committee to
assist in guiding family and children's work in the municipality.
The Vancouver Charter was amended also, as was the City of Greenwood Debt
Refunding Act; the latter by increasing the remuneration payable to members of
Council to the level fixed for all other municipalities by the Municipal Act. A number of municipalities were affected by specific additions or amendments to the
Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act. These municipalities were Surrey,
Burnaby, Richmond, Delta, Mission City, North Vancouver (District), Sidney,
Squamish, and Victoria.
Early in the year Mr. J. D. Baird, Supervisor of Municipalities and Deputy
Inspector of Municipalities, was promoted to Assistant Deputy Minister, while
retaining his appointments as Deputy Inspector of Municipalities.
The past year has been one of varied activity. The problems engendered by
reason of the Department being charged with the responsibility of administering the
licensing of commercial vehicles, reported in the 1962 Annual Report, have now
been overcome, and this function is progressing smoothly. However, the year
1963 saw the enactment of the Municipal Development and Loan Act by the
Government of Canada. The Department has been made responsible for the Provincial administration of the programme under this Act and is presently engaged
in setting up and organizing this activity. Needless to say, this appreciably affected
the work load of the staff. The general responsibilities and duties of the Department continue to expand year by year commensurate with the enlarging activities of
the municipalities. It is clearly evident that the Department is playing an increasingly important role as a major service function of the Provincial Government.
I would again express, on behalf of the Department and myself, our thanks
to all municipal officers for their continued courtesy and assistance, to the members
of the executive and the staff of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities, to
the executive of the Municipal Officers' Association, and to departmental heads
and staff of the other departments of government. I am especially grateful to you,
Sir, for your continued direction, confidence, and encouragement.
J. E. BROWN, F.C.I.S.,
Deputy Minister.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1963 BB 13
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER AND
DEPUTY INSPECTOR OF MUNICIPALITIES
Victoria, B.C., February 10, 1964.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—As anticipated, the expansion and active growth evident in the municipalities over the past several years continued during 1963. Total revenues,
including those of utilities of all municipalities, exceeded $220,000,000 in 1962.
During that year slightly more than $48,000,000 was expended on capital works,
part of which was financed by debenture loan and part by capital expenditures out
of revenue. It seems evident that this period of expansion and development of the
various municipal services will continue for some time to come due to the demands
made by residents of the new urban communities.
What should now perhaps be referred to as normal growth in the municipalities has continued over the past several years, although by pre-war standards it
would be considered extraordinary. This growth, plus the introduction of the
Municipal Commercial Vehicle Licensing Programme, has strained the administrative capacity of the Department to the limit. The general administration of the
programme, which is the responsibility of the Department, consists of having the
licence and exempt plates manufactured, determining the requirements of each
municipality and arranging for the allotment of plates. Pursuant to the requirements
of the Municipal Act, the proceeds from the sale of commercial-vehicle licences by
the municipalities are remitted to the Inspector of Municipalities and later distributed on a per capita basis. Records must be maintained of the serial numbers
of the licence and exempt plates supplied to each municipality and as issued by the
municipal licence inspectors. Proceeds from the sale of licences have exceeded
$600,000 to date for the licence-year which ends on February 29, 1964.
Because of the pressure of other work caused by the introduction of the motor-
vehicle licensing programme as well as other features, a number of the normal
activities of the Department were curtailed or altered. Among these was the
policy, which has been in effect for some years, of having a senior member of the
Department visit each municipality at least once during the year, which we were
not able to carry out this year. However, with certain adjustments to the work
load we expect that this and other problems will be more satisfactorily met during
the coming year.
A record of major activities of the Department during 1963 would include
the following:—
(1) One hundred and fifty-one visits were made to municipalities. The
number of municipalities actually visited was 111, some receiving more
than one visit.
(2) Two hundred and sixty-eight Minutes of Council were prepared and
subsequently approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
(3) One hundred and five certificates of approval for municipal loan by-laws
were issued.
(4) Eighty-six debenture issues were examined and subsequently certified
by the Inspector of Municipalities, consisting of 12,441 debentures of a
total par value of $14,171,157.
 BB14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
(5) Six hundred and ninety-two by-laws were examined and registered. Of
this amount, 79 were town by-laws, 607 were village by-laws, and 6 were
local district by-laws. Many of the by-laws required advice and correspondence, resulting in resubmission in revised form.
(6) Many draft by-laws and similar documents were submitted for review
and comment, involving a considerable amount of correspondence.
(7) Publication of the Annual Report of Municipal Statistics, which includes
some 30 different schedules.
(8) Editing the financial and statistical returns of the municipalities to ensure
conformity with statutory and other requirements. This phase of
administration involves considerable correspondence with municipal
officials and auditors.
(9) Administration of the Municipal Winter Works Incentive Programme.
