Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Ninety-first Annual Report 1961/62 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1963

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0363982.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0363982.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0363982-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0363982-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0363982-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0363982-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0363982-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0363982-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0363982-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0363982.ris

Full Text

 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Ninety-first Annual Report
1961/62
By the Superintendent of Education
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1963
    To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Ninety-first Annual Report of the Public Schools
of the Province.
LESLIE RAYMOND PETERSON,
Minister of Education.
January, 1963.
  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION,  1962
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C., LL.B., F.R.S.A.
Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education:
J. F. K. English, M.A., Ed.D., LL.D.
Assistant Superintendent (Administration):
G. W. Graham, B.A.
Assistant Superintendent (Instruction):
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.)
Chief Inspector of Schools:
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Pasd.
District Superintendents, Superintendents, and Inspectors of Schools:
H. D. Abbott, M.A., Nanaimo.
K. F. Alexander, B.Sc., B.Ed., Mission City.
N. A. Allen, B.A., Kamloops.
J. E. Beech, B.A., B.Ed., Creston.
G. C. Bissell, B.A., B.Ed., Castlegar.
J. N. Burnett, M.A., B.Ed., Richmond.
D. H. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Squamish.
D. G. Chamberlain, B.A., B.Ed., Port Alberni.
J. Chell, M.A., Assistant Superintendent,
Victoria.
C. E. Clay, B.A., Penticton.
C Cuthbert, B.S.Acc, B. Ed., Nelson.
H. C Ferguson, B.A., West Vancouver.
C. J. Frederickson, B.A., Burnaby.
W. B. Fromson, B.A., B.Ed., Revelstoke.
J. Gough, M.A., Victoria.
S. J. Graham, B.A., New Westminster.
J. V. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector, Vancouver.
W. H. Gurney, M.A., Kitimat.
R. M. Hall, B.A., B.Ed., Williams Lake.
R. R. Hanna, B.A., B.Ed., Quesnel.
A. E. Henderson, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector,
Vancouver.
F. L. Irwin, B.A., Vernon.
I. H. R. Jeffery, B.A., Haney.
G. E. Johnson, B.A., B.Ed., Powell River.
A. D. Jones, B.A., Duncan.
J. G. Kirk, M.A., Chilliwack.
W. J. Logie, B.A., Campbell River.
R. F. Lucas, B.A., B.Ed., Courtenay.
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B. Pad., North Vancouver.
J. I. Macdougall, M.A., M.Ed., D.Pffid.,
Kamloops.
D. B. Mackenzie, M.A., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
C. S. McKenzie, B.A., Trail.
F. A. McLellan, M.A., B.Paed., Victoria.
W. A. Marchbank, A.B., B.Ed., Dawson
Creek.
E. Marriott, B.A., Assistant Superintendent,
Cloverdale.
L. A. Matheson, M.A., B.Ed., Kimberley.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., Abbotsford.
G. H. Nelson, B.A., B.Ed., Salmon Arm.
F. J. Orme, B.A., B.Paed., Kelowna.
G. M. Paton, B.A., B.Ed., Prince Rupert.
J. Phillipson, B.A., B.Ed., Prince George.
R. S. Price, B.A., B.Com., Ladysmith.
D. L. Pritchard, M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
P. B. Pullinger, B.A., B.Ed., Cranbrook.
W. D. Reid, B.A., M.Ed., Ladner.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., Courtenay.
C. E. Ritchie, B.A., Oliver.
R. F. Sharp, B.A., D.PEed., Vancouver.
H. B. Smith, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant, Vancouver.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., Langley.
R. B. Stibbs, B.A., New Westminster.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Burnaby.
R. F. Thorstenson, B.A., B.Ed., M.B.A.,
Hope.
D. P. Todd, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St. John.
F. M. Wallace, M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Cloverdale.
C. C. Wright, B.A., Smithers.
 Z 8 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1961/62
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Special Services: W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment: P. J. Kitley, M.A.
Comptroller of Expenditures: S. E. Espley.
Supervisor of School Construction: H. Dickinson.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education: J. S. White.
Assistant Director of Technical and Vocational Education: T. Quayle.
Inspectors of Technical Classes: C. J. Strong, M.A., and V. E. Rickard.
Registrar: H. M. Evans, BA.
Assistant Registrars: J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Paed., and P. E. Wilkinson, B.A., B.Ed.
Director of Home Economics: Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.S.
Inspectors of Home Economics:
Miss J. R. Irvine, B.Sc.(H.Ec), and Miss J. Campbell, M.A., B.Sc.(H.Ec), Dip.Ed.
Director of Community Programmes: J. H. Panton, B.A., M.Sc.
Director of Visual Education: J. R. Pollock, B.A.Sc.
Director of School Radio Broadcasts: Miss M. Musselman, B.A.
Director of Tests and Standards: C B. Conway, B.Sc., M.S., D.Paed.
Director of High School Correspondence: Miss Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Director of Elementary School Correspondence: A. H. Plows.
Director of Textbook Branch: Basil R. Wilson.
Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (for the Deaf and the Blind):
C E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., LL.D.
Director of Curriculum: J. R. Meredith, B.A., B.Ed.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Report of the Superintendent of Education  11
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Administration and School Board
Relations)  36
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Instructional Services)  38
Report of the Director of Curriculum  41
Report of the Co-ordinator of Special Services  45
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  47
Report of the Director of Home Economics  51
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
Secondary School and Vocational Courses  54
Elementary Correspondence School  58
Report of the Director of the Division of School Radio Broadcasts  60
Report of the Director of Visual Education  62
Report of the Director of the Textbook Branch  64
Report of the Chief Inspector of Schools  68
Report of the Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment  73
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education  75
Report of the Director of Community Programmes Branch  85
Report of the Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (Deaf and Blind School)  95
Report of the Registrar of Teachers and Examinations  97
Report of the Commission on Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act  106
Statistical Returns  107
Information re Examination Papers Inside back cover
 Z 10 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Page
Number of Pupils Enrolled by Type of School  11
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  12
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils According to Different Classes of Schools 13
Teachers' Certificates  13
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  14
Number of School Districts  15
Number of Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  15
Number of Junior-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  16
Number of Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  17
Number of Superior Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District 17
Number of Elementary-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils
in Each District  18
Number of Elementary-Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils
in Each District  18
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  19
District Supervisory and Instructional Personnel  21
Summary of All Schools Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils 22
Number of Schools, Teachers, Pupils, and Average Daily Attendance in Each
Type of School  23
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  24
Classification of Teachers' Salaries  25
Expenditure for Education for the Calendar Year 1961  26
Costs per Pupil, Various Bases, Calendar Year 1961  26
Expenditure by School Districts for the Calendar Year 1961  27
Revenue for Education for the Calendar Year 1961 by School District  30
Summary of Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance by Schools in the Various School Districts  109
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades  153
 Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1961/62
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., January, 1963.
To the Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Ninety-first Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30, 1962.
ENROLMENT
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from
321,760 to 340,290, and the average daily attendance increased from 298,175 to
312,173.  The percentage of the regular attendance was 91.7.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown
hereunder:—
Type of School
Number of Pupils Enrolled
Municipal
Rural
Total
29,194
49,494
39,446
1,691
9,550
6,256
194,462
121
739
475
212
2,866
917
4,867
29,315
50,233
39,921
1,903
12,416
7,173
199,329
Totals -   _    	
330,093
10,197
340,290
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled :—
In the High School Correspondence classes, regular students
(exclusive of the  5,282 officially registered  in  other
schools)  	
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular students	
Under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, pupils receiving
instruction	
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme
Night-schools 	
Vancouver School of Art	
Vancouver Vocational Institute	
High School Correspondence (adults only)	
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only)_
Carried forward	
1 Day, 4,528; night, 3,755.
2 Includes 36,765 non-vocational.
3 Day, 2,293; night, 2,622.
4,522
1,095
69
5,686
8,283!
46,5482
219
4,9153
9,959
310
75,920
11
 Z 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
Brought forward	
        75,920
Adult education—Continued
Number of participants in recreational programme  1,415,6414
Vocational teachers-in-training (summer session)  32
Victoria College, regular credit courses—
Arts, Science, Commerce  1,105
College of Education      636
Evening division      270
Summer session      817
University of British Columbia
2,8285
6,5946
1,501,015
* This figure does not include Vancouver.
5 This figure does not include an enrolment of 780 in the non-credit evening classes and 97 in the non-credit
summer session.
6 This figure does not include the following enrolments:   1961 summer session, 5,156;   1961/62 extra sessional
classes, 1,311; correspondence courses, 1,390.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade
for the school-year 1961/62:—
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total
3,599
18,931
17,793
17,168
15,976
15,227
14,579
15,288
15,057
14,198
11,493
8,763
7,102
1,277
3,432
17,253
16,450
15,611
14,855
14,161
13,840
14,101
14,057
13,733
10,878
8,146
6,587
735
7,031
36,184
34,243
Grade III
32,779
Grade IV                                                   	
30,831
29,388
Grade VI	
28,419
Grade VII- 	
29,389
Grade VIII            ...    .    ..
29,114
Gradp IX
27,931
22,371
Grade X                                                            ...
Grade XI. .   	
16,909
Grade XII   	
13,689
Grade XIII                     	
2,012
Totals	
176,451
163,839
340,290
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
Z 13
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING
TO THE DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number
of pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per
teacher are shown in the following table:—
Number of Teachers
Total
Enrolment
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment
Average
Enrolment
per Grade
Teacher
Type of School
Grade
Teacher
Special
Instructor
Total
922
1,627
1,254
73
434
231
6,078
366
590
444
3
76
36
417
221
1,288
2,217
1,698
76
510
267
6,495
221
29,315
50,233
39,921
1,903
12,416
7,173
199,329
8.61               31.80
Junior-senior high schools
]         14.76
11.73
.56
3.65
2.11
58.58
|        30.88
31.83
26.07
Elementary-senior high schools
Elementary-junior high schools-
28.61
31.05
32.80
Totals	
10,619
2,153
12,772
340,290
100.00
32.05
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
The following table shows the number of teachers employed and also the number with or without university degrees:—
Type of School
Number of Teachers
With
Degrees
Without
Degrees
Total
1,044
1,558
991
14
153
95
814
121
244
659
707
62
357
172
5,681
100
1,288
2,217
1,698
76
510
267
6,495
221
Totals- _  	
4,790
7,982
12,772
 Z  14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1961/62
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE
FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for the various years since
1877/78 and also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year
Number
of
Teachers
Employed
Number
of
School
Districts
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Daily
Attendance
Percentage of
Attendance
Government
Expenditure
for
Education
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools
1877/78...
1882/83....
1887/88 ...
1892/93....
1897/98...
1902/03....
1907/08...
1912/13...
1913/14....
1917/18....
1922/23....
1927/28....
1928/29—
1929/30—
1930/31 —
1931/32—
1932/33....
1933/34—
1934/35—
1935/36—
1936/37....
1937/38—
1938/39—
1939/40—
1940/41—
1941/42—
1942/43—
1943/44—
1944/45—
1945/46...
1946/47—
1947/48—
1948/49—
1949/50....
1950/51—
1951/52—
1952/53—
1953/54—
1954/55—
1955/56...
1956/57—
1957/58 —
1958/59....
1959/60...
1960/61....
1961/62...
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
597
.859
.246
,118
668
784
854
948
,959
,912
,873
,942
,956
,025
,092
,194
220
248
224
055
162
354
512
833
116
496
,873
272
598
105
574
,185
690
,474
,171
,839
,513
,137
,772
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
97
98
101
100
104
104
102
103
102
101
98
97
99
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
195,290
210,174
223,840
240,674
260,069
277,070
291,223
305,837
321,760
340,290
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
163,364
176,138
191,061
204,239
218,303
235,396
252,490
267,052
281,513
298,175
312,173
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
89.87
88.88
89.21
90.19
90.91
91.24
90.70
90.51
91.13
91.70
92.05
92.67
91.74
$48
60
113
174,
290
473
544
1,663
1,885.
1,653
3,176.
3,532
3,765
3,743,
3,834.
4,015.
2,849
2,611
2,835
2,972,
3,277
3,524
3,630
3,585,
3,963,
4,028,
3,924.
4,244.
5,022,
5,765,
9,398
12,468,
17,363
22,809
25,830.
26,885,
26,555
24,060,
34,279
41,067,
43,989
50,861,-
53,288
59,472
70,174
77,632,
,411.141
,758.751
679.361
775.43
255.26
802.29
671.60
003.34
654.11
796.60
686.283
518.953
920.693
317.083
727.193
074.373
,972.023
,937.803
,040.743
,385.043
,660.233
,962.693
670.783
769.003
848.243
397.883
243.533
898.823
534.593
205.503
,473.463
653.183
,430.943
631.233
076.883
980.433
080.243
233.153
302.273
740.344
524.325
473.636
.028.947
.055.068
,999.84
,903.48
$215
425
604
1,220
4,658
4,634
3,519
7,630
9,261
11,149
10,008
10,061
9,719
8,941
8,213,
[ 8,458
8,775
9,593
10,193
10,640,
10,521,
10,982.
11,120,
11,502.
12,231.
13,683.
14,818,
20,176
25,768.
35,538
47,726.
54,195.
57,881,
58,401,
70,791,
80,823.
69,314.
77,653,
90,483.
101,351,
115,941,
133,401,
|145,535,
,056.222
555.10
,357.86
,509.85
894.97
.877.56
014.61
009.543
094.983
,996.273
,255.663
,387.993
,333.813
,497.343
,369.043
,156.003
,353.783
,562.643
,367.083
,740.473
.684.923
,364.493
801.943
291.353
029.353
538.183
625.813
,930.533
392.093
,079.883
750.373
133.953
559.483
121.153
844.253
263.713
181.24*
192.325
765.636
107.947
018.068
622.849
715.4810
I
iThe
2 This
districts.
3 This
* This
5 This
6 This
7 This
s This
9 This
io This
total expenditure for public schools borne by the Government,
amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school
amount
amount
amount
amount
amount
amount
amount
amount
includes the
on calendar
on calendar
on calendar
on calendar
on calendar
on calendar
on calendar
annual grant from the
year 1955, exclusive of
year 1956, exclusive of
year 1957, exclusive of
year 1958, exclusive of
year 1959, exclusive of
year 1960, exclusive of
year 1961, exclusive of
Government to the Provincial University,
capital expenditure from by-law funds,
capital expenditure from by-law funds,
capital expenditure from by-law funds,
capital expenditure from by-law funds,
capital expenditure from by-law funds,
capital expenditure from by-law funds,
capital expendituref rom by-law funds.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
7.  15
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1961/62:—
Municipal school districts     74
Rural school districts     26
Total number of districts.
100
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in senior high schools during the school-year was 29,315; of
this number, 15,298 were boys and 14,017 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1961/62 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
4
15
20
31
11
14
23
23
30
34
27
85
27
92
40
83
53
43
15
11
17
16
130
4
8
34
17
18
20
27
45
17
22
34
29
41
45
37
116
37
137
53
109
74
54
22
17
31
22
181
9
11
50
24
24
437
7. Nelson  - -.	
11. Trail -   -   .
646
938
304
446
778
598
970
33. Chilliwack    —     ~ -	
1,087
920
36. Surrey—  -     	
2,663
38. Richmond    —	
908
3,070
1,209
2,690
1,654
1,284
47. Powell River      _	
478
358
714
475
4,149
62. Sooke     —	
121
188
1,100
558
572
Totals     	
40
921
1,288
29,315
 Z 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior-senior high schools during the school-year was 50,233;
of this number, 26,010 were boys and 24,223 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1961/62 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number ot
Pupils
1. Fernie. _ - 	
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
12
1
1
3
2
2
2
2
9
25
10
27
11
15
26
9
20
15
23
40
8
7
11
7
43
23
24
20
10
15
50
38
25
602
40
11
87
41
20
11
17
12
8
9
18
8
11
33
18
31
35
8
27
19
9
27
14
11
34
12
37
14
15
34
10
28
20
30
54
12
9
17
11
58
32
35
29
16
19
73
55
33
841
49
15
123
53
25
14
22
15
10
13
25
9
14
43
25
42
46
11
37
24
13
32
18
217
772
246
830
301
335
708
222
11. Trail                                                 .     .
569
12. Grand Forks..          	
430
717
1,261
16. Keremeos            .   . _ -  —
18. Golden
218
202
359
22. Vernon-   	
201
1,189
24. Kamloops —	
691
799
617
31. Merritt           .                    -       -
344
434
35. Langley _   -	
37. Delta                                         	
1,736
1,216
727
39. Vancouver..   ~    — —- —	
19,885
1,114
324
2,858
1,214
46. Sechelt
470
289
494
314
215
56. Vanderhoof       ....                   	
283
622
62. Sooke -    	
177
302
65. Cowichan    _. - 	
892
528
857
70. Alberni.     .     	
1,113
71. Courtenay...	
72. Campbell River
254
898
550
78. Enderby       „
244
80. Kitimat _..   _       -.
655
340
Totals  _  ....
76
1,627
2,217
50,233
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
Z 17
The enrolment in junior high schools during the school-year was 39,921; of
this number, 20,616 were boys and 19,305 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1961/62 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
3. Kimberley  	
3
2
6
3
2
1
6
3
3
2
1
1
1
2
1
7
1
2
2
2
1
1
24
21
20
14
29
23
14
46
33
93
72
77
45
142
46
73
48
4
22
20
30
17
176
16
21
18
52
20
23
15
30
31
30
19
40
31
20
61
45
126
91
105
60
198
61
97
61
6
31
28
43
25
243
21
26
25
68
27
29
20
698
721
11. Trail  -  _
666
467
22. Vernon         — -  _   	
929
727
24. Kamloops  	
33. Chilliwack   -    -
482
1,462
1,085
36. Surrey   	
38. Richmond     	
2,895
2,318
2,619
1,464
4,454
1,498
2,129
1,415
46. Sechelt            	
132
47. Powell River    —       . -
682
52. Prince Rupert      	
57. Prince George   	
673
975
515
6,012
62. Sooke    — -     -
475
567
492
68. Nanaimo  — .
70. Alberni            - —. 	
1,610
607
71. Courtenay          	
722
430
Totals         	
62
1,254
1,698
39,921
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS
The enrolment in superior schools during the school-year was 1,903; of this
number, 1,016 were boys and 887 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1961/62 in
each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
13. Kettle Valley                                       ...           .
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
4
4
6
7
2
5
7
12
5
8
6
4
4
6
7
2
5
8
14
5
8
6
7
119
18. Golden. -  	
100
147
28. Quesnel                      	
159
45
132
196
303
58. McBride  	
131
72. Campbell River                              	
198
161
212
Totals _ —	
16
73
76
1.E03
 Z 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-senior high schools during the school-year was
12,416; of this number, 6,351 were boys and 6,065 were girls. The number of
schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
year 1961/62 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2
2
1
2
33
10
6
16
10
22
16
10
8
8
12
27
35
7
7
7
30
18
3
12
9
11
13
17
16
23
14
16
8
10
38
11
6
17
10
27
18
12
9
9
15
32
39
9
10
8
39
18
3
14
10
14
16
22
20
26
16
21
10
11
987
4. Windermere  —-  - -	
240
134
6. Kootenay Lake   -  -
13. Kettle Valley            —	
451
311
703
455
298
244
26. Birch Island    	
28. Quesnel — 	
29. Lillooet                    	
226
323
686
992
207
188
165
49. Ocean Falls    	
827
50. Queen Charlotte     .        .
447
51. Portland Canal	
69
362
54. Smithers     	
58. McBride   	
282
329
64. Gulf Islands	
371
69. Qualicum  -   — —  ..
71. Courtenay      	
73. Alert Bay.   —	
493
485
579
423
559
79. Ucluelet Tofino                                  	
252
81. Fort Nelson          	
328
Totals..
510
12,416
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-junior high schools during the school-year was
7,173; of this number, 3,729 were boys and 3,444 were girls. The number of
schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
year 1961/62 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
2
3
37
18
13
3
3
10
16
35
16
5
10
25
3
2
12
20
3
42
20
16
3
3
10
18
46
20
6
11
29
3
2
13
22
67
11. Trail  _    	
1,159
568
405
28. Quesnel      - ~
77
29. Lillooet    _.	
33. Chilliwack      —	
51
347
482
41. Burnaby -   	
1,021
518
137
331
798
62. Sooke—  	
64. Gulf Islands           _..
77
46
362
727
Totals   .       -        —.          .   .
20
231
267
7,173
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
Z  19
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 199,329; of
this number, 103,431 were boys and 95,898 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1961/62 in each district are shown in the following table:-—■
District Number and Name
Number cf
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
5
7
7
8
7
2
11
11
13
3
10
3
6
2
8
3
3
5
8
14
1
12
24
29
7
8
35
22
6
6
7
6
19
26
22
46
12
26
59
7
31
18
19
18
10
12
12
9
6
3
9
5
12
7
43
8
28
30
36
10
12
3
18
14
51
43
19
36
3
58
24
46
16
81
21
12
21
59
13
3
20
35
46
14
75
107
136
9
15
76
60
10
12
30
23
109
95
80
349
71
183
1,145
90
354
84
177
251
93
35
62
25
14
4
50
40
23
30
23
144
13
92
70
360
58
62
5
68
14
56
45
19
38
4
63
25
49
17
86
21
12
22
64
13
3
21
37
49
15
78
115
146
9
15
78
63
10
12
31
23
110
96
84
360
71
195
1,309
101
380
85
188
269
101
39
62
26
14
4
55
41
24
31
23
152
13
95
73
382
61
64
5
73
397
2. Cranbrook   	
1,864
1,354
551
1,173
40
1,933
544
1,424
10. Arrow Lakes   '   	
11. Trail 	
431
2,491
12. Grand Forks   .                             	
738
13. Kettle Valley -   	
14. Southern Okanagan   	
15. Penticton- „    .,._	
259
686
2,079
420
46
18. Golden                               	
672
19. Revelstoke - -    	
20. Salmon Arm    	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen —  	
22. Vernon      ...	
1,050
1,369
479
2,459
3,325
4,148
160
316
27. Williams Lake   	
28. Quesnel   —	
29. Lillooet    ... _	
30. South Cariboo - —     	
2,027
1,763
170
269
31. Merritt  ..._.  	
1,002
759
33. Chilliwack - __   	
34. Abbotsford  	
35. Langley   —   -	
36. Surrey — —  	
37. Delta                                          	
3,811
2,988
2,630
12,115
2,371
38. Richmond  —        	
6,166
39,003
3,263
12,426
2,624
6,294
8,701
3,232
46. Sechelt -	
953
1,838
651
49. Ocean Falls      	
265
50. Queen Charlotte           ..   .    -	
67
1,796
1,234
715
744
54. Smithers   -   	
56. Vanderhoof    	
660
4,318
253
58. McBride                         	
59. Peace River South   	
2,737
2,120
13,723
62. Sooke     .
1,778
1,953
64. Gulf Islands -.                           	
64
65. Cowichan      	
2,166
 Z 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1961/62
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
8
7
22
7
15
12
16
4
4
17
5
2
7
3
3
6
5
17
32
33
119
13
103
57
54
4
4
57
8
19
19
5
36
11
7
52
34
36
125
13
108
58
54
4
4
57
8
20
19
5
39
11
7
54
937
1,036
3,594
69. Qualicum           .   _—
70. Alberni 	
349
3,628
1,860
77.  Camphe.H River
1,620
73. Alert Bay                 -    	
74
74. Quatsino  	
65
75. Mission     	
1,778
172
77. Summerland      	
78. Enderby...   _ . 	
627
490
79. Ucluelet-Toflno -	
111
80. Kitimat 	
1,165
81. Fort Nelson    	
287
82. Chilcotin  .    _ ...
118
1,361
Totals 	
1,042
6,080
6,495
199,329
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT Z 21
DISTRICT SUPERVISORY AND INSTRUCTIONAL PERSONNEL
District Number and Name
2. Cranbrook                __
Number of
Teachers
3. Kimberlev     _ _  .__    ._ __          .___    .                 1
7. Nelson    	
8. Slocan             ___      1
11. Trail                          -      2
13. Kettle Vallev                                  1
15. Penticton         	
19. Revelstoke       „ -   _ _           1
20. Salmon Arm    __                          1
22. Vernon       ____
       4
23. Kelowna —               __    	
              _      2
24. Kamloops
                           4
27. Williams Lake
       2
28. Quesnel     -                  	
       2
30. South Cariboo       _       	
       1
31. Merritt     __        _       	
__           1
32. Fraser Canyon          ___         	
       2
33. Chilliwack
       6
34. Abbotsford
.            4
35. Langley
_____          6
36. Surrey                	
___          8
37. Delta     —-          -    ..    	
___           7
38. Richmond
       5
39. Vancouver
                  33
40. New Westminster ___               ,  •
____                        3
41. Burnaby             	
17
42. Maple Ridge    	
.....               4
43. Coquitlam
             12
44. North Vancouver —         	
____               11
45. West Vancouver
                      2
46. Sechelt
_    ____              1
47. Powell River           .
       4
48. Howe Sound  	
       2
54. Smithers
                   1
56. Vanderhoof           	
1
57. Prince George	
              4
58. McBride     __
1
59. Peace River South    __   _ _   _ _   -
4
60. Peace River North	
                           1
61. Greater Victoria      _
____         _                  24
62. Sooke	
                           1
63. Saanich         _          _ _
    ____                         4
65. Cowichan __      ______ ___     ____ __
1
66. Lake Cowichan             	
1
67. Ladysmith	
       1
68. Nanaimo          ._ 	
                      6
69. Qualicum      _
____                   1
70. Alberni 	
       5
 Z 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1961/62
DISTRICT SUPERVISORY AND INSTRUCTIONAL PERSONNEL—
Continued Number of
District Number and Name Teachers
71. Courtenay ,  4
72. Campbell River  4
75. Mission   3
80. Kitimat   1
Total
221
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The following table is a summary of all schools, showing number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
8
8
9
11
9
4
14
14
14
6
15
4
8
4
10
4
4
7
9
18
2
15
30
33
8
9
39
26
9
9
8
8
24
29
24
57
14
31
78
9
41
22
22
26
13
15
15
12
8
6
1
9
56
76
82
39
69
19
110
39
72
28
189
36
26
62
112
21
25
31
46
90
25
134
196
213
17
23
106
102
40
47
40
45
199
155
130
527
109
307
1,932
175
654
141
264
434
184
59
106
48
44
22
3
81
63
91
96
42
81
21
136
41
83
30
233
41
27
72
135
25
30
34
55
109
32
167
235
255
18
24
121
119
45
52
48
53
232
182
163
610
133
361
2,443
217
799
165
323
524
218
71
129
56
53
22
3
100
1,601
2,636
3. Kimberley- -   ,—  	
2,489
1,037
5. Creston    	
2,137
491
3,601
879
2,132
720
11. Trail                                        	
5,823
12. Grand Forks  	
1,168
13. Kettle Valley     -  —    ....
689
1,971
3,745
638
17. Princeton     	
18. Golden                     	
749
974
1,354
2,737
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen .	
838
4,367
5,839
6,589
404
542
27. Williams Lake   	
28. Quesnel    ...  	
29. Lillooet                                                      _
2,973
2,939
907
30. South Cariboo    	
1,261
31. Merritt                   -             	
1,346
1,400
33. Chilliwack     -    - -
6,707
34. Abbotsford -   	
4,993
4,366
36. Surrey    -  	
37. Delta    -	
17,673
3,587
38. Richmond — —    	
39. Vancouver —  —	
10,119
65,059
5,936
41. Burnaby              	
42. Maple Ridge    	
43. Coquitlam         „ .
44. North Vancouver  —	
21,705
4,446
9,152
14,216
5,931
46. Sechelt      — —	
1,555
3,186
1,242
49. Ocean Falls     	
1,092
514
51. Portland Canal - 	
2,827
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
Z 23
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
12
7
14
9
49
10
33
31
48
14
16
5
22
9
9
25
9
17
17
19
9
7
19
6
3
8
4
4
7
5
20
71
44
43
39
213
29
150
88
666
89
102
20
119
50
64
205
42
158
121
89
33
25
90
24
38
28
13
63
21
7
86
79
50
46
45
255
33
175
99
830
104
119
23
142
60
79
249
49
186
146
103
36
27
104
29
44
32
15
72
22
7
94
2,135
1,311
1,091
1,139
6,641
58. McBride      ....
713
4,525
2,742
23,884
62. Sooke        	
2,628
3,010
64. Gulf Islands   _	
481
3,550
1,465
1,893
6,304
1,204
70. Alberni ... — _. __	
5,348
3,879
72. Campbell River _  	
73. Alert Bay..... -   	
2,716
814
700
2,780
731
77. Summerland       „
78. Enderby	
1,177
734
79. Ucluelet-Toflno                 	
363
80. Kitimat     	
1,820
81. Fort Nelson..           —	
615
82. Chilcotin—  	
118
— Unattached districts 	
2,428
Totals    -     -    _             	
1,299
10,620
12,772
340,290
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, PUPILS, AND AVERAGE
DAILY ATTENDANCE IN EACH TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number of
teachers employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance
in each type of school for the school-year 1961/62:—
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Number
of
Teachers
Number of Pupils
Average
Total
Male
Female
Attendance
40
76
62
16
43
20
1,042
1,288
2,217
1,698
76
510
267
6,495
221
29,315
50,233
39,921
1,903
12,416
7,173
199,329
15,298
26,010
20,616
1,016
6,351
3,729
103,431
14,017
24,223
19,305
887
6,065
3,444
95,898
26,288.30
45,873.02
36,703.21
1,717.93
11,371.67
6,527.14
183,691.26
	
