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Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the YEAR ENDED MARCH 31 1962 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1963]

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Annual Report of the
Department of Social Welfare
for the
YEAR ENDED MARCH 31
1962
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1962
 .
,.,    i-j
 Victoria, B.C., October 29, 1962.
To His Honour George Randolph Pearkes, V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the year ended
March 31, 1962, is herewith respectfully submitted.
W. D. BLACK,
Minister of Social Welfare.
Office of the Minister of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
 Department of Social Welfare,
Victoria, B.C., October 29, 1962.
The Honourable W. D. Black,
Minister of Social Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Social Welfare for the year ended March 31, 1962.
E. R. RICKINSON,
Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
 DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE
April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Hon. W. D. Black.
.Minister of Social Welfare.
E. R. RlCKINSON
J. A. Sadler	
R. J. BURNHAM—
SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
 Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
 Director of Social Welfare.
 Assistant Director of Social Welfare.
DIVISIONAL AND INSTITUTIONAL ADMINISTRATION
.Departmental Comptroller.
Superintendent of Child Welfare.
J. McDiarmid	
Miss M. K. King	
Mrs. J. P. Scott Casework Supervisor, Family Division.
F. G. Hassard Superintendent, Brannen Lake School for Boys.
Miss W. M. Urquhart Superintendent, Willingdon School for Girls.
Dr. P. W. Laundy. Director of Medical Services.
E. W. Berry Chairman, Old-age Assistance and Blind Persons'
and Disabled Persons' Allowances and Supplementary Assistance.
Mrs. M. Miller Personnel Officer.
G. P. Willie Superintendent, Provincial Home.
D. W. Fowler Training Supervisor.
Mrs. M. Titterington Supervisor, Social Service Department, Division
Tuberculosis Control.
A. A. Shipp Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions.
Miss M. Jamieson.
H. E. Blanchard-
R. I. Stringer	
W. J. Camozzi	
V. H. Dallamore-
A. E. Bingham	
W. H. Crossley	
REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
 Administrator, Region I.
 Administrator, Region II.
 Administrator, Region III.
 Administrator, Region IV.
 Administrator, Region V.
 Administrator, Region VI.
—  Administrator, Region VII.
CONSULTANTS
C. W. Gorby Juvenile Delinquency Prevention Services.
Miss A. E. Mann Medical Social Work.
Mrs. C. Mackenzie Office Procedures.
F. S. Hatcher Rehabilitation.
Miss B. W. Snider Research.
5
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Part I.—General Administration—
Director of Social Welfare     9
Assistant Director of Social Welfare  12
Part II.—Regional Administration—
Region I  15
Region II  16
Region III  18
Region IV  20
Region V  21
Region VI  24
Region VII  27
Part III.—Divisional Administration—
Family Division—
Social Allowances  30
Family Service  34
Child Welfare Division  3 6
Medical Services Division  55
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowances, Disabled Persons' Allowances, and Supplementary Assistance  58
Part IV.—Institutions—
Industrial School for Boys  73
Industrial School for Girls  78
Provincial Home, Kamloops  _ 8 3
Welfare Institutions Board  8 6
Part V.—Social Work Services—
Tuberculosis Control and Poliomyelitis Pavilion  91
Part VI.—Accounting Division  93
  Report of the Department of Social Welfare
PART L—GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE
J. A. Sadler
Throughout the past year there has been increased activity in welfare services
in the Province, and changes have been made in the operation of the Department.
In an effort to utilize the abilities of staff to the fullest advantage, case loads
have been reallotted and, where necessary, specialized by category. By these
means, social workers have been assigned to handle the types of cases in the various
phases of the Department's programme in which they have shown their greatest skill.
In August, 1961, a sub-office was opened in Prince George for the purpose of
handling the unemployed employable persons in that area. Demands for service
increased in Lillooet, and a new social welfare office was opened there in November,
1961. As from July 1, 1961, North Kamloops District Municipality became responsible for its welfare costs.
Staff changes at the senior level have taken place. Dr. P. W. Laundy was
appointed Director of Medical Services when Dr. G. E. Wakefield resigned to accept
a new position with the Vancouver General Hospital. Mr. R. J. Burnham succeeded
Miss M. Riddell as Assistant Director of Social Welfare, and Mrs. M. Miller was
appointed Personnel Officer. Mr. D. W. Fowler became Supervisor of Training
Division when Miss M. Moscrop left the Department to accept an appointment with
the Crown Colony of Hong Kong.
With the death of Mr. E. L. Rimmer, Regional Administrator for Vancouver Island, certain regional staff changes were made, and Miss M. Jamieson was
appointed Regional Administrator, Vancouver Island. Mr. W. J. Camozzi was
appointed Regional Administrator for the Kootenay area.
Mr. C. W. Gorby was appointed Co-ordinator, Juvenile Delinquency Prevention Services, to initiate, under the direction of the Delinquent Children Supervision
Committee, the recommendations contained in the report of the Juvenile Delinquency Inquiry Board. Mr. Gorby has been carrying out an analysis of all facets
of juvenile delinquency throughout the Province.
Mr. A. G. Gilmore was appointed Supervisor, Civil Defence Welfare Services,
to continue the development of these services through the training of departmental
staff, municipal officials, and volunteers who denote an interest in this work.
Under the guidance of Miss B. W. Snider, Research Consultant, as Co-
Chairman, the Federal-Provincial Welfare Committee on Indians has continued to
develop and realign services to Indians. With the utmost co-operation from the
Department of Indian Affairs, two projects have been established in the Prince
Rupert and Smithers areas whereby studies are being carried on in order to coordinate and develop all strengths necessary to help Indian people live a secure and
productive life in their communities.
In addition to the annual meeting of Municipal and Provincial Welfare Administrators, administration and committee meetings were held throughout the year.
The following committees continued their studies: Recording, Earnings and Exemp-
9
l_
 K 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
tion, Delinquent Children Su -.ervision, and Research. An Interdepartmental Case
Review Committee, with members from the Provincial Mental Health Services and
from this Department, was established.
In this report are three tables which show, on a comparative basis, case loads
and changes in case loads.
In Table II it is noted that 66 per cent of the movement in case load took place
in the Social Allowance category. However, in Table I the Social Allowance
category shows as only 35 per cent of the case load. This is a healthy sign, for it
shows that those who have to seek financial help do not merely remain in the position
of being dependent on such assistance, and it demonstrates the concerted effort that
the social workers are making to help these citizens to become self-supporting.
This effort is being made not only with unemployed employable persons, but
also with men or women who might be considered unemployable. In this connection the rehabilitation team has worked in conjunction with our social workers and
has continued its activities in the Nanaimo and Chilliwack areas and is planning
a survey in Prince George and other areas. The team's efforts have been most
productive with the return to employment of individuals who have not been self-
supporting for a number of years.
The Department continued to study and explore all methods of rehabilitation
and was pleased to co-operate with the officials of Matsqui District Municipality in
a pilot plan established by them through their centennial park project, whereby jobs
were made available by the municipality to people who for some time had been
unable to find even summer-time employment.
Table 3 shows a decrease over the year 1961 in the percentage of population
receiving Old-age Assistance and Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance. In last year's report the 1961 figures showed a decrease over the year 1960.
These decreases would seem to indicate that more and more of our citizens over the
age of 65 years have accumulated certain resources during their working lives and
thus in decreasing numbers do they have to turn to the Province for this extra help.
It is expected this trend will continue in the future in the light of the establishment
of superannuation plans during the past quarter of a century.
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major
Categories as at March 31st for the Years 1961 and 1962
Category
1961
1962
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
1,290
27,643
649
8,542
32,060
2,118
7,160
746
1.6
34.5
0.8
10.7
40.0
2.6
8.9
0.9
1,325
28,026
684
8,420
31,262
2,261
7,362
795
1.7
35.0
Blind Persons' Allowance1 	
Old-age Assistancei— -	
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance1 	
Disabled Persons' Allowance1	
Child Welfare                      ■	
0.9
10.5
39.0
2.8
9.2
1.0
80,208
100.0
80,135
100.0
1 Includes Old-age Assistance Board figures which are not shown in regional reports.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 11
Table II.—Movement in Case Load during Fiscal Year 1961/62
Gategory
Cases Opened during Year
Cases Closed during Year
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
2,081
66,717
414
1,358
6,171
13,754
8,294
638
2.1
67.1
0.4
1.4
6.2
13.8
8.3
0.6
2,046
66,334
379
1,215
6,293
14,552
8,092
589
2.1
66.7
Blind Persons' Allowance — -  	
Disabled Persons' Allowance 	
0.4
1.2
6.3
14.6
Child Welfare                 -.                                                	
8.1
0.6
99,427
100.0
99 snn     I     innn
Table III.—Number of Cases by Category and as a Percentage of Population
as at March 31st for the Years 1961 and 1962
1961
1962
Category
Number
Per Cent of
Population
(1,602,000)
Number
Per Cent of
Population
(1,629,082)
1,290
27,646
649
8,542
32,060
2,118
7,160
746
0.08
1.73
0.04
0.53
2.00
0.13
0.45
0.05
1,325
28,026
684
8,420
31,262
2,261
7,362
795
0.08
1.72
Blind Persons' Allowance1   	
Old-age Assistance1  	
0.04
0.52
1.92
Disabled Persons' Allowance1   	
Child Welfare                                                                   	
0.14
0 45
0.05
80,208
5.01
80,135
4.92
1 Includes Old-age Assistance Board figures which are not shown in regional reports.
The Department is most appreciative of the co-operation and help given by
other departments of Government, municipal officials, private agencies, and other
organizations.
 K 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE
R. J. BURNHAM
Miss Marie Ridde 11 held the position of Assistant Director of Social Welfare
for the greater part of the year and up to January 31, 1962; therefore, this report
will cover, in a great part, a period in which the writer did not participate.
For many years past and up until March of 1962, the function of this office has
been to carry certain specific and delegated duties related to the administration of
the Department, with its principal responsibility being to maintain social-work and
stenographic staff. With the ever-increasing pressures of administration brought
about by heavier case loads over the past years and a larger staff in the field, it
became apparent more time had to be devoted to assisting the Director of Social
Welfare in his duties. Just before the end of the 1961/62 fiscal year, we were fortunate in having Mrs. M. Miller appointed as Personnel Officer, and she assumed
responsibility for the job of maintaining staff.
The Assistant Director of Social Welfare assumed administrative responsibility
for the Family Division. The Department is further developing its rehabilitation
programme in co-operation with the Departments of Public Health and of Education
and the National Employment Service. Programmes have been established in Nanaimo and Chilliwack, and, although still in the experimental stage, we believe they
will be very productive. A preliminary study has been made in Prince George, and
we are now prepared to proceed with a rehabilitation programme for that area.
In-service training, placement of staff, and the greater part of recruitment is
delegated to the Training Division in Vancouver. Mr. D. W. Fowler was appointed
our new Training Supervisor as of January 1, 1962, and has ably taken over this job.
Mrs. Mackenzie, Office Consultant, is a member of the staff of the Assistant Director
of Social Welfare, and it is our responsibility to see that office routines and procedures are kept up to date and maintained.
This report will, of course, deal mainly with staff, as has been its main theme
in past years. The year under review showed a slight decrease in case loads, with a
total of 80,135 at March 31, 1962, as compared with 80,208 at March 31, 1961,
being a decrease of seventy-three cases.
For the same period there was an increase of forty-seven in staff, made up of
thirty-three social-work and fourteen clerical positions.
The following table shows the total number of casual and permanent staff
(clerical, professional, and technical) that were employed and their location in the
Department as at March 31, 1962:—
General Administration     16
Field Service  322
Medical Services Division     13
Child Welfare Division     27
Provincial Home     3 4
Brannen Lake School for Boys     62
Willingdon School for Girls     50
Old-age Assistance Board     76
Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division       5
Total  605
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 13
The following table shows the total social-work staff employed for the fiscal
years ended March 31, 1961, and March 31, 1962:—
University
Trained
In-service
Trained
Total
Total staff, March 31, 1961              	
89
+5
147
—5
236
Completed formal training during fiscal year 	
Staff aonointed. Anril 1. 1961. to March 31. 19621  	
94
24
28
142
54
37
236
78
Resignations, deaths (2), and transfers (2), April 1,
1961
to March 31, 1962-
65
Total staff, March 31, 1962 (excluding institutions)
90
5
159
2
249
>olfo
- Girls   -	
7
Totals   	
95
161
256
1 Ten of these appointments were temporary to allow the Training Division time to  recruit permanent
replacements.
The following table shows the total social-work staff, according to degrees and
training, as at March 31, 1962:—
Men
Total
Master of Social Work  _	
Master of Social Work lacking thesis  _ -
Bachelor of Social Work   	
Social Work Diploma    	
One year of training at the School of Social Work but no degree-
Two years of training at the School of Social Work but no degree
In-service trainees now taking course  -	
In-service trained     	
Totals    „
5
3
17
3
6
1
2
77
4
2
22
21
9
2
2
80
114
142
9
5
39
24
15
3
4
157
256
During the year under review there was a total of 159 separations, and appointments numbered 212. Of these separations, sixty-five were social workers. The
separations were due to the following reasons:—
Domestic  19
To further education  14
Temporary only  10
To accept other employment    _    _ -     _ 10
111 health  3
Died  2
Transferred   2
Services unsatisfactory  2
To accept municipal job  2
Voluntary retirement  1
Total  65
The Department was represented at nine conferences and institutes related to
social welfare, and twenty-eight delegates attended. Regions I, IV, and VI had a
combined staff meeting in Abbotsford, while Regions III, V, and VII held one in
Kamloops.
During the course of the year, Mrs. Mackenzie, our Office Consultant, was
able to visit seven district offices as well as the Training Division and Medical Services Division. Careful consideration is being given to the pressing problem of
reviewing office routines and procedures as the volume of work and the increased
demands made on our stenographic staff have been heavy.  This is a most exacting
 K 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
and demanding task, requiring a good deal of detailed work as well as staff-training.
It can be readily seen that without proper office administration many hours of social-
work time would be lost to the people of this Province.
I should like to express sincere appreciation for the co-operation of the staff of
the Department with this office, and I am sure Miss Marie Riddell, former Assistant
Director, would join me in this.
TRAINING DIVISION
D. W. Fowler
The provision and training of staff to implement our programme continues to
be a heavy responsibility, and in carrying out these responsibilities the Training
Division has had an active year. The functions of this Division consist of recruiting,
selecting, placing, and training of new staff members, and we are also involved in the
total staff development programme.
The problem of staffing our services remains a critical one. There has been no
appreciable increase in the supply of professionally trained social workers, and we
continue to be dependent on persons with suitable background and education for
whom the Division takes responsibility for training.
As we meet all requests for interviews, during the year these averaged thirty-five
per month. In addition, we dealt with a large number of requests for information
regarding employment over the telephone and by letter. Seventy-eight appointments
were made to the field staff, and we had sixty-five resignations.
Five orientation classes were held during the year which involved fifty-one
trainees and four classes involving twenty-five trainees returning to complete their
in-service training.
Five workers were granted educational leave, three of whom received Departmental bursaries.
In conclusion, I would like to pay a tribute to Miss Martha Moscrop, who
founded this programme of training and brought it to the point where it has achieved
national recognition. Miss Moscrop resigned in 1961 to go to Hong Kong, where
she is presently involved in educational activity for training social workers.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 15
PART II.—REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
REGION I
Miss M. Jamieson, Regional Administrator
There has been no change in the boundaries for Region I, which includes
Vancouver Island, the Gulf Islands, and a small section of the Mainland bordering
the Johnstone and Queen Charlotte Straits. The total land area of the region is
roughly 13,000 square miles. The approximate population served is 291,300 persons, with 76 per cent of this number living from Nanaimo south.
In April, 1961, the social-worker strength was increased in Region I by three
full-time social workers; placements were made in Alberni, Nanaimo, and Duncan.
During the year under review a full-time assistant district supervisor was placed in
the Duncan office. This office had formerly been served by a half-time acting
district supervisor who carried a case load in the Victoria district office on a half-time
basis. The region is now served by thirty-six and one-half social workers, four district supervisors, two municipal administrators, and one Regional Administrator.
The following tables show case-load figures as at March 31, 1962, by category
and location of offices and numerical and percentage comparison of case load by
categories for the years 1960/61 and 1961/62:—
Table 1-
-Administrative Offices with Distribution of Case Load by Category of
Services as at March 31, 1962
Category
Alberni
Courtenay
Duncan
Nanaimo
Saanich
Victoria
City
Victoria
District
Total
20
374
1
24
113
319
213
13
26
410
9
37
160
520
204
11
23
280
10
27
95
441
157
25
77
703
12
55
270
952
264
32
196
5
41
120
689
36
643
21
85
343
1,920
38
53
399
8
59
143
978
134
60
199
3,005
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Disabled Persons' Allowance
Old-age Assistance	
Old-age   Security   Supplementary Social Allowance-
Child Welfare	
66
328
1,244
5,819
972
Health and Institutional	
215
Totals 	
1,077
1,377
1,058
2,365
1,087
3,050
1,834
11,848
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region I for the Fiscal Years 1960/61 and 1961/62
Category
1-60/61
1961/62
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
166
3,195
68
319
1,221
6,039
942
189
1.4
26.3
0.6
2.6
10.1
49.7
7.8
1.5
199
3,005
66
328
1,244
5,819
972
215
1 7
25.4
06
2 8
10 4
Old-age Security Supplementary Social Allowance	
rhilrl Welfare
49.1
82
1.8
Totnl-
12,139
100.0
11,848
100 0
 K 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The placing of elderly persons in nursing or boarding homes or providing alternate care by home-makers or housekeepers continued to be a major problem.
Licensed boarding homes and private hospitals in the region were used as resources
in regard to placements of the aged and infirm.
The Family Service and Child Welfare case load was relatively high, and within
this group were found many complex problems which required much time and effort
on the part of the staff. In addition to this, the processing of applications for Old-
age Assistance and proving eligibility for public assistance for employable and unemployable persons added to the total demands. It is interesting to note that during
the past fiscal year 36,176 unemployed persons were assisted, as compared with
32,966 for the previous year.
During the year a rehabilitation survey was made in Nanaimo district office by
Mr. Hatcher, Rehabilitation Consultant, and the results of this survey were gratifying as a number of incapacitated persons were placed in gainful employment.
In May, 1961, the region suffered a loss in the death of Mr. E. L. Rimmer,
Regional Administrator.
In conclusion may I express my thanks to the supervisory social-work, and
stenographic staff in Region I, who responded so well to the demands placed on
them. The courtesy and co-operation extended by the municipal staffs as well as
members of private agencies has been most appreciated.
REGION II
H. E. Blanchard, Regional Administrator
Public welfare in the geographic area of British Columbia known as Region II
is administered from municipal and Provincial offices as follows:—
Amalgamated offices (municipal offices under the charge of Municipal Administrators) :  District of Burnaby, District of Coquitlam, New Westminster
City, City and District of North Vancouver, District of Richmond, Vancouver City, and District of West Vancouver.
District offices (Department of Social Welfare offices under the charge of district supervisors, serving unorganized areas and per capita municipalities) :
New Westminster district office, serving unorganized areas and the municipalities of Delta, Fraser Mills, Port Coquitlam, and Port Moody; Powell
River district office, serving the District of Powell River and surrounding
area; Vancouver district office, serving unorganized areas of University
of British Columbia Endowment Lands, North Arm of Burrard Inlet,
Howe Sound, Cheakamus Valley, Sechelt Peninsula, Ocean Falls, and
surrounding coast.
The boundary of the region as delineated above varies only in a minor way
from that reported in earlier years.   In October, 1961, Lasqueti Island was transferred to Region I.   The number of cases was small but required several visits during
a year, and from Powell River these could be made only by chartering a small aeroplane.   A crash landing on a swampy beach which injured a social worker and a
public health nurse who were, in the course of their duties, sharing the transportation
drew attention to the fact that the area could more easily be served by water taxi
from Vancouver Island.
