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Minister of Public Works REPORT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1961/62 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1963

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Minister of Public Works
REPORT
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
1961/62
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1963
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes.
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Public Works for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1962, in compliance with the provisions of the Public Works Act.
W. N. CHANT,
Minister of Public Works.
Office of the Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, December 17, 1962.
  INDEX
Page
.    7
Report of the Deputy Minister	
Report of the Provincial Architect 8-10
Report of the Construction and Maintenance Architect 12-13
Lecture Block, College of Education, University of British Columbia  14
Report of the Civil and Structural Engineer  16
Report of the Mechanical Engineer 18-19
Notes on Helmcken House  20
Report of the Landscaping Architect 22-23
Report of the Architect-Planner 26-27
Report of the Personnel Officer 28-30
All-electric Buildings  31
On Government Architecture  33
Report of the Supervisor of Telephones  34
Report of the Chief Inspector of Boilers and Pressure Vessels 35-36
Report of the Inspector of Electrical Energy 38-40
Report of the Chief Gas Inspector  41
Report of the Comptroller of Expenditure 42-45
Tenders Received and Contracts Awarded 46-48
" Let ancient architecture be your tutor but not your model."—John Ruskin.
On the cover is the first architectural impression of a complex of buildings which
could house the new Provincial Museum.
This sketch is purely to suggest possible mass and composition rather than specific
architectural detail. Close harmony with the main building can only be effected when
the accommodation programme has been drawn up and numerous design studies have
been made.
 " You don't have to preach honesty to men with a creative purpose. Let
a human being throw the energies of his soul into the making of something,
and the instinct of workmanship will take care of his honesty."—Walter
Lippman.
 The Honourable W. N. Chant,
Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—/ have the honour to submit for your consideration the Annual Report
for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1962.
Elsewhere in this Report will be found those of the heads of divisions. These
set out work accomplished and planned, tenders let and accepted, and Departmental
accounts.
The expectation expressed in last year's report that an upsurge of work would
be experienced has proved to be true. Our Architectural, Mechanical, Structural,
and Electrical Divisions have, between them, designed projects to the value of over
$16,000,000. This is almost double the previous record set in 1957. When it is
remembered that this has been accomplished with staff and facilities geared to much
lower production levels, the significance of this performance can be appreciated. It
speaks volumes for the morale and team spirit of the staff.
Efforts to control capital costs, as reported previously, have now been realized
and appear to have stabilized into a definite pattern. Several recent major projects
have revealed that square and cubic footage costs are lower than those usually
expected. This indicates a consciousness of the need for economical design and
finishes. Extras remain consistently less than 2 per cent of contract price. This,
coupled with close bidding and the observations of contracting firms, indicates a high
standard of plans and specifications.
Consistency in itself, however, is no virtue. We should aim for still higher
standards. This Department, as the one in a position to form a public image of
Government architecture, should be regarded as a leader. This is the objective we
have set for ourselves. With your approval we will introduce moderate, but effective,
modifications to architectural design which will achieve this purpose.
In conclusion, Sir, I would report that Departmental efficiency and productivity
is high. The staff, working under pressure, have demonstrated recognition of their
responsibility and loyalty to you and to the public. I would like to record my personal thanks to them for their efforts.
A. E. WEBB,
Deputy Minister.
 Q 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL ARCHITECT
" We may live without architecture, and worship without her, but we
cannot remember without her."-—John Ruskin ("Seven Lamps of Architecture ").
This review of the activities of the Architect's Branch is divided into two
principal categories:—
(1) Projects put out to tender during the fiscal year 1961/62; and
(2) Projects in the planning stage during this period.
CATEGORY (1)—PROJECTS PUT OUT TO TENDER
Thirteen major contracts were put out to tender during the fiscal year, the
majority of which were related to the growing vocational-school programme.
1. British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby.—Phase 2: Foundations for
two buildings were let as a prior contract as a time-saving measure.
2. Phase 2: On the foundations previously prepared, a plumbing, steam-fitting,
and sheet-metal workshop and an electrical workshop were erected. These workshops became the first major additions to the vocational school since the four original
workshops and four classrooms were erected in 1960.
3. Phase 3: Three classrooms were built to be used as required for teaching
in connection with the various workshops.
4. Phase 4: Contracts were let for three additional buildings—an aeronautics
workshop, a lath and plastering workshop, and a storage and paint shop.
5. British Columbia Vocational School, Prince George.-—-Phase 1 of this
northern vocational school consisted of an automobile workshop and a heating plant.
6. Oakalla Prison Farm.—A contract was let for new primary service and
underground electrical distribution. This work was designed partly from the aspect
of renewal, partly to get fines underground, and also to obtain more favourable
rates by going from 4,000 to 12,000 volts on the primary line.
7. New Westminster—The Woodlands School.—The remodelling of Nurses
Home No. 2 was done to provide new medical facilities on the second floor and
social services and administration offices on the ground floor.
8. Essondale—Credit Union and Telephone Exchange Building.—-These two
buildings, with an interconnected pergola entrance, were required variously to
accommodate expanded credit union facilities and to permit the conversion of telephone services from manual to automatic.
9. Essondale—Public Works Building.—Foundations and the erection of a
steel-frame building upon them were the subjects of a primary contract. This building was originally designed for the British Columbia International Trade Fair at
the Exhibition Park in Vancouver. It was subsequently dismantled and transported
to Essondale to be adapted as a Public Works stores and shops building.
10. Essondale—Industrial Therapy Building.—This building was designed to
replace the old occupational therapy building destroyed by fire in 1955. The new
building is of reinforced concrete.
11. Essondale—Accounting Building.—This one-story building was constructed for the accounting section of the Laundry and Stores Department, and is
a self-contained unit immediately adjacent to the laundry building.
12. Vancouver—College of Education, University of British Columbia.—
Phase 1: The central lecture-room block was the first contract let in the initial
development of a complex of buildings which will include an office block, a classroom block, and a gymnasium.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1961/62 Q 9
13. Victoria—Victoria College.—Sciences Building: This building will be one
of the first structures to be erected on the new Gordon Head campus. It will contain
facilities for physics, chemistry, biology, and astronomy.
CATEGORY (2)—PROJECTS IN THE PLANNING STAGE
Approximately fifteen major projects were in the planning stage during this
period, scheduled for tendering in 1962/63. A high proportion of planning time
was again devoted to vocational-school work.
1. British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby.—Phase 5: An administration building was planned as a separate entity. Until the present time, limited
administrative facilities had been obtained in one of the Phase 1 classrooms. On
completion of the new building, the former quarters will be changed back to classroom function.
2. British Columbia Vocational School, Nanaimo.—To provide much-needed
accommodation and improved facilities, an administration and classroom building
and a cafeteria were planned.
3. British Columbia Vocational School, Prince George.—In the development
of Phase 2 of planning, an administration and classroom building and a welding and
millwright workshop were designed.
4. British Columbia Vocational School, Nelson.—A crash programme was
initiated to provide as many buildings for this new school as were required at one
time. In this phase of activity the following buildings were planned: An administration and classroom building, an automotive and heavy-duty workshop, a welding
and millwright workshop, and a boiler-house.
5. British Columbia Vocational School, Kelowna.—A similar speeded-up programme got under way to provide the majority of all buildings for this new vocational development. They comprised an auto-mechanics and heavy-duty workshop,
a welding and auto-body workshop, a farm-machinery and building-construction
workshop, an administration and classroom building, and a boiler-house. The three
large workshops, separate from each other, are, however, all under one roof.
6. British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby.—Two buildings being
planned by this Department for the institute are the cafeteria and chef-training block,
and the boiler-house and heat engine-machine shop.
7. Vancouver—College of Education, University of British Columbia.—Phase
2 comprised the planning of the office block, the classroom block, and the gymnasium.   Completion of the first phase occurred in midsummer of 1962.
8. Abbotsford—Animal Pathology Laboratory.—This modern laboratory
building was planned to replace the hut facilities at the University of British
Columbia.
9. Fort Nelson—New Government Offices.—This building was planned principally for the Department of Finance, Forest Service, and the Department of Recreation and Conservation to remove existing Government departments from high-rental
accommodation. A residence for the Government Sub-Agent has also been planned
on the site.
10. Tranquille—New Milking-parlour.—Due to existing poor facilities, the
labour required in connection with the dairy-herd operation resulted in far too high
production costs. The new facility will streamline operations in a much more
efficient manner.
11. Essondale—Centre Lawn Building.—New fire exits and stairs to comply
with the latest Fire Marshal's requirements.
 Q 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
12. Port Coquitlam—Valleyview Buildings Nos. 1, 2, and 3.—General renovations to bring the buildings up to acceptable standards and to provide an additional 50 beds.
13. Essondale.—Alterations and additions to West Lawn kitchens and dining-
room to improve the standard of existing facilities.
14. Essondale—New Medical Clinic.—The purpose of this building is to
provide the most up-to-date medical and surgical treatment for the whole institution
with extensive diagnostic and laboratory areas, and the facility for treating up to
100 out-patients a day.
15. Vancouver—Jericho Hill School.—Planning of three buildings commenced
late in the fiscal year, comprising a dormitory building, a classroom building, and
an industrial arts and home economics wing off the classroom building.
Perhaps the greatest single achievement in the fiscal year under review was the
completion of the new Victoria Law Courts approximately five months ahead of
schedule.
The first occupants of the building were the Royal Canadian Mounted Police,
who moved into their new quarters on December 18, 1961.
The Law Courts were accepted as substantially complete from the contractors
on February 1, 1962, and two weeks later occupancy got under way on the lower
main floor with the Companies and Brokers Offices and the Official Committee
moving in.
Prior moving of the vast amount of documents belonging to the Land Registry
into the two large vault areas enabled the Registry to open its doors to the public
on February 19, 1962. Only the officials of the Land Registry Office and the
Department of Public Works can appreciate the organization that had to be achieved
to move the tremendous quantity of material from Bastion Square to its designated
areas in the new Courthouse.
On February 26th the Court Registry, the County and Supreme Courts were
ready for their respective dealings with the public, and the first County Court
sessions were held shortly thereafter.
During the fiscal year 1961/62 twenty-three projects for senior citizens' housing were reviewed for the Provincial Secretary's Department, and, where necessary,
recommendations were suggested for amendments to the related drawings and
specifications.