1,299
12,772
340,290
176,451
163,839
312,172.53
 Z 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars
only) paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals, and special instructors. Teachers earning less than $1,000 are
excluded.
Grade Teachers
Type of School
Number
Employed
Low
Salary
High
Salary
Average
Salary
922
1,627
1,254
73
434
231
6,078
$2,900
1,956
3,000
2,350
2,225
2,900
1,030
$9,700
9,980
9,562
8,781
10,840
10,017
10,464
$7,028
6,528
6,081
4,899
5,261
Elementary-junior high schools  _ 	
5,259
4,976
Supervising Principals
40
68
62
26
10
157
$9,620
8,270
8,963
6,950
9,220
1,082
$12,928
13,649
13,120
11,850
12,119
12,000
$11,412
11,099
10,848
9,607
Elementary-junior high schools	
10,355
9,999
Special Instructors
326
522
382
3
50
26
260
221
$1,740
1,125
2,412
1,335
1,200
1,080
1,215
1,200
$11,100
11,045
10,620
1,335
10,580
10,635
9,900
13,308
$7,376
7,032
6,660
1,335
6,110
6,300
4,616
7,327
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT Z 25
SALARY CLASSIFICATION
Distribution of teachers by $100 salary-groups, including principals, supervising principals, and part-time teachers:—
Number of Number of
Salary Range                                   Teachers Salary Range                                   Teachers
Under $1,200   29 $5,600-$5,699   297
$1,200-$1,299    6 5,700- 5,799   191
1,300- 1,399    4 5,800- 5,899   255
1,400- 1,499    7 5,900- 5,999   423
1,500- 1,599    3 6,000- 6,099   236
1,600- 1,699    5 6,100- 6,199   130
1,700- 1,799    2 6,200- 6,299   135
1,800- 1,899    7 6,300- 6,399   140
1,900- 1,999    8 6,400- 6,499   101
2,000- 2,099    6 6,500- 6,599   220
2,100- 2,199    9 6,600- 6,699   168
2,200- 2,299   11 6,700- 6,799   181
2,300- 2,399    6 6,800- 6,899   132
2,400- 2,499    4 6,900- 6,999   93
2,500- 2,599    7 7,000- 7,099   111
2,600- 2,699    5 7,100- 7,199   73
2,700- 2,799   16 7,200- 7,299   106
2,800- 2,899   11 7,300- 7,399   165
2,900- 2,999   65 7,400- 7,499   205
3,000- 3,099   137 7,500- 7,599   96
3,100- 3,199   78 7,600- 7,699   139
3,200- 3,299   79 7,700- 7,799   87
3,300- 3,399   79 7,800- 7,899   156
3,400- 3,499   136 7,900- 7,999   239
3,500- 3,599   335 8,000- 8,099   150
3,600- 3,699   185 8,100- 8,199   121
3,700- 3,799   298 8,200- 8,299   125
3,800- 3,899   182 8,300- 8,399   215
3,900- 3,999   274 8,400- 8,499   322
4,000- 4,099   168 8,500- 8,599   49
4,100- 4,199   271 8,600- 8,699   84
4,200- 4,299   210 8,700- 8,799   58
4,300- 4,399   249 8,800- 8,899   35
4,400- 4,499   243 8,900- 8,999   58
4,500- 4,599   323 9,000- 9,099   53
4,600- 4,699   243 9,100- 9,199   21
4,700- 4,799   322 9,200- 9,299   27
4,800- 4,899   306 9,300- 9,399   36
4,900- 4,999   308 9,400- 9,499   21
5,000- 5,099   251 9,500- 9,599   32
5,100- 5,199   310 9,600- 9,699   22
5,200- 5,299   306 9,700- 9,799   27
5,300- 5,399   298 9,800- 9,899   20
5,400- 5,499   464 9,900- 9,999   34
5,500- 5,599   546 10,000 and over  371
 Z 26 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1961
(Exclusive of Capital Expenditures from By-law Funds)
Total expenditure by school districts  $127,616,486.00
Add Department of Education expenditures for—
Administration,   grants   to   University   of
British Columbia, services, etc  $13,683,070.59
Teachers' Pension Fund       3,603,914.99
Free textbooks, maps, etc.   632,243.90
       17,919,229.48
Grand total expenditure   $145,535,715.48
COST PER PUPIL, CALENDAR YEAR 1961
Grand total cost of education  $145,535,715.48
Deduct—
Capital expenditures from current revenue       $814,777.00
Debt charges on school district debt     16,543,070.00
Grant to University of British Columbia-      9,021,507.06
Grant to Victoria College       1,249,612.00
High Correspondence School  172,934.24
Elementary Correspondence School  76,283.17
Night-schools    59,014.33
Adult education        1,395,361.73
       29,332,559.53
Total operating cost  $116,203,155.95
Operating cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of 312,173_ $372.24
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
Z 27
cn ©
oo tn
tn Tt
oo so so so
o ti asm
V *t ri tn so *
h r- CS O oo -
) 00 ** 00 ti t
t- o
w rn
tM tr~
Os so
00 o
•># CN
) OO CS
os^r^^t
in oo i>
H»om
rj* OS 00
r- oo cs
cn oo r-
OOiHO
©gC^
CS O f4
cn cn tn
SOOno6pO\V.HNfNt*.OvommKHOT|-ooO
v.MMaovoiflro-tooor.hvONN'too^r)
Vl^t CS SO cS <n CS rn rt CO VO v^O^N >0 CO ffl oo^^t^vo
Tf"«ooCcnrt\oooTtoCrtgCr4^^r4'ooo*'osr^'o'
t^vOt^'t'-ioONSOOs't^OiHOOOHCiOVOV.r^O
Os(S«nrHVOrtr*T-Ji'-i'^"<n'^-i--. Ovb « SO 0_ Cj in N h
rHCS(S rtrH vi tM t-h vT t-T cn 00 ff
QS
*««winifli_H('iiooi-*oooinhvi"_n(.^f.viNin'-NhO\voO'itooofjifio>NH
r^o\v->o-HO\\_3E^\DC\'/ioomooop.r^r-<Ov_)n.r^-f-ov£)-Ht^o^or-mfn<n^'v_>ooGovo^.r.
^r-mHnco^nrtiftMOwiooo^M^Mi/ioi^h-wwooiviconooino^rtOafto
«_T -t in rToCooon^oo"\_rt^-t-HtnoToocI'^H\-r^'ooCv.\_roCr^'^''-^'o »n *e .h" ^" o" w" r> ri ^f o* »
ooot^o3-tr4t^-Hi^(noo(Sc^voc^-^w>nvo-Hrj^o_Dc^csot^w.Tfw.v_>r-o\>n-tr*-o-H-H
rH -h -h -HtH(SC. NH -HrH-Hl-cSW-OOr.)
t/.
cn
VO
Pi
<
p.
<
Q
Z
W
<
O
w
ffi
H
rt
O
U.
on
I—!
rt
H
oo
O
o
ffi
o
on
>h
PQ
W
5
H
P
Ph
X
w
^ ID c
lag
u
o o
cs ©
RS
tn
00 o
in o
00
in in
cn m
cs cn
<n cs
m
33
Os ** so
Tf i-H cn
©"sd
© f* © so CS Os
cn so © cs en Tt
m ^ © t- oo *n
as      ntSi-Trt
cn cs cs
CS
o o m o © c
© o i> m o c	
ov^cocnt-^ir^OvOt-HOscn os m onwooh cs cs i> so cn o © so t^cnrto©cst^«nm0^o<n«ncs
en ^ WvT ^f     i>csvoTrtoo"cscN!'^so'TMcT'^"^oOrt"r4>voocr ^oCcscscscnr^cnoCcssooo
«■ in i-H n n tM tm t-h        cn        T-H
S.2o
2 x C
O p <u
oot--v. oso t- o«n©T-tomcn
socnoosocncS<n*ncn-_-.r^insOrS
cn cS Os cn r- cn cn os t—
VO VD tt" VD rH If O" N SO
fftrl n        r.        »h
II
~ ctH
o o
u
4.     S
__•     <->
s  2
o~
.9 o
3 so
<ovOHOinot*"d-o\ot^oovei-ioO'tooo
ooTj-©moincsos©o*-Hcs©©incscsoT_
Ovcno©int^Trtirtc^cNinc^©oo©ov©incnorHinOTHTfTtinvo"ncnosoin©osoosvocsc
cs cs rn rn t-h th o *n^ so cs oo^ so o th cn in oo^ c^ co ^ r^ c> m rn n cs son r| r| ri "n c^ o^ (» * q^ o^ >n q i
0Or-rrnt^TrtVOcnirr©cnr^Tfr4"©"oCr^vorfcN"©"vo^ Tf^ocNoTrHc^cs^sosOTrco cn t-h rH ci o
CScnrirH^J- »n.-HfT.CNVOcSrNcncST-HTrtCNrHQ-i.-H\©cn(»CST-HSOsOcS^C^CSVO^
T-fScnTj-msot-aoosOr-icsc
 Z 28
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
T3
3
■S
s
o
U
VO
OV
Pi
<
m
pi
<
p
z
w
j
<
o
w
ffi
H
t
v_
on
O
O
ffi
U
00
PQ
W
rt
p
H
5
z
Ph
X
w
u
u
SCcOcSOvOOcnOv-rJ-inOO©'*   -.
•-'ooossocsasvocsr-TtrHocsoo
M   Tf   Tj-  o   O   VO   fl
■^■vooooosincsn-soos©vooO'^-T-HOOT-HoovoooT-iT-HrncnT-(in
^T-HOMcwsoinOso^tOvO\inr--^or--co©©cS»nosrH»nr-Tt-T-Hinoooo
sor^r^cnoo«nTrtt-^oovi>Mt>©oocninsOTj-ooT-Hinr^cnoscncst^cs^tO\
*Q IS 'ri vo os oo cn ob t> **£ O ©" cS in m" so Os" os" so in" Os" so" m" © cs so oo" <n" •*_■" od1 so oo" so" in" so ■>* -<t" oo" © r^
wooosrnTfcorHT*asrNcnTH;TtininTfcso\voT--<OincScncSr/^r-in.^
~  ^- so in cS      oscoin^TjcncNsOT-Hcnosocscnint^^ininTj-OvcncnocscncSrHO
J. **   OS    rH   T^ t-   Tt   \
£ *-< cs" in cS      t-T
osoomTtTtcncSs
CS       rt,
£©Ttcn©inooovosD©©©©inin©OsoT-HOs©soinOssoosoocninoornoor--inTtcS©vo©
©©OstnooTtrHO\incnoo©cnooo\OocSoocnovoinrHOscSt--Tt©©cncnor--TtcS©in©
sDrnr^coT—THcS_cncSTtT-HTt r^mHTt ©„ "~> OsO^inoocnT-iT-HOvO^cnin t- os m cs f^-iH vo ^ f< in
S"t* r^in'cnK©sorT,Tt©'TtcST-r Ttcnrn"oooCc^oooo©aCoo"incn"vooocn"
mt^ininTtcScnsor^cNOvT-HcnTtov©Ttr-vOfs)TtTtcncScnT-irHOv
in CnCSrH©T-H rH m T-H   T-H   rH ri fS
i © i> i -*,-■■■-
© cs Tt t- cn
to-
_tt a £
© © m vo Tt o vo
m
r- ©
OO
CS
Tt in
-*
*■*
OS   © T-H
m cn m
oo so 00
ooocoooootj- cn ©
) os r- Tf rs
i ___ DO
ir.m©©©o©©©©
r^t^©ooo©oo©
feftsotnocnmassoint—
oo"»nos"Ttl>ocn"cn
nrirt        t-h
Os cn m t-h ts t-h »
m©r-©o©©mTtcs©ooo©©©©©Q
csommoposocnminoscnooooooo©
so os Tt so oo © cn so r^ © cs^ es © ©^ os^ o^ o^ t> o
inooTisocAc^TiQsQsTiooenTisDTicncA      cn
,_< cn rH r-l
•of*
C**H
o o
0
___  o
c.o.S
a +3 a.
a s
oo m m cS Ov
>n cs os m ©
cn r-;SO Os^O
CS Os" rH Tt OO'
m rs m m m
*"J cs •■*■ r- cn
a....
CS rH 00 Tt
•rt»noinT-HincnooO\0©ossD©TtrHVOT
cs vo c~~ t~- ["*■ r~" ,**~i
mcnooO\0©ossD©TtrHVOT-H©voT-4vnTtvocnTtcocnmooovO©
r-©mvoo©cs©r-o©vot—inmsomvoooooOscnOvinrHincno
_^ h os_ os^ r- es © t> cs so_ cs vo cs so^ Tt oco«Hqq*rH\oB'nq>rtH
r^ cs" os" in" cn r> o" r^ Os" Tt" oo" so" oo" cn t-T o" oC t-h i-t cs" oo" tT in t* in oo" ri ov" t-h" t-h o" t-T so" so m"
cSTtT-HOsTt      r^in©t^so^^oocsooinincnTtrHrrtOoooTtcssoinTtt--TtTtcncsoo
rl(Srl Hrirt rn (SCScnT-Hi-H (v)  w  r-< Cn CSCSt-H rH t1
og
•a «
•S.9
H
©©©TtT-irSrninrncS©ininT--rHt^©©inTtT-Hc^c<)inT-HCO©OSTtcs©vocninooooooo\0©
r^cnveoscsoscNt^r^^inooTt00t^vov£)Q'^r-vot^r^oo.-Hc».^F-
q tj n in in ys o^Tt ^a>TH(v)Htv|TtinosoovO<»Ttavoots-(rir-'foa\r>iO\i/. w Ov m ^ n ci
cn rn" ©" in" so ©" os" so" t-T so      cs vo Ov" en cs" so © Tt" oo" © cs" cs" r-" cn cn" os" in t> ©" Ov" in" t-h -st cs" oo c
""intSrHOvcnmcScS mcST-HrHrHco.-Ht--mT-imrn      TtN^OrivOTtmr-HP.      t
cn oo in t*
qs o © © in
vc © © m so
cs © Tt oo cn
-. ^ m o as
Ov m os cn cn
© Tt © so cn
. _ \ so Os oo
vO oo t- Ov en
rtCSrH"
?©Tto©cncs©ininincs©©ooT-irJ©oo©in©int---i>©©cn©©r--oor--in©©©cn©in
oocSc^Ttco<^©r^sornoN©vcrnrHfsinT-Hinvocsr^©cs©socninccrHiooor^vocsc^
;tH  SO  H  ff\ Ifl  m  If.  Tt  OWC  t»  ffi  O^SO OrH^OfrnHOMr-SOrvl  't  ^^.I^vO  H  Tf  ^.t^ f^1*  N SO
TOovot^cn"Ttoocs"rn"vOTt^r^Os"©rH©oC»os"oCcs"
HcnovooomincncnT-H      cnencnenen<XTiinTtt^TtTtTiinr^cn<Oe^inTtcnr<iTicnTiTiTiTiin
i IT «
|
3
z
§ see
<_    L.
>   8
° 2
_! TJ
111
Th1   fll   o
so
3B.5
0-Z o
•_.  _.  u
QJ   « _.
> >>
V_    tZ
s _
1 E'l fiJ S BS ll SB S sf JB-aSl • R-l
llHiJ.1 Bl 3.3 IS 8 81? 8 iili."3 J
3£o£S«S15S3S-BSE3a-3S2SS8§lS'a«SsSS
mSoz?«(Swooft«8«fi>«Ss«o«woOi3i3lz;a<o
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
Z 29
Q
IT
© in oc
r- © OO rH c
©©Ovcnmcsmo
IvO
t- i>           inTt©cn!nsoossDcscnTtr-T-HTtmm   oo
cs o
OsrnrH©©rH\OrH^oinoo(SvOTtoscS
cs o
t-T rM m" cs Os oo cs" os t-T l— m" Tt oo oo" m* r^
so
rn t
T-HmOvOO                     T-lrHrHCST-HrHVOCSrHCS
CS
t-h                                                     cn
SO
<ft
CS
(ft
©
mom©;     ©I     mm
O     !
©
so
cn © cS it
m
r»
t
cn
m
m
©
rn
en
m
Tt
(ft
m
so
(ft
I                  !         !      © m    :    !    i ©
r-
© r-
©
i>
Tt  -H
cs
oo"
Tt
OO
(ft
© c
im    i m o © oo    : oo ©    i    i m r- o ©
SO
•n c
if-         i    T-H   \D   VO   T-H
t-h m
! © cs m m
en
oo r
1 ci
m ti
: cn      os oo
©
(ft
,_r
cs"
i
SO
(ft
© v-
© o
© ©
mo©©omoooomoo
cSrnocnmmrHOcSTtTt©©
Tt
in r-
Tf
OS   T-
os m
cncnrHT-HoocSTtrsmsoTtTtT-Hin
rH Q
cs
rH                     rH     m
(ft
OO
cn
(ft
© c
o
o   :     ©   t   t   i   l        :
©
so c
m
m    i
t~~
oo y
t-
CN
Tt          !
cn
r-^T-
4ft-
so
cS
(ft
© tr
©o©m©©m©©o^t©r-mm©
moor^oocncsovmocncsT-iT-Ht^©
CS^ Os^ © CS cn C» © © SO_ Tt rH 00^ rH rn rH ©
m
Tt tr
OS
r» o
sv
en f* ©' cS t-T t-T Tt" in" rt" in cn rn" in oo" en so
Os
Tt cs                                    t-h     m
CS
«■
00
©
cs
(ft
S3
omcsooooooo©cs©ooosooo©o
SO
incSTtoocScsr-©rHr*-mOsrHooi>m
en
TtOvcncsmT-HrHos©T-HmcsooT-H©os
Os
CS i-
Os tn           t-h      *-cS           T-nrncn
Os
Tt
«■
00
Tt
(ft
m a
OOMsOOOOiTiinOHOOOOO
©©T-HrH©©lnTtO©Tt©rH©rn©
ininOsrH©vooosocSTt©tnoovoo\©
m
in c
Os
r- ir
r-
m c*-
somT-Hcsmmso©mooT-H©mmcst^
g"
ri t>
oo
(ft
CS
r-
(ft
o c
OOTtV.OOOif.OOTtOW.hOO
insomOvm«nOvr-©©Ttmcssosom
m
rs ©
SO
O OC
ooTtcnTtsOTtTtT-Hinsor-T-iosoooocn
i>
r-
T-iCnrH                          ,-h                          ,-h  rn          CS rH
t>
Tt
(ft
cn
m
(ft
^2
,<_.
C
63
Q
&
5
e
g
'B
3
w
fi
=3
c
v
1
00
|
c
e
CS
00
1
<
T.
1
S
ffi
T*
Ah
|
C
£
ffi
o
E
o
0
0
ts
C
a
*-
S
C
w
<H
1
«H
R
M
a
Ph
c
,_.
CI
hJ
a
c
o
TT
•n
c
c
0
O
:
a
1
V
&
iH
£
5
o
<_
C
o
S
0
■i
1
t-
>
«
1
X
H
<U
o
!
h
d
5
t
j
ai
O
1
X)
N
i
tr
-
1
 Z 30
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1961/62
vo
Pi
<
m
Pi
<
9
z
w
<
u
a
H
rt
O
Ph
CO
H
U
Pi
H
on
O
O
ffi
u
GO
PQ
Z
tf)
>
a
pi
Eg
IIP
0,2<
*H   ->
Is
E <«
5°
o
E
Cd
m © oo vo so so r-
oo m © rn Os m t-<
-     h m Tt
i r-
! ©
! co
: (ft
m © m
COOT
en rs cn
! Qs m
! Tt h
i "t ^
1 en" t-h
Os
rn
Tt
|
j
t> cs
os rt © r-
t-h in
[-- rH © cs
Qs in
(ft
cs Tt rn co vo m CO
r- -h -h r-- so © —.
oo so © oo oo en en
Tt cn sn
cn cs ©
OS  rH  TT
CS rn t*
' u~~ Tt Os m tt (S
0OT-HC^TtSOOOCS-0OI«-.w
Ov cn so in — i«-. CS © t_- so f- — 00 © v ■..
t^TtsDvijosTtov-tvooornos >— © m cS CS
rN vC i- ifi d tN >t ^ ri" -h' ri o' Tt 1^' rH' «" rn
m csrs — oo      >-i rS      so r-i
cSmm©mTt©©©moinos©©o©©©©in©©ocsrHmr-so©©w-i©©©©©tSTt©
©mcs©voT^inoinrs©rsomoocsin©r~rHr-.o©rncsrnrnTtasin©©©©©©©csoo
m O t^ t^ ^ cvj Tt o m cn cn Tt n t^q a « n os r| th r^q t^ so t> » o^ r~ cj >fi rHoo©Tt©ino.cs r-~
r-^. s*.   r*\ /■*.  »». r-rs t\ r-.\ rs  r-r\ f~s *-*■  r<\ m tvs vf. Irs *rr  fK  ^.i  ***- *~*  —■- »—*  *-*-  »^-   ^ ^^  ^ *~* —«- +*-  *-*   *-*■■  ^       .  ^  ---   -*  ^
co" Ov" cn Os Tt cn o"
W-T-H rH    es    rn
O cs os cn © »t cn
oo"cosoinTtOscSC^©Ttincot^©©©-__-
men CS  cn-^h     mcSn-.TtrHrH,-Hr-.rNTtrHSO©mr-
SO
OS
CN
Tt"
00
3
! ©
1 oo
: m
i f$
: © ! o ©
©   ! <-_- O
! CS  [Of.
i *■*
S  !
cs ;
Os  !
m
in  !
©  j
rn  |
j
! Ov sc  !
i r- so  !
| © "n ;
| oo os i
j    1
rn m oo t-~ as co
cs so <n oo r~ in
in cn >-h rn o t>
aVc.o"r.vo"
rxcscoo©mmmc>sDmr^sosocntnosr^r^oocSTtO©r^TtsDcocs©m©tScosornTt
©inr^Ttovcs^T-irncst^osMTtcnrSvocnr^Tt-nT-HTtr^Ttcosovor^T-HOvMc^
rH©OV0Tt00CNrH00rH^\0rHCSTtincncninTtT^rHC^
oo©socorH*rnm"os-nr^Os-HOO©-H'©rnoofS rn © in oo Tt r-" \o r. ri cn ^' r-' ri Tt i^" ri un m'
rHOSTtasOO_^T-HOSCnOSVOVOTtCOr^CnO©©TtSDrHTtOOSOrHrHln--HO\COCOVOOsr^©Cn
^^oocn^H^^mooN^cnMvOH^rncnlf.o\^NlnHTtrtfS^<^HH;Trtxf|^^'-
«■ rn" ci rn" rt* Cr (sT HH
)  © CS
m cn os rn
© © CS o
SO -n SO O
O cn « ti
Tf   ©   SO   rH
tt en © m
rH^HrimrHrnr-csr-
OrHr>-vcosoornr--mO'-Hr-rnOvrSrnvjD©fNoomTt©cocomi>'
cnrnr^r^ascncosocsomr^Ttvot^soosoo©cncofSOsTtrssosD<
cnoorHQor^mcooesr^mcninroosTto_m©TtcStnrHt^
i-HasoocnOriint--o©OTtoorninr~r-^rH
rHrHOssoOTtt^r^rnTtosmr4^©cososot--tNinosinrHrSsoasasavoin©rHrH!
TtrHeS      vorHin      t ri      csm      t—i      rHcs      m os ©      rHrnmcnrHr-rsc^-somTt1
T-" rn" ci
tneSsomr-rHOcSTt
sot~-r-cSrH©TtoornT-]
rn cnencorHoqr^mrnO
cs as ,-.
cs cs Tf
i so Tt rn cn
> oo in cs in
I Tt t> 00 OS
* co co oo in
1 © so © OS
J so t> rn 0O
n* sd rn m*
cn © cs r- cn
Tt OO O rH r-
Os so t- co cn
cd cs Tt co rn
ov Ov m (— co
en Tt Tt rs Tf
TtmrninsoTto©r^m©tScS_^t^T^rHrHooTtoosOvOTtin^©Tt©-HsornasO\oo©
cst^cr.©osTtcsinTtosTtOrHr^osoor^r^ovooc»cosoovcsr^ascocnTtmr^^
O-t mm ©OsO^r^ooooT-HTto^moo^cssoTtrnfNovTtOsoo cn cs c- Ov co m ©Tf rH m co ©
©Ttr^©©co©r-'nfNC--"r^© in ov" Tt sdcp ti ri ifi -t cn ri so t-' -* m ri n" rn -" ti ^f sd" «
rHt-HtnsDCSrncsmcSTtsoascScnr-ooooOsosrHococo(S©osoooovsoosmcntnmrH
T-HC^r^rNcSr~cSrHTtvorHrtC^cnso--osrHrnrH^-,i---r^       cv."rSOas©inincoint^vo
ti ti ti       ti rs       rn o       m
■5. s. §
9 __ _•
o fa -> u
| § g.S
£o2^
§18
Sol
owz
oo .
S
_d  o> _.
O rt
Ph>
s°?
So;
_i ■_!
T3 rt
_hl
g ss a-a-
_l"|a
•ooJ-E'Bio;
oaflBBii'otc_sb?'_'ia!_
u„i_  3C^G^>-_SK^CCOS_i^
05tS^«_S»'50».'-».,1-i!.33
O J
re
53°
k. * a
CmU<
M B 2 J_
| s g
C3   QJ   3
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
Z 31
w Q\ \U (N ffi
Tt rt ©„© SO
l> rH SO OS OO
oo os cn Tt oo
Tt ov HTtr-
rn rimes
osTtm©o©TtinTtsooo©OvmcSTtsoov©soooTtT-HoorHoovocor--Hrncn-Hmosm
vocNr^TT--ocsc»somo\OTtosOsmr^Tt©r--ir.©orsmosrHinr^Tt-Hincocor~r~-
rN r-cosocsr-cn oo in rn i> o os h co_ l^ q » cn ia ^o ■* oo h in t^.cr3.°i,ril.rir^clrC0\cvirl
rnoor^vdoo'ciminsdosoCsom a so i^ d ri d oo «n t* oo" vo co so io vo ^ Tt oo" d c^ fN rs
-^ os cs m TtTtmmTtcSOssorH©incSc^cst^r^mrHcorHsovoocssor-v£)VDvornTt
iti N       0s00mTtTtrncSsDrHrnosOc^rn»nt^T^ininTtO\rnrnOcSrncSrH©cS
CN ririoO rH tA CS iHH ri ri
© m oo c- c-
m Tt © m m
OvtOrrOO
f sC i
OO OS OS
r* rn m
Tt m Ov
r~or-©moscs©r-oomcs
m©mmm'-H©ovoscrsr-
m©cnsOTtinco©rninr^rH
©mCS COVDTtvdvOTtrHrH
cs cn cs rn cS
©©csmoocsmTtTtOvsocsosm
mvo©rH-tmsoo©0\ooc~-oooo
csooornoor-TtsooTtovmr-m
Tt oocs mmcorHrnvdr^ocoTtm
TJ-    Ti ti   Ti fN    r-Nr-H
r- oo tj- © Tt Tt
© " 00 so so SO
cn m rn rs *h ©
mo©oo©©©©o©©QO©©r--©m©©©in©©r-om©es©m©o©OTt©o©©
r-m©inmmm©o©mmomm©r-csco©oor-©soQomr-in©mr~-mmoo©inm©mm
^itiOMf.TtM3\«)h\OOf|Hin rn ts » n o rJOr;r-(v|fniflosO'-_vocoitivOTt\tON«)ir.O
cxTmin-iriririosri oo* cn oo" oo" ti O -h !/. co ^ a Ov h ri ov" co" so if. -h m" oC Tt tt" m" so" it. t" cn o" d ri
rHCNinosrHrNcncSCS       rH ts       rHrHSfrHinTteS       ■-.       rs*       i-.osT-inrtcSmm.-H rr cn
(ft rH
CS Tt
cS oo m CS
CS CS Os SO
rn m © Os
«* r-T ,^T «-?
os os rn r^ r^
OS Tt OS © vo
OO TJ. rn m rH
CS rt
en en  rH Ct
•"I cs
cs
I r» © ©
_j rn rn m
! cn rt m m
rf ri rn cS
Os
cn
r- ©
© r-
r- OS
SO
CS
©
cn
m in
rH   OS
CS CN
0\pi
rt- t-h
rt OS
ri CS'
(ft
c^cnOvor~-inm©mmcnosooscocoTtrHi>.t--rHQ-!tT--t
cnMTt^l-t^(»voHlnQOTtOf.a\|fJTt^coo^oowootnlf.r^^^lfiTH^Hlf.c^H^
ocna^«)0\^oo^hMq^H(^qcnTto\H^\oinTrcofTTtTtH^oiif.Tthoov
cor^©vdmrisooo"rncs cs" <-h t+ox. os r- oo t- rn m rioorfcN"©"sd©ovdosm©m"rn'ri
mmsoooovmovtN-^osrnrnrTVOcococo-Hrnoscsr~-rt«nmosrHincs »-< m -h m so so Tt
osmr-mininrH osr^mrtTtrScsm©oasosrTCsmr~-mrrmmovmts©tsm(ST-H
Ttti      n" tiririoo ,_; ^J      ,_r-i ,_?
Os m m
rn so ri
r> so <n
tHCo'i-"
rH 00 Tt
© T-H
m © m m o\
rt m 00 t-h ©
CS CS Os VO st.
.soinosr~-vo©mTtr~-t--sommTtsovoosmvosomTtovsooocsoo
._   ..-oor~ossqrHa\mr^mrSrrcoasr~-TtinooostsmoscscSrtcomm
Hsomrtrnr^csc^©r--r^osr^©mo^cocSmoo^©vocomsoc^
r^oscs©mrfinvdco"mr~^rfcdmGoin m Ovrim rt rfrn ^osmrtoCr^osor^rt-H,©rnriinvom©
cNrtt^m©mr-©inrHrNcscno©TtrHr^Ttrtt^mvor-rtOvt^rHTtsocomcsinmTtvososocST
inr-mminoinrt r-eN.—iT-.rHOs.-HinvOrHT--->. •" "' ~"   "
oo oo r- m o
© t~~ 00 t-h rn
rH   t— rH   SO
^TtrtrHt-.-frNmcS^HrtsOrHrSrt'
m oo o vo wi
CS CS © SO OO rt
0*0^(0 1/1"-
Nr-mvoh
.O»0^Q0lf.MTtN^OTt(^HMrtNfnTt^n00M00C0fn^-Ol?lfNTtHH^lf.r(fn
ort«ooTt©sorncoOvrimososrsoomrnrSi>mosmr~co©o\mosr--sor--oocsmT-H
.^lnrl^o^cecorlO\Bcnr^q^qnqqH^o^ln\OTt(S^^cno•H^^ooTt(^)
"rioincominr^timso rtcs Os m en en r^cs os" ov oo" oo" o" co" ri ov oo" iti >tf o" ri —" ri itT m"
rsr-insor—rHomcom mr-eNinsor_-rN!--smrn
(NsosoooinmcocsmrHocsooeS'-H"—ir~©rrr*'
OvrHinOvfNm       nn       t— inrrrnencnrH©rfcoi
WrH*ti ri" rH m
rf © tN -h (N m ir
so © rs o oo rr so <
m  t-h CS tS rH rH
m tS oo © Ov
cn r- ov o c-
-h rt co m Os
m m ri Tt so
u    |H
> y
a >
5 o§
rH   W   "
__.    H_    ™
*    £    «
2 a \
tf,_3>5 .
_2 * ,q ^ «
iS  §_?•?  6   ~     '    -    ~   "-'■
§uz^_.(_,Moa)_,(-,H
Sot
"3;
rt rj  O,
° C*
SS 3  «5
to Z o
ID    U .S
c C S 5 0
*«s j-slloil
<D  iu  "   «,sh   usv  35 *3-.a
-'  u rt->H 3 «H S  H. J_? .2 *d
rt 7_i   c?
S-Offi.S
;piuu«-.fi'H>o^2du = ciH3«3r
£   3   CU   Q ^   W<D   t-<   od   3o   rt   (S 5__H   O   «""_.___ S   °f 3
■/5pq>fc2c_(jL(awc!_oujKjz o< u u < aS < £
111
S32
Z o
PhO
h<S 3 2 S
 Z 32
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
rs
s
•S
s
0
U
VD
Pi
<
w
Pi
<
9
z
w
tf]
<
u
tfl
ffi
H
rt
o
W5
H
U
r—(
rt
H
t/3
O
O
ffi
u
v.
><
Ph
5
z
tfl
>
tfl
rt
CO
o
©
3~
en
cn
cs
©
SO
voossocSmrtr-rHTtmm
oo
3
rHSOrH^OmootSSDrfOscS
Tt
oocSOsrHr-mrtcooomc~-
sd
o
H
^g-rHrHrHtSrHrHSDCSrHtS
m
vO
(S
(ft
eg
i
oo
g><
*»
m
£ 3
u O
OS
■
fe
s g
W(H
.
a£
l4Hr
CS © p- CS     1
tS Tt 00 ©
r-
m © OS TT
m m m ©
cs
Tt m      so
Os CS 00 rN
w _2
T-Jri     Tt
CS   ri ri
OS
18
(ft
t-
&1
3 2
(ft
eS£
CQ
3
© co © co os ©
or-©©
Ti
SO   rH   O    rH   OV   ©
os ts m m
rt
11
W-      n <© «n cs
t-h rn
rn © rt
ti t> m
OS
Os
II
—
00
ri
(ft
i oo
ir-
rrent
pital
ances
plied
cs
m
Os
p
SO
3 rt>_j a
VO
0O^<
(ft
OOrHOmOvOsmrHrHOS©
Ov
©rtsO©oortr-OSOO'--0
OS
rt
rlcivi?.viri.^j,ri,,;t.r^.^cl
SO
o
oo t-h so© oiinrfmossDsd
SO
s
rn
©
3
en
in
CS
(ft
Cfl
a
oosor-osoocsmr~-©m
oo
rHoomootsossooootS
00
■aSl
•8 If
£/_"©mtsmcncscoi>so
Tt
ri      os" so r~* so      so m"
ri
rn           rn      so
O
MQ cr
IH   ->
|
p3
(ft
c
oo en rt oo
© cs r- so
rH -H so rt OS m
cs oo cS t— m r-
rn cs m OS
rn oo cs en m m
cs
oo t-h rf Os
W-rH   rH
Os sc
Os OC
Os CS
cn CS
Tt
cn
ts
rH
Os
>o
oo
0
m
O
(ft
T3
OJ
3
5
u
i
3
1
a
O
z
9
-o
J,
c
CO
t>
^
'C
0>
££
m
i
5
3
z
k.
Ea
^_J
a
*3
(_>
&.
r-j
cfl
5
13
I
u
c
f
a
T
t
V-
1
*
c
1
it
£
-
>
0
C
P.
t-
d
a
t-
i
E
r
I
1-
c
c
i
5
1
,_■
a
B
1-
L
1
s-
j
X
f-
T-
'I
tn
o
a
ri
-O
<_>
N
ci
"rt
O
H
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT Z 33
GENERAL REVIEW
Local Responsibility for Education
In every community there are three major groups concerned with the quality,
objectives, and accomplishments of education. There are the teachers and educational administrators responsible for the instructional programme. There are also
boards of education or trustees concerned with over-all policy in educational matters,
and finally the parents, who have a particular and unique role to play in the general
well-being of those to be educated. The influence wielded by each of these groups
varies greatly with the time, the place, and the kind of educational institution being
considered. When a community has what is regarded as a superior local school
system, it is usually because the teachers, the trustees, and the parents together take
a keen interest and pride in that system. Conversely, the responsibility for " bad "
education must be shared by all three groups and cannot be apportioned percentagewise among them.
Since each group has a different base for its duties and responsibilities, its
relationship to the school and the problems of education will vary. In the first
place, members of the teaching profession follow a specialized occupation, generally with professional competency, and should be accorded proper recognition for
their training, for their skill in teaching, and for their scientific approach to the
general field of education. The school trustees, as representatives of the people,
are held accountable for the physical requirements of the schools, for the general
welfare of both teachers and pupils, and for giving expression to the wishes of the
people in terms of what they want in the local educational system. The deepest
and most fundamental responsibility is that of the parents, who in the final analysis
determine the objectives of education. They also, along with other members of the
community, pay the taxes or make financial contributions to keep the schools in
operation. The harmonious co-operation of these components of the community
is needed if their responsibilities for effective and realistic education are to be
discharged.
Retirements
Two District Superintendents of Schools retired in June, 1962—Mr. C. J.
Frederickson, District Superintendent for Burnaby, and Mr. K. B. Woodward,
District Superintendent for Surrey.
Mr. Frederickson began teaching in North Bend in the early 1920's and subsequently taught at New Denver, Nelson, and Kelowna. From 1931 to 1936 he was
principal of the Kelowna Junior High School, one of the first in the Province. From
there he went to Powell River Elementary-Junior-Senior High School as supervising
principal from 1936 to 1938. In the latter year he was appointed an Inspector of
Schools and served in a number of areas until he became Inspector and District
Superintendent of Schools for Burnaby, where he has been for the past eleven years.
In 1961 Mr. Frederickson received the Fergusson Memorial Award from the British
Columbia Teachers' Federation for outstanding service to education.
Mr. Woodward held teaching positions in elementary schools at Nanaimo, Port
Simpson, Alice Arm, North Vancouver, and was principal of the Trail Central
School from December, 1929, to August, 1935, when he was appointed to the
inspection staff of the Department of Education. Except for the period 1941-42,
when he was on the staff of the Victoria Normal School, he served as Inspector at
Smithers and at Rossland before he became Municipal Inspector of Schools for
Surrey in 1943.
 Z 34 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
The contribution that these gentlemen have made to education in our Province
over the years can hardly be measured. They were outstanding in their professional
leadership, highly respected by the boards they served, and well regarded by the
communities in which they lived.
Appointments
Five District Superintendents of Schools were appointed in May-—-two as
replacements and three as additions to staff. These were as follows: Mr. R. E.
Flower, principal of the Williams Lake Secondary School; Mr. E. E. Lewis, principal of Mission Senior Secondary School; Mr. D. E. McFee, principal of the South
Peace Senior Secondary School, Dawson Creek; Mr. D. H. MacKirdy, principal of
the Brooks Junior Secondary School, Powell River; and Mr. F. T. Middleton,
Director of Elementary Instruction in the Kamloops School District.
Other appointments included Mr. K. K. Maltman, Recreation Consultant,
Kelowna, as Co-ordinator of Sports and Fitness, Community Programmes Branch;
Mr. A. L. Cartier, Director of Night-schools, Langley, as Assistant Director of
Community Programmes, to be in charge of night-schools; Mr. Cecil Roper, Faculty
of Commerce, University of British Columbia, as principal of the British Columbia
Institute of Technology at Burnaby; Mr. Philip Calder MacGregor, supervising
principal of Connaught Junior High School, Prince George, as principal of the new
British Columbia Vocational School at Prince George.
Mr. A. J. Longmore, principal of the Summerland Junior-Senior High School,
and Mr. R. B. Knowles, principal of the Rutland Elementary School, were seconded
from the Provincial school system by arrangement with their respective School
Boards for a one-year period to assist in curriculum development in the Department
of Education.
Departmental Conference
A successful three-day Departmental conference was held in the Easter vacation from April 25th to 27th under the general direction of Mr. E. E. Hyndman,
Chief Inspector of Schools. The theme of the conference was " The Junior Secondary School," which was timely in that District Superintendents of Schools and
other Departmental staff were about to be faced with decisions relating to programmes under development at this level. Intensive study was given to the following
aspects of the junior secondary school: Philosophical considerations, administration
in the secondary school, programming, in-service teacher education for the junior
secondary school, the occupational programme, examinations, tests and standards,
as well as the vocational programme for the senior secondary school as it was envisaged at that time. Further reference to the conference is made elsewhere in
this Report.
Legislation
(a) Public Schools Act and Rules of Council of Public Instruction
The Public Schools Act was amended in a number of sections. The more important of these related to the establishment and the closing of elementary and
secondary schools by Boards of School Trustees; payment of grants, in respect of
kindergarten classes, to the Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia;
the establishment and maintenance of adult education programmes in day or night
schools; the construction of community facilities by municipalities on school-sites;
a further reduction in the pupil-teacher ratio at the elementary-school level; provision for a Board of School Trustees to require that the wages paid by a contractor
should be in accordance with the prevailing rate in the school district as fixed under
the Public Works Fair Wages and Conditions of Employment Act.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT Z 35
The rules of the Council of Public Instruction were also amended in certain
respects. The most important amendment covers the conditions governing the
operation of day and night schools.
Copies of amendments to the Act and revised rules of the Council of Public
Instruction were sent to all school authorities at the end of the school-year.
(b) Vocational Schools Assistance Act
Legislation was brought down respecting a new Act known as the Vocational
Schools Assistance Act. The purpose of this Act is to make it possible for school
districts in the Province to participate in Federal-Provincial grants for the construction and equipping of vocational training facilities in secondary schools. This
legislation enables the Province, under prescribed conditions, to make cash grants
to school districts and to afford school districts an opportunity to share indirectly in
Federal funds.
Acknowledgment
The school-year 1961/62 was an exceptionally busy one. Almost every person
in the Department was involved in one aspect or another in the reorganization of the
programme in the elementary and secondary schools. Frequent meetings were held
and important decisions were made early in the year in order that the programme
for Grade VIII would be available for September, 1962. Much of the responsibility
for this work fell upon Mr. F. P. Levirs, Assistant Superintendent in Charge of
Instruction, who provided keen insight into the problems which had to be faced.
I am deeply indebted to him and to other members of the Department, as well as
to the District Superintendents, for their co-operation throughout the year.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. F. K. ENGLISH,
Superintendent of Education.
 Z 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1961/62
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
REPORT OF G. W. GRAHAM, B.A., ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT
OF EDUCATION (ADMINISTRATION)
School Districts
During the 1961/62 school-year two new unattached school districts were
created; these were Amai, located on the north-west coast of Vancouver Island,
and Haines, located north-west of Haines, Alaska. The Province now includes
seventy-three municipal school districts, ten rural school districts (large), and
seventeen rural school districts (unattached). These districts are under the administration of seventy-four School Boards and eleven official trustees. There are 569
school trustees serving on School Boards, and a further 423 persons serve as
attendance area representatives in thirty-six of the school districts. Because of the
failure of electors to attend the annual meetings in rural areas, many of the representatives are appointed by the Minister of Education.
School Construction
School-building construction has continued to meet the expanding needs of an
increasingly large regular enrolment in addition to meeting the extra demands due
to the establishment of more special classes and kindergartens than in former years.
During the school-year 1961/62, thirty school districts placed referenda amounting
to $27,000,000 for school construction before the electors. The electors authorized
the expenditure of $24,500,000 for school construction. The electors of four school
districts, by defeating the referenda, rejected the proposals of their School Boards.
In 1961, 711 classrooms and special rooms and thirty-eight gymnasium-
auditoriums and activity rooms were constructed under contracts amounting to
$17,750,000. The major portion of this year's building has been at the elementary-
school level. By agreement between the Federal Government and School District
No. 31 (Merritt) and School District No. 78 (Enderby), joint construction projects
were undertaken and the Indian pupils of the area were included in the local public
school system.
The School Planning Division of the Department continues to check and
approve plans and expenditures for public schools as submitted by the School
Boards. An analysis of school-construction costs indicates that they have remained
steady, and it would appear that as better communication routes develop in the
Province, the differential in the cost of construction created by geographic location
is becoming less. The School Planning Division has also provided twenty-eight
school districts with plans for the construction of schools to a contract amount of
$2,000,000.
The Department policy of approving expenditures of a specific amount to equip
new school buildings rather than continuing the former policy of approving the type
and item of equipment has proven to be more satisfactory and has allowed flexibility
and autonomy at the local level.
Assistance to Isolated Areas
All pupils who five in isolated areas where neither school accommodation nor
transportation is available may apply for correspondence work from the Corre-
 ADMINISTRATION BRANCH Z 37
spondence Branch of the Department of Education. In conjunction with the
Correspondence Branch, and under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, if four or
more pupils are assembled for the regular school-hours and are tutored by a qualified instructor, the Province may make a grant of $15 per month toward the salary
of the instructor for each pupil doing satisfactory work. An effort is being made to
assure that instructors will be reasonably qualified. There are now twenty-six
classes, enrolling 142 pupils in operation.
 Z 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
Instructional Services
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION (INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES)
Instructional services include the work of the following divisions, each of
which has its own director and submits its own annual report: Curriculum; Tests,
Standards, and Research; Secondary School Correspondence; Elementary School
Correspondence; Visual Education; School Radio Broadcasts; Home Economics;
Jericho Hill School; and the Textbook Branch. There are, in addition, aspects of
instructional services that do not fall readily under any of the above-named divisions;
these form the substance of this report.
Staff
During a large portion of this school-year, the services of Dr. E. E. Lucas,
Director of Secondary School Correspondence, were utilized by the Ministry of
Education in Jamaica under a Ford Foundation grant. Mr. D. Kershaw, Assistant
Director, took charge of the Division during her absence. Similarly, under the
participation programme of UNESCO, Mr. J. R. Pollock, Director of Visual Education, was loaned as an expert in audio-visual aids to the Government of Kuwait
for a period of three months. Mr. N. M. Henderson, Assistant Director, was in
charge of the Division during his absence. This recognition by the educational
authorities of the work done by our senior officials reflects great credit on them.
Three staff meetings of Directors were held during the school-year.
Accreditation of Schools
The Accrediting Committee considered 100 applications this year and accepted
fifty-six schools for accreditation, three for the first time. Thirteen schools were
accredited for four years, fifteen for three, thirteen for two, and fifteen for one year.
One school was restored to the accredited list, and three were removed from it.
Remaining on the list from previous years were forty-seven schools.
Teacher Qualification
The shortage of fully qualified teachers for secondary schools has lead to
employment of teachers with elementary-school qualifications only. A determined
effort is being made to reduce the number of these by replacing them as supply
increases and by having them improve their certification. A study over the last few
years shows that both efforts have been moderately successful. The number of
these teachers teaching at senior grade levels—Grade X and up—in academic fields
has remained substantially the same, but the percentage has definitely decreased.
In 1961/62 there were 140 concentrated mostly in remote and small schools. Of
these, fifty-six had E-A certificates and seventy-seven had taken courses to improve
their certification within the last year.
Advanced Electives Most Frequently Chosen
Greater changes than usual were evident in the frequency of choice of advanced electives: Biology 91 jumped from third to first place, History 91 and
Economics 92 each advanced one place, and Home Economics 91 dropped from
 —
'
CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
Z 39
seventh to ninth. Rank of the ten leading advanced electives was Biology 91,
Chemistry 91, Mathematics 91, English 91, Physics 91, Geography 91, History 91,
English 93, Home Economics 91, and Industrial Arts 91.
Organization of Secondary Schools
The first major change brought about by the recommendations of the Report
of the Royal Commission was the return of Grade VII to the elementary schools in
September of 1961. Since the actual shift of classes was impossible in many instances, there was a major increase in the number of children housed in schools
primarily designed for secondary grades. Of 30,652 elementary pupils in secondary
schools, 17,458 were in schools that previously had no elementary pupils. Most
of these would be in Grade VII. An additional result was a slight decrease in the
number of secondary pupils enrolled in the typical school. Schools with over 2,000
secondary pupils enrolled disappeared. The percentage enrolling over 500 secondary pupils decreased to 66.6 per cent.
The ratio of total number of secondary pupils to total numbers of instructional
staff members showed a decrease to 21.8, the lowest point yet reached.
As this was in the last year for the pre-Royal Commission type of school
organization, figures showing changes over recent years may have a historical
interest. The following table shows the numbers of schools reporting from 1955
to 1961, inclusive:—
Type of School
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
28
27
60
50
7
27
29
32
66
51
8
26
30
32
73
47
13
28
32
35
74
50
15
23
39
50
71
46
11
21
40
54
75
42
14
22
42
61
76
Elementary-senior high _   	
41
13
Superior 	
23
Totals         	
199
212
223
229
238
247
256
With the advent of the longer school-day in secondary schools, a minimum
increase to 5V_s hours, new types of time-table organization appeared. Whereas 126
schools used the favourite " 60-5-7 " week and sixty-four the traditional " 43-7-5 "
week, forty-eight schools tried out a new fifty-minute period, six-period day, six-day
week, and sixteen others tried still other forms of organization.
Grade VII Examinations and Promotions to Grade VIII
Under new regulations, all Grade VII pupils were required to write final
examinations in June, the results to be used to confirm the judgment of teachers
and principal in the promotion of students. The examinations were either prepared
in the school district itself or by arrangement over several school districts.
To assist the smaller school districts, the Department also furnished a set of
seven such examinations in English Reading and Literature; English Grammar,
Usage, and Composition; English Spelling, Dictation, and Word Study; Mathematics Computation; Mathematics Problems; Social Studies; and Science. These
were prepared by experienced teachers commissioned by the Department but were
marked within the local district.
Thirty-six districts used all seven examinations; five others used one or more
examinations. The total number of pupils writing ranged from a minimum of
7,765 in Reading and Literature to a maximum of 8,760 in Grammar, Usage, and
Composition.
 Z 40
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
These examinations are not to be confused with the standardized tests given
to all Grade VII pupils in April by the Division of Tests and Standards.
Reports from the districts in July, 1962, showed that a total of 27,809 pupils
out of 27,952 registered in Grade VII classes on June 15, 1962, wrote final examinations. After consideration of all factors governing promotion, including the
results of these examinations, 24,564 were recommended for promotion to the
Grade VIII regular programme, 1,550 were recommended to the first year of the
Occupational Programme, and 1,821 were asked to repeat Grade VII.
Grade XIII Enrolments
The number and size of Grade XIII classes continued to increase. Enrolment
on September 30, 1961, was reported as 1,974 in thirty-eight classes, an increase
from 1,377 in thirty-three classes in one year.
Kindergartens
The first year of the new regulations covering kindergartens showed 6,276
pupils enrolled in ninety-one classes in eighty-five schools in thirteen school districts
as of September 30, 1961.
Schools for Retarded Children
Schools operated by local chapters of the Association for Retarded Children
showed a slight decrease in number and enrolments as four more school districts
took over the direct operation of special classes for the trainable retarded of school
age. A total of 452 children, 403 of whom were eligible for grant, was enrolled
in thirty-six schools. With the 232 children in public schools, the number of trainable mentally retarded enrolled in day-schools rose to a new high of 684, an increase
of fifty-five over the previous record of one year before.
Retention of Pupils in Schools
Retention rates of the public schools continue to increase. For each 100
pupils enrolled in Grade VII in 1955/56, there were sixty-one enrolled in Grade
XII in 1960/61. This was a new high, the comparable figure for the preceding
year being fifty-eight.
Special Classes in Public Schools
These continued to increase in number, as shown by the table below,
ments are as at September 30th.
Enrol-
Type of Class
Number of Teachers
Number of Pupils
1961
1960
1961
1960
211
18
6
15
5
13
2
2
2
6
3
23
1
1
161
21
5
17
5
13
2
2
2
4
3
13
1
3,190
293
213
51
289
18
17
11
66
56
232
11
2,394
317
240
56
276
19
29
14
37
62
138
10
Totals
308       1         249
4.447       1      3.592
1 Enrolment varies.
 CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES Z 41
Local Supervisory Personnel
The following table shows the number of district teachers employed in supervisory and special capacities as at September 30th:—
1961 I960
Directors of instruction  12 11
Supervisors of instruction  68 56
Teacher consultants  22 27
Special counsellors  33 31
District teachers other than relieving teachers  31 36
Totals  166 161
New Legislation and Royal Commission Recommendations
The major activity of this office was in further implementation of the reorganization of schools. Although many of the changes are reported by the Division of
Curriculum, the following should be noted here as a matter of record:—-
(1) A complete new programme for Grade VIII, as the exploratory year of
the junior secondary school, was prepared.
(2) Administrative and curricular procedures were outlined for the first year
of the Occupational Programme.
(3) New report cards, completely revised after a year's experience and study,
were prepared at primary, intermediate, and secondary grade levels.
(4) A promotional policy for promotion from Grade VII to Grade VIII, with
some suggestions as to procedures, was issued.
(5) A new system of nomenclature for schools, replacing the terms "junior
high school," " senior high school," and " superior school" with definitions
of "junior secondary" and "senior secondary" schools was devised.
(6) For the second consecutive year, the pupil-teacher ratio in elementary
schools was reduced by Statute. In addition, special entitlement was
given occupational classes in secondary schools.
(7) Provision was made for the recognition of kindergarten pupils in schools
for retarded children. The per pupil grant to be paid in such cases was
set at half that for pupils of school age.
(8) Regulations regarding programmes of adult education were brought into
conformity with more modern practice.
Division of Curriculum
REPORT OF J. R. MEREDITH, B.A., B.Ed., DIRECTOR
During the year 1961/62 this Division engaged in an extensive programme of
curriculum-development work. Major aspects of this programme may be summarized as follows:—
Elementary
The arithmetic programme was revised to introduce arithmetical skills and
concepts in earlier grades than was formerly done and to emphasize a mathematical
approach in teaching for understanding. This revision was developed in consultation with members of the Departmental and teaching staff in Alberta, who were
engaged in similar revision studies. The joint project authorized two years ago by
the Ministers of Education in both Provinces has resulted in the development of
 Z 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
two programmes. Each of them is adaptable, but both have a reasonable degree of
uniformity. The revision for British Columbia will be introduced, beginning with
Grade III, in September, 1962. Since it represents a significant change from the
existing programme, the Division of Curriculum and the office of the Chief Inspector
of Schools assisted in an extensive programme of in-service training conducted
largely on the initiative of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation with considerable assistance being given by Boards of School Trustees, the College of Education,
and the University Department of Mathematics. The Division of Curriculum has
also planned some experimental work to determine whether or not content in the
revised programme can be introduced earlier than is presently planned.
Further revisions were made in the Provincially prescribed cards for reporting
to parents. During the year a revised card was used on a trial basis, and opinions
and recommendations were obtained from a variety of sources as to its effectiveness.
The Professional Committee on Curriculum Development spent a great deal of
time in assessing this material. In view of the many conflicting and contradictory
opinions as to what constitutes a desirable card, it was suggested that local authorities be permitted to develop their own cards. The Department, while recognizing
some merit in this proposal, considered it advisable to revise the Provincial card to
make it as far as possible educationally sound and generally acceptable to those for
whom it is intended. A revised card was therefore developed, which incorporated
many of the changes suggested and allowed for flexibility in its use at the discretion
of the local authorities. This card will be used effective September, 1962. Provision was also made for reporting to be done on a card prescribed or approved by
the Department.
The study of dictionaries for elementary schools was continued. A new Canadian beginner's dictionary suitable for Grades IV and V was recommended. Since
this is a teaching dictionary rather than a personal dictionary, it was considered
advisable to recommend it for school rather than pupil purchase. The study will
continue to deal with dictionaries suitable for purchase for upper grades.
Work was continued on the preparation of material for adapting the curriculum to the needs of slow-learning pupils in elementary schools. It is expected that
a special bulletin will be completed for September, 1963.
Secondary
As noted in the Report for last year, Grade VII has been classified as an
elementary-school grade, and Grade VIII became the first year of secondary school.
A special bulletin outlining all Grade VII subjects was prepared. Revisions were
completed and textbooks changed as required for Grade VIII in the following
subjects: English (Language), Mathematics, French, Home Economics, and Industrial Arts. Each of these revisions has been designed to remove repetition and
insignificant content and allow for the constructing of specific courses to challenge
the individual abilities of the various classes. The requirements for Grade VIII
were prepared and announced for September, 1962, as follows:—
After careful consultation with general curriculum committees and after consideration of the needs of the pupils and the practicality of the changes suggested,
the Department is reorganizing the Grade VIII programme to serve the following
purposes:-—■
(1) To provide an introductory and exploratory year for all pupils entering
secondary schools. For this reason, the curriculum will be limited as to
electives but will provide experience in each of the main fields of study.
 CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
Z 43
(2) To provide increased emphasis on the basic subjects and an order of
priority of emphasis in other subjects. Time allotted to English, Mathematics, Social Studies, and Science has all been increased.
(3) To provide opportunity in the basic subjects for pupils to concentrate in
these fields according to their needs. Minimum and maximum times are
therefore allotted to English and Mathematics, in the belief that there is
a wide variation in the times required by different pupils to acquire
competence appropriate to the grade level in these fields.
(4) To provide pupils with an opportunity to identify and develop their
aptitudes and interests before making a tentative selection of the programme they will follow in later years of school.
Time Allotments
(In percentages of time and in minutes per 1,500-minute
instructional week.)
Subject
Percentage
of Time
Minutes
Required	
88-100
1,320-1,500
English 	
16- 24
240-   360
Mathematics       	
16- 20
240-   300
Social Studies 	
16
240
Science   —_   	
12
180
Physical and Health Education, Guidance
12
180
French     	
8
120
Industrial Arts or Home Economics	
8
120
Electives—
Agriculture                _                             1
Art                                       	
- 0- 12
'
Music	
0-   180
Additional   Industrial  Arts   or   Home
Economics 	
Notes on Above.—1. English will include instruction in library procedures.
2. The French requirement is not envisaged as being a narrowly academic grammatically oriented study
about a foreign language. It is intended to provide introductory experiences in learning a modern living language
through the use of natural situations and the experience of hearing, speaking, reading, and writing.
3. Home Economics or Industrial Arts has been made compulsory on a reduced time basis for one year in
the belief that all pupils need or can benefit in a predominantly academic curriculum from some organized
training in the practical skills involved.
4. Students on the minimal programme in English and (or) Mathematics will be able to take up to a total
of 12 per cent of their time in electives.
5. It is important to make sure that, where teachers are available, pupils who may wish to take one or both
of Art and Music have the opportunity of doing so.
In addition to the revisions in the regular Grade VIII programme, a special
programme was developed for a small group of pupils whose record and special
interests indicate that they are unlikely tosucceed or profit from secondary education of the type normally provided. This programme is referred to as an Occupational Programme, and its chief purpose is to give further education at a post-
elementary level to pupils who in former years would drop out of school. Enrolment
is voluntary, and the sole purpose is to provide an essentially practical curriculum
leading eventually to successful employment. The first year of this programme was
completed for use in September, 1962.
Revisions were also completed for a number of senior grades. The two courses
in bookkeeping were revised to bring them into line with modern Canadian practice.
The second course in Latin was revised, and a Canadian textbook was authorized.
 Z 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1961/62
The final Guidance course was revised, and a new Canadian textbook specially
written for this purpose was prescribed. Revisions were made in report cards similar in nature to those undertaken for the elementary school. For Grade XIII (first-
year university), changes were made in Chemistry and Mathematics, and a new
course in Zoology was authorized. Changes were also made in the recommendations
regarding dictionaries suitable for this level. All of these changes are designed to
make the Grade XIII programme in public schools comparable to that offered in
the University.
Considerable attention was also given to planning the further reorganization
of the secondary-school curriculum. Particular study is being undertaken in respect
of secondary-school programmes in vocational fields. Tentative definitions and statements of aims of vocational, industrial arts, and technical education programmes
have been developed as a basis for further planning.
Information Services
Directives and information in the form of circulars were issued regularly to all
schools to keep them informed of changes and to draw attention to curriculum
matters requiring emphasis. Nearly 2,000 such circulars were issued at regular
intervals during the year. Included with them were special supplements recommending books suitable for school libraries. The increase in the demand for an
informational and administrative service is such that the provision of expanded
facilities may have to be considered in the near future.
Acknowledgment
It is evident from the foregoing that a very extensive programme of curriculum
development is being undertaken. A new plan was approved for engaging the
services of two curriculum consultants selected from experienced qualified school
personnel. These consultants, with the co-operation of the School Boards, will be
brought into the Department on a leave-of-absence basis to work in the field of
curriculum. In addition, mention should be made of the extensive professional
assistance provided by those who act on the Department's various committees.
During the year there were fifteen revision committees at work on specific subjects,
two committees on library books, four advisory committees on geography, commerce, chemistry, and music, as well as the two new professional committees dealing
with the technical aspects of curriculum planning at the elementary and secondary
levels. In addition, acknowledgment should be made of the Provincial Curriculum
Advisory Board. Three meetings of this Board were held during the year, and
significant study was given to matters concerning curriculum policy, including such
things as the new Grade VIII programme, vocational education, adult education,
and report cards.
The work of all these committees is invaluable to the Department and the
cause of education generally throughout the Province. Sincere appreciation is
extended to all who have participated and contributed their time and professional
advice so generously.
 SPECIAL SERVICES
Z 45
SPECIAL SERVICES
REPORT OF WILLIAM A. PLENDERLEITH, M.A., D.P/ED., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.,
CO-ORDINATOR OF SPECIAL SERVICES
The Conveyance of School-children
The following statistics indicate details connected with the conveyance of
school-children during the school-year 1961/62:—
Item
1. Number of large school districts providing transportation	
2. Number of unattached districts providing transportation	
3. Total number of vehicles...—	
(a) District-owned        411
(b) Contract         134
(c) Other (water taxis, etc.)  8
4. Total daily approved mileage 	
(a) Average distance per vehicle (miles)	
(b) Average number of trips per vehicle	
1961/62
78
3
553
33,893
61.3
2.1
1,180
14.4
46,791
5. Total number of daily trips by all vehicles	
Average distance per single trip (miles)	
6. Total number of pupils carried daily	
(a) Elementary  23,593
(b) Secondary   23,198
7. Average number of pupils carried per vehicle       84.4
8. Average number of pupils carried per route       39.7
Transportation Assistance
In addition to the operation of regular school transportation services, each
School Board is empowered to make a grant to parents who provide their own
transportation for their children. These grants are given in cases where there are
insufficient pupils beyond Departmental walk limits to establish a regular bus route.
During the school-year, 1,763 pupils from sixty districts utilized this means
of conveyance at a total cost of $272,902.
Table of Transportation Costs
The following table indicates the relationship between the total district expenditure and the total conveyance costs over the past seven years:—
Calendar Year
Total District
Expenditures
Conveyance
Costs
Conveyance
Costs as a
Percentage
of District
Expenditures
1955         	
$62,238,464
69,234,423
80,966,873
91,279,662
105,044,901
118,269,991
127,616,486
$1,812,353
1,918,902
2,104,443
2,236,918
2,340,813
2,477,202
2,611,370
2.9
1956	
2.8
1957	
2.5
1958   	
2.4
1959   ...
2.2
1960	
2.1
1961	
2.0
 Z 46
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
School Dormitories
In many isolated rural sections of the large school districts, it is impossible
for the School Boards to provide transportation services for secondary pupils who
desire to attend centralized secondary schools. In order to enable these pupils to
attend secondary schools that offer a full high-school programme, authority to
operate school dormitories is given to School Boards.
The following table provides data respecting the dormitories that were in operation during 1961/62:—
School District
Capacity
Occupany,
1961/62
Staff
Grade Limits
Accommodated
Number and Name
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Full
Time
J? art
Time
From
To
15
23
18
12
20
45
16
28
50
14
25
18
10
24
45
12
30
50
15
19
17
11
12
25
11
14
36
14
20
15
6
7
32
10
17
36
1
1
2
1
2
3
2
4
4
li
1
2
VIII
IX
DC
VIII
IX
IX
IX
rx
IX
XIII
XII
28. Quesnel _	
?». Lillooet	
XII
XII
56. Vanderhoof	
XII
XIII
58. McBride	
XII
XIII
XII
Totals (9) 	
227
228
160
157
20
8
VIII
XIII
i Week-ends.
Boarding Allowances
For pupils who are unable to take advantage of transportation or dormitization,
the School Board is empowered to provide a boarding allowance. Under this
arrangement a pupil can receive up to $30 per month on a basis shared by the
Department of Education. During the school-year 1961/62 there were 522 pupils
from fifty-two school districts who received a total of $152,680 in such boarding
allowances.
Jericho Hill School Advisory Board
This Board consists of representatives from The Deaf and the Blind Parent-
Teacher Association, The Vancouver School Board, and the Department of
Education.
The Advisory Board met once each school-month during 1961/62 and provided monthly reports to the Department respecting the operation of the Jericho
Hill School.
The accompanying report of Dr. C. E. MacDonald, the superintendent of the
Jericho Hill School, contains the pertinent statistics relating to the enrolment in
the school.
 DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH Z 47
DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.P/ed., DIRECTOR
Three major projects occupied the attention of the staff during the 1961/62
school-year: the administration, marking, and reporting of 300,000 tests for 30,000
Grade VII pupils; the testing of ability of 26,000 Grade VIII pupils; and partial
mechanization of the handling of 63,000 matriculation examination scores.
The latter has been made necessary by the tremendous increases, both current
and expected, in the number of examination papers. The number marked in July
has tripled during the past ten years and is expected to double again during the
next twelve to fourteen. Even after the papers have been marked and the raw
scores have been obtained, the processing of scores has become a major administrative task. Data on recommendations and scholarship students must be summarized,
papers must be identified according to type of school, scales must be produced,
marks must be converted, scaled scores belonging to individual candidates must be
collated, scholarship averages must be calculated in line with rather complicated
regulations, marks must be adjudicated, and transcripts must be prepared. And,
of course, each step must be checked for accuracy. As numbers have increased,
this has become a tremendous burden for the Registrar and his staff. This Division,
which has been responsible for the intervening steps between marking and mark
entry, has been investigating and advocating systems of mechanization for several
years, and looking fearfully forward to the wave of candidates that will inundate
Grade XII in 1964.
In 1961 computer programmes were prepared and tested, while the graphical
methods of scaling that had been developed in previous years were continued. In
1962 no hand-calculations and graphs were considered necessary, and operations
were completely mechanized as far as the mark-entry stage. Punch and verifier
machines were installed in the school used as a marking headquarters, and two
shifts of operators maintained a continuous flow of punched cards. As the marking
of each subject ended, the pupils were identified by the computer, and Phase I,
distributions of raw scores of pupils in accredited, non-accredited, and private
schools, was completed. When scholarship constants, failure rates, and other
scaling data were inserted, the scales were produced and checked, after which Phase
III, the assignment of a scaled score to each candidate number, could proceed.
Scholarship candidates were identified by an " X " punch, and a preliminary programme was produced to select the highest scores among the subjects offered,
exclude certain combinations of courses, determine elegibility, and calculate the
averages.
Steps eliminated in 1962 included hand-identification of the papers, hand-
production of distributions, the calculation of percentiles, the draughting of ogives
and the reading of graphical scales, the typing of scales, the conversion of raw to
scaled scores on the papers, and the handling of the papers during mark-entry.
It must not be assumed, however, that this automatically advanced the final production of results. The use of machines requires careful scheduling and introduces
inflexibility which is not common to hand operations. While the number of persons involved at each stage was considerably smaller, some 285 man-hours and
160 machine-hours of overtime were necessary in order to meet July deadlines.
Although mark-entry and subsequent steps were carried out by hand this year, it is
 Z 48 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1961/62
obvious that the maximum benefit of automation will only become evident when
machines are installed in the Department of Education for preliminary punching
operations and the whole procedure is mechanized.
The number of University Entrance scholarship applications decreased this
year from 1,373 to 1,299, but there was an increase in the number of " serious "
scholarship candidates; i.e., those likely to obtain scholarship averages above 70
per cent. As a result, the proportion of University Entrance public-school candidates (defined as those attempting to obtain credit in English 40) whose averages
exceeded the 70-per-cent level increased from 9.4 to 9.7 per cent, while those below
70 per cent decreased from 3.5 to 2.4 per cent, and the " inelligibles " decreased
from 1.3 to 1.0 per cent. It is notable, however, that of the students designated
as "A" in English 40 by their teachers only 45 per cent wrote for scholarships, and
of the " B " students only 26 per cent wrote. Another matter of some concern is
the increasing number of students who reach Grade XII but do not graduate. In
1960/61, 64 per cent of the corresponding average enrolment in Grades II to VI
entered Grade XII, but 29 per cent of the General Programme students and 36 per
cent of the University Programme students did not meet their respective requirements for graduation. This means that 22 per cent of the original elementary-
school population, which is 34 per cent of Grade XII, do not graduate. To this
group must, of course, be added the 36 per cent who dropped out previously,
making a total of 58 per cent. As both drop-outs and failures are considerably
higher in non-urban areas and standards of admission to university are likely to
rise as population pressure increases, this problem is of great concern to rural districts. In addition, the difficulty of offering alternative courses in small rural high
schools is well recognized.
A survey of the scholastic aptitude of pupils in Grades VII and VIII was carried out in March, 1962. Public school, private school, Indian school, and Yukon
school pupils were tested in Grade VII, and British Columbia public-school pupils
only in Grade VIII. The results that were obtained provided bases of comparison
for the Grade VII achievement survey that followed during the week of April 2nd.
The purpose of the latter was badly misinterpreted in some quarters, being considered the equivalent of the British "11+" programme. ActuaUy, the purposes
of the Grade VII survey were practically the same as those of previous surveys:—
(a) To assist teachers in establishing common standards of achievement.
Previous surveys had indicated that great differences in achievement existed between different geographical regions in the Province,
between schools in the same school district, and between classes in
the same school. The chief purpose of the survey was not merely to
obtain scores on particular sub-tests, but to indicate the approximate
range of letter grades that should be assigned on other tests and examinations used in the school.
(b) To assist in the selection and guidance of pupils.
Many adults classify all children into only two categories—those
who pass and those who fail the University Programme. Actually, an
infinite number of degrees of academic success is possible, and of 120
predicted intellectual abilities, more than sixty are known. This indicates the need for continuous assessment of student potential, repeated
selection and continuous guidance conducted at the classroom level. But
realistic standards are essential in all schools, and the Grade VII tests
should provide convenient check points for teachers and administrators.
 DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS. AND RESEARCH
Z 49
Pupils
Tested
Estimated Punching Required
Pupil Reports
Identification Data
Numerical
Data
Score
Data
Items
Data
Numerical
Equivalents
56,164
29,889
710,000
807,000
707,600
687,400
141,900
687,400
224,700
298,900
112,300
Achievement  	
239,100
57,000
1,517,000    | 1,295,000
829,300
523,600    [    351,400
2,812,000
Identification data includes school and division numbers, and pupil name, number, and sex.
Numerical data includes raw sub-score data, C.A.s, M.A.s, I.Q.s, etc., but not numerical equivalents
which were gang-punched later.
Numerical equivalents were substituted for letter grades for mechanical reasons. They were not provided for such data as chronological ages.
.  .
The smallest employee and the largest test survey.
(c)  To establish British Columbia norms, make comparisons with previous
and future surveys, and determine the effect of curriculum changes.
Some of the items used in 1962 had been administered to Grade VII
in 1948 and 1959, and such readministrations provide valuable indications of trends. For example, the 1958/59 pupils showed distinct improvement over the 1948/49 group in all areas except arithmetic fundamentals and language, and it is expected that further analyses will show
that the gains have been maintained in 1962. It should also be noted
that the superiority of British Columbia students seems to be greater when
 Z 50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
they are measured with newly standardized American tests than when
they are measured with old ones. This may merely indicate that the
United States standardization populations have been more carefully
selected and therefore are lower than the ones that were used previously
and were obtained on a voluntary basis.
(d) To determine the efficiency and accuracy of pre-selection.
The validity of achievement and aptitude tests as long-term predictors
of student success is not known, and errors of selection caused by cut-off
points at various levels must be assumed.   With this in mind, a numerical
code based on pupils' and family birth dates was designed so that positive
identification in follow-up studies will be possible.    Answers may be
obtained to such questions as:   " How many children whose achievement
was below the 25th percentile in Grade VII became successful U.E. candidates? "    " What percentage of pupils with various levels of achievement have dropped out of school? "    " How soon may streaming into
academic, technical, and vocational programmes safely be carried out? "
The volume of testing, marking, coding, calculating, and collating required
for 56,164 Grades VII and VIII pupils and the reporting of 523,000 data items and
over 350,000 numerical equivalents presented many difficulties that had not been
anticipated.   Pupils often changed their home-room division number from one test
to another, or even their birth dates, thus making mechanical collation impossible.
A great deal of credit must be given to staff members, who were able to handle
the extra work in May and June and be ready by the first of July to do a similar job
on the scaling of Grade XII and Grade XIII examinations.
By-products of the first Grade VII survey that will be useful in the future are
new school and pupil coding systems, methods of obtaining C.A.s from pupil code
numbers, and several newly standardized tests; e.g., in Social Studies, which had not
previously been tested. The chief values, however, will be found in the great mass
of information that has been obtained for the Department and for local administrators, the streamlining procedures that have been developed, and the educative value
of the information that has been provided to teachers.
 HOME ECONOMICS
Z 51
HOME ECONOMICS
REPORT OF MISS MILDRED C. ORR, B.A., B.S., DIRECTOR
The total number of pupils receiving instruction in Home Economics in public
schools during 1961/62 was 36,072. The enrolment by course is shown in the
following tables:—
Home Economics 8	
12,896
Home Economics 32_ _
59
Home Economics 10	
8,392
Home Economics 91	
2,671
Home Economics 20	
5,328
Home Economics 11	
157
Home Economics 21	
457
Home Economics 23	
382
Home Economics 22	
80
Home Economics 24	
372
Home Economics 30	
4,028
Home Economics 26	
154
Home Economics 31	
186
Occupational, domestic,
and related service skills	
.__ 459
Vocational tailoring
___    34
Special and remedial or
Jericho Hill School	
slow learners
___ 370
___    47
In addition to the above, some senior Home Economics classes in public schools
were enrolled for Home Economics in the High School of Correspondence and carried on their work under the supervision of teachers who did not have sufficient
Home Economics training as yet to undertake instruction in senior Home Economics
courses.
Home Economics classes continued to be conducted in some Indian schools
also.
The return of Grade VII to the elementary-school programme removed Grade
VII pupils from the Home Economics programme in the public schools. However,
with the release of some Home Economics teacher-time and with somewhat less
pressure upon the Home Economics facilities in the public schools, it is interesting
to note the increase in enrolment in elective Home Economics courses. Such increases were especially noticeable in the basic composite courses Home Economics
10, Home Economics 20, and Home Economics 30.
The following table shows the increases in the above three elective courses:—
1960/61
1961/62
Increase
Per Cent Increase
7,406
4,509
3,767
8,392
5,328
4,028
986
819
261
13.3
18.1
6.9
Totals	
15,682
17,748
2,066
13.1
The total number of Home Economics centres in public schools of the Province
increased from 194 in 1960/61 to 204 in 1961/62. Of the new Home Economics
centres opened in 1961/62, two were in school districts which had not previously
offered Home Economics in their schools—namely, School District No. 55 (Burns
Lake) and School District No. 4 (Windermere).
The following table shows the school districts in which new Home Economics
centres were opened during 1961/62 and the number of new centres in each of these
school districts:—
 Z 52 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1961/62
Number of New Home Economics
School District Centres Opened, 1961/62
No. 4 (Windermere)   1
No. 20 (Salmon Arm)   1
No. 24 (Kamloops)   1
No. 39 (Vancouver)   1
No. 41 (Burnaby)   2
No. 42 (Maple Ridge)   1
No. 44 (North Vancouver)   2
No. 55 (Burns Lake)   1
No. 59 (Peace River South)  1
No. 63 (Saanich)   1
No. 65 (Cowichan)   1
Home Economics centres in new secondary schools in Vancouver and North
Vancouver School Districts replaced three older centres which were closed in elementary schools in these districts.
Home Economics centres in operation in the public schools vary in size from
one to eight rooms, with the greatest number of centres having two rooms. The
total number of Home Economics rooms in use during 1961/62 was 400.
During 1961/62 there were 366 Home Economics teachers employed in public
schools, showing a slight decrease of 3.4 per cent from the previous year. The
decrease occurred, as was to be expected, in the city areas. Although there was no
decrease in the over-all total of Home Economics teachers employed in other districts throughout the Province, in some schools Home Economics teachers were
teaching somewhat more of their time in academic subjects than they had before
the return of Grade VII to the elementary-school programme.
The introduction of the Occupational Programme in some schools resulted in
some Home Economics teachers teaching units on Domestic and Related Service
Skills to pupils on this programme. Such units are of necessity very flexible to
meet the needs of the pupils and to recognize their previous training and experience
as well as their abilities. In the units on Domestic and Related Service Skills, the
emphasis is upon practical work, with a correspondingly greater proportion of time
being given to practical activities and less to theory and written work.
Some upgrading of the qualifications of teachers of Home Economics has been
noted, with a slight increase in the percentage of Home Economics teachers having
a degree in Home Economics. The percentage of Home Economics teachers holding a Bachelor of Home Economics degree (or its equivalent) has increased from
54 to 56 per cent. There has also been a very slight increase in the number of Home
Economics teachers holding Bachelor of Education degrees with Professional C or
Professional Basic certification. Of the remainder (of which the majority hold Elementary certification), many are continuing to work toward a Bachelor of Education
(secondary) major in Home Economics through the summer session programme
at the University of British Columbia. In general, Home Economics teachers with
Elementary certification and some training toward their major in Home Economics,
Bachelor of Education degree, are employed in junior secondary schools or in
secondary schools where there is also a Home Economics graduate on the teaching
staff.
Due to the continued high percentage of Home Economics graduates whose
teaching service is interrupted for home and family reasons, the demand for Home
Economics graduates for teaching positions continues to be greater than the number
of Home Economics graduates available.    In recognition of this situation, the School
 HOME ECONOMICS Z 53
of Home Economics and the College of Education of the University of British
Columbia have continued the three summer session teacher-training programme for
Home Economics graduates at the 1962 summer session of the University of British
Columbia.
A Home Economics Curriculum Revision Committee was set up in September,
1961, to evaluate, update, and revise the Home Economics programme for the
secondary schools. During 1961/62 the philosophy and general objectives of
Home Economics for secondary schools were revised, and a revised course for
Grade VIII was prepared. The revised Home Economics 8 course will be in use
in September, 1962. The Committee continues its evaluation and revision of subsequent Home Economics courses.
 Z 54
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
Secondary School Correspondence Branch
REPORT OF DR. EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. es L., DIRECTOR
Enrolment
The total enrolment in the Secondary School Correspondence Branch during
the year 1961/62 was 19,763. This shows an increase of 794 students or 4.2 per
cent over 1960/61, when the enrolment was 18,969.
1. Number of Students.—The enrolment by age over the last five years and
the per cent increase in the total enrolment is shown in the following table:—
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
School age (under 19 years) 	
Adult (19 and over)  	
5,4601
8,9672
9,834
6,555
10,120
7,184
10,192
8,777
9,804
9,959
14,427
2,466
20.3
16,389
1,962
13.6
17,304
915
5.6
18,969
1,665
9.6
19,763
Increase by year  -...
794
4.2
1 Under 18 years.
2 Eighteen years and over.
2. School Students by Grade.—Students who could properly be called school
students (those registered in a school or taking a full grade by correspondence)
were classified by grade as follows:—
Grade IX	
Grade X	
Grade XI	
Grade XII	
Number
Per Cent
844
16.0
1,324
25.1
1,419
26.8
1,695
32.1
Totals
5,282
100.0
These figures do not include students who merely continue a course from one
year to the next, since we have no way of knowing whether or not they returned to
school in the fall.
3. School Students Registered in a School.—A large number of school students
were registered in a school and took one or more courses by correspondence. These
figures do not include those students who merely continue a course from one year
to the next, since we have no way of knowing whether or not they returned to school.
Number
Per Cent
Per Cent of Total
Enrolment
301
1,352
3,073
388
5.9
26.4
60.1
7.6
1.5
Small high schools (fewer than 140 students in Grades IX to XII)	
Large high schools (more than 140 students in Grades IX to XII)	
6.8
15.5
2.0
Totals       	
5,114
100.0
25.8
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
Z 55
Students registered in a school enrolled in correspondence courses for the following reasons:—
Course not offered in school
Time-table difficulties 	
Failure in the course	
Other reasons	
Number
3,137
1,263
1,087
16
Per Cent
57.0
23.0
19.7
0.3
4. Students Taking a Full Grade by Correspondence.—A total of 561 students
enrolled in a full grade by correspondence for the following reasons:—
Number
Living too far from a school  326
Too ill to attend school  101
In receipt of social assistance  4
Needed at home  4
Other   4
Correctional institution  11
Not free or continuing from a previous year  111
Totals
561
Per Cent
58.2
18.0
0.7
0.7
0.7
2.0
19.7
100.0
Classification of Students by Fees
Students may be classified by the fee they paid for each course.
1. School-age Students Charged No Fees:
Not in attendance at school— Number
Because of illness      249
Because of need at home        22
Because of distance factor      390
In receipt of social assistance        71
In correctional institutions  202
In attendance at a superior school      301
Unemployed         28
Totals  1,263
2. School-age Students Charged Fees: Number
In high schools with fewer than 140 students in
Grades IX to XII ($5 per course)  1,352
In high schools with more than 140 students in
Grades IX to XII ($8 per course)  3,073
In private schools ($8 per course)      388
Summer students enrolled in courses in which
they failed ($8 per course)        86
Gainfully employed ($5 per course)      723
Totals  5,622
Percentage of Total
Enrolment
1.3
0.1
2.0
0.4
1.0
1.5
0.1
6.4
Percentage of Total
Enrolment
6.8
15.5
2.0
0.4
3.7
28.4
 Z 56
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
Adult Students Charged No Fees: Number
Because of illness  140
Because in receipt of social assistance  157
Because in a correctional institution  646
Enrolled in preparation for Canadian citizenship   416
Unemployed   152
Totals  1,511
4. Adult Students Charged Fees:
Taking academic courses— Number
Resident in  British  Columbia   ($8   per
course)   3,364
Non-resident in British Columbia ($16 per
course)       192
Taking technical courses ($12 per course)—
Resident in British Columbia      708
Non-resident in British Columbia      217
Totals  4,481
5. Senior Matriculation Students Charged Fees:
Number
Resident in British Columbia ($20 per course)   1,261
Non-resident in British Columbia  ($25 per
course)         23
Totals  1,284
Percentage of Total
Enrolment
0.7
0.8
3.3
2.1
0.8
7.7
Percentage of Total
Enrolment
16.9
1.0
3.6
1.1
22.6
Percentage of Total
Enrolment
6.4
0.1
6.5
6. Students Abroad.—British Columbia taxpayers living abroad and in other
Provinces of Canada were charged rates applicable to British Columbia residents
($8 per course).    Number, 88; percentage of total enrolment, 0.4.
Completion of Papers
The number of papers marked over the last five years and the per cent increase
per year is shown in the following table:—
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
Number of papers marked	
158,236
20.8
178,246
12.7
196,618
10.6
205,435
4.5
216,487
5.4
Instructional Staff
An inside staff of four course-writers and an outside staff of eighty-eight
instructors were employed during the year. The outside instructors were paid on
a piece-work basis.
New and Revised Courses
New and revised courses offered during the year were as follows: English
Language 10, Homemaking 20a, Mathematics for Second-class Stationary Engineering, Physics 101, Law 93, Geography 91.
 correspondence schools
Courses
Z 57
The number of students who enrolled in each of the high-school subjects
during the year was as follows:—
School Age Adult
Total
English Literature 10, 20, 30, 40, 100	
English Language 10, 20, 30, 31, 40, 101..
Social Studies 10, 20, 30, 32, 33-
Health and Personal Development 10, 20, 30_
Mathematics 10, 20, 12, 30, 91, 101	
Science 10, 20    	
French 10, 20, 91, 92,110, 120  	
German 10, 20, 91, 92, 110, 90, 120	
Latin 10, 20, 91, 92, 110, 120 L __
Spanish 10, 20, 91, 92, 110  	
Agriculture 10, 20, 38, 39  	
Art 10, 20, 39  	
Homemaking 10, 20, 30, 91	
Record-keeping 11 	
Typewriting 10, 20._
Mechanical Drawing 10, 20	
Bible Literature 10, 20, 30, 40-
Extramural Music 11, 21	
English and Citizenship 19, 29-
Electricity 20	
Business Fundamentals 24	
Frame-house Construction 20—
Auto Mechanics 20, 30	
Shorthand 21, 31  	
Bookkeeping 34, 91	
Economics 92 	
History 91, 101,102	
Geography 91-
English 32, 91,93, 99 —
Radio and Wireless 30-
Forestry 30	
Biology 91„
Chemistry 91, 101	
Physics 91,101	
Home Furnishing 23	
Secretarial Practice 92-
Diesel Engines 91	
Law 93 	
Vocational Courses
Air Navigation I, II  	
Dressmaking  _  	
Electricity for the Building Trades	
Glove-making   	
House Painting and Decorating  _	
Industrial Mathematics	
Mathematics for Steam Engineering, Second Class
Spherical Trigonometry  _ 	
Steam Engineering, Fourth, Third, Second, First -
Steam Heating for Plant Operators.. _	
Preparation for Citizenship 	
1,211
1,334
1,249
629
2,388
664
799
517
592
293
254
339
599
392
923
227
55
9
14
96
217
20
595
183
217
86
267
156
229
108
133
194
149
145
45
18
15
157
1,644
2,076
593
54
3,113
245
552
279
159
161
54
146
54
134
257
116
44
13
531
121
86
45
180
130
524
39
470
98
257
166
83
97
212
193
18
1
64
90
15
26
118
3
13
181
38
8
469
89
416
2,855
3,410
1,842
683
5,501
909
1,351
796
751
454
308
485
653
526
1,180
343
99
22
545
217
303
65
775
313
741
125
737
254
486
274
216
291
361
338
63
19
79
247
16
31
120
3
13
185
38
8
472
90
417
English for New Canadians
During the year this division supplied 1,308 students with new material from
our course in English and Citizenship I; 580 students were supplied with material
from the English and Citizenship II; 150 students with English and Citizenship III;
248 students took the course in English 19 and 297 students took the course in
English 29 by correspondence. In addition, 417 students were enrolled in the
Preparation for Citizenship course. Classes in English were held in about fifty
night-school centres, and material was supplied for other classes and individuals in
about eighty-five small isolated places throughout the Province. Since volunteer
instructors no longer make yearly reports, it is impossible to estimate how many
students have been using books already supplied.
 Z 58
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
Adult Education
Enrolment— 1960/61 1961/62
Total enrolment  18,969 19,763
Adult enrolment (19 years and over)  8,777 9,959
Per cent adults  46.3 50.5
Unemployed Students Exempt from Fees
A number of unemployed students were exempt from fees for the following
reasons:—
Illness and hospital      140
Correctional institution      646
Social assistance      157
Others      152
Total  1,095
Adult Students Completing on the Interrupted Programme
A total of 1,026 students was completing the University Entrance requirements
under the Interrupted Programme.
Enrolment in Courses
The number of adult students enrolled in each course will be found under my
report of High School and Vocational Courses.
Elementary Correspondence School
REPORT OF ARTHUR H. PLOWS, B.Ed., DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1961/62 there were 1,095 pupils enrolled in the
Elementary Correspondence School. Of these, 989 were enrolled at Victoria and
the remaining 106 at Pouce Coupe in the Peace River District.
ENROLLED AT VICTORIA
Month
Grade
1
Grade
11
Grade
III
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Grade
VIII
Total
September. 	
112
85
92
95
59
75
51
59
628
October 	
121
100
98
102
70
79
68
73
711
November	
124
106
111
108
84
79
79
98
789
December	
122
117
114
112
89
80
85
106
825
January	
128
122
115
115
93
83
89
116
861
February   	
134
127
117
117
94
87
92
122
890
139
141
139
130
133
134
116
119
121
121
99
90
92
98
98
98
102
132
138
145
925
118      |      107
122             110
946
May	
971
June 	
139
138
123
125      j      113
98
105
148
989
ENROLLED AT POUCE COUPE (PEACE RIVER BRANCH)
September    	
8
8
9
8
3
5
3
2
46
October
10
9
10
9
5
5
4
5
57
November.	
11
10
12
8
5
7
4
7
64
December
12
10
12
8
5
7
4
8
66
January.    	
15
13
14
9
6
7
5
9
78
February..  	
15
15
14
10
6
9
7
9
85
March
17
16
14
11
7
10
9
10
94
17
16
14
12
7
11
9
11
97
May
17
17
14
12
8
11
9
11
99
17
20
15
13
9
11
10
11
106
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS Z 59
The number of papers marked in the two centres was as follows: Victoria,
133,091; Pouce Coupe, 11,065; total, 144,156.
In addition to the number of pupils and papers shown above, 310 students
were enrolled in the Adult Section and 7,472 papers were marked.
Thus the services of the School were used by 1,405 persons and 151,628
papers were marked. The average enrolment per instructor was 100 pupils, and each
instructor marked an average of 10,831 papers. The average number of papers
submitted per pupil was 108, as compared with an average of 137 in 1960/61.
As an additional service, kindergarten kits were sent to 172 pre-school age
children.
Authorized under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, correspondence instruction classes were established at eighteen centres with a total enrolment of 105 pupils.
During 1961/62, course revisions were carried out in Grade V Social Studies
and Grade VI Language.
The Victoria staff consisted of a Director, thirteen instructors, and a clerical
staff of five; at Pouce Coupe, one instructor and one clerk.
 Z 60 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
DIVISION OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS
REPORT OF MARGARET A. MUSSELMAN, B.A.,
DIRECTOR OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS
Programmes Presented
Radio
Provincial programmes presented  (planned, prepared,  supervised
production, and evaluated results)   118
Western regional programmes (planned and prepared content, supervised production, and evaluated results)     34
Western regional programmes (analysed scripts and evaluated results)    36
National programmes (gave suggestions and advice in planning, and
evaluated results)     51
Total number of radio programmes made available for
classroom and home student participation  239
Television
Western regional (British Columbia was responsible for four of the
eight programmes)       8
National (some advice and some assistance in distributing materials
and in evaluating was given for these programmes)     80
Total television programmes available     88
Manuals and Guides (Prepared and Distributed)
British Columbia Teachers' Bulletins  10,000
Pictures in the Air  3,500
Junior music  25,000
Intermediate music  41,000
Ecoutez  11,000
Calling Young Canada (distributed only)  7,000
The request for these materials increases each year.
Demonstration Classes
Classes were conducted during winter and summer courses in the Victoria and
the Vancouver Colleges of Education.
Extent of In-school Participation in British Columbia
Number of schools reporting 1,051 (79.50%)
Out of schools reporting—
Schools using radio    712 (67.74%)
Divisions using radio       3,304
Students using radio  106,532
Number of radios       1,753
Schools using television  62
Divisions using television  167
Students using television       5,491
Number of television receivers  41
(Of these, 15 were rented, 5 were borrowed.)
 DIVISION OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS Z 61
Increase in use over 1960/61 is indicated in both radio and television.
The British Columbia Department of Education won a first award for " Patterns
of Living," the Ian McTaggart Cowan television series. The content was planned
by this branch so that it had specific application to courses of studies as well as
enrichment. The Institute for Education by Radio-Television, the Ohio State University, rated this series the best in-school educational television on this continent.
 Z 62                                     PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sc, DIRECTOR
Submitted herewith is the circulation report of the Division of Visual Education covering the period September 1, 1961, to August 31, 1962.
District Number and Name
Motion Pictures
Filmstrips
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
321
212
459
766
53
321
761
281
65
143
449
81
196
252
348
119
152
371
472
673
191
373
1,093
1,331
218
322
1,114
524
269
239
99
896
1,750
999
930
617
1
187                         84
63
113
713
285
37
27
664
182
278
15
177
35
396
292
299
10
38
780
411
1,197
176
969
1,058
751
284
146
490
601
68
136
191
834
603
859
390
1,981
272
1,135
316
607
782
1,049
1,521
107
53
888
1,220
21
385
279
206
190
45
264
123
923
4
830
111
305
394
29
135
444
163
42
74
300
47
95
145
248
73
84
242
276
373
93
231
545
765
78
171
545
357
159
141
56
454
1,234
631
637
144
833
430
54
35
884
329
315
28
220
61
521
370
333
10
47
1,038
551
1,815
220
1,334
1,596
984
452
195
742
772
80
188
255
1,320
801
996
466
11  Trail
1?   Grand FnrVs
]3, Kpftle valley
16. Keremeos  	
18. Golden	
23. Kelowna	
28. Quesnel               	
29. Lillooet 	
31   Merritt
33. Chilliwack    _ _	
328
2,676
37. Delta                      ....
182
113
372
1,591
407
753
1,024
1,485
2,290
135
78
1,211
1,578
42
571
294
308
240
77
456
257
1,180
5
1.339
1,048
1,465
827
2,636
1,231
955
423
503
688
958
55
668
646
151
436
379
89
496
133
728
43
576
590
1,096
542
1,548
679
510
306
280
346
546
30
338
443
66
189
208
42
226
57
449
31
302
43. Coquitlam                       ......                                 	
45. West Vancouver.                — ..
46. Sechelt
5(1.   nupen Charlotte
54. Smithers                                                            	
 DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
Z 63
Motion Pictures
Filmstrips
District Number and Name
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
60. North Peace   —
80                     42
7,001                 3,416
710                   426
409                   237
197                    119
770                   447
181                     61
484                   272
843 627
542                   296
478                   377
366        |           195
1,550                   818
162        1           119
448                   215
844 612
258                    135
169                    116
37                     33
76        !             52
354                    178
2,236                1,138
857                   470
9
778"
392
206
1,571
88
122
5
62. Sooke - - -             -
585
272
64. Saltspring _    	
146
1,140
47
88
251                   232
446        [           351
70. Alberni        	
407                   363
252                    186
72. Campbell River ...
1.108                   761
73. Alert Bay  _ _     	
268
102
1,003
436
140
102
61
104
1,298
592
213
60
75. Mission... _	
815
307
114
78. Enderby	
83
79. Ucluelet-Tofino	
50
80. Kitimat —  	
83
81. Fort Nelson..—   _ „	
82. Chilcotin-    _	
939
445
Totals 	
"11.828                 29.530
46,548
34,054
The teachers' demand for illustrative material to increase the effectiveness of
their teaching continues to expand. The above figures indicate that the library of
teaching films and filmstrips is not adequate to meet this growing demand. Every
two months the Division issues a statement to the District Superintendents of Schools
on the quantities of material circulated to the schools of their respective districts.
During the year the Division of Visual Education was given the responsibility
of handling the circulation and care of the film and filmstrip library of the Community Programmes Branch of the Department of Education.
 Z 64
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
TEXTBOOK BRANCH
REPORT OF BASIL R. WILSON, DIRECTOR
To purchase and distribute free books and supplies during the school-year
1961/62, an expenditure of $630,604.89 was required to complete the 4,972
requisitions received. This is an increase of $21,989.11 or 3.6 per cent over the
previous year and an increase of 409 requisitions or 9 per cent of the total number
of requisitions received and serviced.
A total of 22,932 purchase orders valued at $1,052,481 was received during
the year, which is about the same number received during the previous year, though
the value of these orders was 4.3 per cent higher than the previous year.
A total of 2,919 requisitions for textbooks supplied for the use of students
participating in the Rental Plan was received and completed during the year, an
increase of 5.3 per cent over the previous year.
Collections for rental fees, lost and damaged books paid for by students, and
remittances covering fire losses showed an increase of 7 per cent to $743,806.27
for the year. Rental refunds to students who left the British Columbia school
system showed an increase of 21 per cent to $9,260 for the school-year.
The Textbook Branch Library Service Division received and serviced 676
purchase orders for 19,752 library books, supplementary reading material and wall
maps and globes. These orders were received from the various school districts
throughout the Province, and it is interesting to note that over 90 per cent of the
school districts are now taking advantage of this service.
To complete the requisitions received, it was necessary to bring in shipments
with a gross weight of 1,210,514 pounds during the spring months. Of these
shipments, 723,627 pounds or 59.8 per cent were of books manufactured in British
Columbia, 453,619 pounds or 37.5 per cent were of books manufactured in Ontario,
and 33,268 pounds or 2.7 per cent were of books manufactured in the United
Kingdom, the United States, and other points.
To supply schools, dealers, and others with books as ordered, the following
tabulation shows the monthly distribution shipments made by freight, express,
and mail:—
Report of Shipping Department
Month
Freight
Express
Mail
Pieces
Weight
Pieces
Weight
Pieces
Weight
July        -             	
9,128
13,884
3,495
1,370
353
200
396
281
160
188
704
622,700
770,020
170,410
62,920
16,030
8,380
15,220
10,660
6,860
8,920
8.690
30
48
132
119
52
29
41
18
18
3
17
23
989
1,469
4,090
3,291
1,091
596
720
499
447
99
302
601
1,229
3,157
4,156
6,179
2,974
2,676
1,590
1,488
2,675
1,218
2,578
4,290
3,572
7,650
September.... _	
13,062
15,330
6,861
December 	
4,700
4,332
3,570
3,645
2,359
3,345
603      |        25,520
3,306
Totals     	
30,262      [   1,726,260
530
14,194
34,210
71,732
Total pieces, 65,002; total weight, 1,812,186 pounds.
 TEXTBOOK BRANCH Z 65
In conclusion, I wish to take this opportunity of thanking each and every
member of the staff of the Textbook Branch for all the help and co-operation given
during the school-year. I would also like to express my appreciation to those
responsible in each school district for all the courtesies extended to the Branch and
for the patience and consideration shown during the year.
Balance-sheet, March 31, 1962
Assets
Imprest Account—Cash on hand  $100.00
Inventory—Stock on hand        712,977.84
Consigned textbooks  $1,813,852.49
Less depreciation1        851,691.95
        962,160.54
Accounts receivable  11,100.58
Outstanding publishers' credit notes  94.94
$1,686,433.90
Liabilities
Customers' credit balances carried as back orders  $50.26
Outstanding publishers' invoices  24.67
Treasury advances for petty cash, Imprest Account  100.00
Advances from Consolidated Revenue Fund  1,686,258.97
$1,686,433.90
i Third-year depreciation on 1959/60 inventory, $247,563.66.
Second-year depreciation on 1960/61 inventory, $246,096.02.
First-year depreciation on 1961/62 inventory, $358,032.27.
 Z 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 31, 1962
Textbook Branch Operations—Sales
Revenue—Sales  $1,278,592.41
Less discount        245,812.41
Net sales  $1,032,780.00
Deduct cost of sales—
Inventory, March 31, 1961  $693,677.55
Purchases for year (cost, freight,
duty)     903,464.14
  $1,597,141.69
Inventory, March 31, 1962        712,977.84
Cost of sales        884,163.85
Gross profit      $148,616.15
Expenditure—
Salaries and wages       $38,465.80
Packing and general expense  4,413.00
Freight and delivery  12,053.34
Sundry expense  941.84
  55,873.98
Excess of revenue over expenditure for the fiscal year
ended March 31, 1962        $92,742.17
 TEXTBOOK BRANCH
Z 67
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 31, 1962—Continued
Textbook Rental Plan Operations
Rental fees collected	
Opening rental inventory at March 31, 1961      $739,755.70
Plus purchases for year (cost, freight, duty, and
S.S. tax)     1,074,096.79
$729,867.70
1961/62
Depreciation1
$1,813,852.49
Inventory, March 31,
1960      $742,690.96
Less three years' depreciation at 33VS
per cent per annum       742,690.96 $247,563.66
Inventory, March 31,
1961      $738,288.06
Less two years' depreciation at 33^ per
cent per annum    „       492,192.04    246,096.02
$246,096.02
Inventory, March 31,
1962  $1,074,096.79
Less one year's depreciation at 33V6 per
cent per annum     _       358,032.27    358,032.27
$716,064.52
Closing rental inventory on March 31,
1962	
962,160.54
Total depreciation for year
1961/62  $851,691.95     $851,691.95
Add expenses—
Salaries and wages.
Packing and general expense.
$43,813.96
5,026.56
Freight and delivery       13,729.20
Sundry expense         1,072.79
63,642.51
915,334.46
Excess of expenditure over revenue for the fiscal year
1961/62      $185,466.76
i See footnote to balance-sheet.
 Z 68 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1961/62
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
REPORT BY E. E. HYNDMAN, B.A., B.P/ED., CHIEF INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
An increase of three to the field supervisory staff raised to fifty the number of
Provincially appointed District Superintendents. In addition, the Superintendent
of Schools, Vancouver, with two Assistant Superintendents and four Inspectors of
Schools, has the same duties in supervision of the instructional programme and is
responsible to the Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education for the standard
of public education. The District Superintendents were directly responsible for the
supervision of 13,000 teachers, which included not only those employed in public
schools, but also those in Indian day-schools, as requested by the Indian Affairs
Branch. This is 700 more teachers than last year. Supervision was also provided
for some teachers in Provincial institutions and in private schools for certification
purposes.   Formal reports were issued on behalf of 3,177 teachers.
The three additions to staff had all shown outstanding ability as secondary-
school principals. Mr. R. R. Hanna, principal of the Maple Ridge Senior Secondary
School, was appointed to the Quesnel Superintendency with School Districts No.
28 (Quesnel) and No. 82 (Chilcotin). Mr. G. M. Paton, principal of the North
Peace Secondary School, undertook his new duties in Prince Rupert with School
Districts No. 50 (Queen Charlotte), No. 51 (Portland Canal), and No. 52 (Prince
Rupert). Mr. D. P. Todd, principal of the George Bonner Secondary School, was
appointed to the Fort St. John Superintendency with School Districts No. 60 (Peace
River North) and No. 81 (Fort Nelson), as well as the northern unattached school
districts. These additional members permitted the reorganization of some districts,
and new headquarters were established at Haney, Squamish, and Revelstoke.
Directors of Instruction were appointed in Kamloops, Surrey, Chilliwack, and Richmond, with the authority to write reports on teachers.
In addition to the work of the field staff in supervision, a number of assignments were undertaken directly through this branch. These included the supervision of the West Coast unattached schools with twenty teachers and administrative
assistance to the School Boards or official trustees, the inspection of instructional
procedures in the Jericho Hill School, an evaluation of teaching procedures in two
classrooms of The Woodlands School, and a special investigation and report on
one school system. During this year, 284 visits to classrooms were made, and of
these, many were in isolated rural districts.
The District Superintendents and Departmental officials shared in a number
of projects to improve the quality of instruction and to clarify relationships and
responsibilities among associating services. In every instance there was excellent
co-operation.
(1) A conference of District Superintendents and headquarters officials was
organized with workshop procedures to obtain maximum participation
of all senior personnel in the changes taking place in public education.
Guests included representatives from the University of British Columbia,
the Teachers' Federation, and the Trustees Association. Many constructive suggestions from this conference will have an immediate influence on
the developing programme, and in addition the administrative problems
were clearly enunciated. The conference served to clarify the roles of
both field and headquarters officials in curriculum development.
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES Z 69
(2) The Health Department, in co-operation with the Department of Education, undertook to restate the relationship of public health personnel with
teachers, school district officials, and the Boards of School Trustees. The
field officers of both departments were provided with a means to develop
close co-operation.
(3) The officials in Civil Defence, with some assistance from this Department,
prepared a statement of school responsibility in the event of civil disaster.
Civil Defence officers met with the District Superintendents in a series of
meetings to clarify areas of co-operation.
(4) A planning committee representing the University of British Columbia,
the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, the British Columbia Trustees Association, and the Department of Education organized the Thud
Bienniel Principals' Conference on the University campus for August,
1962.
(5) The Department of Education co-operated with the British Columbia
Teachers' Federation in the organization of a workshop for teachers of
modern mathematics in Grades III and VIII. One elementary and one
secondary teacher from each of the school districts were invited to attend
a one-week course on the University campus. The Teachers' Federation
provided for the travel and living expenses of the teachers, and the Boards
of School Trustees arranged for substitutes. The teacher representatives
returned to their districts and arranged study groups of teachers during
May and June in preparation for curriculum revisions for September.
Among the activities reported by the District Superintendents, the most significant include the following:—
1. In-service Training Projects.—-There has been a marked emphasis on in-
service education, reflecting the needs of a changing curriculum. It is gratifying to
observe the integration of supervisory and teaching personnel in planning the programmes, indicating a high level of professional responsibility in this area. Many
districts provided courses in modern mathematics under the instruction of the
University of British Columbia and Victoria College specialists. A few districts
also provided instruction for teachers of the new French 8 programme. Almost all
District Superintendents reported on the effectiveness of administrators' meetings
for in-service education. For example, the Vancouver group made an intensive
study of elementary arithmetic, and the Richmond committee provided a Guide for
School Administrators, an excellent series of papers on professional subjects. The
contributions of specialists in such fields as music, art, and physical education for
in-service activities were noted among others in Burnaby, Vancouver, Nanaimo,
and Mission. The Conference on Special Education, sponsored by the Surrey School
Board, gave an excellent stimulus and assistance to the special-class teachers.
2. Experimental Occupational Programme.—A number of districts reported
on the establishment of classes on the Occupational Programme. The philosophy
and the procedures developed so far have had excellent support by the School
Boards and their professional staffs. They have accepted this as a constructive and
worth-while approach to the needs of the non-academic pupil. The reports of those
districts with experimental classes reflect optimism that the programme will be
successful. In addition to the Cities of Vancouver and Victoria, where similar-type
programmes were developed before the Royal Commission Report, very effective
projects were initiated in Trail, Burnaby, and Revelstoke districts.
3. Reorganization of Schools.—Reports of the District Superintendents revealed the extent of school reorganization that took place in the preceding year.
 Z 70 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1961/62
These included the establishment of kindergartens, the retention of Grade VII in
the elementary schools, and the increase of Grade XIII classes. The Superintendent
of Schools (Vancouver) reported a marked increase in kindergarten classes and
indicated the Board's intention of providing accommodation and teachers by September, 1962, so that full-time attendance of kindergarten children may be arranged.
On the other hand, the report of the District Superintendent of Schools for Victoria
indicated that 936 kindergarten children were being instructed in eight centres. The
growth of kindergartens since the enabling legislation in 1960 has been steady, but
by no means startling. Kindergartens were commenced or extended in Courtenay,
Princeton, Kitimat, Creston, and Cranbrook. One referendum to provide accommodation for kindergartens was defeated in Chilliwack and another in West Vancouver, but a similar referendum was passed in Coquitlam.
The return of Grade VII pupils to elementary-school buildings has been taking
place more rapidly than was first indicated. Since this transfer is related to the
increase of population in the district, in some instances it may take several years
before the number of pupils justifies emptying classrooms in the secondary schools.
Burnaby reported that practically all Grade VII pupils will be integrated into the
elementary schools by September, 1963. Vancouver reported that a substantial
number of Grade VII pupils has been retained in elementary schools, but that plans
were well advanced for the complete change-over in the immediate future. On the
other hand, Powell River reported that there was little possibility of an early transfer
of Grade VII to elementary buildings because of the stability of population and
adequacy of existing classroom space in the secondary schools. It is quite apparent
that the mechanics of this change are being effected with a minimum of disruption
because of the good judgment and wise decisions by trustees and administrators at
the local level.
The statistical increase in the pupils in Senior Matriculation is available elsewhere in this Report. It should be noted, however, that this development has had
the close supervision of the District Superintendents, as reflected in their annual
reports. A number of districts undertook to provide classes which had not previously offered Senior Matriculation; these included Quesnel, Fernie, Cranbrook,
and Duncan. Further, districts such as Burnaby, North Vancouver, West Vancouver, and Abbotsford reported an exceptionally high percentage increase in their
enrolments. Vancouver reported the reorganization of the King Edward Secondary
School to become the centre for Senior Matriculation and continuing education.
This unique development will provide valuable data for the emerging concepts of
post-high-school education in British Columbia.
4. Provision for Exceptional Children.—Several more districts have this year
established classes for the moderately retarded that were formerly operated by the
Retarded Children's Association. North Vancouver, Langley, and Richmond are
among the districts reporting the establishment of these classes. A continued increase in the number of special classes for the slightly retarded is also a reflection
of the interest in public education for the handicapped. During this year a class
for the hard of hearing was established in Burnaby in addition to the long-established
one in Vancouver. It is now noted that the homogeneous grouping of pupils on
bases of ability and interest is the accepted rather than the unusual pattern in British
Columbia. Several districts, including North Vancouver, West Vancouver, Trail,
Vancouver, and others, reported clases and (or) projects for the gifted children.
Among those projects attracting interest are the " major work areas " in North Vancouver, the " honours programme " in Trail, the " Joe Berg science seminars " in
a number of centres, the Saturday morning Victoria College classes in English for
 —
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES Z 71
superior students in the Vitcoria area, and lectures from University professors in
English for superior and interested pupils of the Abbotsford-Langley-Mission districts. It is particularly gratifying to note the enthusiasm and vitality of the programmes for exceptional children, as reflected in the annual reports from the districts.
5. School District Referenda.—The reports indicate an unusually large number
of referenda on building construction this year. These have been made necessary by
the steady increase in school population, and by the desire of School Boards to provide for the new organization of schools. In all but a few districts, excellent public
support was evident.
6. Standards of Instruction.—The annual reports reflect an increased emphasis
on standards of instruction. All districts participated in the survey and terminal
test programme at Grade VII. As a result, there was much effort and time spent by
district and school personnel both in the preparation of these instruments and in their
use. It is gratifying to report there was a highly professional quality to the local
testing programmes.
The Vancouver Superintendents reported that continued emphasis was placed
on the basic subjects, with particular attention on arithmetic and language arts.
A committee of Vancouver principals and supervisory staff examined the arithmetic
programme. Tests in the basic subjects for intermediate grades were prepared and
administered by committees of teachers and district staff in Abbotsford. The report
from the Chiliwack School District states, " The Board of School Trustees continued
to stress the high standard of education provided to every pupil of the district."
Comments on standards and scholarship were also made by the District Superintendents from Victoria, Campbell River, Powell River, Lillooet, and Delta.
The recommendation of the Royal Commission on Education on the intensification of instruction is being observed by the chool districts of the Province. This
is being interpreted, wisely, as a challenge to make the most effective and economical
use of teaching time rather than to assign ill-considered busy work. Although survey
tests and terminal examinations for Grade VII have sharpened and stimulated instructional procedures, they are being kept in perspective to more significant data
in the determination of pupil progress. There is no danger under the existing professional interpretation of school needs that our schools will become dull from an
overemphasis on subject content nor regimented by centralized examinations.
7. Liaison Activities.—As in previous years, zone meetings of District Superintendents have served effectively to provide lines of communication between headquarters and field staff. These have been particularly valuable during this period of
changing curriculum and school organization, not only to ensure understanding of
new proposals, but also to utilize the special abilities of field officers.
Membership on such standing committees as the Provincial Advisory Curriculum Committee, the two Professional Advisory Curriculum Committees, the
Board of Examiners, the Educational and Scientific Advisory Committee of the
Retarded Children's Association, the Committee on Administration for the University of British Columbia, the Accrediting Committee, the Planning Committee
for the Principals' Conference, the British Columbia Committee on the Canadian
Conference on Children, and others have made it possible to bring at one time the
points of view of both headquarters and field staff. In addition, membership on a
large number of ad hoc committees on in-service training projects and conferences
gave valuable opportunity for the exchange of ideas with teachers' groups. The
leadership and the co-operation manifest by the British Columbia Teachers' Federation in all areas of in-service education are a credit to their professional responsibility.   Without their assistance and goodwill, many of the developments  in
 Z 72
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
curriculum and organization would have failed. It is also noteworthy that School
Boards throughout the Province gave support to every request for co-operation on
every project of in-service education.
Conclusion
This year has been an extremely interesting and exciting one. Even though
the changes in education have made heavy demands upon all teachers and administrators, nevertheless there have been no faltering steps. Once the significant features
of the change reveal truly that the interests and welfare of the pupils are being
advanced, there is agreement and strong support.
May I, once again, express my appreciation to the many trustees, both then
lay and professional staffs, as well as to my colleagues in the field, for making my
visits to the many parts of this Province so pleasant.
 TEACHER RECRUITMENT Z 73
TEACHER RECRUITMENT
REPORT OF PHILIP J. KITLEY, M.A., CO-ORDINATOR
The function of this Branch is to promote activities which will lead to a better
supply and selection of teachers and assist in co-ordinating these activities among
School Boards, teachers, officials of the College of Education, and other interested
groups. The Branch also takes care of the counselling and guidance services maintained by the Department of Education.
Future Teachers Clubs
These have been in organized operation since 1954, with the aim of interesting
suitable young people in the choice of teaching as a career, supplying a background
of information, and, where possible, providing opportunity for first-hand experience
in teaching situations in schools. This year the almost unbroken trend upward both
in number of clubs and total enrolment has been maintained, as the following figures
Will Show:  Number of Total
Clubs Membership
1955/56  86 1,112
1956/57  77 1,330
1957/58  92 1,481
1958/59  85 1,476
1959/60  99 1,951
1960/61  110 2,087
1961/62  120 2,209
For the first time a detailed survey of educational plans of club members has
been made, and although returns are incomplete, there is ample evidence that
upwards of 80 per cent of club members intend to become teachers, although only
about one-quarter of these will have entered the College of Education in September,
1962. It should be noted that many club members will go on to Grade XIII in
their own district, and that some clubs include members who have not reached
Grade XII.
During the year thirty clubs were visited, and in most cases addressed.
Assistance was given with the planning of a conference for Greater Victoria Future
Teachers Clubs. An address was given to the Future Teachers Conference at the
University of British Columbia.
A one-day conference of club sponsors was organized in September with the
co-operation of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation and held in the Federation Building.
Programme, promotional, and informational material was distributed to all
clubs and others interested throughout the year. A complete revision of the booklet
"Teaching in British Columbia" was made.
Addresses were given to other interested groups, and more particularly to most
of the undergraduate Arts and Science students at the University of British Columbia, on the need for teachers and the advantages of teaching as a career.
Advisory Committee on Teacher Recruitment
This group, composed of representatives of the Department of Education, the
College of Education, the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, and the British
 Z 74 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
Columbia School Trustees Association, met three times during the year to discuss
ways and means of improving the supply of teachers and exchange information.
Surveys
Investigation was carried on during the year regarding the sources of teacher
supply in the Province. During June, July, and August continuous reports were
made on school staff requirements.
Scholarships
The Co-ordinator acts as secretary to the selection committee for teachers'
scholarships awarded each year by the Minister of Education to teachers of high
scholarship as a recognition of a substantial number of years of outstanding service
in the classroom. This year scholarships were awarded to H. J. A. Goodman, Kil-
larney Secondary School, Vancouver; C. M. Hamm, Prince of Wales Elementary-
Secondary, Vancouver; and A. B. Chalmers, Alberni District Secondary, Port
Alberni.
Information
During the year the Branch continued to distribute information on teaching as
a career and details of teacher education, as requested. Once again, assistance was
provided to the office of the Registrar in making full information available to persons
in the United Kingdom who might be interested in teaching in the Province.
Five days were devoted to interviewing teachers and others at the University
and Victoria College summer sessions in regard to certification, programme, and
employment matters.
Educational and Vocational Guidance
A survey was made of qualifications of school counsellors, and new minimum
training requirements were drawn up and distributed.
A roster of school counsellors was compiled, and material and information were
distributed regularly throughout the year. This included 111 separate items of
occupational and other printed material. Occupational and kindred information
was also supplied by mail in response to approximately 300 individual queries.
During the year, visits were made to the guidance and counselling departments
of thirty-four schools, and meetings and discussions were held. A successful two-
week workshop for counsellors with little or no formal training in this field was
conducted during July at Victoria College.
As in former years, judging of submissions for the job study competition was
entrusted to this Branch. The competition is jointly sponsored by the Pacific National Exhibition and the Vancouver Board of Trade through its B.C. Products
Bureau, and these bodies generously provided a total of $600 in bursaries for eight
awards presented during the Pacific National Exhibition. Well over 20,000 individual job studies were prepared in the senior secondary schools, and of these,
some 150 were considered in the final judging.
In conclusion, it should be pointed out that the successful operation of this
Branch involves the co-operation of many other groups within the central offices
of the Department of Education as well as the District Superintendents and School
Board officials.  Their assistance is greatly appreciated.
 	
TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION Z 75
TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. S. WHITE, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND REGIONAL DIRECTOR FOR CANADIAN
VOCATIONAL TRAINING.
There has been an expanding interest and demand on .behalf of School Boards
and people at large who are concerned over the development of vocational and
technical training facilities in British Columbia.
Technical and vocational programmes are relatively expensive to operate, and
the population of the Province is not sufficiently concentrated in all areas to warrant
the expenditure necessary to build technical and vocational schools in every city.
If we are going to equalize educational opportunities, then the soundest basis is to
have regional vocational schools open to all citizens regardless of where they may
five in the Province.
Regional schools provide a very positive type of training and lend themselves
to training of people of different categories and persons of all levels. These programmes include pre-apprenticeship training, apprenticeship training for those young
men in the designated trades, pre-employment training in non-designated trade
areas, upgrading trade training in both day and evening programmes, and training
of unemployed persons by short-term emergency programmes. This type of training
would be very difficult to include in a secondary school.
On April 1, 1961, a six-year agreement was signed with the Federal Government known as the " Federal-Provincial Technical Training Agreement." The purpose of this Agreement is to provide financial assistance to the Provinces for the
development of vocational training facilities to meet the manpower requirements of
our country.
Capital Expenditures
Under this Agreement the Federal Government has agreed to reimburse the
Provincial Government 75 per cent of all capital expenditures for the construction
and equipping of all schools made prior to April 1, 1963, and 50 per cent thereafter.
A sub-committee of the Provincial Advisory Board was authorized to investigate the locations for two new regional vocational schools. This body recommended
to the Government the sites of Nelson and Kelowna. As a result of this and other
surveys, we now have under consideration the following programme:—
(1) An addition to the British Columbia Vocational School (Nanaimo).
(2) An addition to the British Columbia Vocational School (Burnaby).
(3) The construction of the British Columbia Vocational School (Prince
George), in which a programme of a limited basis will be offered in
September, 1962.
(4) The planning of two additional vocational schools—one in Kelowna for
the Okanagan region and one in Nelson for the Kootenay region.
(5) The planning of a British Columbia Institute of Technology, to be located
in Burnaby adjacent to the vocational school.
(6) An addition to the Vancouver Vocational Institute was commenced on
December 4, 1961.
Training Programmes
There are nine programmes under which all training is carried out in this
Province in accordance with the Federal-Provincial Technical Training Agreement.
A detailed and statistical report on each programme follows.
 Z 76 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
Programme 1.—Vocational High School Training Programme
This programme provides for approved technical and vocational training at the
secondary-school level. At least one-half of the school time must be devoted to
industrial, commercial, agricultural, or other vocational subjects.
Under this Agreement, Ottawa shares in operating costs up to a maximum
Federal grant of $227,800. This represents approximately 12 per cent of our actual
operating costs.
Approved Vocational Courses
Number of
School
Districts
Number of
Schools
Enrolment
Agriculture .__	
Automotive 	
Carpentry and Woodworking.
Chef Training _ _ „
Commercial  	
Draughting  	
Electricity _	
Foundry 	
Hairdressing-	
Machine Shop _	
Printing	
Sheet Metal	
Tailoring.
Wireless Communications-
Totals  _	
2
4
7
1
29
1
2
1
1
5
1
2
1
1
2
4
7
1
56
1
2
1
1
5
1
2
1
1
58
85
50
347
411
24
6,927
75
256
46
29
398
66
173
9
80
8,891
Programme 2.—Technician Training Programme (T)
This programme provides for technological training at the post-high-school
level to an agreed standard of qualification in the principles of science or technology
and other fields, except where such training is designed for university credit.
Plans have been completed and construction is expected to commence shortly
on an Institute of Technology, to be located adjacent to the British Columbia Vocational School in Burnaby. A principal, Mr. E. C. Roper, has been appointed, and
work is progressing on the proposed curricula.
The school plans to offer seventeen courses. They include Architectural Technology; Broadcast Communications; Chemical and Metallurgical Technology; Civil
and Structural Technology; Electrical and Electronic Technology; Food Processing
Technology; Forestry; Forest Products Utilization; Gas and Oil Technology; Hotel,
Motel, and Restaurant Administration; Instrumentation Technology; Mechanical
Technology; Medical Laboratory Technology; Medical Radiography; Merchandising and Business Training; Mining Technology; and Surveying Technology.
Programme 3.—Trade and Other Occupational Training (TO)
This programme provides for pre-employment training and upgrading or retraining for persons over the compulsory school attendance age.
Pre-apprentice and apprentice training is not shown here as this is under
Provincial apprenticeship legislation and is shown elsewhere in this report.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
DAY CLASSES
Z 77
Pre-employment
Day Classes
Upgrading
Day Classes
School and Courses
Number
Enrolled
Number
Completed
Number
Enrolled
Number
Completed
British Columbia Vocational School (Burnaby)
26
9
5
7
5
23
31
45
34
197
59
49
14
2
5
6
5
22
23
32
22
117
38
22
342
Welding—
337
British Columbia Vocational School (Nanaimo)
Welding tests—
A.S.M.E.                                                                  	
62
15
Vancouver Vocational Institute
Auto Collision Repairs	
4
1
6
10
3
Commercial—
General	
219        |         129
186                   156
4
40
75
54
66
669
16
36
197
39
192
17
72
23
11
43
25
13
79
11
19
93
30
74
7
34
20
4
250
20
84
74
Kootenay School of Art
Commercial Art                 	
:
NIGHT CLASSES
School and Courses
Number
Enrolled
Number
Completed
British Columbia Vocational School (Burnaby)
Advanced Gas .
Basic Gas _	
Basic Oil Heat .
Blueprint Reading-
Calibration of Industrial Instruments-
Industrial Gas I	
Industrial Gas II 	
Leadburning and Wiping.
Low Pressure Steam _.
Plastic Laminate  	
Plumbing General	
Plumbing Code	
Telecommunications	
Welding...
Transit and Level..
British Columbia Vocational School (Nanaimo)
Upgrade Welding.
Air Brakes 	
"C " Class Driving	
Remedial Mathematics .
49
34
27
53
36
50
50
8
32
33
25
112
82
313
16
50
66
57
40
49
31
27
45
31
50
50
8
25
33
23
103
62
268
12
50
66
57
40
 Z 78 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
Programme 4.—Training in Co-operation with Industry (TI)
Training under this programme may include:—
(1) Supervisory training for those in supervisory positions or others exhibiting
supervisory potential.
(2) Upgrading to increase efficiency and versatility of employees.
(3) Retraining for those who for one reason or another find it necessary to
learn new skills or occupations.
Fundamentals of Management.—This programme covers communications, industrial human relations, method study, and industrial accident prevention.
Throughout the year approximately 270 representatives of management from
every type of industry attended one-week seminars. Public utilities and municipal,
city, Provincial, and Federal governments are now participating in this programme.
Their reaction has been excellent.
Under this programme the Department has two Provincial consultants. The
report of Mr. Roy Evans, Superintendent of Management Training, on supervisory
training, 1961/62, follows:—
The aim is to help industry and business produce more quality products at
lower costs in less time with full consideration for the safety of the operator.
From the popular and practical " J " series training programmes for supervisors, an even more practical and effective management training series has been
developed. The new programme is the " Fundamentals of Management," and it
covers Communications, Industrial Human Relations, Methods Study, and Industrial
Accident Prevention.
This programme has met with approval again in the 1961/62 term. Approximately 270 representatives of management attended the one-week seminars on each
subject. Every type of industry in British Columbia has been represented. More
than 1,600 management representatives have received certificates since the recent
inception of this new series in 1957.
Constant modification has been made to fit every need of management in the
areas named, and we are now able to offer this training to public utilities and
municipal, city, Provincial, and Federal governments. The reaction from these
groups has been excellent.
Our new schedule for the fall and spring conferences includes advances into
the new field of productivity. Short one-week sessions on work study—a programme recently introduced into Canada—will be offered to all representatives of
any management group. Members of all organizations are invited to write for
details and outline material.
Summary of attendance for 1961/62:— _£&       Co^-
Programme        Programme
Communications (job instruction training)  129 73
Human Relations (job relations training)  68
Cost and Quality Control (job methods training)  54
Safety Training     20 37
Combination Programme (job instruction, job relations,
and job methods)  44
149 276
Follow-up and appreciation sessions, 14.
Total attendance for forty-hour programme since 1957, 1,617.
Accommodation Industries.—On January 1, 1962, Mr. Karl F. Severson was
appointed Tourist Services Consultant for the Province of British Columbia.   His
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
Z 79
duties are primarily to arrange and supervise training clinics for management and
staffs in the hotel, motel, and restaurant industries of the Province in co-operation
with the Department of Recreation and Conservation of the Provincial Government.
His report follows:—
During the spring of 1962 an emergency training programme was conducted
in Victoria and Vancouver. The purpose of this training was to alleviate the anticipated shortage of trained help in the service industries during the "Century 21"
(Seattle World's Fair) season. Some thought was given to extending this training
to other sections of the Province, such as the Okanagan and Kamloops districts, but
through correspondence it was apparent that the general interest of the industry in
these areas was not strong enough to ensure the support and participation necessary
to conduct this type of training successfully.
All recruiting and placement for the programme was conducted by the National
Employment Service, and a very high percentage of graduates found immediate
employment after the completion of classes.
This programme has established sound relationships among the service industries, National Employment Service, and the Department of Education, and has
done much to improve standards of operation in establishments catering to the
travelling public.
SUMMARY OF COURSES
Length in
Weeks
Number Completed
Course
Victoria
Vancouver
1
2
2
4
6
43
63
68
107
14
33
19
Totals   	
106
241
Programme 5.—Training for the Unemployed (M)
This is a programme for the training or retraining of unemployed persons
to improve employment opportunities and increase their trade or occupational
competency.
To qualify for assistance under this programme, persons must be registered for
employment with the National Employment Service. To enter training the person
must be counselled, assessed vocationally, approved and directed by the National
Employment Service to one of our Provincial schools or to one of the private trade-
schools approved by the Technical and Vocational Education Division. The school
may reject the applicant if in its opinion the person is not considered suitable.
A selection committee on training adjudicates the application and decides as
to whether fees, subsistence allowances, books, and (or) travelling expenses are to
be approved in whole or in part, in accordance with financial need. The Selection
Committee consists of Provincial Director of Technical and Vocational Education
(Chairman); Provincial Co-ordinator of Rehabilitation, Department of Health;
Regional Supervisor, Special Placement, National Employment Service; Provincial
Director of Apprenticeship, Department of Labour; and Provincial Rehabilitation
Consultant, Department of Health.
 Z 80
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
The following table lists the number of persons and the schools engaged in
this programme:—
School and Courses
Number
Number
Enrolled
Completed
6
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
18
14
20
12
12
12
11
10
10
7
7
5
18
14
11
6
24
18
41
13
11
8
5
2
37
26
7
3
28
18
109
56
23
14
23
11
14
6
12
7
31
13
10
1
8
2
14
14
3
2
17
10
40
11
8
3
25
17
234
176
22
21
34
34
85
83
14
14
52
37
36
35
54
18
British Columbia Vocational School (Burnaby)
Aeronautics          	
Boat Building      	
Carpentry    - _	
Electronics  _   _ -   	
Millwork and Joinery _   	
Welding—
General    - 	
Upgrading  _ _ _	
Fishermen (Network)   	
British Columbia Vocational School (Nanaimo)
General Welding     	
Upgrade Welding   	
Pipe Welding— —   	
H.E. Operators     - -	
Commercial  _     _. 	
Timekeeping, Bookkeeping, and Industrial First Aid  	
Practical Nursing  _     	
Vancouver Vocational Institute
Auto Mechanics     -  	
Barbering  _ -  	
Beauty Culture   	
Carpentry    _   — _ 	
Chef Training   __ _  	
Commercial — - _   —
Diesel Operations   .	
Draughting    _ _  	
Electrical	
Electronics    - 	
Engineering _   _ _	
Engineering—Technical Programme   	
Machine Shop  -  	
Medical Office Assistants   _ 	
Navigation  -  	
Power Sewing— __     	
Practical Nursing  —  	
Shoe Repairing    	
Welding  	
Vocational Preparatory Programme (Basic Training for Skilled Development)
Short Order Cook    — __   	
Salad and Sandwich Making    — 	
Waitress Training    — —   _ 	
Waiter Training     _    	
British Columbia Vocational School (Victoria)
Practical Nursing   	
Commercial Upgrading-   	
Vocational Preparatory (Basic Training for Skilled Development) 	
Private Schools
Kamloops—
Royal Inland School of Medical Technology—   	
St. Ann's Academy—    	
Kamloops Business College      	
Kelowna—
Herbert Business College —   _ _	
Kelowna Secretarial School   	
Nanaimo—
St. Ann's Convent    _ _	
Nanaimo School of Hairdressing  _.. _ _ 	
New Westminster—
New Westminster Commercial College  _ 	
New Westminster School of Hairdressing 	
Penticton—Penticton Business College  	
Trail—Trail Business College      	
Kamloops-Vernon—
Olga's School of Hairdressing, Kamloops  	
Olga's Beauty Bar, Vernon    _ 	
7
25
34
59
6
16
53
13
15
29
76
6
8
11
20
5
9
21
7
9
21
33
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
Z 81
School and Courses
Number
Number
Enrolled
Completed
57
16
30
11
19
9
4
3
1
	