Table I following shows the distribution of the total case load into the several
categories covering the two fiscal years 1960/61 and 1961/62. The two years are
detailed to show what seems to be a typical movement.    Between 1959/60 and
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1961/62        K 17
1960/61 there was a large increase in Social Allowance cases, and this heavy load
has been maintained both numerically and percentage-wise. The percentage of
Old-age Assistance cases shows a gradual decrease, while Disabled Persons' Allowances show a gradual increase. This latter can be expected because the generally
younger age of the recipients will cause a build-up of cases.
Table II shows the same categories of cases as distributed among the several
administrative offices in the region.
Table 1.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region II as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1960/61 and 1961/62
Category
1960/61
1961/62
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Family Service	
205
11,230
277
3,817
14,634
915
1,659
217
0.6
34.0
0.9
11.6
44.4
2.8
5.0
0.7
217
11,566
321
3,470
14,683
1,009
1,662
226
0.6
34.9
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Old-age Assistance -	
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Child Welfare	
1.0
10.5
44.3
3.0
5 0
07
Totals        	
32,954
1000
33,154
100 0
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region II as at March 31,1962
Category
en
II
IIS
O cfl
4-   U
%>
C-.S
(-J
> o
OS .2
>o
Totals
Mar.
31,
1962
Mar.
31,
1961
Family Service	
Social Allowance .	
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Old-age Assistance	
Old   Age   Security   Supplementary
Social Allowance	
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Child Welfare	
Health and Institutional 	
Totals	
51
907
32
429
2,104
97
396
72
33
957
15
165
724
43
125
24
18
421
4
77
413
33
177
15
24
379
12
125
781
39
184
35
15
100
2
41
132
19
78
8
25
243
7
131
399
45
174
14
8,107
233
2,334
9,153
655
(1)
28
177
8
67
334
34
344
27
6
54
3
28
356
17
46
23
217
11,566
321
3,470
14,683
1,009
1,662
226
205
11,230
277
3,817
14,634
915
1,659
217
4,088
1,579
20,482
1,019
533
33,154
32,954
1 Carried in Vancouver by Children's Aid Societies.   See report of Superintendent of Child Welfare.
Emergency Shelters
In both Vancouver and New Westminster the winter of 1961/62 again saw the
need for the provision of an emergency shelter for single transient men. Vancouver
made provisions for such during the months of November, 1961, to February, 1962,
but closed out the project early in March when it became obvious that the existing
facilities of private organizations could accommodate the demand.
The Vancouver project was planned only to supplement existing voluntary
facilities, but in New Westminster, where, because of its smaller population, such
facilities do not exist, the emergency shelter continued to operate on a different basis.
Single transient men were housed in the shelter for several days until their cases
could be evaluated. If granted assistance, they found suitable housing for themselves.
This resulted in a near maximum use of the shelter and proved most beneficial and
economical.
 K 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Staff
The total number of social workers employed in the public welfare programme
dealing with the categories mentioned in Region II was 95 Vi at March 31, 1962.
These were carrying a total case load of 33,154 at March 31, 1962. The 327 average case load so represented becomes significant only when variety and intricacies of
case-handling are realized.
Again I would like to take this opportunity to thank the private agencies and
the Municipal Administrators and their staffs for their co-operation. To the staff of
the Department of Social Welfare, clerical persons, social workers, supervisors, and
senior administration, I would like to extend special thanks for their help.
REGION III
R. I. Stringer, Regional Administrator
There have been no changes in the regional boundaries during the past year.
The region is bounded on the south by the International Boundary, on the north by
Wells Gray Park, on the east by Revelstoke and district, and on the west by Bralorne.
A new office was opened in Lillooet on November 1, 1961, to serve the areas of
Lillooet, Lytton, Spences Bridge, Clinton, Pavilion, Shalalth, Seton Portage, Bralorne, Pioneer, and the Cariboo Road north to 70 Mile House, including Jesmond,
Queen, and Loon Lake areas. These districts had formerly been served by the
Kamloops office. The office is staffed by two social workers and a stenographer who
transferred from our Kamloops office.
The Department of Social Welfare services are now provided from seven
Provincial offices, one each located at Lillooet, Kamloops, Kelowna, Penticton,
Oliver, Salmon Arm, and Vernon, and four amalgamated municipal offices located
at Kamloops, Kelowna, Penticton, and Vernon. Services are provided in the Municipalities of Armstrong, Enderby, Revelstoke, Salmon Arm, and Summerland and are
paid for by these municipalities on a per capita basis. On July 1, 1961, North Kamloops was included as a municipality responsible for its own welfare services under
the same arrangement.
The population of the region has continued to increase at a regular rate, and
there has been some progress in agriculture and industrial development. This is
expected to accelerate with the opening of the Rogers Pass on July 30, 1962.
Total case load has increased 3.5 per cent, which is slightly less than the estimated population increase. However, the majority of the new cases have been in the
costly Social Allowance category. Although the problem of unemployment showed
signs of levelling off, the total Social Allowance case load was approximately 11 per
cent higher at the end of the fiscal year than at the beginning.
An analysis of a typical case load containing 158 Social Allowance cases determined that the reason for granting Social Allowance was as follows: Thirty desertions, two husbands contributing partially; three children in homes of relatives, aged
between 12 and 15 years; thirty-six age factor, ages ranging from 51 to 65 years;
forty-five illness, ages ranging from 39 to 63 years, and one Disabled Persons' Allowance; five widows, ages ranging from 34 to 46 years, one getting job because
daughter now 17 years of age, and the rest having young children; two Unmarried
Parents Act, pressure being brought to obtain assistance for mothers; thirty-seven
unemployed employables.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 19
The Social Allowance case load increased from 32.9 to 35.4 per cent of the
total case load, an actual increase from 3,050 to 3,392 cases. The total case load
increased from 9,262 to 9,582, an increase of 3.5 per cent. In addition to this
increase in case load, there were 33,472 cases opened and closed, an increase of 44
per cent over the year before.
The finding and placing of children in suitable foster homes, who are not available for adoption, continues to be a time-consuming responsibility, and good foster
homes continue to be in demand. This problem has been increased due to the
changing balance of children available for adoption and suitable adopting couples.
Whereas for some time it has been felt that there is a real need for group-living homes
for teen-agers who cannot adjust to foster homes, it is now becoming apparent that
unless the trend in adoption changes, it will be necessary to develop more receiving
homes for babies approved for adoption placement but for whom a home is not
immediately available. Provision of both these types of homes is being carefully
investigated in the region.
There was a most welcome increase in staff in the region, and, as a result,
average case loads are lower than those carried in the previous fiscal year. Improvement in services has been possible, and staff have been encouraged to feel that their
efforts may be even more productive in the future. I wish to take this opportunity to
thank them for their efficient and constructive efforts, which, I am sure, are not
exceeded by any department of Government.
The following tables show the regional case load as of March 31, 1961, and
March 31, 1962, by types of assistance and location of servicing offices:—
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region III as at March 31, 1962
Category
a
o,
o
o
E
cfl
rt
C>
V
u
o
o
3
c
o
c
u
a,
U
>
o
a
o
j=.
"rt.5
c
o
e
>
OS
a
o
o
1„
Wo
cfl
22.
->rtrt
-JO
a
o
a..t-
a
o
E>.
O
u
94
735
20
155
400
28
413
27
32
234
4
84
257
42
125
12
35
220
7
65
126
13
70
6
77
314
9
161
485
50
260
18
14
155
47
16
330
2
33
70
13
171
13
23
314
18
235
614
37
216
15
354
42
194
10
171
7
106
381
43
6
368
2
80
249
26
1
197
2
85
315
29
291
3,392
Blind Persons' Allowance    	
71
1,046
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance-
3,091
291
Child Welfare _  	
1,302
98
Totals
1,872
79U
542
1,374
216|  648
1,472
600
714| 726
628|9,582
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region HI as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1960/61 and 1961/62
Category
1960/61
1961/62
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
293
3,050
79
970
3,215
284
1,279
92
3.1
32.9
0.9
10.5
34.7
3.1
13.8
1.0
291
3,392
71
1,046
3,091
291
1,302
98
3.0
35.4
Blind Persons' Allowance 	
Old-age Assistance.  _.    	
0.7
10.9
32.3
Disabled Persons' Allowance..	
Child Welfare..       '
3.0
13.6
1.0
Totals        -         ..                         	
9,262
100.0
9,582
100.0
 K 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REGION IV
Walter J. Camozzi, Regional Administrator
The Rockies to the east, the 49th parallel from Greenwood to meet them, and
a line drawn from Greenwood to the Rockies north to Field form the triangular
shape of Region IV, which remained unchanged for the year 1961/62.
There have been no great administrative changes. A Regional Administrator
at Nelson, three district offices supervised by district supervisors at Nelson, Cranbrook, and Trail, with sub-offices at New Denver, Fernie, Creston, Golden, Castle-
gar, and Grand Forks respectively are served by twenty-two social workers and
fourteen clerical staff. The distances to be travelled in the region are quite far and
often not direct, and with fall coming early and spring late makes work difficult,
especially for many workers who are inexperienced in this respect as well as in the
arduous demands that go along with the job. Many of these workers, of good
character and possessing natural abilities, do not always feel equal to accepting the
isolation and sudden responsibilities involved.
There are several peculiarities of the region. The Doukhobors represent a
complex problem of many years standing. They are unique in their genius to frustrate any constructive work with them, and they take up an inordinate amount of
time that could be spent to great constructive use with other people.
The Department also has in this region the so-called " Japanese Pavilion,"
which is a litde nursing home situated at New Denver. It accommodates fourteen
patients. At one time all were older Japanese Canadians relocated at the outbreak
of war as an emergency measure. At present we have eight Japanese, a Chinese
couple, a single Chinese man, an older lady of Scottish background, and an older
man with English background. These patients, few of whom are ambulatory, are
served by the matron, Miss Reynolds, R.N., and a staff of thirteen. The setting of
the litde hospital is beautiful. The patients are near relatives and friends, and every
care is made for their comfort, including the preparation of Oriental meals. Some
of the local residents have been very kind in donating fruit, cigarettes, and tobacco
to the patients every month during the year. Three reclining chairs were purchased
during the year for the comfort of the patients.
Another peculiarity of the region is the relative stability of the major communities in which steady employment has prevailed. This makes, too, for a fairly steady
stream of transient men looking for work on highways that extended tremendously,
also allowing for greater mobility of these people. This is particularly evident with
the Blueberry-Paulson Cut-off and is already felt in the Golden region even though
the Rogers Pass Road is not completed yet. The last particularly will allow free
access from the Coast to Alberta or down to Cranbrook and thus back to the Coast.
There has not been any great commercial development in the region. Such
projects as road-building and pipe-lines demand the services of a few specialists
rather than large numbers of unskilled labourers. Opportunities afforded by the
winter works projects were not used to any great extent but were very successful in
helping Social Allowance recipients when they were used.
The interest in furthering the development of mental-health services has grown,
and no doubt this coming year will see the realization of increased decentralized
services to the region. Interest in the retarded child is such that property near
Creston has been purchased by the Association for Retarded Children to serve the
region, and the school will be called the Dr. W. J. Endicott School for Retarded
Children to honour this esteemed practitioner from Trail.
Although the tables show some slight over-all decrease in numbers for the past
year, social assistance numbers are still high.   In spite of successful efforts to sta-
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 21
bilize numbers in the Cranbrook and Trail districts, the preponderance of Doukhobors in the Nelson district raises the over-all total.
I am very pleased to be able to thank other Government departments, the
police, municipal officials, the Civil Defence Co-ordinators, and private organizations for unstinted help. My thanks to the field-service staff who, with loyalty to the
Department and with good humour and humanity, serve the people of British
Columbia.
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region IV as at March 31,1962
Category
M
O
O
Cn
JO
a
U
c
o
Cfl
U
rt,
u
1
ft
2
o
ft
•o
rt
cfl
O
Q
O
(A
"5.
z;
ZQ
cfl
rt,
H
rt
39
610
7
87
350
24
162
15
7
249
5
82
236
24
64
6
15
100
2
54
176
18
38
2
3
176
8
96
263
24
29
3
22
664
4
149
479
34
97
15
8
91
4
37
196
7
48
3
24
377
9
129
398
45
131
27
118
2,267
Blind Persons' Allowance —- -   	
Old-age Assistance  -	
39
634
2,098
176
Child Welfare                  ' -...
569
71
Totals                    	
1,294
673
405
602
1,464
394
1,140
5,972
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories in Region IV as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1960/61 and 1961/62
Category
1960/61
1961/62
Number             Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
143                      2.4
118
2,267
39
634
2,098
176
569
71
2.0
2,047
39
713
2,269
174
618
81
33.6
06
11.7
37.3
2.9
10.2
1.3
38.0
Blind Persons' Allowance 	
0.7
10.6
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance -
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Child Welfare	
35.1
2.9
9.5
1.2
Totals      	
6,084
100.0
5,972
100.0
REGION FIVE
V. H. Dallamore, Regional Administrator
This region covers the eastern portion of the Province from a general line
approximately 150 miles north of the United States-Canadian Border up to the
British Columbia-Yukon-Northwest Territories Boundary. In the northern portion
the regional boundary moves westward to the Alaska Panhandle, so that the entire
extreme northern portion of the Province lies within it.
The explosive nature of the case load which was so apparent in the past fiscal
year continued until June, 1961, when the case-load total reached a peak of 6,067.
Since that time it has shown a gradual but inconsistent decrease to a low of 5,591
cases in February, 1962. Conditions in March caused the over-all case load again
to increase slightly.
 K 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
A feature which stands out clearly is the direct increase in need for our services
when looking toward the north. It is noted that the two Cariboo offices of Quesnel
and Williams Lake showed a decrease of 6.2 per cent and the two Central Interior
offices of Prince George and Vanderhoof showed a decrease of 1.8 per cent, whereas
the two Peace River offices of Dawson Creek and Fort St. John showed an increase
of 14.5 per cent. It is obvious that this pattern is directly related to the move
toward northern development of the Province, with the burgeoning oil and gas
industry and the potential of electrical development which is taking place in the
Peace River area.
All this resulted in an increase of the total regional case load by 1.8 per cent.
It is significant to note that this occurred when the over-all Provincial pattern lay
in decrease.
The regional Social Allowance case load decreased by 2.7 per cent during the
year. This category of service has decreased from 52.3 per cent of the total case
load to 50.1 per cent during the twelve-month period under review. It is interesting
to note that the same pattern existed in this category of service as existed for the
total case load in that the Cariboo offices showed a decrease of 19.5 per cent and
the Central Interior offices showed a decrease of 7.6 per cent, whereas the Peace
River offices showed an increase of 22.4 per cent.
The favourable change in Social Allowance case load was, however, offset in
the area of Child Welfare. The various categories of Child Welfare services increased by 157 cases, or 17.2 per cent. Regionally the Child Welfare case load
increased during the year from 16.4 per cent of the total case load to 18.9 per cent.
Again it is significant to note that the area in which the greatest increase occurred
was that of the Peace River. Whereas the Child Welfare case load of the Cariboo
offices increased by 11.9 per cent and the Central Interior offices increased by 11.5
per cent, the Peace River offices increased by 31.5 per cent.
Table I shows the distribution of case loads for the entire region for the fiscal
years 1960/61 and 1961/62. Table II shows the distribution of the various categories between the different district offices.
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region V as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1960/61 and 1961/62
Category
1960/61
1961/62
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
244
2,906
46
377
986
48
913
38
4.4
52.3
0.8
6.8
17.7
0.9
16.4
0.7
229
2,827
51
429
946
59
1,070
45
4.0
50.0
0.9
7.6
16.7
1.0
Child Welfare       	
18.9
0.8
Totals   —. -             	
5.558
100.0
5,656
100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62
K 23
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region V as at March 31, 1962
Category
Dawson
Creek
Fort
St. John
Prince
George
Main
Prince
George
Sub
Quesnel
Vanderhoof
Williams
Lake
Total
40
663
3
76
186
16
184
7
66
249
4
47
120
4
150
9
40
377
11
135
263
13
355
20
865
36
357
4
57
123
8
141
3
10
120
10
45
131
4
99
37
196
19
69
123
14
141
6
229
Social Allowance    "	
Blind Persons' Allowance -	
Old-age Assistance  	
Old Age Security Supplementary
Social Allowance -	
Disabled Persons' Allowance-
Child Welfare- -	
2,827
51
429
946
59
1,070
Health and Institutional... 	
45
1,175
649
1,214
865
729
419
605
5,656
A most gratifying change which took place during the year was the increase of
social-work staff from eighteen to twenty-three, and stenographic staff from fourteen
to fifteen and one-half (one half-time employee). This brought the average case
loads down from 309 as of March 31, 1961, to 246 as of March 31, 1962.
With the additional staff, the workers were able to inspire and achieve much
improvement in organization of their offices and at the same time promote the development of needed social-work resources. For instance, specialization applied to
only three workers in March of 1961, but by March 31, 1962, it applied to eight.
The latter included one Family and Child Welfare worker, six social assistance
workers, and one social assistance and Old-age Assistance worker. Plans were
completed for the opening of a children's receiving home and a group-living home
for girls before the next fiscal year was two months old.
A major change was the establishment of a sub-office in Prince George to deal
with employable social assistance clients only. A survey done in March, 1961,
indicated that a goodly proportion of those clients were potentially receptive to casework oriented toward vocational training and retraining. A close liaison with local
employment and educational authorities was established, and by the time the specialized sub-office was opened on August 1, 1961, over 110 clients were working on
self-improvement programmes inspired by their social workers in anticipation of
vocational-training opportunities which were expected to be enlarged by the establishment of a vocational school in Prince George next fall. The sub-office took over
a case load of 1,220 on August 1, 1961, and by March 31, 1962, had reduced this
case load to 865. This decrease by 29.1 per cent was most gratifying and speaks for
itself the effective co-operation of National Employment Service personnel and
officials of School District No. 57 as well as the dedication of our own social-work
staff. The fact that night classes in high-school subjects were offered played a significant part.
Long-term Social Allowance recipients occupied our attention, and particular
efforts were made to see that these clients secured at least temporary employment.
The first group actively worked upon numbered twenty-eight, who had been on continuous Social Allowance from one to four years. In the two summer months,
twenty-seven of these clients were put into employment. Since then this kind of plan
has been regularly followed with gratifying results.
I wish to thank related agencies, civic officials, community organizations, and
interested persons who have helped us so well. I also wish to commend and thank
all members of staff for the energy and devotion they have applied to their duties.
 K 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REGION VI
A. E. Bingham, Regional Administrator
Region VI is located adjacent to the Vancouver metropolitan area. It begins
with the City of White Rock and the Municipalities of Surrey and Pitt Meadows, and
they form the western boundary. The region includes the Fraser Valley, the Harrison Lake area, and the Fraser Canyon up to Lytton. It is bounded on the south
by the International Boundary and on the north by mountains which rise above the
Fraser River.   The region is divided throughout its length by the Fraser River.
According to the 1961 Census, this region has a population of slightly in excess
of 180,000.
The region is partly suburban and partly rural in character. Large areas are in
the process of being transformed from rural to suburban type of settiement. There is
an unfolding pattern of freeways and highways within the region. The impact is not
yet fully felt, but there are an increasing number of people, residing in the western
end of the region, commuting to jobs in the Vancouver area.
The services provided by the Department of Social Welfare flow to the people
of the region in two administrative channels. In Surrey, social welfare services are
implemented by the Surrey Municipal Social Welfare Department. For the rest of
the Fraser Valley and the western section of the Fraser Canyon, social welfare
services are administered through five Provincial district offices. These offices serve
the various municipalities and unorganized territory alike, by agreement, under the
terms of the Social Assistance Act.