In this same period three projects—a church, a fraternity house, and a residence—were reviewed. These projects were for construction on University Endowment Land property at the University of British Columbia, and, as such, recommendations were made to the Department of Lands.
To cope with the stepped-up vocational-school programme, which alone necessitated the preparation of contract drawings for approximately eighteen major buildings, staff was augmented by a net increase of six.
Once again it is a pleasure to mention the loyalty and dependable efficiency of
all staff.
W. R. H. Curtis, M.R.A.I.C, A.R.I.B.A., A.N.Z.I.A.,
Provincial A rchitect.
 British Columbia Vocational School, Kelowna. This photograph shows the
levelled and pre-loaded site of the vocational school at Kelowna. It was presented by
the City of Kelowna to the Province of British Columbia. Construction is now
under way.
^*v kir    J° &.S*    ^.A-*«,V^* Vr
■    ,    . ..
British Columbia Vocational School, Nelson. Officials of the City of Nelson
and the Department of Public Works examine the site at Nelson. It is located among
beautiful surroundings and was presented by the City of Nelson to the Province of
British Columbia.    Construction is under way.
 Q 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE
ARCHITECT
" The secret of happiness is not in doing what one likes, but in liking
what one has to do."—J. M. Barrie.
This Division, in its second year of operation, has had immeasurable success
in its dual role of supervision of new construction and maintenance of existing
Government buildings.
Problems, of which there have been many, have been overcome and solved
through the complete co-operation of all divisions concerned, and particularly
through the efforts of our staff of project inspectors.
This fiscal year has proved to be a very busy one, and under the heading of
" Construction," project inspectors have been appointed to and supervision given
to the following capital construction projects designed by the Design Division of the
Department of Public Works:—
(1) Victoria Law Courts (Contract No. 3).
(2) College of Education, University of British Columbia.
(3) Burnaby Vocational School—Phases 2, 3, and 4.
(4) Department of Highways laboratory, Burnaby.
(5) Telephone Exchange and Credit Union Building, Essondale.
(6) Underground electrical supply, Oakalla Prison Farm.
(7) Phase 1, Prince George Vocational Training School.
(8) Accounting Building, Essondale.
(9) Public Works Building, Essondale.
(10) Industrial Therapy Building, Essondale.
We anticipate this high rate of new construction will continue into the next fiscal
year.
In addition to the above, this Division also prepared sketches, working drawings, and specifications for the following capital projects, which were subsequently
supervised by this Division's personnel during construction:—
(1) 800 Cassiar Street, conversion to offices of the old Girls' Industrial School
for the Departments of Social Welfare and Agriculture.
(2) Duplex accommodation for ferry personnel at Darrell Bay.
(3) New Agency residence at Prince Rupert.
(4) Renovations to Social Welfare offices at Dawson Creek.
The above projects have been carried through to completion, and the offices
provided at 800 Cassiar Street have brought all divisions of the Department of Social
Welfare in the Vancouver area into one building, thereby releasing office space on
Burrard Street to other departments of the Government.
Frequent inspections have been made in the field, and as a result some 100
specifications have been written and contracts let for various types of maintenance
work.
The standards which this Division attempts to maintain are quite difficult in
the older buildings in the Province, and it is respectfully recommended that some
consideration be given in the near future to the replacement of this type of building,
particularly residences.
In various locations throughout the Province this Division maintains Government premises that are occupied by R.C.M.P. detachments, but gradually, as the
Federal Government builds its own quarters, these are becoming fewer. Those
detachment quarters under control of this Department have been visited and various
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1961/62
Q 13
maintenance work carried out. Fullest co-operation has been received throughout
the year from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
Another phase of maintenance now confronting this Division is in the deterioration of masonry-finished buildings, such as older Courthouses, due to age and the
elements. As funds permit, a programme of masonry restoration and waterproofing
is being effected. Buildings so restored are the Crease Clinic at Essondale and the
Courthouses at Nelson and Grand Forks.
Overcrowding in Government buildings is becoming an ever-increasing problem
for this Division, and through remodelling and alterations to existing buildings we
have tried to alleviate these situations for the various departments of Government.
Unfortunately it has now reached the point where little, or no more, space exists in
the majority of Government buildings, and it appears some will need to be enlarged.
Once again a full programme of maintenance work has been carried out by the
Superintendents of Works in their respective areas. Maintenance staffs have been
used to their fullest, wherever possible, in carrying out alterations in existing buildings, and although this does save the Department time and funds, the volume of
general maintenance work required limits the use of the staff in alterations of an
extensive nature.
Throughout the year, close liaison with the Architectural Design, Structural,
Mechanical, and Electrical Design Divisions has been maintained, and frequent
conferences have proved invaluable to all concerned.
May I close this report by thanking all who, by their splendid co-operation,
have helped to make this fiscal year the success it has been. More particularly,
I would like to thank all Government Agents and Department of Highways officials
who act on our behalf in so many locations throughout the Province.
E. C. Clarkson, M.R.A.I.C, A.I.A.A.,
Senior Construction and Maintenance Architect.
' Maybe if we painted it."
 Q  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
LECTURE BLOCK, COLLEGE OF  EDUCATION,  U.B.C.
The Lecture Block of the College of Education, which was opened on October
4, 1962, by the Minister of Education, the Honourable Leslie Peterson, is but the
first phase of a complex which will, upon completion, provide all the requirements
for the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia.
The guiding thought in the design of the Lecture Block has been to create a
building academic yet functional in spirit providing an atmosphere of spaciousness
and grace in keeping with the vital influence that it will have upon the future of the
Province. A reinforced-concrete frame clothed in light-grey glazed brick and blue
porcelain enamel panels imparts a sparkling exterior which blends harmoniously
with its surroundings, whilst at the same time proclaiming its own individuality and
character.
The approach to the building is from the main mall across a paved and terraced
piazza into which projects the simple outline of the auditorium, a strong emphasis
of light-grey brickwork contrasting effectively with the more delicate treatment of
the main building beyond. Large areas of planting and a simple but effective
fountain give colour and movement to the paved forecourt, whilst pointing the way
to the interior of the Lecture Block.
Basically T-shaped in plan at ground-floor level and rectangular above, the
building is arranged on four floors, providing classroom and lecture space for more
than 900 students. The ground floor contains a large student lounge, auditorium,
and main concourse, together with administrative offices. In the basement a cheerful cafeteria is operated by the Canadian Institute for the Blind for the benefit of
students. Lecture and class rooms account for the second floor, whilst the third
accommodates a large library complete with study areas and reading-rooms. On this
floor are gathered together copies of all the textbooks in use throughout the Province,
besides a great deal of other resource material required in the training of future
teachers.
Internally a sense of cheerfulness and fight have been achieved by the use of
clear and vital colours, together with furniture and fittings of fine design. Hardwood
panelling has been skilfully used to emphasize certain areas of particular importance,
and an exceedingly high standard of workmanship and finish throughout the building
results in an interior of simple eloquence in keeping with its purpose and concept.
Complete air-conditioning ensures a comfortable working environment, and careful
attention to acoustic design has resulted in the highly efficient sound performance
of the auditorium and lecture-rooms.
The Lecture Block forms the nucleus of the College of Education. Future
extensions will include a Classroom Block to the north to accommodate 1,200
students and a Faculty Office Wing to the south, six stories in height. A physical
education area is planned to the south of the Faculty offices, which will consist of
gymnasia and specialized lecture and class rooms. Finally the addition of an
industrial arts workshop will bring the entire complex to completion.
J. D. Hooper,
Architect.
 (Upper) forecourt, fountain, and entrance and (lower) students' lounge,
College of Education, University of British Columbia.
 Q 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CIVIL AND STRUCTURAL ENGINEER
"An arch never sleeps."—James Ferguson ("History of Indian and
Eastern Architecture ").
The past year was, undoubtedly, the busiest that this Division has experienced.
Our major work was on the design of vocational schools in Nelson, Kelowna, Prince
George, Burnaby, and Nanaimo, followed by the Sciences Building at Victoria
College.
Complex soil conditions on a few of our larger jobs made thorough studies
essential. The Testing Division of the Department of Highways undertook much
of this exploratory work, and our thanks go to it for the thorough and efficient manner in which this was done. The Sciences Building at Victoria College was founded
for the most part on Franki-type piles. This pile is formed by driving a steel tube,
open at the ends, and filled with a foot or so of gravel to act as a driving-shoe. The
tube is driven down until it reaches acceptable bearing, determined by the number
of blows and the set. Very dry concrete is then placed in the tube, compacted by
the driving-hammer, and the tube slowly raised up. On completion, the pile consists of highly compacted dense concrete from the ground level down to solid bearing.
This type of pile was also used on the Administration Building at the Nelson Vocational School.
The vocational-school site at Kelowna presented another type of soils problem
—namely, the founding of buildings on a compressible soil with no solid bearing at
an economic depth for the use of piles. The building is located in an alluvial area
of an old stream-bed which has long since moved its location. In order to minimize
settlement, the ground under all buildings was pre-loaded with approximately 6 to 8
feet of pit-run gravel. This pre-load remained undisturbed for approximately four
months. Settlement readings were taken and the settlement plotted against time.
The graphs indicated that most of the settlement had ceased and, subject to any
radical change in ground-water conditions, settlement should be reduced to minimum.
The site at Nelson, in common with most of the city, has quite pronounced
slopes, and a considerable amount of earthwork was required in order to fit large
buildings on it. The site presents a commanding view of the city, and when completed the school should prove a credit to all who worked on its inception and
planning.
The photogrammetric mapping of the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale,
was completed, and the Department now has a complete and up-to-date map of the
entire complex for the first time. This is the first resurvey of the institution since
1933.
The Topographic Division of the Lands Service of the Department of Lands,
Forests, and Water Resources compiled the map from aerial photos taken by the
Air Division.
Mr. W. R. Meadows, B.C.L.S., P.Eng., Provincial Superintendent of Works,
has searched the records of the Land Titles Office for the legal description of all
properties in the complex, and the lot boundaries will be added to the topographical
map by the Topographic Division. It is interesting to note that this search involved
the examination of notes made by the Royal Engineers in 1876 during a survey
required for a Crown grant of what is now Colony Farm to Mr. Ford, who was a
son-in-law of Colonel Moody, R.E., after whom Port Moody is named.