13
3
5
3
7
6
1
1
9
7
66
22
10
4
90
33
75
28
Private Schools—Continued
Vancouver—
Radio Electronics School   	
Pitman Business College  	
Western School of Commerce—	
Burnaby Beauty School-
Continental School of Hairdressing..
Duffus School of Business Ltd 	
The Victor Comptometer School	
The Industrial First Aid  	
St. Paul's Hospital-
St. John Ambulance Association-
Victoria—•
General Business School Ltd _.
Victoria School of Hairdressing-
Vancouver-Victoria-New Westminster—Moler System of Schools..
Vancouver-Victoria—Sprott-Shaw Schools 	
Vernon—
McEwen-Wilkie Business College..
56
19
Olga's Beauty Bar (see under Kamloops-Vernon)..
Private Schools Summary
Approved Course
Number
of Schools
Number
Enrolled
Number
Completed
16
7
1
1
397
144
1
23
16
196
89
1
16
13
Totals                                                                          	
25
581
315
Programme 6.—Training of the Disabled (R)
Under this programme the Federal Government contributes 50 per cent of all
costs involved. Persons requesting training under Schedule R make application
through the National Employment offices. The Co-ordinator of Rehabilitation
arranges through the Health Branch for medical assessment to make sure that the
continuing disability is not " active " nor will mitigate against the type of vocational
training recommended by the National Employment Service.
School and Courses
Number
Enrolled
Number
Completed
Canadian National Institute for the Blind—Cafeteria Operation and Management	
2
1
1
3
1
14
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
Vancouver Vocational Institute—
2
1
9
1
Secretarial	
1
1
1
1
1
British Columbia Vocational School (Nanaimo)—Heavy Equipment Operator 	
1
1
Pitman Business College—Commercial _ -	
1
 Z 82
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
School and Courses
Number
Enrolled
Number
Completed
Sprott-Shaw—Bookkeeping-
Insurance Institute, Vancouver—Second Year Agent's Course (correspondence) 	
Hollway Radio and Record Centre, Port Alberni—Radio and Electronics (T.O.J.)	
Howard Powell School of Beauty, Prince George—Beauty Culture  	
New Westminster Business College—General Commercial 	
Olga's School of Hairdressing, Kamloops—Hairdressing	
Lenkurt Electric, Vancouver—Engineering Aid   	
Western School of Auctioneering, Billings, Montana—Auctioneer  	
Island Chain Saws, Nanaimo—Power Saw Mechanics (T.O.J.) _   	
Programme 7.—Training of Technical and Vocational Teachers
Adult School Level.—Vocational-teacher training for the adult vocational
schools is offered by the Technical Branch, Department of Education, in the British
Columbia Vocational School (Burnaby).
The 1961 summer session provided courses in four areas—Teaching Methods
in Vocational Education, Principles of Instruction, Measurement and Evaluation in
Vocational Training, and School Administration in Vocational Education.
A maximum of 6 credits is allowed for any one summer session. A total of
thirty-two teachers attended the 1961 summer session.
Secondary-school level.—For senior secondary vocational instructors and Industrial Arts instructors, we offer a five-year programme under the auspices of the
University of British Columbia leading to a Bachelor of Education degree (secondary) with a double major in Industrial Arts.
The technical portion of this programme is carried out in the British Columbia
Vocational School (Burnaby) from September to June 30th each year.
The selection of candidates for this programme is made by the Technical
Branch, Department of Education, and all selected candidates must have trade
competency to teach at the vocational level. Those who do not have trade competency may only teach at the Industrial Arts level.
Total number of students admitted to course  43
Number of withdrawals at end of Education 150     5
Failed or dropped one course     4
Failed or dropped two courses	
Failed or dropped three courses     1
Failed or dropped five courses     1
12
Number of students securing a clear pass '_— 31
Programme 8.—Training Programme for Federal Department and Agencies
In British Columbia we hire and inspect eight civilian instructors in the Army
engineers' school at Camp Chilliwack. We are also hiring instructors for the naval
school (Naden) in Esquimalt.   Twelve instructors are required here.
The Federal Government reimburses the Province 100 per cent in this programme.
Programme 9.—Student Aid
The Federal Government provides a grant of $30,000 annually toward this
programme.   The Provincial Government's current annual expenditure is $200,000.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
Pre-apprenticeship and Apprenticeship Training
z 83
The Department of Education provides training for courses sponsored by the
Apprenticeship Branch, Department of Labour, in our regional vocational schools.
The following table lists the training areas and the numbers enrolled:—
Pre-apprentice
Apprentice
School and Course
Number
Enrolled
to July 1,
1961
Number
Enrolled
Number
Completed
Number
Enrolled
Number
Completed
British Columbia Vocational School
(Burnaby)
14
10
9
6
12
5
1
6
10
14
12
7
5
27
1
23
22
15
18
26
18
11
9
23
17
27
13
11
21
29
78
22
1
15
18
15
12
22
13
3
7
23
16
21
21
14
13
29
77
22
14
104
72
7
29
14
42
26
2
13
23
130
53
4
10
10
1
23
18
13
102
70
Electronics—	
7
29
Plastering             .  . ...	
11
41
Sheet Metal
26
2
Sprinkler Fitting
Steamfitting  	
13
22
British Columbia Vocational School
(Nanaimo)
130
53
Vancouver Vocational Institute
4
10
Carpentry
10
1
23
Vocational Curriculum Development Division
This Division is responsible for the development of all vocational-course outlines used in our regional vocational schools. It co-operates with the Apprenticeship Branch in the developing of course outlines for apprenticeship and pre-apprenticeship training in designated trade areas.
Other activities of the Division include the development and production of an
extensive number of instruction sheets for distribution by instructors to students,
production of publicity brochures, teaching aids, visual aids, photographs, instructional manuals, etc.   Activities during the year included the following:—
Aeronautics:  A detailed outline of the two-year programme presented in the
Burnaby school.
Practical Nursing:   A draft copy of this programme has been prepared and
circulated to all schools.
Piledriving and Bridgeman:   A four-year course outline and six-month pre-
apprentice course has been printed and distributed.
Timekeeping:  This course is being developed by the instructor at the British
Columbia Vocational School in Nanaimo.
Horticulture and Gardening:  This course is in the process of development.
 Z 84 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
Plumbing and Steamfitting: As these trades have been lengthened to a five-
year apprenticeship from four, it has necessitated a revision of the course
outlines.   Draft copies have been prepared.
Heavy Equipment Operator's Course: This has been prepared by the instructor at the British Columbia Vocational School in Nanaimo. Draft copies
have been prepared and accepted by the Advisory Committee.
Electrical Trades:  This is under development.
Sign Painting:  A four-year course outline is under development.
Institute of Technology: This Division has participated actively in the planning
of the Institute. Aside from co-ordinating several of the committees,
requisitions for equipment were typed, minutes and correspondence relating to many meetings were printed and distributed, and a multi-coloured
brochure was printed and distributed to all schools.
Cafeteria: The responsibility for co-ordinating the planning and acting as
liaison between the architects and the Advisory Committee in the preparation of plans and specifications for a cafeteria to be erected on the
Burnaby school-site was accepted by this Division.
Library: The Provincial Vocational Technical Library forms a part of the
Vocational Curriculum Development Division. During the past year the
library grew from a few hundred volumes to over 2,500, and in June,
1962, the first library index was issued. Instructors of regional vocational schools and all public schools offering an approved vocational programme may borrow books.
Report of Inspectors of Technical Classes
New facilities for teaching Industrial Arts have been provided in Ashcroft,
Clinton, Cowichan, Greater Victoria, Lytton, Hagensborg, Richmond, Vancouver,
Windermere, Maple Ridge, Salmon Arm, Chase, Burnaby, North Vancouver, Burns
Lake, and Dawson Creek.
Twenty-seven qualified and three untrained teachers were required to fill
vacancies in new Industrial Arts centres and to replace those leaving the profession.
The Industrial Arts Teacher Training Unit of the College of Education of the University of British Columbia is to be commended for the work it is doing. Our new
Industrial Arts teachers are now starting out in the profession better prepared than
they have been at any period in the past.
During this past year the Grade VIII course in Industrial Arts has been revised
and is ready for use when school opens in September.
The total number of Industrial Arts teachers employed to staff our schools
during the past year stands at 470.
Pupils participating in Industrial Arts in junior secondary schools numbered
24,222, and those in senior secondary schools numbered 16,940, a total of 41,162.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
Z 85
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
REPORT OF J. H. PANTON, B.A., M.Sc, DIRECTOR
Steady growth, increasing community interest, and participation in recreation
and closer relations between British Columbia communities and the Community
Programmes Branch have all contributed to the continual progress of Government
recreation services to the Province.
The past year followed the same trend as the year before. Recreation Commissions increased in number; all aspects of leadership services indicated more
interest and expansion, better organization, and more enthusiastic approval by participants. The total acceptance of Recreation Commissions as necessary and vital
components of the community structure is still a future objective; however, the
steady progress toward this objective is manifested in the growth of community
recreation activity throughout the Province.
The following table shows the growth of Recreation Commissions in British
Columbia to March 31, 1962:—
1954     86 1959  266
1955  140 1960  281
1956  183 1961  307
1957  216 1962  332
1958  250
Services extended by the Community Programmes Branch to British Columbia
communities are as follows:—
(1) Advice to public agencies and individuals on recreational matters by a
staff of regional Recreation Consultants.
(2) Aid in recreation to the blind through White Cane Clubs organized by
staff member Mr. Joseph Lewis.
(3) Large and comprehensive library of books, booklets, films, and filmstrips
on innumerable recreation topics.
(4) Drama library, materials, and advisory services.
(5) Leadership training through workshops, conferences, clinics, and regional
schools.
(6) Night-school grants for regularly organized night-school classes.
(7) Regular grants to Recreation Commissions to assist communities with
paid recreation help and expenses.
(8) Special grants to those Recreation Commissions who conducted summer
swimming and playground programmes.
(9) Responsible for educational sessions and resource personnel at Annual
British Columbia Recreation Conference.
Recreation Commissions
The following is a list of Recreation Commissions in British Columbia and the
annual Provincial Government grant allocated for the year:—
* Commissions receiving grants for directors' salaries.
t Inactive Commissions during year with actual amount received shown in parentheses.
Annual Annual
Recreation Commission Grant Recreation Commission Grant
Abbotsford      $480.00 * Alert Bay  $1,200.00
Adams Lake        300.00 Alexandria        300.00
Ainsworth         300.00 Alexis Creek       240.00
 Z 86
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
Recreation Commission
Argenta-Johnsons Landing
Armstrong
Arrowhead-Sidmouth
Arrow Park	
Ashcroft 	
Balfour	
Bamfield	
Barnston Island .
Bear Creek	
Beaver Creek	
Beaverdell 	
Birch Island	
Black Creek	
Blue River.
Bonnington-Corra Linn
Boston Bar	
Boswell 	
Bouchie Lake	
Bowen Island	
*Bralorne 	
Bridesville 	
Brisco 	
Britannia Beach
Brocklehurst	
Brookmere 	
*Burnaby Parks ...
Burns Lake	
Burton
*Campbell River.
Canal Flats	
Canoe 	
Canyon	
Cawston	
Cedar
Annual
Grant
  $300.00
  600.00
  180.00
  240.00
  300.00
  540.00
  420.00
  No grant
  240.00
  480.00
  240.00
  240.00
  480.00
  144.00
  240.00
  300.00
  420.00
  180.00
  240.00
  1,200.00
  240.00
  180.00
  480.00
  300.00
  240.00
  3,600.00
  480.00
  240.00
  1,500.00
No grant ($150)
  240.00
Central Saanich
Chase
Chehalis Crossing
Chehalis Reserve _
Cherry Creek	
Cherryville	
Chetwynd
Christian Valley
Christina Lake ...
Clearwater	
300.00
240.00
420.00
480.00
300.00
420.00
240.00
540.00
300.00
300.00
240.00
300.00
300.00
420.00
240.00
240.00
1,800.00
900.00
300.00
240.00
900.00
No grant
600.00
180.00
300.00
1,020.00
300.00
420.00
360.00
420.00
*District of Coquitlam     2,100.00
District of Matsqui       600.00
District of Mission       480.00
Doe River       240.00
Comox Community (R.C.A.F.)
Connaught Heights	
Coombs 	
*Courtenay 	
*Cranbrook	
Crawford Bay	
Crescent Valley	
*Creston	
Cultus Lake 	
Cumberland 	
Decker Lake	
Deep Cove	
*Delta Parks	
Denman Island .
Departure Bay .
Deroche 	
Dewdney
tDragon Lake	
Eagle Valley .	
East Kelowna _
East Wellington
.200.00 (none)
240.00
420.00
420.00
Recreation Commission
Edgewater 	
Elko	
Emerald Mines
Enderby	
Erickson	
Errington	
Falkland	
Fanny Bay 	
Ferndale	
Field 	
Forest Grove —
Fort Fraser	
tFort St. John ...
Francois Lake .
Franklin River
tFraser Lake	
Fruitvale
-240
Gabriola Island
Galloway 	
Genelle	
Gibsons	
Gillies Bay	
tGiscome	
Glenmore 	
Glenora	
Golden 	
Grand Forks	
Gray Creek	
Great Central....
Greenwood	
Grindrod 	
.300
Groundbirch	
Haida Masset	
Halfmoon Bay	
Happy Valley-Glen Lake
Harrison Hot Springs	
tHarrop and District	
Hatzic Prairie	
Hazelton	
Hedley	
Hixon 	
Hope
.240
Hornby Island .
Horsefly 	
Houston 	
Inonoaklin	
Invermere	
loco 	
Jeune Landing
Jordan River _
Kaleden 	
Kaslo 	
*Kelowna	
Kent	
Keremeos 	
Kersley	
Kettle Valley .
Kilkerran	
*Kimberley _...
Kingfisher
Kitwanga Valley
Kootenay Bay .	
Kyuquot 	
Lac la Hache	
Ladysmith 	
La France	
tLaidlaw	
Lakeview Heights
Langford 	
Annual
Grant
$420.00
180.00
180.00
300.00
420.00
300.00
300.00
480.00
300.00
600.00
300.00
300.00
No grant
300.00
300.00
.00 (none)
240.00
360.00
600.00
540.00
420.00
300.00
.00 (none)
360.00
420.00
480.00
600.00
240.00
300.00
420.00
300.00
240.00
No grant
300.00
300.00
420.00
.00 (none)
300.00
300.00
240.00
420.00
600.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
480.00
300.00
420.00
1,200.00
480.00
240.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
1,200.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
360.00
300.00
540.00
240.00
No grant
300.00
480.00
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
Z 87
Recreation Commission
Langley 	
Lantzville 	
Lardeau District 	
Lavington	
Lillooet 	
Lister 	
Little Fort	
tLone Bute	
Lumby	
Lund 	
Lytton
.180
Mahatta River.
Mahood Falls .
Malaspina 	
tMaple Ridge	
Mara	
Marysville 	
Merritt	
Metchosin	
Midway
Minstrel Island.
Minto	
Montney
Moose Heights
Mount Ida	
.Mud River	
.180
McConnell Creek
McLeese Lake ...
Nakusp
*Nanaimo Civic Properties ...
Nanoose 	
Naramata	
tNarcosli Creek 180
Natal 	
Nazko	
*Nelson	
New Denver	
New Hazelton	
New Masset	
*New Westminster	
Nicomen Island	
Noralee - Clemretta - Colleymount
North Bend	
North Cowichan	
Northfield 	
North Kamloops 	
North Shore (Nelson)	
North Shuswap	
*North Vancouver	
Oak Bay	
t Okanagan Centre 120
Okanagan Falls	
t Okanagan Mission 240
Oliver	
tlOO Mile House.
150 Mile House.
Osoyoos	
Oyama	
Palling	
Parksville 	
Paul Creek	
Peachland 	
180
Pemberton and District
Pendleton Bay	
Pender Harbour	
Penticton	
tPitt Meadows	
Popkum	
Port Alberni	
Annual
Grant
$600.00
480.00
300.00
600.00
240.00
480.00
240.00
00 (none)
300.00
240.00
420.00
300.00
180.00
300.00
No grant
240.00
300.00
300.00
480.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
300.00
180.00
240.00
.00 (none)
240.00
240.00
600.00
2,100.00
420.00
300.00
1.00 (none)
300.00
240.00
2,300.00
240.00
360.00
180.00
2,700.00
360.00
360.00
480.00
600.00
420.00
600.00
480.00
360.00
600.00
600.00
.00 (none)
240.00
.00 (none)
300.00
.00 (none)
240.00
360.00
300.00
360.00
600.00
240.00
300.00
300.00
180.00
300.00
600.00
No grant
360.00
600.00
Recreation Commission
Port Alice	
Port Clements	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Mellon	
Port Moody	
Port McNeill	
Port Renfrew	
Pouce Coupe	
tPowell River	
*Prince George	
*Prince Rupert	
Princeton	
Procter 	
Progress	
Quadra
Qualicum Beach	
Queen Charlotte	
tQuesnel 300
Radium Junction	
Red Bluff	
Redwell 	
Reid Lake	
Revelstoke	
*Richmond	
Riondel	
Riske Creek	
Riverside 	
Roberts Creek
Robson	
Rock Creek ....
Roe Lake	
Rose Lake	
Round Lake ...
Rutland	
Salmo 	
Salmon Arm
Saltair 	
Saltspring Island
Sandspit
Savona District.
Sayward	
Sechelt	
70 Mile and Watch Lake
Shalalth	
Shawnigan Lake
Shirley ...
Sidney .
Silver Creek
Silverton
Skidegate Mission .
Slocan	
tSmithers	
.300
Soda Creek	
Songhees Indian .
Sooke 	
Southern Cortez
South Hazelton ..
South Kelowna ..
Southside	
South Slocan	
South Taylor.	
Spences Bridge ..
Sproat Lake	
Squamish
Squamish Indian Band
tStikine	
Straiton 	
.240
Sumas Municipality.
Summerland 	
Annual
Grant
No grant
$216.00
300.00
600.00
300.00
540.00
420.00
300.00
No grant
1,500.00
2,700.00
420.00
480.00
300.00
480.00
300.00
180.00
.00 (none)
360.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
300.00
2,700.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
600.00
240.00
300.00
300.00
240.00
300.00
600.00
600.00
No grant
600.00
180.00
300.00
480.00
300.00
180.00
180.00
420.00
240.00
540.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
360.00
.00 (none)
240.00
480.00
540.00
540.00
360.00
180.00
360.00
420.00
240.00
180.00
420.00
480.00
No grant
.00 (none)
360.00
600.00
480.00
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1961/62
Recreation Commission
Sunnybrae
Sunrise-Two Rivers
Sunset Prairie	
Annual
Recreation Commission Grant
Village of Mission      $600.00
Wardner District
Warfield 	
Wellington
Westbank	
West Bench ...
Westbridge 	
West Creston
300.00
480.00
420.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
180.00
*West Vancouver     2,400.00
Whaletown Community        360.00
White Lake         300.00
*Williams Lake     1,200.00
480.00
240.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
360.00
240.00
480.00
300.00
180.00
300.00
420.00
Willow Point District
Willow River .
Wilson Creek
Windermere _
Winfield	
Winlaw 	
Wistaria	
Woodfibre 	
Wynndel 	
Yale 	
Ymir  	
Zeballos	
Annual
Grant
       $180.00
180.00
240.00
tTahsis 300.00 (none)
tTappen 180.00 (none)
Tarrys and District       300.00
Tatla Lake       420.00
Tatlayoko Lake        120.00
Tchesinkut Lake       300.00
tTelkwa 240.00 (none)
tTerrace 600.00 (none)
Texada       300.00
Tofino       540.00
Topley         240.00
*Trail-Tadanac      3,300.00
Tulameen         300.00
Ucluelet        600.00
Union Bay        420.00
University Hill   No grant
Valemount       360.00
Valleyview-Dallas        360.00
*Vancouver Board of Parks     7,800.00
Vavenby        240.00
tVernon 300.00 (none)
View Royal       540.00
Twelve Commissions became totally or partially inactive during the year.
A Commission usually becomes inactive due to poor leadership; however, in most
cases they return to regular activity. Very often inactivity is the result of lack of
interest in seasonal activities or heavy seasonal work on farms and orchards.
The information taken from Recreation Commissions' quarterly reports indicates the magnitude of energy and expense which goes into community recreation
in British Columbia. The figures below are not a picture of all recreation in British
Columbia as they do not include private agencies, clubs, commercial recreation,
and all activities not under the jurisdiction of Recreation Commissions; these run
into many millions. The number of participants is also misleading as this includes
many who participate in several activities, where they are counted each time.
Although we realize there are many discrepancies in reporting, the over-all picture
does emphasize the importance of community recreation and the necessity for good
organization and administration on the municipal level.
Number of activities reported  6,272
Total number of participants       1,415,641
Income of Recreation Commissions  $821,440.54
Expenditure of Recreation Commissions  $870,341.15
Forty-five Recreation Commissions applied for and received increased grants
during the year. Twenty-five new Commissions were added to the list, and each of
these applied for and received grants.
Community grants are based on such factors as size of community, type of
programme, activity of the Recreation Commission, and financial contribution by
the Recreation Commission.
Staff
The seven members of the field staff again completed a year of efficient and
effective service to British Columbia communities. The union of the Fraser Valley
and Sechelt regions increased this area from twenty-four to forty-five Commissions
to be served by Mr. T. Ruben, Fraser Valley Recreation Consultant. The seven
Greater Vancouver Commissions are now served from Victoria.   Each member of
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
Z 89
the field staff now covers a larger region, and each region contains more than forty
Recreation Commissions. Visitation to each community is of necessity infrequent;
however, good organization, sound administration, and a thorough understanding
of good communication should enable a community to receive effective aid from
each regional office without frequent visits by the Consultant. All Recreation Commissions should strive for efficient management of their affairs, as this will preclude
any lack of assistance from the Community Programmes Branch and all other
sources of recreation aid and information.
The consultative staff of the Community Programmes Branch are deserving of
high commendation for the effective way they are discharging ever-increasing duties.
The consultative staff and their regions are as follows:—
Consultant
Office
Region
T. Ruben 	
K. K. Maltman	
E. W. Mayers 	
G. J. Pynn  —
D. M. McCooey	
J. R. McKeen ....
J. M. MacKinnon..
Abbotsford..
Kelowna	
Kamloops.—
Victoria	
Quesnel	
Nelson	
Cranbrook...
Fraser-Sechelt.
Okanagan-Similkameen.
Central British Columbia.
Vancouver Island.
Northern British Columbia.
West Kootenay.
East Kootenay.
Leadership
The realization of the importance of good leadership has resulted in more
demands for this service from the Community Programmes Branch. The inevitable
result of this is an increase in the activity of the Branch in this respect. Although
there were fewer local clinics, there were more participants. A significant project
was the in-service training course for Greater Vancouver Commissions, which was
conducted by the Vancouver Board of Parks and Public Recreation and the Community Programmes Branch. The Branch provided $240 for resource personnel,
and the course, which was conducted between November, 1961, and March, 1962,
was eminently successful.
The regional leadership workshops continued to provide excellent opportunity
for leadership training.
Workshops
Number
Attending
Number of
Commissions
Represented
Number of
Courses
Given
Cost
45
71
130
61
100
99
14
23
31
18
17
26
5
9
7
8
9
10
$852.35
721.20
545.00
374.00
907.17
8on.no
506
129
48            1       $4.199.72
 Z 90
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
Statistical Analysis, 1961/62
Clinics
Conferences
Leadership
Workshops
Regional
104
4,671
138
1
271
34
1,138
310
2
146
60
7
597
138
Provincial
Special grants to communities conducting playground programmes and swimming instruction and water safety totalled $10,425; 117 communities received this
aid. One hundred and three aquatic and twenty-nine playground programmes were
assisted. These grants are provided to encourage community activity in these
extremely important aspects of recreation.
The Nelson and Okanagan Summer Schools of Fine Arts received grants of
$200 each. This aid is an effective way to ascertain where the Branch can procure
future leaders in the fine arts.
The Annual Provincial Recreation Conference is also a major project for the
Community Programmes Branch. The Branch is responsible for the educational
sessions and the resource personnel. The conference is also part of the B.C.R.A.
annual meeting and provides excellent learning opportunity for professional people,
Recreation Commission personnel, and municipal Councillors with recreation responsibilities. The 1961 conference was held in Penticton, and the programme
included the following sessions: Teen-age Recreation, Arts in Recreation, Planning
Recreation Facilities, Use of Natural Resources in Recreation, Organization of
Aquatic Programmes, Leadership Personnel, Camping in British Columbia, Community Planning for Recreation, Municipal Government in Recreation, Adult Physical Fitness, Recreation Commission Administration, Recreation Resources, and
Recreation Programme Activities Demonstration.
Library Service
During the summer of 1961 the complete film library of the Community Programmes Branch was moved to the Visual Education Division in Vancouver. The
method of booking was revised by replacing the old request cards with new forms.
Although the move and subsequent reorganization created some disruption of service, the Community Programmes Branch film library is much better organized and
maintained than was formerly possible. Indications are that there will be much
more use made of Branch films than in the past.
The excellent book library of the Community Programmes Branch is not used
as much as it should be. The library contains up-to-date reference material on
every aspect of recreation and is a great asset to recreation people in British
Columbia.
Library Statistics
New books purchased  214
New films purchased     13
Number of books circulated  572
 community programmes branch z 91
Publications
The quarterly recreation bulletin published by the Branch has become an outstanding source of information, particularly for small communities. Five hundred
copies are mailed each quarter covering ah Recreation Commissions, Superintendents of Education, Adult Education Directors in British Columbia, and recreation
people in all Provinces throughout Canada.
During the year the following were printed: (1) Catalogue of Drama Resource
Material and (2) Leadership Training Brochure.
Drama
The drama services of the Community Programmes Branch continued to be
taxed to the limit. Between eight and nine thousand books, including plays, pamphlets, magazines, etc., were sent out to interested individuals, groups, schools,
teachers, etc. Equipment including curtains, lights, and rheostats was in constant
demand for productions, concerts, special events, and festivals of all kinds.
Over 250 active drama groups with a minimum of about fifteen members produced from one to six full-length plays each during the season, with one-act and
workshop plays completing the programme.
Drama festivals play a major role in the cultural life of British Columbia. Last
spring thirty-four drama festivals were held throughout the Province; of these,
eleven were for schools only, eleven adults only, three included both school and
community groups, and nine combined drama and speech arts with music and
dancing.
Victoria played host to the British Columbia region of the Dominion Drama
Festival. Entries came from Kamloops, New Westminster, and Victoria, with two
groups not meeting the required standards and one being withdrawn. Mr. Peter
Haworth, of Vancouver, acted as preliminary judge. The adjudicator, Mr. David
Gardner, of Toronto, chose the Kamloops presentation of "The Long and the
Short and the Tall" as the winning play. Mr. Tom Kerr was the director. As
British Columbia and Alberta have been made into one region, only one entry competes at the Dominion Drama Festival, and Mr. Gardner chose the Red Deer play
to represent the West at Winnipeg.
The One-act Final Festival took place in Dawson Creek, with Mr. Herbert
Whittaker, drama editor, Toronto Globe and Mail, acting as adjudicator. Nine
regional festival winners competed, and first-place honours went to Dawson Creek
Choral and Dramatic Society's presentation of a Chinese classic, "The Thrice-
promised Bride," directed by Miss Mary McPhee. The Community Programmes
Branch appointed adjudicators for all British Columbia festivals and provided assistance to the committees in charge. Workshops continued to be important to the
groups, and the Branch provided leadership and financial assistance in this regard.
The British Columbia Drama Association, with Mr. Franklin Johnson, of White
Rock, as its president, continued to function as the parent body of drama groups
in the Province. Our Drama Adviser, Miss Anne Adamson, in her capacity of
corresponding secretary, gave invaluable assistance to drama groups throughout the
Province. Miss Adamson and Mr. Don Rush, of Vancouver, were awarded the
Hamber Troupy in tribute to their contribution to community drama in British
Columbia.
The association has set up a British Columbia Guild of Adjudicators to train
and raise the standard of adjudication in this Province. It is hoped to set up
examinations for those already acting as judges in the dramatic field and to provide
 Z 92
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1961/62
assistance to those desirous of being appointed to this position.    Mr. Antony Holland, of Haney, heads the committee.
A committee has also been appointed to assist students to attend the National
Theatre School at Montreal, University of British Columbia Summer School of the
Theatre, and other estabhshed schools in British Columbia. The drama magazine
continues to be pubhshed twice yearly. This receives the support and encouragement of interested readers.
Adult Education Division (Night-schools)
The adult education programme in British Columbia public schools is reaching
out to encompass such a wide variety of activities and large numbers of citizens that
planning, for even the immediate future, is subject to such a growth trend that plans
need constant revisions. Adult education isp resenting a tredenmous challenge and
is demanding serious thought and imaginary foresight. If this challenge is not met,
those charged with the provision of facilities and opportunity will have to contend
with problems of immense magnitude; these problems are acute because of the
necessity for continuing education and the great desire to gain knowledge, which is
continually expressed by so many people in our complex society.
The adult education programme in British Columbia schools continues to
expand, but the most significant aspect of the 1961/62 year was the increased
emphasis placed on adequate administration of adult education. More and more
school districts are accepting the important role continuing education must play and
are providing capable directors with adequate time to do the job. No longer is it
possible for a full-time day-school teacher to do justice to an adult education programme without being relieved of some day-school duties. We now have several
full-time adult education directors, and many on a half-time or part time basis. This
will inevitably lead to better programmes and expansions in adult education.
The following School Boards conducted night-school programmes during the
academic year 1961/62:—
Abbotsford.
Agassiz.
Alberni.
Alert Bay.
Armstrong-Spallumcheen.
Burnaby.
Campbell River.
Castlegar.
Chilliwack.
Coquitlam.
Courtenay.
Cowichan.
Cranbrook.
Creston.
Delta.
Enderby.
Fernie.
Fort Nelson.
Golden.
Grand Forks.
Gulf Islands.
Howe Sound.
Kamloops.
Kelowna.
Keremeos.
Kimberley.
Kitimat.
Ladysmith.
Lake Cowichan.
Langley.
Maple Ridge.
Merritt.
Mission.
Nanaimo.
Nelson.
New Westminster.
North Vancouver.
Ocean Falls.
Peace River North.
Peace River South.
Penticton.
Powell River.
Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Princeton.
Qualicum.
Revelstoke.
Richmond.
Saanich.
Salmon Arm.
Sechelt.
Smithers.
South Cariboo.
Southern Okanagan.
Summerland.
Surrey.
Terrace.
Trail.
Vancouver.
Vanderhoof.
Vernon.
Victoria.
West Vancouver.
Windermere.
Williams Lake.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
Classification of Courses and Enrolment
Z 93
Course
Vancouver
Other
Centres
Total
Non-vocational
5,355
2,432
1,058
3,090
1,525
2,115
438
1,442
2,630
2,657
2,378
4,251
1,658
4,711
182
843
7,985
5,089
3,436
7,341
3,183
6,826
620
2,285
Totals 	
17,455
19,310
36,765
Vocational
1,946
698
270
393
244
369
211
176
82
107
972
2,492
107
33
359
316
69
472
79
72
316
4,438
805
303
752
560
438
683
Sub-engineering     _   	
176
161
179
1,288
5,468
4,315
9,783
Summary Showing Trends in Number of School Districts, Instructors, and Classes
Year
Number
of School
Districts
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
1953/54.     ,        .                          	
49
55
57
60
62
64
58
64
75
19,969
22,280
29,335
33,565
36,611
39,108
40,867
40,917
46,548
842
948
1,186
1,328
1,401
1,578
1,796
1,945
2,273
1954/55 	
1955/56-	
	
1956/57                                                         	
1957/58                                                                                	
1958/59   -	
1959/60
1,578
1960/61
2,220
1961/62	
2,219
 Z 94
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
Summary Showing Trends in Number of School Districts, Instructors, and Classes-
Continued
VOCATIONAL
Year
Number of
Number of
Enrollees
Instructors
9,040
357
11,582
440
11,118
477
10,761
454
13,539
540
12,530
552
9,783
518
Number of
Courses
1955/56-
1956/57-
1957/58..
1958/59-
1959/60-
1960/61-
1961/62-
322
552
512
NON-VOCATIONAL
1955/56
20,291
21,983
25,493
28,427
27,328
28,387
36,765
829
888
924
1,124
1,256
1,393
1,755
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59   	
1959/60
1,256
1960/61
1,648
1961/62
1,707
One hundred and forty-three different non-vocational courses were offered in
the total programme during the year. Forty-two academic courses were given for
credit.   The ranking of courses in enrolment were as follows:—
Academic—
1. English 30, 40     543
2. English 100, 101      350
3. Mathematics 91       297
4. Mathematics 101      293
5. Social Studies 30      249
Others—
1. Sewing  3,618
2. Ballroom Dancing  1,919
3. English for New Canadians  1,632
4. Latin-American Dancing  1,397
5. Painting   1,211
6. Physical Fitness
1,205
The new procedure which made it possible to achieve high-school graduation
through the General Interrupted Programme met with enthusiastic approval. The
large adult education programmes in the Province, particularly Vancouver and
Victoria, could hardly accommodate those who desired to avail themselves of this
opportunity.   A total of 7,985 students was enrolled throughout the Province.
Regional conferences were again conducted at various points throughout the
Province, and the first Provincial conference since 1955 was held in Vancouver on
April 3rd and 4th. The significant aspect of this Vancouver conference was the
formation of a committee to work with the Department of Education to study adult
education in British Columbia and to make recommendations on the findings of the
study. The result of the study has had a great impact on adult education in the
public schools. The rules and regulations governing night-school classes were
changed and new reporting procedure and revised forms were instituted, to become
effective in September of 1962. Many other aspects of adult education are being
studied, with the objective of providing better service for expanded programmes.
 JERICHO HILL SCHOOL
Z 95
JERICHO HILL SCHOOL
(A Special School for Aurally or Visually Handicapped Children)
REPORT OF C. E. MacDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D.,
SUPERINTENDENT
During the 1961/62 school-year there were 292 pupils enrolled in the school,
as shown below. Twelve blind children were from the Province of Alberta, three
deaf came from the Northwest Territories, and one from Yukon Territory.
Day
Resident
Total
35
88
2
62
105
97
193
2
125
167
292
Magna-type readers were loaned through District Superintendents to fourteen
pupils attending regular public schools within the Province. Part-time training
was provided for two 5-year-old deaf-blind boys and a small group of pre-school
deaf children.
General Remarks
As in previous years, the Children's Health Centre and the Metropolitan
Health Services have provided valuable assistance to the School in the assessment
and care of our pupils.
The wartime frame barrack block, which had been used by our senior pupils
as a dormitory for a number of years, was demolished during the summer.
Night-school courses in " Language Problems of the Deaf " and " Speech and
Lipreading for the Deaf " were conducted for the second year by the Vancouver
School Board at John Oliver High School. These very useful courses, conducted
by members of our school staff, were well attended.
As a result of numerous inquiries from parents with regard to civil defence
provision for their children in case of emergency, a fallout protection survey of the
buildings was made by an expert of the Department of Public Works. The basements of Lawrence Hall and the Braille Building were deemed to afford suitable
protection, particularly the former.
The Board accepted a sub-commitee report on pupil-supervisor ratios and
recommended approval by the Department of Education and the Civil Service
Commission of an entitlement ratio of eighteen pupils to one resident instructor for
this School. After due consideration, the recommended average ratio was approved
by both departments.
An attempt was made to secure suggestions from former pupils with regard to
vocational training. However, the results of the questionnaire were of little or no
value for the purposes designed.
A conference on special education was held in Cloverdale on October 28th
and attended by Mr. Carson and Mr. White as resource persons. A paper prepared
by Dr. MacDonald, relating to the education of visually and aurally handicapped
children, was presented at the conference.
 Z 96 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1961/62
Five student-teachers were attached to the deaf department for observation
and practice teaching half a day a week, and four were similarly attached to the
blind department. This had been the first time practice teachers were attached to
this School.
The School family was saddened by the passing of Kenneth Nore and David
Hall, of our blind department. Both these fine young lads died from brain tumours,
after some months of illness.
A twenty-minute CBC-TV programme, entitled " Listen with Your Eyes,"
was presented on a national hook-up, Sunday, March 4th. This excellent film deals
with the teaching techniques employed with deaf children, particularly speech and
lipreading. It was presented again during the summer Vancouver International
Film Festival as one of the outstanding documentary films of the year.
On March 29th it was announced in the Legislature that two new buildings
would be constructed at Jericho Hill—a boys' dormitory and an intermediate-senior
deaf school building—costing in the vicinity of a million dollars. Favourable
consideration was subsequently given to construction of a vocational training building. Commencement date for the construction of one or more of these projects
was to be early in 1963.
A number of vocational courses deemed suitable for deaf and blind pupils
were referred by the Board to the Director of Vocational Training, Mr. White, and
his staff for evaluation and subsequent inclusion in a training programme for handicapped persons.
Thirteen deaf and two blind students were graduated on Friday, June 8th, at
a well-attended evening ceremony.
For the first time in the history of our School, two senior deaf students, Henry
Vlug and Wayne Sinclair, successfully passed the Gallaudet College entrance examinations and will be enrolled there this fall. Gallaudet College, it should be mentioned, is at present the only college for the deaf in the world.
In concluding this report, I wish to thank the Department of Education, the
Advisory Committee, both parent-teacher groups, and staff for their wonderful cooperation and support.
 r
OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS Z 97
OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION
OF EXAMINATIONS
REPORT OF HARRY M. EVANS, B.A., REGISTRAR
For reference convenience this report includes data covering a number of years.
Teacher Registration and Certification
I. Each teacher employed in the public schools must hold a valid certificate,
and this office must establish certification and classification, maintaining an individual record for each person, including teaching service. The following chart shows
developments in the past ten years, and indicates that the number of individual
service records to be maintained has increased by approximately 94 per cent in
this period.
1 -	
1951/52
1952/53
1953/54
1954/55
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
2a	
6,622
7,116
7,560
8,223
8,757
9,482
10,119
10,856
11,547
12,148
12,815
2b...- 	
126
158
154
229
176
221
297
332
369
327
254
2c 	
372
494
444
663
534
725
637
737
691
601
667
2d— 	
6.0
7.5
6.2
8.8
6.5
8.3
6.7
7.3
6.4
5.2
5.5
3a...	
895
829
965
974
(?)
1,135
1,165
1,270
1,357
1,356
1,503
3b	
14.3
12.5
13.6
12.9
(?)
13.0
12.3
12.6
12.5
11.7
12.4
4
1,267
1,323
1,637
287
(?)
310
1,860
313
1,802
348
2,007
388
2,048
317
1,957
385
5a	
1,409
2,170
5b 	
20.3
20.0
19.8
21.7
(?)
21.2
19.0
19.8
19.0
16.9
17.9
1. School-year
2a. Teachers employed, as at October, from district nominal rolls. Includes regular staff of Vancouver
Vocational Institute, Vancouver School of Art, and, up to 1955/56, a portion of Victoria College. Includes
supervisors, consultants, relieving teachers, etc.
2b. Numbers with temporary certificates or letters of permission for lack of qualifications, or qualified but
over age, included in 2a.   A change in age regulations occurred for 1955/56 and continued thereafter.
2c. Increase in teachers employed.
2d. Percentage increase in teachers employed.
3a. Numbers who were teaching as at June 30th in previous school-year, not teaching in November of year
shown; that is, drop-outs.
3b. Drop-outs as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
4. Numbers who left positions during the school-year shown.
5a. Numbers of teachers needed in September of year shown to staff new positions and replace drop-outs
from June previous; that is, teacher demand. This does not include replacements for staff changes during the
school-year.
5b. Teacher demand for September as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
In 1961/62 there was a significant drop in the number of temporary certificates
or letters of permission issued. For the first time, letters of permission, rather than
temporary certificates, were issued to those who lacked basic teacher-training qualifications. The number of drop-outs rose to its highest point, but remained in the
general range of 12 to 13 per cent.
II. During the period up to the end of 1955/56, teacher-training was carried
out in normal schools or in the one-year course for graduates at the University.
Enrolments, therefore, in such one-year courses were easy to determine. Since
1956/57 such training has been in the College of Education, and enrolment figures
are more difficult to relate to completion of a basic teacher-training programme as
enrolments cover all years of training. The following charts, however, covering
some twelve years, permit of useful comparisons.
 Z 98
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
1949/50
1950/51
1951/52
1952/53
1953/54
1954/55
1955/56
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
la	
175
36
211
170
35
205
102
39
141
77
35
112
86
22
108
91
22
113
72
50
122
lb	
109
259
368
124
251
375
108
228
336
116
284
400
114
219
333
204
342
546
196
393
589
Ic-   	
54
128
182
79
162
241
33
136
169
48
156
204
40
125
165
90
155
245
99
228
327
Id	
338
423
761
473 448
821
243
403
646
241
475
716
240
366
606
385
519
904
367
671
1.038
2a— 	
152
32
184
137
30
167
88
35
123
67
35
102
71
20
91
74
17
91
55
44
99
2b    	
96
44
249
117
345
161
690
110
66
313
239
149
418
349
215
731
96
24
208
214
124
373
310
148
581
102
44
213
271
149
455
373
193
668
100
37
208
206
119
345
306 185
156 83
553 342
322
150
489
507
233
831
177
93
325
369
222
635
546
2c    	
315
2d 	
2921398
960
3a 	
9
?.
2
11
4
13
10
2
1?
15
77
5
3
1
6
6
9
8
5
13
8
18
2
?
8
2
10
3
1?
2
11
5
3b 	
7,3
3c    	
	
21  6
8
23
708
23
184
1
15
358
1
38
543
1
9
204
3
10
445
4
19
649
1
14
194
4
17
378
5
31
522
4
338
3
11
478
3
15
816
6
21
304
6
19
616
12
3d 	
13
300
10
408
40
4
920
References:  M.=male;  F.=female;  T._=total;  a=University of British Columbia;  b=Vancouver Normal;
c=Victoria Normal.
1. Enrolments in teacher-training as at Ocober.
2. Number graduating as at June of the school-year, available for September following.
3. Number graduating as at June of the school-year who were not teaching in November following.   Some
entered teaching in later years.
4. Number graduating as at June of the school-year who were teaching in November following;  i.e., supply
from training institutions.
r-
<->
vc
CTs
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
M.
F.  T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
la     	
766
1
 ] 985
1,353
1,635
2,006
2,127
lb—   	
378
	
410
523
666
798
855
Ic.  . ...	
1,144
1,395
1,876
2,301
2,804
2,982
2a  	
548
635
827
981
1,224
1,223
2b    	
131
	
135
	
177
200
	
257
266
2c-    	
679
770
1,004
1,181
1,026
1,481
1,258
1,489
3a...   	
487
657
835
1,371
3b	
120
	