The five Provincial district offices are located at White Rock, Langley, Abbots-
ford, Chilliwack, and Haney. In addition, the Abbotsford district office has a sub-
office at Mission and the Chilliwack district office operates a sub-office at Hope. In
the year under review, arrangements were made for the Chilliwack office to hold
office hours at Boston Bar at regular intervals.
The total social-work staff, including municipal as well as Provincial social
workers, increased by five social workers during the year. As at March 31, 1962,
the region was staffed by thirty-five social workers, one acting district supervisor, four
district supervisors, one Municipal Administrator, and one Regional Administrator.
The problems brought to our offices during the year fell into two main groups—
those in need of income maintenance and those seeking or referred for Family and
Child Welfare services. As can be seen in Table I, the regional case load increased
slighdy during the year. This table also reveals that 9,725 cases, or 86.7 per cent
of the regional case load, were cases involving direct financial assistance. Of these,
84.1 per cent were unemployable because of age, disability, illness or loss of breadwinner through death, desertion, etc., while 15.9 per cent were in need because of
lack of employment.
A lot of services are required along with financial aid in these cases, as the problems presented are many and varied. Financial need is not often a primary problem;
the need results from some other situation or condition. In other instances, financial
dependency aggravates other conditions. Thus a family where the husband is temporarily unemployed because of illness or lack of employment may develop into a
problem of long-term dependency if our service is only to establish or re-establish
eligibility. The Department and the regional staff worked very hard during the year
to provide, along with financial assistance, medical care, family counselling, housekeeper service, help with living arrangements, assistance in plans to meet educational
needs, and many other services.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 25
During the year under review many communities in the region shared our concern in seeking solutions to the problems of excessive dependency in a few cases.
Staff worked hard to seek a solution in these cases, through a process of understanding help designed to strengthen rather than punish the persons and families involved.
Family and Child Welfare services made up 1,379 cases, or 12.3 per cent of the
regional case load. This included services to children in their own homes who were
manifesting behaviour problems, adoption services, services to the unmarried mother
and her child, the development of substitute facilities for children when their own
homes were no longer available to them, and the supervision of children in foster
homes.
During the past year within the region, consideration was given to case assignment. The purpose was to look at ways in which staff could be utilized the most
productively. Traditionally, social workers in rural areas have carried a general
case load in a specific geographic area. Modification of this traditional method was
made during the year, and now, throughout the region, cases involving a common
problem or a common service are grouped together and assigned to a social worker
who has a close interest or more skill in dealing with the problem or service.
Time was given during the year to the planning of emergency welfare services
which might be needed in a time of national disaster or an emergency. In the event
of an emergency, a stream of people voluntarily dispersing from the Vancouver area
would move through the Fraser Valley en route to the Interior of the Province. Thus
the communities in this region may be called upon to provide for these people
emergency needs of food, clothing, lodging, and information about separated family
members.
Several new projects commenced during the year. In June a joint rehabilitation
survey was started in Chilliwack. This is a co-operative project undertaken by the
Department of Social Welfare and the Health Branch of the Department of Health
Services and Hospital Insurance working in close co-operation with the National
Employment Service. The purpose is to review social assistance cases in which there
is a health problem, and to promote the return of these people to full employment
or to better ability to care for themselves. Most of these cases are not easy to rehabilitate because they are people with long-term disabilities, marginal skills, and social
problems.
In October the Abbotsford district office with Matsqui Municipality commenced a joint study of an approved winter works project- The men hired for this
project had received assistance for periods from nine months to eleven years. Each
man was interviewed in advance of the project, and each one expressed a willingness
to work. The purpose of the study was to test out whether work for social assistance
can, under certain controls, be advantageous to the client and to the community.
In the last three months of the year under review, two students in their final
year at the School of Social Work at the University of British Columbia used the
Haney district office in a research sampling for their thesis project. Their thesis
was related to minimum budgets in social assistance, current standards, and welfare
service implications.
In October a 21/i-day joint regional casework institute on public welfare was
held at Abbotsford for regional social workers and the social workers of two other
regions. The institute leader was Mr. Gerald W. Pepper, Assistant Professor of
the School of Social Work, University of British Columbia.
The region co-operated again with the School of Social Work, University of
British Columbia, in a programme of student placements. Five students were given
field-work experience in three Provincial district offices for the 1961/62 University
 K 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
term. The students carried out assigned field-work duties, two days each week,
under the direction of Department supervisors.
In the year under review there was an extension in the programme of placement
of patients from the Provincial Mental Hospital in approved boarding homes in the
region. Four of the Provincial district offices are now co-operating with Mental
Health Services in this plan. These are patients who can function with less than
hospital care but do not have family or friends to plan for them. Also, this plan
gives the hospital an opportunity to test in the community a patient's progress toward self-care.
There was a further increase in Mental Health Services at the community level
during the year. Effective in April, a team from the Mental Health Clinic in
Burnaby commenced weekly visits to the Boundary Health Unit, which serves the
White Rock-Surrey-Langley section of the region.
We are indebted to many municipal officials and other key community persons
for their assistance during the year. The staff, social workers, and stenographers,
municipal and Provincial, have all done splendid work, and I wish to commend them.
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories in Region VI as at March 31st for the Fiscal. Years 1960/61 and 1961/62
Category
1960/61
1961/62
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
140
3,988
61
1,215
4,196
307
1,142
102
1.3
35.8
0.5
10.9
37.6
2.8
10.2
0.9
183
4,024
60
1,251
4,068
322
1,196
117
1.6
35.9
Blind Persons' Allowance—   —
Old-age Assistance  	
0.5
11.1
36.3
Disabled Persons' Allowance -	
Child Welfare                                                -	
2.9
10.7
1.0
Totals                                  	
11,151
100.0
11,221
100 0
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices of
Region VI as at March 31, 1962
Category
Abbotsford
Chilliwack
Haney
Langley
Surrey
White
Rock
Total
23
689
15
267
923
79
201
26
66
919
15
256
697
58
275
18
18
441
3
139
411
36
138
15
14
468
8
169
437
34
172
7
58
1,369
16
362
1,317
95
374
43
4
138
3
58
283
20
36
8
183
4,024
60
1,251
4,068
322
1,196
117
Blind Persons' Allowance 	
Old-age Assistance _   	
Old  Age   Security   Supplementary   Social
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Child Welfare	
Totals	
2,223
2,304
1,201
1,309
3,634
550
11,221
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62 K 27
REGION VII
W. H. Crossley, Regional Administrator
The regional boundaries were unaltered this year. The area covered is from
Milbanke Sound on the south to the Alaska Border on the north and from the Queen
Charlotte Islands on the west to the village of Endako on the east. The population
in the region is increasing rapidly in comparison with the Provincial average, particularly within the Municipality of Terrace and on the Indian reserves throughout the
area served. This increase means that there is a steady growth in those parts of the
case load which are not necessarily correlated with economic conditions, be they
poor or prosperous. These increases will be commented on following the statistical
tables below.
The latter half of the year has been encouraging to the staff in the region
because improvements have appeared in various ways. The staff increase of two
full-time social workers in Prince Rupert and an additional part-time social worker
in Terrace started to relieve pressure and improve services in this period. The
economic conditions improved fairly steadily from the fall of 1961 through to the
spring. There has been growth in community interest and desire to strengthen welfare services shown in all communities this year. The optimistic note sounded by
these developments has resulted in many steps being taken to evaluate or improve
service.   The following are the highlights.
We had two improvements in providing office space for the staff. The Forest
Service moved out of the Government Building in Smithers to a new building. The
Smithers district office was allocated the space vacated, enabling it to move from
cramped, inefficient space into ample room. It was learned in March that our
struggle with difficult office accommodation in Prince Rupert would be short-lived
when approval was given to rent space in a new building being erected. It is hoped
the Prince Rupert office will be relocated in October, 1962.
The Prince Rupert Indian project mentioned in last year's report began operation November 1st, when Mr. R. T. Ferris transferred to the project position from
district supervisor at Smithers. Mr. Ferris has completed a thorough survey of those
cases in our Prince Rupert Social Allowance case load who have Indian racial inheritance with a view to learning their particular problems for which remedies must
be sought. An extremely successful meeting to introduce the project was held
January 12 at the Prince Rupert Civic Centre, with twenty-four community leaders
in various fields in attendance. Miss Snider, Research Consultant from this Department, and Miss Shirley Arnold, social worker with the Federal Department of Indian
Affairs, represented the Joint Federal-Provincial Committee on Indian Affairs, which
administers the project, at this encouraging meeting. The findings of this mutual
project will be of interest.
It was also learned in mid-February that the complementary Indian project in
the Hazelton-Smithers area, also recommended by the Joint Committee, which is
designed to study and ameliorate conditions leading to neglect of children on the
Indian reserves in that area, had been approved by the Federal Government, which
will pay the salary of this project worker, with our Department meeting all other
costs and offering supervisory and administrative services. It is hoped that this
position will be filled shortly. The co-operation evidenced between two Departments representing different levels of government in these projects is inspiring.
 K 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices of
Region VII as at March 31, 1962
Category
Burns
Lake
Prince
Rupert
Smithers
Terrace
Total
13
77
15
24
92
4
57
25
501
17
101
179
17
211
24
148
20
69
122
22
126
26
219
12
43
73
12
197
5
88
945
Blind Persons' Allowance.       	
64
237
466
Disabled Persons' Allowance   	
Child Welfare--            -	
55
591
4                 12                   2
23
Totals  -	
286      1     1.063               533
587
2,469
Table II,
-Case Load by Major Categories in Region VII as at March 31st
for the Fiscal Years 1960/61 and 1961/62
Category
1960/61
1961/62
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
99
1,227
60
200
506
54
607
27
3.6
44.1
2.2
7.2
18.2
1.9
21.8
1.0
88
945
64
237
466
55
591
23
3.6
38.3
Blind Persons' Allowance      - ,.
2.6
9.6
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance   	
18.9
2.2
Child Welfare...          ..                             	
23.9
0.9
Totals -   j.	
2,780
100.0
2,469
100.0
It will be seen from the above tables that the total case load in the region is
down some 311 cases from the same month last year. If, however, one refers to the
tables in my last annual report, it will be noted that the case load in Burns Lake
office has increased slightly, as has the case load in Smithers district office. These
offices have never been as seriously affected by transient single men as the Terrace
and Prince Rupert offices, and thus the case load is relatively stable, reflecting the
gradual increase in population in the areas served. In Smithers and Burns Lake
offices there has been an increase of forty-two Child Welfare cases, made up largely
of children in care, foster homes, and children in adoption homes. In Prince Rupert
and Terrace offices together there has been a decrease of 260 Social Allowance and
fifty-eight Child Welfare cases. The latter decrease is largely in children in care
(twenty) and adoption cases (twenty-eight). The increase in Burns Lake-Smithers
area is normal for an area heavy in neglect situations with an expanding population.
The decrease in Social Allowance and Child Welfare cases in the two western offices
is, however, unusual. We believe the decrease in Social Allowance is the direct
result of increased staff being able to visit people in their homes, and thus being able
to know their clients' needs or their clients' ineligibility. It is also to a lesser degree
the reflection of better economic conditions and improved issue-control, with transients being issued meals and lodging rather than cash. The decrease in Child Welfare is the direct result of increased staff clearing up a backlog of adoption applications, as well as being able to return foster-children to strengthened families or else
move them to an adoption status in their foster home or elsewhere. Once again our
percentage of native or part-native children in care remained at an average of 85 per
cent of all foster-children in the region for the year.   It is good to see many of these
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 29
children being adopted by their white foster-parents. The activity in Child Welfare
in the past year has been tremendous despite the fact that the total child-in-care
figure only increased from 297 to 298. In this fiscal year, 139 children were admitted to care, either permanently or temporarily, whilst 138 were discharged from
care.   These are eloquent figures.
The surge of interest in social welfare in the communities served evidences a
high level of public relations activity carried on by staff at all levels. We have continuously spoken of the need for resources for the children we serve, who are the
responsibility of all community members, not the sole charge of this Department.
As a result, the Roman Catholic Church in Burns Lake is engaged in preparing a
small receiving home and planning other facilities. A home for boys requiring
intensive help has been opened in Smithers, with a capacity for four boys, later to
be increased to eight. The Parent-Teacher Association in Prince Rupert has taken
Child Welfare as its focus of activity for the forthcoming year. There are two community groups in Terrace organizing to provide resources—one a receiving home
and the other a home for teen-age girls. As these efforts become concrete realities,
the children will be helped. For our older citizens there is a continuing need for
adequate inexpensive housing, boarding homes, and nursing homes.
To raise the level of service provided requires knowledgeable staff. To this
end, a staff-development programme built on one-day institutes for all social-work
staff, at six-week intervals, devoted to a review of principles and methods underlying
various aspects of our services, was introduced in mid-January. Child Welfare
Division will provide institute leaders as the programme develops. Two sessions
held to date have definitely improved services.
In this challenging year we have had excellent co-operation from municipal
officials, police, school staffs, the medical profession, ministers, and many other
community leaders. During the year we have had a stable, keen, interested staff,
who have devoted many extra hours to their jobs. It is a pleasure to extend thanks
on behalf of the Department to these people for their efforts.
 K 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PART III.—DIVISIONAL ADMINISTRATION
R. J. Burnham, Assistant Director of Social Welfare
FAMILY DIVISION
SOCIAL ALLOWANCES SECTION
As may be noted from Tables I and II, there has been a levelling-off in the rate
of increase in assistance, with the number of cases opened in March, 1962, reduced
somewhat over the corresponding number for the month of March, 1961. Although
this is in contrast to the previous year's continuous rise to a peak at year's end, the
rate has continued at a high level throughout the year, with the net result that the
total amount of assistance paid for 1961/62, shown in Table IV, is up some 18 per
cen over the total for 1960/61.
In order to alleviate some of the pressure of increased numbers of applications
for assistance in Prince George, a special office has been set up, with the primary
function of the administration of Social Allowance to the unemployed employable
persons.   This programme has met with success.
Transient single men have continued to pose a problem in administration that
has necessitated the general use of vouchers for room and meals and greater use of
hostels in order to prevent abuse.
Table I.—Case Load and Numbers of Beneficiaries by Month for 1961/62
Heads of
Families
Dependents
Single
Recipients
Total
Case Load
April, 1961	
May, 1961 _
June, 1961	
July, 1961	
August, 1961	
September, 1961..
October, 1961	
November, 1961.-
December, 1961_.
January, 1962	
February, 1962	
March, 1962 _
11,481
11,397
11,865
11,412
10,627
10,529
10,758
11,612
11,963
12,191
11,897
11,883
34,782
33,814
34,569
32,482
30,541
30,033
31,033
34,036
35,089
36,308
35,911
35,785
16,305
16,852
17,338
16,284
15,884
15,689
16,178
17,492
16,490
16,875
16,275
16,758
62,568
62,063
63,772
60,178
57,052
56,251
57,969
63,140
63,542
65,374
64,083
64,426
27,786
28,249
29,203
27,696
26,511
26,218
26,936
29,104
28,453
29,066
28,172
28,641
Table II.—Comparative Figures of Cases Opened and Closed
Opened Closed
March, 1960  3,867        3,527
March, 1961  4,737        4,636
March, 1962  4,422        4,928
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62
K 31
Table HI.—Comparative Totals by Region and Organized and Unorganized
Territory of Recipients of Social Allowance in March, 1962,1961, and 1960
PROVINCIAL
Mar.,   Mar.,   Mar.,
1962     1961     1960
Region I—
Alberni
337       313
Courtenay  - 1,188 1,326
Duncan    _ 329 331
Nanaimo   1,166 986
Victoria    636 590
201
750
242
768
505
MUNICIPAL
Mar., Mar., Mar.,
1962 1961 1960
Alberni         128 142 122
Courtenay  _.... —       125 125 70
Central Saanich          44 44 33
Duncan -         114 126 65
Esquimalt          162 137 98
Nanaimo           581 788 549
North Cowichan  _       300 265 123
Oak Bay           49 46 30
Port Alberni         396 384 266
Saanich          506 600 374
Victoria      1,492 1,686 1,364
Region II—
3,656
3,546
2,466
3,897
4,343
3,094
New Westminster.-.
86
55
53
Burnaby  	
2,419
2,403
1,522
Vancouver  . 	
466
448
397
669
998
493
Westview __.	
78
99
101
Delta   	
347
290
189
New Westminster	
1,677
1,553
914
N. Vancouver City —
483
551
336
N. Vancouver District
309
335
199
Port Coquitlam 	
321
278
167
Port Moody 	
197
182
81
187
199
177
Richmond	
766
701
445
Vancouver 	
14,785
14,318
9,017
Region III—
West Vancouver 	
92
129
104
630
602
551
22,252 21,937
13,644
Kamloops 	
1,432
1,896
1,359
Armstrong  	
37
44
22
Kelowna  	
506
623
420
Enderby   ..;  	
40
27
39
Lillooet 	
552
Kamloops  	
574
427
353
Penticton  	
1,033
929
812
Kelowna 	
409
310
219
Salmon Arm 	
610
562
353
Penticton 	
925
690
551
Vernon  	
746
902
755
Revelstoke 	
83
84
58
Salmon Arm District
251
252
171
Summerland  	
169
152
105
Vernon  	
395
354
264
Region IV—
North Kamloops
366
4,879
4,912
3,699
3,249
2,340
1,782
Cranbrook 	
1,021
1,115
819
Cranbrook  	
575
831
343
Creston	
735
640
421
Fernie  -	
107
131
60
Fernie  ..    	
Grand Forks 	
99
290
112
212
80
124
95
27
98
28
66
Greenwood - 	
14
Nelson      	
1,085
859
548
Kimberley  	
172
92
60
229
171
133
339
326
282
Trail 	
620
606
561
Rossland 	
107
130
129
Region V—
Trail                   	
686
889
354
4,079
3,715
2,686
2,108
2,525
1,308
Fort St. John 	
302
323
152
Dawson Creek 	
1,009
739
217
*Pouce Coupe .   ...
944
652
217
Fort St. John   	
107
106
61
1,338
1,354
792
802
691
377
Quesnel  	
655
577
232
Quesnel	
333
311
134
Vanderhoof    	
273
289
139
Williams Lake
506
608
364
4,018
3,803
1,896
2,251
1,847
789
7,553    7,889    5,560
22,882 22,539 14,195
8,128   7,252   5,481
6,187    6,240    3,994
6,269    5,650   2,685
 K 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table III.—Comparative Totals by Region and Organized and Unorganized Territory of Recipients of Social Allowance in March, 1962,1961, and 1960—Cont'd
PROVINCIAL MUNICIPAL
Mar.,   Mar.,   Mar., Mar., Mar., Mar.,
1962     1961     1960 1962 1961 1960
Region VI—
Abbotsford         264      327       195      Chilliwack City _  445 456 288
Chilliwack         679      628       534      Chilliwhack   Town-
Haney —       131       122         56          ship  1,101 1,083 751
Langley City — - 145 140 90
Langley Township _ 971 867 552
Maple Ridge ._  1,084 1,146 577
Matsqui    810 843 731
Mission District  455 498 330
Mission Town   177 133 61
Sumas  —  175 220 177
Surrey -...  4,503 4,153 2,230'
White Rock  298 310 279
1,074 1,077 785 10,164 9,849 6,066
   11,238 10,926    6,851
Region VII—
Burns Lake .         199 184 172      Kitimat ._..:         88 59 58
Prince Rupert        304 414 306      Prince Rupert —.       596 949 610
Smithers       487 497 351      Terrace   -       370 556 395
Terrace .         125 97 50
1,115    1,192      879                                               1,054    1,564    1,063
   2,169    2,756    1,942
64,426 63,252 40,708
1 Pouce Coupe office transferred to Dawson Creek.
The following comparison shows the approximate percentage of the total num-
nf rp.r.iniRnts hv res-ions-—
ber of recipients by regions:—
March, 1962
(Per Cent)
Region I  11.7
Region II  35.5
Region III   12.6
Region IV   9.6
Region V  9.7
Region VI   17.5
Region VII   3.4
March, 1961
March, 1960
(Per Cent)
(Percent)
12.5
13.7
35.6
34.9
11.5
13.5
9.9
9.8
8.9
6.6
17.3
16.8
4.3
4.8
Totals  100.0
100.0
100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 33
Table IV.—Expenditures by the Province for Social Allowances,
Medical Services, etc.