This Division has been engaged on numerous problems connected with civil
defence, mainly in connection with fallout protection. A survey has been made of
all Government buildings, and the fallout protection, if any, tabulated, together with
the approximate areas available. This service has been extended to certain municipalities at the request of the Provincial Civil Defence Co-ordinator.
J. R. Simpson, B.Sc, A.M.I.C.E., P.Eng., Dip.Pub.Admin.,
Senior Structural Engineer.
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Two views of the School for the Blind and the Deaf (Jericho Hill) show
(upper) the Braille Unit, erected 1955, and (lower) the swimming-pool in the Recreation Unit. Two more major buildings—a dormitory block and a classroom block—
are being currently planned.
 Q 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE MECHANICAL ENGINEER
" Men who love building are their own undoers and need no other
enemies."—Plutarch ("Lives—Marcus Crassno ").
The year's activity of this Division can be characterized by the number of interesting and diversified projects handled. Though we have participated in most of
the capital projects handled by the Department and mentioned elsewhere in this
year's Report, there are several that are outstanding and worthy of mention.
Incinerator, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.—This project was handled
directly by this Division. Located adjacent to the Colony Farm boiler-house, the
incinerator is unique. It is provided with a travelling chain grate for burning all
manner of garbage quickly, and it is coupled with a waste heat-boiler to provide
steam for heating purposes to the Colony Farm. It is expected we shall be able to
provide up to 75 per cent of the steam requirements of the Colony Farm from
garbage. The variation in the percentage depends upon the moisture content of the
refuse received, all of which will be reduced to clinker. This incinerator replaced
an old and very inadequate hand-fired one which has been considered a health
hazard and was very unsightly.
Ventilation of the China Bar Tunnel, Trans-Canada Highway.—This Division
designed the ventilation for the 2,050-foot vehicular tunnel on the Trans-Canada
Highway near Boston Bar. Designing the ventilation in this tunnel is unusual in
that there was to be two-way traffic in the same bore at the same time. Little or no
applicable data were available, so basic principles had to be applied.
The design is based upon a " chimney effect" for natural ventilation. However, there are two periods of the year—one during the spring and the other during
the fall—in which natural ventilation would possibly fail on account of the air temperature being so close to that of the rock.
Since the duration of these periods is unpredictable, it was decided to put in
four large propellor fans, each handling 75,000 cubic feet of air a minute. These
fans are controlled by a sensing apparatus which starts them when the concentration
of carbon monoxide exceeds 200 parts per million. They are cut off when the air
in the tunnel is purer than this figure.
Vocational School, Burnaby.—The Burnaby Vocational School has, besides the
usual classroom areas, a number of large open shop areas where the roof is quite
high. These areas are for teaching, and extraneous noise would make talking difficult and also distract the pupils. The usual unit heaters having the necessary
" throw " of warm air are noisy and tend to create draughts. A radiant floor panel
was considered and, although much more expensive, would fulfil the necessary heating requirements. The Division then investigated the use of gas-fired infra-red
heating-panels. These panels fulfil all the requirements and are very little more
expensive than unit heaters. By judicious overhead spacing the whole of the shop
floor is covered by infra-red heating. Infra-red heat rays do not heat the air. When
they land on solid objects, they are converted to heat energy. The air is heated by
the warm objects giving off their heat into rising convection currents. The warming
sensation is pleasant, very similar to that of the sun.
MAINTENANCE OF MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT
Obsolescence of mechanical equipment and changes in building use have kept
this part of the Division busy. Although we emphasize preventive maintenance,
there comes a time when it is quite uneconomic to further repair equipment and
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1961/62
Q  19
replace parts.   It is actually cheaper to buy new equipment and divert man-hours of
work to " middle life " equipment to get maximum use from it.
Operation of swimming-pools continue to take many maintenance man-hours
to keep them clean and sanitary.
As noted in previous Reports, requests for summer cooling in buildings continue. Several installations were made this year—Land Registry Office at Kamloops, Health and Welfare Building at Kamloops, and among them the Courthouse
at Lillooet.
Total maintenance money has been held at the same level for several years,
although new buildings are being opened continuously. Every expenditure is carefully examined.
We would like to take this opportunity to thank the Superintendents, the Chief
Engineers, and their staffs for the co-operation shown to this Division during the
year.
W. E. Mills, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Dip.Pub.Admin.,
Senior Mechanical Engineer.
' I guess it was a wrinkle in the blue-print.'
 Q 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
NOTES ON  HELMCKEN  HOUSE
" The people are the city."—Coriolamis.
With the indication of the exigency for considerable conservation work needed to Helmcken
House, one of British Columbia's most valuable ancient monuments, it is of interest to recall
some of the oft-repeated writings on the subject of this unique building.
Named after its owner, designer, and builder, Dr. J. S. Helmcken (or Helmiken, vide
Reminiscences, Vol. 1, page 9), as far as is known the house is the oldest residence in the Province which has survived in anything like its original conception and contains a wealth of internal
decor, furniture, and trappings used during a span of nearly seventy years in the one home.
During later years other pioneer exhibits have been assembled to round out the total exhibit.
The original three-roomed home of the young doctor and his bride is the most easterly
single-story section of the building. As was the fashion in those days, families grew as fast as
the years, and the two additions, clearly marked in the building's outline, were added in quick
succession, but unfortunately no firm records of dates have been discovered. A good record of
the building of his log home in 1852 is to be found in Dr. Helmcken's Reminiscences (Vol. 3.
page 55), which clearly indicates the conditions pertaining to the construction of a building
during the early days of Fort Victoria:—
" Mr. Douglas gave me an acre of land, wanted me to live on it, there would be mutual aid
in case of trouble at any time from Indians—besides there were no servants save Indians—and
they never remained long and would not live in houses. I ought never to have built there, and
soon found it very inconvenient away from my office in the fort. The piece of land was very
rough and cost a good deal of time and money to clear, this being done by Indians from the
North.
" To build a house now is an easy matter—but very different then. How we studied over
the design, i.e. interior divisions of the building 30' x 25'. There were no contractors, everything
had to be done piecemeal. There being no lumber, it had to be built with logs squared on two
sides and six inches thick. The sills and uprights were very heavy and morticed—the supports
of the floors likewise—the logs had to be let into groves in the uprights.
" The timber had to be taken from the forest, squared there and brought down by water.
When brought to the beach (this was the Inner Harbour), I had big oxen of the Company haul
it to the site.
" Other Canadians took the job of putting the building up as far as the logs were concerned
—then the shingling—the Indians at this time made shingles—all split. (Note, the natives were
not familiar with splitting cedar lath, so they were a little thin and too springy.)
" Lumber very scarce and a favour to get any at forty dollars per thousand in the rough—
so it all had to be planed and grooved by hand. Kanakas (Hawaiian Islanders) cut most of it
in a saw pit so it was not very regular in thickness. I wrote to Blenkinsop at Fort Rupert for
plank—he sent me some, and also some yellow cedar, from which the doors, windows and
skirting boards were made.
" It so happened Halcro, a company crofter, was here—he did carpentering, plastering and
everything connected with a house. Fortunately, I had bought the two lots next to mine—
a house stood on it, and here Halcro worked, and I think lived.
Then to get lime—this came from Langfords and McKenzies, who burned lime occasionally
for their own use.
" The expense and annoyance was very great, in fact the house cost more than treble of
a good house now.
" Indians dug a couple of wells and lined one with boulders! The boulders left very little
well—they were too large and heavy. A well was an important thing then. Most of the water
in the summer time had to be drawn in carts from a spring at a place called Spring Ridge."
One of the interesting points about this colonial house, to the younger generations, should
be the scale—people were shorter 100 years ago—ceilings were lower, heads can be cracked in
doorways, and those delicate china door-knobs of yesteryear appear below our .grasp.
Some of the window glazing is original and, like some inferior glass today, is not too clear.
It must be remembered, however, that everything was hand-forged a century ago, and techniques
were not so advanced as we know them. The cast-iron fireplaces are miniature in area and
consumption; many a body must have huddled over these for warmth. There were no planing-
machines in those days either, so that once the flooring was dowelled in position, each plank,
being at least 8 inches in width, had to be levelled with those adjoining, so by modern machine
standards the general effect is not very uniform.
One realizes how really good B.C. timber is when going through this " English cottage,"
and how thoroughly British the structure is, even down to the nails and tools that made it—
everything was manufactured in the Old Country and shipped in by clipper via Cape Horn!
Of course, there was no British Columbia in those days for Vancouver Island was a Crown
Colony and the Mainland was known as New Caledonia. It was indeed a wise move on the part
of the Government to buy the property after the decease of Dr. Helmcken's youngest daughter
in 1939 and open the building as a colonial museum in the spring of 1941.
The raising and replacing of the structure on a non-corrosive base, in itself a very intricate
and delicate twentieth-century operation, should ensure that the life of this remarkable example
of a previous era will be preserved for many generations to come.
W.   D.  LOUGHER-GOODEY,
Architect-Planner.
 ■^xk
wEmm
■p
;■;       • u"-;:
tifsiblft
Helmcken House as it appeared during Dr. Hemcken's time.
I.      '"
Helmcken House as it appears today, 1962.
 Q 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT
" Where site and structure meet we may well ' structure' the site and
at the same time ' wash ' the landscape over and into the structure."—Hideo
Saski.
Art is the science of feeling, science is the art of knowing, we must know to be
able to do, but we must feel to know what to do.
Designing is the culmination of thought and knowledge. It is a complex and
intricate task. It comprises the integration of technological, social, and economic
requirements. The designer must see the periphery as well as the core, the immediate and the ultimate. To these facts he must anchor his special job in a complex
world. New vision has dissolved the ancient boundary between architecture and
landscape architecture, and now the garden scope flows into and over the structure,
through loggias and areas of clear glass and over roofs and canopied terraces. The
building reaches out into the surrounding gardens with walls and terraced enclosures
that continue its rhythms and share its grace.
Therefore, landscape architecture today is concerned with the problems of
simple and appropriate forms which display design and spaciousness yet comply
with the three great patterns which dominate the environment of man—the pattern
of climate, the pattern of vegetation, and the pattern of soil.
On these we must lay a fourth pattern, that of human culture.
