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DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1962 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1963

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1962
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1963
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual Report of the Department
of Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1962.
W. D. BLACK,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Victoria, B.C.
  Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs
Victoria, B.C., January 18, 1963.
The Honourable W. D. Black,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Annual Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1962.
As the real-property tax is the mainstay of municipal finance, we report year
by year the changes in assessed values of real property in the municipalities.   As a
comparison, the 1949 total assessed values of land and improvements were just
slightly in excess of 1 billion dollars.   By the year 1955 these values had doubled
to over 2 billion dollars.   The values for the year under review amount to more
than 4 billion dollars.    This comparison serves to indicate the very substantial
growth in the municipal tax base over the past few years.    The figure for 1962
represents an increase of about 300 million dollars over 1961 values.   This is an
increase of 8 per cent, somewhat more than the percentage increase of the previous
year.   The year-by-year increase in the tax base is more particularly depicted in the
following table.
Growth in Combined Assessed Values and Taxes in Municipalities
of British Columbia
Year
Assessed Values
Assessed Values Actually Taxed
Tax
Revenues
All Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
1955	
1956     	
$2,108,458,383
2,432,313,912
2,765,873,099
3,047,766,854
3,327,118,937
3,569,240,135
3,717,472,643
4.032.288.772
$1,742,081,045
2,035,542,999
2,315,295,651
2,569,271,281
2,805,547,214
3,015,844,390
3,142,969,534
3.407.538.034
$1,350,856,875
1,586,627,603
1,854,677,597
2,053,934,444
2,248,145,499
2,417,467,198
2,508,401,082
2.770.194.168
$1,044,040,275
1,238,390,209
1,415,935,241
1,562,991,738
1,721,746,974
1,843,967,404
1,920,101,216
2.182.411.559
$59,112,580
66,418,657
78,811,653
92,429,190
104,819,992
116,857,478
122,272,311
140,000,0001
1957 	
1958 	
1959     	
1960     ..
1961.	
1962  	
1
I
1 Estimated.
The total assessed values actually taxed for school purposes in the Province
in 1962 amounted to $3,559,503,840.    Of this total, $2,770,194,168 or 78 per
cent represented values within the municipalities.
During 1962 the Inspector of Municipalities approved term borrowing for the
municipalities in the total amount of $14,006,884, the major part of which was
supported by serial debenture issues.   This is a decrease from the amount of borrowing approved by the Inspector for the previous year.   This decrease is brought
about mainly as a result of the austerity programme of the Federal Government,
which resulted in a rapid rise in interest rates on borrowed funds, which in turn
made borrowing on a long-term basis an unattractive proposition.    Many municipalities with works projected or in hand were severely affected by the rapid deterioration of the bond market in the early summer.    Some municipalities experienced
difficulty in arranging financing for capital projects, even on a temporary basis.
Extreme difficulties were encountered where a contract had already been let for
the work and the need for funds pressing.    The general recovery of the money
market in recent months has eased some of the pressure, and bond sales at the end
5
 X 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA
of the year were again going forward with interest rates at a generally lower plane
than those prevailing earlier in the year. It is hoped that the firming trend shown
by the market will continue into the new year to allow the rather considerable backlog of municipal debentures to be marketed. The austerity programme, as reflected
in municipal financing, was severely felt by the smaller municipalities, which do not
have the resources or credit of the larger units. However, in the majority of cases
temporary financing or bond sales have now been arranged.
The amount and the purpose for which new borrowings were approved by the
Inspector of Municipalities are set out below. The major part of these new borrowings was or is to be financed by way of debenture issues, although it is significant
to report that term bank loans and financing by the metropolitan water and sewer
boards played an increasingly important role in municipal financing during the year.
Borrowing by the City of Vancouver is not subject to the approval of the Inspector
of Municipalities and therefore is not included in this table.
Distribution of Authorized Debenture Debt by Purposes
for the Year 1962
Purpose
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Local
Districts
Total
$2,033,000
290,033
27,700
107,000
727,500
$4,982,000
1,994,105
1,400,000
1,216,448
539,000
89,000
67,000
30,000
$2,998
$143,100
90,000
$7,161,098
2,374,138
	
	
1,427,700
1,323,448
6,000
237,000
1,272,500
	
326,000
67,000
25,000
55,000
Totals
$3,210,233
$10,317,553
$2,998
$476,100
$14,006,884
The total debenture debt as at December 31, 1961, of all municipalities, including the City of Vancouver, is illustrated by the following table:—
Total Authorized Debenture Debt as at December 31,
1961
Issued, Sold
and Outstanding
Unissued
and Unsold
Total
$45,925,615
50,008,211
3,253,199
5,944,758
58,000
$12,064,522
6,859,926
642,040
461,000
$57,990,137
56,868,137
3,895,239
Districts             	
6,405,758
58,000
Totals
$105,189,783      |      $20,027,488
$125,217,271
Vancouver  ...