119
	
	
199
216
	
266
284
3c              	
607
776
1,034
1,242
1,524
1,655
4a  	
?
159
377
589
279
508
787
338
555
893
397
617
1,009
4b    	
525
7
166
9
386
16
605
18
797
28
536
46
833
12
350
35
590
47
940
29
421
28
645
57
1,066
—
5a	
?
12
34
46
39
60
99
46
99
145
57
97
154
5b   	
9
23
102
125
19
95
114
51
135
186
90
236
326
5c...  . . 	
">
35
136
171
58
155
213
97
234
331
147
333
480
—
References:   M.=male;  F.=female; T._=total.
1. Teacher-training enrolments, in all years;  (a) elementary training, (b) secondary training, (c) total.
2. Enrolled in training programmes leading to a certificate at end of year, and therefore considered likely
to teach.
3. Listed by training-college at close of year, and teaching considered likely (includes those who may be
considered for temporary certificates, but not those who failed the year or failed practice teaching and a limited
number of special cases).
4. Number of those listed in 3 who were teaching as at November in school-year following training;
(a) numbers with regular certificates, (b) numbers with temporary certificates, (c) total.
5. Numbers of those listed in 3; (a) not teaching as at November but certificates issued, (b) not teaching
and no certificate issued or requested, (c) total not teaching.
Note.—The above do not include those taking emergency Industrial Arts and summer session Home Economics training programme. The discrepancy between the total of 3c and totals of 4c plus 5c arise from the
fact that some not included in 3c passed further work to be included in 4c plus 5c.
The certification of those listed in the preceding table as undertaking teacher-
training in 1958/59, who were teaching as at November, 1959, was as follows, and
includes adjustments through supplemental or summer session courses taken in
1959:—
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
Z 99
Certificate
E-T
E-C
E-B
E-A
S-T
PC
P-B
P-A
Total
17
28
61
150
54
238
32
36
1
20
38
110
45
2
1
297
536
Totals	
45
211
292
68
1
58
155
3
833
Similar information for the training-year 1959/60 (teaching-year 1960/61)
follows and indicates a drop in the E-C category and increases in the E-B and E-A
categories, reflecting improvement at the elementary certification level. The secondary levels remained relatively the same.
Certificate
Total
E-T
E-C
E-B
E-A
S-T
PC
P-B
P-A
10
34
58
128
92
295
56
45
2
1
15
40
109
46
8
1
350
Female	
590
Totals —
44
186
387
101
3
55
155
9
940
In the training-year 1960/61 (teaching-year 1961/62) there was a significant
increase in the E-B category and also in the P-B category, as shown below:—
Certificate
Total
E-T
E-C
E-B
E-A
S-T
PC
P-B
P-A
Male 	
Female 	
21
27
64
123
111
327
37
42
8
1
38
54
138
68
4
3
421
645
Totals
48
187
438
79
9
92
206
7
1,066
III. From the preceding tables can be calculated supply from the training-
colleges as a percentage of demand:—
1951/52
1952/53
1953/54
1954/55
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
la  	
lb   	
2..             	
731
708
1,267
57.7
55.9
581
543
1,323
43.9
41.0
668
649
1,409
47.4
46.1
553
522
1,637
33.8
31.9
831
816
(?)
(?)
(?)
960
920
1,860
51.6
49.5
607
525
1,802
33.7
29.1
776
605
2,007
38.7
29.9
1,034
833
2,048
50.5
40.7
1,242
940
1,957
63.5
48.0
1,542
1,066
2,170
3a _       	
71.1
3b       	
49.1
la. Numbers in training-college listed in June previous as likely available to teach in September of school-
year shown.
lb. Numbers in training-college in June previous actually teaching in October of school-year shown.
2. Numbers needed in September to staff new positions and replace drop-outs from June previous; that is,
teacher demand.   This does not include further replacements required during the school-year.
3a. Numbers listed in training-college in June, as a percentage of demand;  that is, la as a percentage of 2.
3b. Numbers from training-college who taught, as a percentage of demand; that is, lb as a percentage of
2—actual training-college supply as a percentage of demand.
 Z 100
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1961/62
IV. The employment of teachers with temporary certificates in 1959/60, as at
October 31st, was as follows:—
Temporary Elementary
Temporary Secondary
E-T
E-C
Total
S-T
S-C
S-B
vc
Total
127
82
13
1
140
83
9
83
2
8
2
8
11
101
Totals     	
209    ]      14    |    223
92
10    |        2    [        8
112
Vancouver School of Art  —
8
8
—
3
23
3
23
217    |      14    |    231
92
13    |        2    |      31
138
369
Of the 369 persons with temporary certificates (letters of permission) in
1959/60, 335 were in regular public schools. In 1960/61 the total was 327, with
285 in public schools, and in 1961/62 the total was 254, with 228 in public schools.
V. Since 1955 the Department of Education has co-operated with School
Boards to obtain teachers from the United Kingdom, and in 1955 to 1960, inclusive, has sent an interivewing officer in the early spring to select and recommend
individuals for appointments. The procedure changed for 1961, and no interviewing
officer proceeded overseas. An extensive file of material is provided to each applicant, with information concerning specific vacancies. Certification and experience
are recorded and assistance given to applicants and Boards to assist in appointments.
The numbers who have arrived under the immigration plan have been as follows:—
School-year
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
21
41
30
35
48
33
61
30
33
35
35
27
20
Secondary      	
9
Totals 	
62
65
81
91
68
62
29
VI. Teacher-exchange applications proceed through this office. The numbers
of applications from British Columbia teachers annually exceed the exchange positions available.   Exchanges in recent years were as shown:—
School-year
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
22
4
3
22
4
5
23
1
1
26
2
1
26
2
28
1
1
23
1
1
Totals..	
29
31
25
29              28
1
30
25
VII. Annually several thousand teachers' certificates have been issued to new
teachers and to those who have qualified for permanent certificates or for higher
certification. Evaluations are completed for many teachers from other Provinces or
countries who have submitted credentials for this purpose; a goodly number do not
arrive. General inquiries are considered from outside teachers, numbering in the
thousands.   In addition, there are many inquiries from British Columbia teachers
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
Z 101
for evaluations, certification or experience changes, and assistance in learning of
specific requirements or suitable training programmes.
Since 1958 an individual teacher-docket system has been possible, leading to
significant improvement in correspondence handling. There is difficulty in keeping
up with significant annual correspondence volume increase.
Division of Examinations
I. There has been a significant increase in examinations over the years. This
Division has arranged for the preparation, printing, and distribution of the June
and August University Entrance (Grade XI-XII) and for Grade XIII examinations.
Considerable administrative time is involved. It is also responsible for arrangements for marking, tabulating, and releasing results, appeals, and maintenance of
records.   The following tables give significant data:—
Number of Markers
1952/53
1953/54
1954/55  1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
193
34
210
33
220         234
42|           39
243
41
246
44
290
48
301
50
343
61
395
61
Totals	
227j         243|         262|         273
284|          290|          338
351|         404|         456
Approximate costs	
$81,700
$88,4001 $90,000
$96,000
$113,000|$123,000|$153,000
$168,000 $179,000 $212,500
Number o
f Candidates (June)
University Entrance
Grade XIII 	
9,048
1,336
7,985
1,375
9,159
1,653
9,418
1,765
10,924
1,565
13,014
1,797
14,933
2,204
16,786
2,673
19,113
3,253
20,103
3,597
Totals	
10,384
9,360
10,812
11,183
12,489
14,811
17,137
19,459
22,366
23,700
Number Completed in June
University Entrance	
Grade XIII	
2,328
269
2,594
304
3,139|
399
3,160
410
3,433
383
4,025
341
4,215
464
4,720
587
5,651
620
5,779
659
Totals  .
2,597
2,898
3,5381
1
3,570
3,816
4,366
4,679
5,307
6,271
6,438
Papers Marked in June
16,399	
20,311
5,669
21,042
6,028
24,024     29,765
5,647       6,388
36,236
8,055
_L1 963
46.777
49,318
Grade XIII	
4,516]	
9,75l|    11,974
13,812
Totals	
20,915[    23,280
1
25,980
27,070
29,6711    36,153
1
44,291
51,714
58,201
63,130
Papers Marked in August
._           I	
6,844
1,727
8,931
1.869
9,236
2.489
8,569
Grade XIII.   	
|	
2,192
Totals    	
5,134
4,663
4,914
5,185
5,789]     7,031
8,571
10.8001     11.775
10,761
 Z 102
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
Number of Candidates (August)
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
4,178
1,164
5,985
1,262
6,245
1,537
5,878
Grade XIII           	
1,434
Totals  	
5,342
7,247
7,782
7,312
Number Completed in August
534                   882
132                   161
993
210
712
Grade XIII	
172
Totals	
666
1,043
1,203
884
Total University Entrance and Grade XIII papers for June and August,
1952/53 to 1961/62, were as foUows: 1952/53, 26,049; 1953/54, 27,943;
1954/55, 30,894; 1955/56, 32,255; 1956/57, 35,460; 1957/58, 43,184;
1958/59, 52,862;  1959/60, 62,514;  1960/61, 69,926;  1961/62, 73,891.
II. For 1961/62, examinations were prepared for June and August in twenty-
one University Entrance subjects and in eighteen Grade XIII subjects. In June,
1962, 181 examination centres were established in the Province and thirty-five
outside British Columbia, with the farthest-removed centres being in Germany and
Switzerland.
III. There has been a very heavy increase in the number of requests for evaluations of academic standing from those who wish to enrol in British Columbia high
schools or to take night-school or private-study courses to complete requirements,
as well as from those who wish to undertake nurse's training or enter similar professional courses. A very large number of persons has sought evaluations and permission to follow the Interrupted Programme for Adult Students. These numbers
are increasing rapidly with expansion in the number of areas offering academic
courses through night-schools.
IV. Scholarship Awards, 1962
University Entrance.—The fifteen General Proficiency Scholarships, each of
$500, awarded jointly by the University of British Columbia and the Chris Spencer
Foundation were won by the following:—
Place
Name
School
Per Cent
1st in B.C.-
2nd in B.C	
Area 1	
Area 2	
Area 3	
Area 4	
Area 5	
Area 6	
Area 7	
Area 8	
Area 9	
Area 10	
Area 11	
Area 12 	
Area 13	
Eleanor Jane Turner 	
Peter Jonathan Carrodus	
Clinton Guy Peter  „
Roger Woods Crossley	
Elizabeth Eugenia Mackenzie
Alan Lawrence Sieber	
Robert Wayne Kean— _
John Thomas Martin	
David Michael Walker..	
Robert Michael Noble 	
William John Lloyd Johnston
Charles Rex Eaton 	
Thomas Reginald Harding	
Andrew James Cleland	
Margaret Anne Lockhart	
Oak Bay Senior High-
Lord Byng Junior-Senior High..
Salmo Senior High.
Rossland Junior-Senior High._
Revelstoke Senior High	
Mission Senior High	
Delta Junior-Senior High-
Britannia Junior-Senior High-
King Edward Senior High.
Lord Byng Junior-Senior High..
Burnaby Central High	
Delbrook Senior High	
Prince Rupert Senior High	
Oak Bay Senior High	
Courtenay Senior High  _
94.75
93.25
87.75
89.25
87.125
92.125
90.25
89.875
91.625
91.875
88.5
91.5
89.75
92.25
89.125
The Governor-General's Silver Medal for the highest standing in the University
Entrance examinations was won by Eleanor Jane Turner.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
Z 103
The Governor-General's Bronze Medal for the second highest standing was
won by Peter Jonathan Carrodus.
Grade XIII.—The six Royal Institution Scholarships, each of $200, awarded
by the University of British Columbia for general proficiency were won by the
following:—
Name
David Michael Ree_-Thomas_
Kathleen Beverly Osatenko—
John Frederick Clark	
Charles Edward Livingstone-
Marjorie Joan Brake	
Peter Madderom	
School
West Vancouver Senior High..
Vernon Senior High-
Mount Baker Junior-Senior High-
Chilliwack Senior High..
Penticton Junior-Senior High-
Abbotsford Senior High	
Per Cent
91.2
90.5
87.3
86.0
85.7
85.7
Financial Assistance
I. In 1959, for the first time in British Columbia, the Government entered the
field of extensive scholarship awards to high-school graduates, Grade XIII students,
and to students of the University of British Columbia and Victoria College. To
qualify, candidates must be domiciled in the Province, are required to apply, and
must undertake a full-year winter session undergraduate programme at the University or Victoria College or in Grade XIII in public high schools of the Province to
receive the award. Selection of winners is made on the basis of the final Grade XII
or Grade XIII or University of British Columbia or Victoria College examinations.
There are two awards—first class, for all students who obtain an average of 80 per
cent or higher based on a full year's programme, and second class, available for up
to 2,000 top-ranking students with high second-class standing. The second-class
awards are divided among Grade XII (University Entrance), Grade XIII, University undergraduate students, and Victoria College undergraduate students, and
among the various faculties and groups roughly proportionate to enrolment. First-
class awards amount to one-half the tuition fee of the next year of undergraduate
study, and second-class awards similarly to one-third the tuition fee. An average
of at least 70 per cent, subject to minimum adjustment for certain groups, is required for a second-class award. Awards vary in amount, depending on the institution and faculty attended.
The plan commenced with those writing examinations at the end of 1958/59,
with awards being made to those who would undertake training in 1959/60, and
has continued similarly annually.
Candidates writing University Entrance or Grade XIII examinations apply
through the Division of Examinations, University students through the University,
and Victoria College students through that institution. All applications are then
considered by the Scholarship Selection Committee, representative of the University
of British Columbia, Victoria College, and the Department of Education, chaired
by the Registrar. Notification to all candidates is made from the Registrar's office,
with cheques issued through the Departmental Comptroller. Figures covering Government of British Columbia scholarships follow, based on applications received:—
Examination
Year
Original Applications
Final Awards
Number
Received
Eligible
First
Class
Second
Class
Total
First
Class
Second
Class
Amount
1958/59	
2,703
3,466
4,223
4,488
1,860
2,300
2,557
2,871
552
635
703
771
1,308
1,665
1,854
2,100
1,782
2,192
2,437
531
612
677
1,251
1,580
1,760
$229,175.16
276,513.32
304,117.00
1959/60        	
1960/61        --   -.	
1961 /62   	
 Z 104
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
University Entrance Examinations
Grade XIII Examinations
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
First class (80 to 100 per cent)	
268
337
189
82
298
492
290
113
313
554
371
135
354
550
283
100
26
104
53
47
37
133
90
80
33
169
127
144
37
Second class (70 to 79.9 per cent)	
50 to 69.9 per cent            	
213
129
Ineligible  	
150
Total applications	
876    |   1,193
1,373
1,287
230
340
473    |      529
To assist local school authorities, complete tabulations showing schools concerned and final academic averages obtained by all Provincial Grade XII and Grade
XIII scholarship candidates are provided to the District Superintendents of Schools.
II. The Provincial Government, with some assistance from the Federal Government, annually provides Government bursaries to assist students to undertake
further training. An average of 65 per cent is required, together with evidence of
financial need. Assessment is based on the last academic studies undertaken.
Awards vary from $50 to $300, depending on academic standing and need, with
most awards in the range $100 to $150. These awards may be made available to
those undertaking University of British Columbia or Victoria College undergraduate
study, recognized nurse's training in the Province, and for recognized university
study outside British Columbia in undergraduate courses of training not available
in this Province; for example, dentistry, veterinary.
All bursary applications proceed through the Registrar's office, and Bursary
Selection Committees, representative of the University and of Victoria College and
chaired by the Registrar, determine awards. Notification to all candidates is made
from this office, with cheques issued through the Departmental Comptroller.
Figures covering Government bursaries follow, based on applications received
by the deadline. A relatively large number of applications cannot be considered
because of late submission.
Original Applications
Final Awards
Year
Number
Received
Eligible
Number
Amount
1959	
821
1.071
693
904
653
865
1,125
$82,650
1960         .                 ..        -   -
113,465
1961            	
1,395        |        1,171
1.426         I         1.199
133,145
19ft7
III. In 1959 a significant change was made in respect of loan assistance. By
amendment to the British Columbia University Act, authority was given for establishment of the Student Aid Loan Fund of up to $2,000,000. A joint committee
composed of two representatives of the University and two representatives of the
Department of Education (at present the Registrar and the Departmental Comptroller) authorizes loans. The Department of Education no longer provides loans.
Loan assistance may be provided to undertake undergraduate training at the
University of British Columbia, Victoria College, the Vancouver School of Art, or
recognized university undergraduate training outside the Province when such training is not available in British Columbia.    Loan awards have been as follows:—
Year
1959/60	
1960/61	
1961/62 to March 31st  869
Number of
Awards
__ 843
_ 842
Amount
$397,570
435,130
472,486
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
Z 105
Strathcona Trust
For many years the Province has participated in the Strathcona Trust. An
annual grant has been received, in recent years approximating $1,600, with the
moneys to be utilized to encourage physical fitness in the schools and cadet-training
and rifle shooting. Cadet awards have been made to the four leading corps for
proficiency, to the National Cadet Camp, to the annual Cadet Trades Training
Camp at Vernon, for cadet rifle-shooting competition, and to British Columbia
cadets attending Bisley.
Physical Education Shield awards have been provided for each district superintendency, with four in Vancouver and two in Victoria, for presentation to the schools
showing the greatest proficiency or the most significant improvement. These awards
were discontinued at the end of 1959/60, with the shield to be retained by the
winning school and utilized for internal competition within the school.
To recognize and encourage physical education, Strathcona Trust bursaries
have been provided in recent years to teachers wishing to undertake further undergraduate course work in physical education. These bursaries recently have been
$125 in value. Five awards were made on 1958/59 standings, five on 1959/60,
six on 1960/61, and five on 1961/62.
The Local Committee, Strathcona Trust for British Columbia, administers the
moneys received, and consists of military representatives and representatives of the
Department of Education. The Registrar has continued as Secretary, Local Committee, for some years and is British Columbia representative on the Executive
Council, Strathcona Trust Fund.
Certification of Professional Librarians
New regulations for the certification of professional librarians became effective
in November, 1954.   The Registrar acts as Secretary, Board of Examiners for
Certification of Professional Librarians, maintains records, and issues certificates
authorized.    Since new regulations were introduced, the numbers of certificates
issued were as follows:   1955,57; 1956,62; 1957,16; 1958,18; 1959,10; 1960,
17; 1961,10.
Correspondence
Volume and detail continue to be two major problems because of continual
growth. New filing procedures have not permitted the maintenance of records
indicating correspondence volume. For some years, records were maintained of
letter volume, as shown below. These figures do not include application and other
forms, circulars, instructions, examination papers, and similar items, but refer to
correspondence volume only.
Year
Normally Require Reply
Exams
Inward
Registrar
Inward
Total
Initiated by
Branch—
Exams and
Registrar
Outward
Total
1950.
1951..
1952.
1953..
1954_
1955-
1956.
1957-
1958..
1959-
1960.
1961..
920
278
071
220
465
.222
339
130
,084
113
,867
373
7,756
8,092
8,900
10,111
12,165
13,398
14,671
13,676
14,370
14,971
17,231
19,630
21,620
23,010
3,649
4,802
4,923
5,187
5,726
5,628
6,680
17,709
19,777
20,555
23,352
26,842
29,249
30,537
New recording system precludes tabulations.
In those years for which accurate figures are no longer available, it is known
that volume exceeded 41,000 in 1958, and similar increases continued.
 Z 106 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT
REPORT OF MRS. FREDA KINSMAN, SECRETARY
OF THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1961/62 a total of 311 apphcations was considered
by the Commission. Of these, fifty-seven were turned down, the chief reason being
that family income was higher than that set by the Commission for grant purposes.
Two hundred and fifty-four applications were approved for grants. Students
were distributed by grades as follows: Grade IX, 73; Grade X, 74; Grade XI, 63;
Grade XII, 44. During the year twenty-six students dropped out and grants were
discontinued.
The students in the greatest financial need received $89 for the year; the
balance received $79. In addition, seventeen students who showed outstanding
ability were granted a bonus of $20.
   STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 109
IHX 3PejO
!   i 1
ill!
li          t-        	
!  !       N      !!!!!!
!R
O
CO
!   Mill
IIX 3PE->0
co      en t~-
n      cs
©           !     !     !     !
cn
1 oo             ©          !     1     !     !     !     1
l*      *     1 1 1 i i 1
! O
|  ON
©
Qs
1   MM
1
IX sp^O
1—        Qs ©
^       i   i   i   :   i
Tf
1 VD             in           !!!!![
I00       °°     ill!:!
i m
: oo
!
VO
Tt
i    MM
tn       ^DO\
1 ©            >n          1    1    I    1    1    1
! v>
__,
i    titii
X sps-O
ts      ■* ^
nc
;      :      '.      ;
Is     a    MINI
t-
Tt               O   Ti
! V.              Tt            !!!!!!     1
i "*
1   ©                     1         I         I         I         1
XIap«JO
■rt        t- CS
o
I  CO                   rH                               III
! rn                CS             .111.11
1 CS
! m              II
i CS            ill!!
O        (SO
ri
!    ! en    i    :
co tn            r-
1     1     !     1     1     J     i
: o
1 m          1    1    1    1   1
m
u
IIIA SP^O
tn       tn tS
tr-
!  i     1  1
CS             c
rH                   (V
1
:   i   !   1    1    i   :
! C
i c^
'
1  CO
1 CS          1     1     1     1     i
en       — ©
:    i Tt   i   :
Tt    00                          O
:   i \o   :    :   : *n
T-H   C
| co          I    1    j    j    j
Z
IIA SP^O
Tt      oo ri
c
II        II
Tt             tr
t-   T-
T-H   CV
! cs
<
Q
Z
'      W
H
I      tm m
so
VO  rH C*} VO  CS
So  "*
Ov vo rn     !     i Tt in
in v
! n     1 CS CS
IA ap^O
00    1-H
on
Tt
CO 00 CO
es e>
r im
A ap^O
:      oo Tt
CS
rS rn en tn Tt
•C! t-
© oo o   :    i co r-
eo c-
VD  VO       j  Tt  rH
CO  t-h
c
m
so so
Tt t- o   ;   ;
co c*-
CO  rn       |  CO
<
*■'
1-1
rn     !      ;
n r*
AI SpB-Q
!       Qs ©
Os
co    i r- oo en
rs ©
CS On co co Tt tn "n
vO vc
© Os     : in co
r- -h
oo
Tt
vfi ^
f-  rH  CS          CO
vo vc
VO  rH       |  m
^
CS C"J
►J
III apBJO
:      oo no
"t
Ct tH CO CS CO
vo ©
r-CO       ICOTt-nONrHi—
O VD f- vo CO
HH
r- t-i
ON
in
vo vo
CO O     |        t>
CO  CO
!
>n rn        CS
<
P
,H
T-1        !
cs cs
II -pt-io
!        Tt CO
f
CO rH f- cs     :
CO  ©
© co    ! o\ Tt tn co
Tf   CS          |               ©               T-H
Tt   Tt
oo in t-h t^ eo
00 r-l
ON
m    |
vo vo
as Os
in rn tn eo
o
rH
rn                   rH
CS CS
\o m
rH
rn m © r- Tt
t— CO
On CS     ! CS Tt VO ©
CO  CO
vo © co cS vo
*+
I -peio
00    1-H
O
rH >n
r- t-
VO   ©          |               CO               rH
CS cs
«n cs m Tt
a
*"■
^
1-H        !            rH
CO  CO
—
U-J-E3
1   i   1   1   i
!       j
1   1   Mm   1   1
CO  C"
ill!
>
-j_pur_j
i   i   :   i t-h   i    :
<
so       ri cn
•n
m cs co t-h vo
CS CO              vc
rH Qs SO tM  CS CO  OV
T-H   t-
© rn cs Ov co
Q
_3U_pU_MV
im      Tt tn
On
CO © [> CO ©
© rH                   C*-
CO rH (N| 00 oo VO VO
r-; o
rH Q
Qs VO ON cS CO
Xirea
_8EJ3AV
o      vo in
,-H
vo i> on eo in
CS* Tt                O
oo co © en Tt Tt vo
rH Tt
Qs C
Tt  rH  CS  VO VI
O        "* VD
rH         cn On rH
r- oo           r^
t--  Tt in  rH  f- CO Tt
SO cr
oo m
Tt ON © On rH
JZi
CS       T~- n
ON
CS
CO Tj-              vc
cS >n eo      cn
co vc
CS          i—1  rH
H
•?
^h"cS
cs vo
«
Qs      oo r-
m
oo m co © oo
Tt CO             >r
VO   Tt   rH  Tf   ON   Tt   T-H
Qs Tf
VO   TJ
ON <n On
H
o      oo o
On
cs so
© ©                OC
Tt On © rn cS t-h CO
CS  rn
oo cs
eo Tt Tt On
Z
•a
u
1
s
rH         CO ri
Tt
r"1
CS 00              cc
■n CS CS         CS
CT*  CO
rH  cr
_1
n
oo       On en
CS
os Tt n o oo
co co          r-
rH  r-  Tt  CO  CO  ON  CO
tn rs
-n tJ
rn (S CS Tt rs
_j»
©      «h r-
On
cS m
OV On              CC
tn   rH   O            Tf   rH   cs
CO ts
in r-
cs m vd t-h t-h
O
T-C              Tt
Tt
t-h r—           c*"
rH  CO  rH          CS
Os c
CS tr
o
6fl
'S
3
m
r-
*e3
r-      r- o
r-
r— On tn © so
t- rH              ts
r- t— in t- t- co Tt
|^
t- OC
© r- rn vc oo
z
—           ©  00
oc
1-H               Tf   1-H   1-H
On ©                t-
On t-h r— n r- co m
CO  O"
VO   Qs   rH   o   T-H
o
fN           00  rH
Os
CO
CO  NO                   P-
CS vo CO         Tf
0O  NC
Tt   NC
CS          rH  (S|
H
*-*
^H*r
o
^H
rt
<
i
1
0
J_
o
0
_,
1\
D
o
jr.
•22
'5
-_.
t.
t/_
w
•a
•S
■_!   <u
s
14
P.
5 *
0   c
CO
s ai
i_ <« s
1 .
t3 ^
c
&
o
E
£3
•2    1 S
<J
V
B 1
"_   j:
■0
!      c
1
a
w
M
y-
___.
c
E
(5
S? o
•a &._
IP
i
7
c
I
T>
SB
Si
o I
OC
3
9
3
2
"3
c
5
s
c
.s
.
1
c
I          0
,1
rt >
1 E
h
c
1
. c
I
.1
=
r
<L
>
<
X
*!
-
>1
C
i
tr
Q
Ti
T%      X
DO   C
2^
a1-
1 2 c
i.6 g
sal
T
"I
-
5
a
u
cc
■
G   U
d>                                              c
s
S E
o
iS
W
a
a.
£
a
 Z 110
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
IIIX SPBJO
1   i
CO
1     1 i
i   1   i   j        i
i   :   i   i   i   i   i   i
CS
1  M  M  1  1
iM
IIX 3P«0
i   i
! i
i ©
Is
CO            Tj-  Tf
oo        I   :   i   i   i   i   !   :
1  M 1 i  M  1
1  VC
ics
>n cs             tilt,
i   i   i   i   1   !   i
IX 3PE-"0
i   1
1 vo
rH          VO  (S
OC
1   !   1   !   1   1   1   1
1 Ov
CO
8^       1   1   1   l.l.l   1
|§
■    '
1
,H
1111111
XSPBJQ
1    1
r-
m     m cs
co            cs
r-
CN
M
1 ^
1 vo
rH  Tt               |       1       I       j       j       j       I
1 >n
1 VO
 '    ''    ''
*■*
1     1     1     ,     !     1     .
1 rH
XI spEJO
;   j
i c
r-      tn r-
CS            j     I     I     I     1     1     |     j
CS             !      1      !      i      I      1      1      1
1  ON
1t-
32    |.| Mm
1 tr-
. n
IIIA 3P«0
I i
tn
cr
OS          rH  CO
»n         rH rH
rs
I   1   1   |   |   1   f
1 oc
1 or
vSrn"         I    M    M    M
1 rs
00
rH
1  CO
C
CO o
in r-
IIA SP^O
!   i
CS
in        rllN
t»
!   1
1      !      1      1                    II
CO
1    N
en c-
On on
t>  CO
ir
rH  VC
m S
IA apE-O
tr-
CN
CO          rH          rn
r~o
*"■
T-H   T-H
A 3PBJO
Tf  rH
CS  CS
Tt  CS
NT
I          1   VO   Tt   Tf   CO   CO   Tt
Tt  ©
ICO          r-CSrHVOOrHVD
CO   T-H
T-H   rH
AI apBJQ
i Ov
VO  VC
i     r-   i
r-
rHTtM©cnrHtn»n
rH   OC
CS cs
1 O
cS r
t-H          Tt          rH          rH
m vo
i  rH
^
tH  rH
III apEJQ
tc r-
CO  CO
cs cs
:      co    i
en        Clt^t^TtCSt^Ot-
t-H                   rH          fO                   rH
VO Qs
OO On
lin         OOeOONTtCSrHf^
1 rH                t—i CS         —l         i-H
ss
rH
TH
t-h  rH
II apEJO
o ©
i      en
cn      r-r-cnrHinrHincn
cs m
im      ONcsONVDcsinrH
VD
cs cs
rH rH
co on cs    ! cn
m cS
55
1        CS     1
cs      cnTtcomtnONrHOv
Tt vo
© rs
Tt   00
CS CO
vo
t-h cn CS          1-H       j  (Sl
rH  r-
rn                           1
i             U-1J.3
-J.pURl
1            III
II      i I    Is 1 I 1 II
© ©
in tr
f-         © CO
tr
t--r-voco©TtTtr--
tn©ooovcsn-vOTt
eo oo
t-h  Tt          rHC-ICO[--TtVOln
csvo      mmrHinvocncn
CO OC
r
©  OV
-Sejsav
tn ©
VD VC
VO        On O
o
cSt-^vdinONTten-n
in ©
T-.CO        VOCSOOVOVOOCS
•—"ncSrHcsmTtvo
vo
rs f
CS          rH  rH
o
rs
m on
t- »-
VO  rH                          ^H
© Ov
t-h r
rnrn
a
co cn
00        CO cs
MCOWf »f  hH|n
cs t-h © t-h cn cS cn
vOtI
r-©
m vc
CS      tr> tn
•o
0
cn
r~'
1—1
en
tn p
1
Cfl
OO            ON   rH
C~
tnTtr-T-HNDTtvDcs
m  rr
cn tj
en
tr- cr
■rf
^
ra
3
Oh
"rt
vo       r— cn
<-
eocs©m©mr—on
"3
in oc
'-'NOcncneovoTtvo
co tr
VO in Tt Tf in rH rH
CJ
tr-  t-h                          rH
H
rn cs
rH    CS
•a
3
g
c
o
o
0
«
a
rt
w
O.
ft
o
u
1
<_
«
s
£
In
a
_
i
c
J-
p
1
c
i
00
0
B
3S
I
c:
iZ
0
0}
t
c
a.
>
rt
PC
■s
1
)
u
.a |
a
&.
IK
a
3
c
c
=-_
<5
a S
t-
u
1
<_>
tr
c
2
z
V
ta Q
rt
rt
F
£
.5
U
2
41
t
E
.S
u
_•
F
4>
t-
E
-a
<r
"a
c
2
CO
0
C
H
Q
a g
ii
G   i-
■ti
c
c
f
a
s
u
>
t.
r.
rt
•a
tt
C
s
B
■   j
I
o
H
8*
rt
is
lias
s
>
1
JH      QJ
•2F
G  rt
0
£
2 9
1
u
G  a
w
•-
W
W
Hi
Ii
W
sU
3
-S
C
o
u
p
u
H
H
<
<
Q
M
O
>
<
Q
i
H
z
w
o
I
w
Ph
o
Pi
<
1
D
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 111
i   i   i   i   i   i   i
MINI
! ov cs     vo
I   VO   rH
i      cs
•-H   Tt   OS
CS   CS   rH
tn m
oo oo
CS cs
intnT-HcocncQTtvovc
On on
© ©
CO  CO
cs-Ttm    : cs r- m r> ©
CSCS-vfTtT-OOCSOO©
>n m
On On
cs rs
T-HinvoinTtinvor^co
ro co
CO  CO
CO CO
NO rH  rH
tj h Mn Nt in oo O <n
!   i   i
i   i   i   I   j
Tt OtH
en"      ovth
oo      >n vo
tnTtTtONeoooT-Hr^cocSrH
toTtrHcncsr-r-oocsvovo
m Tt     cs cs
r^esin-_r.r-f_ot-~voTtTtoo
rncs      r-OcncnTtrncocs
CS CS    rH T-H
ON cs
-3
Cn CS     T-H T-H
Qs Os so tn Tt n <
t-h in
Tt t-»
co m
r- oo
cs oo
On no
UO Tf rH    CS CS 1
VO rH T-H
SO CS
co t>
i>vor--covo©oor~-incscS
coTtT-Hoococor-ONcsr-vo
■n -vt      cs cs
J4
vo
Ss 9
■a •=
O   C3
C       rt
SJ
6Ss
rt v <u
a
■_>!
•1
T OO'
►ciw:
0.
u
G   oj
Q    P    O O
m t ,_2 -_2
rt rt u "
ffiffiZ
Jos
u,    | A I> r> -  - :
a 1
ll"
o>
: 2M0 -g
r/>   H   <_   O M
S s § w w s ~ a s
.3s£
o3
SM -
ill
<z>   G   >
rt   OJ .73
Ph Ph CO
£2
3 §5
 Z 112
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
M     	
j 00
IIIX SP^JO
1 I 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1
1 i
\    !    i
! 1
I m
_ "~
cn m
CO
1 00
IIX 3P"JO
i
i"
r~
j    |   1
| r-
IX 3P"JO
1 cs
1 **
s
1   i   1
1   "*
1    O
rH  O
cn  rH
Tt
i *
1-1             ...-III	
I  rH
X 3P"JO
1$
3
1   Tt
i M
00 tn
CO
CO
Tt
!  CO
|  Tt
13
1—1            	
,     T—1
XI3PEJO
1 vo
i f-
NO
Mill
1    |   1
1  VC
vO ©
CO ts
NO
in
: vo
1 "*
s
'         '        '        ' '
1        i        i
•S
IIIA aP^O
j
1 VO
©
cn
! O
: co
rn r-
Tt
00 r-
Tf   T-H
1 m
1 vo
cs
I cs
c
0
IIA 3PB*0
1
1 cs
i °°
Tt C-
i       co in    !
0
r-    1    1
00   1   1   I
CN     1     1
On On
CO CO
1 ^°
vD O
: ©
i "*
0 vo
Tt v£
m
0
T-H   1-H
IA 3PBJO
CS VD
Tt    Tt
OO   00
o\eSTtcov-.TtmrHts    1    1    i
in            r-                CS rn    j    1
© ©
On On
tn
ON  VD  CO
t-h  CO
00  CO
>n vo
.    ,    ,
i-H  rH
A SP^D
r- t-h
©   ©
00  OO
r-ooT-HfNvotnmcn    ;Ov    :      on
cS tn            cn                    | t-h    :    | cs
in in
00 cc
j    |
1*
Tt m m
T—   CO
Tt   00
vn m
z
rH   r-.
; *
© ©
l             TtcScnTtooNDooT-HTtT-H     :oo
ON ON
ir*
CO  O  CO
00 -n
pq
AI ap^ro
On ON
l co             -rt                   en rn cs     j co
©  ©
rs cs
rH   Tt
vo r-
H
H
III 3PEJO
Tt en
Tt  Tt
|rHcSi-H©coTti-Hcn>nc-!Nco
tS rs
1 ^
Tt   ©   O
Tt    T-H
<
><
"
© 0
Tt rn             co cs tn       rH
ON  ON
rH Tt
in vo
II 3P^O
ro r-
VO VD
On On
■cs©r--©cscn-HTtooNON
t-h m 1—1             cocnr-T-HT-H
en cn
r
S23
© On
On On
ts CS
<
I 3P«0
Tt    O
© O
1    irSrH<7\incooT-H©ONfS
ts cs
1  CO
On © CO
t- m
Q
W
On Oi
co                    co eo nd CS CS
cs cs
cs cs
1-H   Tt
ND   t>
U3JJE8
i    |
1    1    1    j    l   i    i    1    I
j
.
O
-_.pur_i
1    i
1   [
<
Pi
-DUEpU-HV
0 cs
tr- tS
in      eoONTt©-Hco-Hi-HcocococoON
CO eo
VD ©
VO  OC
Tt   VD   i-H
-h in
O  NO
tn c*
ti          ©C«O\ONQ0ON©VD0N00r^©CS
ON   rH
On i-H
© ©
in © cS
OO On
fliEa
ON   rH
rH  C
co      odoNDi--^ONCScocsr^-HONcsr^
Tf   00
rH OO
©' cn
r> in on
-"I    Tt
>
3SBJ9AV
-h m
c c
m oc
in      in©      cS©TtcSeSeoTtco»ni-H
ND                  CS                   CO                          rH  rH  t-h          rH
cs r-
co On
Tt m
© vc
CS
Tt 0 00
CS
rH r~.
Tt   ND
<
Q
tItI
a
in on
r- in
co      r-QinrsorSTtcs-Hr-'-'voTt
©         CS©         T-HNOCST-HrHr— co © co r-
rH Tf
nd tS
00 r-
vo m co
Tt   CO
h
rH   fS
VD cr
CS cs
00 eo
tH  CO
tS ro m
r-  NO
Z
<
■0
"o
3
CS   Tt
r- q
CS  CO
M
Wl
m r-
r- tj
tn       Ttcoco-Hr^mT-HTtcoTtmT-Hr-
co 00
CO    <-H
Tt   NC
eS in ©
t—  t>
H
C3
cs
0       too       -i>iN--r-i>orMH/
0 0
CS   Tt   NO
w
O
CS T]
TJ                           T-<                          t—.                                                            T—.
t- >-
CS  CO
Z
W
•3
ca
'a
2
3
©   NO
5?
00       Tienoocnt— t^mso-TfTisor^Ti
T+;  CS
ts CO
ON  CO
cs r-
OO  ©  CO
rH  O
PM
eS
cs in
©        VOO        CSrOTtcSCSTtNO©mcS
m vo
rs vc
Tt  CO  ©
CO ts
m cc
r-            cs            to                 rn — cs      —
Tt   rH
—"c^
TJ
CS
CO
Tt r»
0
c*
Z
w
Ph
O
•O
C4
0
3
.H
G
|
-i
a
<
0
O
<D
T*
T-
rt
P-
s
i
1
0
7.
□
rt
T
00
<3
Oh
a
3
0
5
00
0.
H
0\
0
X
>_
Hi
G
0
6
c
1-
1-
1
+-T
.20
«11
t>
rt
2;
^
(j
*c
[A
s
-C3
"3
c
=
—
rt
C
f-
5
CO
1
■a
s
a & a
■u rt —
K
01
a
a
y-
g
' c
E
c
c
-
•a
1
CI
i
.E
t
41
U
■
rt
j
t
•r
ii
>
' c
0
>
it
'—
rt
Ph
G
rt
1
tr
rt
C
2
■=,
<r
rt
C
H
s
to
1
rG
Ofi
'ffi
U
.2 c
c SC
n> r
*3
rt
C
2
3
E
ffi
u
C
'i
>
1
1
-a
c
1
a
CO
a
cz
C
2
3
tr
H
05 a e
c7_   rt    r
c
C
X
C -r
rt P
CO •*  d>        *•
•H         T-
W)^
G  c.
tr
_L   c   E
rt X! •-
C
e
a
c
«_ S
y rt oj       c
c c
•n rt
g>?
II*
UUC
5
C
PnPi
PS
HH>£
szz    |
(U rr
WZ
u
B    O
G                   a.
O
W
5w
l                                        t
w
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 113
t—
CO
vo    |    ;
if
i10
!  I  i
! *""
i   i
^_         ,,,.,,
1  rH
I 00
: co
CS          1     1     :
11 '■     '
I rs
i 1
! cs
: oo
rs              Ml
1    I    1   1    i    1   1   I    !    1
1 co
1
c
i   i   -
i c
|rH
! a
co         :        :    i
1   Ti
CS cs
; co cs      t-h    :
rs               ill
-H                 1)11111111
! ©
1   ©                          ON   T-
oo oo
I eS Tt       co vo
Tt          1     1     i     1     1     1     1     !    !     i
rH CO                       II               i       1
: <n
■n          ,     1     ,
1 CS Tt        On Tt
! eo r>      oo vo
CO             1     1     1      1      1      1     IH     |V3
m                         l    :         i Tt    i Tt
I— vo
CO   Tf
is i
33
vD       t-h co t-h cS v. vo
CS            rH                               rH
CO  ON
Tt   NO
' *"1
rH                 .        1        1        ...        1                  .   rH
,    T-H          |
i-H   r-
Os         im    i    j co in oo r> oo eS
*""■£-.   i
ON a
On      en cn en    i r^ cS
co t-~
rs        iTt    i    i © r> cs en rn r»
CO  CO
1               1       1  rH
co in
rn      i
1-H   r-
:in    irHcSTtinTtTtr-
iTt          ICSr~VOrHTtT-HNO
C\ rH       1
e**
t-      in Tt cS cS rn i>
rH  rH
II        vo no
rr
00       1
On O
vo ©     1
VD vc
©Tt      ONtncomTtvO
cs vo
Ml  <-*
|Tt          CSCOVOeOCOrHNO
r> a
cn tj
On 0>
i  !  1   35
t~~         ivDrHinmotnONin©
ND c
Tt in On
co      oo cs cs tn © cn
© NO
CO NO
©        iTtrHcsoor>encsrHr--
oo a
rH  ND CO
CO    Tj
rH  ,-
|         1        ,|               T-H   CO
oo e>
© Tt  0O
CS CN
cn      r- m cS vo © oo
CO eo
c> in
cv
TtT-HCOOOVDCOCOT-HCO
rn   T
t-h in co
o©
CO                                                  rH
r-
cncscsONcomT-HvoONTt
ON VC
t- rs
ON   Q
cn       m eo Tf co oo vO
r~ p*
r>
On c^-
cn ir
—
rSTtcS—'Ttvor-rHr-rH
nDOt-ht-hcSOOCSOnvOO
to cs
OvD vo      m r-
CN
oo cn
CS Tt NO
co If
Ov tr
r~- r- eo On vO rn
CO Tt vo        vO vo
rr
eSeSrHONesooONNOON©
1-H   ON
I-
Oeo       t-hoooncSOnvo
00 CO
csmTtcsoNNor-Ttoovo
cs      t-h Tt cn rn cs      tn
00   Tj
CO T
On        VO CS rn cs r- ro
CS NO
oo m vo       vO Tf
c
r
m
vo C
rH  CS
cS m
?
m©      oo Tt r- t— r- on
NO   rH
NT
On 0
in vc
m Tt      cs ti      t-h m rn
Tt cs eo      co rs
ir
rH                  CN  rn          rn          CS
rH  C~~
f>
CO
co ic
Ti
T-H   CO
n r-
TtONOOrHiOOVO©©-"*
vr
on tr
t- nd © en co on
CO OO
ON  C^
1^
voir-      mHHHitrt
m cs co      co cs
V
rn                cS CS         rn         CS
O
CO
CO   NC
rH
rH  CO
i-H  cr
m © t> Tt m oo
VO CO rH cs OO CO
ON  ON
co vo vO       -«-t
on m vo      r- Tt
P
CO  NC
r-
m oo
cS      --I m en rn cS      m
Tt a
T
VO
t>   r-
■n cn
tS vo
CS ir
0
hi
IX
h
'a
<u
c
r
"-1
o
-*
«
X
is
c
t
0     oj
<s
u.
<   » 5
—1
r
rict
Cro
•C
0
c
re
i-
0
%
X
B  -Of?
u.
ii
5|j
M)c
HH     -
|H      1-
o c
j'rt
ffi
i-
C
ffi
.2
rt «
G =
tu £
u
a
rt
>->
<r
"ci
C
2
3
tr
V
i   «
It
lH      0.
a >
ti rt
G   i
4)
3
E
C
A
1
c
C
|    0
!   1-
1   C
&s
ge
Oh-
1.
1
1
c
5
OJ
1
1
--
u
r
c
r
c-
g
o
-H
2
H
I
C
tr
'r
0
C
§
1
tZ
C
£
c
c
i
t>
c
OJ
1   *
H-
1     K
hi
ii
ic
1
!
rS
<u
Ph
rt
C
7
tr
<r
1
1 1
5
4
ffi
1 c
'!
a
>
T
a
c
a
F
ll
i-  a.
rt  >
13   rt
G   c
1
!
a
s
>
a
e
>
c
e
V
X
An
a
a
4.
s
c
C
1
t
'ai
CD
tit
<r
"rt
C
2
3
tr
IT
I
ai
i  8
01
V
£
E
S3
m
—
55
c7
u.
W
 Z 114
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
vo
!  VC
ON       1               II       1       M      1       1      1
: on
|
1    1
IIIX spE.ro
en
i    i
i  ^
^ i    M M M 1 1
1 *"
1          III
1 !
IIX 3PBJO
CO      i             II
* 1    ! i
! OC
1   ON
CO       ;               1       I       :       1       1       1       1       !
CO      |             |      |             1      1      |      1      !
1 oc
j oc
en         III
en                      1
1  CC
|  CC
t-         1    1
cs
IX 3PE:"0
OO
©
1  |
!  OC
: C
en    ;         :    i    :    I    I    I    :    :
CS     I            .
1  CC
i r
Tt
|  ^
On           1     !
CS
TJ
1—1
1  '
CS    i         1    1    i    i    1    i    i    ]
I rs
i   i
X SP^JO
m    j          II
SI         11
tn
|  CO
Si    II I II II i
cs    ;        i    i    i    {    ;    i    i    i
| vc
1 oc
I r^
r-        III
cn
I r>
1 cn
ON               1       1
■*      1  !
XI SP^O
S3
! 1
CO
CO
SS3       M   1   M   M   1
CS                  1     1     1     1     1     j     1     !
!  ON
i "**"
1  CO
ON           ill
m
On
N          1     1
">          |     1
a
•5
© m
! m
CO CO            1     |     I     I     i     I     I     I
!  VC
CO           lit
1 cc
c
o
u
a
u
z
<
Q
z
IIIA 3PEJQ
o vc
| vc
cn Tt         1    1         .    t         1
CS rn             !      !      1      1      1      1      i      1
!  CC
1  C"
Tf                               !
i "*
NO
vo tr
i   i
1©      vocSTtTtoo    jr>rH
tS O
r- t-h Tt
CS Cn
On      cS en
IIA SPBJO
rn  r-
|   1
12'
ICO         inrHTfrH©      Ivors
CS »f
CO tr
1        CS rH en
l> C-
: W
cs r-
ON   Tt
cn       cOTt©envo    iTtvo
ICS          TtrHlnrHO       j  Tf rH
NO Q
© co On
r-1-
oo     cs cs
IA 3PEJO
1 ""
1H   T-H
CS CO
CO O
CS   T-H   CS
NO   VC
m
'""'
rH   rH
rH      |
cs rr
1 OC
OO   -H
on r-
'oo     Ttr-r-csm   lots
r- tf
l      vo r> m
CO oc
Tj
ch es
A 3PEJO
j t-
C-
t> m
|  rn          in          CO  rH  t-H       j  Tf  CO
On i-
CS cc
cs      cs
in tf
If
1   Tl
© o
O   Tt
:r-      no t-h r-~ in vo    sr^co
© r>
1      m Tt co
t- tr
OC
1  rH
w
AI sp^JO
it
■n cs
CO oo
ICO            TtrHcnrHON        1   in   rH
OO   T-
CS  CC
rHrHCS
io tf
VC
H
H
III 3P«0
rH  ©
rH  CS
|rn          OOCOOO©       1  ON  t— Tt
00 On
1          CO  rH CO
ts cs
t-
cn    |
1 *
rH  ©
rH  f-
; cs      m      en tS    i t> tn ts
tr- On
n CS
Tf   Tf
V
,"H
rH  T-
CS CS
1
l c
Tt «n
ON  O
; i>      en rH r- vo    icococo
-h  OQ
1          t-  rH  ti
On O
Q
rH in
II .pejQ
1 ^
rH  ©
1-H   f
|  CS          VDrHTfrH       !©TfrH
-h  rr
CO  CC
1          1-H  rH  cn
m if
V
<
I vc
OO  ©
00   Tt
ION          r-cnCOrH       IfScOrH
m Tt
I      m cn on
in m
t-
CS
O
o
I .pEJO
3
T-H    t~
It-h      m t-h Tt t-h    jO-ncS
© cs
CO  CC
CS  rH CS
vo VC
NC
■
U-1-T.8
II    M 1 M 1 M
i
rr
VC
i  j
-japuix
i
:     ■
rH t-
NO VO
cs c
tn in     cSrHr-rHO\»nr-i>|o\ON
rn      cn © m
CO O
r*
vO in
no
-.UEpU-JJV
cn r-
VO VO
CO cc
o\r>      cninenoNC^r>vDtSjr>Tt
en       cs eo r-
cs m
CS CO
r*
^nsa
l> ©
t> CO
VD rr
tr- so      rHr^covDvooo'eno   en cc
rH          r> t-h  Tf
rn Tl
CN
00 csi
Si.
m c-
m oo
VD CC
Tfi>      mNooocNONvotnTf
vo OC
On        CS CO oo
On OC
a
i<
.SEI9AV
VO  IT
m
rnco      cn      cs      cncseoT-H
ON Tf
cn in
<
0
""•
TH  cc
r-
J9
*__! *
On Tt
CO CC
cson      vomcseocs©tsr-
r> oo
in       co m
in ©
vc
in r^
Tt   OC
CS  rH
TT  VC
coco      coTtTtmONinNDr-
O cs
On       t- Tf ©
CS cs
ts
z
•O
ai
5
cn cs
CO
CO O"
VO  rn          rH          rH          rHrHrH
p oc
cS cc
CC
<
"o
1
co
VO   Tt
Tt On
cn r-
O.   VD            rHr-ONOOCOONCOCO
cs r-
co       cn © cs
in oc
r-
t-~ NO
H
>.
r- oc
cn ©
Tf  c
cs r-*       ONcomTtcocoONt~-
CS         no TT On
ON   i—
r-
14
O
co cN
en
en ©
ND  CN          t-h          t-h          CS  rH rH
© 5
rH  CC
CC
z
w
3
n
rn"r-
p.
3
"rt
t- oc
cn co
VfJ   r-
t-h in       t— vorHrHinON©©
On if
co       vo tn on
©  OC
CT
cs cn
A
rH  VC
no cs
oo r-
vo©       c^c-©©cSoovom
r- Tt
t-h       cn oo on   CS cc
©         rH rH
O
H
t- if
NO
NO Q
CSTt          CO          eOrHTfCSCOrH
o r-
rs cr
CS              rH               T-H      Tf   NC
t-^
o
i
pq
Ph
O
>H
&
^
a
^-^
<
O
O
5
0
C
rt
CJ
>
C
0
r>
rt
6
l~
rt
J
0
s
1?
0
C
1
i
g
<*>
i
0
c
o
C
C
S
tt
In
3
3
c
p
4>
>
o
"-H
3
c
t
c
u
u
G
v.
a
•s
.1
Cfl
ft
to
T*1
3
Q
C
i
0
Jh
CO
M
0
5
T
P-
1
5
Ti,
to .2
Tffi
a
'C
Ph.=?
IS
rt
>
%i
(5
CO
1
tV\J
<5
C
ffi
\
.a
Q
tg
,«fl
q
"a
Ph
.    C
tr
1
C
2
t_c
0
s
CO 3        -
ffi|       S
c
hSi
i-
B
P-
C
OJ
3
C
OJ
c.
B
c
V
■a
3
S 1 g
Cfl
O
O
C
2
0
_c
a
Cf
i
c
■a 6
U   C.
£■ rt  ui
goo
3
cr
t-
1 b b-=
oj  rt   rt  E
CO a a «~
j   G  G  rt
)H    <u    ty  ,
■2 6 S°
i
l
rt
.3 6 Sti
£ *y g
CJ   M
•a iy$
§ rt z
"? a I
•2S°
>
j!
•c
ffi
1
ii
u
CJ
M
co h
K
C
q
E
G 33   C
2<C
d a
u
CUD
5 °
a.
CJ
hWW
T%m
w
Sm
tx
a
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 115
I j I; I ;i
i i i ! i
! ! i
lit
! i
: co cS m i © 'co
I en  (S I co vo Tf
m Tf On On t-h on tS
; en ; oo Tt m j cs
cS eo vo co vo CO vo
c Tf cs m vo vo tn
VD  ! CO m On ND —<
t-h i m r- rn no on
Tt >n m m t-h
cs cs O Tf cs
rH    Tf
CS Tf
tS co
NO CO
rHONCOOCOVOONTf
VD \£>
O Tf
ON t>
© 00
o cs
CS co
ON CS
CO Tf
vo cn
r-Tt
CS rH
Tf    rH    ,-H
CO ON
co [—
CO Tf
o\     <nrHrsTtm©oor>
I tS Tt »
I rH cs e
o o\
cs m
m vo
is ©
On in
co On
CO Tf
m      co*-HOvomvor>r>
VD       CS rH CS ON Tt rH
co co
cs cs
cs ©
© o
CS rH
CS Tf
r- tr-
so On
T-Hcscso©voinTt
T-HTtcsm©tninrH
CS Tt cs
O  Tf
m m
© CO
Tf rH tH
S S3
G     *r°
e coH
W2
2 to
8
i.S
ala
coo
SOQ
i 5 £
3-3   1.
■si S5'
■3 .a a
I      C.    Cd
be s
I P
3   aj
3<
s
>       ai   rt
1        3 o»
2 3 s
5        C  3 J2  u
rt BO 3 O 3 fe
BBfcSlBH
s
IN.
yZ.     H   OT
.11
■ rt   «
1 ° ti I 3
II
3  2
.5 M
M co
33 a*
3 S I« JB
"Co
co S W
M»
■ggsS,
3§
rt O o
rt *u ui-ij^ —
UQfeOSSZ
 Z 116
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
IIIX 3PEIO
i   i   i   i   i   i   i
1 r-
NO        1
M M M M
1 ^
cn
IIX spEJO
1    1   1    1    i   i   i
i es
eo     !
rr
On CS
1 CS
1  CS
r-
IX 3PbiO
I   I   |   1   I   I   I
1 r-~
I cc
NO       1
Tf         1
NC
Tt
Tf    T-H
CS CS
1 ! M II M
!   i   !
: m
cn
tn
rH
X 3PE-IO
1 O"
vo     I
vC
On CO
CS
1 M i M 11
r   CC
1 er
cn
rs
TS
a
XI SpEJQ
i   1   1    1   i   1    1
1 c-
SO     |
no                I m On          II::
1       co          1     1     l     ;     1     1
!  If
1   Tt
K
-^
IIIA spero
cs
E-     j
r-
1  NO  VC
1           CC
1 cc
C
0
U
|
eo   ;   i eo Tt    i vo
IIA 3PEJQ
CS     |     1 CS            1
CS oc
rH   OI
r-    i
t-
i   i *
CO l>         CS      1         NO ch
t-h r-
CS CO                    1
p!
o
Z
<
Q
Z
w
m    1 m cs Tf    ; co
i r-
VO H- N NO ON - VO r.             !      !      !
IA spEJQ
T-H         1   IT-   T-H                    ;   rH
©   Tt
ts cs
i °°
CJC
t— on        co co t-h Tf CS
NO  St
en cc
i
A 3PEJO
T-H        |   Tf   rH   T-H   rH
££
oc
:
ch r>      Tt Tt      co ts    1
Tf   Tf
en cn              l
■n co Tt on m co co
ON Cn
i vo
AI 3PEJQ
T-H            in   rH            T-H  rH
© m
cs cs
1   1
rn o        ror/jHiniH     1
cs                           i           i
On on                l
cn en
H
H
<
m cs co Tt m on o
en vc
1 o
ONTtNOr-VOOOTf-HrHCOVO
III 3PEJO
oo cs
rH   CS
i r>
r-
O          CSCOrHt^CSTfrH          NO
r- r-
en tn              i
>H
oo l> On CS CS cs o
© If
: ©
II 3P"J£>
rH            IflHHlNH
co r-
! °°
x
fNIS          CSTfrHTfCScn                   vo
vo VO
I 3PEIQ
O eo © On © m CO
Tf    C
1   T-H
Ttmcor-NOTtNOONONOOrHin
Q
Tf   TJ
m
U3JJE8
||     II     j|     j
i   i
|       !       I     ,1      ll       1       1
o
-japujX
i    1    1    i    ;    :    1    i
M
Ov vo CS CO CS CO On
ON c
rH   ©
r- CO r-
TtONtSTtVOTfln  —  COrHr-00
ONOOTfNOincovoTtcoinec. m
§3
W
3DUEPU3JJV
m t> © cn no on co
m oc
CS  CO
vo f- C
Ov
^IFa
oo cs m cs tr- r> en
NO   r-
co On
CN
cs r^ vc
ON VC
>
©  CH  CS  ©  Tf  ON  >o
CO   Tf
V
00 t~- lf
<n
t-h      en t-h
CS if
VO   r-   0C
T-H00             rH<S            COrHrH                      T-H
ts ©          m
<
rH   CS
CS   Tf
Q
j-
CO  CS
if
S
vo      oo Tt rs Tt en
3 c
CO CS
c
vo © r-
vocncSONCSTft-r-voi-H      as
Z
•a
3
w
Tf                      T-H            rH
ts T-
CO
<
u
vo vo vo vo co r- m
CS vc
vd r-
cr
~Hr-ON©cncsmr-^H»ninco
cs a
H
nocot—i^Hcsenor~-r--i-H       ©
m
o
Tt           rH  t-h           rn                                   rH
n r
rs
z
pq
£
P3
rH cs
a
3
On t-
On On
CSTt©aoTtTtmooONCSeo©
csr-Tt©Ttr-voTtcnmT—o
rH rH in rn m o vo
NO  cr
in r-
r- © p
m vc
O
H
rH          cn  rH           ti
rH~CS
CO   Tf
CC
r-NO
t—co      cscs      cni-Hi-H            cs
Tt cc
ri tj
in
O
Pi
z
pq
Ph
•a
O
3
C
4)
><
G
O
VJ
5
oi
O
U
c
a
<
O
.3
1
ft.
c
i
Ci
CO
•3
□
T
e
E
5>
E
D
Cfl
ai
a
>.
h
0
cn a
Ts
a
CJ
■>
li
0
T>
Ph
£
3
C
cr
5
3.
rn
CS
c
c
1-
c/
E
F-
<
j
j
a
o
rs
r>
'£   r
3
tl
C
cs
r>         |
BO
Q
12; c a.
*. o c
C   I   cc
g e
ai y
ffi
c
0
z
E
I-.
<
C
c
E
0
v.
rt K
CO CO
9>
0
3
rt
u
3
O
CO
|
i
3
CO
'J
rt
C
h
0
X
e
T
c
a
a
t-
c
8
i E
b
ra
G
I
9
rt
C
H
•a o
q E
4)
I
.2
ffi
c
if
M  OJ
2 i
o J=
?l«
"ffi
,1   I-
1
&
fix
f
C
<r
'«
OJ
PC
OJ
E
E
cc:
V
1 7
■3
C
IT
C
c
I
ffi
3
s
a
i
E
3
1-1
c
ra
c
ra
0
T.
rt
Cf
I-
CJ
>
CO
X
m
T~
I
CO
>
o
6
>
>
;e
T
H
c
o
p
>
OJ
V
r
C
X
Cf
tf
I
c
c-
II
1
3
a
0
0>
CSC
3
m
Is
pq
03
3
3
W
W
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z  117
cs
Tt
1
M   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   i   1   1   II   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   J   r 1
en
l
1        i   1   i   !   i
1 CS CS CS
no Tt    ;
rH
r- es cs Tt
m co co Tf
VD
vo On     ! rn            ill!
1-1
'	
1 cn
1-H                     ,
"   '    '   '   '
VO  CO  Tf  NC
cn
rs vo    i cs         i    i    I    I    i
i Tf
© oo On On
! VO
t- m   '■ «
CS CS            1     1     1     i     1     1     i     !     1     1     1     i     1     !      I     1     1     i     1     1     1     1     !     1
i m
CO cs
vOmntlN
.    .    .    ,    ,
oo m r- co
eo f>
1   1   1   1   1   Ii   :   1  J   1   1   1   M   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   M
I >n
1    T-H   CO
vo r- Tt ©
I    I    :    itscom    :        1    :rn    icsco    :    ih    i    i    i    ionco
r> cS t-h r>
CO  CN
1                  CS                III
ti      ItI                    JrHiilrHfS
rH cn
:    : in co         1 t>    1    i cs
rH m
■    ■ *"~'
i        i   i
i    ion    : r- eo no On    |    i    iooTtvom    ieo©ONencooocstn
j       IO       1  CS  rH          CS       1       1       IhtJh               jT-HCSTfNO          riCSrH
in if
1     1     1 CS            1 Tf © CS On
on a
I   Tf   T-H            CS
1  rH       !                                        1.1                                        i
Tf  TJ
loo    iTtcoONco               iTfcnrHin    lcninoN«nONCOTtr>
1     I     I oo            1 © On Tf ©
I      1 rH      |                                   ,      ,      ,                                   ,
m in
1    i    1    1
Tf    | r-    1    jvoovOv    loo    :rHooooON©NOT-HONCSr-ooNo©
I on vo cs in
rH'OlirH          CSICSIrHcn                   Tt iH H rf  VO          tH  H (N
©O
I  m  rH          CS
m if
1
cnrH    i    i    ;tSN©cHr-.rH    :mmrHi>vovoinoooor-.r--ONes
t-h  r-
I         ; m      Tt Tf vo t-h cs
rH                 1                  |   T-H            Tf   rH   cn
CSCnrH            cnrHrHTfVOT-Hr-fSrH
in if
vO t-h       eo
,        .        1                               1-H                  !
in m
covo    loo    :©©inmcooco      mvOooomHiflHiNvoin
i    !    i cs      in co co Tt t-
T-H                  |VO        IrHT-HCOTtCOTtT-H        |rl            COr-IH   MOHMtSm
1       1       1  Tf                   r~  rH          CO
m m
Onoo    ;0    iTfTtr-cscsmcs    icntni-HoooocSTf©vDcs
33
1               1  ©          VO Tf  rH NO VO
|VO       1  t-h          rn  cn  rrt   rr,  ti       |  rH          TfT—,r-.t--NOrHCST-HCO
tn CS       CS
i
j    1   1   I    j    j    1   j    j   j
1 1 M I 1 M i 1 I i j
m m
oo m r> co
I
00 p-
ONrHT-HCSOOOTtNCOOVOr-
I
CO  ON I— Tt
rn t-h © cs m
cOTtcScnovTtinT^r^»rHt^\OT-Hooi-«tn©in'TtoOTtrHr>
ON  CC
CS  CO  VO  t-
OO   Vi   Tt   T-H    -H
vO Ov © CO
m e>
vocsvo©ooeotsvovDTfONvor-rsinTtincSincsminT-HTf
VO   T)
cn vc
Tt On CS co
oo cs Tt r-
CO  NO  Tf  CN
rH CO  CO  rH  r-
CO rH                           rHrHrH          HH                   t-h                  cnen          HHH
rH   TJ
eo             i-i
1-1
en tn
tS © m rH
OO    T-
esoovoccr^©intnTfvovoesr^cnrHO\esONr^r---©ONNOON
00     T—
© © O if
NO  OO  ©  00  00
cs       invocSTrcsONOoinenmrHcncSNOinTtvor--cnTtr-r-
oo tn
vo m Tt vc
On Tf        CO
in oc
r-TtS
Tf  CO  CS  r-
CO  t- rH  m
T-H   ND
t-;r^co©vovDTfONOooONr-.corHTtcocsvDONco©Ttvoin
On On O t-h vo
t>  CC
m eo cs t-
rH  in  rH  ON
rH   T-H  rH  rH
m cc
r> a*
rH  CS
© r- vo vo
cn r-
ONtnTtcocoNDONTtTtTfinc>OTtinr--TtinNDinocorSTt
in o>
© t-h cs cc
in t- © On Tf
oo r<
rn t-h On rn CO
CO CS CS eo
•-I tr
COrH                           t_,rHT-H          t-HCS                  I-"                  COcn          rHrHrH
CO  OC
co ir
On vo Tf cn
Tf                   rn
1
0
£
c
c
K
b
0
Tt
CS
ra
Sx
a
C
>
tt r
1
.3
cm
5
" s
1
G   KJ
4J  1*
"2 -
C
W
<u
CI
c
CJ
C
OJ
X
to
OJ
e
i-
c
OJ
c
)
3
1
3
<r
"rt
C
X
3
Cf
3
c
*CJ
I
.2
ffi
1-
c
b!
ra >
a S
«
t
I
s
M
<■
2
e
p
f
j
0
t
ra
X
OJ
c
T
OJ
rt
rt
X
8
c
c
ra
1
e
CJ
Ti
D
P-
C
C
3
to
V
Ih
G
B
3
CJ
c
a
3
3
OJ
>
<
C
3
I
s
c
OJ
k
CO
3
0
■a
13
G
aj
U
u
CO
E
rt
T-
rt
i-
5
D
C
'a
s
OJ
'§
rt
h-
I
3
3
aj
>
<
C
rt
s
OJ
QJ
£
c
c
1
ii
aj
1
u
c
ra
I
1
3
_C
cf
2
3
rt
CI
rt
C
c
•3
c
rt
a
ra
■> CJ
PL.
CJ
3
C
aj
>
<
pe
•a
';
ra
3
c
3
0
CO
p
cc
:
LT
hV
j
4.
T
■a
o
in
.5
tr
c
3
CO
tr
rt
f2
JO
5
C
c
c
E
R
X
t
s
c
O   aj
<"•
MX
55
°i
i cj e
CO  rt
u-   t-
o c
X
J
ffi
c
E
Cf
,£
e
0,
F
1
T*
e
I-
cd  g
ai <]
1
B
r
—
<
c
c
1
>
V
ti?
1
<
a.
ra
>
t
cc
X
E
cc
s
X
C
3   3   3   a
i-i
3
y-
W
a.
1/
i
3
H-
E
a
 Z 118
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
IIIX apEJO
1
1
Tt
oc
1     |     |     !     1     |
|     IIX 8PEJO
1   1   1   !   1   1   1   1   1   i   1   I   1   1   i   I   1   |   1   1   I   1   i   1
1 CS
,—'
IX apEJO
1   1   I   I   1   1   1   i   1
II   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   II   1   1
IB
1 cs
°*     Mill!
	