The general concept of work was developed in this vein is connection with the
production of the entrance terrace to the College of Education at the University of
British Columbia in Vancouver. On this project the piece de resistance was a fountain in stone and tile with a bronze motif emblematic of the illuminating qualities
of education.
This general grounds plan should, when completed, prove one of the outstanding Government works.
This Division during 1962 has been actively concerned with the ground planing of Provincial vocational schools throughout the Province. Detail drawings and
specifications for the properties at Prince George and Nelson are well developed.
Those dealing with Kelowna and Burnaby are well advanced.
The satisfactory completion of the Fountain Garden within the Legislative
Precinct brought to a conclusion a year of intensive work by Public Works crews in
charge of the construction of the motif.
The development of the east area of the grounds at Government House, Victoria, as the start of an arboretum for species of rhododendron and allied genera
has been successfully accomplished. This work has two aims: first, to improve
the grounds of this property, which has recently become a tourist attraction, and,
secondly, to provide an instruction ground in ericaceous and allied genera.
Remedial treatment and surgery have been required on many of the trees on
our properties which are suffering from deterioration and age. This work has been
successful in preserving some very good specimens. The fact that we have trained
members of our staff to successfully handle all but the most difficult cases is of
interest.
Our Grounds Superintendent, who is a competent horticulturist, has been
responsible for a very noticeable improvement in both the management and appearance of the grounds generally, but especially the quality of our various lawn areas.
He has, like many others in the West, been handicapped by the lack of trained personnel for both landscape development and maintenance problems. The training of
personnel has not kept pace in past years with the growth of modern requirements.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1961/62
Q 23
The writer believes the answer to this problem is indicated in the establishhment
of a vocational training programme similar to that in Eastern Canada, to serve both
governmental and commercial enterprise.
During 1962 the development of mechanization has continued, and the Victoria
area is well serviced with up-to-date motorized units highly suitable to the work
required. We are able thereby to make more satisfactory use of such skilled men
as are available and economically cope with the problems of an ever-expanding area
of maintenance.
R. H. Savery, M.A.I.L.A.,
Landscape Architect.
I SAID    FnuNTAj,N
NOT    MOUNTAUT?
  r'*'/)'','   ■,
/      y~.
>e Precinct.
 Q 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE ARCHITECT-PLANNER
" Make your year's plans in the spring, and your day's plans early in the
morning."—H. H. Hart (700 Chinese Proverbs, No. 87).
While analysis and rationalization of information will have long-term value,
immediate interest in this work will be stimulated if it is related to visible results on
the ground.
Work on Government properties' records is proceeding and has proven of value
in assistance required following the Government assessments roll order coming into
force in 1963.
Instituted by this Division three years ago, surveys of some twelve large
properties have now been completed, including a monumental work of the Essondale mental institution and Colony Farm. This is a long and tedious programme,
with much leeway to be made up.
Land-use assembly plans are proceeding on large Crown land holdings such
as Burnaby.
Policy briefs have been prepared concerning urban planning, mental-hospital
units, forward planning at Government House, surface parking and parking buildings, siting of Government buildings in regional planning, James Bay traffic problems.
A regional committee is considering and preparing a report on the " larger
canvass " of planning implications in the Capital Region, embracing urban renewal,
the Inner Harbour, Precinct areas, open spaces, traffic problems, and tourism.
Continuing projects are progressing at Jericho Hill School and at Oliver, where
architectural plans are now under way. Through co-ordination with other departments, works are continuing at Essondale, public buildings in smaller communities,
consolidation of properties in built-up areas, uniform traffic signs for Government
properties throughout the Province.
The Department was represented at national and regional town planning conferences held during the year.
It can be argued that every major development by senior governments should
be based on the highest regard for up-to-date and forward-looking planning principles. These latter are much in evidence with the completion and occupation of
the Law Courts, the first section of the Cathedral Hill Precinct, an integrated land-
assembly scheme of over 9 acres. Favourable comment from press, public, and
pulpit bears witness to the factual sensibility of policy decisions made in the preceding years to construction, and is in sharp contrast to certain major works in the city
area by other developers.
This formed a highlight in a year that has seen the momentum of large-scale
development remain in top gear despite austerity budgeting. Vocational schools
are proceeding at high speed, based on master plans produced in preceding years,
with minor changes consequent upon more accurate information being available.
Following Cabinet decision being handed down with respect to the perimeter
of the Legislative Precinct, and having due regard to the creation of the fine centennial fountain, the aesthetic value of the south aspect of the Connaught Library,
and the growing interest in the " rear " of the Buildings, a land-development scheme
was produced for the central third of the Precinct area, including tentative areas for
a Provincial Museum and ancillaries, together with office wings and parking areas.
This esquisse has been well received, and work continues, in the light of the foregoing, on adjacent areas forming the whole contemplated Precinct. An interdivi-
sional Precinct Committee has now been appointed, with wide powers to co-opt and
direct, where considered necessary, any help to forward the completion of this most
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1961/62
Q 27
important work. This is a significant step in the direction of bringing an end to
laissez-faire planning in the very heart of the Provincial capital. The vast majority
of tourists see our area first and last; the impression they take away depends on how
this Precinct appears, not only on paper, but also in actual fact. A topographic
survey is now under way with the kind co-operation of the Lands Department, and
will be completed early in the new year.
" City development, cannot be left forever to individual enterprise; it
must be placed (as in Holland) under competent regional and local authorities, who are empowered to purchase land, to design and operate new communities—or who may delegate these functions to> organizations that will
work under their direction."—Lewis Munford (T.P.I, gold medalist 1957,
American Sociologist, Bernis Professor, M.I.T.).
W. D. Lougher-Goodey, M.T.P.I., M.T.P.I.C,
F.I.L.A., A.I.Struct.E.,
A rchitect-Planner.
' Well, my dears, and how do you like Victoria? '
 Q 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE PERSONNEL OFFICER
In common with the policy followed over the past three years, this year's
Report will introduce staff members of the Department of Public Works.
On the opposite page will be found photographs of engineers and draughtsmen
of the Mechanical Division.
During the past few years we have observed staff totals steadily increasing.
This is due, primarily, to an increased architectural design programme, which has
accounted for the design and construction of a large number of Government buildings. In the Vancouver area the number of Government buildings maintained in
1959 amounted to seventy-eight; today there are 136. At Victoria in 1959 there
were fifty buildings; today we have eighty-three. The increase in Government buildings naturally does not apply only to the Vancouver-Victoria areas. It is common
throughout the Province. The volume of work carried out by the Safety Inspection
Divisions has also increased sharply. This is due largely to growing industrial
development. It is worth emphasizing that although work load has increased over
25 per cent since 1959, staff totals have not increased accordingly. This is due
largely to
(a) constant checks being carried out to determine the absolute necessity of
additional staff;
(b) over-specialization not being permitted, unless such specialization can be
proven to be full time and advantageous to efficiency and economy;
(c) organizational changes which permit a great flexibility and a utilization
of staff;
(d) allowing some phases of maintenance work to be carried out by contract.
The seasonal peak period—June 30, 1961—involved the employment of 901
employees.   Some of these were students, and with their return to school this total
was reduced to 857 by December 31, 1961.
APPOINTMENTS
Through competition the following employees were promoted:—
(1) W. R. Meadows—Provincial Superintendent of Works.
(2) D. Murray—Superintendent of Works, Essondale.
(3) E. W. Mabbett—Assistant Superintendent of Works, Essondale.
(4) J. L. Jamieson—Carpenter Foreman and Overseer, Tranquille.
(5) J. F. Gillis—Assistant Chief Engineer, The Woodlands School.
(6) G. M. Anderson—Mechanical Maintenance Foreman, Essondale.
(7) R. W. Morgan—Assistant Chief Engineer, Boys' Industrial School, Bran-
nen Lake.
(8) In addition there were other promotions too numerous to mention in the
space allotted.
ORGANIZATION
The major organizational change during this year was the transferring and centralizing of The Woodlands School maintenance staff to Essondale. It has been the
Department's contention that a highly mobilized maintenance staff centred at one
 G. S. Birks,
Draughtsman.
H. B. C. Jobsis,
Draughtsman.
D. G. Strang, B.A.Sc,
Mechanical Engineer.
J. Low, P.Eng., B.A.Sc,
Mechanical Engineer.
P. J. Hart,
Draughtsman.
H. F. Kent,
Draughtsman.
E, I. Mackie, B.A.Sc,
Mechanical Engineer.
L
 Q 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
location is more effective and economical than smaller groups of tradesmen stationed
at individual buildings. The combining of the Essondale and Woodlands School
maintenance staff was achieved with a minimum of criticism and unrest. Now that
conditions have been settled and understood, a faster and better standard of maintenance work is taking place.
TRAINING
The second Maintenance and Operations Conference of this Department was
held at Parksville on April 5, 6, and 7, 1961. This informal assembly brought
together many of the Department's officials with various skills, responsibilities, and
spheres of influence. The pooling of problems, solutions, procedures, and methods
helped to establish a clear, concise line of communication. Most of those present
contributed and gained considerably from this workshop-type meeting, and it proved
there is no better method than direct discussion to provide clear understanding.
These conferences add considerably to morale and provide the basis for teamwork
within the Department.
This Department has been following a plan of sending its superintendents,
supervisors, and foremen to the Management Training Course being offered by the
British Columbia Department of Education. These conference programmes provide
a practical application of administrative fundamentals and techniques and give a
fuller meaning of responsibility to those in the middle strata of management.
In one of the previous Annual Reports some historical data were provided on
the evolution of personnel administration within departments, and it is not out of
place to again include this information on what we consider a most important phase
of administration.
SOME HISTORICAL DATA
The evolution of personnel administration has had its impact on the Department, gradually strengthening and being useful to all employees from the top executive to the junior staff member. In 1947 the stage was set for advancement in this
field by the preparation and publication of the Report on Outside Service. This
pioneering in job descriptions and analysis was prepared in conjunction with the
Civil Service Commission and senior staff officials of the Department. It laid the
groundwork for gradual refinement of line authority, carefully described in detail
by job descriptions available to all members of the staff. We can recall the rather
confused approach employees had to the Personnel Office at this time. Personnel
administration was supervised by the Accounting Branch, and because it was not
possible to specialize, it took a rather nebulous form. Through a gradual process,
by trial and error, by technical advice from the Civil Service Commission, and the
decision in 1959 to have a separate Personnel Branch, we have proceeded to a
dynamic, factual approach to our problems. The Executive is now provided with
correct technical information, and the Personnel Office is always available to any
employee who wishes to discuss problems of employment as they affect her or him.