153,185,108      |             700,000
153,885,108
$258,374,891
$20,727,488
$279,102,379
Provincial guarantees authorized under the provisions of the Municipalities
Assistance Act were reduced in number this year. However, Provincial guarantees
in the total amount of $5,382,500 were approved, a significant amount and representing a large percentage of the over-all borrowing by the municipalities during
1962. The borrowings which were guaranteed during the year, including borrowings by the City of Vancouver, are summarized below.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1962
X 7
Municipalities Assistance Act Guarantees
Approved during 1962
Cities (excluding Vancouver) _
Districts 	
Towns	
Villages	
Local districts	
$418,000
519,500
245,000
Total
Vancouver	
Grand total
$1,182,500
4,200,000
$5,382,500
A summary of the amount of the debentures guaranteed by the Province under
the Municipalities Assistance Act and under the Village Municipalities Assistance
Act outstanding as at December 31, 1962, is indicated below.
Outstanding Debentures Guaranteed by the Province
as at December 31, 1962
Village
Municipalities
Assistance
Act
Municipalities
Assistance
Act
Total
Cities (excluding Vancouver)..
Districts	
Towns	
Villages-
Local districts....
Totals-
Vancouver 	
Greater Victoria Water District	
Greater Nanaimo Sewerage and Drainage District-
Greater Nanaimo Water District	
Greater Vancouver Water District — _
Grand totals  	
$516,500
323,500
2,247,000
2,996,200
$11,907,500
8,049,850
572,000
2,429,500
57,000
$12,424,000
8,373,350
2,819,000
5,425,700
57,000
$6,083,200
$23,015,850
18,364,000
871,000
2,133,000
180,000
23,254,000
$29,099,050
18,364,000
871,000
2,133,000
180,000
23,254,000
$6,083,200
$67,817,850
$96,916,900
It is conservatively estimated that the liability represented by guaranteed
debenture issues is supported by the revenues of self-liquidating utilities or enterprises with an appraised value in excess of 115 million dollars. Guaranteed debt
is first, of course, a direct obligation of the issuing municipality.
In addition to the amounts mentioned in the above table, there is also outstanding under the Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District Act debentures totalling $33,990,500.
The Department of Finance of the Federal Government has advised the
Department that as at January 1, 1963, all semi-annual repayments have been met
on loans authorized under the provisions of the Municipalities Improvements Assistance Act, 1938. The total amount outstanding on these loans is $138,240.22,
comprising one city, $12,336.81; two district municipalities, $34,524.69; one village, $4,626.29; one improvement district incorporated under the Water Act,
$12,090.08; and the Greater Vancouver Water District, $74,662.35. The principal amounts of all loans authorized under the Municipalities Improvements Assistance Act, 1938, to British Columbia municipalities and other corporations totalled
$2,146,759.70.
 X 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The sewer financing assistance programme offered by the Central Mortgage
and Housing Corporation under the provisions of the National Housing Act has
continued to have an expanding influence in the financing of municipal sewage-
disposal schemes. The programme which was due to terminate on March 31,1963,
has been extended by the Federal Government for a further term and will continue
to be of real benefit to those municipalities constructing or extending sewage treatment and disposal facilities during the coming year. This programme has offered
a below-market interest rate for borrowing on a long-term basis and significant debt-
cancellation benefits to those municipalities participating.
Short-term borrowing for capital projects proved to be of major importance
during 1962 as an added means of financing where the issue and marketing of
debenture issues proved to be a problem through high interest requirements. These
undertakings, normally by means of a bank loan, are for a maximum term of five
years, and the borrowing limit for this category of debt is fixed for each municipality
on the basis of its population. Borrowings under this provision amounted to
$206,940 during 1962. The borrowing must first be approved by the Inspector of
Municipalities, but does not require the assent of the owner-electors as in the case
of ordinary term borrowings.
It was found necessary to hold one public inquiry during 1962 into an application for a certificate of approval to a debenture by-law. The certificate was granted.
This was the first time it was necessary to hold such an inquiry since the year 1959.
Twenty certificates of self-liquidation were granted to seventeen municipalities
in respect of eleven utility systems and nine sewer systems during the year under
review. A number of the certificates were provisional, which will eventually be
replaced by subsisting certificates after the municipality has proved by actual operation that the new utility or enterprise is on a self-liquidating basis. To date there
have been ninety-nine certificates of self-liquidation issued to seventy municipalities,
a number of which have received more than one certificate. The majority of municipalities have now established their utilities and other municipal enterprises on a
self-liquidating basis, thereby gaining additional borrowing power under the formula
established by the Municipal Act.