(10) Administration of the Municipal Commercial Vehicle Licensing Programme.
(11) Administration of the Municipal Development and Loan Act.
(12) By correspondence and by personal visits to the various municipalities,
encouraging the adoption of good financial, accounting, and administrative procedures.
We are continuing in our efforts to ensure that financial and other statistical
information contained in the annual edition of Municipal Statistics is accurate and
on a comparable basis with prior years. In this regard I would like to acknowledge
the co-operation which we have continued to receive from the various municipal
officials and auditors in submitting financial and other statements promptly and in
the required form.
The Government of Canada has, for the sixth consecutive winter, provided an
incentive for municipalities to undertake winter works for the relief of unemployment. The incentive, as in prior years, is the offer by the Federal Government to
pay one-half of the direct labour costs of approved projects of a capital nature.
The programme period for the current programme is November 1st to April 30th,
with a declaration of the Federal Government not to extend the programme as in
the previous years. There are no basic changes in the regulations or in the type
of project which may be undertaken during the current programme except that
work cannot proceed until a project has been accepted by the Federal authority.
In past years, work could commence upon Provincial approval.
The Government of this Province has, in addition to the incentive offered by
the Federal Government, agreed to pay to municipalities 25 per cent of the approved
direct labour costs relating to accepted projects. In addition, the Province has
agreed to pay a further 25 per cent of the wages of any person employed on an
accepted project who has been continuously in receipt of welfare assistance from
on or before August 15, 1963, to the date of being engaged on the project.
An indication of the growth of the programme may be gained from the
following:—
Cost of Projects
Man-days Work
Payroll
1959/60 as at January 15, 1960 	
1960/61 as at January 15, 1961 	
1961/62 as at January 15, 1962 	
$7,000,000
20,000,000
26,500,000
25,000,000
19,527,859
183,000
392,000
426,000
413,000
413,210
$3,000,000
7,000,000
8,333,333
1962/63 as at January 15, 1963— 	
7,500,000
1963/64 as at January 15, 1964 _	
7,979,178
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1963 BB 15
These are estimated figures of the municipalities for the programme period.
As of January 15, 1964, approvals had been given to 451 projects, whereas the
total number for last year's programme was 529 projects. It is anticipated that
additional applications will be received this year following the consideration of
municipal budgets by the Councils in 1964.
The following tabulation gives a summary of the British Columbia municipalities participating in the Winter Works Programme as at January 15, 1964, according to the records of this office:—
Number of men  5,914
Man-days work  413,210
Total cost of projects  $19,527,859
Federal share (payroll cost)     $4,023,558
Provincial share (payroll cost)     $2,043,103
Municipal share (payroll cost)     $1,912,517
Total payroll under offer     $7,979,178
Nature and Total Cost of Projects
Waterworks   $4,132,568
Sewers   6,037,310
Drainage   698,163
Roads  2,228,664
Sidewalks  715,408
Buildings   3,251,606
Parks   1,123,893
Other ,  1,340,247
Municipalities Participating Number of Accepted Projects
Cities ,  27 Cities  178
Districts   24 Districts  133
Towns  4 Towns  9
Villages  33 Villages  84
Other -  26 Other   47
Total  114 Total  451
Table 1 shows the final summary of the Municipal Winter Works Incentive
Programme for the year 1962/63 as issued by the Department of Labour, Ottawa,
and Table 2 indicates the same information for the current programme as at
January 10, 1964.
In September the Province agreed to administer the Municipal Development
and Loan Act of Canada. This Act provides for the loaning of $400,000,000 to
municipalities in Canada for acceptable capital projects which have not been
included in the current budget plans of the municipalities or, if planned for, have
been advanced at least a year in time. A further stipulation is that an accepted
project cannot be one which displaces another capital project during the period
ending March 31, 1966.
The Province in administering the Act examines all project applications and
approves or rejects. The Province has been allocated $35,728,900 as its share of
the total amount.   This represents a per capita share of the whole.
As at December 31, 1963, the following loans had been applied for, and
approved by the Province on the date shown:—
 BB16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Date
Municipality
Amount
Purpose
Nov. 12,
Nov. 21,
Dec. 2,
Dec. 9,
Dec. 9,
Dec. 10,
Dec. 16,
Dec. 17,
Dec. 17,
Dec. 23,
Dec. 23,
1963
1963
1963
1963
1963
1963
1963
1963
1963
1963
1963
Greater Vancouver Water District-
Greater Vancouver Water District-
District of Central Saanich	
Village of Merritt	
Village of Valemount-
Deep Cove Waterworks District-
Village of Golden-
South Pender Harbour Waterworks District-
District of Terrace    	
Greater Vancouver Water District	
City of Victoria 	
Total..
$527,000
512,600
34,000
47,000
74,717
120,666
261,305
156,000
200,000
184,300
28,600
Pumping-station.