Fiscal Year
1959/60
Fiscal Year
1960/61
Fiscal Year
1961/62
Basic Social Allowances    	
Repatriation, transportation within the Province, nursing- and
boarding-home care (other than tuberculosis), special allowances and grants      	
Emergency payments, such as where a family may lose its
home by fire or similar circumstances	
Municipal and Provincial cases—
(a) Tuberculosis,   boarding-,   nursing-,   and   private-home
cases  	
(6) Transportation of tuberculosis cases _ 	
(c) Comforts allowance for tuberculosis cases	
Hospitalization of social assistance cases  	
Gross Social Allowance costs as per Public Accounts 	
Less municipal share of costs and sundry credits	
Net Social Allowances  	
Administration and operation of New Denver pavilion	
Medical services and drugs  .	
Totals  	
$13,146,730.69
2,579,293.56
60,783.84
363,191.77
2,942.76
7,510.00
9,790.60
$21,406,719.50
3,020,886.15
50,492.14
319,920.87
2,170.00
4,825.00
14,269.55
$25,365,840.91
3,240,890.05
16,860.76
262,494.56
1,553.86
5,002.00
13,796.90
$16,170,243.22
1,593,962.31
$24,819,283.21
2,545,723.88
$28,906,439.04
3,437,805.71
$14,576,280.91 I $22,273,559.33
22,841.25 22,303.13
3,697,606.19 4,087,943.73
$25,468,633.33
19,708.73
4,123,807.86
$18,296,728.35
$26,383,806.19
$29,612,149.92
For the fiscal year 1961/62 the Province received from the Federal Government re—
Unemployment Assistance Agreement  $12,481,806.66
Welfare assistance to immigrants  Nil
Sundry   8,252.41
Total _   $ 12,490,059.07
REHABILITATION
The pilot rehabilitation programme which was begun in the previous fiscal year
has been carried forward with good results. This programme, which is enabled by
Federal health grants and directed by a Rehabilitation Consultant, is focused on
restoring handicapped persons to useful functioning. A number of people have
become fully self-supporting as a direct result of particular projects that have been
under way in Nanaimo and Chilliwack, and that have involved a survey of all Social
Allowances paid in those districts.
Selected cases are referred for assessment and planning to a committee having
professional representation from the local offices of the Departments of Health and
of Social Welfare, and of the National Employment Service, and in particular including the local public health doctor and the special placement officer of the National
Employment Service, in co-ordination with other local groups and resources.
Eligibility is not limited to persons in receipt of public welfare, although in
practice they account for the higher percentage of referrals.
It is hoped that the knowledge and technique derived from the programme can
be applied more generally throughout the Province, and that the projects already
initiated will be able to sustain themselves on the basis of local initiative.
Vocational Training
The Federal-Provincial vocational training grants administered by the Department of Education continue to be a valuable resource in providing persons an opportunity to obtain up-grading of scholastic standing and (or) vocational training.
There has been a general increase in the numbers of persons who have taken advan-
3
 K 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
tage of this opportunity.   Through this resource, recipients of assistance have become
self-supporting, but, more important, their way of life more purposeful and satisfying.
General
Thirty-one Boards of Review were held in the course of the fiscal year in accordance with section 13 of the regulations to the Social Assistance Act. Of these,
eighteen were in favour of the applicant, while the remainder were not.
There were no amendments to the Social Assistance Act or regulations.
FAMILY SERVICE SECTION
This is a category of services given in accordance with the terms and definitions
of the Social Assistance Act, but not limited to active financial assistance paid under
this Act. This is a basic service in any welfare programme, and its focus is to alleviate personal problems and to uphold and strengthen the individual or the family
and its children toward reducing breakdown and future dependency. This casework
service, demanding the special skills and knowledge of the social worker, offers us
our greatest challenge and scope for preventive and rehabilitative work.
The following table gives the case load of the activity in this regard during the
fiscal year:—
Table I.—Total of Family Service Cases, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Total at
Total at
Total at
End of
Same
Month
Previous
Beginning
Opened
Closed
End of
of Month
Month
Year
1,290
144
145
1,289
1,356
1,289
167
165
1,291
1,403
1,291
128
127
1,292
1,427
1,292
143
160
1,275
1,410
1,275
137
137
1,275
1,434
1,275
185
206
1,254
1,403
1,254
199
209
1,244
1,366
1,244
237
242
1,239
1,348
1,239
179
148
1,270
1,311
1,270
203
176
1,297
1,311
1,297
191
189
1,299
1,280
1,299
168
142
1,325
1,290
April, 1961.	
May, 1961	
June, 1961	
July, 1961	
August, 1961	
September, 1961-
October, 1961.—
November, 1961_
December, 1961..
January, 1962	
February, 1962—
March, 1962	
Other Services
Family Allowances
This Division, for a number of years, has been a channel for requests from the
Family Allowances Division of the Department of National Health and Welfare.
These requests have to do with inquiries and reports in connection with Family
Allowances.
Table II.—Requests Received from Family Allowances Division,
April 1,1961, to March 31,1962
Received during fiscal year  44
Referrals pending April 1, 1961     4
Total number of requests referred  48
Referrals completed  47
Referrals pending March 31, 1962
1
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1961/62        K 35
Old Age Security
The Division continues to serve also as a channel for requests to assist, where
necessary, elderly persons who are encountering difficulties with documents or correspondence in completing applications for Old Age Security.
Table III.—Requests Received from Old Age Security Division from
April 1,1961, to March 31,1962
Pending as at April 1, 1961     2
Received during fiscal year     7
Total case load     9
Total reports completed     7
Requests cancelled     2
Requests pending March 31, 1962	
Conclusion
The Family Division is sincerely grateful to all staff of the Department for their
co-operation and assistance in the work of the Division, as well as to municipal welfare departments, to other departments of Government, and the voluntary agencies.
 K 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
CHILD WELFARE DIVISION
Miss Mary K. King, Superintendent
The Child Welfare Division is responsible for the administration of the Protection of Children Act, the Children of Unmarried Parents Act, and the Adoption Act.
As well the Division has certain responsibilities arising out of the Juvenile Delinquents Act, the Welfare Institutions Licensing Act, the Equal Guardianship of Infants
Act, and the Legitimacy Act. The functions of Divisional staff are administrative,
supervisory, and consultative. The Protection of Children Act gives the Superintendent of Child Welfare authority to act as a Children's Aid Society throughout the
Province. The Superintendent acts in this capacity in all areas of the Province other
than those served by the Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, the Children's Aid
Society of the Catholic Archdiocese of Vancouver, and the Children's Aid Society of
Victoria. The Act also places responsibility upon the Superintendent of Child Welfare for the Children's Aid Societies and child-caring institutions in the Province.
PROTECTION SERVICES
The goal of this service is to restore and to maintain family life or, as stated in
the Protection of Children Act, the " amelioration of family conditions that lead to
neglect of children." During the past year approximately 2,000 families received
such a casework service from the field staff of the Department of Social Welfare.
This is a demanding service, requiring the time, experience, and skill of social-work
staff. The effects of an improved protective service, due largely to an increase in
staff during this fiscal year, is noticeable in those district offices where the number
of children admitted to the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare dropped, or
were held in check, during the past year. It is hoped that during the next fiscal year
more district offices will be enabled to give an improved service to families and
thereby further decrease the number of children needing to be moved from then-
own homes into the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare.
CHILDREN IN CARE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF CHILD WELFARE
AND THE THREE CHILDREN'S AID SOCIETIES
There has again been a rise in the number of children cared for by the Superintendent of Child Welfare and the three Children's Aid Societies. A total of 7,710
children was cared for during this fiscal year, which is an increase of 400 more than
were cared for last year. Of these children, 4,440 were in the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare. This is an increase of 8.4 per cent over the 4,096 children cared for last year.
The three Children's Aid Societies cared for 3,270, an increase of only 1.7 per
cent over the 3,214 children cared for last year. Although the percentage of increase
in the number of children cared for by the Superintendent of Child Welfare is higher
than it should be, it is 1.99 per cent less than in the previous year. Hopefully this
may be an indication that a peak has been reached and we may look for a further
decrease next year.
There was also an increase in the number of children in the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and three Children's Aid Societies as at March 31, 1962.
There were 5,652 children in care, an increase of 396 over last year. Of these children, 3,252 were in the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare, which is a
7.8-per-cent increase over last year's total of 3,016. The remaining 2,400 were in
the care of the Children's Aid Societies, an increase of 7.1 per cent over last year's
total of 2,240.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 37
The continuing increase in the number of children being cared for by the Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies is cause for concern and
action both from a social and economic point of view. During the past five years
the gross expenditure in maintenance costs has increased from $2,184,992.72 to
$3,816,293.81. Part of this increase is due to the increased number of children
being cared for; part to the increased cost of living necessitating increased maintenance payments for children and increased salaries to staff; and part to the increasing need to provide children with behavioural and emotional problems with special
kinds of care.
It is through an increased opportunity to provide services to children in their
own homes, and further emphasis on the adoption placement of children in care
who cannot return to their own home, that a gradual decrease in the number of
children requiring care can be achieved. This will result in a gradual decrease in
maintenance costs.
ADMISSIONS TO CARE
A total of 2,454 children was admitted to the care of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies during this fiscal year, an increase of
seventy-nine over last year. Of these children, 1,424 were admitted to the care of
the Superintendent of Child Welfare and 1,030 to the care of the Children's Aid
Societies.
The most frequent reason for the admission of children to the care of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare was physical and moral neglect or desertion of one
or both parents. Five hundred and twenty-eight children were admitted for this
reason. Two hundred and seventy-two children were admitted due to the illness
or death of the mother and inability of the father to plan. Seventeen other children
were admitted due to illness of the father. A slightly smaller, but very significant,
group of 202 children was admitted to care while awaiting placement in an adoption
home. One hundred and two children were admitted because of behaviour problems that could not be dealt with in their own homes. Forty of these latter children
were committed to the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare under the Juvenile
Delinquents Act. The remaining 159 children were admitted for various reasons,
such as physical handicap or mental retardation.
As well as the admission to care of children directly from their own homes
were the admission of 144 wards of the Children's Aid Societies of British Columbia
and of other Provinces.
Of the 2,454 children admitted to care, 1,075 were apprehended under the
Protection of Children Act, 54 were wards under the Juvenile Delinquents Act, 1,027
were non-wards, and 298 were wards of other agencies of British Columbia or of
other Provinces.
DISCHARGES FROM CARE
A total of 2,058 children was discharged from the care of the Superintendent
of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies during the past fiscal year. This is
six less than were discharged during the previous year. Of these children, 1,188
were discharged from the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and 870 from
the Children's Aid Societies.
The continuing increase in the number of children admitted to care and the
decrease in the number of children discharged from care accounts for the growing
body of children remaining in care each year between the ages of 6 and 18 years.
The focus during the next fiscal year needs not only to be on services to families to
prevent the need for children to be admitted to care, but also on discharge planning
for those children already in care.
 K 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Of the children discharged from the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies, 853 were wards, 314 were before the Court, 51
were apprehended and not presented, and 840 were non-wards.
Of the children discharged from care, 1,201 were returned to their own parents,
172 became 21 years of age, 63 were married, and 15 died during the year. Seven
of these children were wards, seven were non-wards, and one was a child before the
Court. One hundred and eighty-seven children returned to the agency having guardianship or guardianship was transferred. Nine children were discharged for miscellaneous reasons.
Two hundred and forty-nine wards and children before the Court were discharged from care when an adoption order was granted, and 162 non-wards were
discharged from care on being placed for adoption. Thus a total of 411 children
was discharged from care by reason of adoption this year as against 431 last year.
AGE AND LEGAL STATUS OF CHILDREN IN CARE
Of the 5,652 children in care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and the
Children's Aid Societies as at March 31, 1962, 3,459 were between the ages of 6
and 18 years. This is a 9.3-per-cent increase over last year in the number of children in this age-group. The increase in the 19-21 age-group was 8.02 per cent;
the 3-5 age-group, 5.46 per cent; and the birth to 2 years, 2.5 per cent.
LEGAL STATUS OF CHILDREN IN CARE
Of the 5,652 children in care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies at March 31, 1962, 76.9 per cent were wards under the Protection of Children Act, 8.9 per cent were non-wards; 6.8 per cent were children in
care at the request of another agency or Province, 4.9 per cent were children before
the Court under the Protection of Children Act, and 2.5 per cent were wards under
the Juvenile Delinquents Act.
As these percentages indicate, the majority of children admitted to care come
through the Court, with only a comparatively small percentage coming into care at
the request of their parents as non-wards.
PLACEMENT OF CHILDREN
The vast majority of the children in the care of the Superintendent of Child
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies are placed in foster homes, where they are
receiving the care and attention of foster-parents who are an important and integral
part of our child-care programme.
A relatively small but increasing number of children are being cared for in
correctional, health, educational, residential, and treatment institutions. As at
March 31, 1962, 375 children were receiving such care. The need for further
development of treatment resources for children of all ages is required to prevent
the unhealthy growth of children into maladjusted teen-agers and adults who require
correctional or mental-hospital care.
GROUP-LIVING RESOURCES
The Department of Social Welfare established two small group-living homes
during the year—one for disturbed teen-age boys and the other for disturbed teenage girls. These added to the two receiving homes already in use by the Department make a total of four group-living homes in operation.   It is planned to increase
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62 K 39
the number of such homes as opportunity presents. Well-qualified house parents
and social workers to provide casework services are the core of this programme.
The pace at which the programme can develop depends upon the availability of this
staff. The field staff are to be commended for the progress made during this past
year in the development of these placement resources.
INTERDEPARTMENTAL CASE REVIEW COMMITTEE
This past year saw the establishment of an Interdepartmental Case Review
Committee in conjunction with the Department of Mental Health. The purpose of
this Committee is to make the best use of available resources for disturbed children,
to define the need, and to make recommendations in regard to the establishment of
further resources. The value of the Committee has already been felt in our services
to children, as has the value of the consultative services so freely given by the Provincial Mental Health Services staff.
EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING
Five wards of the Superintendent of Child Welfare attended university during
the past year, and nine children benefited from vocational training through Schedule M. Sixteen children requiring special educational care were placed in private
schools.
OTHER SERVICES RELATED TO THE PROTECTION OF CHILDREN
These services include the completion of custody reports as requested by the
Supreme Court under the Equal Guardianship of Infants Act, the completion of
reports and recommendations for the Department of Immigration in regard to the
entry of juveniles into British Columbia from other countries, interprovincial correspondence concerning repatriation of children, and services to families and other
sundry matters.
These services are steadily growing in number and demanding a greater proportion of divisional and field staff time. However, it is believed they are an important aspect of our protective and family services and justify the time involved.
SERVICES TO UNMARRIED MOTHERS
The field staff of the Department of Social Welfare served approximately
1,105* unmarried mothers during the past fiscal year, an increase of 188 over the
previous year, while the Children's Aid Societies served 1,534, 143 more than last
year. There will be some duplication in these figures as a number of unmarried
mothers were known to both the Department of Social Welfare and the Children's
Aid Societies. In those cases where there is duplication the major service is generally given by the Children's Aid Society. The Vancouver Children's Aid Society
served 1,051 unmarried mothers, which is 40 per cent of the unmarried mothers in
the Province who received a service.
Many unmarried mothers continue to go to Vancouver from other parts of this
Province and from other Provinces for their confinement. The Children's Aid
Societies give the service to these mothers and their babies, adding greatly to the
burden of work already being carried by these agencies.
Forty-eight maintenance orders, fifty-three maintenance agreements, and seven
agreements in the form of settlements were made under the Children of Unmarried
* The figure of 231 in last year's Annual Report represented only those cases relating to maintenance orders,
agreements, settlements, and sundry services. The number of unmarried mothers served by the field staff during
1960/61 was 917.
 K 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Parents Act during the past fiscal year. This is approximately the same number as
last year. A total of $78,532.64 was paid to the Superintendent of Child Welfare
by fathers for children born out of wedlock.
CHILDREN BORN OUT OF WEDLOCK
According to the statistical figures provided by the Division of Vital Statistics,
2,485 children were born out of wedlock during this fiscal year, a decrease of 125
or 4.8 per cent.
The greatest percentage of decrease was in the under-15-year age-group, in
which there was a decrease from twenty-seven to sixteen children or 40.7 per cent.
The next largest decrease was in the 25- to 29-year age-group. In this group there
was a decrease from 445 to 406 children or 8.8 per cent.
ADOPTION SERVICES
Adoption services as administered by the Child Welfare Division involve the
study of adoption homes, the placement of children in approved adoption homes, the
supervision of children during the one-year probationary period, and the preparation of adoption reports for the Supreme Court, as required by the Adoption Act.
Similar services are given in the completion of step-parent, relative, and private
placement adoptions.
ADOPTION HOMES
The adoption programme in this Province is reaching the point where there
are not enough adoption homes to meet the placement needs of normal, healthy
infants. As a result, an increasing number of infants are being placed in foster
homes while awaiting placement in adoption homes.
In looking back five years we find that during the fiscal year 1957/58 there
were 142 more adoption homes available for use than during this fiscal year and
100 more homes available as at March 31, 1958, than at March 31, 1962. Despite
this, forty-one more children were placed in adoption homes during this fiscal year
than in 1957/58. This accounts in part for the fact that there were only thirty-eight
adoption homes available for use by the Department of Social Welfare as at March
31, 1962.
This shortage of adoption homes is part of a trend in Canada and the United
States, caused partly by the population decrease in the age-groups from which
adopting parents are drawn. Other reasons are the smaller housing units and increased apartment dwelling, the economic situation, and advances in medical science
increasing the possibility of natural childbirth. This trend will undoubtedly continue
until the increase in birth rate which began in the late 1940's will be felt in the
adopting parents' age-group.
Increased efforts are therefore now required in the finding of adoption homes
of the Protestant faith as well as the Roman Catholic faith, both for normal infants
and children as well as for those children with special needs.
RELIGIOUS FAITH OF HOMES IN WHICH CHILDREN
WERE PLACED
The problem of finding adopting parents of the Roman Catholic faith for the
placement of children of this faith remains acute, and this is especially true for
the increasing number of Indian and part-Indian children being admitted to care.
Approximately 165 Roman Catholic Indian and part-Indian children of all ages
were awaiting adoption homes at the end of this fiscal year.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 41
Of the 533 children placed by the Department of Social Welfare during this
fiscal year, 460 were placed in homes of the Protestant faith, sixty-seven in homes
of the Roman Catholic faith, three in homes of the Hebrew faith, and three in homes
of the Buddhist faith.
PLACEMENT OF CHILDREN
Five hundred and thirty-three children were placed for adoption by the Department of Social Welfare and 331 by the three Children's Aid Societies, a total of 864
during this fiscal year. This is thirty-five less than were placed in the previous fiscal
year. This decrease is due to the shortage of adoption homes referred to previously.
SOURCE OF REFERRAL
The Adoption Placement Section of the Child Welfare Division selected homes
for 309 children referred by the field staff of the Department of Social Welfare. As
well, homes were selected for 224 children referred by other agencies. One hundred
and ninety-three children were referred by the Vancouver Children's Aid Society,
twenty-seven by the Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, one by the Family
Service Agency in Vancouver, two by the Children's Aid Society of Victoria, and
one by the Children's Aid Society in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory.
AGES AND SEX OF CHILDREN PLACED FOR ADOPTION
The ages of the children placed for adoption in the regions of the Department
of Social Welfare ranged from less than 15 days to 20 years. Since the needs of the
infant child are best met by individual love and attention, early placement is a well-
established policy of the Department. This past year, 298 children were less than 1
month old when placed with their adopting parents, and, of this number, 232 were
placed directly from hospital.