This office gratefully acknowledges the help, co-operation, and courtesy given
by the other divisions of this Department, Civil Service Commission, and the Superannuation Branch.
W. R. Henderson,
Personnel Officer.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1961/62 Q 31
ALL-ELECTRIC  BUILDINGS
The very large hydro-electric power potential of British Columbia and the
developments presently under way provoke thoughts of low-cost electric power
being available in this Province.
The all-electric building, recently considered but an interesting possibility, now
appears on the verge of becoming economical fact. The Department of Public
Works believes it to be so and is actively studying, with the help of British Columbia
Hydro and Power Authority engineers, the mechanics of making the theory become
fact.
What is meant by an all-electric building is one in which electrical energy is
used for heating, air-conditioning, ventilation, fighting, and, of course, other power
needs. While most of these needs have been met already by electricity, the principle
of using it for full-scale heating is a new departure.
Heating by electrical energy has many advantages over other means. Capital
costs for installation of wiring and radiation are lower than those for extensive steam
or hot-water pipes. Installation is easier. It is much more flexible in that individual areas, or zones, can be adjusted to suit the requirements of those persons
using them. It is very clean, safe, easy to control, and convenient. It can be made,
by means of timing and sensing devices, as fully automatic as any form of fuel is ever
likely to be.   It requires very little attention, and maintenance costs are low.
While it has many basic principles in common with orthodox fuels, there are
some important differences. When heat energy is delivered by wire, no combustion
process is necessary. The heat output of an electric source is constant and unaffected
by the temperature of the surrounding air.
All heat is a form of energy. Other fuels hold stored energy in chemical form
which is released by combustion, and not all of the heat can be delivered to the place
where it is needed. Electrical energy is converted to heat at the place where it is
needed by passing the current through a resistive material. One hundred per cent
of the energy applied to the resistor is transformed into heat.
There are other means of using electric power to supply heat. For example,
an electric furnace which heats a standard form of hot-water heat distribution. The
engineering studies presently under way will include all means.
In summary it may be said that the advantages of electric heating heavily outweigh the disadvantages, if there are any. The big question is: Can power be
delivered at a price comparable with the other convenience fuels?
  ■ -    .rt..   rt... -.v.--. .,-   -       ..-   -'-    	
PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1961/62 Q 33
ON GOVERNMENT ARCHITECTURE
" Each building should have three virtues.    Commodity, firmness and
delight."—Classic dictum of Vitruvius.
All too frequently it has been said, quite often with justice, that government
architecture lacks imagination and contributes little to the architectural harmony
of its surroundings. Statements of this kind are frequently followed by assertions
that this is because of a low standard of architectural ability on the part of government architects.   At this point, objectivity and fairness break down.
The architect employed by government is subjected to influences and pressures
not experienced to the same extent by the private architect. While much could be
written on this aspect, for the purposes of this article we can isolate and consider
one main factor. It is to what extent are the taxpayers prepared to subscribe to,
and pay for, the last of Vitruvius dicta—" delight "?
In the Department of Public Works of this Province we believe that the taxpayer is prepared to pay providing he is convinced that reasonable and sensible
practices are being followed. The interpretation of " reasonable and sensible " is
naturally open to a wide range of personal opinion, and it is here that extreme care
must be exercised.
Specifically our buildings should stand in the community as a symbol of the
legislative authority. As such they should have a dignity suitable to their position,
but this dignity should not be confused with the neo-classicism which has tended
to become the standard for government buildings. We believe that a government
building, as any other, should reflect the technology, the freedom, and the spirit of
this age. They should incorporate some of the work of our sculptors and artists;
they should be cleverly landscaped.
Our buildings will be affected by many factors, all of which will be reflected
in their design. Victoria, with its mild climate and its character, requires different
treatment to, say, the mountainous, lumbered regions of the Kootenays with their
great range of temperature and humidity. No rigid standard is thus possible, nor
is it desirable.
We believe that our Department can, and must, achieve something rather more
difficult than a high standard of building. We must be an organization that can
develop ideas, can investigate and experiment with new techniques. Above all,
we must improve our own programmes by studying and analysing the needs of the
people we serve.   We must lead, not follow.
This can be stated as our goal!
In commenting on the work of the architect's department of the London
County Council, J. M. Richards (author, Introduction to Modern Architecture)
says:—
" They have shown how sensitively the new and economical materials can be
handled, they have led the way in design, they have been pioneers in all matters
of policy ranging from the profound social analysis that has preceded housing enterprises to the patronage of the fine arts and in commissioning sculpture and wall
paintings for public places. In fact they have provided a patch of light in the gloom
of contemporary mediocrity."
Perhaps we could take this as our credo and aim—" to lead, and provide a
patch of light in the gloom of contemporary mediocrity."
Could we have a finer aim?
 Q 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF TELEPHONES
During the year every phase of telephone work exceeded expectations. Telephone traffic both in and from Government has increased. This is due to use of
voice communication to transact business in the initial stages instead of writing
letters. It is more economical to discuss difficult or troublesome problems by telephone and confirm with one letter than to write several at $2 or more each.
In keeping with the effort by telephone companies to develop improved services,
designed to meet the varied and exacting requirements of their customers, we have
found it advisable to order surveys on our existing equipment and service. These
have shown a need for modern methods whereby we can increase efficiency, restrict
movement of personnel (which is a time-loss factor), and cut costs. We have now
completed several major changes, supplying Government offices with the most
efficient means of communication at the least possible cost.
Our modern installation located at the British Columbia Vocational School,
Burnaby, is second to none. The problems of providing communication for such
a large and complex group of buildings was a challenge. Drastically different
noise levels were a complicating factor. With the advice and co-operation of British
Columbia Telephone Company technicians we now have a paging system combined
with a public address cut-in feature operating through a fully automatic switchboard.
This allows instant contact at the flick of a switch, most important in emergencies.
The principal at his desk has contact, either privately or by loudspeaker, with every
area.   Students have conveniently located pay-stations for their private purposes.
The Victoria Law Courts, completed this year, has the latest and the best
in communications for a building of its kind. To meet the need for flexibility,
efficiency, and economy, we provided centralized answering, two-way area communication in the spacious Land Registry vaults, interoffice communication, and
other specialized equipment. This project, the result of many months of planning,
was completed with a minimum of difficulty, a lot of hard exacting work on the
part of the installation crews, and not more than seconds interruption of service
for any office connected with the move. As a result of good planning, not only is
the present service efficient, but economical future expansion at minimum cost has
been assured.
The consolidation of all Government telephone accounts to the care of this
Department is now proving its worth. The accounts, which include business lines,
switchboards, foreign exchange services, leases for radio and private services, also
all special services for Government offices within the Province, are now carefully
scrutinized, checked, and vouchered from this Division. The take-over has been
successfully accomplished, and a share of the credit must be given to the excellent
accounts clerk, who now has the history of every account at her fingertips.
We compliment our excellent switchboard operators throughout the Province
for a job well done. Of special mention are the operators who worked far into the
night and week-ends when our Forest Service needed them to maintain service
during high fire-hazard periods.
In closing we extend our thanks to the operating telephone companies and their
employees for their courtesy, co-operation, and technical advice, without which our
work would have been most difficult.
(Miss) Ruth E. Thompson,
Supervisor of Telephones.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1961/62 Q 35
REPORT OF THE CHIEF  INSPECTOR OF  BOILERS
AND PRESSURE VESSELS
In accordance with the provisions of the Boiler and Pressure-vessel Act, I have
the honour to submit the sixtieth annual report of the Boilers and Pressure Vessels
Inspection Division for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1962.
GENERAL
On July 3, 1961, we opened a branch office in Nelson, with a resident inspector
assigned to the East and West Kootenay inspection districts.
The plant-owners in that area are particularly pleased with this arrangement.
The fact that the services of an inspector are available to them at reasonably short
notice saves them time and expense A similar office was opened in Prince George
in June, 1962.
In co-operation with the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, our
Prince George inspector now makes an annual winter patrol through the oil-drilling
area in the north. These visits to the oil rigs have proved valuable in enabling us to
correct violations and ascertain that boilers were properly maintained and operated.
Ten inspectors obtained National Board commissions in the examinations
held in December, 1961, and March, 1962. A commission is a measure of an
inspector's knowledge of design and construction and is of value when they supervise
construction of boilers and pressure vessels designed in the United States and built
in British Columbia.
Training of steam engineers in the use of natural gas as a boiler fuel was
provided during the fall and spring periods at Vancouver Vocational Institute.
Examinations at the end of the courses were conducted by us. There were thirty-
four successful students.
As a committee member, the Chief Inspector attended the Canadian Standards
meeting in Victoria in September, where, with the Chief Inspectors of the other
Provinces, uniformity of regulations was discussed. The outcome of this continuous
work in interprovincial standardization of codes is that our boiler-shops continued
to receive orders for pressure vessels destined for the refineries, oilfields, and petrochemical plants in Alberta and Saskatchewan.
Rapid advances in the art of welding and its applications in all phases of
pressure-vessel engineering made it necessary to produce a separate set of regulations in this regard. On September 6, 1961, the Regulations Governing Welding
and the Qualification of Welders was passed by Order in Council No. 2265. These
rules embrace standards which are accepted throughout the continent. Our industries welcomed them as another contribution to interprovincial uniformity.
NEW CONSTRUCTION AND INSTALLATION
During the year our workshops manufactured twenty-eight steam-boilers,
seventy-three hot-water boilers, and 1,287 pressure vessels. Large expansion programmes are under way in our pulp and paper industry; this, together with new
utility plants and oil-refineries under construction in Alberta, has kept our design
office extremely busy.
ACCIDENTS AND REPAIRS
Three steam-boilers were damaged by low-water conditions and two by furnace
explosions. Defective float controls in automatic plants are the prime cause of
low-water damage. Inspectors are emphasizing the need for regular cleaning and
servicing of these controls to owners and engineers.