X SPEJO
i 1 ! 1 ! ! 1 1 !
I   M   |   HI   |   I   1   I   1   1   1
1 ©
1   Tf
n  11 M 11
!       !       '       '  rH       t       j       1      I      1       I       !       I       1      1       1       1      1       1       1       '       1       '       |
T-H   T-
XI 3PBJO
111!    1 1 1 1 1 1 , i 1 1 1 I.I II 1 II 1
»n
cs
IIIA 3PEJQ
M M M M 1
ill    II 1 1 M I.I 1 1
cc
if
cc
:
no ec
©      i-i cS    i in m co
IIA apEJQ
t-h cn      t-h    j cs    I      vo
j   «- j |        i     | | |N
CO cc
CO  If
c
.
eOO\    IvOTfvo    lvOr>vo    : Tt t-h rH «-i oo r>    !vOr>i-HtncOi-H
CS   Tt
fC
rn cs >n cS cn vo
IA apEJQ
rH  CS                          rHjmO\|l>-                                       j  rH cn          CS          t-h
© cs
in if
ptn    imcnovor-r-TttSco'-'    itsr^cn    i Tt t-h cn co r> co
CS CO          rH          rH i-H          SO Qs                  C-       j          rH                  rH Tf          CS
r- if
tr-      t-h cs Tf t-h cs vo
A apEJQ
m r-
in tf
"■
Ttov    !cotnTtt^O\rSONcnvocstncsooT-HrHvocncS©i-Hr>
cscsj         cs cs     r- oo         co         t-ht-h         mcocSrH
VD VC
Ov      CS en cn rS vo t-h
AI SPEJO
S3
rHOOmcS       Ir-TtOlnOOT-Hln-HCSTfcnCOrHVO©       1HHH
CSTf          rHlCSCSi-HOOOO                  Ov                  i-H                  rHTfltScSrH
CO cc
ON         rH t-H             1 Tf in
III apEJO
VD VD
vo NO
o\ on co Tt co vo    !vor~-ONTfcsr-cotn©rHrHcoTfcScoNoi>
O       rH no CS cn tn On
II 3PEJO
CSTf          rH          *S                  t> CO          rH 00                  CSrH          rHTf          COrH
On CO
vo t-
cs
cs Tt m cn in rs
I apEJQ
COCO          rH       j CS          rH  CO 00                  ©                   rHrHJT-llnlTfCSrH
© VD
C- C-
"
U3JIE3
II II 1 M M i i I i 1 I 11 1 M M M
M II i i
-japuRi
ll l i M l i i l l l i I i l j i i ! I 1 i l
i   !   1   i   i   1
30UEPU3HV
COrnr^C«C»©©i-HONOvCOTfTt©©rHCSO©ONONt--rH©
NO r-
NC
o vo m t» cs o
xirea
r^©oocx5TfCSt^Tfr^incsoOTfT-HTtt^inincorH
OO C
CN
on c- c- m t-- r-
38BJ3AV
rH CS                          rH                  Tf  Tf                   m                                                   CS          rHrHrH
CO  rH
r-
co \C
a
OrHTfCSVOCSCOcOCOC^TtCOTtVDt^CJV'-HT-HlnTtVOONrH©
CO OC
tf
vo Ov vo On t> en
C-.rH      Tf      cocncscnin      (S r>           Ttcs      encn      co vo Tt
m vc
rH CS
rH                                            CS CS                CS                                            rH
On r-
•a
o
•n tr
"3
Oc«TtTto©oo©oocoNor^r^oencocsesesescs©i>-
ONTt      TfrHr-cscnoooo      chq      rHincn      men      ©vocn
lU
Qs r
o
rH                                            CS CS                cn                                            rn         rn
CO
CS ec
'E
^_
OOvcovONOCSrHcocoONCSO\T-Hcot^cSC>cor>vooOi-HT-Hr>
VOtn         COrHlnVOtnrHCOrHCOOOrHT-l©in         oono         on cS r>
CO o-
5
© O On no © rS
to
rH CS  rH  rH CO in
o
H
rn cs                 rn           m in            m           rn                 cs      t-h t-h
r
Tf   VC
•g
OJ
.s
M
G
o
o
ft
o
T
5
JO
O
1
£
CO
e-3
G
0
,3
s
OJ
i-
0.
£
cs
F
a
3
1
a
1
s ■§
,o
i
)
i
5
J.Sc|
O   0   k
•cog
ts 1 &
Q be
I
3
X
CJ
s
T*
Co
a-
s
8"S
as
§ffi
Is
T3    r"
rt o
(U    CJ
OJ
0
i
1
ti
Ih
O
OJ
0
n
A
CJ
CJ
I-
u
o
CJ
rS
CI
1-1
o
c
c
c
E
ct
&
T~
or
s
K
3
c
e
■3
u
ra
X
"5
X
X
CJ
T
CJ
i
ra
1-
0
3
-3
0
O
T
f
ra
c
i
CJ
•B
?
TJ
TJ
O
tt
tf
c
1
8
<5
3:
t-
c
CJ
cr
£
.3
>
a
>
c
0
A:
c
c
«
OJ
aj
u
b S £
Sbcs
11
7
e
B  S   *>«  5
ffiSSSS
ISto
£
s-
>
ra
■o
CJ
TT
C
>
CO
rt   2-C3  co  co
3  2  rt ||
c
a
E
=3  3
Sis
1
|9S
x=xi .3
UOh
3
c
T
n
to
W
TS
a
■S
K
O
O
i
u
I
r—I
<
Q
W
o
1
p
<
H
Z
pq
►J
O
w
o
00
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 119
cs    I m t-h    I cs cs
eo oo cn    I so in t
CSeOTtrHrHON      ItnTf
'Tf co     ; on ch rn cn
)Tf       iTfCSenCSrHrHCnTtTtcnrHrHrHVO
t-h in r> rn cn    | tc m
Nt-HhHfvUntC,   f.
tn vo co    : © ch Tf in
TtC-COT-HTfT-ITtO
mr--Ttr>vDcncscs
©T-Hoot-covOcnr-
CS ON © rH r- rH in cS
cscscscocovo'od©
CSTtNOrHr-cHi-HTf
ON On
OO CO
CS Tf
Tf m
rH CS
O On
in co
rH CS
1 CS  m n  t-h cs
m m
■n "n
n  CS
NO CS
rH Tf
cn <n
in Tt
© On
CO Tt
% ,G
6
B
b b CS -    ;
B 2 O  o oi 3 a
BsS.3 3iS3rt
||<pq«OQW
Oi   Oi
HE
%   Q
x J2 oi
ffiffi-l
M «
'i  3
ilS.3S.S.
& >
O. rt
3 5  rt
5 I
: -^  vj u
<L> -3   00 M rt
3^'3».Efrt1§ll||lSKg||cj
g<«cqpanm00QQWli<[i<000,-l
w
 Z 120
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,
1961/62
IIIX 3PEJO
1 ill II1 Ii 1 1 11 II 1 II
m   -i    :
ts    j    I
||    j    j    j    j    j
I     '     |     |     1     1     1     1     |     1     '     !     1     1     '     I     1     ]
1 cc
CO      1 ©
IIX 3PE^O
II     1     1   J     1     1     Ii     1     1     1     1     1     |     1     1     1
c-
no   : cs
MM
IX 3PEJO
j     1     |     |           j     |     |     j     |     |     i     |     |     |                  i
©
ON      1  rH
NO       1   CO
i   i   !   i
Tt m oo cn
:   :   i   i    i   :   :   i    i   i
X 3PEJO
1     1     1     1   J     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     |     1     11
if
T-H               CO
1   1
—i cs r- ti
TS
s
XI 3PEJQ
1 1 1 II 1 I 1 I 1 1 ! 1 1 I 1 1 1
if
CS rH »o
■5
i-«t   I   t   !   | cs   I   !   !   I   i <s   1   1   1   t   |
vo r>
© oo r* Tt
t—I
rH       1
T^
IIIA 3PEJQ
1    Mil    I II 1 1    ! 1 1 i !
t-h cn
CS
co rn r—
c
u
pq
U
CScSOv    !    leo    1    1    !    Ico    leo    1    !cs    its
CS •-
in co © r-
i rs            ; co   i Tt   :    i
IIA 3PEJQ
II    Mil    I    1 I00 1
co cn
rH   CS
ON   T-H   ON
II        iH   i   1
CSOeOrHrHCSTfTtVOTfCOTfT-H        !  lf|   VO  H   1(1
r> cs
1 00     ! VC
1 On    1     I co en i-h t-h cS ©
IA 3PEJQ
T-H  rH                                  CO  rH                  rH               !          in
m r-
CS ts
r \
j          rH          rH
<
Q
CSCS        IrH        ICS        |l-HrH©TtONinCSTfTf        if-
rH       |                               !  CO  rH  rH          rH                           ND       i
rH   ©
1 CO     | cs
I r>
j  I-  Tf  rH Tt       !  On
A spEJO
in r-
cS CS
:r>r~-TtT-HTti-HCO00VOrHT-HT-HT-HCOr--T-HT-H
© vc
I r-    ; o
mcooo      !VOr-rHCntSON
pq
AI apEJO
co                 co                 tr-      t-h
ON   ©
CS er
i *"'    I
CO        1             rH            1-H
H
H
mCSrHrH       ICOrHCONDcOCONOCSCSNOOOrHr-
t-  ON
j rf     in
es©r-oooooN    :oo    i-h
<
III 3PEI£)
tH                              CO rH i-H         tS                       r>
rn  CS
CO  CO
rH   CS               CH   rH          |    1-          Ir
—
COOOr-TtCOTti-ICOl-Ht-      IrH       :  ts  r- On  r>  vo
00 CS
1 O      1  On
TtTfrHr-CSrHCS-H        ICC
II 3PEJQ
m t-h         ; cs    I           co
Tt   NO
CO  CO
i M   i
Tf             r-   CS            CS        1
<
eoencn    ii-HtSrHONTtcoeorHesesvor— t-h r*
VO   Tt
Is I5
CO©t-©VDr-CS©rHTt
Q
pq
O
I 3PEJO
rH  ti       »                          cn  rH                  Tf                           00
NO  00
co cn
rH  •rtw  rn  rH CS          CS          rH
U3JJE8
II | | |-1| M II 1 i 1 II II
1
1  i  1
i  1  1  I  !
1
-japur^
i     !     1     1     1     i     1     1     i     1
ootnvDooNVOcococooNCocooor-Tttncocs
Tt   Tf
ON CO NO OC
©©CSi-HOtnVOrHONt-
©©cSini—oooocSr-;vo
pq
30UBpU31JV
r>[>cnovr^cotncorHVDcsTtcoo\cs©ONC-}
On O
CO  CO  CS  Tt
Kw^a
cnen©©voc«o\>>coTtinooinr>©in©o,v
cn ec
in" in tr- vc
NDt^Tfinc^in©vot>NO
>
<
rilnVOH          rH          ©VOTfrHcnrH          cnONrHcn
NO cc
tn tn co vc
T-HinTtcSmi-HT-Hr>      m
38EJ9AV
CS                               rH                               Tf
OO  NC
tn I- cs
t-H                   rH
rH~CS
•2
5
c-envocSrHc-NooinvDONr-ONVovocoTtcs
cscs                    rn Tt cs      t-           rn m      >*s
CS a
in r- Tt ir
oocSr-TtcSeoinvocSoo
tr- cr
On vo vo cc
CO CO rH CO NO         Tf         cs
2
<
•a
Oi
3
rH                                                           CS
ON Tl
CS           rH
CO
©inTtavincoTtooT-HcSQOin r- co tn © C— co
in Tt
CS CS  ON CS
nooonDi—'invDcninTfco
H
3
>.
rHcnen              rn        — eo CS        I—              r-00        CS
in ec
CS On m Tf
CS vo rn co m       vo       eo
W
0
1-H                                                                                   CS
© u-
CO               T-H
pa
Hr-
pq
'a
a
o
a!
3
r-coO-HNOo©oovooor-cSvoo\-Hcoi-Hin
r- ec
r- on co t-
Tf©eoinr-ON00T-HvO—i
Oh
rt
1-HlnVOrH            CSrHCSOTfrHinT-H            rr,   m   Tl   Tf
rs r-
—< in cs it-
1-HNOinCSVO-H               1-H               VD
O
H
cs                 t-h                 m
coo-
cs"cs
no  rH CO
J
2
pq
Ph
TJ
OJ
o
3
G
>H
0
O
y
j
*
O
c
A
<C
O
X
4)
OJ
OJ
|
o
c/j
3
o
|
•0
3
to
O)
e
c
"-3
C
0
1-
D
^i
s
CO
es
X
CO
p.
>.
H
C
c
JO
It
3
v
ii
3
4
S
1
T~
Ci
M
CJ
1
0
rt
<
cys.2
I**
•S.n »■
_M7  c
0   Ci
ffi
>
CJ
S
•^ffid
•a b a
M
cd
OJ
OJ
gg
to
J*
*oj
Hi
rt
OJ
cs
3
O
rt
3
Ih
c
CJ
a
i
i   r*
oj rt
>
rJ
3  aj
S i
o "
,3s
U
G
G   oj
*aj r3
SS
t
OJ
u
C
S
ffiffi-
oj oj a
oo?
2££
OJ
Ih
U    OJ
il
2£
s s °
CCJ  5 TJ
TJ   oj 33
5h£
to
tr
3
to
OS
E
0
T
rt
CO
CD
1
c
2
3
CO
<r
C
C
H
ffi tt <= 6
"  oj  oj  3
CJ  ^   rt   B
~£ o g c
t- 'C  o oj
•i 8.SE
oj rt
1 oi
» >i 3  C
lis
i-
OJ
A
a
PC
OJ
II g
rt  O cc
mm 0
c
1—
3
C
u-
ff
3
0
3 s;
g.Sh >
o  >  «
60 OJ -3
rt   G   t-
U   OJ   D
QOrt!
o
9 S" i xi
a>
to
in
t»pq w
W
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 121
vo cn I cn
© Tf
m r>
rs cS
cs r> i cn cn vo
CO Cn rH
r- r-
CO NO
cs ts
tS t-h ' oo co
r-    tS Tt CO CO Tf NO
r— ro
VD ON
CS cs
CO O fS  I ON CS
so in
O co
co co
vo : vo co m m
m I t-h m r~ on
VO 00 rH Tf rH o
rn © rn t-h en co
cn O
cn r-
cn en
OOO TfrHVOVOt-Tf
ONOovo©covocsvor--Hm©
t-Ht-h rH CJ —  i-H  CS  CS
CS rH rH
ON   Tf
cn ©
vo C-
rn~CS
i-h m
eS^t
On 00
Tf CS
T-H   CO
cn cs i—
oo ON cs
ts cs en
00 so
in m
cs i-
en Tf
ri   CS
cn on
\0 cn
r- on
cn cn
cs no
CS   Tf
cS m in
i-i ts m
co cn co
ON   rH
VO  ND
tS ts
.2 i
TJ   2    OJ
3||
O   rt   3
pq 3x
3SS
>SB
x >> 9
8 °£
o « o
8 a 9
SzcMacpscieis?
= m
aj   ai -o
m >t
o   cfl
3   O
in H
91,
CJ
w
« o
11
3 >> :
c/l  H   '
: a b
,3    Q
- c2 m o s
- -. 'X:   Oi
oHcJB
OS"
"   CU    K
r n*   U •* .* ^ ro     Oc«
U ih cs [j 4 ffl   Yra
S3"L    ..._
| pq pq 0 Ph Ph Bj
E    3,"
C  i/jH
•2.3.9
§<:u,4
1 « SWig § g g "H
"    BO  OJ    S    M
rt i- 5
1  oj  G
a m ■  ■    -
|SOWOcoco'
u
 Z 122
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
IIIX 3PEJO
.   II             j     j
i      1      1      1      1      1      1
II     EMM!
c~-
IIX 3PEJO
3   ["MINI
i  Tf
i   "*
cn              i    I    I    i    I    i
i i i i i i
i ^
m
VO
ts
j   j        III
IX 3PEJO
°0             1     1     1     I     1     1     1
■*    ill!!!
! 00
! ■*
rH©                 j        |        |        |        !        1
NO  rH
; r~-
VD
cs
cn
I   1        III
i   1       1   i   !
X 3PEJO
on         i    ;    I    I    I    i    \
"°     1 1 1 1 II i
1  ON
1  ^°
©  l>               II               III
NO   rH
! r»
j tr-
ON
Tf
! !   ! ! !
-
vc
1 vo
so so          1     1     1     1     1     1
1 cs
CS t-h co
rH   0>
T3
XI3PEJO
CO
I 00
CO   rH
1 h
cn On co
— cs
UJ
i   i   ;   i   i    :
CS                   rH
tn
a
•S
r>
CS     I     1 rn    j     |     ;
cn ©
o©        i   1   1   1   1   1
: ©
rH  i-H  f-
ON   rH
e
o
CJ
IIIA 3PEIO
ON
1     1          Mi
o
rn  CO                                               M
j   Tf
Tt On On
CS en
II          III
,—'
rH                       1,1111
CS               CH
in
CS   CS  Tf   1-H   VD   rH   rH
r- r-
oo m                    1 OV rH CO OO
cn cn
VO  ©  NO
rs ir
IIA apEJQ
CO                  VO CS  rH
cn ro
^ i-H               |       |  rH
r> rn cn
es cs
ci
rH  rH
,H
■
t-H  rH  rH
Tt
IA 3PEJO
1 oo Tf t-h m cs co
00 CO
1   CS            CS   T-H   Tf   1-H  Tf   CO
m r>
'       <       1
1 o
vo r- m
y
1 cn          in cs
cs cs
|   rH          VO  rH CS
©   rH
1       '•       1
1  Tf
CS en
1-H   rH
rH   rH
1       1       1
1-H   Tf   rH   rH  CO   Tl   on
in tn
1 CO         © VO rH      1 f- VO
© cn
,       ,       ,
1 CS
CO  CO  ©
A apEJO
cn             m cS
rs cn
; cs     vo     ts   |
© eS
1 1 i
i ""*
rs co t-h
1-H   1-H
rH  rH
Tf O Tf cn m vo on
rH   rH
1 CS        ON On C* co vO On
cn m
,
ro cS CO
m
AI apEJQ
Tf                  NO i-H
Tf  Tt
j  rH          00          rH
cn Tt
i i 1
1 ■**
CS CO
H
i-h VO CS VO NO CO CO
t> c-
1   CS            rH   in   O  rH   NO  ©
co in
1  rH
VD   t-H   ©
<
III SPE-Ifj
en                VO rH
cn en
; cs     o     ts          ch
rH   CO
i i i
1  ,t
CS  Tf  rH
II apEJfj
m cs cn rn ov vo i-h
r- r>
1  NO          Tf  rH O  CS  rH ©
00  Tt
! ON
ON   Tf   CS
Tt                   ->HH
<n "n
; cs      tr- t-h cs      t-h rn
cs m
j   Tf
cs m t-h
<
—
cn in CS rn i-h cS O
Tf  Tf
1 ©      Tt ov vo tn On vo
On On
i t-
oo in oo
ft
w
o
2
I apEJfj
m                     00   CS   rH
r- r-
! rs      co      rs          rn
Tt   \C
[   Tt
cs cs
U31JB8
1    |    1    j    1    I   j
j
M         !    1    1    !    i    1
i i i
|
i   !   i
-jspura
I i i 1 i M
1    i         1    i    1    i    i    i
i i i
!   1   i
OC
© co t- CS cS cn co
© 00
r- ©      vooooNvomoN
tn ©
CO
CO CS ©
O CO
Tt  Tf  00
E?
SDUEPU3HV
a
rn en <n © p >> en
5 on
Ovr-;       encSenTtvot-
On vC
V
c- r- r-
rs vo
Tf in On
^I!Ea
sSejsav
cs
r> in cc'. i^ tr- o rV
■f! r-^
VD*Tt        Tf O CS Tf CS* l>
—* cn
VC
t-h r-^ r^
r> Tf
l>
Q
rH in  CS  rH  rH  CS  VO
T~    O
ov co      t- m Tf t-h Tf m
rs o
CO
On VD vO
CS  ri
in on tn
CS
CS                     Tf   1-H
ON  f>
cn  rH          Tf          rH
IT- C
On
in CS Tt
CO CO
<
ft
rH
^
^
Ih
3
cs
vo cn © Ov co no m
r» on
CSVO        cS©cnvOrnri
VO Tf
VO
in vo cn
Tt  r-
© o r»
VC
Tf rH        © in' CS
m  rH
©CO        rn tS VO        CS co
in Tt
cn
<z> tn so
© r>
00 © CS
z
•a
T-H                cs
Tf   VD
CS             rS
m so
m
en i-h cS
l>   T—
<
*o
3
CN
CS Tt © VO CS O i-h
m t—
CSrH            OOrH^tOCOO
m no
_
Tt  vo CO
OO   NO
in r— no
>,
CC
rH cn  rH          \D  00  Tf
Tf ts
en rs       CS cn co       CS cn
© in
in
Tt m m
in r-
t> © CS
O
ra
rH                  CS
in r>
CJ  rH          CS
Tt r-
m
en t-h cS
r- i-
p.
3
"«
T}
co t> © in O vo vo
rs vo
Tft>     ©rHr-cnvocs
ON O
h-
Ov CS t-h
cs t-
m r> cn
Ph
Ti
rn r> cS rn r- en vo
©   Tt
cn©      TttnTtrHTfvo
in ©
CO
Tt On CS
vo CS m
NO   Tt
m © m
H-l
S
ec
CS                     Tf   CH
© cn
Tf  CS            Tt            t-H
tr- tt
p
Tt   CC
n CS
o
w
Ph
o
>H
c
0
«■%
tf
0
"^
a;
-1
<c
o
■G
'C
Q
u
i
p
o
CO
■a
c
rt
*-H
en
:
t.
m
c
c
3
en
3
c
u
co
OJ
Q,
6   *
rs
a
C
en
ci
Ct
!
c
c
- 1
t>   M
X
e
1
'm
.3    1
■3
,^j
ffi
■E  £
ffi
a
ffi
1.
C
c
V
tr.
T
c
)
.1
CJ
1    3
ct   C
In
rt
>
-a
3
C
I
4
AC
0
I-I
1
a
c
Q
a,
M
J
I
0
1
1
4
5
C
3
CI
u
rt
S
■a
Hi
xi
Q
CJ
z
a
"rt
C
2
3
0
c
<3
A u
Si o
w|  ,S
'S c b~
aj rt rt 3
w "£ 3 2
,i   3   3  C
u ai ai r
■2 s eu
ft
E
I
c
1
rt
C
1
tr
e
Q £
1
1
CA
tr
It
C
2
3
c
3
=
>
1*
rt x
ci
Oi <
9^
r-
ffi
c
OJ
PQ
>
s
1
4
O   r^    3
Z CO CO CO
tr.
Ih
c
SB
o I-
3 «
P< CO
1
CJ
E
OJ
Coo
"s
C                           CJ
OJ
n                         ■-
t-
n
r-
K
n
V.
i-i
pq
a
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 123
NT
1   1   i   i   1   1   II   1   1   1   1   1   1   I   1
i r"
VC
1     |
1     1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II i 1 1 M II I i 1 i i
vr
l cs
CN
1     1
i       1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   I   l   I   1   1   1   1   i   l   1   1
cr
i         i    i    i    i    i    ■    i    i    i    i    i    :    i    i    i    !    •    i    i    i    :
C
1 tc
c
1 o-
If
1     1
: Tt
rr
1     1
tn On
^         	
no O
r-         ii         i    I    1    I    i    I    j    |    1
l   I. i   I   I   i   f   l   I   i   I   i   i   i   i   i
i tf
r» r>
i v-
cn         |    i    i    i    !    i     1    i    |    !    i    I    l    l    l    1    1    1    1    l    i
1        1        1        1        i        \        1        ITf        IVOVO        iTfCS
CS    T-
rH  NO
T-H    O
1     1     !     1     1     1     1     1            1                  1                  I
1-h \r
©vo    :Oco©cs©Ttinc-Tt    i r-- vo i-h
oo oc
CSen          Icncovoi-H          icovo          ; t- in co Tt © Tt eo
NO  C
OOrH       I       ItS           i—  CS       1       IrnrH       j                   rllri  H  H  ffl  n
rH       ,                                                                                1
in sc
oven    ivo©NOeovocooN©©    immoN
m r>
l      vocn    ; ts vc oo Tt eo    i    :o\eS         l r- in eS on m vo ©
On ec
m vd
1          rH               1                                                |l                       ,1
rHTfrHT-lOrHr^CSVOTtr-VO       !  i—  ON  ©
CO  Tf
i      vocst-oocs©r-in    l    icovo    !eooor-©cocScoco
i-HcscSenrHcnin»-Hcnco      m    i i-h ro vo
vo vo
1 i
0\rH                   rtnnM               |NH       j                   i-iTt          rHCO
r^inrHTtinvovoovo©TtcninTtr--Tt
.  ,
c»cSvo>>vorooocSt^cnTtONcoini>f>vOrHr>tnvo
cs vc
1          ©rH                  CSrHCSCS          cHCS                                   rHCOrH          CSrH
1-1
vo vc
'   ''
1          rH
Ttr^oONOrHOvDTtr~-CSTfTtcoeninvD
©  ON
|          CnenrH00>^ONCSTtCOVOCOTtOvCO00VDTtC--i-HTtON
T-HONi-HCSrHTtr-rHT-HCO          Vl  rH  t-h  CO  VO
t-h in
vo vo
I    i
rHCS          T-HrH          CSfS                  <S  i-<                          rHCO          rHtn
On VD
Tti-HVOcnrHTt^cnTnrHCC)Ttr--C--rHr>VO©ONCnvO
T-Hfscncsi-Hcnr-      cncnT-HineorHCSco
r> cs
vo r>
1    i
CSCS          rlrlHCNlCS          rHCOrH                  rHrHCScH          TfrH
1    | | | | | | | 1 || M 1 IIii 1 1 1 I
in vc
a
r- cn
I      I 1 I'l 1  M M 1  1  M M 1 1 1 1 1 1
o      TtcScScovocor^Tt©cSco©TtTtovi-'oooocscnr--
tr-      voTfinc--cScScSi-Hi;otr-TtoNOv©rHoococnvocSO
Nor^<noococscsr^ovt---TtNOr--i>vovo
co r-
rH m
00 vc
rr-
VO ©
inTftOTtvo©TfinOONTtTtmoNrstn
vo       —*       cscn       cSrH       cn             CSen
1-H   Tl
©
tr- t-h
co      T-Hooi-HinOmrHTti-icsrsc—rHT-HTfoocsmin©vo
ex
vo en
OnVo                       ti         ti -n                n                                     CSCS
CO vo
r^Tteovooor^oocncnONCSi-HNOONr~-tn
cOTtTft-enOvcorS©oocsr-.eOTtcSO
m vo
m vc
r» vo
Tt      ONTtT-HCSTtcSvor-      rHvoTf      1-HrHinT-HcncSrscn
CO                                                 T-H               rH                          T-l                          rH   tS
t-h" CO
VO    rH
m      r^o^i>'--'©r^voineoONrHONrHt^'-Heot~-ONinocs
tSvoint>tSrHcocoi-Hr-.cs©tSTtcsrs
■n Tt
vr
r- r-
Tf          VOTf          CO  NO d  VO (> H H IN t  iH          COTfcSCSCSONTt
m                 ,_,_,-,,-,      cs           chcS
ON^Tt
rH  CO
•n      co                                                                        t-h
CSONCOONVD©--00cnro©CSTtCOrHr-
voooNTfVDrHr-m-H©inr-^vooNtnes
rH   C
CN
co      tnONcStn©vocSTfcScoTtoNrHT-<TfO\TtininrHr-.
r-      t-h      rsco      rscs      eo          cSTt
oo r>
CO vo
1
j
i
j
i
i
i
i
i
?•
j
f
i
*o
tQ
i
^
Tf
i
<n
0
T%
t
c=
L.
1
o
0
2
M
T
3
i
£
CCl
a
X.
U
CJ
0
C.
rt
■x
X
U
<
2
w
:
3
0
i
X
U
tr
a
m
3
*[/
"cj
■e
ft
a
TJ
3
CJ
OJ
o
CI
3
3
C
s
OJ
OJ
1-
1
]c
"|
O
r-l
r
0
tr
t
O
ja
o
t<
a.
c
TJ
OJ
C
Pi
OJ
rt
U   v
X
1
3
0
CO
c.
G
O
u
■G
B
U
co
Ih
tu
TJ
TJ
OJ
>
rt   o
SI
3   •§
§  «
rt
t/
e
c
H
Q
J3
i
0
l-H
o
i   *-
1 £
X  cc
»o
ffi -°
.    «
o
o
I-I
-D
rt
CJ
u
TJ
1  o c
•a ^
i,  »   OJ
rt ° t<
+3 JD   OJ
T.
'c
3
1-
<
3
is
o
*£
S-§
3  rt
rt  c
mm
c
c
3
X
t*
c
c
J3
u
re
a
c
o
c
§
c
T
1
TJ
cti
3
Q
Ih
C
E
3
OJ
5
3
s
•g
0
3
C
a
3
c
3
ffi
1?
OJ
X
3
H
c
l
5
5
a
s
s
G
rt
1
S
rt
$
1
s
a
1
p.
X
t
1
TT
1
rt
Oi
Ph
G
CO
►->
m
.
 Z 124
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
I vo
1 cs
CS           I     1     I     1     I     |     1     1     I     I     1     t     1     1     I     |     t     |     1     [     1     I
1 CS
IIIX 3PEJQ
i   1   i   1   1
1 ^
| in
m                      ;;.;:■::           i     ;     ;     :     ;     ;     :     ;     :     i     :
m
1 ^
On CS
.            ,     ,     ,     ,     ,     ,     ,     ,     ,     ,     ,
, _,
IIX =PEJO
i cn
m CS
oo         1    (    i    !    1                              1    1    1         1              !         1    1
ti         \    i    i    i    i    i    i    i    i    i    i    i    i    i    i    i    i    i    i    !    i    i
1 °°
IX 3PEJO
! ! ! ! !
j cn
1 o
cs in
ON CO
8   M 1 1 i i 1 II 'II ■ 1 II 11 M 1 II I
IS
1  CO
1-1
ts        i   i    i   i   i   i   :   i    i   i   i   1   i    i    i   i   1   i    i   i   i    i
i cs
j m
r> cn
©           1     |     1     1     1     !     1     !     !     1     j     1     1     |     1     j     1     i     i     ;     !     1
i o
X 3PEJO
Mill
1  CO
1 eo
rH ON
£        1   i   1   1   1   1   1   1   II   I   1   1   i   1   i   1   1    1   i   1   1
!<^
	
1  Tt
VD ©
y-              ,.,,,,,,,,
1 VO
TS
XI apEifJ
i i i i i
1 eo
23
no      ||i             1  M  1  1  1   II   r 1   1  I  II  1  1
cn         |    1    1    1    1    1    1    1    1    1    1    1    1    1    1.   1    1    1    1    1    I    1
vc
1 CO
a
.c
1 ■**
On On
co         1    l    ;    |    I    !    (   -|    I    |    |    1    1    l    l    I    |    1    1    I    l    I
1 CO
s
CJ
ci
IIIA 3PEJO
! ! ! l!
i Ov
1  CO
ti in
rH   CS
CO            1     1     1     1     1     1     1     !     1     1     1     1     1     1     !     1     1     1     1     1     1     1
1  CO
IIA 3PEJO
1    1    1    1 vo
Mir
ON  VC
m r-
co
Tt t>
ts         |    i    i    l    i    :    i    l m    1    i    j    ;    i    i    i    i    l    i    i    i    l
CS             !      1      i      i      I      1      1      I ON      1      1      i      1      1      1      !      1      1      1      (      1
CS           1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1 i-H     |     ]     1     1     1     |     1     !     1     1     1     |     |
in t-
ON  —l
rH Tf
ISS"1?
in m
;      vDtSTtovOv    ieorS©T-Hco©cor^©    : cs    'OvOcnvo
ON  Ov
u
<
ft
IA spEJQ
Tt   Tt
CnrHCS            rH        |TtCSinrHrHT-lCST-HtS        jrH        j            CSCS
r- r-
1
Tt   Tt
eo en
I co eo tn vo
On On
l       TfcSmvor^    lOtnvorHcntnTtr^rH      cn    iTfvococn
m m
A 3PEJO
CS CO         CO
On On
Tt    Tf
1    1
COrHfS          CS       iTfCOrHCSrHtSCSrHCS       IrH       1  H fN| H  H
On On
cn en
1 r- VD Tf On
NO   VC
I      ©TfvoTtm    iinrHcoT-HincooNr-m    i co    imr-Ttr-
On Ov
AI 3PEJO
CS CO        cs
in m
Tt   Tt
|    j
m m
en cn
© co vo CS Tt
T-H cn T-H        cs
r-1-
i      cscscsr>cotsoNin©TtT-Hi-Hcotnin©ocoTtTtr--vo
CSrHCO          rH          cSCOrSCSi-ICSi-HT-HCS-HrH          nrNH
o ©
h-H
III spEJQ
00 oc
Tt  Tt
I    |
CO CO
cn cn
II SpEJQ
ON Tf Tt  Tf  Tf
cs cs      cn
Tf   Tf
j      Tfr>T—incoinesr-inesvotnT—TfesooestnooNrHcs
COrHTfrHCS          eOCSrHCnT-HrHcnCSCS          tH          M  H <S  H
NO   NO
©   ©
m m
j    |
55
<
r> in rn cn ts
oo oc
!      cntn©incsr~-T-HtS©T-HTfTtOTr--©r--©ONcninNor~-
NO vo
ft
I apEJQ
rn tS       CS
ro cr
m m
i    1
TfrHTfT-ltS          CnTfCSTfi-lCSCSrHCn          rH          H(Sh
Tf   Tf
U31JBS
j i | j j
i     [ j j j | 1 j 1 j j 1 j 1 1 |, | 1 j ]
I   i
5
-jspurij
i   i   1   i    !
1   1
m OO On t-h t-h
NO  C
en m
00          COONCSTtNDC^inr--rHVDONeOONl>OTtCOinCSOTfCO
Tf   CS
m
souEpiranv
Tf  rH Tf  C>  rH
CS VC
en on
cs      cocScor>vot^cx3TtcSrScOTf©ovc^r^©inc^
CO VD
^i?Ea
rs t> Tt o on
I> cr
rH tS
Tt           Hlf!NiHrfitf)xV'Nri|^CA^COTtoi6d6itlfir^
r-      ONr^r^NDcsrHoocoi-Hcor--ONTfONMrHvocsoocsONTt
in on
>
CS   VO  in   CS   rH
ON  0>
rH vo
m cS
1-H   T-H               CS
r- m
NO  ON
Ini-HrHrHT-HrHCOrH                      T-H            —1                                         rH
Tf ©
<
ft
CS   TJ
T-H
CS"Tf
■S
nmr-HH
oo m
© in
in      ooinONNOcsvOi-Hr^ovcaTfcoor--TtcSONeocor^©vo
ii
CH   CS
rH  00  NO  rH i-h
o ©
CO  CO
vo      oncooocovo      ©OvinincninooTfinrHcSrHTtinincs
z
<
•3
3
*-<
Tt   Tj
HCS
co m
CO                                                                     rH            rH
*o
9
in oo in © cn
©  00
CO  CO
t-H            rH|>ON©CSCOONln©CSCO©CO©ONCOVOONCSTtTtln
no r-
H
Z
%,
i-h oo On t-h CS
CO 00
CS  Tf
r>      rHTfONcoo      oovcooOTfinNOVDr>i-Hcn      Tfr—mcs
oo in
B
V\
0
m
m m
HCS
eo in
CO          rH                                           rH          rH
co cS
HCS
W
s
hH
o
3
"rt
VD   T-H   CS    rH   Tf
CO ec
CO  00
no      ONCSooNDTtTfOtsoNOcscocnr-eoinincs»nrHTi-i-H
eo       OcjooovOeOi-H--.ONcoTtoo©Tt©cocSNDfSoocn©in
© VD
Oh
cs r- vo rs cn
CO ON
in r>
CO  NO
o
H
HH            CS
On On
CS"Tf
ND  ©
r-            CS            I—            rH            cS-HCn-H            rH   rH   rH   rH                                         rHrH
NO   CO
tS   Tt
w
|
Ph
TJ
o
OJ
3
.5
>
G
O
O
Pi
O
^
<
O
45
j
•Si
00
i
u
co
K.
g
TJ
G
rt
0
§
"n
p
<a
0
•ft
<n
tr
Ph
P
3.
Cri    Cu
'   3
0
VI
3
5 .5
r\   ^TJ
^  rt oi
g3
G
O
in
I
CO
I-I
B
C
o
Ph
s
3
O
CO
c
0
«
CO
Cfl
a
tr
o.
a
D
tr
c
c
1
CO
c,
o
H
^
3
i
ffi !
SS
3 2
OJ    OJ
CO T
V
M
C
ci
r-l
C
2
3
CO
ll
>i 0
rt a.
g2
oj <•
3
C
t
o
TJ
3
<
3
C
E
CJ
PC
3
rt
X
C
C
0
4
C
-
>
c
3
C
0
1
CJ
3
:
U-
>
CJ
*CJ
3
n
rJ
.o
tt.
TJ
c
c
3
5
'ci
n
T
a
u
>
a
Ti
3
a
hJ
X
"c.
PL
>
CJ
e
3
re
-
C
OJ
3
aj
£
s
aj
0
X
I
»-
0,
c
rt
|
re
P-
-s
3
C
1
Cf
t-
OJ
c
t
o
CO
CJ
_3
o
C
Cf
>
aj
3
rt
H
X
JZ
01
3
C
i
g
pq
cc
~c-
C
2
3
CO
tr.
Is
o
H
OJ
v
0
3,           S
 —
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 125
I      !      t      I      I      1      I      I      I      1      I      I      I      I      I      I      I      I     ,'      I      I
i   I   II   i   i   i   II   i   i   i   i   i   i   i   i   i   i   i   i
O  VO © OO  CO
CS  ©  Tt  OO  CO
1-H   T-H    T-H   CS   1-H
I   II   I   I   I   I   I
■> CS On
" On r-
H   CO   T-H
r- cs en vo © m
rHTti-HrHTf    iont-hovcS    i t in    |ij-HcoeorHTtinvoeo»nooeSe
cSTfincSrS    IcSTfinrH    i co eo    iTfr-eSeocsencSeSoorHCSt
© cs Tf Tf cn m i
o cs r- o On
no in co r- oo
CO CO CO ON CO
O co tr- r» in co
CO VD 00 © NO CO
CO Tf CO Tt NO CO
>inrHcoTfesintnrH
..lOoeor^oovoinrHco
cninrHCSCSCStSi-HNOrHrHtS'-'
in no r^ On no
vo oo oo On co
rH  rH  rH  Tf  tS
ts in o\ o vo co
co m i-h cs Tt rS
rn cs CS tS en CS
ONTttSi-Hr-©i-Hoocnc
cnoocnoooOrHi-HvOc
CO rH  rH t-h rH  rH C
tninincorHVDONr--voinT-Hi-HcocScocoe
TtrHNDcnrHVOCSVOeSONTtrHOOlnCOCOe.
rHrH rHcn -n HH cn i
CS CS '
oo vo en en Tf vo
m in O en on ©
t-h cS CS cS en cs
i-HCScnoocncSONCScnvocncS©votnONTtTfcn--HCoOvor--rHcScSO
rHOvTtoNONes      esr^inr--i-Hr>enrHr^ot^Tfesincs©r-ovcocSC--
Cn rHrH rH HH(S rHrH HI*) T-HT-HrHrHT-Hcn rH
Tf © ON 00 CS
On Ov vO ND Tf
m cn cn © Tf
O t-h CS cn © On
Tt i-h cS m tt cs
cn in Tf Tt r— Tf
iONOtso©voincor-inoNvomeo
" l Tf CO VD rn - ■ ■ -  - - -
CS CO Tf rH
' ON ON Tt m CS O
. , ~  _. . i oo cs r- vo cs co
COVOT-HCSCSCSCSrHC-T-li-HeSrH
is
00 OJ
.ill 8
I %3, ">a 9
j:lhw w     ji
ffi   t  «   1   8   3
* q o -c 3 g
•g
«
5
*j i
S a
eb rt
•Srx
H Oj
~   01
5 .2? s
la
« ffi
.a °  V
rr1 i*s   rs
,.. - -^ 3>Bh
»5S?2' ai
H > 3 C > w ."3
a o jb rt £ n> x
S u
..Ph-
'2ffi-
'rt £
S u s
rt   O  +j   ** X   G
j-Bt.-d'PP'flWMo
m *5 ojjTj  (j^rj.'H
TJ  >> > £ <g 5
CJ    (A
Ex
O   M
00'rt tn   rt
£? B
»
O ,—' J3  Hi  ,S  J3    3    r-
•^S*SS--^o§
gi.ac§Sm(§o
I 2-S s g^Sfipq
Oi  C  oi <s £ o u    .
rt  oi p —  « OH
oi o
ffip<
gu5SZ?S       "<<pq«oOUOQQawEOOOOffiffiffi^i
1 §
9
OJ
fa
ojl
»L*3°
ifflS
3  ■ w
»  *  HH
W « C
oj co •"»
 Z 126
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
IIIX 3PEJ.O
!
Tt
i
,   ,        .   ,
IIX 3PEJO
II   II   i.l   Ii   1   1.  1   1   Ii   II   1   1
1  NO
if
NO Tf
I I i 1 1 1
IX 3PE-IO
II II 1 1 II II II 1 1 M II
i r-
I  CC
t> On
On in
vc
1 ! 1 1 1 I
■     ■ ■ ' iii
X 3PEJO
Ii II II 1 1 II II 1   1 1 1 1
1 t-
C
Tf On
cs
I j i || I I I I
ii	
.,, | | . . ,
XI spejQ
II Ii 11 II II II 1 1 1
1 ©
CC
in eo
oc
,
IIIA 3PEJO
II II M M M 1 II II 1 M
(C
VC
Tf cn
ires
1   i
1 II 1 1 1
r>r-vOTtTfcs        i©         icst--ON-Hcsor-
OV CS CS  rH O CS       !       |  CS       |       1  CO CS  rn  CS  CS  © rH
e-
1 Tt      1      ! OO      1 VO      1      1
IIA 3PEJO
On tr
| m
| CO
| CS      | rH      |
_
_
CSeOOVOtnr-     loon     |     loOT-HOONOOtOTf
NO vc
■    ,
ONt-ONTfNOOvr-NOtS
IA spEJO
VOmCSrHONCS       jCSrH       |       1  Nf P) T  n  tN  00 ri
CS CN
Tt  Tt
'    !
TtCSl-HrHCScHVOt--cH
cnoorHcocsr>inTf\o   :     ttminHHinov
.
A 3PEIO
csmeScs©rHinenrH    i    j en cs cS cs cs oo --h
Tf   Tt
m tr
1    j
meocST-HcorHinin
0\eScnrHinvooor~-oo     1     1 vo © CS in i-< Tf on
1-HOCSTttni-HlnTfrH
]     r-TtcSrHcocsmvorH
AI 3PEJO
cncnencScscsmcn               I Tt en Tf ~ co r- rH
S3
1  !
cninr^rHt>inrH©vo©vDcscnincSTtvorH
TfTtcscSrHcSC^cncscSrHinenTtrncSONCS
T-H   T-
III 3PEJO
cn cc
i   |
oomrSrHcsrHinin
CS   CN
rHTtTfrHOcOCSTtCOVO00r-enCO©OONTf
VO VC
II SPEIQ
TfincNcnrHcsr--cncSrHi-HCSenTfcocnr--cs
t- t-
00 OC
1 !
COTfrHrHCSrHNOOrH
,     .
I 3PEJO
voincscsmcn©TtrHrHcseoeoincsv-HNDT-H
On On
|
ONcncSrHcncnvovoT-H
CS Cn
uajJEg
||M|||||||||||  |T|
Tf   Tf
j   ;
1 M M M 'II
-japnrx
I   i   i   i   i   i   1   i   i   i   i   i   i   i   i   :   i   i
1
I  1  1  M  i  II  1
r>cococorHcoinTti-Heoo\i-iON©>nr--T-Ho
m Tf
o*
TtOCOrHVOOrHNOTt
VDNDinCSONinVOCSCS
3DUEPU3JJV
inmcsi>ooNmooNcstncSTtoNNOTtooo
cs r-
rH  VO
c-
Xirea
vor^©ovaNcsiOrH(»csONVDinooeSTtONin
VD Tf
Tf   O
CS cs
Tt in
3SEJ3AV
COCSrHT-HOrHtOCSCS                  CSCSCSrHrHlnrH
m tn
Tf   CS   T-H            rH   T-.  Tf   CO
T-H  so
rH  t—
^
NOTtOOVOr-ONT-HVOtnr>©i-HTfrH-HtSTtOO
r^enoooor^c--r>ONi-HCScnrHOrHCOooinin
in tr
CO  rH
HH                     mrHrH                     THrHrH                     CS
cn cn
NC
CS  rH                  rH          CS rH
•a
o
m oc
o
c>Ttooi>cso\corH©cscnvorHincooocsr--
m o
r> On
r-
rHcSvotnONintn©eo
w
rHrH                  Tf          rHrHrH                  i-Ht-Ht-h                  m
cn 1—
ir
CS rn                        cS cs
m
VO   ON
'a.
^H
r^csrNOcnor>NOcsinT-Hvor>vovorHco©
m tr
r- on
sr
Tfcoeoini-HTtTtcSco
P.
i-h r
cncSi-HrHOOrHcntStS                   CStSCSrHrHini-H
rH   NC
vo VO
Tf   CS   rH            CS   rH   Tt   CO
H
cs r*
TJ
CJ
3
G
o
o
G
o
"o
XI
T
Hi
tn
M
■a
rS
§
%
1-n
ai"
a
d
&
fc
H
lit a
0  1) c
9
0
X
0
C
3
0
B
c
1
CO
u
"C
IH
s
•^   B ts
k 5 co
ta C   CJ
QlS
S i
a £
oi T
c
C
%
CJ
tf
u
u
c
p.
1
rt
s
o
ft.
•r
CJ
IZ
K
JZ
c
OJ
u
t
p.
TJ
c
OJ
x
3
CJ
x
B
>
rt
p2
a
cn
•s
>
5
OJ
K
E
u.
c
0
g
V
3
CJ
rC
3
C
CO
ffi
>
CJ
&
g
CO
OJ
>
3
3
3
CO
1.
3
QJ
5
u
3
Cf
J
tt-
f-
*•
u
X
F
SS
■s
3
T
it
V
c
«
X
'1
3
o
I
9
ci
"re
c
2
3
Cf
if
rt
T
Q
1
■a
s
Ch
_o
§ a
rt
"oj
Q
&
•H
o
V
0
C
2
3
CO
If
3 3
3   C
01 <
9
>
re
PC
>
re
X
I
PC
> a
CI
0
C
T
X
c
ffi
>
p
c
1
3
C
V
•c
1-
R
ft:
01
9
u
a
r-l
W
T3
S
C
o
Cj
m
u
F
H
r—<
Q
w
Ph
O
b
p<
<
1
D
co
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 127
ON Tt
eS co
CS   t-H
I t-h        On t-h On
l vo      cn o r-»
I   T-H CS  CS   T-H
I  i
r> oo r-
Tt m cs
cs eS m
00 CO
r- cs
t-h cn
vc cn oo
vo m Tf
rS CS en
ON ON
CS cs
en en
m    i co co m
•n m
ON  ON
VD vo
vo vo
On On
CO CO
VD VD
cn en
On On
VD NO
© ©
cn cn
© o
Tt   Tf
cs cs
Tf   Tf
en co
CO  CO
cS cS
I   I   !
I   I
!   I
O co ir-
co On in
CS co in
tr- Tt oo
00 ON
CO CO
CS eo
Tf   tr~   rH
Ov in On
vo no C-
■I   CO   ©   Tl   Tl   ©   Tf
CS co Tf in co eo
Tt cn
en CS
tr- en
© m
t—   T-H
rH   CO
en vo
cn en
Tf rn
en ri tn
tr- so as
cn en en
inrntscScnc«eni^cocjNCOrSOvocSrHco©TtinooT-HCOcSCTvcs
OieoONCr\CoenenrHcnT-HTtcnTtoocsco©i-HTfvovocScSONi-Hcn
t-Hi-Hi-Ht-H CS T-HT-HCStSCSCSrH rH
On CO
cS cS
© Ov
m i-h
t- On
Tt en
ONi-HTtininovDONr~-voinovenoovor^-HtScocnoNOrHO©cn
i-HTtco©ONinenrHincsincncni>Oi>ONOocovDincSTti-HtSTt
CS CStSrH CS rHrHCSeSi-lrH rH rHrH
oo tr-
O tS
on r>
CS CS Tf
■n i-h m
r- r- co
Ttcsvor-ooooONVomtnen
Htriovr- ooVDcnONTfor>t--
Tf      Tf cn cn Tf rn
oocoTftSrscoi>i-HONrsONtn
- csinONONCoeSeSTtvoOeor/-
cScoTtincoeO       corn       cSrS
>     r2
SL   ii  Tt    o
a> vi  if.     i   rt
S«3c?S
2 S o
3 cu 3
O   vi
coH
V
TJ    cj
8«
9
S3 A
Ci   00
A .2 A 2
.SP p ss
ffi CO ffi   S
o cs
PQ0H
rt
S   Ci  |
3
; oi o
co 12 oi
I 3 c: 3
i   O   01 -3
■So
o 3 oUffirt
J   8
."2   CO
- 3 *n
a's '§
OJ  3  -
i   i «; rt
*cS^
|<! pqpqpqUQ
oi
a
•g S 11 ig ! s 81       p
|al|QU3 = gan°   §"'§>,
^2H3c3l??H^OP!il
3
r.    fa    «
Saa
:9  .«
= c°
 Z 128
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
in
IIIX 3PEJO
1 m    | cs
g        j   !   j   !    j   i    1    i   1    1
lit
co      ooor—Tfinr^oor-rH    ivo    l
t-h       cSoooO©incooOi-HCO    Ivo    1
ON         CSt-hcScOt-hcOCSt-hcS         CS
IIX 3PEJO
vO On tr- t—
Tf           CS
3
'
ii m i i
.,,,.,,,,,,,
IX spEJO
m      Tti-Hincooor-i-HcSi-H    ivo   ]
r-
<i
CS
CS        CS
vo       eScScStSr-cSeocSco     icn
CN
cs
1    '    !    '    '    '	
vo      ,>eSeOcnmt—moomenovo
IS
i en
Tt   OC
X 3PEJO
00  CO  CO  CO
CS           CO
co      Tfin©i-Hcsr^Tf>nONTtr~oo
r>      rHcocnTfcScncntSencsenrH
rc
o
CO
i ! M M
©      inovDTfrsr-ONTfOeSTto
On        ooTtcor-cooovCcOoOTtNOfS
in       T-HTfcOTfcScoeorSTfcOTfcn
cn        Tt Tt
rH            Tf  NO
cn       cs en
Tt
oo r-
TS
3
K
XI 3PEJO
m r- cs Tf
CS t-h n
©
NO
MINI
1               l-HTt©TfTtCOCOONCSVOTtin
i>rHOOTtTtvOTfinooinvors
IIIA spEJQ
ill!
cS cS
1     1     1 vo     1
s
!      i-HincnincoeococScoTttSco
c
Tt
Tf  Tf
CO
CJ
NT
Tf  NO
O if
r>    I     IrHin    ;     icScn    I     leo
IIA 3PEJO
MM
On m oo    iNDi-HTf    i    iTfTfin
I            cSco    :csencs    l    lenrsen
o
2
oo in
en tS
3"
CO     |     1 vo t-
i oo r>   ]   i Tt
m
u
z
<
vovOTfTtr-ONOONco    icnrs
IA 3PEJO
|w-
Tfr>ooincoNOvcr-r^    i vo Tt
A 3PEJO
I l l I
1         1    j    1    j    |    j    j    i    j    |
1 o
1 If
Ttt-T-.es©ON-HoovOT-Hvoin
enoor>Ttr-vDoor-vOcovoTt
Q
Z
W
H
vOvOT-HOvO©vo©covOrHVO
TtooooTtONvovor-r-Tfvotn
AI 3PEi-0
i j] 1
1 If
H
tiii
1  CC
ONTtt^-HcscomTfTfcStnin
<
III SPEJO
Mil
1 <f
coc-ONTtooinooONinTfTfTf
f3
II apEJO
I r-
|    Tf
cor-ooTtoo'OONOincorSTt
<rj
1 o
Tfi-HvooNcoovi-ivor-Ttr-o
Q
ill!
1 vO
mooNOcoooinONOTfcncnTt
W
U3JIE3
I    i      coooTtr-ONONcooinTtrs
inoooNTtr^t--oocoinvoTtr-
O
-jgpum
ill!
i    i i \ \ i ■ i i 1 i
«
CO          NOr— VOCOVDOOOnONOOi-HCSNO
VO   rH
w
in co i-h co
CO            NOONi-!©00©rH©VOl-HinVO
C
en co
CS On
T-HotncocSNDrHcSinvo©cs
^iiEa
vo       oorHinr—ooONinONcoinOrH
NT
Tl   O0
>
<
cn i-h cn On
P~         OM>OOrCiMr*-OMNlNr<
Tt
On Tf
Tf cn
CSTtTtcoinTtTtvOTtcScoco
*"■
OC
CS
p
3
CO  rH  oo  ©
r»      rHvovo©coTtcovor~-tnmrH
r-
r> t>
Tt m
OOCSTtOCST-HONt^rHtSONTt
r^
cs c
z
<
■a
0
ts m i-h m
in      inovONONr-ONOoincovoootn
Tt
Tf r-
CS CS
rHtscscscocsescocsT-HrHrH
OVVOOl/lrHlAlOIClOQOIOVO
H
z
en         TtNO©TtTtCTvCS001--©CSON
in      inONOOr>o©inONi>rHtn
vo cn
On t]
en ts
a
PQ
! r-* ts m
Tt
©
in co
cHcSCScScocSCSencSrHT-icS
w
a
1
©      NOTfONTtT-HONONr--cncnr--cn
c-      invocnrsin'*oONtnoor-co
©              ©ONON©Tt©OV©COCOONl-H
O On
ON  CN
r-ooTfincoNOincSrHOTfo
o
CS  CO  CO ©
ex.
© in
VO   Tf
cointnTtvoTtmvDTteScncn
H
rO            HlHHciHfNHrlrtHHH
r>
CS
o
*
z
W
fa
O
>H
-^
P,
0
j
<
X.
3
u
H
S
60
c
ON
en
6
9
>
2
D
to
3
rt
01
a
>,
H
01
*C
1/1
s
9
o
O
o
O
o
X
CJ
c/5
■St
£  rt
1 t *
■S.sw
ffi.sg
SaS
1
bl
i-
c
CJ
c
a
3
5
01
1
1
tr
~
C
M
3
CO
i
00
ffi
u. ci
.9  3
3   tt
01  cc
C/J ±
oPh
3
C
V
C
E
c
T
TJ
">
«
Q
a
c
c
V
1
5
r
OJ
c
3
X
c
1—
>
OJ
3
CI
S
c
3
e
5
0
|
pp
I
a
Of
OJ
c
~T
C
OJ
u
3
X
ft.
2
I
L
s
c
1
5
3
c
CJ
I
CJ
h
0
t
"c
h
g
3
C
CJ
3
rt
>
CJ
OJ
9
OJ
TJ
3
*5
C
X
3
CO
>
1 B
ffi.S
Ih   °
u
OJ
D-
Cw
3
H
Th
CO
j3
u
CO
V
c
2
3
CO
u
£
'•a
W
i
e
5
Ih
O
3
3
I
c
u
1
a
>—
lH        OJ
a *=
G  C
8<
13
1
>
>
P2
J*
c
c
U
9
OJ
E
rt
r-
3
"rt
1
0
D
CJ
1
c,
OJ
0
u
3
CJ
c
(r*
a
rt
0
R
3
G
3
O
rt
T
a
X
U
4
3
C
C
c
TJ
>
rt
c
4
ti
C
aj
e
-a
c
h-
TJ
>
rt
C
E
I
CJ
c
c
>
rt
0
a
S
OJ
CJ
u
c
OJ
0
w
Q
I
a
CJ
5
)
P-
i-
c
1-4
3
I
a
3                                    3
CO
TT)
r-l
W
W
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z  129
lllll
1     \     1     i
|     | CS     |
00
NO
c-
1 in
l m
1 ©    i
1"*    1
1       1   i-H  ON
©
NO
vO
ON
Tf        |
© ©
cn ©
Tf r~
vo r-
en co
o ©
t-h r-
in in
vo r-
cs r-
cs cs
T-HNOTtvoTtTtT-H-HcsocstnTt©ooinr^©fSTti-HTtvo©vDcnovci-, inincncso>i-Hooco©©cncSTtr--ONNDooi-HON
inr^occ»>nr>coincnONcnoor-vo^ONNOr-r-.cn-Hj-r^o\©vocsini^
rH    rH   1-H   CS    rH
TO©Tt©vocn^ONOocoi-HcSONCOrHONOONenTftncocoONincoinOTtcntnor-r-csin
4o>r^rHTOr^Tt>-HcS©cnvor^in©>^©.n
N^-tinMvoTctcoinNwvoooNaiNCOMinfnwotNvovoM
r- © o
©   VD   in      ,.-;■• -..    -    ;    -.        ■,■■—.        '.-.'-'.      ~     " „    •■■;-■;.- ••    •    .    ■■    ;■    - .    -^ ■■,,■—_._      ■   .      .,_    .._        ■.-;•„•„        -       -        1        '   ■    "   ■
o6in'rHC^ese>r^rHTOi^Tt"-"es©envDi^.^
eSOin>r>a>r--TtincfivDTtooincNc»vocoeNcj\r^ooc»inenM
TftnvOTtcnoOTfccr^invovor^TfvooOTtTtr^cSenTtinvocnONinTtTtincoi^
on in
•n 00"
t-h cn
00 r-
cn©©OenTtTtvOi-HO>©inr^-Hcn©vDONeSTtcoa\ONineoeN©Ttin©TtONr^
T-HOeoin©©cscoTt©TTvocoTtONr^vo©coTt©r^©in©OrHcsincoinotncSi-HcovoTti-H©o^
CScococSCStncSTtTtencncocoeSencncScSTtrHcScScoeOts^encScStSTtTtcnTtcSTfc^
      ,..._.    _ . ■> on vo 00 r-
         ..........     . .  . .  1 r- On co CS tn vD CO co On Tt t-h © t-h cs vo rn on O i-h
iNcSTfeSesincsinTtcocoTtTteseoinrScSTfT-HcScSeorncsincotse^
Ttinr-OTtOTtomr-voocoi.
ineocSco-Htsr—r—csvoincSooTfi
Tfint^inTt©Tf^covor^i>r--Ttr-ooi
cn On
© tn
© ©
50l* g
<S8
O     rj     JJ     U     M
11,0000
.2  c j3
rt  oj -tr
„ Sjp
5 s »
I rtf. ^
rt X ? C
01  01 .N  rt
►H-SjrtH-X^rtSrti-    iXX--^rt
° .g$ 8s» o-iJaS CO   :a<wgg
■o0JrtOOOOOO055£53333
™«0'irt00O00O0SS««33
ffiffi^^hja-ja-jhja^SSSSaa
s5
Sg
T    3
3  S
a 3;
la-:
O ci 3
9 3 O
>. rt   g
, . .. s 0
£ « 0>u
9
o£
rH    C5
J  rS
_flj TJ
if-sg
(H    9  T3
-3 m
S Sfl
J3   rt   o
"S2
00
.9 >.==
o  »   B
a-§£
3 *rt .-3
1/) jS p^
QO>
a
££
rt a "3 x; m
3 3  C  CJ rt
3 3 3 e m
%feXi  I rt
..Pun
f^/rv^> <° w ,c-.a .a .a .a .a -a -a -a .a .a .a .a .a .3 .3 o « ><
UVPhWOTCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOIZICOCOCOCOCOHH
Cfl
H
O   w
3   O
 Z 130
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
IIIX SPEJQ
cS
c-
j
rs
Tt
T*
Tt
Tt
i
HX SPEJQ
s 1   i 1 1 11 1 !
rH                           © Tf
eS                 co i-h
CO                           CO Tf
Tt rs         ill!!!
Tt sn         I     i    I    i    1
r> cs          ll          ;    1
IX 3PEJQ
©   i       ill       ii:
r—
co    i          1    i    [    '    1    |    1
©                t-h r-
r>               r> rn
CO                           Tf Tf
oo vo         !    I    i    !    1    1
0O On            1     i     1     !     1     :
00 cs
X aPBJ0
vo    1                                            i
5 1     1 1 1 ! I-I 1
NO                           CO  rH
1   Tt                                      T-H   ©
• Tt                 Tf >n
Tf On          i m
rn cs          i m         i    l    :
On Tt            : i-h
ml            1     :     1     1     1     1     1
in    1         1    I    :    1
XI 3PEJ.O
1 vo           1.   1 -   I     I     1     1     I
j cS                        i
I m         I    1    1    1    1    i    1
1 vo
i rs                  ii
i m                    ii
cs       co cs no m t- r-
1 NO        CS On Tt tr- — CS
CS   rH   rH   CS   Tf   CS
O  rH               I       .                       Ill
coin          i    i    i    i    I    i    !
Tt CS            i     '            'II!
IIIA 3PEJQ
, cs          ,    ;    I         I    ,    I
; in         I    l    i    !    I    l    l
m               .i         ill
; cS                      ,i
m
in                    i    i
m      on Tt © tn cs rn
vO         Ov f- CS On 0O t—
rH  rH  rn  CS  CO  CS
Tt m         ill::!
Tf CS            1     ]                  *     1     1
IIA 3PEJO
1 NO         VO     1 t—     i     1     7 ov
1 CO       cs    l vo    i    1     1 ©
1  CO                       1               1       !       1  rH
eS oo                    ii
©  CO
rs in                   ;    i
;    i      m — Tf nd m t—
I       1           —  ON  Tt  ND  Tt  —
i            cs — t-t cs cn cs
co m        1   i   ;        i   1 m
t- On           !     1     1     )     1     1 VO
en t-h         i    i    i    i    i    1
IA 3PEJ-0
i    ;      cn r- ih m cn on cs
1     }        CS On On On CO co eo
© ©                    li
VO VO                           1      j
in m                  i
I j    1 .j 1 j [j
> eo      rHcncooocsoNO
ico      vomvowhHin
A SPEJQ
On Tl
CS «
Tf no O in rs
) t— r> co co On
O ©                        II
Tt  Tf                               I       |
■■©     co r-Tt cs nd r-no
ivo      Ttcsooor>©c-
AI SPEIQ
1      1         t-h cS 00 rs NO 00 VO
i      1         CO ON NO O0 ON CS CO
CO CO                               !       1
00 oo
Tt  Tt                               ||
i                   .   i   .   !
l©       T-HONenT-HcncSen
|Tt      oocor-cor^coco
III 3PEJQ
l    l      co m it- cS on r- cS
cs co i> r> oo rs t-h
O O                        II
Ov Ov                           II
Tt   Tf
ivo     r- cs r^ oo in r- Tt
co      tn co o\ on co oo r-
II apEiQ
i      o © rs vo r- co Tt
Tf t- r- oo co Tt eo
r- r-                  ii
CO  CO                               11
m m
•      i   i .1  !  f  |
-h      cnrHmmcscScn
;en      r>TtoNCScorHoo
I 3PBJ-0
i    1      r— <n Tt r-- co vd Tt
I     |       Tf Ov t> t— oo eo ©
cs cs                     :
mm                 i   :
! i   I-i 1 1 II
i ©      m © on c
I >n      no cn © r
VD © Tt
00 CO ©
U0J1C3
-rspurji
1           CO               1
i   i      ;     oo -
souEpuauv
Aired
33BJ3AV
1,085.99
1,339.86
213.14
503.62
480.00
461.70
484.20
198.65
717.59
3,058.90
5,484.75
1,126.19
1,323.87
2,450.06
1,013.19
593.83
657.22
383.82
782.19
1,068.79
669.38
4,155.23
945.89
360.69
191.52
544.56
624.21
455.33
547.37
502.98
jH
o
3
a
cn
'a
3
Ph
a
5
enoo      TttnvocnrHvoin
oncs      ©incncsinONO
m r-     i-Hcstscscs     en
O   T-H                               Tf   CS
Tf vo                       CS CO
m oo               so so
rt  CN
NO©         OO t— CS NO r- NO
©co      i-HTti-©Ttm
enTf      encncSTrmcn
2,186
461
201
101
309
307
224
262
256
CO
o
pq
novo      Ooor-mcsr-Tf
i—i co      csvoooNor--i-HON
no r—      i-HcsescScSrHco
co m               © Tt
CS  1—                          <^\  Os
t> ©                 m r-
rn en
TtTt      on in oo © r- on
oo tn        i—< no On co cjv in
cove       encni-HTfincn
oo©       TtrHin©©vom
novo       oo o o vo in n co
csm      rtrHcocncscocs
cs
"rt
O
H
Ont}-       TteococococooN
©NO         CS CS CS CO CS i— NO
CSTf      eSmmTtmesr-
CO   VD                               Tt   NO
NO CO                       rt f-
CS On                    CS Tt
©Tt       r- cs © no Tt in
On t—<       eni-HT-HcnTfi-H
NOrH          VOr-TfCOrHt--
CS  rH                                           "
Tt i-h      mcsTtr-TtoorH
mcs      oo o i— vo r^ r> Tt
Tt©      coesNOvOTtmm
Tt   rt
0
O
X
ci
W
•3
3
rt
ai*
3.
>.
H
Ci
[A
a
•V.
CD
£
s
&>.
•4
cu
*  c
<S      V
* s
^       IH
5 S
5   !
3 a
3i
>
OJ
«
s
1
c
>
1
£1
>
«
IS
i   °
T-
CJ
L
C
CJ
C
CO
C
c
a
X)
o
Ch*
C
'>
"a
l-
5
E
V
T
OJ
CJ
OJ
tZ
a
a
PQ
o
V
C
x>
3
•r
o
District No. 41 (Burnaby)
•B
5
o
CO
>>
V.
C
1
3
CC
T
G
aj
u
>
rt
G
i-
T
P3
1
-G
c
S
c
1
tr
tZ
0
OJ
ffi
X
ffi
0
0
c
o
0
3
Ch
a
Ph
3
c
OJ
a
c
i t/
•c
c
1 o
! B
i *a
11
1   6
iffi
£ y
rt c
51
A*?
G   >
%
g
1   3
P
a
CJ
Cf
>
It.
cc
Ph
-a
o
o
ffi
V
1
s
ffi
OJ
•a
OJ
1
3
•a
rt
O
«
u
rt
Senior Hi
Junior Hi
Elemental
F. W
Herb
John
Lord
Lord
Queei
Sir R
S
Senior Hi
Burn;
Burn;
S
Junior-Set
Junior Hi
AlDh
a tS »
U   Ch   3
3   rt   01
CPUW
T
a
9
4.
3 M
gi
u
tS
<
11
PhU
W   2   "X
UUQ
T3
<sj
S
.K
K
O
g
m
u
TT
<
p
z
w
H
H
<
-I
<
P
m
a
2
pq
P
<
z
w
s
o
Oh
Z
m
o
>H
<
§
D
tf
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 131
Tt
L>
j   Tf
Tf
r vo
ON
!   i    i
! ©
CO
i ©
1  Tt
ON
OO
O
CS
' CO
On On
1 Ov
m ir
i   1   i
1   Tf
es
1  CO
I in
©©
©
r- t>
Tt
00
rs
Tr
1  r*
1 f""
On VD
m
! vo
OO 00
tr-
: t-
1 *"
1-1
r
ir
1    ■   i   l   .   1   1   I
Illir-llcot-IIIIIICSIICSIIllO
VO On
'; <*
O ON
On
Q
O       !       1       1       1       1
1     IN     1
r- t>     1
n
r*
1 CO
r- Tt
co On
CS    Tl
r
cn
I   i-H   rn        ,
CS      1             II
INDcOOn     lOvTtOONO     :TtCSTtTtTtcSOv©Tt            Icoon
CO VD
coovcSONTtr-rtcoi-HcSvo
t- rn CS     1 CS On no cs
rtTtr-enesr-Ocnvo    I
t- m
CS o
T-HrHrtCSrtCSTtTfCS          Tt
NO   t>
m    i ti co tt-    iinONrtTtNO©ONco©NOcscsoNr-vo    iTtoo
VD vo
cnTfONcn©i-HOOvooTtTf
rtrttscscscnmts      Tf
r-
OnOnCS     ;eor-r-r~-eotSTtoocnrSONDeoNOTf
vo vo
m  rH
r- oo
oocncortr-    icortONCSrtmTtcscs-HrSTtONCSmONCOcs
© ©
ONr-vomoo©-Hr--wvort
cocoi-iOTt    icoONC^r>corHrooococooor~-rS©TteSr--co
r- -h
rtrHCSrtfSTtTtCS        Tf
ON ©
—< rs
TtONCSri©NOo\r--inTtoNmoNCSOmooTfcooortmeot--
rs oo
1
vOrHcsoNOmvocscnO\i>
© CS —* rn q-TfcoONCSr--coi-Hco©cSeoOinenr--vocor-co
ON cs
CStSCSCSCScnNOrt        Tf
©    T-H
1
CS cs
mcocococortcscommcoi-Hrtco©ONONr-©ONTfcoeocS
CO   Tf
rtcovoeSTt©rt,_icsesr-
ONcnoi-HmTtTtONrtcocni-HmcoTfcsOmmNOTtTtONON
© co
i-HTrti-HcntSenTfincSrtTt
CS cs
cs rs
On on m oo rt m
CS rt
eoineooNO\ON©oe
rtCOmrtTtCOeOCS
en co
rt CS © t-h CO rt
Tf   CO   VD  Tf   CO   ON
rs rs
rs or
©mcsoNTfmcscsvDTtr-
rtrtrtcSrtcoTtmcs      cs
ON CS CS © co Tt
m co
-H    f-
rH   t-H                                         Tl                                                                     rH
es rs
cs rs
vO     I     I     I     1     1     t     I     1     I     1     I     1     1     I     t - 1     1     1     t     1     I     '     1
Tt   Tt
ON
CO  00
1     1     1     1     1     i     !     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1
i    :
vDt^Tfco©tsOrtTt©r>mcSvocsvooNCSrtmcoTtoo©
co ©
rH If)
ON  CO
l>
TtvotnONinmrHcoONONON
eSvomm©cococoNOrtcocoTtrtmco©eocsa\r--esooo
©  TT
vd G
NO  C
r> c-
Tt On
© l>
Tt
OO
© r-
c^ CN
0O  f  CO  O  O"
O   Tj
vd©NOl^rt^c»©enrtco>cnt>cS
TToomcococNiu-iinr-o
i- y »i >cu ii ^ i^ «j ^r m oi
Ttrt©m©NOCSONrtCOCO
fSirt©rtCOCS-^OOrtONOOONTtCOr^COONrtTteOeOTtTtCS
"nrHNOvocSrtcSmvOTtrH      cSTfrtrtinTtcsTtcSi-HTfin
tn r-
r- o>
•n cs
m ts
NO
T-t   ©
Tl   CS
CSCOrtVO©00©r~-©CO-HrtOCOCSCOONCOOOONCSCSCSON
Tt r-
S3
r- Tt
rH
voeoininOoocooNr-cooN
ooinco©^mcortcsi^©mTtro©omescSrtcSr--Ttvo
-1   Tt
VO  Tt
CS rH
Tf
csvomvomcoi-HmTti-HCS
cs      en cn ti      i-h co co es >--      i-hcScht—icscSrHcSrH      cScS
NO©
mvoONONCOTt©NOoocovoroTtmTtc>ir--vOT-HcoTtvorso
CS  CO
© ©
c; "■
CO
vo©r-csoovorsvooNcn
r>vDONcocor>©ONcSTtONTtrsr~-oooNrs© cr, Tt eo r- eo on
m oo
© eo
cn
csvom©voavcSmr-rtfs
CS        cSeOrt        rHCSeOCS              <-h CS              eocSrtCSrH        cStS
CO  i-
«r
CO  r-
en ti
Tt
•>Tf©moors©eocoNor-TtTtcovomNOONONCSvDooTtON
mcscoTtTtcocortTtrtONONNOrHoooNcocsinvomTtr-.tn
inrtvovocsi-Hcsvovomrt      cSinrtrtinTtcSTtcSrtTtin
vo m
S3
On in
Tt
cscorsr-©coONrtcoi~-rs
CS  ©
vo r-
Tt
incsT-HvOi-Hr-m-Hcseoin
Tt  t>
vo cc
m cs
00
^J1"
4)
■8
ft,
CS
l
s
IN
-c
-ch
rt
~-   oi
J=
c
OJ
o    01
-  Pi
CC
C
[
c
4)
§
>
<
■c
c
3
5
c I
C3   rt
is
Oj
£
>
<
rt!  «
00  OJ
3 fc
gco
V
i
V
C
>
c
t
t
a
(
4
c
c
OJ
>
c
CJ
1  a.
Si     C
3*
s
!
0 u
V
C
V
r
cj   r-
•-   a
1   §
« s
1
1
i
'i
T
6
1   ~
1 a
a
(f
1
C
c
X
c
a
c.
a
3
c
tf
k
«
T
1
r
I
U    T-
c
t/3
K S
2 *
S c
53   a
.1. «
> -c
O JZ
^ t;
rt C
tAt-
yndhu
[aribo
lorley
lelson
arkcre
iversic
iverw;
osser
chou ;
econd
perlinj
tride i
Jss
o  t
e
.2? c
S»
IH    t
or High
Maple ]
Pitt Me
Sul
gS.2 I
oi rt .j- a
<Sn.c
Golden
Hammc
Haney i
Maple !
Meado\
Mount
cn   ft)   v
3   > <
•3 cot-
.s
OC
rJ^^rCpHpHpHp:
co to co a
wH!>?
'9 s
01
OJ
173
5
3
l->
U
 Z 132
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
1 r*
On     1     1
0>
1   ON
IHX 3PEJO
MM
i "**
Tf         |
Tt
M 1 Ml l/i J i 1 1 ! i i i i j j
i  Tt
1 On                    vo CS On
t~-             1      !      !      !      1      j      1      1      1      1      1      |      1      1      !      !      1      I      1
i r-
IIX aPEJO
i i i i
1  CC
t-h m t-
cs        i   1   Ii   1   1   1   1   1   II   1   1   M   1   1   1   1
IS
IX 3PEJO
On                  eS cS co
i ©               m vo Ov
cs        i    |   |   i   ;   ;   i   ;   i    i   i   j   i   |   ;   i    |   ;   i
1   CN
1  CS                          rt
cn        i   i   i    i   i   i    1    1   1   1    1   :   1    1   i   i   i    !   1
; co
1 00                       rH t-h f*
 ,   ,
1 On
X 3PEJQ
1   CO                               00   00  Tf
1  CO                          CS          rt
©              I        i 1 ! I 1 I I 1 1 1 1
i °
! m                Tt cS no
1 CS
TS
tsj
a
XI apBJO
lii
U-l                       rt © CS
1 en                m t-h cs
Tf
00           i     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     i     1      1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1
1  Tf
: OO
•S
IIIA 3PEJO
l cS                 Tt co r-
! On                    CO CS On
ON               1      1       j       I       t      1      1       1       1       1      1       1      I       I       1      I       J       1       I
©                  I!)!
1 On
i <=>
C
o
O
ffl
U
z
<
p
z
m
1      I      1     1      1 _  1      1
1  cn                           cn  rH rH
r~        i    i   i   i   i   :   i    i   i    i    i   i   i   i   i    i   i   i   i
1 tr-
|   p^PJcSi  |
Tt vo                  oo no vo
O            lOvVO           1                        iTtcS     irtcOTt        On     'CS
oo         imvo         |    ;    |    l    jinTt    j Tt r- no    |m    |m
m in
HA 3PEJO
ti tn                 Tt cs
Tl  os
no r-
Tl  NO
1 m On 00 On © t-h
ON On                        1     1 m
m       r^vor--invoi-HOO©rtrt\OeocoTtvovo©     ! n
IA apEJO
1"    "<"~<"
O ©                        II
Tt   Tf                                     II
TtvotscscscoTrcSrtTtcsr--cor~-t--      vo    ion
00 00
r- r-
ts co cn co m cs r-
r- r-
: in
csvo©o©ONrtcoeor~-TfrtcSNDTtoor--      r-
ov 5
r- oo
A spEiQ
in t-h      cS rn cs
© c
Tt  Tl
CO  t> CO  CS  CO  O
Tf   i-
N rl-  rri  CO it  Vfi is          vn          r—
On
Tt  rt  VO  ©  ©  CO  ©
m if
csinrtrHcoeo©mcsinTtTtcscomr-i—
AI 3PEJO
Tt            rt   CS   rt   CS
r- r-
CO  tr
:   i   !
mr^cocsTfeovDi-HrHTtcor--TtNoco      r>    j©
r- r-
oo oo
H
H
<C
><
rH CS o\ CO cs r~- o
as Qs                  ill
tnmONTt©inTtcnvocoNOenr--coi>vooovoco
TtONTtcsinTtvOrHrscnTtONTfoo©      oo      oo
CO CO
III 3PEI£>
Tt                CO rH cn
rs o
Tt  Tl
i    i   i
© s
CS 00 CS vO ON 00 On
oo oc
i   i   i
t^l^vofScSc»voencoTfr-TrtcsmovOOoor>-H
inovTfcoTfmir^csrSTtTtovvocjooo      ov      n
© ©
II SPEJQ
NO  rH rH  CS  rt  CS
r- r-                     :ii
J
Tt   Tj
© o
<
1 m rH rt m 00 VD
CS    tN
i    i   i
rHt>>r--CS©ONCOTtCOONr--TtCOTfmOONrH©
00 oo
P
W
I apEro
1  in  rH  rt  CS  t-h  CS
Tt T?               i   !   !
VO ON Tt  CO  Tf  Tt
00   CN
eomTtONmoNONi-HCOi-Ho
-=—
U31IES
iil
;     j     |     i     j     I     |     j     ,     ,     1     |     |     ;     i     i     |     1
o
-japurjj
1 1 1 i II !
11 i i i ! i i i i i i i
Tt © © vo Tt r- ov
m CO                    CS NO On
r>      i-Hco©i-HOrtT-HoONmovcnvDvocooorHtnin
m tS
w
SDUEpuSJJV
vo Tt ti in Tf i> co
t~l OO                          NO  Tt  CS
co      vocor-r^inr^TtTtmrr-r>ineso\vDinOeScs
ON  CO
^nEa
33EJ3AV
od oi Tt cs* © od Tt
co vo r- co © m
00 1-
ON   CO   Tf
r^      Ttococ^cdmvOrtodcSrtm'cso'cSeomtSTt
on r-^
>
r— CS                    On On CO
r>      t^eciooTtrtcoTfrtrHi-Hinr^coirtTtTfoocsr--
NO Tf
CS                                 Tl     Tl    Tl
Tf  rH                          CO  Tf  vo
<n      csmcsrHcscsenrtrtcncSTfcsmm      Tf      vo
CO  Tt
p
CS Tt                          t^
cs"
in cd
•3
Tf On m On co CS NO
•n ©                  © m CO
co      oocnTtcnrtC#ovin©oocoONVOcovoTtincort
Tt CS
CS VD
Tf co co o in oo
OO   Tj
© m oo
tr
cor^cocoes©t^mvovorsrsmvor--csr--rHTt
z
<
■a
5
rH                   rH
cS i-
rt cv
r- cs eo
tr
T-HCSrt               Tl   Tl    Tl                          rHT-HCSrtCStS              CS               CO
O co
eo" Tf
"o
i
cn
m O CS On On © t—
CO  vc.
Tt   NO   ©
e
voescS-Hot^coooc«©cSi^Tt©Tt-Hr~-i-Hr--
moNvorr-rtcooNmvovoTtr^vDONrtcSmi-Hoo
© o
z
1
m co ro oo vj_i r-
Tt   C
co ec
rH cn
tt- On 0O
co CS en
CN
If
r~ On
rt N rt         t—I rt rt                rtrtCSrtCScO         CS         CO
CO  Tt
ffl
a
3
"rt
On On r— oo cs CS co
Tf    VO
Tf rn cn
oc
TtmvDTtrtmcScooooo©vooco©mtSTfoo
ONvooNmcoTtr--rtcstsr~-©csmoNTfeocSfS
csincSrtcScscoi-Hi-HcocS|ncomin      m      r*-
Tf   CS
tU
ON  VO  O ON  rt  NO
rs t.
Tt in vo
if
On in
I-I
o
c<
g
CS
NO  T
CS t;
in m r~
oc
CS  rt
NO*" On"
z
w
Oh
■a
OJ
o
3
Eg
>H
n
o
^
C*
o
9
s
<
o
TT
J^
i
CJ
CO
3
i
•a
3
ti
5
O
D
cn
CJ
a
01
9
0
a
-ch   Jj
a .5
■gVoi
&L*.
Q rt ->
3 2
%
c
X
0
OJ
s
s
3
s
ffi
3
C
cfl
Ih
OJ
c
c
o
U
ih    O
OJ   o
*" 5
JO   0
§
•a
a
V
a
c
-6
3
CO
Cf
0
0
H
s 1
■a A
M CO
HH J.0
Ch    C4
OJ
3   o
01  3
So
>
tj
c
c
T
B
"3
0
0
0
Ph
V
Q
C
2
3
CO
|  c
>H        ^_
a oj
32
V
c
'oj
ffi
3
cc
3
<
01
1-
OJ
E
u.
c
c
Ih
PC
OJ
>
•-
CI
OJ
u
t
u
3
c.
5
>
n
T
OJ
5
O
u
C
u
rt
Pu
a
T
a
rt
>
T-
Ci
S
OJ
X
'v
S
>
•a
0
o
s
is
OJ
>
3
"5
c
s
T3
a
c
TT
>
TJ
i
■a
1
3
R
4
X
*a
rt
tf
rt
a
X
a
la
CO
TH
a.
s
Ph
OJ
_>
P
.5
X
c
t
>
Ih
OJ
TJ
3
rt
S
<
o
CJ
>
V
*C!
C
S
3
CO
c
H
u
a
TT
UJ
i-i
m
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 133
co eS
© m
co eS
i i
tn      oo ti
CO   so Os
CO     T-H
CS     Tl   Tl
Ov 3
co r- oo
© cS ©
CS CS CO
co On
Tt O
t- rt
rt ND r-
O Tt m
cs cs cs
CO oo
-1 Os
cs cs
CS Tf
r- co
rt CS
Tt no i no m v
tr- Tf
Ov On
CS CS
cs cs
CO 00
Tf Tf
eo eo
Ttr>©r^vor*-Ttmvo'OTtONONC--mTfi>Tt
Tt  Tf
On On
Tf   Tf
mi>ONr*-coi>mTfONONmrtcor--cScov
CO CO
VD VO
m m
On On
VO CS
t- ir
es NO
cs m
Tf CO
ON Tl
rt NO
in vo
© ©
l> Tf
m no
00 T-H
co CS
t-i       rt o cS
i-h   co m On
t-h   vo no vo
CO ©
r- On
On Tf
it>VOrHl^TrtTfmONTti>NOOVrtl>-inTt
ino^Ttasr.encntr^ooTten'oocoriost^'dicn
r>NOror--mmmr--TtTtONCoinor~-NOTtNO
coencoeoeoTtt>cSTtcocSmmTtr-cSeocS
cn oo
co m
O -n
© © ©
TT Tf ©
00 CO CO
i-H NO VO
rH On
CS no
© ts
TfcsoocnONOO©cSoo©ooovNOTfcnooTfi-H
ONOOTtONCOCOONTtCOONTtCOONONCOCor— CO
rti-HTtrHT-HCSeOrtCSrtrtCSCSrtCOrtrHrt
CO ©
oo co
cn cS
Tf 00 V0
cn m t-h
CO CO Tf
00 On
ONCSvoTtr-eor-ONOOrtcocoONTtNor-Ttcs
ocSinrtcoc-OinTtovvDTtrHcoTtcocom
CStSTtCSrtCSTtrteSrtrtCOCOeSTtrHrHrt
ND cs
vo r-
CO CO
m On
cn ti
00 00
m cs cs
r- — Tt
vo r> i>
iin      TtTtovTteomr-eOTfenenvovOTtoocseocs
1  NO
O    Tl
r> CS
CS CO
OO CO
vo tr-
.£?£j-j
rt Ti o
cjQZ
.S3 ^
rt   M
o ffi
•is
CO    Grl^
CO   M.S
itf
s in
rt  0
i m 9 53
•e1? I
■a
tS 1
'Id
oj co fa b r
W rt   3
rt rt oj ih £?
soffit   nas
s a
rt   rt
OO
alii I OS ill |S 8
owffi^jcjzzaapicSiD'?:
5 >
CJ *j
.a £
q i
oo orj'O £
K S « «
rt " 3 oo
u u tS d
o o K i-h
 Z 134
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
IIIX 9PBIO
On
es
IIX 3PbjO
CS                    On rt
o
Tf
1  ©                   00
TT                      ©
	