Two hundred and seventy-four of the total number of children placed for
adoption were male and 259 were female.
PLACEMENT OF CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
Children with special needs are the older child, the child with health problems,
and the child of inter-racial or other than white origin. One hundred and sixty-seven
children with special needs were placed during this fiscal year. Sixty-one were children older than 1 year of age, twenty-eight had health problems, fifty-six were of
inter-racial origin, and twenty-two were of racial origin other than white. Despite
the difficulties of placing these children, twenty-two more were placed this year than
in the previous year.
For some children of this group we were fortunate to find adopting parents of
the same background, and this was so for one child of Negro-white background and
three children of Oriental-white origin, but most adopting parents were of the
white race.
There are usually adopting parents available for the child of wholly Oriental
racial origin, and three children—two of Japanese and one of Chinese background—-
were placed with adopting parents of similar heritage. This is not usually true,
however, for the child who is wholly native Indian, but this year we are pleased to
report the placement of four such children with adopting parents of the same background. We trust that more Indian families will be encouraged by these placements to wish to adopt.
Placement of the older child is never easy despite the number of adopting
parents who request a child past infancy.   Many of the older children available for
 K 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
adoption are those who have health problems or those of inter-racial heritage.
Frequently the child with a health problem of minor severity, such as cleft palate,
will be more difficult to place than a child with a congenital heart condition, which
may imperil his life. One of our most handsome and brightest children is still not
placed, although his cleft palate has been repaired and only a faint scar remains to
indicate the repair to the harelip.
Many means are used to find homes for the child with special needs, but it is
our belief that the most effective is the social worker who is alert to the needs of all
children and convinced that there is a suitable home somewhere for every child.
With the hope of helping the social workers in their efforts, the Adoption Placement
Section commenced this year the periodic circulation of a pictorial bulletin of children with special needs requiring adoption homes. It is a tribute to our field staff
that so many homes were found this year for the child with special needs, and that
in so doing our standards in adoption practice have been maintained.
ADOPTION PLACEMENTS OUTSIDE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
In our search for homes for children with special needs, we have continued to
explore resources both within and without British Columbia. Nine children with
special needs were placed outside British Columbia in approved adoption homes.
Three were placed in Manitoba, two in Ontario, and one each in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Northwest Territories, and Washington State.
FAMILY GROUPS PLACED
Two family groups, a total of five children, were happily placed during this
fiscal year. These children were all of the Protestant faith. In addition, two sisters
have been placed on a paid foster-home basis with a view to adoption at a later date.
Eight sets of twins, four sets fraternal and four identical, were available for
adoption placement this year and have been happily placed. A brother and sister
were of native Indian and white background.
COMPLETED ADOPTIONS
Seventy more adoptions were completed during this fiscal year than in the
previous year.
Of the 1,486 adoptions completed during this year, 547 were placements which
had been made by the Department of Social Welfare and 325 by the Children's Aid
Societies, 108 were placements which had been made privately, 416 were step-parent
adoptions, and 90 were relative other than step-parent adoptions.
In analysing the increase in the number of adoptions completed, it was found
that the step-parent and relative adoptions had increased by forty-eight, two-thirds
of the total increase of seventy. The increasing number of step-parent adoptions
would indicate that the emotional and legal security offered a child through adoption by a step-parent is becoming more widely recognized. It may also be indicative of the increase in the number of divorces being obtained. However, we do not
have statistical information available at the present time to confirm this impression.
Two mothers applied to the Supreme Court of British Columbia under section
8, subsection (5), of the Adoption Act for revocation of their consent. In each case
the judgment of the Supreme Court was that it was not in the best interest of the child
to permit the mother to revoke her consent.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 43
GENERAL
During this fiscal year the staff of the Child Welfare Division have focused on
the development of programme with emphasis on their consultative function and the
development and use of placement resources for children. With the addition of one
supervisor, the Superintendent of Child Welfare was enabled to have more contact
with the field and Children's Aid Societies. The Deputy Superintendent and divisional supervisors were able to have more consultative contact with the field, with
special reference to the development of placement resources. They were also able to
spend more time in contact with other agencies and in interdepartmental committee
work, which is required in the development of programme and establishment of
policy.
The Superintendent of Child Welfare took part in two regional conferences
which included all regions but one and made two other field trips. The Deputy
Superintendent and divisional supervisors were able to make six field trips. This
contact with the field staff is mutually beneficial as it keeps the Division appraised
of " grass roots " needs and developments and brings to the field information and
support which is needed in giving family and child welfare services. Divisional staff
also took part in the in-service training programme.
It is hoped that there will be further development of divisional consultative
service during the next fiscal year as this is required to keep pace with the continuing
increase in need for family and child welfare services, as revealed in the statistics
previously given in this report.
The three Children's Aid Societies are to be commended for the way in which
they are meeting the increasing need for family and child welfare services within the
communities in which they operate. They continue to develop their programmes in
accordance with best professional knowledge and standards of practice.
STATISTICAL TABLES
A change has been made in the format of this year's report, and statistical tables
will be found immediately following this report.
CONCLUSION
In conclusion I would like to express my appreciation and thanks to divisional
and field staff, to senior administration, to other departments of Government, to our
foster-parents, and to all those agencies and organizations throughout the Province
who have directed their thoughts and energies toward the betterment of services to
children.
 K 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICAL TABLES
Number of Children in Care
Table I.—Comparative Statistics Showing Number of Children in Care, during ana
as at End of Fiscal Year 1961/62, of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies.
During
1961/62
Superintendent of Child Welfare  4,440
Vancouver Children's Aid Society  1,743
Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver      966
Victoria Children's Aid Society      561
  3,270
At Mar. 31,
1962
3,252
1,285
772
343
2,400
Totals-
7,710
5,652
Maintenance Costs
Table II.—Cost of Maintaining Children in Care of the Superintendent
of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies
Gross cost of maintenance of children in Child Welfare
Division foster homes  $1,649,612.82
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance of
children in care of Children's Aid Societies     2,047,168.63
Gross cost of transportation of children in care of Superintendent  20,572.36
Gross cost of hospitalization of newborn infants being permanently planned for by Superintendent  27,840.00
Grants to sundry homes  71,100.00
Gross expenditure -  $3,816,293.81
Less collections        778,818.01
Net cost to Provincial Government as per Public
Accounts -  $3,037,475.80
Admissions to Care
Table HI.—Comparative Statistics Showing Legal Status of Children Admitted to
Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies during
Fiscal Year 1961/62.
Legal Status
Superintendent of Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Apprehended under Protection of Children Act..
662               151
40        1           4
576                283
124                  65
22                    5
145
3
67
37
1
117
7
101
43
1
1,075
54
1,027
269
29
Totals	
1,424
508
253
269
2,454
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 45
Table IV.—Reasons for Admissions of Children to the Care of the Superintendent
of Child Welfare during Fiscal Year 1961/62
Reason Number of children
  334
-  194
-.__  246
  17
  26
  28
  21
  34
  102
  11
  16
  36
  13
Awaiting adoption placement  202
At request of other agencies  124
At request of other Provinces .  20
Neglect	
Desertion of one or both parents
Illness of mother _,	
Illness of father  	
Death of mother	
Rehabilitation of parents J	
Transient child	
Minor unmarried mother	
Behaviour of child	
Medical care	
Physical handicap or mental retardation.
Education and training	
Removed from adoption placement
Total
1,424
I Discharges from Care
Table V.—Comparative Statistics Showing Legal Status of Children Discharged from
the Care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies
during Fiscal Year 1961/62.
Legal Status
Superintendent of
Child Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid Society
Vancouver
Catholic
Children's Aid
Society
Victoria
Children's Aid
Society
Total
Protection of Children Act wards-
Juvenile Delinquents Act wards	
Before the Court. . ..	
Apprehended but not presented	
Non-wards	
Other agency wards	
Other Provinces' wards..
Total 	
357
26
181
51
484
64
25
169
1
19
210
55
4
46
1
51
58
35
3
1,188
458
194
28
1
63
88
32
6
600
29
314
51
840
186
38
2,058
 K 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VI.—Comparative Statistics of Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies Showing Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care
According to Agency for Fiscal Year 1961/62.
Reasons for Discharge
Superintendent of
Child Welfare
Vancouver
Children's Aid
Society
Vancouver
Catholic
Children's Aid
Society
Victoria
Children's Aid
Society
Total
Wards
76
32
5
123
1
4
53
13
157
55
16
2
19
37
26
55
24
2
7
Tl
2
21
16
9
3
18
1
13
171
59
7
152
38
Other agency guardianship terminated-
Other Province guardianship termin-
4
Returned to other agency	
Returned to other Province	
108
16
246
Sub-totals..           _
464
210
67
60
801
Before the Court (Protection of
Children Act)
84
102
"3
51
18
1
49
1
1
1
6
57
157
Order under section 8 (6) (a), (b)	
159
1
3
1
1
1
51
240
19
52
63
374
Non-wards
1
3
4
401
75
3
131
71
20
4
67
6
2
79
10
1
5
1
3
7
678
162
Returned to other agency   -  .
Ofhpr
23
9
Sub-totals   ..               .
484
229
75
95
883
Totals!
1,188
458
194
218
2,058
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 47
Table VII.—Reasons for Discharge of Total Children in Care of the Superintendent
of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies According to Legal Status for
Fiscal Year 1961/62.
Reasons for Discharge
Protection of
Children Act
Juvenile
Delinquents
Act
Under Supervision of Other
Agency, within
or without
Province
Total
Wards
Twenty-one years of age	
Married (female)	
Deceased. 	
Committal order rescinded-
Guardianship transferred-
Other agency guardianship terminated—
Other Province guardianship terminated..
Returned to other agency  	
Returned to other Province	
Adoption order granted	
Sub-totals  - 	
Before the Court (Protection of Children Act)
Withdrawn from Court 	
Order under section 8 (6) (a), (&)..
Deceased .	
Adoption order granted	
Returned to other agency—
Returned to other Province-
Married	
Apprehended but not presented-
Sub-totals.	
Non-wards
Twenty-one years of age	
Married	
Deceased	
To parents or relatives	
Placed for adoption	
Returned to other agency-
Other  	
Sub-totals-
Totals	
148
50
5
118
38
242
1
3
7
674
161
855
1,820
27
21
9
2
7
4
108
16
4
4
1
23
28
29
209
171
59
7
152
38
4
108
16
246
1
3
7
678
162
23
9
883
2,058
Age of Children in Care
Table VIII.—Comparative Statistics for Fiscal Years 1960/61 and 1961/62 of
Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies by Age-group.
Age-group
Superintendent
of Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's Aid
Society
Total
1960/61
1961/62
1960/61
1961/62
1960/61
1961/62
1960/61
1961/62
1960/61
1961/62
429
422
822
996
347
438
430
920
1,089
375
235
160
294
441
105
244
166
306
475
94
162
109
168
234
40
159
114
176
251
72
28
22
68
143
31
35
42
83
159
24
854
713
1,352
1,814
523
876
752
6-11    „    _        	
1,485
1 974
12-18    „     	
19-21    „      .
565
Totals	
3,016
3,252
1,235
1,285
713
772
292
343
5,256
5,652
 K 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Legal Status of Children in Care
Table IX. — Comparative Statistics Showing Legal Status of Children in Care of
Superintendent of Child Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies by Region,1
Agency,2 and Other Agency3 Supervision for the Fiscal Year 1961/62.
P.C.A.
Wards
Before
Court
J.D.A.
Wards
Other
Agency
Non-wards,
Wards, and
Before Court
O.P.
Wards
Non-
wards
Total
Region I   -	
Region II	
266
393
434
138
382
380
281
4
44
30
12
33
39
9
27
16
20
5
11
15
4
22
12
13
14
9
16
2
5
6
4
5
9
3
59
36
61
23
38
45
14
378
506
564
Region IV ' 	
196
478
Region VI
Region VII      	
504
313
(a) Totals  	
(6) Superintendent of Child Welfare    children    under    other
2,274
126
77
171
2
2
98
16
3
88
35
32
19
276
32
1
2,939
195
(c)  Superintendent of Child Welfare and agency wards supervised by another Province	
118
Totals of (a), (6), and (c)
2,477
175
117
123
51
309
3,252
Vancouver Children's Aid Society-
Vancouver Children's Aid Society
children in other agency super-
989
45
6
17
1
92
131
4
1,229
50
Vancouver Children's Aid Society
children in other Provinces	
6
(d) Totals	
1,040
18
92
135
1,285
Catholic Children's Aid  Society,
Vancouver  —	
Catholic Children's Aid  Society,
Vancouver,   children   in   other
575
46
70
1
3
47
2
28
723
49
(e) Totals 	
621
71
3
47
2
28
772
Victoria Children's Aid Society
Victoria   Children's   Aid   Society
children in other agency super-
196
12
------
21
2
71
1
29
329
14
(/) Totals  _ -	
208
11
23
71
1
29
343
Grand totals of (a), (b),
(-),(_.),(-), and (/)	
4,346
275
143
333
54
501
5,652
1 Region is an administrative unit of the field service of the Department of Social Welfare.
2 Agency is Vancouver Children's Aid Society, Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, and Victoria
Children's Aid Society.
3 Other agency is the Director of Child Welfare in a Province other than British Columbia.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 49
Institutional Care
Table X.—Comparative Statistics Showing Children in Care Who Are Receiving
Institutional Care by Institution and Type of Institution as at March 31, 1962
Institution
Superintendent of
Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
I
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Correctional Institutions
Brannen Lake School 	
Willingdon School for Girls _
Oakalla 	
Detention 	
Young Offenders' Unit	
Haney Correctional Institution-
British Columbia Penitentiary.—
Unclassified „ 	
Totals _. —
Health Institutions
Sunny Hill Hospital.
General hospitals-
Woodlands, Provincial Mental Hospital, Crease Clinic
Coqualeetza Indian Hospital	
Queen Alexandra Solarium	
Alouette Private Hospital .	
United Church Home 	
Maywood Home -
Our Lady of Mercy Home.
Unclassified 	
Totals.
Educational Institutions
Jericho Hill School  	
School of nursing   	
Private schools _ 	
Indian residential schools-
Totals —	
Residential Institutions
Infants'Home 	
St. Mary's Hostel	
St. Christopher's School	
Rainbow Christian Fellowship-
Sisters of Service 	
Central City Mission Youth Residence..
Y.W.C.A	
Totals .
Treatment Centres
Children's Foundation	
St. Euphrasia's School	
Sevenoaks  	
Harterre House, Montreal  	
St. Joseph's Vocational School, Winnipeg-
Secret Harbour Farms, Washington	
Unclassified  	
Totals-
Grand totals..
18
20
9
1
2
9
3
62
4
1
31
1
2
1
1
4
45
16
27
47
1
12
1
16
194
5
3
12
2
2
1
17
25
17
10
3
6
20
10
13
13
21
21
2
10
12
90
62
29
32
23
21
3
2
11
5
17
|      114
7
7
58
1
4
1
3
8
102
6
1
29
27
63
21
1
17
1
1
4
2
47
7
23
7
1
1
1
9
49
375
 K 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Services Related to Protection of Children
Table XL—Comparative Statistics for Fiscal Years 1960/61 and 1961/62 Showing
Cases1 Receiving Services Related to Protection of Children Opened during
Year, Carried during Year, and Incomplete at End of Year, by Type of Service.
Type of Service
Opened during Year
Carried during Year
Incomplete at End of Year
1961
1962
1961
1962
1961
1962
85
98
61
7
1
j.       341
82
127
57
4
f      258
\      256
1         51
UO
105
91
11
473
121
147
73
6
258
256
51
39
20
16
1
171
36
Repatriation	
Immigration	
9
18
Family Service	
84
35
22
Totals	
592
835
790
912
247           I           204
1 Cases are the number of family units receiving services on behalf of their children.
Children Born Out of Wedlock in British Columbia
Table XII.—Comparative Statistics of Children Born Out of Wedlock in British
Columbia during Fiscal Years 1960/61 and 1961/62 According to Age-group
Age-group of Mother
Fiscal Year
Under 15
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40 Years
and Over
Total
1960/61	
1061/62
27
16
792
772
781
752
445
406
498
474
67
65
2,610
2,485
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1961/62        K 51
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 K 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XIV.—Adoption Placements by Regions According to Religious Faith
of Adopting Parents for Fiscal Year 1961/62
Religion
Region1
Protestant
Roman
Catholic
Hebrew
Buddhist
Total
1 _     .
72
152
58
43
35
54
41
1
1
3
15
14
13
11
7
2
3
1
1
1
2
3
87
II                                                       i
167
III -    	
rv _
v  	
VI  	
71
54
42
56
VII...   _	
44
1
2
9
Totals 	
460
67
3
3
533
1 Region is an administrative unit of the field service of the Department of Social Welfare, and includes
Vancouver Children's Aid Society, Victoria Children's Aid Society, and outside Province.
Table XV.—Comparative Statistics for Fiscal Years 1960/61 and 1961/62 Showing
Number of Children Placed by Regions and Children's Aid Societies
Regions1	
Victoria Children's Aid Society	
Catholic Children's Aid Society, Vancouver I
1960/61
-_ 556
66
.    62
Vancouver Children's Aid Society  215
343
1961/62
533
98
36
197
  331
Totals .
899
864
i Region is an administrative unit of the field service of the Department of Social Welfare.
Table XVI.—Adoption Placements by Region and by Specific Type of Placement
for Fiscal Year 1961/62
Type of Placement
Region1
Long-term
Probations
One-year
Probation
Foster
Home to
Adoption
Total
I	
1
2
2
1
81
165
67
42
33
51
30
1
2
9
6
1
6
6
8
4
15
87
II                                      ...,	
167
Ill       j   „_
75
rv —..
50
V                          .      -   -.-....     ...-. -	
41
VI                 -  - '	
56
vn
45
1
2
9
Totals
6
481
46
533
i Region is an administrative unit of the field service of the Department of Social Welfare, and includes
Vancouver Children's Aid Society, Victoria Children's Aid Society, and outside Province.
2 These are placements of children with health or other problems requiring a longer period of probation.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 53
Table XVII.—Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Department of Social
Welfare during Fiscal Year 1961/62
Age Number of Children
Birth to 15 days - .  192
15 days to 1 month  106
1 to 2 months —  67
3 to 5 months - Z "~  48
6 to 11 months -  35
1 year ] .  24
2 years  - i.  19
3 years  i  9
4 years  -  3
5 years   7
6 years _,  6
7 years  + - .  4
8 years   5
9 years   2
10 years   2
11 years   1
12 years  .  2
20 years   1
Total  .  533
Table XVIII.—Children of Interracial Origin and Racial Origin Other than White
Placed for Adoption by Department of Social Welfare According to Sex during
■\     Fiscal Year 1961/62.
i Male Female
Native Indian and white j.  17 21
Negro and white L -     2 2
East Indian and white -  1
Chinese and white —._-—_     2 4
Japanese and white     1 1
Chinese and native Indian .    1
Syrian and white     2 1
Arabian and white -     1
Native Indian      8 11
Japanese  - .     1 1
Chinese   1
Totals   34 44
 K 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XIX.—Children of Interracial Origin and Racial Origin Other than White
Placed for Adoption by Department of Social Welfare According to Religion
during Fiscal Year 1961/62.
Protestant
Roman
Catholic
Buddhist
Total
Native Indian and white—
Negro and white	
East Indian and white	
Chinese and white  	
Japanese and white	
Chinese and native Indian-
Syrian and white	
Arabian and white	
Native Indian	
Japanese	
Chinese  —
30
4
1
6
2
1
3
1
13
Totals..
62
14
38
4
1
6
2
1
3
1
19
2
1
78
Adoptions Completed
Table XX. — Comparative Statistics Showing Legally Completed Adoptions by
Regions and Children's Aid Societies According to Type of Placement during
Fiscal Year 1961/62.