Reserve funds for various purposes at the end of 1961 amounted to $13,914,-
629. This represents an increase of approximately 4 per cent or $61,590 over the
previous year. These funds are available for capital expenditures, subject to approval of the Minister of Municipal Affairs. These reserves comprise statutory funds,
such as receipts from the sale of tax-sale properties or other municipal lands and
special-purpose reserves, made up of contributions from current revenue or general
revenue fund surplus.
The year 1962 marked the third year of the award of the Minister of Municipal
Affairs' shield to the municipalities having the highest percentage turnout of electors
at the annual election. The municipalities receiving the awards for the December,
1961, elections in the three categories were: Cities and towns—Cranbrook, with
a turnout of 76.6 per cent; districts—Kitimat, with a turnout of 70.9 per cent
(Kitimat also won the award in 1961); villages—Natal, with a turnout of 79.1 per
cent. This was the first annual election for Natal. The percentage returns were
high, as the year 1961 was generally a mayoralty year. These awards have proved
to be of value in encouraging the municipalities to make an effort to increase their
percentage turnout of electors. The interest in the competition is reflected in the
prompt return of the election results to the Department.
The course in municipal administration being offered by the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration of the University of British Columbia under the
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1962 X 9
sponsorship of the Department is now in its ninth year. The total enrolment for
the 1962/63 course-year is made up of thirty-seven first-year students, twenty-nine
second-year students, twenty-five third-year students, twenty-two fourth-year students, and seven in special one-year assessors' course. It is gratifying to note that
131 students have now completed the four-year course in either municipal administration or municipal finance, or both. The annual institute was held at the University, during which the year-end examinations took place. The results of the examinations were as follows: Completed first-year, 26; second-year, 19; third-year, 19,
and fourth year, 23. Diplomas in both the junior and senior categories were
granted by the University to all students successfully completing the second or
fourth year of the course. The Board of Examiners established under Part XXVI
of the Municipal Act is playing an increasingly active role in the advancement of
municipal administration, largely through the interest shown in in-service training
offered by the University. During 1962 the Board granted thirty certificates of
proficiency, bringing to 151 the number now issued to municipal officials; six junior
certificates in administration, seven senior certificates in administration, eleven
senior certificates in finance, and six certificates in property appraisal were issued.
The twenty-third annual conference of the Municipal Officers' Association of
British Columbia was held again in Victoria on June 4, 5, and 6, 1962. The conference was well attended, with a large percentage of the municipalities represented,
and, as in previous years, proved to be of value both to the representatives of the
municipalities and to the members of the Department. Many facets of municipal
administration and municipal functions were dealt with by individual addresses or
panel discussions.
The Union of British Columbia Municipalities held its fifty-ninth annual convention in September at Kamloops. This convention was attended by the undersigned and the Supervisor of Municipalities.
Two communities were incorporated as village municipalities in 1962. These
were Chetwynd and Valemount. Chetwynd was incorporated on the 25th day of
September, 1962, and has an estimated population of 925 and an area of 958 acres.
Valemount was incorporated on the 13th day of December, 1962, with an estimated
population of 511 and an area of 640 acres. A number of communities throughout
the Province showed interest in incorporation, and it is anticipated that possibly two
or three new villages will be incorporated during the coming year. Sparwood,
a neighbour community of the Village of Natal, held its incorporation plebiscite
late in the year and will likely be incorporated as a village municipality early in the
new year. Incorporation plebiscites were also held at Bella Coola and Clinton.
In both instances the question failed to meet the required three-fifths majority by
a small margin. There were no changes of status during 1962, and none are immediately indicated, although a number of municipalities now have a population sufficient to allow them to rise to another status. This, in particular, is the case in
some of the larger villages. The boundaries of the Villages of Sidney, Hazelton,
Ashcroft, and Princeton and the Cities of Cranbrook and Fernie were extended in
1962. Details of these extensions are illustrated by the following table, which
shows the increase in area as well as the increase in population:—
 X 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Adjustments in Area and Increases in Population, 1962
Area (in Acres)
Population
Municipality
Before
Extension
of Area
Contained
in Area
Added
After
Extension
of Area
Before
Extension
of Area
Contained
in Area
Added
After
Extension
of Area
Cities
Cranbrook	
Fernie   	
Villages
Sidney	
Hazelton	
516.00
336.50
578.00
27.63
228.40
665.00
226.00
277.50
46.66
59.90
1,181.00
562.50
855.50
74.29
288.30
547.31
5,549
2,661
1,558
410
868
2,163
1,085
5
316
46
2
4
6,634
2,666
1,874
456
870
546.00     1           1.31
2,167
The Local Services Act has again proved to be a very workable means of providing needed community services in unorganized territory. A number of local
areas were established this year, as follows:—
Local Areas Established, 1962
Name
Purpose
Date
Robson Local Area..