 Q 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
A derrick scow exploded in New Westminster when the accumulated gasoline
fumes in the double bottom were ignited by sparks from a welding operation on
deck. Two workmen were killed and a third badly injured. Although this vessel
was outside the scope of our regulations and the Canada Shipping Act, we volunteered our services to the Workmen's Compensation Board in the matter of investigation and report. The inspector assigned to this task also acted as expert witness
at the inquest. The Coroner expressed appreciation of his work and the information
he supplied.
There were three accidents to propane-tanks. In one case a propane-tank in
a house trailer exploded; two men were injured at the time and one died later in
hospital.  This tank was imported and defective in construction.
Another tank exploded when exposed to the flame of a burner, and another on
a trailer exploded due to overcharging.
New regulations are being prepared with respect to propane under the Fire
Marshal Act; it will therefore be necessary to prepare complementary rules under
the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act.
The increase in the use of propane over the years and the accidents resulting
from carelessness and unskilled personnel in filling plants indicate a need for tighter
control.
SUMMARY OF WORK
1961/62
1960/61
1959/60
Designs registered 	
Boilers built under inspection 	
Pressure vessels built under inspection.
Total boilers inspected-
Total pressure vessels inspected-
New boiler installations	
Engineers examined. 	
Welders examined	
763
101
1,287
3,911
2,511
264
554
1.145
718
93
1,240
3,771
2,138
474
580
1,624
560
115
1,245
4,371
2,226
740
555
1,828
ENGINEERS' EXAMINATIONS
Class
Number
Examined
Passed
Failed
6
6
32
112
184
54
108
52
6
5
27
89
141
49
96
42
1
5
Third   .   ...                  '    .
23
43
5
12
10
Totals                                   -   -
554
455
99
WELDERS'
TESTS
Grade
Number
Examined
Passed
Failed
A	
771
82
21
102
21
148
663
68
21
94
19
148
108
B                                  	
14
C          	
D    ..	
8
2
Provisional 	
Totals  	
1,145
1,013
132
D. Denham, P.Eng.,
Chief Inspector.
 L
 Q 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY
In accordance with the Electrical Energy Inspection Act, I have the honour
to submit my annual report for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1962.
BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
The Honourable Minister of Public Works has been pleased to appoint the
following members to the Board, effective January 1, 1962: D. C. Carter, electrical
contractor, representing the Associated Electrical Contractors of British Columbia;
N. V. Beech, electrical contractor, representing the Vancouver Electrical Association; and R. Matthew, electrical inspector for the City of New Westminster, representing cities and municipalities. Other members of the Board are L. Robson
(Chairman), Chief Inspector of Electrical Energy, and G. A. Harrower, Assistant
Inspector of Electrical Energy.   Seven meetings were held throughout the year.
The total number of certificates of competency in effect during the year was
as follows:—
Class A      207 Class PC      148
Class B      439 Class TC   1
Class C      585 	
Class PA        51 Total  1,530
Class PB        99
Two hundred and sixty-two candidates for electrical contractors' certificates of
competency were examined during the year, with the following results:—
Class
Number of
Candidates
Examined
Passed
Failed
A                                               	
34
109
119
17
45
48
17
B	
64
C         ..                           	
71
262
110
152
CERTIFICATES OF QUALIFICATION
Effective January 1, 1962, certificates of qualification were introduced, which
are issued to all candidates successfully passing the written examination for a certificate of competency as an electrical contractor.
The new certificates are issued without fee and serve as proof of qualifications
of a successful candidate. However, if a successful candidate wishes to operate as
an electrical contractor, it is still necessary for him to obtain a certificate of competency and pay the annual fee.
PERMITS
The total number of permits issued during the year was as follows:—■
April, 1961  3,098 November, 1961   4,052
May, 1961   3,678 December, 1961  2,615
June, 1961  3,802 January, 1962   2,787
July, 1961  3,374 February, 1962  2,613
August, 1961  3,873 March, 1962 .. 2,835
September, 1961  3,752
October, 1961  4,151
Total .  40,630
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1961/62 Q 39
DISTRICT OFFICES AND INSPECTIONS
The following is a record of inspections undertaken during the year:—
Office Location Inspections
Abbotsford   2,922
Alberni   2,289
Bridge River Valley (inspector from Richmond office)   27
Chilliwack   2,315
Courtenay    3,553
Cranbrook   2,162
Dawson Creek  1,329
Duncan  2,820
Fort St. John  1,451
Gulf Islands (inspector from Richmond office)  62
Kamloops   2,542
Langley, Delta, and White Rock  2,383
Nanaimo    2,778
Nelson   2,134
New Westminster (three inspectors)   5,334
Penticton   2,411
Powell River   1,839
Prince George (two inspectors)  4,849
Prince Rupert  1,898
Quesnel   2,081
Richmond (two inspectors)   3,061
Salmon Arm  1,401
Trail   1,848
Vancouver (West Coast, Gulf Islands, and Lillooet)        454
Vernon   2,325
Victoria (three inspectors)   7,885
Total   64,153
Effective October 1, 1961, the inspector from Vancouver office was transferred
to Alberni, and areas of the West Coast district were incorporated in the districts of
six inspectors.
Effective August 15, 1961, inspections for The Corporation of the City of
Kelowna were undertaken by this Division. The City of Kelowna was incorporated
with the district area, which was being inspected from the Vernon office.
CANADIAN STANDARDS ASSOCIATION
The Chief Inspector continued to represent the Province on the Approvals
Council of the Canadian Standards Association and on committees on the Canadian
Electrical Code. He continues to act as Chairman of the Canadian Electrical Code,
Part I, Committee, which Committee is responsible for the preparation and editing
of the Canadian Electrical Code.
Two meetings of the Canadian Standards Association Approvals Council (Electrical) and of the Committee on the Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, were attended,
the first during June in Halifax and the second during November in Toronto. Upon
the conclusion of these meetings, all material which had been processed as interim
revisions to the Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, was authorized to be included in
the forthcoming eighth edition of the Canadian Electrical Code, Part I.   It is antici-
 Q 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
pated that a complete newly edited revised code will be available for adoption early
in 1962. These revisions will incorporate changing techniques and new methods and
materials which have become available since the issuance of the seventh edition of
Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, in 1958. The proposal to adopt manufacturer
certification for equipment which is beyond the scope of the testing facilities at the
Canadian Standards Association laboratory is being continued. It is anticipated that
this programme will be in effect in 1962. To this end, the definition of the term
" approval " was amended by Order in Council in May, 1961, so as to make possible
the acceptance of the certification programme.
This Division is being faced with an ever-increasing number of requests for
local acceptance of electrical equipment which has not been officially certified by
the Canadian Standards Association. It is anticipated that it will be necessary to
expand our services in order to handle this volume of work in order to facilitate the
use of electrical equipment in industry and for domestic or commercial purposes.
Studies are being undertaken in order to determine what recommendations should
be made in this regard.
The work of keeping electrical regulations generally up to date in connection
with new techniques, practices, and new materials is continuing.
EXAMINATION OF MOTION-PICTURE PROJECTIONISTS
The Division assisted the Provincial Fire Marshal in conducting three examinations for projectionists. The regulations covering such examination provide that
the Inspector of Electrical Energy be a member of this Examining Board in company
with the Fire Marshal. In this connection, all fees arising from these examinations
accrue to the credit of the Fire Marshal's department.
POLE-LINE PERMITS
During the year the Division checked 822 applications for the erection of pole-
lines on Crown lands or Provincial highways. Recommendations on each application were forwarded to the Regional Engineer of the Department of Highways.
ACCIDENTS
There were five accidents recorded during the year, and two of these were fatal.
May I again express my appreciation for your splendid co-operation and continued interest in our problems and to your Departmental staff for valuable assistance
rendered during the year.
L. Robson, P.Eng.,
Inspector of Electrical Energy.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT, 1961/62
Q 41
REPORT OF THE CHIEF GAS INSPECTOR
THE ACT
The Regulations Respecting Gas-fitters, Contractors, and Dealers were
amended by Order in Council No. 2552, approved October 11, 1961. None of
the other regulations were amended during the fiscal year ended March 31, 1962.
THE DIVISION
The staff consists of the Chief Inspector, Assistant Chief Inspector, sixteen Gas
Inspectors, one Senior Clerk (Office Manager), one Clerk—Grade 2, one Clerk—
Grade 1, two Clerk-Stenographers—Grade 2, one Clerk-Typist—Grade 1, plus one
Clerk-Typist—Grade 1 (part time) in our Abbotsford office and one Clerk—
Grade 1 (half time) in our Victoria office.
Night-school courses were conducted in Vancouver, Burnaby, Abbotsford, and
Kimberley.
A new gas-fitter's course was established at the Provincial Vocational Institute,
Burnaby, to upgrade the gas-fitters and to assist them in procuring their Grade II
gas-fitter's licence.
The acceptance of natural gas in industry has maintained its momentum. Of
the many large boilers that were converted or were newly installed to use natural
gas, perhaps the largest single unit, was the No. 3 boiler of the British Columbia
Hydro and Power Authority's Burrard thermal plant, which was activated in February, 1962.   The input to this boiler is 1,200,000,000 B.t.u. per hour.
ACCIDENTS
During the fiscal year there were three deaths in the City of Vancouver and
one death in the City of Victoria which were attributed to monoxide poisoning.
SUMMARY OF WORK
1961/62
1960/61
1959/60
New designs checked, industrial approval	
547
444
1,492
543
631
134
42
98
12,159
11,584
480
601
2,182
1,413
535
862
184
71
239
14,635
12,883
485
639
574
1,002
553
1,190
303
Gas-fitters' re-examinations -	
123
343
19,624
17,328
662
A. G. Kaneen, P.Eng.,
Chief Inspector.
 Q 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF EXPENDITURE
The following pages show in detail the expenditures relating to the construction, alteration, and repairs on the various Government buildings and institutions,
etc., coming under the management, charge, and direction of the Minister of Public
Works. During the period under review there were no major changes in accounting
methods that would result in revised presentation of financial reports; however, it
will be noted that the separate appropriation for maintenance of the Parliament
Buildings has been eliminated and provision is now made in the general maintenance
vote for other Government buildings.
A. E. RHODES,
Comptroller of Expenditure.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1961/62 Q 43
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, FISCAL YEAR 1961/62
ADMINISTRATION AND MAINTENANCE VOTES
(For details see Public Accounts.)