Type of Placement
Region1
Agency
Relative
Private
Total
Stepparent
Other
I	
101
170
78
52
38
91
17
42
104
30
31
19
66
12
5
26
8
5
14
6
6
9
27
7
6
8
10
2
157
II        -	
327
Ill _	
123
IV..  .
94
V                    -                                    ..   .
79
VI..             -  -     - -	
173
VII                             	
37
547
304
70
69
990
202
58
65
74
4
34
7
2
11
27
3
9
310
67
119
325
112              20
39
496
872
416      I        90
108
1,486
(5
36)
1 Region is an administrative unit of the field service of the Department of Social Welfare.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 55
MEDICAL SERVICES DIVISION
P. W. Laundy, M.D., Director
As a neophyte in the Department, it is refreshing to meet friendly co-operation
from staff, fellow workers, professional organizations, hospitals and other institutions, especially colleagues in the medical profession.
Welfare medical services must be ever elastic and adaptable, within the limits
of its resources, to the changing needs of its clients. Although it may not always be
easy, this rule shall be our guide.
Reference to the tables will give comparative figures of services and costs of the
past few years. It will be noted that our gross costs were up over that of the preceding year. Drug costs, dental expenses, and optical costs each showed increases
for the year.   On the other hand, payments to doctors were down slightly.
Reference to Table V shows that our dental programme is elaborate. It is
probably one of the most generous in North America. This is a credit to our Province. However, I am of the opinion that a scheme involving a contribution, however
small, by the client should be devised. This applies particularly in the provision of
dentures.
Other ancillary services provided have remained more or less constant during
the past year.
Time has been spent on ways which we hope will facilitate our present programme and be of value in development in the future.
The introduction of the reissue of the health services identification card will
assist in the discouragement of excessive "shopping" by our clients. Physicians
know well the frequency of doctor changes by welfare patients. Besides a waste of
public funds, it produces confusion for the physician and often interference in his
treatment programme.
There are also fields in which the Division hopes to further its co-operation
with others, such as in the co-ordination of programmes for mental, physical, and
vocational rehabilitation.
Much time continues to be spent in bringing clients into Vancouver for special
medical care. This involves our Medical Social Work Consultant in making arrangements for the local transportation, giving casework support, and providing accommodation where indicated.
Referral by doctors directly to consultants is now encouraged. It is believed
that this is better than having the Division act as a go-between for medical information for such cases.  We continue to authorize transportation for these persons.
Appreciation is expressed for their co-operation in our over-all programme to
the doctors of the Province.
I would like to thank all those who have extended a kind and generous welcome
to a newcomer, not only in the Department of Welfare, but also in other departments and outside the Government. The understanding and co-operation of the
staff are ever apparent.
 K 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICAL TABLES
Table I.—Gross Costs for Fiscal Year 1957/58 to 1961/62
Fiscal Year
Medical
Drugs1
Dental
Optical
Transportation
Other
Totall
1057/58
$1,503,964.91
1,587,997.03
1,766,536.60
2,120,498.73
2,085,017.09
$1,106,153.01
1,281,107/27
1,492,138.17
1,704,222.44
1,758,767.53
$148,223.72
168,031.06
279,550.08
508,392.25
548,973.74
$55,440.66
57,050.37
79,632.04
93,874.45
95,768.46
$25,763.04
41,329.60
57,297.87
97,832.33
99,311.32
$16,983.77
21,374.78
22,451.43
30,329.72
33,175.48
$2,856,529.11
1958/59     ...
1959/60-
1960/61
1961/62      	
3,156,910.11
3,697,606.19
4,555,149.92
4,621,013.62
1 Not included in these figures is the cost of drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare institutions.
Table II-—Payments to British Columbia Doctors (Gross Costs)
Fiscal Year
Medical
Agreement
Immigrant
Other
Total
1957/58-
1958/59-
1959/60-
1960/61-
1961 /62...
$1,492,741.27
1,580,815.44
1,759,646.67
2,114,033.44
2,072,720.58
$6,951.51
1,330.62
565.00
226.00
$4,272.13
5,850.97
6,324.93
6,239.29
12,296.51
$1,503,964.91
1,587,997.03
1,766,536.60
2,120,498.73
2,085,017.09
Table III.—Categorical Breakdown of Medical Coverage with Average
Numbers of Persons Eligible
Fiscal Year
Social
Allowance1
Child
Welfare
Division
O.A.S. Supplementary Social
Allowance and
Blind
Old-age
Assistance
Disabled
Persons'
Allowance
Total Average
Monthly
Coverage
1957/58-
1958/59-
1959/60-
1960/61-
1961/62-
18,363
19,914
25,362
33,751
36,097
3,546
3,814
3,998
4,194
4,462
36,440
36,191
35,860
35,772
34,282
7,195
7,150
7,410
7,216
6,899
1,221
1,516
1,785
1,999
2,123
66,763
68,585
74,415
82,932
83,863
1 Until August 31, 1958, there was a Mothers' Allowance case load, but effective September 1, 1958, these
cases became Social Allowance cases. So that figures from 1958/59 will be comparable with previous years,
Mothers' Allowance and Social Allowance recipients have been combined in this statement under the heading
" Social Allowance."
Table IV.—Drug Costs
Fiscal Year
Number of Prescriptions
Provincial
Pharmacy
Drug-stores
Total
Costs of Medicines
Provincial
Pharmacy1
Drug-stores
Total
1957/58...
1-58/59-
1959/60-
1960/61-
1961/62...
23,487
30,140
41,585
43,437
31,969
458,002
534,352
567,222
621,973
728,578
481,489
564,492
608,807
665,410
760,547
$113,841.90
137,255.34
184,437.87
189,620.86
153,450.36
$992,311.11
1,143,851.93
1,307,700.30
1,514,601.58
1,605,317.17
$1,106,153.01
1,281,107.27
1,492,138.17
1,704,222.44
1,758,767.53
1 Not included in these figures is the cost of drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare institutions.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1961/62        K 57
Table V.—Dental Expenses
Fiscal Year
Prophylaxis
Extractions
Dentures
Total
WVT/SR
$28,430.52
34,1-5.73
76,740.07
199,686.63
227,033.02
$9,595.80
12,138.92
26,115.00
65,07«.39
74,339.50
$110,203.40
121,796.41
176,695.01
2413,627.23
247,601.22
$148,223.72
1958/59
168,051.06
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62 —  	
279,550.08
508,392.25
548,973.74
Table VI.—Optical Costs
Fiscal Year
Optometric
Examinations
Glasses
Total
1957/58-
1958/59-
1959/60-
1960/61-
1961/62-
$9,896.45
9,735.50
15,589.00
19,252.95
19,496.00
$45,544.21
47,314.87
64,043.04
74,621.50
76,272.46
$55,440.66
57,050.37
79,632.04
93,874.45
95,768.46
 K 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA
OLD-AGE ASSISTANCE, BLIND PERSONS' ALLOWANCES, DISABLED
PERSONS' ALLOWANCES, AND SUPPLEMENTARY ASSISTANCE
GENERAL
E. W. Berry, Chairman
The Old-age Assistance Board is a division of the Department of Social Welfare. The Board consists of three members appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council. These same three members also comprise the Blind Persons' Allowances Board and the Disabled Persons' Allowances Board. The Boards are charged
with the administration of the respective Federal and Provincial Acts and regulations, including the consideration of applications and the payment of assistance.
The Boards also consider applications for Supplementary Social Allowance and
health services, and grant these additional Provincial benefits where applicable.
The fiscal year under review was an extremely active one for this administration as a result of processing an unusually large number of investigation reports
received from a Province-wide survey conducted to determine the essential need of
Supplementary Social Allowance recipients. The interviewers from the Board office
had the co-operation of the district workers and found their assistance extremely
valuable in locating recipients and avoiding duplication of visits.
The Old-age Assistance Board subsequently determined the portion of the
Supplementary Social Allowance in pay which was shareable with the Federal Government under the Unemployment Assistance Agreement.
To add to the above extraordinary volume of work, the regulations governing
the entidement to Supplementary Social Allowance and health services were amended
from January 1, 1962. Previously Supplementary Social Allowance was paid and
health services eligibility was determined on a maximum allowable annual income
basis. After January 1, 1962, the new regulations permitted payment of Supplementary Social Allowance to persons only if they established a need for it on a
monthly budget basis. Health benefits were granted if the recipient qualified for
Supplementary Social Allowance. Former recipients continued to receive the rate
and the health benefits already established for them under the former regulations.
However, if they applied for an increase in Supplementary Social Allowance, it
could only be granted if they established a need for it under the budget deficit rules.
As of February 1, 1962, all recipients of Old Age Security pension received a
$10-a-month increase. Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' and Disabled Persons'
Allowances were increased immediately after the end of the fiscal year, but preparatory work had to be done during the latter part of the fiscal year to take care of these
increases and make the necessary adjustments to the Supplementary Social Allowances.
With the co-operation of the experienced staff at the Board office who voluntarily worked overtime, the increases and adjustments were accomplished with very
little inconvenience or delay to the recipients.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 59
STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1962
Old-age Assistance
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received  2,296
  2,162i
      446
Applications granted	
Applications not granted (refused, withdrawn, etc.)
1 Includes some left over from previous year.
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Returned to British Columbia  24
Reinstated  151
Suspended  358
Deaths  256
Transferred to other Provinces  34
Transferred to Old Age Security  1,803
Total number on payroll at end of fiscal year  7,054
(b) Other-Province recipients—
New transfers to British Columbia  75
Transferred to British Columbia  12
Reinstated  2
Suspended  7
Deaths      	
Transferred out of British Columbia  55
Transferred to Old Age Security  40
(c) Total number of British Columbia and other-Province recipients on payroll at end of fiscal year  7,189
Table III.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Not of age	
Unable to prove age	
Not sufficient residence -	
Income in excess	
Unable to prove residence.
Transfer of property.
Receiving War Veterans' Allowance _
Information refused	
Application withdrawn
Applicants died before grant.
Whereabouts unknown	
Eligible for Old Age Security-	
Assistance from private sources.
Receiving Old Age Security	
Miscellaneous	
Totals.
Number
Per Cent
70
15.7
2
0.4
4
0.9
183
41.0
1
0.2
2
0.4
5
1.1
37
8.3
90
20.2
18
4.0
10
2.2
18
4.0
2
0.4
4
0.9
446
100.0
 K 60                                                    BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IV.—Sex of New Recipients
Number
Male      961
Female  1,201
Per Cent
44.4
55.6
Totals                                         2,162
100.0
Table V.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Number
Married                                            904
Per Cent
41.8
15.0
21.8
5.1
13.6
2.6
Single      325
Widows    472
Widowers _                             110
Separated          295
Divorced ___      '  '"         .         56
Table VI.—Birthplace of New Recipients
British Columbia	
Other parts of Canada	
British Isles	
Other parts of British Commonwealth	
United States of America	
Other foreign countries      709
Totals	
Table VII.—Ages at Granting of Assistance
Age 65
Age 66
Age 67
Age 68
Age 69
Totals.
Totals -  2,162 100.0
Number
Per Cent
246
11.4
508
23.5
431
19.9
10
0.5
258
11.9
709
32.8
2,162
100.0
Number
Per Cent
1,227
56.8
340
15.7
222
10.3
206
9.5
167
7.7
2,162
100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 61
Table VIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Age 65
Number
            31
Per Cent
12.1
Age 66 _
        40
15.6
Age 67 -
        42
16.4
Age 68 .
        64
25.0
Age 69 .
             79
30.9
Totals	
      256
100.0
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Living alone	
Living with spouse	
Living with spouse and children.
Living with children
Living with other relatives.
Living with others	
Totals.
Number
■Per Cent
772
35.7
838
38.8
66
3.1
241
11.1
75
3.5
170
7.9
2,162
100.0
Table X.—Where New Recipients Are Living
In own home . „
In rented house	
In children's home	
In home of other relatives.
Boarding.
In housekeeping room	
In single room (eating out).
In rented suite	
In public institutions	
In private institutions	
Totals	
Number
Per Cent
934
43.2
232
10.7
269
12.4
62
2.9
27
1.2
281
13.0
66
3.1
179
8.3
85
3.9
27
1.2
2,162
100.0
 K 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XI.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a) Holding real property of value—
$0	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500--
$501 to $750
$751 to $1,000 __.
$1,001 to $1,500
$1,501 to $2,000
$2,001 and up      403
Number
Per Cent
1,157
53.5
92
4.3
23
1.1
67
3.1
61
2.8
174
8.0
185
8.6
403
18.6
Totals  2,162
(b) Holding personal property of value—
$0	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500	
$501 to $750 -	
$751 to $1,000 -
$1,001 to $1,500
$1,501 to $2,000
$2,001 and up	
Totals.
958
541
175
103
93
135
69
88
2,162
100.0
44.3
25.0
8.1
4.8
4.3
6.2
3.2
4.1
100.0
Table XII.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31,
1962, Whose Assistance Is Paid by British Columbia
Alberta                          -   -
       35
Saskatchewan                   -            	
     •<        19
Manitoba -          -                 -          	
     15
Ontario                                            - - -
          20
Quebec .          -   -        	
       7
New Brunswick - -            .	
         1
Nova Scotia                          -        _     	
             7
Yukon Territory —        —           --•
       1
Prince Edward Island -            	
       1
=    Total ,-.	
  106
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 63
Table XIII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the
Amount of Assistance Received (Basic Assistance, $55)
Amount of Assistance
$55     	
Per Cent
          80.46
$50 to $54.99     -	
       4.56
$45 to $49.99	
3.32
$40 to $44.99 -   	
2.60
$35 to $39.99 . 	
2.02
$30 to $34.99	
1.74
$25 to $29.99	
       . .           1.38
$20 to $24.99	
                1.21
Less than $19.99	
.    .                   2.71
Total   ...
        .      .   ....    .... 100.00
Blind Persons' Allowances
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received 	
Applications granted —	
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc._
57
46i
19
1 Includes some left over from previous year.
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended 	
Reinstated 	
Transferred to other Provinces-
Returned to British Columbia-
  22
  11
     2
     1
  19
  15
(b)  Other-Province recipients—
New transfers to British Columbia     6
Transferred to Old Age Security-
Deaths 	
Retransferred to British Columbia-
Reinstated 	
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended-
Deaths 	
Transfers to Old Age Security-
Suspended
3
1
9
1
3
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia	
Other Province	
534
29
563
 K 64 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table III.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Number Per Cent
Not blind within the meaning of the Act     8 42.1
Income in excess     6 31.6
Applications withdrawn     2 10.5
Died before grant  0.0
War Veterans' Allowance     1 5.3
Information refused     1 5.3
Whereabouts unknown      1 5.3
Totals  19 100.0
Table IV.—Sex of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Male  24 52.2
Female  22 47.8
Totals   46 100.8
Table V.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Married   16 34.8
Single   22 47.8
Widows      3 6.5
Separated      5 10.9
Divorced   	
Totals   46 100.0
Table VI.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
British Columbia  13 28.3
Other parts of Canada  22 47.8
British Isles      4 8.7
United States of America     1 2.2
Other foreign countries     6 13.0
Other parts of British Commonwealth  	
Totals  46 100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 65
Table VII.—Ages at Granting of Allowance
Number Per Cent
Age 18     8 17.4
Ages 19 to 21     2 4.3
Ages 22 to 30     3 6.5
Ages 31 to 40     1 2.2
Ages 41 to 50-  11 23.9
Ages 51 to 60  16 34.8
Ages 61 to 69     5 10.9
Ages 21 to 30 _
Ages 31 to 40 ._
Ages 41 to 50 __
Ages 51 to 60 ..
Ages 61 to 69 __
Totals
Totals   46 100.0
Table VIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number Per Cent
2
13.3
3
20.0
10
66.7
15
100.0
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Number Per Cent
Living with parents   11 23.9
Living alone     8 17.4
Living with spouse  15 32.6
Living with spouse and children     1 2.2
Living with children      1 2.2
Living with other relatives     3 6.5
Living with others      7 15.2
Totals   46 100.0
 rtrt 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table X.—Where New Recipients Are Living
In parents' home	
In own home
Number
    11
       .-    9
Per Cent
23.9
19.6
In rented house            .   __   	
  10
     5
21,7
In rented suite _             .       . .    	
10.9
In children's home    	
In home of other relatives
     3
6.5
In housekeeping room
3
6.5
In public institutions    _            _ 	
     4
8.7
In private institutions .___ _ _ __ __	
In single room (eating out) 	
Boarding              	
1
2.2
  46
Totals 	
100.0
Table XI.—Economic Status of New Recipient
Number
(a) Holding real property of value—
$0  36
$1 to $250     4
$251 to $500	
$501 to $750	
$751 to $1,000	
$1,001 to $1,500	
$1,501 to $2,000	
$2,001 and up	
Totals 	
(b) Holding personal property of value—
$0 	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500	
$501 to $750	
$751 to $1,000 -
$1,001 to $1,500
$1,501 to $2,000
$2,001 and up	
Totals
Per Cent
78.3
8.7
1
2.2
1
2.2
1
2.2
3
6.5
46
100.0
28
60.9
10
21.7
1
2.2
2
4.3
1
2.2
2
4.3
2
4.3
46
100.0
=t-rr.—-r
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 67
Table XII.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31,
1962, Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Alberta   2
Saskatchewan  2
Manitoba   2
Ontario   3
New Brunswick  1
Total  10
Table XIII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the
Amount of Allowances Received (Basic Allowance, $55)
Amount of Allowance Per Cent
$55   91.30
$50 to $54.99   2.31
$45 to $49.99   0.89
$40 to $44.99   1.24
$35 to $39.99   1.07
$30 to $34.99   0.71
$25 to $29.99   0.35
$20 to $24.99   0.35
$19.99 and less  1.78
Total   100.00
Disabled Persons' Allowances
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received  387
Applications granted  289*
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc.  199
i Includes some left over from previous year.
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended  158
Reinstated  79
Transferred to other Provinces  9
Returned to British Columbia  5
Transferred to Old Age Security  13
Deaths  48
 K 68 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Miscellaneous—Continued
(->)  Other-Province recipients—
Suspended
New transfers to British Columbia
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended  8
Reinstated  2
Deaths  3
Transferred to Old Age Security  1
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia  2,106
Other Province        50
  2,156
Table III.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Number Per Cent
Not 18 years of age       	
Too much income       6 3.0
Refused information       7 3.5
Whereabouts unknown       2 1.0
Unable to meet medical test  163 81.9
Mental hospital       4 2.0
Hospital       3 1.5
Nursing home       	
Application withdrawn     11 5.5
Died before grant       2 1.0
Not sufficient residence       1 0.5
Totals  199 100.0
Table IV.—Primary Causes of Disability on Accepted Cases
Infective and parasitic diseases
Neoplasms
Allergic, endocrine system, metabolic, and nutritional
diseases	
Diseases of blood and blood-forming organs
Mental, psychoneurotic, and personality disorders
Diseases of the nervous system and sense organs     73
Diseases of the circulatory system     30
Diseases of the respiratory system	
Diseases of the digestive system	
Diseases of the genito-urinary system	
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissues	
Diseases of the bones and organs of movement
Congenital malformations
Number
Per Cent
14
4.8
4
1.4
10
3.5
1
0.4
124
42.9
73
25.3
30
10.4
2
0.7
1
0.4
21
7.3
4
1.4
Symptoms, senility, and ill-defined conditions       	
Accidents, poisoning, and violence (nature of injury)...      5 1.7
Totals  289 100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1961/62        K 69
Table V.—Sex of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Male  157 54.3
Female  132 45.7
Table VIII.—Ages at Granting of Allowance
Ages 18 to 19.
Ages 20 to 24.
Ages 25 to 29 .
Ages 30 to 34 .
Ages 35 to 39 .
Ages 40 to 44.
Ages 45 to 49 .
Ages 50 to 54 .
Ages 55 to 59 .
Ages 60 to 64 .