Spences Bridge Local Area-
Simon Fraser Local Area..	
View Royal Local Area	
Campbell River Local Area..
Nanaimo Local Area	
Home nursing ...
Fire protection-
Home nursing..
Public comfort-stations..
Home nursing	
Home nursing	
February 1st.
February 1st.
March 8th.
April 19th.
May 28th.
May 28th.
In addition to the above, minor boundary adjustments were made to two
previously established home nursing local areas.
There was also activity in community planning areas in 1962, which is a
further function under the Local Services Act. Details of this and of other activities
of the Regional Planning Division of the Department follow in the report of the
Director.
We have continued to work with the other Provincial departments in the matter of providing adequate garbage-disposal facilities for residents in unorganized
territory. All the Provincial health units have been contacted, and information
obtained as to the problems in each area. From this it has been possible for us to
suggest ways of overcoming some of the problems, and it is pleasing to note that
many areas now have satisfactory facilities and that several local organizations have
been willing to take on increased responsibility in maintaining the disposal-sites.
This has, in part, been made easier by the co-operation of the Department of Lands
in leasing Crown land for this purpose. In the process of formation at the present
time are the areas around Campbell River, Prince George (John Hart Highway),
and Shuswap Lake. The main obstacle encountered has been the difficulty in finding organizations or local groups who are able to establish and operate the facilities
required. It would appear that some other solution to the problem must be sought
in such instances.
The most significant changes and additions enacted by the 1962 Session of
the Legislature which affected municipalities are as follows:—
Three major amendments were made to the Municipal Act. The first dealt
with the licensing of commercial vehicles. This is an innovation in that commercial
vehicles are licensed by means of a uniform procedure rather than on an individual
basis, as was previously the case through municipal trades licensing. The effect of
this new procedure is a common licence issued by participating municipalities which
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1962 X 11
is valid throughout the Province. This replaces the previous trades licence practice
of multiple licensing where commercial vehicles operate in more than one municipality. The licence fee has been standardized, and receipts from this source are
centrally deposited with the Department for disbursement, after deducting administration costs, to the participating municipalities on a per capita basis. The Department is charged with the administrative responsibility for this function and is in
the process of setting up and organizing the programme. This additional activity
has added materially to the responsibilities of the staff. The programme goes into
effect in 1963 with the majority of the municipalities participating in the scheme.
The second important amendment concerns special ditching powers for district
municipalities to enable this class of municipality to deal effectively with drainage
problems. This entailed the inclusion of a further subdivision within the Municipal
Act dealing with this specific function. Municipalities are now excluded from the
provisions of the Ditches and Watercourses Act, except where co-operation is
required between a municipality and property-owners in unorganized territory.
The third major amendment was the complete rewriting of Division (1) of
Part XXIV of the Municipal Act, dealing with urban areas. The amendments
made, I feel, have greatly improved the workability of this Division and provide
greater local powers and responsibilities for urban boards. The Division as rewritten is designed to make the establishment of urban areas a more attractive and
practical solution for administration problems on the local level in the municipalities
of large area and decentralized population cores. Other amendments to the
Municipal Act oi a more general nature involved specific administrative matters,
borrowing for utilities, zoning and subdivision control, and parks. Amendments
were made to the Local Services Act, which is under the direct jurisdiction of the
Department. This Act was amended to broaden the scope of the legislation to
include recreational or community facilities. Certain municipalities were affected
by specific amendments to the Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act. These
municipahties were Cache Creek, Surrey, Matsqui, Oak Bay, Peachland, Richmond,
Port Moody, Delta, and Vancouver.
The Greater Campbell River Water District Act, enacted at the 1962 Session
of the Legislature, was proclaimed on the 1st day of August, 1962, establishing
the member communities of the Village of Campbell River and the Improvement
Districts of Willow Point and Quinsam as the Greater Campbell River Water District. This followed the separate endorsement of the move by the owner-electors of
the three communities.
The work in the Department has continued to expand, and this year added
burdens were placed on the staff through the Department being charged with the
responsibility for the general administration of the licensing procedures for commercial vehicles. In addition, the Municipal Winter Works Incentive Programme
and the Sewer Financing Assistance Programme have continued to expand, adding
an increasing volume of work detail. The ever-enlarging activities of the municipalities, both in the field of finance and in general administration, continue to utilize
the services of the Department to the full.
I would again like to express my thanks to all municipal officials of this Province, both elected and appointed, for their courtesy and assistance, to the executive
and staff of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities, to the executive of the
Municipal Officers' Association, to all other Government officials, and to you, Sir,
for your support and encouragement.