IX apsJO
I ov                 co m
1 ON                     NO cs
CO
oo
1  00                   ON
! oo            co
~
X apwo
NO                     Ov CO
--                     vo CS
On
l r-           vp
On             ©
XI sptuo
Mill
1 On                    VD eo
1   Tt
On co                  ||i
I w
IIIA 3PBJO
i I I t j I : i  1 i
r— co
r> cs
m ©                      |     j     ,     ,     ;     :                :i
O Tt          l     l     ;     !     I     i     i     i     l     l     l     |
ii?        !
,_l
VO  rt       I        ;   rH
IIA »pwo
CO CS     1     1 Tt     1     1     1     1     :
ON  C
Tt        1
TfNO               II               III           CSrtT-Hll
m v
IA apeio
©COCSOOTf       lONCSTfTf
no sr
mcSeocoTf    iT—r~Ttoo
O C
rt          Tf       i           r-  CS          rt CS
1    T-H
rn   t-
A apeio
mcococovo    !r-ooTfr-
CO  rr
CO       1                   —          —•  CS       1
CS    (N
ONOrtrtNO          ©inTt©
COCOTtCOTf       1  CO  ON  NO  t--
AI spsio
m if
Tt                      rt   Tl   T+            CS
NT   Tl
rtCOCSvOVOrt©mONO
III ap^io
NOcSTtTfTfTtr-r-eooN
co co                   I    :
m                 cs      — tt
NO   NT
—
""■'   '
II SpEIO
©cor-csTtcoTtrtr~-CTN
© C
rt OS Tf O CS rn rt ON in Tf t-
CO oc
—1 ^-
m if
ISpEIQ
mcscoTtTts,-vor--Ttr~-
© ©                    ll
m                    CS        — ro
m if
U3JJBS
i    1    1    i    l    i    l    j    1    l
-ISpUT^J
i i i i • i i i ; ; i i
On
vOrtmmovrtONTt©vo
THTl                                     Tf    Tf
oo©      NOcso©TtcsmmrtNOini>
m ti
oo
*n«ci
NtTtgNTtTtmocSrtt--
1-H©©i-HrHrHCOr-VOrt
eocscscseoi-imTtrSTt
CSCS            T-HTfi-HNDrt            TtTfVOOOr-
cn
©   If
CO i-h
Tt  r-
On tj
eo in
3
r--csmcSTtvocooNCSTt
moNrH^mvococsmrs
vD©      vor--r-covocsvort — ococo
in —
00 v£
tr- m
cs r—          ti      co          rsoocoTfoo
cn C
Tt
O
—   O
Tt©cor^cSoooocSNOop
oort©cSl>inooTtcocs
Tl   Tl   Tl   Tr   Tl               CSrSrtCS
^
>.
SS
t- vo
Tt vo          cs t-h in          cs tr- co m ©
—   CN
cn
w
ts
m oc
(0
— c
a
3
3
rtCSCOONVOTtrtr-OOCS
enm©TtTf©ocn©vo©co
cn if
00
COCSeSCScOr-lnTfCSTf
cs o
CO   rn
Tt   «-
ON  If
H
CO If
T3
OJ
3
3
3
Q
k      \
0
<U
«    i
1J
tC
•a
3
0
CO
a    !
c
Oh        i
OJ
^
a
H
_CJ
GO
Q
1
"n
if
ci
3 1
Jb >■
CJ
8
01
W
X
1
<3
=
ra
u
0.
a
■c
ci
TJ
OJ
u
I
o-
ra
CJ
I
5
OJ
C
B
3
c
5
s
3
.3
>
O
ffi
J*
Ch
rt
Ph
3
O
cc
j§
O
aj
13
>
ra
CO
o
u
tfl
OJ
17
c
1
CO
B
O
H
District N
Junior-Senior High—
Elphinstone     .
u
3
0
JO
Ti
a
ffi
Ih
V
"a
c
s
>
cc
fE
■?
3
«
I3
1 *
3  o
Sec
E
01
«
>
rt
co.
&
3
•E
T
a
Cfl
>
rt
CP
3
C
O
b
3
TJ
3
rt
h-J
L
1          Ti
«
'Ph
S  rt
3
O
d
CJ
i—
o
V
>,
rt
K
c-
01
>
3
V
C
JO
V
C
o
.    O
5 a
13
3 3
4
s
Ch
O
■a
OJ
CO
0-3
OD tfl
TJ   oj
2£
■3 "» =
3         ffi
°                IH
Ph         0
I
w  O
rt  ex
DW
O
1
5
.5
>
I-
Pi
dirt   O
i-1.<Ph
OJ
•g
Ph-
CJ
.3
oj
OJ
CO
>
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z  135
if
i          i          i          i
cs
i    II    i    I
i
j
i 1
1 oc
r- vo
rr
1-
i «
	
© ©
1 c
r^ c
r—
Is.
m  rH
1 V£
l
rt rn    •     ■     |     |     1     ;     ■
r- m
CN
1     1     !     1     1
1   CN
NO  rt
cc
,_, ,_,	
•n CS
c
!               1       1  rH
Tl   C>
cS
ill
1   !   1   1
IT
o
in cs i-
O
m cc
oc
rH   ©
r- cc
tn © t-
,_, ,_,    ,           	
tS Tf
ND
»n cn
iii
l-
r- ec
i     1     1     j     1     1     1
Tt  If
j r- m
O if
If
1  rt CO  rt
i cs
cs
CO oT-
CS
i
r ll r 1
VD On
VO ts
1  CN
i> 00 OO      l©Tt-HOO©rt      IVD
co m
1   CO  Tt
i   i co ts   i Tt co r- no
O cs
ON
o-
cs t-h r* cn
m no
cs cs
i   i            i
'""
1 r-
inmcoTtvor-©inTtmrovo
co m
l Tf in
oo r-
Tf   CS
NC
cs    * m Tt rt
1
Tt Tt            cs Tt no en t-h
Os C
cS eo
r
r> c
m rH
CC
i c
mrSmcotSfScooNVOcoTfr>
_, ,_
: © o
rH       IrHt-rtON^Or-rt
CO  CO
t»  rH
Tt m Tt
CS cs
TtONmcSONNOTtcocoooeovo
r^ cc
; tr- oc
CO c
t-c
co cs vo in t-h
m Tt            co Tt co ro t-h
Tf   If
ON  CC
m i—
1
1       1                       1
r-
Ttr-Tt      cscomNor-rsinr>
3 m
1 t- ec
in m
ON CO
cs
CS     j rt NO cs
TtTt           T-HTfCONDCOrt
1           rt  CS                          Tf  rt
m r-
vo
! CS
-H©TtTtrHCJveOrtin©CC
r- o
' 00 O
m vc
CS      i  CS  NO  Tf
CN
mco      i-HcncnoocSi-"      t-h
rt  CS          CS       1 CO  rt
T—   lf
m r-
"*
M T_
cs
1    i    t    I    l
i i i i i i : i i i i i
i i 1
vo
Tf CC
ovTfOvcocoesr-vooNrtov©
coovTfrtc»TtooeocoTfcn©
as
CO CO Tt
TtescooovOinvoTt
CsenmcoinTfTtTtNO
If
O rt © CO cs
CO m
©  ©   ON
ON  C
rH  T]
NC
© © co eo m
On VC
csvoincocortTfrtTtcor-cs
(S r
Tf   Tt   VC
O Tf Tf t-h cn
CS OC
cS r
If
cS cs            cs tS en rt
r- o>
CS rt i-
rt                cs
NO   r-
m r-
r-
•n cs
© c
Tt   Tt   CO   rt   f-  COCSTtcOTfCSOO
i-HcoocScSOO\©ONcni-HCS
m o
VO CO o
c
m t-h in m Tf
CS o
CO C- VC
Tt co      cs      cs rs
© r-
o<
0O  Trt
cn
ONr-NOineoeoONeneS©N©0
en r-
VO G
rtCOCScHCnrtcnrHCJ^Tt          Tf
r- nc
m co vc
Tf   C
to
Ov vC
eo NC
CO   i—
Tt
cs oc
fCi-OvvOOvO-MriTjijooS
CO vc
On m t-
r-
rt  Tf  CO  rt  Tf
00 oc
VO r-
eor-rscovo-Hcortcot-
CS CS                CS CS Tf t-h
CO  OC
CO —
00  NO  CC
CS   r-   r-
i-h co Tt      Tt T— r- m
r-                cs
m Tt
nd rs
Tt  0C
NO  r-
OC
■n        ON CO rt
ti  cc
i
i
"^
C
t>l
k,
<u
3  o
£
R
TJ
cr
TJ
C
3
rj "O
O
*■
oo
Tt
O   3   c
h*
oj-V?
Tt
1
0
•2 A ^
tfl
%
1
1
fC    DC  0
O
00
f  ~
M ffi
i «
c
■^
1 5 ffi
J3
•o
rt
■»
ffi
S.S
CO c
i *
mentary—
Blubber Bay .
Cranberry Lak
: >
>* cc
Xt   P
rt v
OJ   5-
0.-2 -=
rt ~
Pu
IcW
Ov
b
j
t
TJ
c
4.
c
rt
r
P
ft
Cfl
Ei
0 o.
JO  J.
Hf
01 ^>
1 ?
■n't
E
-
u
rt
■3
CO
If
r
C
jt
tr
V
c
—
c
c~
"1
Q
•S. »H   Ih
cc o c
ffi   3  C
"    OJ    -
S"?T
St I
oj  rt   re
■£e S
"H    OJ    Ov
■2 fi F
-
B cc
3 s
h
c
c
TJ
C
i
L
PC
CCS
'3 S
3 c
5 ■»
rt o.
■3 o
COO
0
£
co
5
2
B
2-5
01 "c
■2 £
E  3
01   c
Cc «
3
I
5
CO
a
*r
C
|
Cf
*rt
T
in
3
.9
'3
o> c
CO   c
c3 t
+->   cc
3 X
ri
a
J^
ci
<
Cf
"rt
C
i
Cf
3 c
rt »—
C   >
a
"5
PC
c
1
£
c
c
jr
"3
cr
I
ra
2
u
g
B
i
i
tr
i
OJ
rt-
a.
W
rt
ft
ft.
w
UJ
UJ
 Z 136
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,
1961/62
IIIX »P«0
1
1
: cn
Tf cn rn
00
1 CO
.
> '
©  i
HxspBJO
1
cn
1   !   i
CO
i «
* i
IX3PEJO
CO
Tf   Tf  NO
Tt
1 ■**
CO
Tt
©
1   Tt
1 o
ON       1
«n    1
1-1
!   Tl
1
1 CS
© VO  Tf
O
1 ©
Tt
CO
1 CO
© rt
X apBJQ
Tt
CS
] ts
r>
i r*
00
1
*H
1    1    1    1    III
rt   Tf
cs co in
m
1   Tr         |
rt NO
rs
|  NO
1 vo
r- r-
TS
ou
XI spsJO
00
1-1
cs
CS
i CN
II ! 1 ! I i
1  r-
1 cs
cs
3
•S
rH
CO On
Tl   Tl   Tl
CO
I    ; cs
cs »n
00
i   i   i   i   i   i   i
m m
IIIA spEJO
C
T~i
cn
cn
la
1   i   1   i   i   I   1
i 5
1 cs
CJ
W
U
© m
cs tn tn
rs
CS        1   Tt
vo 00
Tf
j vc
CS CC
en o
IIA apsiO
1
CS c
CS n
Tt
Tt
i cs
1 \" Is 1 1
CO  Tj
cs
r- ti
IA sp^O
,_
Tf  CO
r- cs r>
NO
rt rt CS
Tf   O
t-
cs    ; cs © cs 1-h m
cs cs
i """
CO CO
CS rt
Tf
Tt    ;      oo en r^ cn
NO VC
tS cs
—
<
Q
Z
CS CO
Tt ov r~
©
;    j no
VO VD
•n
CS     IHCOOhh
m m
| CO
A speio
'
CO  ON
cn  rH
VO
VO
in    |      Tt eo r- cs
CO  CC
CS ts
ts
in co
VO  CS  ON
r>
CO  CO  CO
ON vo
,_,
Tt    i «-H r- r- m on
CO tr
I in
w
AISPEIO
CO Ov
CS cs
in
vo
*"■
CO       |          VO Tf  VO  CO
m tf
tS cs
H
H
CS
ON CS
en rt vo
©
|    Tl   CO
Tf   Tf
CO
CO O CS CS Tf rt rt
CO  CC
[CS
<
III apeio
CO  O
CS rt rt
m
m
tn ti      tr- Tt oo Tt
©  ©
CO cc
1
I
II apBJQ
m
NO CO
rt  Tf VO
^
tn Tt tr-
vo r-
tr-
r- cn cs O oo in cs
r- ir
1 "**
Tf  r-
CS  rt  rH
vn
rt vo
:
VO              Ov eo CO Tf
es cs
co ec
<
^H
in vo
cn tS VD
_,
cn m rn
On ©
as
O oo    l cS co On r-
Tt  Tt
1  CO
Q
ISpEIQ
m t>
CS   Tl
Tt
rH
Tl NO
VO            1 On vo ON m
00 00
CO  CO
1
rrajjreS
r-
NC
o
-isptiiX
<
Pi
»n
ti vo
VO ON Tf
On
© m vo
Tl   ©
3
*n r-
Tt oo t-h vo o m m
On n
oo o
aotrepnsrjv'
av
r- co
CS © en
VD
© CS rt
Tt   Tl
Tf On
00 CS Tt C-; CO CS ti
Tf On
rH f;
38E19AV
T-H
m ©
©" co' On
t-
o cs" in
tr- m
Tf
VO" ©
vd r> oo' co* in on ©
Tl   0C
co" CO
>
1—1
Tf   O
CS C5
O  rt  CO
CS    Tl
§
HHfH
vn no
Tf
SO
CS n
tn vo
On rt        cn co CS tS
rs           Tf cs Tt cs
Tt r-
so^tn
CO Tf
Tf
<
Q
Tr
rt" CS
■9
m
m m
© CS rt
CO
vo oo in
On fS
CO
r- ©
ON 00 Tf CO rt l> NO
oo in
Tf OV
ti as
CS NO Tf
ts
cs m
co
m t]
Tt          © m co ©
m m
m ti
z
<
•a
aj
O
I
s
rH   Tf
CS
rs
rH cn
T-i                CS rt CS rt
co ec
cs
© r-
© NO
On co in vo os i-h in
H
>.
o
"n On
ti m
On C— m
cs
rs
cs
CO   NO
CS
eo
©  CO
cs cn
in rt        Tf co Tf co
cn r-
Tf CS
cs
z
w
CO
*•
'a
a
ts
m cS
C— t— en
r-
Tf m oo
r- Tt
ON
00  CO
CO rt ON Ov © CO rt
so r-
Tf in
♦3
vO Ov
i-h cn ov
Tt
tt t-H cn
VD  Tl
VO
in r-
©   fS            Tt   ON   r-   Tt
CO                      Tf   CS   Tt   CS
On eS
On Tf
8
cS ©
CS rti
Tt
tn
cn no
r— oc
rt r
Tt
o
Z
pq
Ph
TJ
O
OJ
3
=5
0
|
3
0
o
15
•C3
cu
&
eu
<
o
M
X
"J
3
2
i
CO
■H"
K
8
Es
en
»n
i
9
to
§  i
1     i
CU
CD
3
H
fl
Cfl
cu
CJ
o
*! 1
0
J) 3
£ *
S y
"Oi    ft  n
-    «  e
1
a
c
S
a)
o
"G
^   =    3
*-   CJ    .3
1 I
5 A
§1
OJ
>    3  5
Sis
Q Cccs
ra
p-
,c!
s
tf
ra
C
■C
3
CO
cr
15
c
h
C
ra
X
"S
to
TJ
3
If
c
-C
3
CO
ra _:
"3  Tl
>
■5
a
w
r
175
a
CJ
E
CJ
0
1-
V
C
Cf
« .2
Q  g
|
C
a
E
—    0
1 CO r-
3
□
'5
—
C-
r
■J
ra
V
0
c
cc
"5
5
c-
q
oo 3
at
Ch .«
sA
3     1
OJ  ,1
°? o
Ih t1
.2 S
3   C
coh
I 1
oo e
II t-
o c
*  tt =
UJ       *-
t*     1
1       ^
311
C" rt
rt  3
3  c
3   c
so
>
JE
c
w w £ u «
|ScS5
O
Ph
s
?n o y u
WW AcPScn
u
OJ
u
a
a "c
01
c &
COrt,
H   3
53
«
ffl
W
w
l-l
to
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 137
i   I   I
SS
rt m cn Tf cn Tf rt rt    i co cs cs
r-Tf rt t-Tf cn m \o    I xn    i cs
in      ovooowom    iTtr-cnOTfcn
ON On
© Tt
ts cs
©r-cSooNOCSeneninONcnTt
; cs Tt rt ov rt
COcnOQTfCSrtOOCSON
mcsmm©rtinr-rt
CS rt Tf rt
m Ov
vo vo
Tl  CS
en o
Tt CS#
oo' cs"
stz
NO O
in «n
vd en"
On ii
■r-cncsrtrtincnvortrt
On On
vo r-
VO On
CS NO
VO Tf
m in
cs vo
cn ov
vO O
CO CS rt VO ©
Tf © rt ©
CS   <n
r- cs
VO t-
cn no
cs «n
CO Tf
cn tn
ONNOTtr-VOtSrtCOrt
r-esr-incSrtvor--es
CS rt Tf ti
Tt tn
cn co
CS   rH
tM cs
-  OO rti
i co cn vo
• t-h cn oo
Tf rt
m ti
r> en
in cs
t-h cn
CS n
cu
E
OJ
Si
i .3    ,n 01 a «
i   §   E*   2  fe j3   3
>J23;>alcfl*3rtf,
I0lrtal.3OnCH&
)UWZC<rtw|3|3
in H
U    E J3
I   IK
S   3
—  ol
I ss
I   >-.  OJ
■SE
3  oj
la
is2.§
3 rt rt iJJ  3  tu
|0c-iSaH
01
W
5   ;
* i-
sis
BO >s
S   1
H   rt
.2 0
5 I
CO    .1
q cjiij
•§SE
Oo
>^        i~
oiCO
■a a"cr
•2 s oi j S »   .
O   H   U M   U JJ   >,
ci  *J -3  rt =3 j3 01
sw 2j3^|-a
Bh 2 Z O cc o5 H
ect        J3 —
a .a
o >C
 Z 138
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
j
IIIX SPB^O
i   1   1   !   1   1   1
-5   ; ;
MM
IIX 3Pb^O
m    :         ii
cs    I
1 1 1 1
i   i   1   i
l m
|<N
o
CO             1      1
1       i   i
M   MM
IX apttfO
Tf      i
MM
i Tt
i
o\        :
cs
CS            1     1
i   i        1   Ml   1
X 3PBJO
m c-        ii
MM
\9
CO
©
cn        i    i
t- o
r>   ;        l   1   l   j
1-1   1        i   i   I   i
1 II 1 II 1
r- vc
I cn
fS VD
OC
cs vo
00 ©
:   :   i   i   :   i   i   i   i   i   :   i
T3
XI apBiQ
m t—
1   !
i   i   i   i
i   i   ;   i
r-
CS O
1      i-h cn
3
rt
ri cn
Mil
1 i I i 1 1 i
3
-S
VO CS
I vo   j in   |   ;
rt ov
r- oo
m
•n cs
r- oo
: cn    |    ;
|    |    |    |    l    j cn
o
IIIA 3P«JO
NO   r-
rt   CO
Tf VO
!        -n CS
Tt
CS en
U
pq
U
Z
<
Q
z
Ov vo
CS     1 On CO Tf Ov
CS o
1        CS     !
CS
NO  00
Tt On
i cn    its    :r^             ivoooi-h
IIA apWQ
cn T-
cn oo
1        rfi     i
rr
en rn
;         j"    |         j    j    j      ~
l ts
CS CS rn ON Tf rt oo
r- on
ti On
O  rt
ITfcnvo    !©ineSrH©corH
IA apMQ
rH   CO
vo f-
ts CS
CS       1  rt  ON Tf  CS  rt  rt
1 On
en en Tt rn t-h m co
© ON
CO  ON
CS On
iTfTfTt       IrtTtONOOcntSrt
A sptuf)
■ri ti ti in
cn en
en
t-h © cn cs r-. cs
: ts
cs eo cs rt o oo r-
en m
Tf  O
Tt no
;oomm    irHrtcnooONOvrt
w
AI spEJO
CN
rt   Tl   Tl    rt   VO
CS   Tt
n cs
cn cn
CO
rt O Tt CS       cs
H
H
1 00
CO Tf m "t CO Tf On
cs o
■            ,     .
O CO
00  ON
C-VOVOOO     IVOrtONCSt-rtCS
<
III .apBJO
CN
tH            rt  Tf
O co
!     !  1
CS   Tl
cn Tf
CS     j CS © NO Tf        Tf
II apeio
i m
Tf co no m t- rt rt
r- cs
1            1     !
0O Ov
r> en
©TfONt-tOrtrtinovOvOvin
CN
n vo
ON  CN
i     1 i
Tl   Tl
en in
ti                   cnrHrtONOen          CS
K—1
1   ON
m co oo eo m rn m
oo c-
i        ;   i
CS   Tf
vo vo
©ooinrtrHinincoeSTtinvo
Q
pq
lapcio
O
rti        rt oo
(S  NO
!        1   1
cs cs
Tf  Tf
i-h             cnT-Hrt©\oenrHTf
U3)JB8
0
3
-japnyij
i      i  1
1   1   1 .1   1   1   1
no m
o m t- © r- © m
p r> r-; r- t> rn in
eo" vo* m" r- od m* ©'
Tt m
tr         Tl OV
O
on m
Tf vo
ONi-HOvenVOrHrHcnOVTf\OTt
pq
aotrepuarjv
jfirea
33EJ3AV
CS    Tl
CS CC
NOt c
t> a
m      co p
»n*      od r-
Ov
m
© ©
S3
TM no
t-" m"
tT Tf t> On cn cn On
co" Tt od Tf" in en vr
cn ov
T °i °°.
T 00 00*
cn vc
>
m no
CS   rH   Tf   VO   Tf  OO  CO
rH  CO
r-     vo o
r-
CO On
CSmcSONCSCOr-OC-vOt-rt
CS   T*
cn
NO C
m     mm
00
CS CS
t-h                  in m  rH          1-H
-<
Q
**
Cfl
On 00
oo on Is" r-rt cMn
vo eo
Tf        On
„
© CO
cn t-h
csmococnONr-incot—rtrt
cn oo
CS CS CS en oo
Tl   Tt
CO          O O0
00
r- r-
Tf m
rtrtrt©rtrnONVDCOCS©rt
z
■o
3
'""■
T-H
cn m
m      cs CS
Tf
Tl   TM
rt                          CS   rt                          Tl
<
"3
-
tl
Tt oc
NO On Tt Tt ro © oo
Tf   VO
Tf on
©        t-h ro
Tt
oo cS
©   ©
mmcsmrtcs©rtcSrHi-<ov
H
>>
Tf ©
t-<      cs Tt cn m vo
CO        © On
ON
t> CO
SO  00
rtcSrSOi-HinrtVO©TfO
O
co m
CO         CS CS
Tt
T-H                          CO    T-H   T-H               1-H
h4
w
PQ
"a
S
,_,
en sc
Tf  00  rH  rt  Tf  ON  cn
©   ON
Tf               rt   Tt
m
oo m
eo ti
r-©cscoTfrHr-voooocs©
Ph
a
OO  O1
cs i-i m r- m oo m
vo ro
Tl                         O      t-
r-
Tt m
©   CO
CSTfcOi— CSOn©CSOnVD©CS
o
H
cs —
CO
NO   —
C-*      Tt m
o-
CO CO
tS                  NO  CO  rt          CN
O
^
z
pq
Ph
o
>
5
00
p<
0
0
0
Is
0
<
|
■g    >
s
u
CO
CJ
cd
o
Ph
i
p
•o
3
cd
S. «
c >
•5
©
v©    O
<f
a
"°- •a
tN.
V
M
>^
.   cd
>n
CJ
1
H
5
g    Xi
1
<     CJ   OJ
tl o
.2P-
3 1
OJ J.
°? o
§§
1 «
3  tr
8 ;
3   P
E^
01
5
0.
CO
y
t
E
I
"rt
•c
o
o
■a
u
TJ
>
V
~c-
C
2
5
V
V
a
o
H
0
(5
c
CU
c
CJ
CJ
c
'£
Ph
i 2
M
Ch
rt
Ph
i*
(ic   CJ
so
§•
§
.a
ffi
V
~c
c
2
:
CO
i
on
s
Ch
o
3
ll
u a
rt rt
11
E E
a oj
c
a
<
OJ
rt
rt
rt
3
'co
C
s
T
e
Hi
I
CJ
a
5
|
c
%
!
3
c
V
CJ
£
3
C
Bj
OJ
J 0
1
s
is
0
AM i
SS|
sso
11
CO    X
8    r3
j-   CO
CJ
3
5
5
U    01
O 3
vj   vj ,_5   oti"»
OOg«i-
St 3 St
oo S,»<
UhUhUcKS
01 *   01 T
2 o 2 I
a >
^ N TJ
■^pc
CJ  J3    CO
E^  3
3  01  3
O   3  O
COPOU
£»a
W
0)t\
m          nm
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 139
VO     I CS I rt Tf     I cn «n
! CS eo eo      vo    icnTtcocoTf    : vo cs Tt on CS in    ivo    ', tn n tn
■ Tti—m   irtNooNONCSvor-in      r-tscnvor-   : m
cs on Tt — oo ro m
(SrtvOrtr^ONmrScOC-eomi-HTt
csoo en    : rn ro es-Hrtr-coesco'
lommrtvomr-TfrtT-Hmcortr-
osso     vocncnr-corHrt
Tt   ON
r-  ON
cn Tt
cs en
©   Tt
m m
CO VD Tf       I  CS Tf m
i tr-     tSTtmmovcsrtco
o r-
cs ©
r- oo
Ov On
co rs
t— oo
I i I I I I I
co oo
cn vo
© ©
Tf vo
r- cs  r-co Tt r-\o ov oo ©
ti ti     cscsentnm   cs
rn cn
cs cs
cs in
CS VO
tn Tt
f- co
©   Tl
Tf  CO
©ts
ri m
o\ «n
Tf co
ri tn
ti a\ ocnvot-rtTtovcn
rocs cococOTtvOrt cs
ti tn
en eo
m rt
cs t-
3^  B
'S'gS
rtr^iJ     _....       ,
I
1
TT
+j   CO
is
■a   q
3 oii
Ac   01
w
01  3
r   I   s SU >h 3
;» >. S3 2 7, oj -a
i &§ S E
co "5
•3  01
\s
i 2 a !g s 0 '■'■ E 6 T)
gggUUOQi-'i-IPiH
3,2 ,22
cvoWM
in
 Z 140
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
OO       1               III
, , ,   ,   ,   ,           Ml   M   1
1 00
IIIX =>P"-iO
"1     Ml
1    1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 II 1
M
IIX 3PejO
ON     i            II!
OO       1
i      i i  j  i  i  i i  i  i  i  i  i  i  i  i  i  Mm  i  i  i  ri i  i  i  i
i   111111111111111111111 l-l 111 ll
1 On
100
IX ^P^O
On     1            III
en     1
I     [ 1 1 ! ! 1 1 ! i E 1     1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 mi 1 1 1 -I
rt  ©
Ta
X 3Pe^O
on    i          I    I cn
CS     1                  Irt
cs   !        i   :
eo        |    ;    ;   ;   ;   ;   |   i   i   i   i    ;    i   |    1   |   |   i   ih   |   I   |   |    |   i   |    |
rt en
3
1 vo       ON CS en
Tt               1       I       |      1      |       f      1       |       I.    1       | rt       I       [      1       I -    1      |       j rt      1       1      j       |       1       j       I       j
CS CS
Ti
3
XIapEJO
1 O              tr- CS
1 CS
©
ti           ! 1 I |     I     I     1
en
•S
IIIA 9P«0
1 VO         Tf © CO
cS      cS    iTt    1    i    !Tf    its         IrH    ivOrttSeo    iTfinrt    icncn    in    icn
m cn
i r-          oo t-h
©                         ;                                  I cs
NO  Tt
cn
K
O
W
1 en       vo co ©
Tf      enrtcs    1    I rti r-i    icscooorH    irtcocscoinvovocseseor-    i    i cs Tt
CO  ©
HA apero
1 en       rt rt cs
m                                                                       i cn
©  Ov
ri  CO
IA 3PBJO
:i      r- co oo
en      eSrten    i©cnTf    its    iTtm    icnm    icocncsr-TfcscSTtcocscscs
eo vo
!     |              ©en
m                         | On                                        i cn         l                                          m
Tf Ov
CJ
Z
<
1          1                          1-H
rH                                  |                           1             1                    :                    1
CS co
II        CS     ! 00
©         irtcs    lOr-tsmenmoooN    irtrtcncntSrsoNCSrtmooONrtcscn
Tf  Tt
A spsiQ
rt      | CS
Tf                           | Ov            oo                           I cn                                                          en
cs vo
CO  CO
Q
z
pq
H
11        rt     | on
©       Tfi—     I     iTtTfrtcncSTfvOTt     | rt m     ir-envo©cSrtcncSTtrtrtNO
m in
Al apBJQ
"     p*
VO                                  j rH                rt                       rt      j CO             :                        Tl                              tn
ov m
CO  Tf
^
3
oo    i m
tn      eniNTfenrtVoc»©cscncsmcSrtvortoocScn©cSrorHr-ONCScnTf
CO vo
III apEJO
j  Tf
m                    cnTfvo               rHcocn                         t-h
r>
r- cs
Tt in
II apt3JO
II       On     1 rt
i >n
©         CSrtCSQOOrSCSvOTfTfrHmrtOveOrHr-vOCOmcc
NO                                  TfcSrtVO                           rtmCS                                           -1
rn oo rs CS tS    I
00
CO CO
Ov m
•n                                                                                                                                 1
Tt in
<
Q
pq
II       t-    1 cs
on      cornmmNocSNOTtrtcoovvDcorsr-TrtVomTt©corortmOvrHTfin
CS   Tl
Isp^io
i m
m                    mmi-io               rsmTt                         cs
CO On
NO vo
U3JIB8
j   i        III
i    i    1    1    1    1
2
-jspujx
i       1   i J   1   !   1   1   1   1   1   M   1   1   1   I   1   Ml   Ml-I   1. 1 J   1   1   1
CS CO       CS On Tf
in      in©c«in.r^cn©c«mTtavrtiOTttNC*ijOcnrtr-'rtesvo©©\^
VO rt
pq
aotrepuaijv
OO ri         nqiN
ov      inovc^ovcnTfcnini>cnenesmmvorHOTtvo©vovomrtt^cnr>oo
CS cs
j?n«a
sSbjsav
in vd      On co on
vd      m" ti Tt" >n oo" od m" en Tt ts' rn m" r- rn' vo' od t> en" en h in cs" rt ts; o o od Tt
co cs'
>
On m       vo en CO
en Tf            en cs
on     rn th rn rn Tt cn cs t> rn cs m r-cs Tt cs     Tt cs cn r-» t-h t-h cs Tt r- t-i     rs
vo                  rt vo          cn                  i-h cs                                            m
S?S
<
Q
CS   Tf
Ov On      t— t- Tf
oo      c^Tfoor>rtt>TtTfvOrtco>nON©mTto\cNcnr^r>ovrtrtTtinoen
ti tr-
cn no      cn oo m
t—                              t- in rt rt On         rt rt tf in (N rt         ,-trtrtcn                rHCSrt         ti t1
cs ©
Z
•a
01
T
5
CS CS             -n ti
m                         tn          n                         ti                                                cS
eo CS
rt" cs
<
*o
3
VD  NO          VO  rt  CO
©       cSvOTfrHcx3ooTtTtrSi-HOcor--TtNOvo-rtTtcsr--eSTt©cotsinvoTt
NO  CO
H
s
>.
CO Tt          Tt  Ov OO
CS          Tl          rtmNOCSrtOrtrttSTfr-COrt          co rt CS Tf rt          rtCSrt                  rt
0
CS   CS                          Tl    Tl
Tf                           cn           cs                           rn                                                     tS
Tt m
Z
cq
a
W
rtCS
a
2
j
9
Ph
rt
mm      co oo r-
r- rn      oo r- co
CO          0N©CS000NmC00000rS0000VOTfrH©OVOmTtONC0rtTtVO©V0r-
r- m
co cs
ON          rH  rH  CS  CS  ti  Tf  CS  ON  t1  CS  CO  CO  CO  in  CO  t1  in  ri  en  CO  rn  rH  tS  Tf  CS  rH  ^  tS
o
H
Tt m             co co
r-                                         rt   t-                     CO                                        T-H   CS                                                                                                 Tt
r- m
CS   Tf
o
Z
pq
Ph
o
,^
>j
■5
s
Cd
O
^
<
O
■5
*U
i
CO
s
1
•a
1
tj
CJ
p
CU
a.
tn
D.
>,
H
CJ
pv    u
*n   c
.   rt
i
60
3
3
Q
fe; *s
i II
.* to C
S 11
r3 X
tt) c
. SS
u   u
o c
S
IH
.2
h
.t?2
c
c<
M
E
CJ
■a
c
5
v
rt
c
A
3
CO
I
t>   v-
OI
c
CO
4j
c
c
PQ
-
CJ
a
u
3
i
ci
0
ci
,1
OJ
01
C-
u
-
CJ
c
irt
rt
U
s-
4
rt
rt
TT
>
1
CJ
M
rt
T
OJ
C
P
c
o
.
c
rt
3
C
cfl
a
01
M
a
-1    CH
3 JS
H rt
i
§
>
rt
0
>
a
X
'rt
a.
>
a
c
3
C
-
>
CJ
*
o
s
cc
C
C
A
3  3  ra
S o £
y s5 S
> xt
TJ   3
3   3   £
2 S rt
oOrt
J3J^
0  !h
Sp2
coK
P.t/5
cS £
3  C
O   3
CVOcZl
a) 7; cc
■S3 u "5
Ih    tfl    r
3   3  3
3   3 pO
CO coH
35 s cj
E 832
S a i3 a
iHiH^
co H
■3 o 3
3  O  g
3Qrt
3   tl
u.  «  aj cc
OQQM
CcBh^PC
3  =
O  O
00 c«
B C
U                              U
CU    L-.
coH^i m                pq
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 141
I
j
1
1
j
1
1
1
j
1
I
|
i
1
cn
1 en
co m r- m co
m i-h m vd Tt
r-l
Tl    ~<
CS
ov                       :     i     l     l \          i     : 1     i
On co Ov CS oc
ri 	
Tl   C-
cn ts co r- Tt
Tt
r-
'. ! 1    i   I    :   :   i   i    i   i   i   i   i        i   i    i    i    i   i   i    i    i    i
^
CS CS tS en m
^ SS
II   1   i   I    1    i   I    I        1    1    1    1   i   1    1    I    1        1111:11        II
!     1     ICS     ICSeoeO     1     IcS     ICS     1     It*     IMNioh     ICSrt     IVOrtTfTtco
Tt  Tf
1    1    1    1    1
1
t-                                                                   :                                                   i               i
in r
MM
1
1     '     '                                     '	
OO CO
i i i i i
© ©
imTt    ics    1 rn rt    imcsrtrtr-rtr-    ir-TfcncnTtmcsmvo    in    it-
cs cs
i i i i i
i
mi;                                   m rt                              tJ          *-* ■
cs cs
i i i i i
IrtentnTtrtCSnr-cSTt    i cn en    icncncntSenrHTfcnTfvoooTfcncS©
en en
Tf                                           rt                                   VO                                           rt          Tf                  rt                                   ti
cs cs
l i i i i
|
CS  cn  00       iTfi-HCSirtOOrHmcnCSVOCCONTtr-rHONTtTt       ImOOvrHrtCSVO
vO NO
	