Ages 65 to 69 .
Ages over 70
Totals  289 100.0
Table VI.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Married     56 19.4
Single  193 66.8
Widow      10 3.5
Widower       7 2.4
Separated .     17 5.9
Divorced       6 2.1
Totals...        	
           289
100.0
of New Recipients
Number
         -. 125
Table VII.—Birthplace
British Columbia    __
Per Cent
43.3
Other parts of Canada ____   _ _ _..
 ; .... 108
37.4
British Isles    	
           21
7.3
Other parts of British Empire     	
United States of America     	
                  8
2.8
Other foreign countries	
     27
289
9.3
Totals	
100.0
mber
Per Cent
55
19.0
29
10.0
14
4.8
19
6.6
23
8.0
21
7.3
22
7.6
24
8.3
42
14.5
40
13.8
 K 70 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IX.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Ages 18 to 19	
Ages 20 to 24	
Ages 25 to 29	
Ages 30 to 34	
Ages 35 to 39	
Ages 40 to 44	
Ages 45 to 49	
Ages 50 to 54	
Ages 55 to 59	
Ages 60 to 64	
Ages 65 to 69	
Ages over 70	
Totals
Number
Per Cent
1
2.1
3
6.3
1
2.1
1
2.1
2
4.2
1
2.1
3
6.3
4
8.3
10
20.8
12
25.0
10
20.8
48
100.0
Table X.—With Whom Recipients Live
Living with parents
Living alone
Living with spouse
Living with spouse and children       5
Living with children
Living with other relatives
Living with others	
Totals	
Number
Per Cent
135
46.7
32
11.1
51
17.6
5
1.7
12
4.2
34
11.8
20
6.9
289
100.0
Table XI.—Where New Recipients Are Living
In parents' home
In own house	
In rented house __
In rented suite	
In children's home	
In home of other relatives
In housekeeping room	
In boarding home.
In private institutions	
In single room (eating out)
Totals	
dumber
Per Cent
133
46.0
51
17.6
18
6.2
20
6.9
7
2.4
31
10.7
15
5.2
5
1.7
9
3.1
289
100.0
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 71
Table XII.—Economic Status of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
(a) Holding real property of value—
$0   235 81.3
$1 to $250     12 4.2
$251 to $500       1 0.3
$501 to $750       3 1.0
$751 to $ 1,000       5 1.7
$1,001 to $1,500       8 2.8
$1,501 to $2,000       4 1.4
$2,001 and up        21 7.3
Totals	
(b) Holding personal property of value—
$0 	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500	
$501 to $750 .	
$751 to $1,000	
$1,001 to $1,500       6
$1,501 to $2,000	
$2,001 and up	
Totals	
289
100.0
  193
66.8
  56
19.4
  12
4.2
4
1.4
   8
2.8
6
.—  2
2.1
0.7
8
2.8
.... 289
100.0
Table XIII.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31,
1962, Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Alberta  11
Saskatchewan  9
Manitoba  4
Ontario  8
Quebec  2
New Brunswick	
Nova Scotia  2
Total  36
 K 72
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XIV.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the
Amount of Allowance Received (Basic Allowance $55)
Amount of Allowance
$55	
$50 to $54.99....
$45 to $49.99 -
$40 to $44.99...
$35 to $39.99 -
$30 to $34.99 -
$25 to $29.99 —
$20 to $24.99....
$19.99 and less
Total.
Per Cent
92.67
2.18
1.53
0.70
0.65
0.74
0.46
0.14
0.93
100.00
General Information re Old Age Security Category
New Applications for Supplementary Social Allowance and Health Services
Number received  1,352
Number granted Supplementary Social Allowance and health services 	
Number granted Supplementary Social Allowance only	
Number granted health services only	
Number who died before application was granted	
Number of applications withdrawn	
Number of applicants ineligible	
Number of applications pending	
811
3
94
26
67
26
325
Total
1,352
Total Number in Receipt of Supplementary Social Allowance as at
March 31,1962
British Columbia cases  25,569
Other-Province cases .        980
Total
MEMBERS OF THE BOARD
26,549
The following are the members of the Old-age Assistance Board of the Province of British Columbia:—
Chairman: Mr. E. W. Berry.
Members: Mr. J. A. Sadler, Director of Social Welfare; Mr. H. E. Blanchard,
Administrator, Region II, Department of Social Welfare.
CONCLUSION
In concluding this report the Board wishes to express its sincere appreciation
for the loyal and efficient work of the office and field staffs throughout the year and
for the continued co-operation of other departments of Government and many outside agencies.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1961/62        K 73
PART IV.—INSTITUTIONS
INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS  (BRANNEN LAKE SCHOOL)
F. G. Hassard, Superintendent
The following table shows the statistics for the Brannen Lake School for the
fiscal years 1952/53 to 1961/62:—
Fiscal Year
in
m
cs
in
in
OS
in
-.
.-
m
OS
so
in
*s>
"rt,
os
r-
m
"V
SO
in
OS
OO
•n
\
r-
in
os
m
oo
m
©
so
*N
Os
in
OS
so
1
Os
n
so
-^.
so
OS
Number in School, April 1st....  —
Number A.W.O.L., April 1st	
104
19
3
101
4
1
2
96
15
2
131
9
19
129
1
152
2
3
164
1
162
175
188
3
5
1
Number in Provincial Mental Hospi-
1
14
1
49
Number on extended leave, April 1st—
Number on special leave, April 1st
4
2
33
17
27
34
43
105
17
122
13.9
119
15
2
2
1
118
23
141
16.3
155
4
1
4
171
32
203
15.8
126
9
19
33
143
24
167
14.4
212
1
17
222
40
262
15.3
237
2
3
1
14
210
75
285
26.3
265
1
240
52
292
17.8
283
284
82
366
22.4
342
313
85
398
21.4
387
3
1
43
1
250
94
344
27.3
366
Number A.W.O.L., March 31st.	
4
5
34
3
Number on extended leave, March 31st
27
164
152
55,516
6
122
49
33
2
101
100.6
36,721
9
281
96
102.4
37,383
9.5
432
1
Number in Provincial Mental Hospital, March 31st   	
131
101.9
37,198
(l)
239
129
137.6
50,371
8.3
124
~152
144
52,576
7.7
156
162
159
58,079
6
105
1
175
173
63,233
5.8
61
188
181
65,927
5.1
77
173
Average daily population.  	
185
67,473
5.7
622
Average length of stay in months	
Total A.W.O.L. during the fiscal year-
1 Not recorded.
2 Involving forty-nine boys.
During the fiscal year there were 250 admissions and ninety-four recidivists,
making a total of 344 admitted to the School. There was a 27.3-per-cent rate of
recidivism. Nine of the recidivists were committed for the third time and one for the
fourth time. Two hundred and forty-five of the boys admitted were Protestant,
ninety-eight Roman Catholic, and one of other religion. Fifty-six of the total
number of boys admitted during the year were of native Indian status.
Range of Age upon Admission
Age
9 years
10 „
11 „
12 „    .
13 ..
Number
of Boys
1
1
8
11
37
Number
Age of Boys
14 years     67
15
16
17
101
77
41
The average age on admission was 14.8 years.
 _rt 74
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Supervising Agencies of Boys Admitted Number
of Boys
Provincial Probation Branch  140
Department of Social Welfare  47
Vancouver Probation Service  68
Family Court for Greater Victoria  29
Indian Department  3 3
Children's Aid Society  8
Catholic Children's Aid Society  6
Family and Children's Service  6
Provincial Probation Branch and Department of Social Welfare  3
New Westminster Police  1
None  3
Of this number, twenty-seven were wards of the Superintendent of Child Welfare, seven of the Children's Aid Society, six of the Catholic Children's Aid, five of
the Family and Children's Service, two of the Indian Department, and one of the
Alberta Child Welfare Division.
The 344 boys admitted were committed from the following Juvenile Courts:—
Number Number
of Boys of Boys
Agassiz  4 Masset     5
Alberni  3 Merritt     1
Alert Bay  7 Mission      1
Armstrong  1 Nanaimo  10
Bella Coola  4 Nelson     1
Burnaby  10 New Westminster     9
Campbell River  2 North Vancouver  14
Chemainus  1 Oliver     1
Chilliwack  6 Penticton     2
Cloverdale  5 Prince George  11
Col wood  2 Prince Rupert    14
Coquitlam   6 Port Alberni     5
Courtenay  3 Port Coquidam     2
Cowichan  1 Port Hardy      1
Cranbrook  5 Powell River     1
Cumberland  1 Qualicum Beach      3
Dawson Creek  2 Revelstoke     1
Duncan   2 Richmond      6
Fort Nelson  1 Saanichton     3
Fort St. James  8 Sechelt    4
Fort St. John  1 Smithers     3
Grand Forks  4 Squamish     1
Haney   1 Terrace      7
Kamloops  3 Trail      7
Kelowna  7 Vancouver  82
Kimberley   1 Vanderhoof     5
Kitimat   3 Vernon     3
Ladner  1 Victoria  32
Ladysmith  1 White Rock     1
Lake Cowichan  1 West Vancouver     1
Langley   5 Williams Lake     3
Lytton  2
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 75
Boys were not in all cases residents of the area served by the Juvenile Court
which committed them to the School.
Of the 344 boys committed to the School during the year, 289 were for offences
against property, eleven against persons, and forty-four for other offences which
included incorrigibility.
Of the 250 new admissions during the year, thirty of the boys were never tried
on probation but were committed to the School on their first appearance before the
Court.
There were 366 boys released from the School during the year. The average
length of stay of boys in the School was 5.7 months.
Forty-nine boys accounted for the sixty-two A.W.O.L.s. The difference between these two figures is due to the fact that some of the same boys went A.W.O.L.
two or more times during the year.
Five hundred and eighty boys were worked with in the School during the fiscal
year.   The population reached a high of 199 at one time during the year.
MEDICAL AND DENTAL TREATMENT
Fillings   992
X-rays      25
Extractions   236
Partial dentures      16
Complete upper dentures        2
Complete lower denture       1
Denture reline        1
Gold inlay        1
Repairs to dentures     10
Prophylaxis        6
One hundred and ninety-two boys received the above dental treatment.
We were fortunate on the accident list, there being none of a really serious
nature.
In January, 1962, there was an influenza epidemic, and fifty-six boys were
stricken.
Three hundred and thirty-five boys were tuberculin-tested, of whom fifty-five
were positive; however, X-rays proved that none had tuberculosis.
The usual large number of boys were treated for minor ailments and accidents,
such as coughs, colds, earaches, cuts, bruises, etc. These are not listed in the
report, but they are kept on record.
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1961/62
Salaries  $275,944.34
Office expense  2,742.28
Travelling expense  458.49
Heat, light, power, and water  24,853.05
Medical services  13,542.02
Clothing and uniforms  8,126.82
Provisions and catering  62,492.98
Laundry and dry-goods  14,3 6 8.22
Equipment and machinery  1,427.26
Medical supplies  1,843.29
 K 76 BRITISH COLUMBIA
FINANCIAL STATEMENT,  1961/62—Continued
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  $6,338.21
Maintenance and operation of equipment  2,705.83
Transportation  3,539.80
Incidentals and contingencies  4,315.86
Repairs to furnishings and equipment  537.51
Training programme expense  4,939.88
Less- $428,175.84
Board  $2,460.00
Rentals  2,600.94
Transportation receipts  110.10
Sundry  6.95
Add decrease in inventory—
Inventory at March 31, 1961  $17,376.71
Inventory at March 31, 1962     17,154.50
5,177.99
$422,997.85
222.21
Add Public Works expenditure  $57,191.16
Less rental       1,135.50
56,055.66
$479,275.72
Per capita cost per diem: $479,275.72-f-67,473=$7.10.
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts  $421,494.02
Add—
Decrease in inventory  222.21
Maintenance receipts  233.35
Revenue from sale of timber         1,270.48
Public Works expenditure  $57,191.16
Less rental       1,135.50
       56,055.66
$479,275.72
While there were fifty-four fewer boys committed to the School during the
year, the average daily population rose from 181 to 185. This is accounted for by
the fact that the average length of a boy's stay in the School increased from 5.1 to
5.7 months.
The School programme is designed to teach a boy to accept responsibility, not
avoid it. He is held responsible for his own actions throughout his stay at the School,
during work parties, academic classroom studies, hobby shop, and recreational
activities.
Groups of boys at various times throughout the year assisted service clubs
with community projects in the Nanaimo area.   In addition to improvement work
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 77
to beaches and playground areas, help was given on three church projects. Several
hundreds of toys collected by the Nanaimo Parent-Teacher Association were repaired and renovated by boys of the School for Christmas hampers, which were distributed by the Salvation Army.
The Mid-Island Dale Carnegie Chapter again instructed two classes during the
year. Forty boys graduated after completing their fourteen-week courses. The
School is much indebted to the members of this chapter for giving so freely of their
time during the twenty-eight weeks of instruction.
Our forestry project was expanded considerably during the year. Many of the
older boys were engaged on this project, and it gave them an opportunity to learn
something about nursery work and reforestation. While the work was carried out
by the boys of our School under direct supervision of the School gardener, the technical aspects of the operation were under the direction of the forest nursery staff.
An irrigation system will be installed, the equipment and material being provided by
the Forest Service and the labour by the boys of the School. The irrigation will be
used for our expanded vegetable garden as well as for the forest nursery. The
nursery now consists of approximately 125,000 Douglas fir seedlings in the seedbeds sown this spring plus a similar number of last year's seeding. We have prepared land for approximately 300,000 2-year-old transplants from other nurseries,
which will be set out later this spring. The boys engaged in the forestry project
have shown a real interest in all its phases and can see results for their labour. This
tree nursery, in our opinion, is a most worthwhile project from its educational value
to the boys and the fact the young trees can be used for reforestation purposes by
the Forest Service.
I wish to thank all staff members, clergymen, service clubs, and other organizations, including other departments of Government, both municipal and Provincial,
private agencies, and individuals who have shown an interest in the boys by helping
the School with its programme of rehabilitation. The School is greatly indebted to
all these persons, and their assistance has been appreciated by the administration.
 K 78
BRITISH COLUMBIA
INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS   (WILLINGDON SCHOOL)
Miss Winnifred M. Urquhart, Superintendent
The following table gives the movement of inmates in and out of the School in
comparison with previous years. Figures, however, are only bare facts and do
not give much indication of the changes that take place in the lives of the girls
represented.
Fiscal Year
Number in School, April 1st	
Number A.W.O.L., April 1st	
Number in Oakalla, April 1st 	
Number in Crease Clinic, April 1st—
Number on extended leave, April 1st-
Number on special leave, April 1st—.
Number of new admissions	
Number of recidivists	
Total number of admissions-
Percentage of recidivists	
Number of releases	
Number A.W.O.L., March 31 	
Number in Oakalla, March 31	
Number in Crease Clinic, March 31st_
Number on extended leave, March 31st
Number on special leave, March 31st—
Number in Provincial Mental Hospital, March 31st	
Number in School, March 31st	
Average daily population	
Total inmate-days	
Average length of stay (in months)..
Total A.W.O.L. during fiscal year
29
2
(!)
(!)
C1)
C1)
C1)
C1)
62
(!)
50
4
C1)
C1)
(!)
3
C1)
37
33.4
12,175
C1)
C1)
37
4
(!)
C1)
C1)
C1)
60
8
68
11.8
64
5
10
(!)
C1)
(!)
2
32
37.8
13,780
C1)
C1)
32
5
(!)
77
11
54
15
69
21.7
56
7
12
66
14
70
20.0
70
12
1
60
11
71
15.5
55
13
59
7
66
10.6
75
7
4
66
15
81
18.5
72
9
3
96
10
106
9.4
79
5
9
81
13
94
13.8
100
11
11
84
19
103
18.4
87
11
11
22
43
30.5
11,136
C1)
CM
2
47
41.1
15,036
8.5
232
62
46.2
16,871
11.6
187
58
51.6
18,851
12.4
187
66
51.4
18,765
10.6
124
91
76.5
28,010
10.4
147
77
74.0
26,994
10.3
210
82
73.4
26,783
11.4
213
i Not recorded.
The 103 admissions include eighteen repeaters and one admitted twice during
the year, making the total nineteen. This group of eighteen girls included six Indian
girls, one who was returned for second and third terms during the year, and after a
number of runaways and other poor behaviour on both occasions was charged and
transferred to Adult Court and sentenced to Oakalla. One other also was charged
with escaping lawful custody and transferred to Adult Court and sentenced to
Oakalla. Four are still in the School at the end of the fiscal year and showing
promise of being able to get along when released. Two other girls served a sentence
of nine months in Oakalla for lighting a fire in the School during their first committal,
and one girl has been sentenced to five years in Kingston Penitentiary for an act
committed during the period she was out of the School and which did not come to
light until after her recommittal. Three are now training to be hairdressers in the
School beauty-parlour and will likely do quite well; the prognosis for the other six
would need to be quite guarded.
There has been a slight drop in the percentage of native Indian girls; this year
it was 21.36 per cent, as against 27.7 per cent the previous year.
Range of Age upon Admission
Age
12 years.
13 „   .
14 „   ..
Number
of Girls
6
20
Age
Number
of Girls
15 years  17
16 „     41
17 „     19
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 79
Charges were as follows:—
Incorrigibility (beyond the control of parents or guardian)   54
Infraction of liquor laws or Indian Act  9
Theft  12
Prostitution   1
Sexual immorality  7
Breach of probation  19
Creating a disturbance  2
Wilful damage  1
Trespassing, breaking, and entering  1
Truancy   2
Forgery  1
Assault  1
Attempted suicide  1
Total  111
One girl had six charges of theft and a breach of probation against her and
three had two charges each.
The 103 girls committed were from the following Juvenile Courts:—
Number Number
of Girls of Girls
Alert Bay  2 Langley  1
Burnaby  1 Nanaimo   1
Chilliwack  1 Natal (Fernie)   1
Clearwater  1 New Westminster  3
Cloverdale  5 North Vancouver  2
Coquitlam   1 Port Coquitlam  1
Cranbrook  1 Prince George  3
Duncan   1 Prince Rupert  6
Dawson Creek  4 Quesnel  2
Fort Nelson  1 Qualicum  1
Fort St. James  1 Richmond  1
Fort St. John  3 Salmon Arm  1
Haney   2 Terrace   1
Hazelton   2 Trail-Rossland  1
Kamloops   2 Vancouver  28
Kelowna  1 Vanderhoof  1
Kimberley  1 Victoria  13
Ladner  1 Williams Lake  4
Ladysmith   1
This shows double the number committed from Vancouver City over the previous year.
Eighty-seven girls received an outright release from the School, and forty-three
were first tried on special leave. Out of this special-leave group, only nine were
returned to the School for further training, twelve were included in the number who
received their full release, and twenty-two were still on special leave and doing quite
well.
The average length of stay in the School was approximately 11.4 months.
Our medical programme has continued to be satisfactory. We receive excellent
service from Dr. T. McKenzie and the Cambie Clinic, to which he is attached. We
still have to make some use of the Vancouver General Hospital out-patient depart-
 K 80 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ment at times. Seven girls (unmarried mothers) were confined during the year, and
their babies planned for through the co-operation of the Adoption Section of the
Child Welfare Division, the Burnaby Social Welfare, and Catholic Children's Aid
Society. The Venereal Disease Clinic examined 408 girls (this would include a
number of repeaters, as every girl is examined on admission and following all absences without leave); twenty-two received treatment.
The dental programme consists mainly in taking care of emergencies to prevent
suffering and a breakdown in health. We have one morning every two weeks at the
out-patient dental clinic, when not more than seven girls can be treated. To supplement this, we have used the services of a private dentist in Burnaby for emergency
extractions and for providing dentures.
We have continued to receive the services of the psychiatrist from the Provincial Mental Health Centre, and we are grateful for the work Dr. M. A. Menzies is
doing through regular monthly meetings with cottage supervisors and senior staff.