J. E. BROWN, F.C.I.S.,
Deputy Minister and Inspector of Municipalities.
 X 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF MUNICIPALITIES
Victoria, B.C., January 17, 1963.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—The field of municipal administration continues to expand and become
more complex as the population of the municipalities increases, bringing with it
ever more urgent demands for more services such as roads, sewers, water, etc.
When one considers that the general revenue of the municipalities increased
from $68,000,000 in 1951 to $184,000,000 in 1961, and that the debenture debt
increased from $160,000,000 to $279,000,000 over the same period, it is apparent
that the additional demands placed on the staff in the performance of their duties
have been great. Commensurate with the development of the municipalities and
their expansion has been the requirement for greater knowledge by the staff to deal
with the many problems as they arise. The members of the staff have met this
situation by enrolling for special courses of study from time to time to help them
keep abreast of the latest developments in the fields of administration and finance.
This latter effort has been recognized in that the Board of Examiners has seen fit
to grant certificates of proficiency in municipal finance and in municipal administration to Mr. Smith and in municipal administration to Mr. Woodward of the
Department.
The following is a compilation of some of the major activities of the Department during 1962:—
(1) One hundred and eight-five visits were made to municipalities. The
number of municipalities actually visited was 121, some receiving more
than one visit.
(2) Two hundred and fifty-two Minutes of Council were prepared and subsequently approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
(3) Eighty-four certificates of approval for municipal loan by-laws were
issued. A few of these were cancelled during the year due to the subsequent amendment of the by-law concerned. A new certificate to the
by-law as amended was issued if required.
(4) Sixty-two debenture issues were examined and subsequently certified by
the Inspector of Municipalities, consisting of 11,787 debentures of a
total par value of $11,605,082.41.
(5) Seven hundred and seventeen by-laws were examined and registered.
Of this amount, eighty-one were town by-laws, 632 were village by-laws,
and four were local district by-laws. Many of the by-laws required
advice and correspondence, resulting in resubmission in revised form.
(6) Several hundred draft by-laws and similar documents were submitted for
review and comment, involving a considerable amount of correspondence.
(7) Publication of the Annual Report of Municipal Statistics.
(8) Editing the financial and statistical returns of the municipalities to ensure
conformity with statutory and other requirements. This phase of administration involves considerable correspondence with municipal officials
and auditors.
(9) By correspondence and by personal visits to the various municipalities,
encouraging the adoption of good financial, accounting, and administrative
procedures.
In view of its increased importance to investment houses, financial institutions,
and others, we are continuing in our efforts to ensure that the financial and other
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1962
X 13
statistical information contained in the annual edition of Municipal Statistics is
accurate and on a comparable basis with prior years. We have continued to receive
excellent co-operation from municipal officials and auditors in submitting financial
and other statements promptly, thereby facilitating its early publication.
For the fifth consecutive winter the Government of Canada has provided an
incentive for municipalities to undertake winter works for the relief of unemployment. The incentive is the offer to pay one-half of the direct labour cost of approved
projects of a capital nature. The programme period is initially the same as the
1961/62 season, that is October 15th to April 30th. There were no basic changes
in the regulations or in the type of project which may be undertaken on a shareable
basis under the current programme.
In addition to the incentive offered by the Federal Government, the Government of this Province has again agreed to pay to municipalities 25 per cent of the
approved direct labour costs relating to accepted projects. The Province, in addition, has agreed to pay a further 25 per cent of the wages of any person employed
on an accepted project who has been continuously in receipt of welfare assistance
from on or before July 1, 1962, to the date of being engaged on the project.
An indication of the growth of the programme may be gained from the following:—
Cost of Projects
Man-days Work
Payroll
1959/60 as at January 15, 1960	
1960/61 as at January 15, 1961	
1961/62 as at January 15th, 1962..
1962/63 as at January 15, 1963—
$7,000,000
20,000,000
26,500,000
25,000,000      |
183,000
392,000
426,000
413,000
$3,000,000
7,000,000
8,333,333
7,500,000
These are estimated figures of the municipalities for the programme period.
As of January 15, 1963, approvals had been given to 529 projects, whereas the
total number for last year's programme was 537 projects. It is anticipated that
additional applications will be received this year following the consideration of
municipal budgets by the Councils in 1963.