Vote 302—Minister's Office  $21,139.73
Vote 303—Administration    179,648.57
Vote 304—Government House (Maintenance)   81,921.91
Vote 305—Government Buildings (Maintenance)   4,332,289.09
Vote 307—Rentals   467,391.04
Vote 308—Gas Inspection Division  166,967.05
Vote 309—Steam-boiler Inspection Division  148,002.82
Vote 310—Electrical Energy Inspection Division  312,431.66
$5,709,791.87
Less credits—
Rentals, etc., Government buildings       273,831.89
Repayable items, Rental Vote  240.00
$5,435,719.98
CAPITAL =
Vote 306—Construction of Provincial Buildings (see expenditures by buildings
listed below)   $3,572,091.50
Less Federal Government contributions       377,396.33
$3,194,695.17
SUMMARY =
Net expenditure, Department of Public Works—
Administration and maintenance  $5,435,719.98
Capital      3,194,695.17
$8,630,415.15
VOTE 306—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS
Project No.                                                                     Description Expenditure
401-B          Institute of Technology, Burnaby  $2,755.81
328-B           Highways Laboratory Building, Burnaby  99,262.60
299-B           Burnaby Vocational School  257,283.47
6-B-29      Flood repairs, Colony Farm  15,001.90
6-B-32      Repairs, Colony Farm Annex  15,740.80
353-B           Connaught Fountain Garden, Superior Street  204.64
353-B-l        Connaught Fountain, Parliament Buildings  13,508.14
373-B            Accommodation for ferry personnel, Darrell Bay (Britannia Beach) 18,804.61
394-B          Renovations, Pan-abode buildings, Health and Welfare, Dawson Creek 2,451.72
355-B          Purchase of equipment, Douglas Building and Michigan Street cafeterias  ^  729.48
Essondale—■
5-B-2                Accounting Building  33,908.92
5-B-8               Credit Union and Telephone Exchange Building  47,857.77
5-B-34              Renovations to butcher-shop  8,000.00
5-B-41              Sewage-disposal   4,297.90
5-B-53              300-bed unit, Valleyview (Home for the Aged)   2,000.00
5-B-82              Water distribution system  4,561.24
5-B-87              Laundry equipment  12,351.13
5-B-97             Fire-escapes, Valleyview (Home for the Aged), Nos. 1, 2, and 3 3,500.00
5-B-102            Alterations and renovations to kitchen and staff changing-rooms 19,900.38
5-B-114           Waterproofing, Crease Clinic  58,317.95
5-B-115            New cemetery  3,635.69
5-B-116           Landscaping, roads, and parking  14,925.87
5-B-117 Underground steam  and condensate piping to North Lawn
Building  2,413.54
5-B-119 Garbage-handling and incinerators  (piping, instruments, and
electrical  work)   (includes miscellaneous  steelwork  and
waste heat-boiler)      158,951.88
5-B-120           Industrial Therapy Building  62,689.51
5-B-121           Structural alterations  12,392.66
5-B-122            Storm-sewers, Valleyview (Home for the Aged, Coquitlam)  2,724.50
 Q 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 306—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.                                                                     Description Expenditure
Essondale—Continued
5-B-125           Installation of new telephone equipment  $36.58
5-B-127            Bathing facilities, Ward F 1  4,468.80
5-B-129            Toilet facilities -  5,921.96
5-B-350            Public Works Building  51,410.40
350-B Construction of a prefabricated building at Exhibition Park,
Vancouver (later to be moved to Essondale to be used as a
Public Works storage and workshop building)   30,069.32
395-B           Mines department, residence and rescue-station, Fernie  350.00
390-B          Flag-poles for Government buildings  3,992.00
289-B           General expenses, surveys, supplies, etc.   121,152.27
384-B           Ground improvements, various Government buildings  18,761.29
383-B           Automatic lawn sprinkler system, Government House, Victoria  21,715.41
290-B-l        Surface-water drains, Government House  6,782.14
Haney Correctional Institution—
123-B-2                Awning, administration buildings  3,195.00
123-B-5                Development of grounds and irrigation system  1,370.69
123-B-10              Incinerator     9,889.02
123-B-ll              Alteration to main electrical switchboard  2,424.24
399-B           Renovations, Helmcken House  2,774.81
388-B           Purchase of property, 785 Hornby Street, Vancouver  145,812.42
79-B-9        Refrigeration, Jericho Hill School  1,969.01
319-B           Additions to Kamloops Health and Welfare Building  15,361.78
307-B          Air-cooling, Land Registry Office, Kamloops  11,028.60
406-B           Purchase of property, Kingston Street, Victoria  30,005.00
396-B           Renovations, Lillooet Courthouse  4,435.00
389-B           Red Cross outpost hospital, Masset  1,102.50
346-B           Provincial Government offices, Mission and District  9,142.25
Oakalla—
39-B-18             Security fence, South Wing and Royal Oak Avenue  11,458.84
39-B-51              Fire Marshal's recommendations  1,743.00
39-B-52             Ventilation system, licence-plate shop  9,118.00
39-B-55              Conversion of supply circuits  22,086.75
39-B-61              Renovation of Young Offenders' Unit building to hospital  30,973.24
39-B-62              Roads   8,715.27
311-B          Remodelling old Girls' Industrial School, Cassiar Street  207,678.12
292-B           Structural alterations, Parliament Buildings  67,605.18
368-B          Renewal of steam-lines, Parliament Buildings  487.84
385-B           Parking facilities (grading), Parliament Buildings  2,032.99
312-B           Prince George Vocational School  301,618.73
313-B           Government Agent's residence, Prince Rupert  19,527.01
386-B           Foundations to foremen's residences, Terrace (Department of Highways)    8,851.55
31-B-3        Landscaping, Pearson TB. Hospital   35,721.29
Tranquille School—
10-B-12              Water-supply and sewage-disposal  5,802.08
10-B-37              Installation of showers  4,977.11
10-B-41              Alterations, main buildings   19,519.66
10-B-40             Houses  15,493.13
10-B-42              Boiler No. 1   4.67
10-B-43             Renewal of steam-lines to residences  24,000.00
10-B-44             Renovations to boiler-house  21,449.91
10-B-45             Fire protection  6,000.00
409-B           Alterations, Temple Building, Victoria  7,999.60
408-B           Structural alterations, Vancouver area  20,056.13
397-B           Renovations, Vancouver Courthouse   3,402.35
369-B          College of Education, University of British Columbia (Vancouver)... 2,838.33
345-B          Street-lighting, Heather Street, Vancouver  912.67
Victoria College—
178-B-6                Automatic lawn sprinkler system  17,498.55
352-B Contract No. 1, clearing and excavation for Classroom and Fac
ulty Block, and Contract No. 2, Classroom and Faculty
Block (Credit) 70,031.28
374-B                  Sciences Building  236.83
339-B          Victoria Law Courts  1,219,396.26
 —
PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1961/62 Q 45
VOTE 306—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.                                                                     Description Expenditure
The Woodlands School—
7-B-37              Electrical distribution and rebuild vault   $912.10
7-B-40              Landscaping, fencing, and paving  15,000.00
7-B-42             Toilet facilities, playing area  13,753.45
7-B-43             Sewer-line   4,500.00
7-B-44              Renovations, Nurses' Home No. 2   183.80
Department of Highways-—
392-B                  Building, Good Hope Lake  7,500.00
324-B                  Three-bay equipment-shed, Hope  10,000.00
378-B                  Dry storage shed, Houston  1,000.00
367-B                   Equipment-shed, Kimberley   6,538.86
403-B                   Completion of equipment-shed, Mayne Island  2,496.02
364-B                  Four-bay equipment-shed, McBride (yard-site)  6,000.00
325-B                  Additional garage facilities, Nelson  70,390.86
400-B                  Foremen's residence, Port Clements  8,500.00
323-B                   Addition to main garage, Prince George  7,000.00
404-B                  Completion of equipment-shed, Sayward  2,500.00
362-B                  Dry storage shed, Smithers  1,300.00
375-B                  Ferryman's accommodation, Soda Creek  6,000.00
$3,572,091.50
 Q 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Waterproofing, Crease Clinic, Essondale:
Dobson & Alexander, North Burnaby..
Burkheimer Tuckpointing, Victoria—
C. H. Brown & Son Ltd., Vancouver—
British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby—Phase 2 (Foundations and Footings):
Mainland Installations Ltd., Burnaby .
Burns & Dutton Concrete & Construction Ltd., Richmond .
Klassen Construction Ltd., Vancouver    	
Service Construction Ltd., Vancouver..  	
Ward & Son Ltd., New Westminster 	
Chapman-Long Construction Co. Ltd., North Vancouver....
E. H. Shockley & Son Ltd., Vancouver 	
Mainland Construction Ltd., Burnaby  	
Beaver Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver  	
Lickley-Johnson-Palmer Construction Ltd., Vancouver..
C. J. Oliver Ltd., Vancouver  	
Thomas F. Hall Ltd., North Vancouver   _
Bennett & White Construction Ltd., Burnaby	
Howe Construction Co. Ltd., North Burnaby.— 	
Smith Bros. & Wilson Ltd., Vancouver  	
Government Agent's Residence, Prince Rupert:
Greenall Bros., Burnaby  —
Northwest Construction Ltd., Prince Rupert.
D. Robinson Construction (1952) Ltd., Nanaimo .
Automatic Lawn Sprinkling System, Victoria College, Victoria:
Pacific Lawn Sprinklers Ltd., Vancouver 	
Automatic Lawn Sprinkling System, Government House, Victoria:
Pacific Lawn Sprinklers Ltd., Vancouver..
College of Education, University of British Columbia, Vancouver:
Turnbull & Gale Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver. 	
Anglin-Norcross Western Ltd., Vancouver	
A. R. Grimwood Co. Ltd., Vancouver  	
Narod Construction Ltd., Vancouver 	
Beaver Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver	
Bennett & White Construction Ltd., Burnaby	
E. H. Shockley & Son Ltd., Vancouver 	
Burns & Dutton Construction Co. Ltd., Richmond..
Smith Bros. & Wilson Ltd., Vancouver	
Klassen Construction Ltd., Vancouver	
Dawson & Hall Ltd., Vancouver  	
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver-
Waste Heat-boiler, Incinerator Installation, Essondale:
Bridge & Tank Western Ltd., Winnipeg	
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd., Vancouver 	
Babcock-Willcox Ltd., Ontario..