Reservoir roof.
Municipal hall.
Sewer extension.
Waterworks.
Waterworks.
Waterworks.
Waterworks.
Municipal hall.
Waterworks.
Landscaping,
Civic Square.
$2,146,188
The first loan accepted by Canada under the terms of the Municipal Development and Loan Act was that for the Greater Vancouver Water District shown on
the list above.
The Department has continued the previous policy of stressing the importance
of maintaining a programme to encourage the collection of current taxes. Some
thought has been given toward legislative changes required for instalment payment
of taxes. Any proposal suggested must meet the needs of the municipalities to have
operating funds available throughout as much of the entire year as possible.
Chart 1, showing percentage tax collections for municipalities, reflects the
results of the programme of the past 10 years to improve tax collections. The
result in the case of villages is more spectacular, merely because of the general lack
of effort 10 years ago on the part of village officials. The key is to look at outstanding taxes as a percentage of the current levy. Cities, districts, and villages all have
arrived at a more or less comparable level.
The percentage collection of current taxes in British Columbia municipalities
continues to rank among the highest in Canada, while the percentage of arrears of
taxes is among the lowest.
Chart 2 indicates the trends in various financial aspects of municipal government compared to population and income.
With the evident prospects of industrial and commercial development in the
Province over the next decade, all municipal officers and all Councils should take
a hard look at the possible effects this development will have on the municipality.
Planning in advance for capital improvements is a vital necessity. Planning for
land use is essential, or costly mistakes can result by misdirection of extensions of
municipal works and services.
In this day and age a municipality without a chart for the future is headed
for trouble.
J. D. Baird, F.C.I.S.,
Assistant Deputy Minister and Deputy Inspector
of Municipalities.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1963             BB 17
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 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1963
BB21
TRENDS   IN    FINANCIAL   ASPECTS   OF   MUNICIPAL   GOVERNMENT
COMPARED    TO   POPULATION   AND     INCOME
CHART
LEGEND
i Population in   millions
——Total revenue  in millions   of dollars
Building   permits   in   millions   of   dollars
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 BB 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR, REGIONAL
PLANNING DIVISION
Victoria, B.C., February 10, 1964.
J. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—I am glad to report that interest in the community planning process has
continued to increase in 1963 throughout the Province. One result of this is the
formation of two regional planning areas in the Okanagan Valley. The South
Okanagan Regional Planning Area encompasses the City of Penticton, the Villages
of Oliver and Osoyoos, and surrounding unorganized territory, and the Central
Okanagan Regional Planning Area includes the City of Kelowna, the District of
Peachland, and the surrounding unorganized territory. Other groups of communities in the Interior are now investigating the feasibility of establishing such areas.
There is some apprehension that the Planning Boards will have direct authority to
deal with land-use control. This is understandable because in some other Provinces
this is the case, but the function of a Planning Board in this Province is still an
advisory one. This advice is important because the Board and its staff should be in
a position to see the land-use pattern as a whole and make recommendations to the
responsible authority, which will have a reasoned long-run approach rather than a
short-run approach of considering cases in an isolated way without thinking of the
larger community.
The Division's main interest continues to be the settled areas beyond the two
large urban concentrations of Vancouver and Victoria. During the past year there
has been a marked increase in applications for a change of zoning in the community
planning areas. So far no statistical record of the number of applications has been
kept, but it is estimated that about 100 were received, and, of these, 50 were given
final approval. This number is in contrast to 17 applications received eight years
ago in 1955. It may be of interest to explain how applications for a change of zoning
are processed. The owner of the property affected makes an application for a
change to the Minister of Municipal Affairs, usually through the local building
inspector. The Minister receives a technical report, and where there is an Advisory
Planning Commission, their recommendation. The Minister then either approves
the application in principle or rejects it. When an application is approved in principle, a public hearing must be held before the Minister reconsiders this request.
Should final approval be given, the change becomes a legal change of the zoning
regulations when it is published in Part II of The British Columbia Gazette.
There is growing evidence that if there were an official community plan showing agreed future land uses, this problem of individual changes of zoning could be
studied in a better frame of reference. To this end, the Division is preparing plans
for future land use in two community planning areas and co-operating with the
Capital Region Planning Board in another. The first plan for presentation will
be the area around Prince George, involving a population of around 9,000. The
area is growing rapidly for its population, with 152 dwelling units built in 1963.