The following tabulation gives a summary of the British Columbia municipalities participating in the Winter Works Programme as at January 15, 1963, according to the records of this office:—
Number of men  6,000
Man-days work  413,000
Total cost of projects  $24,768,000
Federal share (payroll cost)     $3,766,000
Provincial share (payroll cost)     $ 1,918,000
Municipal share (payroll cost)     $1,879,000
Total payroll under offer     $7,563,000
Nature and Total Cost of Projects
Waterworks
Sewers	
Drainage	
Roads	
Sidewalks	
Buildings 	
Parks 	
 ___..  $2,068,000
  7,667,000
  646,000
  2,293,000
  1,150,000
  3,708,000
  1,170,000
Other     -  1,716,000
 X 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Municipalities Participating Number of Accepted Projects
Cities	
29
Cities	
Districts
215
Districts	
     26
152
Towns	
Villages	
Other	
4
38
....    25
Towns	
Villages 	
Other	
Total	
18
104
40
Total	
  122
  529
Table 1 shows the final summary of the Municipal Winter Works Incentive
Programme for the year 1961/62 as issued by the Department of Labour, Ottawa,
and Table 2 indicates the same information for the current programme as at January
11, 1963.
All classes of municipalities continue to maintain a high rate of collection of
taxes. The city and district municipalities collected in excess of 95 per cent of the
curernt levy, the villages over 93 per cent, and the towns over 90 per cent.
Correspondence was directed to any municipality where the arrears of taxes
were in excess of 10 per cent of the current levy in an effort to determine whether
appropriate steps were being taken to improve the position. It is felt that improvements could be made in administrative procedures in some of the municipalities
involved, and this matter will receive our continued attention.
A review of the municipal tax-collection picture across Canada reveals that the
percentage collection of current taxes in British Columbia municipalities ranks
among the highest in Canada, and that the percentage of arrears of taxes is among
the lowest. There are, of course, economic factors which have contributed to the
establishment of this favourable position. However, it should also be pointed out
that the municipal treasurers and collectors are continuing to develop techniques
which are proving to be successful in effecting and maintaining a high rate of tax
collection, and they are to be congratulated for their efforts in this regard.
Tables 3 and 4 reveal further information relative to tax collections in British
Columbia municipalities for the years shown.
By reference to Table 5 it will be seen that after correcting for both population
and price there has been between 1921 and 1961 an increase of 95 per cent in
revenues in the case of cities, 205 per cent for Vancouver, and 113 per cent for
districts. The classification of town did not exist prior to January 1, 1958. In the
case of villages the percentage increase over 1931 has been 205 per cent. Subject
to the inherent limitations of the data, this the extent to which today's citizens are
paying for increased or better community services compared with forty years ago
in the cities and districts and thirty years ago in the villages.
The amount of revenue collected by the various municipalities varies quite
widely. Table 6 gives an approximate idea of this range. Generally, the amount
of revenue collected is the result of the interplay between the cost of providing a
certain level of desired services and the willingness of the taxpayer to be taxed.
In part this tendency to collect (or spend) is related to size. The larger the community, the greater the per capita revenues required, although obviously size is not
the only factor.
It may be generally concluded that the municipalities now depend upon local
taxation to a much smaller extent than was the case thirty-five years ago. At that
time roughly 90 per cent of their revenues came from taxation. Today it is approxi-
mately 66 per cent or less. ; D BairDj ^ ^
Deputy Inspector and Supervisor of Municipalities.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1962
X 15
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Table 3.—Percentage Tax Collections
x 17
Percentage of
Current Levy
Collected
Total Collections
as a Percentage of
Current Levy
Outstanding Taxes
as a Percentage of
Current Levy
1939
Cities (Except Vancouver)
1946
1957                     .          -                              — - -
1958                                                                 -    	
1959    ..	
1960
1961                                   	
1939
Vancouver
1946 .                                            	
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961..       	
1939
Districts
1946    .          .   .
1957                       	
1958                         	
1959                                               	
1960      .                   	
1961            .          ...   ._   ...              	
1958
Towns
1959                       	
1960                            	
1961    	
1939      . _■   .
Villages
1946 .   .     .            	
1957
1958    .