rt      Tf    |                                                tr-                                     cn    1       cs
cs cs
Ml!!
cScntStSTfrt    irt^Hrt\Ortcncoovcs>noocSO\v-HrtcSrtONr>
rt  CS   ICS  CN
i  i  i  i  i
l
CO  tr
i  ,  ,  ,  .
©rtcScnoorHTtTtr^cncncS^^r-©inONTfO\cSeocScSooorHcScOTf
33
i  i  i  i  i
,
ro rc
i  i  i  i  i
1
tnrHcortmcnTtTf©    :oortrt©vortTtTfcsr>cnr-cSrt©oort    | Tf cn
1  i | i. i
On Q
co cc
1 I l.-l II I 1 1 1 1 M 1 Mil 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 II 1 11
csoocnoocnmooovTtr>©OmmfSvor-mi>r>cnr--ocoTtr-Tctr-oom
1 M M
VO tS © oo On
m
Tl
eneSrtcs©enr^enONTfOvONmONTfrtcococnr--oocovoTtesc»ONcnmir-
co tr
NocSNOrtmcSTfTtoo©csoor>rtT+tscor--Tf©T-Hcor-ONONooco©mrt
TtrtTtrtCSrtrtrtmrtCS         rtCS'OTfrHTfrHVOrtOrtrtOvTt         rt rH t—
m so
Tt NO CO 1— rt
CS  rt  VO  rt  Tt
tn
in
en                                                           m                                         cs
00  cc
Tl    CN
r*
cn
csoocScocnvo©vocsc»OAlnr>cncoco©comrtmr--ooo\t--cocSinONcn
cs cs
Os Ov t— On ©
Tt
CC
ti                                                                          CS                                                   rt
per.
CS CS CS Tt no
r^mcnmTfr-.voo\T-HmcnTfoencnONirtcncnr>ONDirtrtcoovt-ONOOv
OO ©
vo vo r- tn rn
m
cr
CS                                                           cn                                         rt
rH   Tt
cs cs cn Tt oo
cs"
ON
m m Tt Tt i-h
NC
en                                                     m                                     cS            rn
rn t-
cs'rs
m Tt no on Tt
Tf
|
;
l
SSI
o
CU
rt-
rt
Os
<4)
tt
£
CJ
P-
o
o
£
rt
■"H
NO
'C
in
q
c
2
C
a
co
CU
j
—
c
s
c
'£
CJ
CO
u
c
)
T3
3
53
o
"cj
C
§
■3
rt
2
E
S3
ii
fC
NC
Cv
i
C
Q.
c
5
1
2
OJ
«
s
it
>
I
«
A
0
c
„
c
—
>
B
X
OJ
c
4
CJ
>
CL
rt
OJ
CJ
u
,0
r
al
|i
'So .t
O  co
V
c
tl
c
1
U
v
rt  c
Up-
a
cq
£3
O   ir
51
3   O
CO H
<5
1 cr
i  <^
i Js
J3   3   .
>
>
n
o
V
5
c
2
3
CO
C O m 3*o
i'llls?
c
E
r
. c
E
cc
"oi j3ii
1  ll
3 3 V
O ClO T3   O   >   c
Pllfl
Si J3 'S  6        »
St! 8. .8 8 i
0   £
a >-
O   C
M   2
M.3   c   BCC
,,  v. Jr. _rc  rt
c
rt.
W
CO
 Z 142
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
TJ
IIIX 3PbjO
-—-
MM!
i M II ! j i 1 1 1 M M M j
1 1
1   j   I   j   I   1
IIX apE-"0
i i i i i i i
I 1 I II I I
i
Ii!!!
1   i   1   I   1   1
IX »P«0
-—-
MM
i ill f I
X op* JO
XI aptUQ
On i-h On m 00 OO On
CS On r- Tf O —i Tf
ON
CSJ
3
CO  CS  cS  i—i  CO  CO  CO
o
■5
IIIA SP^O
co m t-h m en cn m
cs vo © oo oo © in
VO
"III
0
cn cS to i-h cS cn eo
©
CS
CJ
IIA SP^O
en cs © m 00 Ov ©
rt © no On vo C- no
'ii
1  !
]       j       1       |       '       |       '       1       1       j       1       ;       |       I       1
ANCE—
en en cs i-h cS cs en
ON
IA ap^JO
vo   iTfTtr-enmcort   i    i o Tt   lOt-Ttcst-ONt-   ics   : r- r-
!en    ivoTfrtmrtTfm    i    icsm    i i-h m m no vo n© r-             ics©
III             -n       ti                llrtirt                        rti          irt
A ap^O
I    loo    iTtooNoocnovrtOv    icnvomrtrtcs<ncSi-Hr>    i    i    inocs
1     Its       inTfrtvortTfvoen
encocSrHcnTfcomNDC-'    l     l    ]csoo
Q
Z
i,,             ti       n                      ,rtrt                        i-h,,,
!    ;r^r^^encx3rHcscsmeom©Ttmt--r^vovoeomirtcx>Ttr-r-co
pq
H
H
AI spBJQ
MM
iTfcomm©r>irtTtmTtTtcooNOrHcoTtNocnor-cs      cnenoo
Ttvooo©r>rtcScncsmrtrtt>ONTfTfinr-rtvomoomvovo©voin
<
>H
<
III sp^O
TtcSTfTtr-voor-csmvovoTtcnrHOoovcn vo r- eo ,-h t- cs     r-cnco
II SpBIfj
rtTtrtomrtOcooovooomr-cocoeoenvDoocooocnONVOCSvort
Ttcomvovovoovr>omvoTtTfTf©ovoocomr-TfrtOots      "nco©
Tl                                                             Tl                                                                        Tl                                                            rt
I SpEJQ
..,,.,,
TtTtesooTtr^voONCOrt©mmoTt©r-ovr-cSrtoorHTfinoomo\
P
pq
TfTfTtmcomf-votsmvomvomrt©ovcc, vooomcooocs      mcnov
I       1       1       1       !       1       1
1-1                                           rtrt                                           rt
U3JJE8
irt         i    !    i m in cs    i         1         im    : Tt         j    lovr-         1    j    i    iTt
0
-jgpurji
cs rn cn
i cn    1 co
j CS CS     j     j     j           j cs
<
pq
tS©Ttrt©in©   cs
cSOcnt—■ t-h © t-h t—i [— OvoOT-HVOOvvocoTtmvovoeovo t** vo © vo m ©
30urcpu3HV
ONvor-mocsm iv
tnTftnoN©rttnrHvocnrtOVTfOvvomr-ovt>vocs
Area
C3SBJ9AV
r-r^i-HTfcdr-o   r-
C^VOI-^rttSCSONTttSTtC»cs"©TtcSC«cS'-H
>
<
Q
r— coNDcortenooiT;
rtOAcSc»r^weSc»©TOestsONrtrtcneNrtcSO©rtcs©cSOoovo
cor-r-TtcoooONtr'
i-h        CSrticncSNOeor^tSeocST-HCSr-COvotSenTtenoOTfrt        Nnin
ja
ND CS © On On CS NO
Tf
©rHcses©me»Ttvo©c^ONco©enrtcnr-ONmoovoocSrHr>entS
00 oo on CO On NO i-h
t-
vomrtOVrtvoTtcsovcor-©©csONNom©TfcSrtTfcSTtrtrtOco
rH          cSrtCOCScnrtrtrtrti-HcnrHcnrtrHCSCSTtCS                   rtrt  M
Z
<
•3
01
3
a
m
5
Tt co co cS co Tf in
oc
cs
co
Tt   Tt   O   VO   ©   CO   NO
0C
ONTt©cOCOrtO\OQ
TtTtrtcONr^NOTt©r^VOCSC=)Tt<nCO©TtON
Tf  rt
H
O
oo r^ in oo vo co Tt
Tt   Tf   Tf   CS   Tf   Tf   m
z.
vo m
TtOONmooONCOt—  00COO©N0©O\r-r—  rtC7>ONitVDrtOONiJ
rtrtrtrtCOtSTfrtrtrtrtrtTfCSeOrtrtCSrHTttS                   Tl           to
z
0?
c
pq
2
0.
3
Is
© NO © m On © CS
C-
tJNlc)^^lfl^^o^NOrtVDMTtc3No^^^Ortovo1t^H;^^-rt
eS©mON©rtcnfScOOmTtOCSVDVDTtrtcSTti-HCOVD©CSrtONOO
Cc.
r- m tt cs m o vo
j
eS
On 00 CO m OO On ©
c
vO
rtrtCSrtTfCOl--mOOCOCOCSeSeSOOCOr^CNCOTtTfONTfrH          cSrHNO
o
C4
Z
pq
•o
1  !  I
Ph
u
3
1    I    I
O
3
i    1   ]
>i
O
U
oi
o
7
<
o
J3
^2
§
ci
Cfl
o
1
■o
3
a
CJ
g
.3
D
01
cu
j    1
j
Cfl
p.
«
■U
I   i
'l-l
i
H
rt
CJ
cfl
5
0
"HJ
VO
1
'C
en
(5
•51
St
oC
IN
1
c
E
- 3
5
p-
•3
CO
1
\
-3
c
j
c
12
3
>
cc
c
1
CO
c
4
V
I"
ir
c
41
PC
i.
3
cc
3
CC
T
1
CL
c
i
"rt
1
t-
u
c
cr
t
'«
1-
c
T
CJ
I
1
c
■g
i
rt
1
0.
1
I
e
r
CU
s
•s
c
c
3
g
c
E
rt
s
>
cc
CC
J
E
rt
rt
rt
CJ
rt
rt
a
CJ
CO
E
c
ty
1
rt
rt
>
i
CJ
ra
cfl
3
3
s
It
rt cc
ll
Oi   ^. CO
'i ufe
3   IS ?
i ai Ss:
Met
Ci  O  r
ssl
•c
s
J^
rt
c
1
K
3
c
t
■'!
c
P-
oc
•c
cc
CO
cd
•■a
I
X
^ c
§1
'a*
01
*CJ
rt
CO
U9
ra
•a
3
0
p
CJ
E
a
Ch
to
3
3
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 143
I   I
i   I   I
CO  CO
r- r-
Ov  ON
inONinvor-cocoTf
r-rSTtmeor-mTt
Tt Tt
Tf Tt
OV   ON
Tf   Tt
OO CO
ON ON
CO  t>
cn Tt
CS cs
j* jt
o ©
rs cs
cs es
Tt   Tf
en eo
es eS
cs cs
cs rs
o ©
VO O
VO 00
ts cs
cs m
rt cs
en en
00 CO
ON ©
tS en
cotnTfTtrtcnrtts
csocsvocscsr-ON
ONTfTtr-rtCOrtNO
oovvocortcsinoo
rH rt rt  rt CS — CO
ovooNcoor-Ttov
TfONr-ONcocSTfvo
rH rt rt rH CS rt CO
c t-
Tf   CO
ON ©
00 ©
ti m
ov eo vo r-
t- cs Ov m
©" rt on rs
rt NO rt  r-
rt  rt Tf
ooTfooONOomeOTtvocs
vDrtr-eocSeot-^eno©
rtrtrt      tn ti      rtrtcs
on t—
ON Tf
m Tf
Tt r-
cs CO
Tl   Tf
© m
00 Tf
VO^Tf
rt CS"
m vo
vo vo
rt cs
Tt cn
co cs
Tt ©
vo vo
m co
oo cs
cs cs
CS ON
Ov co
TfOOtOrtrtVOrHCS
rtOOrttSrtrtCOOO
rt CS CO rt ti
ON©eninrrtininin
TtOvTfooTtmONm
csrHcnencsTtcsr--
CO   Tf
cs oo
t— oo
rn r- m r-
cs t— r- r-
rt   rt   Tf
mcOOOONrtTtOOTtmTt
r>eSrtCONOTtr-Ttrtrt
■ri -ri tn tt rH rt CS
00 CO
r- cs
r- vo
Tf CO
CO  CO
CS co
escSrtOooinrtr-
cs © Tt cn      cs On oo
rt m cn rn      rn
cu
I    I
•a
>
-g.§ErtSL4:2wH
wcoHHD>>£
M-X      T?
_3rM     |
I |T.|S
till J
K co ffi
1 -g ici > «=3 -S ■; „
• Mi
6 as g
i   E
r-.    *h
Q   co
gees cs c s-o 31.3 ~ 2ji„„
Sh3«S'c;cci3CccO
5 55 | |UOK^i-l22wcncn
3  3   S   01   01
3 ,0
.9 a
*   2
O A
ffi « ffi
I*
Big    IS
S      rt
t\t*
rti
o     SJ
O rt  O"
;2«
2S-fc?Igo*H
StutiOwSwj-Jc
*H     f£    C   \^      „    EL*     t>     O
gpqpqUGn1^„(i;
CJ
5
 Z 144
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
IIIX 3PEJO
MM
1
i
- 1
i   i   i
m    ;
m
1   i   1   1   i   I   1   1   i
IIX 3PmO
II II
i m
; c
Tt
! i 1
1   Tf
©    i
cs   ;
o
(N
j   j
1 ! M 1 1 II 1
IX 3P«D
1   !   !   1
1   1   i   !
1 cs
IS
On     1
rs
! 1 1
1  ON
1 CS
en    l
m    i
CO
m
! II ! 1 II ! !
X OP^O
ill;
i r-
1 cs
VO
eo
1   |   i
i    1    i
1 vo
| cn
© en
oo m
co
cr
CS
E 111 11 1 1 i
en cn
ti r-
Tt
XI ap««0
ill!
1 OO
1 cs
i    I
co
i vo
vC
CO           !     1     !     1     1     !     1     1     1
CS            1     i     1     1     1     1     !     1     !
IIIA 3PBJO
i   Tf
1 CO
1 ts
rt Tf
en
CS rt rt
Tf  ON
CO
1 °°
CC
© CO
Tt   Tl
oc
iy-
CS
i    1    i   1   1   1    1    i   1
O 00
1 rt cs
CO   Tl
VO
NT
i cs co t-h t-h   i m o
IIA SP^O
CO rt rt m
00 00
rs ts
cn
CO      |
oo
1       |  rH  rH  rH  rH       jrtH
IA 3PE-tO
cs cs
CS  00  rt
ti tn
NO   N£
CO
•n      ti ti ti ti m i-h
CS CS
A 3PEJO
© tr-
CS Tf CS
oo m
enm©TtTtONONCor>
CO  rt  rt  Tf
Qs Os
CS  CS
1       1
in ti n n ti ti vo
en O
rt VO  Tf
ti   Tf
OvrtTftnineseooo
AI 3PE->0
CO   rt   rt   Tf
m m
eS ts
i    i
III 9P^O
cn co
ov m
CS     1 -n
eo r-
r-COONrt©TtmVOrt
CO          rH  Tf
© c
co eo
en
I   i
in      ti ti ri ti m      i-h
II apEJO
1-H   T-H
CS  Tt
rt   Tf  NO
ti r-
CS cs
I apeJO
ON  CO
rt no m
23           j 1
Tf  rt  rt  CO
00 oc
cs rs
r- rt rt rn cs cs c-
U3JJE8
 j   |   ,   ,
-jspajx
Mm
i
I.I   1   1   1   II   1   1
VO CS
cs m ov
VO  Tj
Tf   VC
Tt      comovrtovoinTto
O      TtmincoovvoinTfo
On rt m in
CO c
r- en tn
en m
oc
Tl   ON
Xirea
9SEJ3AV
en tr- Tf" en"
R?
CO  O
CS  t> rt
rt  CO
Tf ©
Ov CO
oc
cSTfcsvovocsmmin
vo m
T
CS           cs
oo c-
T]
VD   Tl
oc
cs cs
TI
cn                    i-h Tt
rt fS
3
SO cr
00 C
Tf  rt OO
CO  T—
in       CS 00 Tt ov CS t- en © vo
CO          VOCSTfTtTfmONCOCS
en en Tt Tt
CO   i-
CS   Tj
O Ov
%
•3
01
0
1-H                          T-H
OV   TJ
en
o
CO  NC
Tt   Tl
W
©  IT
o
cn n
V
CN
cs                     cs
■3
'S
pa
""
Tl   NC
es © cs
Tf    rt
CN
Ph
i-h tn CS
NO  0C
On O
o
s
tS              co
OVC
t-Tcc
NO CS
(X.
cs cs
Tt
3
3
5
O
0
Q
*
CO
-*,   x£
*
■a
3
rt
01
.CJ
e
1.5c
. tn C
m
>.
H
en
> 1 1
fe;
X
01
5 =
s
1
a
o
<
.83
Q
It*
ft     c
3
C
£
3
X
cn
3
cc
Cfl
>,
OJ
3
•a
CO
ct
rt
c
7
cc
Dist
mentary-Senior
TJ
CI
|2
•3
3
0
cc
TJ
3
n
rt
3
3
rt
CO
1
C
7
V
Q
ceo
53
°1
3 .H
3    v
0  rz
■■!
0)          -H
£? «
o
CJ
0
ior High—
Mount Prevost
Quamichan ....
V
1
C
2
tr
1   a
X
>s   C
rt  K
el
$
ffi
s
x
x
c
C
+3
CO
e
^    r-
?l
o e
OC
I
CJ
E
T
•o
cd
O
tr
3 2
■a c
X   c
X   01
oc
&— u
rt  «'c
3   Q  S
3>
co h
C" °  a
SSp.
i
r/
H
r u
>> c
rt  0.
CQCC
01
w
W
Ph
n
r->
rt.
w
TS
3
•5
r-j
S
O
U
m
u
z
<
Q
w
><
I-I
r—(
<
Q
W
O
Q
%
H
O
1
Pi
<
 rt—
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 145
s
1
CNI
^   ii i i i ii ;
; r-
cn Tf
f*           i     |
i t-
CS           1     !
ON  Tt
1  CO
t-           1
m
Tt  VD
-
r- vo
' rn
m        :
:;;■;;          i
c- CO
r-        !    i
!  1  1  I  I
CS
1 *H
-
	
CO
CO cs
o
Ov ©
oo
Tt m
111111,11
1   CO
*"•
"            .Ii....
n
■ rt   ■   ■   i   ■   ■   -   ■
1 rt
tn        :   :   i   i    i   !   :
i in
r- vo
ro
CC
: rt
ti       :   :   i   i   i   i   :
m
OO
3C
Tt        i   ;   i    i    i    i   :   i
1   TJ
Tf m
tr-         :    i    i    i    i    l    i
: r-
OO o
tH cc
m cs
m
oo    :    i m on t> cs
rH i-
Ov O
V)    j     1 vo CS
VO VO
CS cs
rt   t-
Tl   Tl
-
rn cn    i vo        : r- co
m u*
©       1  VO  ©  Tt  © Tf
vo     :       r- en rt
Tf  Tf
00 00
co en
*"■ *~
ri rt
_ _
ov cs cn Tt Tt oo Tf
Tf  Tf
1    ,
CS       n     1 CS rn rt cS
vO vc
; cs t>   :   i     cs
CO  CC
Tf rt      Tt cn
m m
CO  CO
-H  t—
ti rt
oortTf    icoooONvom
On O-
■    |
© CO co t-h © CO      1
© c
rt rt rt     | CS              CS
CS CS
CO CO
c-              cs
:   i
tn n *-i m cn        i
t- t-
i
vovo   ir-rt©ovcSTf
en ec
ri cn oo m on oo cS
VO vc
ti             1 rt CS rt rt CS
vo vc
ti       ti t-                  en
NO   NO
vo rt      m cn rt
on a
i
CO eo
rH rt
T-H    ^
oo    l    l Tt co tn oo Tt en
es cs
vO 3
cs © vo r- cs o Tf
„ ^_
rt      1      1 rt CS rt         CS
m ir
rt      rt co rt           cn
Tf cs      m en rt
r> r-
en cn
rH rt
Tt   t-
!           ! fS     !     |     : On
Tl    TT
rtrt
OvOTtmr-vo©cSrt
CSTfr-rtOvrtT+Ov
Oroc»i-Hvocs©tn
vo ec
cs vo
or
Tf cn m ov i-h oo m
cn r-
CT
Tl  CO
On
VOVOONrtTfCOrtCOOv
en cn
Ov i-
C- cn
C
tn t- m on © m cs
m
cn oc
r- m
rr
co m cs © »n t- Tt
S  Tt
r-
CS Tf
r-
a
t-O
or
on m tn cs oo m i-h
or
t>   Tl
00
©  CN
T
m                 ti
r> es
cn Tf
t-
cs          en n
t> r-
CS cn
rt
escovoooeortinvoTt
vo tr-
m ti
CO O co
CS V
Tt
vo m
ON
On CO
r-
o VO
CJ
cs
Tf vo
cs cs
Tt
Tf   Q
vr
r>
esr-ineninvoo\©vo
CS ON
oo vo
tn n m eo cs rs ©
Tt OC
Tt  VC
NT
CS On
__
voeoeSrtONCSenr-rt
On r-
O  rt
(N
VO Tf cS vo © en t-h
or
Tt   CO
CO
rt 00
cs
Tf   t-
cs cs
m on
ir
Tt cn
00
Tl   Tl
Ttmrtrtcor-Ttvoo
vO ©
ex
cocsvomt-ONvooN
r> m
Tt en
r-
O eo VO CS 00 t-h vo
CS vo eo Tf Ov vo rt
vo ec
CO  Q
I*
oo tS
co l—
©
rt in
cs'm
If
m               ti
On Tf
Tf  Tf
oc
© oc
co r-
\o
;
•f,
r£
o
•4
P
.e
*5
W
C
rt
•o?
c
cu
M
£
*
c
»N,
8
VO
Iv
1
OJ
M
rt
>
1
0
E
>
rt
4
1
a
s
>
rt
CC
p
ii
X
rt
=
A
C
CJ
<
X
co
JK
C
cf
o
1
c
*
Z
E
e
CO
\
T>
3
rt
.2
1
CO
t-
c
c
OJ
s
1
I
D
J-
c
2
3
CO
V
p
0
H
<5
i
ffi
t-
C
c
<u
5
c
p
p
rt.
>
1   -
i. tr
V 3
d y
c «
Eu
u
3
u
OJ
>
3
C
X
c
a
P3
3
I
1
i
o
3
c
6
01
3
1
CD
rt
i
rt
cc
CJ
2
i
rt
.E
ii
3
3
O
cc
cr:
C
s
c?
cc
J
h
M
.2P
£ £
u   3
§£
°? 1
oCv
3
3
»-»
X
I
co
>,
•§
rt1
C
2
3
vV
•E
SI
|6
u
rt
O
P<
1
T
o
ii
0
T
3
C
E
s
5
X
1
1
-
3
O
3
Si
CO
3
• 3
£
*-
ir
>
c
t
1
1
rt
CJ
|3
cr
C
1
co
cc
P
rt
C
ci
\
ci
5
u
C
1
,1
Jsi
mCO
Sx
IH     C
O   r*i
•a
3
I-i
•3
§
§
Cfl
rt
O
A
3
CO
 Z 146
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1961/62
TS
3
•5
c
o
o
Q
2
W
H
H
<
3
<
p
w
O
H
Z
W
o
c^
z
w
b
O
04
<
1
D
CO
IIIX 3PEJO
1
1
©
TT
i
1
i
IIX 3PbjO
1 i I 1 i 1 i i i 1
i   r i   1   1   i   !   I   i   1   1
00
cn
G
l          l          l          i          II          l
1     !     1     1     !     1     1
i p-
I vo
IX spsiO
i   i   I   i   i   i   !   1   i   1   !
IS
I cn
VO
|     j     j     j     j     j     ]
| VO
X 3Pb:iO
i i i i i II M M I i i i I II i i i 1
15
CO
1   1   i   !   1    I   1
| OO
1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   !   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
m eo
XI speio
i  i M  II  M  Ii  M  M  M  M  II  11
1  ©
i m
in vo
1   1   i   M   !   1
1 rt
,   1	
IIIA 3P"0
1 1  II  i II  i  M
1 1 i r II 1 II 1 1
1  CO
i m
VO  Tt
Ii I i ll 1
Is
■     |     |    1     .     |     |     |     |     |     .     |    ..     |     |     |.|'j     |     |     ■■
CO cc
IIA SP^O
I i I 1 1 I 1 i 1 i 1 1! ! i j 1 M j 1 1
IK
m tc
IM  i  1  i~
cs ©
loots©    icnrtinTtvoovcSeneS    l    1    ! © vo cs cs Tt
Tt   CS
§8
IA sp^O
1 Cn rt rt      ICSrt         n         cnCSrtrt      1             jrHcnCSi-H
CO  CO
Tt   Tt
cS ec
1 Is 1 r
iot*»   ivoTtmmintScovoTf   i   i   i i-h Tt o ov vo
Ti   CO
; «n Tt    ;    i © ov
A spBJO
m          cs rn      cs      Tt cn      ti    j         i vo o\ cs
ON   ON
in m
CS eo
M"   ,   ics
«n t-h
r>r-mTf   iTtoomcnTfTtr-cortcncococsvoovcnm
cs r-
AI =>P"0
TfcoeorH    I en cs      cs      mcs      rHinvoTtcs      rt i-h
m m
m m
CS eo
Tf   OV
rt rt
III apu^O
r-cscsrt    irnm      cs *-< \o Tf          Ttr-enenrtrtrtrt
© o
NO so
CS cc
1
m ©
en r-
II speJO
CO NO
vOTfcncs    icncn      csnvoTtrtrtTft-.TteS    itSrtrt
rt rr
m ©
vo vo
I 3PEJO
■nmcncSrtcnTf      cs      r— en           m ov vo cn    icSi-h
On On
Ti   Tj
rt rt      | fS                Ti
vo ts
1-1
U31JB3
i   I   |   m   j   ;   i   i   i   |   ;   1   |   |   i   i   i   |   |   |   ;
i-h  rH
i   i   1   I   I   i   i
i i
-japajx
:   i   :   i       :   i   i   i   i   !   i   1   i   I   !   i   1   !   i   i   1
1   1   1   1   1.1   1
i i
cn o>
m tr-w cs cs Tf co# tSp Tf in cs t-; cs co on © cS no O ov in cn ov
30UEPU3WV
jcnea
38t3JC3AV
ON  ON
©r-
ov r-
O Co C
tN CO
CJH
cSoOTtcocscovoeSirnenrtcoinvoc-ONi~-vocSOt-Tt
OO vo
5?
cs >n r^ rt cs >n t-
cn O
rs tt tt                rtcn         rt         tnrt                _ fsj _ ,_ ro rt
CO  CC
eo tn
*"
J9
.3
rt©voONC«enmvoTfeoTtcoTtovDcncnenvoTtt-m
ovoc-cn      ONVOi-HVOrtmovcScnooenoocoinvocncS
Tf  Tf
m r-
r-o
0
Tl  CS
1
CO  rt CO rt OO in Tt
m cs
w
3
rH                                           CS                          rHrH                  rt  rH irt          i—1
On cc
M r-
rt VO
a
m
i—  rr
,_
eno>voc^cNc>r>(ScncnmOmvooorto\t--Ttcsc-Tt
ON VC
es »n co cs cS tn co
Tf   O
cs t-h i-h           rtcn      tt      rocs           rtenrtrttni-t
m er
cn cs
H
CO VC
1-1
xt
CU
3
.3
i
j
j
I
j
0
o
-8
B
O
—N
-C
V
.CJ
rt
cu
PQ
I
CO
0
BB
•o
p
CM
Ov
rt-
u
£
§1
i
H
fe;
1 1
:
rt -
CJ
Q
1
P
_
PC
ec
•c
c
c
X
1
1
PS
p
X
0
h
X
0
tn
OJ
f
c
'C
X
0
>
cc
rr
«,
=
e
|
c
c
OJ
CJ
s
i
c
c
1
■1
T
E
c
1
B
cts
6
i
e
r
rt
r
s
c
R
5
3
C
V
I
*
§
1
1
>
'?
c
5
c
2
<
CC
X
t
It
CU
i-
e
X
1
I
Ov
<
E
a
is
>
0
a
o
c
P.
' >
I
i
1
5
1
|
0.
3
'C
>
c-
4
3
o
C
P
1
X
1
c
i St.
i   o
i   c
O  X
cc
1
>*>
3
CO 01
SB
t-r   b-
O   C
11
VI  T
hi
ci  r
a c
cu   c
E F
1
S]f.$
I,
E
C
e
E
I
B.
I
M
cu
CJ
a
11
<U rt
u. iz
rtp:
(L
B
•-
|
u
c
ffi
E
t
1
c
«
*s
—
01
'S
O
3
rt
cc
tl
C
2
=
CO
Cfi
*rt
o
H
01
pq
ft
T
w
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 147
I   I   I
© in
O   Tl
n cs
Ti   00
tr- m
cs cs
f cn r-     Tt in
Tt   CO
rs Tt
Tf  Tf
IS
CO 00
© o
Tf Tf
CS CS
tr- r-
Tt  Tf
j Tf Tf Tf On     I CS
cn ©
CO CS
cs cn
s
Tt   Tf
© On
CS vo
en cn
ti m
tr- cn
cS en
m m
00 CO
in in
cs ©
tr- vo
eS m
■i en in eS Tt on en
Tf cs
Tl   00
CO CO
Ti oo © cS co co !-• tS cn in co en en ov rt rt ov
ov in TO©en«cncnrtONOvoooocooo©co
Tf Tf ON O* in ©* ri in CS* rt (-" © ON © o cs" cn*
com Ttcsmr-csOTfrtr>o     voooTtvo
Q\trt VO rt rt CO CS VD CSeOrt HHHrl
cs cs
On CO
Tt   ©
ON CO
vo On
m tree cs
TfCS
m m
ts CO
CO  CO
© cs
NO  Tf
NO   Tf
COONeSOvCSCSrtrtrtONCOln
rtr-r-TtcSrtmoocscsrH©
i-h cs in eo ri     Ti
co m
co m
r- in
Tt t-
cs ©
m en
rt rt tS  rt cs
On O
cn t—
tr- m
Ti  NO
CO CO
en cS
tvocnr-rtenenenrtvoootn
icor-oort     n tn n so     m
rt CS rt
© cs
vo o
CO CO
Ov O
CO o
in en
cSenvocnTfrHtS©t--oen<nr-enen
csvoc-rtcnTtcsrscovo t-- ov co on
m cS ri cn      th t-h
vo m
co o
rt CS
ONCSTtovvortenTtcsoenr-
mr-encortrtrtinrtt-.rtin
Ti tn ri
o r-
© r-
o o
rt CS
vocsomrtOvrt©r-vort©inTfrt
vocSTtcoTfrtTfcsoNOrti-comr-
vortrtcncsvo     cScnrH     rtrtrtri
CO CO
CS Tt
no en
00 Tf
in >n
in cs
On cn
Tt r-
eo cn
cs m
cs oo
l>Tf
cncor-vor-Tfvot--envOrtcS
csoor^cSrtcsoocsencSrt
ri tn so tn r-i     n
© ON
vo r-
oo oo
t-h cn
* 5
3
CJ
■ "i
H
11
O       1-H
° t4 3 °
V3*"<so
rt
tj e r
0 « c
oO.E
1 Is
tl>   CJ
IV
in
JJ5   Ch
K    _-g  o 3
Xrtr,'3ro!'ciD«CHOl01rt'StHO
.-01     .C0J-.hC.-:3-'H1«u  j..
< co U o o « b. 0 0 O 0 2 ai a? ?
ffi op
Ch   Ch
0 O
'E a"
01 3
C/l  r-|  r
hh *!
Oi-JOh
I |«OUU0Qttc0ffic<cy?|3
01   01
 Z 148
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
IIIX spfJO
i   i
i i II II M i
1   1   1
i
t-
_.
.   ,   .   ,   ,   ,	
1 cc
cs
tS       vO vo cS
Tt
IIX spi«0
oc
i
1 II 1 1 1 M 1 i 1-1
i   i   i
j oc
i
IX 3PbjO
fN
CN
es    i
cs
| i j i i 1 i i j | j • i j [ | i
|S
tS     I
cs     — m co
ti     i
c
r- Tt
„
Tf CS
vo     cs r- Tf
(C
X ap^JO
ir
vc
cs
c
rc
vO ©
NO
i 0>
m eo
oo        ti ti so
oc
i
TS
XI apB^O
OC
Ti
"~l
1        1     I  1  i
'
i *
CN
1
^i
3
•S
CO      oo cs
©
cn:!i!i:i|rtrtrtrtiii
r- ic
«n on
Tf        vO vo OV
IIIA api^O
t-         rt
CS
!     1     |     1     1     1     |     i CS
es cs
CS
rt         m rt
VD                 |
c
ft
—
CJ
i
00          Tf  CO
cs
Ivo    l    :    l    i    i    irtvo    irtrttn    :    l
00 00
©CS
cS      in tr- tn
r-        i
IIA 3PE.IO
t—                          Ti
cs
1    i i i i i i  M i        M
en co
CS
CS       en
Tt
Tf  O
Tf
immov    ion©-    i    :©rt    icSeortCS
t-  rt
00 On
r-     vo i— o
tr
:
U
z
<
IA 3Pb^O
Tf  NO       1  CO  rt       j       j  CS
m
Tt vo
es cs
r-          CS  rn  rt
V
vO Ov
m
CScO©CS       1©©       IrttSrtCSrtCStSTf
m m    : m Ti    |      cs                         Tt
cs r-
m eo
CO        Tf rt On
Tt
A spsJO
Ti
cs
as
c*
ti      tn Ti
in
Q
Z
a
en oo
,_
!r-©r-r---H    ;tSrtO    irtrtrHrtrt
O   r-
•n t—
n      m Tt cs
vo
AI 3P"JO
cs
m vo t-h co    j i-i      ts    |                      tn
VD 00
CS CS
rt            (Tj   Tl   Ti
S
H
<
hJ
<
NO Tf
o
csmmNOTfcnt-rtrtir-cncscScntSi-H
cs cs
oo ©
CO        vO T- rt
S
r>
III apwo
*"
cs
m Tt ti co      rn      cs                         vo
tr- ov
CS CS
Ti      en cS <-«
cn tS
in
rt,r-mOrtinooeocSrtcsnco    ics©
NO   Ti
cs ©
CS      m vo t>
«
CO
II spEJO
cs
CS
in vo n co               ts                         vo
r- o
CS  CO
CS            Tf   rt   rt
r-
Tf r-
_,
•VOVOONTfVO       ,00       IVOrtCO       1       1  rt  00
oo On
© ©
O      cS cn oo
ec
cn
Q
I sp^-io
cs
m vo rt cn            | to                       Tt
tr- a
CS CN
cs      cn rn t-h
NC
U31JE8
j
j         j    [    j
j
0
-jsputx
I
<
Tl            Tt   rt
m
mmomrScSrHrHrtmov©cooor-Tt
oocni>©Oc»cn(n©csOvDr-enmcn
CO  Tj
rt  NO
t-         C> o\ Ti
©
r-
3DHBPU3JJV
©        ON On
00
m t
NO VD
CS        vo cn rH
Ov
cCiiBa
3SEJ0AV
in      m en"
ON
r>V0C0rHOTfrtTt©l-^©000N©©00'
ss
CO CO
it-*.     Tt d d
Tf          © Tf  ON
m
CS
>
en       Tf en
t-
enoocomovcoeortooi-H           t-ht-hoo
vo r-
CC
cs
CO                ri
Ti
cs en      ri                 rn                           cs
m tr
rH              CO   Ti
IcC
<
Q
rt cv
'
•S
t-        CS ©
CS
cn©mcnovooT-Hcncnr-ineni--Tfr>o
CO t-
oo o
00        OvOIn
er
©
Tf      es c-
Ov
csmvocsovcscs      oo                         Tt
vo C
eo Tf
r-     vo r- m
0>
Z
■a
01
"3
ll
3
t-h  rH                                                                                           rH
r> c
'-,
es
<
CS Tt
NO
mt— vo©r-vOTfvocovoTtooTtoorsvo
rs o
oo m
CO          ON  OO  ON
VC
Tt
H
0
m      co r-
©
i-Hm©rs©rtrH      ©                           tr-
rt   CS               rt                                     Ti                                                            Ti
in c
CO  T
eo Tf
00            NO   NO  Tf
oc
es
'
Z
w
Cfl
PO
a
I-I
3
"cci
CO            Tf   Tf
o\      m Tf
CO
OOt—rtCOVDTtmONVOcOONrt  —  fSONVO
COrtVOmocOCO         ON         rtrtrt         Ti
© vc
vo tn
rt          ON Tf  VO
vo      es Tt ©
o
3
Ph
On
cs —
t- CO
r-
fS
OO                  rH
r"1
CO  CO          CS                           Ti                                           CO
vo t-
rt es
'
-H               CO    T-H    T-H
ir
§
z
w
b
j
o
>^
k
11
c*
0
'&,
&
<
0
TT
CJ
CO
"cu
Jo
CJ
>
5
05
^0)
1
TJ
C
s
8
T
p
eu
CJ
"5
R
t/3
P.
H
1
I
E
4
0
fe
1
u
ra
0
)
CD
f.
.CJ
ti
5
tt
a
.£
c
X
3
1    3
^l
CJ  "
X
rt
rt
CO
cc
0
c
A
3
CO
i
«
3
01
£
3
C
—'
t
X
e
CJ
TT
V
rt
■a
Ph
1
E
ra
u
3
C
s
OJ
X
3
E
a
U
trt
<n
TJ
aj
u
«
c/J
«
Oi
Tt
ii
>
O
Ii
QW
3
OJ
t
>
a
PC
rt
TJ
c
C
TJ
a
tf
K
BE
,K
c
c
tf
tj
c
rt
S
c
rt
3
s
c
3
O
Ph
cc
"rt
C
A
"tj
i-
o c
CD  "
c^
rt
rt1
Cfl
1
CC
0
C
2
ffi
Vh
.2
e
to 5
T
3
CI
£
o
c
0
z
o
s
cVH
O
cr
*|
C
A
3
CO
cu
1   "
M 01
vT   £
r5 ±
o =
CH     01   ~
CO  M rt
co cn >
S     3£
o »(■
1
3
CO
c7B
3 S
h^
ss
s a
a               u
D,                      4,
01
3                                  —!
3                    —i
i-i
co               W
CO                                                                    TT
s
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 149
VO
NO
1   !   1
^
1 1 1 i 1 1.1 1 II II i 1 ! i
M
i   i   i
! *
r- Tt
IS
Ov
©
1 i i. f j i j { { 1 1. j i- { 1 j
IS
T-H
1              '       '       ' '	
, rn
Ti      tn Qs
' in
CO
1 °°
;   :   i
'
1-1
 ' '
, rt
i o>
rHCS
rr
i   i   i
'
cs
1 CS
: vc
rr-
1 P-
in m         i    :    i    i    i    ;    i    i    i    !    i    :    i    i    i    ;    i
! ©
I cc
1
TT
ill:
r
On Tf
IS
■n     \     •
cs     oo r-
tr
: cs    :    i
1    1
•    '
1 (S
i i i i I i i i i i i i i i i i
1 CS
Ti   Ti         '
cn     r- ov
vr
00 oo
I
r-
T            TT
ec
:
ir
! cn
:    ico    i    |    :m    |t-h        i    j    jcn
as
CS  Tf       |
vo vC
oo      r- m
<N>
: CS CS Tf
00 OC
1
33
CS cs
r-
vc
|
rt rt cs cS    jrtrt          vo    : rn    |    irt    | rt
1 CS     |
CS   Tj
r-     Tt ov
CC
i n cS CS
m m
Ttr-ovTt   i©ov   |   i tn   i©        icS.csm
csrHcscsjcs        iov;rti|rt     cn
r- r-
!        I
T            TT
cs cs
m cs co
ov es
©      in rt
CS       CS CS
r>
tn co m rH
Tf   CC
eses
rt  CC
CS       en CS    \ ti n            co     | cs     |       rn       m
cs cs
rttsi cn
m o
m      o vo
CS      CS cs
NT
Tf Tf  rt CS
rtCS
VOOVlnOOcntSt-TfmrHVOVDTfOv       IrHTf
o©
rt     cs rn rt r-<              tr-                           cn
S3
m tiv*
ov o>
r-      ov oo
r-
NO rt  rt  CO
Ti \n
00 00
CC
cs    i cs en      cs               r-                             m
cs cs
cn ri in
CS V
Tf      in cn
88
in cn rn rn
Ov OV
m m
 ii1
!   i   1
1
! i
m vo ©
co in
CO         OV O
D>
en oo r- r-
m rs
ov oo m
es vc
Tf           rt  Tt
If
m co rt
CO
Ov c
00  T
rti-no©mcSc»rtcoTfTf©or-mcocs
C-©
Tt rt  ©
© rv
O        vo f-
cc
Ov CS vC
rH
ON  Tj
m ti
0C
vo in
CC
m cc
•ri      -ri Ti      Ti                m                                CS
rt CS
ON VO Ov
Tf ir
o     m co
cc
On CS Tf m
O cc
en ©
Ov        © ON
c
eo cn
00 0
Tf
CS
CS r-
cs
0O CS
r* r- cs
?g
es      oo es
©
rt Tt  O  O
in t-
© m
Tf
CS CS                                                                        cn                                            Ti
ON  Tt
vo en rt
Tf Tf
CS       co ©
cc
o vo Tt m
m ©
cs©      r^rScSr-©csr-mm©mcoTtvocooNrt
rs
OC
cs     cs cs
Tt
m ti
Tl            Ti   Ti            Ti                               NO                                                           es
t> r-
rt tS
c
"c*
§
-}
3
J
X
tn
CN,
0
1
JJ
k
o
c
T-
—
>
a
P5
C
jC
c
c
e
cr
1
1=
i
oi
To!
X
l
v
*c
C
J
rt
<*i
rt
CD
tr
O
r-)
3
rt
CO
I
c
'u
01
3
ll
ll
2ffi
a
§cc
1
8
CC
*rt
C
i
3
CO
T
3
c
X
rt
a-
rt    CC
3   C
<u
1-
CJ
>
r
I
!
3
ir
?
6
3
o
XI
Irt
rt
a
s
3
cr
C
2
3
CO
e
C
V
V
'i
I
■i
X
T
c
0
'Z
1
l o
£
C
"r
b
rt
,k
3 2
a T
E°
X
CJ
c
C
I
1
g
rt
X
C
5
V
e
Is
•3
P-
"3
I
i
.i
"5
K
t-
P-
0
1
cc
tt
i
-
2
Cv
CD
1-
1
c
1
e
i-
E
CD
c
|
a
1
c
Cv
z
rS
«
CD
>
CO
2
CD
>
'tr
I
CO
cc
C
Cv
TJ
1
to
CL
rf
1
4.
C/
crt
3
I
>
cc
c
%
tr
cr
T
l/j
UJ
irt
or
-
rt
 Z 150
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1961/62
IIIX 3P"JO
MM II
Mill
i
i       |
|
i    1 1 j 1 1 ! i
1
i ; ;
IIX ap^JO
s   Mill
3
O
Tj
1 O"
1   Tt
no        1i   |   I   j   i   i
! VC
1 ^
o
! 1 !
1 ■"*
IX 3PBJD
r   Mill
i r-
1  CC
i
c
oc
i e
<n        |    i    i    i    i    I    i
m
1  V
| tr
oc
r-
i i i
j CO
tr>             |      M      Ii
1  rr
©
l   i
! C
en        :    i    i    i    i es    i
eS ir
o
1 Ov
X sp^JO
"*
Tt
r-
■
i   i
! t-
NO
sC
r-
1 ! i
M
Tf            Ti        •        •        '        |
Ti m
en
1 ec
vo        i   i   i   i   i   M
•■ vc
VC
i   !   i
! vo
TS
XI 3PBJO
m            MM
m
r-
1   i
1 r
10        1   1   1   t   1   i   1
• m          cc
! 1 !
i «
s
•S
IIIA SPEJO
en      en    i    '    1    |
VD                              1
cn no
vo
3    i i
: co
"S     1 I I I j-j j
13
a   i* i
On vo
en
6
ci
u
Ti         *          |          1          '
rt  CN
©         1
I c
i      vo vo ov   i cs vo es
Ti  r-
cc
i °°   !
CO vo
IIA apBJO
r-
t-
i  "     r
00 oc
1—
CS
IA spKJO
Tt      cS On m    l    |
en
NO ©
rt IT
S3
cs r
r- cs vo m vo vo es
cn
S3
is
cs in m
cs cn
i-h cn
rH
Ti   T-
z
<
cs     en r> r> © cs
OV  r-
Ov O
Os Q
i      r> c- co cn vo Tt   i
m v
c
CS en CS
r> r-
A aptJJO
Tf                                        T-H
CS tr
.rt- rt
CO CC
I                        cn         i
nO VC
rH
Ti es
Q
z
: ov vo r- cn
m vc
r- m
cs cs
co co co Tf ov On    l
vO VC
CO
1 CS en
m en
m
AI "P^O
Tt
cS vc
00 rt
©©
1                           m         \
NO VC
cs
|  rH
rt Tf
H
On      cS Ti tr- vo cs
oo r-
m co
rn en
j     oo t> t- cn © m n
rH   r-
OC
es Tf rt
r- in
<
l-H
<
Q
W
O
3
III 3PEJO
Tf                          Ti
cs r>
CO   Ti
O©
!                     •*
r- t-
rt m
II apEJQ
VD        CS OTf © Ti
es c-
CS CO
On rn
© ©
|      Tf Tf © in Tt en rn
r- f
c
CN
i © cn
| t-h
en en
i-h cn
I 3pEJ£>
m      Tf m © vo
m                rt rt rt      |
m c
Tf   C
Tf in
CO   Ti
Ov On
On On
I             1 VO ON VD nc
1         l                 r
m oo
© O           cr,
r-1--          cS
es cs vo
© 00
CS  Tf
H3JJB8
i    1    1    !    1
1
i   j
j
!       M   !   M   1   j
<  i  i
-japurx
Mill
i i
i       ii   ii   i|   !
i i i
r>      o r- © on en
Tf         © CS O OO CO
Ov vc
Tj
VO    Ti
tr- t-
ON          rtCOTtCSOvr-rt
rH       oocnvortr-r>©
CS l-
VC
CO CS CO
CO  Tf
=5
SOtrepUSJJV
ON  Tf
c
p cs
cS ec
tn tr
o
VO CO  Tf
ON On
Airerj
33EJ3AV
ri      t- Tt* co m" r>
CS   Tt
NO  VC
Tl  vc
T
od es
O ec
■n"      r-cDTfcJvor-cn
to tn
c
r- vo oo"
cS tn
>
©      ri m cn Tt
in
tr
O CO
m
On C
in r-
cs      Tfcninenmcnrt
tr- on
Tf   NO
a
C- rt
©Tt
rn cn
<
p
•3
oo     o ri es co r-
oo vc
ii en
Tf ir
ri         Ttt-OOTfmOvTf
Cn               CS    Ti   Ti   Ti   Ti   Ti
n CS
c
rn es oo
Ti   Ti
rn cn cs cs
On 00
o
m Tt
On 00
Ti  Tt
ec
Tf
tn co
cs
cn
ts
cs
CS IT
CS ec
1
-a
01
I
0
CO
oo r- r- ti i-h
Tt m
Q
vo r-
co es
tn          VOOOTtcSOOrt©
ov es
cs
t- rt CS
© es
>>
t-         ts ii ts
r- Tt
ir
CO  Tf
CO Q
Ti          CSrtcnrtlneSrt
t-» o-
CN
Tf rt
vO 00
O
PQ
tN
en
rs
cs
CO  V
eS cc
§
3
B
o
oo oo On On 00
eS ti
c
r- o
r- r-
Tf      ©tncSvoen©Tt
©Tf
CN
oo en O
i-h cn
Ph
V
t-h m cn Tf
tr- cn
in
en On
cS r-
Tt      inenincsc-Ttr-i
Ov ec
ir
CO CS
Ti  NO
j
£
m
ti tr-
m
m
VO   T-
Tt C-
CN
i-h cn
o
1
Z
j
w
I
Ph
O
>|
*«
Pi
3
N
53
^
1
<
o
1
bo
Si
Co    S
N    £
.01   X
cu
•Oj
k
<u
ts
|
CJ
CO
a
tN.
tN,
1
^3
CU
i
1
*o
3
rt
co
a
H
tj
i
I
tt
.E
)
t;
3
rt
*H
-
CO
&
CO
tN.
0
>
X
T
c:
5 S
II
)
"trt
s
5 ffi
>
f-
c
1
E
c
CO
c
ft
CJ
T
>
u
1-
■g
o
CJ
s
OJ
s
tr
C
V
C
i
■6
ir
Ih
_C
"c
CD
CO
r
_G
i
•0
i S
a cj
c *
oi T
E
|
cc
'c
C
tr
c*i
Q
i M
.2?    IS
ffi     £
CJ
C
1)
CC
Ir
CU
£
i
"i
cu
CU
rti
0
"ci
C
V
O   rt
q §
CO
>
&
B
c
a
E
3
c
t
o
&
t|
o
3
<3
0
H
0
0
c
cc
mentary—
Bear Cre
Harrison
u i
a ^
Oh
CO
"Be
1
ior-Senior
mentary—
Ashton C
Grandvie
Oi
n
> S
.  a
U
-3
B
1
CO
G
H
■Li
1
CO
0
T
0.
to
01
la
0
o
E
W
rt
55
«
w
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 151
or
cr
Ml
r
j          1    I    1     1    1    I
1
1     1      II     1
1
|   |
I     M I M i
VO          III
1 vc
1       1   1   1   j   1   1
CS
 ,
i     II II II
|
Tf
m
1 1 1 M 1
1-H                                            |
1 *"
a\         i .-<    i    i    i    1
rt  ©
»         I    i    I
i
i       !   j   i   I
Mill
j
CS
CN
II 1 II 1
1-H                 •        ■        1
O          1     1     1     1     1     1
i i t i i
1 *
M       II   I   1   1   1
1  W
i II II
1
m
NC
II 1 II 1
°0                 111
1 00
Tf               |       1       1      1       1      1
	
rt.
1    1 vo ©    1 cn
r
I ec
M ' M
NT
rH               III
,,,!.,
Tf               III
1  Tl
a.         clNto   i   i
r> vo
OO VO
i           1 CS © ON     1     j
rt    Ml
M   j        II
CO
"
Ti   Tf
vo      en               rn
»    tit
i r-
r-        i cs Tf rf Ti   j
Ti  CO
©o
CS  Tf
VO        CO        CSCSOvVOTfCS
vo       \n                             Tf
CS   Tf
Ti tn
i     i-h m r-
en er
m         rH      I Tf O ON ri
en Tf m
en cc
eo                           rt
cn vo
rt r-
O On en
CS O
un     m rn cs r- m oo
oo er
T-H   1-
vo      cn en on Ov ov    i
en m in
CS              Ti                                      rt
''    '
Ti   T-
t1 r-
Tf      eo cn cn co co
CS Tf vo
m ec
m vc
on                           en    1
1-H   1-
rt \D Ti
CO 00
r-          Tf  CO  CO  CO  CO ©
VO cc
o
Ti       |  CS  rt  rt  rt
Tf m rt
VD VD
CO                                                            Ti   Ti
en r-
Ti    Tl
co      m rt cs es Tf rt
m co
■    |
v£
rn cn vo cn co n
cn VO VD
NO   NC
CO               T-H                          rt    T-H   1-H
m On
M   1
I    1
1-H               Tf   rt    rt   m   VD   T-H
m m
o
Ti Ti 00  I"** m Tf
cs es
ON On
CS                     11         |!         M
cc
1    :    1    I m    I
|      «n t- co
cs r-
|          |          |          I          |          |
''
''    '
MM00!
© C
cs     Ti © Tt cs r- Tt
00 c
CS ON
«n      rn cs © Tt tr- vo
VO            Tf  00   Tf
CO  Tl
Tf CN
tn vo m cs en
OC
■
© CO
co r
Tt      oo m m m ov cS
VO   T-
n r>
«
in      rn cS en t*- m c-
s*
m vc
m no
vo       CS en Tf
cn
cS m
CS
Cf
tn      vo es m
CO oc
vo      Tt Ti o r~ m ti
VO          CS  rH  Ti  i-H  m  CO
00 Tf
©c
cn m
or
m      vo co co © cS co
t-      cs © cs
CS        rt CS CS
tn oc
rt  CC
cs      oo m ov vo in vo
Tf   00
rv
cs      vo vo on eo m On
co       en cS m
VO        CS              CS Tf cS
co C
cn Tt
ex.
r—                cs m Tt
CO                                 CS
m      rt cS cs
NO ON
1-H   CO
oo      cs vo on co o r-
t- m
r- en
■—
r-     cs Tt r- co r- cs
m      vo cs tr-
vo cn
cs      »n i-h ti Tt © m
CO i-
m oo
VO            CS   Tf   Tf
rt OC
CO                                                            rH
CS VC
t-H  r-
Tl      rt
1
1
I
-,
e
o
1?
03
S
&
cs
CO
0
fei
,o
let
Jn
Q
I
t
c
1
i
Q
ffi
c
i
c-.
O
1       «
a t
e o
S
rt
T.
§
0
M
a
SS
CJ
01
Z
w
*c
O
1
CO
V
C
h
i
i
00
1
«c«
C
fa
s
3
c
v
*CL
iz
t
c
1
X
E
X
t-
c
CL
<r
cc:
c
Cv
F
1
e.=
FT
rs
Q
ec
i
i
c
»i
i
. c
E
CO
Ic.
Cu
g
j
t
c
1
1
c
O
tr
~o
p
ts
OJ
V
c
c
A
3
CO
cr
C
H
|
rs
oo
i
ja
'C
to
Q
11
II
ss
CL
>
c
rt
e
1
E
p-
c
CO
E
E
iC
1=
P-
6
1
i
D
C
c
1
CO
V
*rt
■r-
«2
,CJ
ft,
■B
Q
•a
01
Ci
a
g
V
CU
s
a
s
3
C
rt
c
"S
i -
Seal
S5
3.2
gj   tv
Wr
fetor-
rt
'ffi
I
QJ
1
P
V
c
c
1
c?
T-
c
£
4
c
JC
X
i-
Sc
1*
S E
a 1
E*
L
1 E
E<
<
c
E
0.
s
c
c
c/
•c
c
C
c
£
TJ
*CL
cc
P
Se
cc
cc
rt
c.
<
c
b-
<
E
E
c
c
1
I
E
J:
tt
1<
CJ    CD
i-i
rt
tt
Uh
UJ
r-l
w
W
 Z 152
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1961/62
IIIX 3PEJO
11! I ll j i ll i
1 cs
IIX 3P"JO
i m
IX spuJO
I oc
1 cs
1          1          1   Ti         1          1          1         1          !          1    rt
ts tr
X 3PEJO
III     !  1  1  1  II
SO
Ti         •         •    Ti         '11         1                     1          •   Ti
co  Tl
TS
XI 3PEJO
1     1                       Ml!
n ti
3
•S
j tS rt    |    irt    j   j in   | cs
n tr-
.*>
IIIA 3P«JO
co CS
s
o
U
1
cs i-h   i cs m   j   |   | r-   | r-
ov en
IIA sptiJO
00   Ti
es
i
W
u
<
Q
icSCSes    ics   itnoortin
CS tr-
IA 3PEJO
1                              |               |  rt          Tf
Tf Ov
mmnfivOrtrtvOOMo vO
Ti tr
A 3PEJQ
ri     tn
ee cn
Ti CS
eSescSen    : Tf --h t- Tt co co
Ti m
W
AI 3P"JO
T-H   VO
vo m
ri CS
H
I-H
TfvOrtTtvovorSooTfeSTf
cn cS
AILY A'
III 3PEJO
Ti              Tf
00 vo
Ti es
cSmrtmmOTtTtcomm
t-h t-
II 3PEJQ
rt            rt   rt  Tf
Ti   ©
cS rn
mTfinTfcSmoocSi-HvovO
CS   Ti
Q
W
0
I spujQ
CS en Tf
m vo
cs cn
U3UE8
I    i    II    II    1    1    II    i
m eo
-jspufx
cs
cninovor-rHcnovor-oo
S3
w
33UEpU3JJV
Tf 00 © CO ON OO CS  Tt rt © Ti
XlTEa
oortrtcnrtr^TtoNTtcn'ov
S rS
>
rtcSrttScSeSrtovr--r-cn
CNtN
38BJ3AV
cS
<
cs
■8
OOcnTfTfOTfONONrNrtO
cc
NO
Ti          HrtH          TfTfinrrt
r- oo
2
•O
5
1-1
VO rt
<
01
O
1-HCSONmTfVOt-COTtrtOO
Ti   Ti            rtrtrt            TfTfTtCS
OO CS
H
0
OO Tf
vo es
Z
|
pa
rt
w
	
3
ONmcnOvTt©vocSrtcSm
rteSrtesesrnrHOvOvONTt
cS
Ti GO
Ph
o
H
vO eS
CO   Tt
Ti CS
o
z
pq
Ph
o
TJ
^
CJ
3
rt
O
O
C
<
CJ
B
o
i
CO
•a
U
1
1
e
rt
£
o
D
co
Oh
o
<H
Tt».
a »
CO
It
01
*Ih
So
S
•s: 3!
§|
J."
2 •■
IS
4.
TT
a
hJ
§
X
■a
o
o
0
IS
•o
rt
s
.E
rt
ffi
1
§
1
1?
C
a.
fc
S
c
-
*
t.
2
t-
>
'TT
CO
rt
g
S
01
a
i
v-
ftj
i
'cr
1
5
|
rt
0)
N
tr
0
C
1
CO
cr
(2
Oi
w
'•.-
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 153
SDUBpuauv
IIIX apBJQ
IIX =>PBJO
CS oo
m co
On m
r- vo
Ti   ©
C3V vo_
en en
©
co
od
oo
es
no"
es
es
©
CO
tr-
00
m"
Tt
es
co'
©
r-
VO
eo
CO
ON
r>
t>
r-
CO_
©
Tt
in
en
CS
m
Tf oo
r- eo
CS n
cs
Tt
©
rs
in
m"
oo On
CO
5
cn    I
CO
S3
00 "i
cs cs
Tf tn
vo r-
On
CO
es
cn
cn On
Tf m
cs es
es
©
m
r- m
r- cn
cs r-
IX 3PEJQ
r- m
r- ti
Tf cs
Tf   Tf
x »pbjo
VO VD
© ©
CO  ©
XI ape-iQ
VO CS
Tt   ©
VO vo
VO  Tt
t- rs
eo"co"
eo vo
Tt   ©
On vo
Tf   Tf
8
© ts
in oo
es n
t-
ON
Tt
in
en vo
CS   Ti
tr-1-
On
©
CS
Tf  NO
1-H   CO
r- m
NO vo"
f*
eS oo
m ri
cn en
o
vo
8
© es
m co
Tf   Tf
CS
co
ON
O
m
Tf   Tt
OV CO
in m
00
r-
en cs
oo en
Tf  Tf
cn oo
on r-
Tf CO
co cn
on cn
rt t-
IIIA apBiO
[ i
IIA 3P^0
IA speao
A sps-iO
Tf in
Ti   NO
VO CS
vo r-
in oo
on no
cs"cs"
Tf tr-
r> cs
m ©
Tt r-
r- o
^ r-
r-
r-
1
627 1     663
599 |     637
8
CO
VO
rs
CS
oo m
t-  Tf
m m
On VO
en Tf
m Tt
eo
NO
in ©
© VD
in Tf
m
NO
ON
in en
On en
en Tf
NO
ON
o ©
© On
m Tf
©
ON
On
cS en
CS On
en eS
in tn
cn ©
m m
en Tt
On oo
oo tn
Ti rt   rt     CS
vo en
vo vo
<n c©
eo'es"
cs ©
O oo
Tf cn
S
t- r-
vi tn
tn Tt
oo ©
es ti
tn Tf
Ti
1-H   T-H
Tt
m oo
SO
rt en
*N
£! *-*
oo
es vo
r-
in Tt
Ti   Ti
AI speiO
III speJQ
II apejQ
I apEJ'j
in vd
Tf rs   .
rt rt    CS
ON ©
CO CS
in m
OO ON
vo r-
vo m
oo r-
Ti On
co cS
in Noes cs
CO  CO
CO OV
co en
tn in
m vo
© Ov
Tt   ON
On O
rt  t-
Vo'Tf
Ii
^ es
es ti
tr- es
vo *n
tr- m
On 00
00 rn
NO   rt
rt.NO.
,t-m"
en ©
On in
t- Tt
r-^vd
■n cn
en tn
co"r-
uajjeSjapuj}!
SM!0
sAog
juaui[oiug
ON CS
Ov CO
in Tt
i
00
y
r3
cr
G
«
C
h
e
C
H
CO
.9 oS
.2 o
3 pa
3
3
3
O w oi
o
TT 3
rt   3
§1
3   «   w
§ss
a cfl m
PI
S
3  vi  tr\
las
2«0
  EXAMINATION PAPERS
Separate booklets of examination papers for University Entrance and
Senior Matriculation, including complete sets of papers for June and August
in each year, may be obtained from the Director, Textbook Branch, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Prices for booklets that are STILL AVAILABLE are as follows:—
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1952.    Price, 74 cents.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1960.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1961.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1962.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1952
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1953
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1960.   Price, 53 cents.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1961.   Price, 53 cents.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1962.   Price, 53 cents.
Note.—The above prices include the 5-per-cent social services tax.
Price, 74 cents.
Price, 74 cents.
Price, 74 cents.
Price, 53 cents.
Price, 53 cents.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1963
4,260263-5400
     

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0363982/manifest

Comment

Related Items