Foster-Wheeler Ltd., Vancouver..
Supply, Fabrication, and Erection of Conveyors, Chutes, Hoppers, and Supporting
Steelwork, Incinerator Installation, Essondale:
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd., Vancouver.
Tryson & Son Iron Works Ltd., Vancouver.	
Mathias & Nichol Installations Ltd., Vancouver..
A.I.M. Steel Ltd., Vancouver	
Industrial Mills Services Ltd., Burnaby..
R. L. Welsh Ltd., Vancouver	
Brittain Steel Fabricators Ltd., New Westminster	
Westminster Boiler & Tank Co. Ltd., New Westminster..
Coast Steel Fabricators Ltd., Burnaby..
Accounting Building, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale:
Wilson Construction Co. Ltd., North Vancouver.	
Lickley-Johnson-Palmer Construction Ltd., Vancouver.	
Mainland Construction Co. Ltd., Burnaby	
Sorensen Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver 	
Howe Construction Co. Ltd., North Burnaby   	
Thomas F. Hall Ltd., North Vancouver	
Brockbank & Hemmingway Ltd., Vancouver .
Burns & Dutton Concrete & Construction Ltd.,
, Richmond..
British Columbia Vocational School, Prince George:
Burns & Dutton Concrete & Construction Ltd., Richmond .
C. J. Oliver Ltd., Vancouver     	
D. Robinson Construction (1952), Nanaimo	
$45,871.00
54,485.00
63,966.00
19,207.00
18,750.00
15,600.00
25,547.00
19,420.00
23,474.00
18,789.00
16,733.00
16,274.00
20,235.00
21,400.00
19,298.00
21,138.00
17,113.00
19,215.00
19,954.00
28,994.00
25,380.00
15,888.68
19,755.27
1,133,644.00
1,129,000.00
1,111,100.00
1,163,557.00
1,160,183.00
1,155,778.00
1,103,877.00
1,130,500.00
1,129,865.00
1,108,814.00
1,195,227.00
1,138,945.00
26,168.00
26,300.00
17,446.00
18,427.00
31,990.00
16,633.00
30,668.00
17,481.00
24,642.00
27,136.00
21,952.00
21,809.00
25,104.00
32,188.00
29,645.00
29,873.00
33,900.00
30,770.00
29,134.00
35,400.00
34,550.00
337,000.00
319,500.00
355,995.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 PUBLIC WORKS REPORT,  1961/62 Q 47
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Remarks
Ferrymen's Accommodation, Darrell Bay:
Greenall Bros. Ltd., Burnaby     	
Brockbank & Hemmingway Ltd., Vancouver   	
W. J. Dick Ltd., West Vancouver   _ 	
Hazel Bros. Construction Co. Ltd., North Vancouver	
Minty & McLean Ltd., Vancouver	
Chris I. Bendesen, North Burnaby    	
G. E. Millhouse Construction Co. Ltd., North Vancouver	
Credit Union and Telephone Exchange, Essondale:
Klassen Construction Ltd., Vancouver   	
C. J. Oliver Ltd., Vancouver  	
Mainland Construction Ltd., Burnaby    _ 	
Bennett & White Construction Ltd., Burnaby	
Howe Construction Co. Ltd., North Burnaby   	
Ward & Son Ltd., New Westminster   	
Thomas F. Hall Ltd., North Vancouver  	
Gilmour Construction & Engineering Co. Ltd., Burnaby  	
British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby, Phase 2:
Burns & Dutton Concrete & Construction Ltd., Richmond 	
C. J. Oliver Ltd., Vancouver  	
Lickley-Johnson-Palmer Construction Ltd., Vancouver - _	
Narod Construction Ltd., Vancouver   	
Allen & Viner Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver.	
George Born Construction Co. Ltd., Burnaby   	
Coyne & Ratcliffe Construction Co. Ltd., New Westminster 	
Klassen Construction Ltd., Vancouver  	
Manson Bros. (1959) Ltd., South Burnaby _ 	
Primary Service and Underground Distribution, Oakalla Prison Farm:
J. H. McRae Co. Ltd., Vancouver     	
Paterson Electrical Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver 	
The Tide Co. (B.C.) Ltd., New Westminster.....   _
The Canadian Comstock Co. Ltd., North Vancouver  	
Mott Electric Ltd., New Westminster 	
Public Works Building, Essondale:
Mainland Construction Ltd., Burnaby  	
Lickley-Johnson-Palmer Construction Ltd., Vancouver  	
Minty & McLean Ltd., Vancouver 	
International Construction Ltd., New Westminster 	
E. H. Shockley & Son Ltd., Vancouver 	
Thomas F. Hall Ltd., North Vancouver	
Kelsey Construction Ltd., Vancouver 	
P. B. Ford & Co., Vancouver.  	
Walter Cabott Construction Ltd., New Westminster 	
Sorensen Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver  _..
Mechanical and Miscellaneous Completion Work, Incinerator, Essondale:
Vancouver Pipe & Engine Works Ltd., Vancouver _   	
Fred Welch & Son Ltd., Vancouver.. _   	
The Bay Co. (B.C.) Ltd., New Westminster	
Regent Construction Co. Ltd., Burnaby    -	
Industrial Therapy Building, Essondale (Project No. 5-B-I20) :
Smith Bros. & Wilson Limited, Vancouver  _  	
Halse-Martin Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver  	
Grimwood Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver  	
Bennett & White Construction Ltd., Burnaby.    	
E. H. Shockley & Son Ltd., Vancouver	
Commonwealth Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver	
C. J. Oliver Ltd., Vancouver	
Kennett Construction Ltd., Vancouver  	
Northern Construction Co. and J. W. Stewart Ltd., Vancouver...	
John Laing & Son (Canada) Ltd., New Westminster	
Sorensen Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver    	
Frank Stand Construction Ltd., Vancouver   	
Narod Construction Ltd., Vancouver 	
Manson Bros. (1959) Ltd., South Burnaby	
George Born Construction Co. Ltd., Burnaby.	
British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby, Phase 3:
Bennett & White Construction Ltd., Burnaby  	
George Born Construction Co. Ltd., Burnaby	
Manson Bros. (1959) Ltd., South Burnaby  	
C. J. Oliver Ltd., Vancouver    	
Alex Park & Son Ltd., Vancouver	
Turnbull & Gale Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver  	
Coyne & Ratcliffe Construction Co. Ltd., New Westminster.	
J. Olund Construction Ltd., New Westminster	
$23,456.00
17,900.00
31,296.00
29,500.00
20,587.00
23,850X0
20,634.00
116,662.00
112,944.00
103,614.00
116,765.00
113,468.00
107,600.00
104,099.00
110,430.00
238,000.00
249,000.00
242,547.00
249,600.00
247,900.00
241,928.00
231,336.00
257,500.00
234,613.00
59,199.00
63,654.00
68,993.00
59,647.00
74,984.00
64,691.00
61,870.00
64,476.00
62,497.00
68,929.00
58,737.00
63,062.00
65,730.00
69,970.00
63,923.00
37,984.00
31,113.00
29,662.00
36,035.00
535,535.00
546,451.00
542,395.00
513,911.00
512,866.00
499,625.00
529,000.00
539,800.00
517,000.00
564,678.00
497,923.00
509,980.00
509,966.00
488,300.00
489,192.00
260,975.00
243,435.00
237,470.00
259,000.00
264,964.00
252,723.00
266,345.00
252,300.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
 Q 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
Moving Files, Records, etc., to Victoria Law Courts, Victoria:
James Bay Movers-
Blue & White and Ferriday's.
Dowell's Cartage & Storage—
Cantin's Moving & Storage.	
Stocker's Security & Storage-
Victoria Van & Storage Ltd....
Heaney's Cartage & Storage..
Janitorial Service, Victoria Law Courts, Victoria:
National Building Maintenance Ltd., Vancouver.
Modern Building Cleaning Service of Canada Ltd., Vancouver.
Excelsior Building Maintenance Ltd., Vancouver..
Industrial Therapy Building, Essondale (Project No. 5-B-120) (Recall):
Manson Bros. (1959) Ltd., South Burnaby..
Sorensen Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver-
Bennett & White Construction Ltd., Burnaby.
Installation of Electrical Circuits andEquipment, Incinerator, Essondale:
J. H. McRae Co. Ltd	
Ricketts-Sewell Electric Ltd., Vancouver	
The Tide Co. (B.C.) Ltd., New Westminster..
Mott Electric Ltd., New Westminster	
British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby, Phase 4:
Beaver Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver -	
Manson Bros. (1959) Ltd., South Burnaby	
John Laing & Sons Ltd., New Westminster	
Frank Stanzl Construction Ltd., Vancouver	
Allen & Viner Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver...
Grimwood Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver	
E. H. Shockley & Son Ltd., Vancouver	
Narod Construction Ltd., Vancouver 	
Bennett & White Construction Ltd., Burnaby.
New Floor for Pumproom, Tranquille School, Tranquille:
McGregor Construction Co. Ltd., Kamloops	
Marpole Construction Co. Ltd., Vancouver..
Conversion of Nurses Home No. 2 to Offices, Woodlands School, New Westminster:
E. H. Shockley & Son Ltd., Vancouver.
B. Bjornson & Sons Ltd., South Burnaby..
C. J. Oliver Ltd., Vancouver.
Lickley-Johnson-Palmer Construction Ltd., Vancouver.
Kelsey Construction Ltd., South Burnaby	
Mainland Construction Ltd., Burnaby 	
Knutson Construction, North Burnaby	
H. J. Hinningson & Sons Ltd., Bumaby	
$3,989.50
2,800.00
5,938.70
6,708.00
4,856.00
5,625.00
5,210.50
179,820.00
128,628.00
124,912.00
505,355.00
504,399.00
549,400.00
15,795.00
16,000.00
18,430.00
18,722.00
630,326.00
621,317.00
625,955.00
682,320.00
641,990.00
649,387.00
626,248.00
615,854.00
605,375.00
9,400.00
11,950.00
61,521.00
60,965.00
65,600.00
67,708.00
58,054.00
65,626.00
61,500.00
64,529.00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
hi right of the Province of British Columbia.
1963
410-163^1704

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