1959                    	
1960
1961 - 	
81.10
94.13
95.02
95.24
94.67
94.97
95.12
91.00
95.74
95.41
95.20
95.08
95.43
95.07
77.60
92.32
95.67
95.83
95.43
95.40
95.17
89.55
88.69
90.41
90.61
76.50
92.45
91.58
91.70
91.69
93.83
93.43
99.10
100.46
100.38
100.02
99.28
99.92
100.12
103.10
100.57
100.74
99.36
99.35
99.47
99.63
95.80
99.28
100.93
100.00
99.46
99.68
99.96
97.06
98.00
101.53
99.73
98.30
99.90
99.94
99.26
99.60
101.96
99.26
40.16
7.85
6.87
6.53
6.92
6.84
6.81
30.06
5.90
6.82
6.62
6.88
6.98
7.43
34.81
9.45
5.74
5.36
5.73
6.10
6.41
13.62
15.18
13.28
13.70
38.71
11.90
11.23
11.19
10.99
8.78
8.75
 X 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1962
X 19
Table 5.—Per Capita of Municipal Revenues by Major Sources
for the Years Shown
Year
Municipal
Taxation
For
Schools
Total
Provincial
Grantsi
Utilities 2
Licences,
Fines,
and
Other
Total
Revenue
Revenue
$4.00
$31.85
7.82
46.55
9.39
45.95
8.03
42.95
15.80
88.00
20.93
144.97
2.35
33.15
6.03
53.15
4.91
52.50
5.54
48.60
10.97
85.50
27.51
174.41
3.00
27.80
6.24
34.35
6.83
31.75
1.27
19.70
6.54
57.00
10.01
116.73
16.91
111.01
4.04
13.42
2.08
9.05
8.43
31.90
11.15
78.01
Total Revenue Corrected for Changes
in Prices
Amount    Change3
Cities (except Vancouver)
1917 	
1921	
1931..                                     	
1941-                                    	
1951      	
1961
1917.....
Vancouver
1921.	
1931
1941            .                         	
1951...	
1961    ....     ...
1917...
Districts
1921	
1931
1941.. .            ..
1951 	
1961 ...     	
1961
Towns*
1931 .
Villages
1941...
1951..   .      .
1961 .    	
$6.42
11.55
13.35
9.35
19.80
34.64
7.05
12.03
12.95
11.95
21.10
42.65
4.55
8.27
9.62
5.75
18.15
37.26
28.25
24.82
$27.85
37.60
31.80
28.20
43.15
87.53
30.80
46.60
44.80
38.40
54.00
117.03
24.80
27.60
21.80
16.20
34.20
85.70
66.04
5.60
5.81
11.14
50.32
$0.57
3.29
3.05
20.45
28.65
.52
2.79
4.35
19.60
29.68
.51
3.12
2.23
15.50
19.92
28.06
3.78
.99
11.13
15.85
$0.56
1.47
3.67
8.60
7.86
.31
.93
.19
.76
1.10
.17
1.20
.69
$57.60
100
67.75
117
61.95
107
77.50
134
112.21
195
65.75
100
77.35
117
69.75
106
75.25
114
134.99
205
42.45
46.75
28.25
50.20
90.35
85.92
19.80
13.10
28.10
60.38
100
110
67
118
213
100
100
66
142
305
1 Does not include Provincial grants for schools.
2 Utility surplus appropriated for general revenue purposes.
3 This column represents relative change in adjusted per capita revenue.
4 The classification of town did not exist prior to lanuary 1, 1958.
 X 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 6.—Distribution of per Capita Revenues for Cities, Districts,
Towns, and Villages for the Years 1951 and 1961
1951
Per Capita Revenues
Cities        Districts
Towns
Villages
$0    $9.99                              ...          	
1
2
A
t
A
2
1
1
4
10
6
2
2
1
1
—
2
10- 19 99                                                -	
7
20- 29.99        -  	
10
30- 39.99               ...                   .
13
40    49.99         -    . .                    	
7
50- 59.99	
2
60- 69.99
70- 79.99         	
80    89 99
....
90- 99.99     .   	
100-109.99                                                    -
110-119.99    ...    —               	
120 129.99               -                 	
130-139.99    -  	
140-149.99          '
150-159.99         -  — 	
160-169.99             —	
170-179.99    _
180-189.99       -	
190-199.99     ...     . .
Personal income for British Columbia:  Total, $1,568,000,000; per capita, $1,346.
Personal income for Canada:  Total, $15,824,000,000; per capita, $1,061.
1961
$0- $9.99    .
2
2
2
4
3
2
3
2
4
4
2
1
1
4
6
3
7
1
2
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
10- 19.99        .  	
20- 29.99    .	
30- 39.99  	
2
40- 49.99	
1
50- 59.99...   .   .    .
8
60- 69.99     	
15
70- 79.99        	
13
SO-  89 99
90- 99.99.  	
3
100-109.99         _
4
110-119.99   	
120-129.99            	
1
130-139.99  .         .                 .     	
140-149.99  _ _        	
150-159.99     .   .	
160-169.99            	
170-179.99        .
180-189.99-      	
190-199.99       	
Personal income for British Columbia:  Total, $2,947,000,000; per capita, $1,809.
Personal income for Canada:  Total, $28,049,000,000; per capita, $1,538.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1962 X 21
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR, REGIONAL
PLANNING DIVISION
Victoria, B.C., January 16, 1963.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—-The Division continued last year to expand and improve its community
planning services throughout the Province. Planning assistance to those municipalities beyond the boundaries of the Lower Mainland Regional Planning Board and
the Capital Region Planning Board who showed an interest in implementing plans
prepared by the Division and to those who have requested that plans be prepared
continued throughout the year.