The plan will not be complex in comparison with some, but it will contain one
essential ingredient—the extension of land uses for the future orderly growth of the
community. In North Saanich (Community Planning Area Number 5) a plan
prepared by the Capital Region Planning Board will be presented after the people
in the area have had an opportunity to study the proposals.   A large number of
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1963
BB23
zoning and subdivision applications have been processed during the course of the
preparation of the plan for an extensive area around Nanaimo. This region is a
rapidly growing complex of land uses, and the knowledge of the area and the practical experience gained in dealing with such a variety of problems should yield a
more realistic and satisfactory pattern of land uses for the plan. It should also
provide valuable background as to the kinds of zoning and subdivision problems
which are peculiar to the semi-rural urban fringe areas which characterize our
Community planning areas. There is no doubt that the zoning and subdivision
regulations written in the course of the preparation of the community planning
area's plans presently being drawn will have wider application throughout all our
community planning areas within a few years.
We prepared last year a new set of mobile-home park regulations after consultation with officials in the Health Department, the Department of Recreation
and Conservation, the Mobile Homes Manufacturers' Association, the Division of
Housing in California, and others in the business of manufacturing mobile homes.
So far mobile-home parks have been unregulated, and there has been a growing
public prejudice against them. We feel, however, that in areas where there is a
rapid and widely fluctuating population increase, such, for example, as large construction projects might cause, the mobile home provides a suitable means of
accommodation for a necessarily transient population. It is not generally realized
that one out of four families in British Columbia moves each year. There is a
tendency and pressure to only allow single-family housing in a community, but
every community needs a variety of housing. Regulations should not inhibit the
various kinds from being developed as long as overcrowding of land is not allowed
and reasonable minimum health and safety standards are maintained.
A set of camp-ground regulations has been prepared, and they will be recommended for adoption in those community planning areas as needed.
Investigation is continuing into the possibility of controlling land use around
airports and on flood plains. Three commercial zones were created in Highway
Planning Area Number 1, and I feel that this area is doing much to protect the
capacity of the Trans-Canada Highway in Columbia Electoral Riding.
The value of construction in the community planning areas in 1963 totalled
$22,035,210. This represents an increase over last year's figure of 27 per cent.
The value of construction, number of dwelling units, and the population of the
community planning areas are shown on the following table:—
 BB24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Dwelling
Units
Built,
1963
Dwelling
Units Built
since Areas
Established
Total Value
of AU
Construction,
1963
Approximate Population of
Area, 1961
Community Planning Area Number 1 (around Kelowna) _
Community Planning Area Number 2 (around Vernon)	
Community Planning Area Number 3 (View Royal) _
Community Planning Area Number 4 (Langford-Metchosin)	
Community Planning Area Number 5 (North Saanich)
Community Planning Area Number 6 (around Nanaimo)	
Community Planning Area Number 7 (around Prince George)
Community Planning Area Number 8 (around Kamloops)	
Community Planning Area Number 9 (around Quesnel).
Community Planning Area Number 10 (Connaught Heights,
D.L. 172, next to New Westminster)
Community Planning Area Number 11 (around Alberni)	
Community Planning Area Number 12 (around Dawson Creek)
Community Planning Area Number 13 (Woodhaven near loco)
Community Planning Area Number 14 (north of Campbell
River to south of Courtenay)
Community Planning Area Number 15 (around Fort St. John)
Community Planning Area Number 16 (Sicamous)
Community Planning Area Number 17 (Fort Nelson)	
Community Planning Area Number 18  (West Bench, near
Penticton) (subdivision regulations only)
Community Planning Area Number 19 (Hudson Hope)	
Community Planning Area Number 20 (Crooked River, 60
miles north of Prince George)	
Community Planning Area Number 211-
229
52
19
122
36
275
135
151
15
1
3
4
136
42
7
1
31
Community Planning Area Number 22 (Chase)..
Others	
1,533
512
514
207
548
2,076
1,060
1,010
204
71
10
232
36
263
193
13
33
35
2
16
68
$3,494,296
857,094
312,700
1,673,970
607,310
3,023,972
1,649,210
4,109,466
133,010
23,900
39,000
116,028
154,260
3,704,719
516,023
156,666
628,639
656,608
950
177,389
Totals-.
1,275
8,636
$22,035,210
10,000
4,600
3,400
11,200
3,300
14,000
9,200
6,500
500
1,450
200
1,800
400
13,400
3,400
1,000
2,500
200
700
10
1,000
88,760
i Community Planning Area Number 21 has been incorporated as the Village of Chetwynd.
Total value of all construction to date, $116,460,790.
The 1960 National Building Code was adopted in all the community planning
areas. In addition, the Code has had a widespread acceptance, and we have given
assistance to villages in the drafting of by-laws for its adoption. A shorter form of
the Code will be available shortly, and it is thought that this will prove most useful
to smaller centres.
The Division has been active in promoting the training of building inspectors,
and a correspondence course for this purpose is now being prepared by the National
Research Council. It is hoped that courses of training will be coupled with a programme of certification of building inspectors to make for improved standards of
public service in this important and growing field.
Don South, M.T.P.I.C,
Director, Regional Planning Division.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1964
1,060-264-4320

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