At the close of the year there were twenty-one community planning areas in
operation in unorganized territory throughout the Province. The following changes
took place during the year in respect of such areas:—
Community Planning Area Number 21 was disestablished when the Village of Chetwynd became incorporated with the same boundaries
as the area.
Community Planning Area Number 16 was established at Sicamous, a
growing community of about 1,000 on the Trans-Canada Highway
between Salmon Arm and Revelstoke.
Community Planning Area Number 12 was enlarged to include the land
around Pouce Coupe and along the Alaska and John Hart Highways.
Community Planning Area Number 13 was enlarged to include the communities of Belcarra and loco and other places north-west of Port
Moody on Burrard Inlet and Indian Arm.
During the year the staff planners completed community plans for two municipalities and gave advice on request to those places where we had previously done
work.   These plans, when finalized, will form a positive guide from which reasonable land-use controls such as zoning can be established.   The staff are also developing similar plans for community planning areas.   While the plans in the area around
Nanaimo are being made, the staff are working closely with the Advisory Planning
Commission for the area.   The staff of the Capital Region Planning Board are doing
similar work in Community Planning Area Number 5, North Saanich, on our behalf.
In Community Planning Area Number 7, around Prince George, two members of
the staff held a public exhibit for four days in the Provincial Government Building.
Many people living in the area came to see the proposed plans, and the staff had an
opportunity to explain the proposals to individuals and record their reactions to them.
The total value of construction in all of the community planning areas was
$17,353,350, the highest annual amount reported by the Division.    This resulted
from the trend of increased construction in the Province last year and the increased
coverage of our services in unorganized territory.
The value of construction, number of dwelling units built, and the population
of the community planning areas is shown in the following table:—
 X 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Dwelling
Units
Built,
1962
Dwelling
Units Built
since Areas
Established
Total Value
of Construction, 1962
Approximate Population of
Area, 1961
Community Planning Area Number 1 (around Kelowna)_
Community Planning Area Number 2 (around Vernon)	
Community Planning Area Number 3 (View Royal)..
Community Planning Area Number 4 (Langford-Metchosin)	
Community Planning Area Number 5 (North Saanich)	
Community Planning Area Number 6 (around Nanaimo)	
Community Planning Area Number 7 (around Prince George)
Community Planning Area Number 8 (around Kamloops)	
Community Planning Area Number 9 (around Quesnel)
137
45
175
66
35
179
103
115
11
Community Planning Area Number 10 (Connaught Heights,
D.L. 172, next to New Westminster)
Community Planning Area Number 11 (around Alberni)	
Community Planning Area Number 12 (around Dawson Creek)
Community Planning Area Number 13 (Woodhaven near
loco)
Community Planning Area Number 14 (North of Campbell
River to south of Courtenay)	
Community Planning Area Number 15 (around Fort St. John)
Community Planning Area Number 16 (Sicamous)
1
10
119
45
6
Community Planning Area Number 17 (Fort Nelson)	
Community Planning Area Number 18  (West Bench,
Penticton)..
Community Planning Area Number 19 (Hudson Hope)	
Community Planning Area Number 20 (Crooked River, 60
miles north of Prince George)
Community Planning Area Number 21 (Chetwynd) _
Community Planning Area Number 22 (Chase)	
Others    	
1,304
460
495
85
521
1,801
825
859
189
70
7
228
28
127
151
6
32
62
$2,504,340
799,610
408,771
1,017,548
610,870
3,222,153
1,190,164
1,646,536
131,130
11,810
47,500
193,179
88,870
3,423,157
798,957
200,970
375,030
297,425
17,570
211,408
156,352
10,000
4,600
3,400
11,200
3,300
14,000
9,200
5,200
500
1,450
200
1,800
400
13,400
3,400
1,000
2,500
200
700
10
925
1,000
Totals.
1,073
7,270
$17,353,350
88,385
Total value of construction to date, $94,425,580.
A change has been made in the make-up of the building inspection staff.
There is now a Chief Building Inspector, eight full-time inspectors, and four part-
time inspectors looking after either larger areas or a number of smaller areas, instead
of the former procedure of having part-time inspectors looking after small areas.
Last January the Chief Building Inspector, in co-operation with officials from
the National Research Council, the Canadian Institute of Timber Construction, and
the Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance, held a two-week course
on advanced building construction at Parksville. It is gratifying to report that in
addition to our full-time building inspectors, twenty-nine municipalities and two
Federal agencies sent their building inspectors to the course.
Don South, M.T.P.I.C.,
Director, Regional Planning Division.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1963
1,060-163-5176
  

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