He spends two afternoons a month at the School and also has other interviews with
girls and parents.
We had only one change in staff during the year—our junior stenographer, after
one year on staff, left to join her family in Saskatchewan.
The general training programme has continued to keep everyone busy. A short
course on waitressing was introduced and carried out by one of the supervisors and
repeated three times in the year.
In June the girls, under the direction of our new physical education and recreational director, Mrs. Eleanor Cowley, presented a gymnastic display to a capacity
audience. This performance was outstanding, with over seventy girls on the floor
taking part at one time. In July we were thrilled by a visit from six of the R.A.F.
drill team, in Vancouver for the military tattoo, who put on a tumbling and box work
demonstration and instructed a few of the girls.
One highlight was the opening of our own foster home as an adjunct of the
School. It is operated by Mr. and Mrs. Airth, of the Pentecostal group, who have
been long-time volunteer workers with the girls. Unfortunately the zoning by-law
held the number in the home to four. This venture is proving successful in rehabilitating girls with no homes of their own.
Various religious groups have continued Sunday services and weekly visits.
Our other volunteer friends have maintained their interests and done much to
broaden our programme and provide pleasant activities.
During the year a number of community groups visited the School to find out
more about our programme and have gained a better impression than given through
the press at times. These groups included Canadian Daughters League, New Westminster Branch; Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire, in Burnaby;
younger married women's group in the University Women's Club; the Vancouver
District high-school special counsellors' group; social welfare in-service training
classes; and the criminology seminar group from the University of British Columbia.
The Superintendent was the guest speaker at meetings of the New Westminster John
Howard Society and the Elizabeth Fry Society. All this is time-consuming and generally after regular working-hours; however, it seems to bring us many friends and
is a good media for establishing a sympathetic and warmer attitude in the community
for our girls when they leave the security of the School.
An advanced psychology student, writing her thesis for her master's degree,
tested a group of our girls to obtain data to prove the validity of certain tests. Our
social workers found this an interesting experiment and enjoyed the association with
her, as she was a mature, interesting person.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 81
It is the general impression of staff and those closely associated with the School
that there is a gradual general improvement taking place in the total atmosphere of
the School. Granted we are still beset with many runaways, but the year has been
free from any other really poor behaviour.
I wish to acknowledge and thank all the organizations and individuals who have
been instrumental in helping our girls, and by so doing have assisted the staff in their
arduous tasks. I wish also to pay tribute to the staff for their faithfulness and to all
others in the Department for their encouragement during the year.
STATISTICAL INFORMATION
Population of the School, March 31, 1962
On roll, April 1, 1961     99
Girls admitted, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962  103
202
Officially released     8 7
Total unreleased, March 31, 1962  115
Financial Statement, 1961/62
Salaries  $ 179,669.17
Office expense  2,105.63
Travelling expense  1,251.44
Heat, light, power, and water  23,994.33
Medical services  4,441.20
Clothing and uniforms  6,700.20
Provisions and catering  33,055.55
Laundry and dry-goods  229.50
Good Conduct Fund  1,489.80
Equipment and machinery  657.96
Medical supplies  1,503.46
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  1,917.22
Maintenance and operation of equipment  1,937.29
Transportation  2,273.84
Vocational and recreational supplies, etc  2,584.19
$263,810.78
Less—
Board  $1,329.00
Rentals     2,100.00
Sundry receipts        544.39
Increase in inventory—
March 31, 1962  $10,655.70
March 31, 1961       8,944.30
1,711.40
5,684.79
$258,125.99
Add Public Works expenditure       36,488.74
Total  $294,614.73
Per capita cost per diem: $294,614.73-=-26,783==$11.00.
 K 82 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts  $259,837.39
Less increase in inventory         1,711.40
$258,125.99
Add Public Works expenditure       36,488.74
Total  $294,614.73
1
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62 K 83
PROVINCIAL HOME, KAMLOOPS
G. P. Willie, Superintendent
This has been another progressive year in the care for the men who have chosen
this institution for their home, and for these residents good service has been supplied for their comfort. Occasionally men come from other areas on their own for
admission, for which a suitable policy is in practice.
The per capita cost per diem has increased from the previous year, chiefly by
a decrease in the inmate-days and an increase in expenditure. The Public Works
expenditure also increased over the last fiscal year.
Two major items have been taken care of—namely, modern and increased
electrical service throughout the Home and complete new scullery equipment,
including dish-washer, garbarator, and stainless-steel sinks and tables. Air-coolers
have been installed in the kitchen, dining-room, sick ward, two recreation-rooms,
laundry, office, and Wards 3 and 7. The ceilings of the older building have been
insulated and air-vents cut into the gable ends.
Good patient-care continues. The services of the medical staff are used more
fully throughout the Home. Possibly due to increased allowable payments available
for the aged by pension and welfare agencies, the applicants who are admitted to the
Home are a more helpless type and require stricter diets and increased personal
attention. The Irving Clinic again rendered medical and surgical care, with other
treatments supplied as required. The laundry is processed in a modern plant at
Tranquille.  The food continues to be the best as recommended for aged people.
Recreation and entertainment continue to be good, with card games, television,
and bus rides most popular. Organizations presented concerts, visited, and distributed gifts at Easter and Christmas. The canteen continues to supply extras at low
cost to the residents.
The religious denominations are ever helpful, both to the residents and administration when required, for the sick and at funerals. Religion is encouraged and has
supplied many enjoyable hours by choir and sermon.
The Provincial Home cemetery continues to be the last resting-place for the
majority of our residents. Twenty-three of our residents died during the year. The
burials of four of the deceased were conducted by private sources, three were conducted under the auspices of the Last Post Fund, and the remaining sixteen under
the auspices of the Home with interment in our cemetery.
Fire protection received attention with periodic drills, inspections by authorized
officers, extinguishers recharged, and all equipment tested regularly. The City of
Kamloops Fire Department is familiar with the plans of the Home.
I wish to thank staff members, co-workers, senior administration, and all others
who assisted with the care of our residents.
EXPENDITURE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1962
Salaries   $ 106,450.16
Office expense  610.19
Travelling expense  5.32
Heat, light, power, and water  2.00
Medical services  6,878.38
Clothing and uniforms  951.87
Provisions and catering  30,338.49
Laundry and dry-goods  6,807.61
Equipment and machinery  5,573.28
 K 84 BRITISH COLUMBIA
EXPENDITURE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED
MARCH 31,  1962—Continued
Medical supplies  $3,580.48
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  1,814.63
Maintenance and operation of equipment  720.61
Transportation  477.63
Burials   1,875.00
Incidentals and contingencies  2,198.87
$168,284.52
Less—
Board  $783.00
Rent     300.00
         1,083.00
$167,201.52
Add Public Works expenditure       15,663.43
$182,864.95
Per capita cost per diem: $182,864.95-r-43,483=$4.21.
Reconciliation
Pensions paid to Government Agent, Kamloops     $81,507.37
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts     $29,141.16
Add—
Maintenance receipts—
Pensions  $81,507.37
Municipalities        2,938.78
Transfer from Provincial Home Trust
Account     13,428.05
Receipts from Government of Canada under the Unemployment
Assistance Agreement     48,145.06
Other collections  343.65
     146,362.91
$175,504.07
Add Public Works expenditure       15,663.43
$191,167.50
Less—
Pensioners' comforts     $7,008.62
Portion of excess of disbursements
over receipts for Tranquille
Farm       1,293.93
         8,302.55
$182,864.95
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1961/62        K 85
Inmate-days
Inmates in the Home, April 1, 1961  129
Inmates admitted during the year     47
  176
Inmates discharged     35
Inmates deceased     23
     58
Total number of inmates, March 31, 1962  118
Total number of inmate-days  43,483
 K 86 BRITISH COLUMBIA
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS BOARD
A. A. Shipp, Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions
I submit herewith the annual report of the Welfare Institutions Licensing Act
for the year 1961. As licences are issued on the basis of the calendar year, this
report covers the period from January 1, 1961, to December 31, 1961.
LICENCES
A total of 751 licences was issued during the year, including 155 new licences
and 596 renewals. Of the licensed institutions, ninety-three were either closed or
had a change of operator, requiring relicensing. There were 280 new applications
for licensing, and 293 pending applications were closed, 138 of which were either
refused or cancelled. Case load at December 31, 1961, totalled 868, made up of
658 licensed institutions and 210 files pending.
BOARD MEETINGS
Eight Board meetings were held during the year. In July Dr. A. A. Larsen
replaced Dr. J. L. M. Whitbread on the Board as the representative of the Deputy
Minister of Health.
The members of the Board for 1961 were as follows:—
Chairman:   Mr. James A. Sadler, Director of Social Welfare.
Members: Mr. F. P. Levirs, Assistant Superintendent (Instruction), Department of Education; Miss Mary King, Superintendent of Child Welfare;
Mr. James Mainguy, Manager, Hospital Consultation and Inspection Division, British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service; Dr. A. A. Larsen,
Director, Occupational Health Division, Department of Health Services.
Chief Inspector:  Mr. A. A. Shipp.
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS FOR CHILDREN
A. Full-time Care of Children
Institutions for Child-care
Two new licences for institutional care of children were issued during the year,
and one institution which had been in operation for a period of eight years closed.
All children's institutions in the Province are administered by boards of directors, who give good co-operation regarding the requirements of the Welfare Institutions Licensing Act.
Number of institutions licensed in 1961  9
Number of children cared for        287
Total days' care  67,343
Private Boarding Homes
The majority of the private boarding homes for children in British Columbia
are located in the Vancouver metropolitan area, and are under the direct supervision
of the two Children's Aid Societies in the city. The Advisory Committee on Private
Boarding Homes for Children, under the chairmanship of a senior staff member of
the Metropolitan Health Committee, continues to be an excellent clearing-house for
the pooling of information regarding these homes.
Number of children's boarding homes licensed in 1961  30
Number of children cared for  75
Total days' care  18,308
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 87
B. Day Care of Children
Foster Day Care
The greatest percentage of homes offering day care to children are also in the
Vancouver area, and these are supervised by the Child Care Centre. These homes
are also brought to the Advisory Committee on Private Boarding Homes for Children, for discussion, with a consequent saving of time and effort. A few homes
which do not wish to work through the Child Care Centre are supervised directly by
the office of the Chief Inspector.
Number of foster day-care homes licensed in 1961   28
Number of children cared for        302
Total days' care  21,237
Kindergartens, Play-schools, etc.
In spite of the fact that in some areas local School Boards have begun to operate
kindergartens, there is a continual interest in both the privately operated and the
co-operative kindergarten. In the past the majority of the children attending have
been 5-year-olds, but it has been noted that during the past two years an increasing
number of 4-year-olds are attending.
Number of pre-school centres licensed in 1961  265
Number of children registered        13,614
Total days' care  1,121,022
Schools for Retarded Children
Local School Boards have taken over the operation of several of the schools
formerly operated by chapters of the British Columbia Association for Retarded
Children. However, ten new licences were issued during the year, increasing the
total number from twenty-seven to thirty-one. It is noted that there was a sharp
increase in the number of children attending.
Number of schools licensed in 1961 .  31
Number of children registered _.___.—        630
Total days' care I   76,034
MATERNITY HOMES
There was no change in the status or programme of the three maternity homes
serving the Province.
Number of homes licensed in 1961  3
Number of mothers cared for        390
Number of infants cared for        259
Total days' care (mothers and children)   30,903
AGED-CARE
The licensing of boarding homes for the care of the aged is one of the main
functions of this Division. To provide good housing and adequate care for our older
citizens is a major problem and one that is becoming greater each year.
Perhaps the most important development during the year was the amendment
to section 2, clause (c), of the Welfare Institutions Licensing Act, which made it
mandatory for all homes giving care and attention to elderly persons to be licensed
by the Welfare Institutions Board. Before the amendment was passed, those persons
who were in receipt of public assistance were protected by the legislation in that the
 K 88 BRITISH COLUMBIA
homes caring for them were subject to inspection, while those who were financially
able to care for themselves did not always have this protection.
The majority of the boarding-home operators have been most co-operative with
the Welfare Institutions Board and have welcomed the need for inspection and
licensing.
Number of homes licensed during 1961  215
Number of persons cared for       4,710
Total days' care  992,824
UNEMPLOYED ADULTS
There was no change in the number or function of these institutions during
the year.
Number of homes licensed during 1961  6
Number of persons cared for     5,502
Total days' care  40,368
SUMMER CAMPS
Many organizations are finding it increasingly difficult to recruit good counsellors for their camps. Many of the young people who have had camping experience
and training are university students who are dependent on summer earnings for their
tuition and living expenses for the next year, and most camping organizations are
unable to compete with industry in this sphere. However, it is noted that most
reports received on summer camps emphasize the fact that the leadership is good,
and it would appear that the activities of the British Columbia Camping Association
are largely responsible for this.
Number of summer camps licensed in 1961  77
Number of persons cared for     26,023
Number of attendance days  248,295
CONCLUSION
Sincere thanks and appreciation are extended to all who helped with the administration of this Act.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1961/62        K 89
STATISTICAL INFORMATION
Table I.—Showing a Comparative Summary of Information Regarding
Licensed Welfare Institutions
1958
1959
1960
1961
Children—Total Care (Excluding Summer Camps)
Number licensed—
Institutions.     —
Boarding homes	
Capacity—
Institutions.- 	
Boarding homes..
Number of children under care—
Institutions	
Boarding homes..
Number of days* care—
Institutions._	
Boarding homes..
Summer Camps
Number licensed-
Capacity-
Number of persons attending-
Number of attendance days—
Children—Day Care
Number licensed—
Kindergartens	
Schools for retarded children..
Foster day care	
Capacity—
Kindergartens-
Schools for retarded children	
Foster day care-
Number of children enrolled—
Kindergartens-
Schools for retarded children-
Foster day care-
Number of attendance days—
Kindergartens-
Schools for retarded children.
Foster day care 	
Adults—Infirm and Unemployable
Number licensed    	
Capacity-
Number of persons under care-
Number of days' care_ 	
Adults—Employable
Number licensed..
Capacity-
Number of persons under care-
Number of days' care	
Women—Maternity
Number licensed	
Capacity (mothers and infants)..
Number of persons under care—
Mothers	
Infants 	
Number of days' care..
9
46
357
105
397
126
82,788
30,557
74
5,280
22,695
233,565
260
25
50
6,724
358
172
11,392
340
320
940,628
42,917
27,754
184
2,805
3,851
859,962
5
72
473
16,208
3
115
327
259
28,795
7
39
242
92
312
107
70,762
24,914
77
5,283
25,735
235,846
251
27
36
7,034
542
170
12,182
501
358
1,055,073
63,547
30,820
174
2,824
3,862
867,864
5
64
396
16,754
2
116
373
282
29,796
7
30
217
78
223
86
47,544
20,265
76
5,308
23,753
205,556
249
27
34
7,221
518
84
12,942
469
291
1,135,696
57,149
20,182
196
3,058
4,385
1,026,783
6
164
8,680
49,268
3
115
390
259
30,903
9
30
243
76
287
75
67,343
18,308
77
5,750
26,023
248,295
265
31
28
7,764
695
135
13,614
630
302
1,121,022
76,034
21,237
215
3,368
4,710
992,824
6
171
5,502
40,368
3
125
394
191
31,263
 K 90
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Case Load Showing the Total Number of Licensed Institutions and
Pending Applications, 1961
LICENSED
Jan. 1,
1961
New
Licences
Closed
Carried
Forward,
Dec. 31,
Children—total care—
1. Boarding homes  —	
2. Institutions  '  -
30
7
76
231
25
34
152
32
6
3
2
2
6
67
10
8
58
2
4
•   1"
5
41
10
8
24
28
8
.  77-' ;
Children—day care—
■'" '257
25'    ;
34
Aged—                                                       |
186
2. Institutions „- -i~	
Adults—employable....  ;'_  — „  ■
34
6
3
Totals  	
596
155
93
658
PENDING
Jan. 1,
1961
New
Cases
Closed
Carried
Forward,
Dec. 31,
1961
Children—total care—
9
3
27
78
8
20
73
4
1
5
16
84
11
28
132
1
3
9
3
11
102
11
29
124
3
1
5
3. Camps —     	
Children—day care—
1. Kindergartens  -   1	
32.       :
60
8
19
Aged—                                                                  ■
81
2
Homes—maternity
223
280
293
210
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 91
PART V.—SOCIAL WORK SERVICES
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL AND PEARSON POLIOMYELITIS
PAVILION
Mrs. M. Titterington, Casework Supervisor
In presenting the annual report of the Social Service Department it is timely to
present a bird's-eye view of the progress in the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis and poliomyelitis.
Dr. G. F. Kincade, Medical Director of the Division, reported that at the end
of 1961 there were 21,799 known cases of tuberculosis in the Province, of whom
4,832 were Indians. Of the total, 19,206 were considered to be inactive, but close
supervision is important, and through this supervision reactivation is ascertained
earlier than would otherwise be the case. Of 109 patients readmitted to sanatorium,
twenty-nine new cases were previously considered inactive, and some for many years.
The number of new cases reported for 1961 was 960, compared with 1,199 in 1960.
These figures include non-pulmonary conditions. Regarding poliomyelitis, there was
a dramatic reduction in the number of new cases. The Division of Epidemiology
reported that during 1961 there were only seven cases reported, compared to 1959
and 1960 when there were 132 and 165 cases respectively.
There has continued to be a decrease in the number of patients being treated
within institutions, so that by the end of 1961 the number of beds for use in the
treatment of tuberculosis was reduced to 300 in Pearson and Willow Chest Centre,
13 in Sunnyhill Hospital, and 150 in the North Lawn Building of the Provincial
Mental Hospital, where mentally ill patients with tuberculosis are treated. With the
reduction in institutional treatment, there is a gradual increase in the number of
patients continuing to receive active treatment in their own homes following hospitalization as well as patients receiving active treatment without hospitalization. The
Willow Chest Centre made a study of 128 cases receiving out-patient antimicrobial
therapy, and the study indicated that treatment had proved satisfactory.
During 1961 there were 420 tuberculous patients admitted to Pearson Hospital
and Willow Chest Centre, 109 or 26 per cent of these being readmissions. There
were 238 tuberculous patients in these two units on March 31, 1962. Excluding
seventeen patients who are in and out of the Poliomyelitis Pavilion frequently, there
were four first admissions to the Poliomyelitis Pavilion this year in addition to three
readmissions. One of the new admissions was not due to poliomyelitis, but to
another condition that required the equipment and nursing care available in this
Pavilion. There were thirty-six poliomyelitis patients in Pearson Pavilion on April
1, 1962.
The Social Service Department had a busy year. There were many difficult
family situations and personality problems that demanded a great deal of time on
the part of the medical social workers and other staff members as well as community
agencies. When the spouse was also emotionally disturbed, more time was demanded. There were 532 cases open during the year, and of these many were closed
and opened more than once. There were 2,279 interviews with patients and their
families and 3,894 collateral interviews, which include consultations with medical
staff, members of other professional disciplines, and community agencies. There
were 706 letters written on behalf of patients.
 K 92
BRITISH COLUMBIA
One of our more difficult and time-consuming problems is that of arranging
housekeeper or homemaker service for the families of the women who are admitted
to hospital or the occasional one who is being treated in her own home, particularly
where the husband is earning more than social assistance but where his earnings are
only sufficient to meet the month-to-month expenses. The Family Service Agency
of Greater Vancouver assisted in one case and the British Columbia Tuberculosis
Society helped in other tuberculosis cases, while the Polio Rehabilitation Foundation
of British Columbia assisted in the poliomyelitis cases.
The members of this department have, as in previous years, participated in the
educational programmes of allied professions.
Many private groups and individuals have been of help throughout the year.
The Women's Auxiliary of the Paraplegic Association and the Three R's Club gave
individualized assistance at Christmas to patients and their families that we were
helping, and this is especially appreciated. The British Columbia Tuberculosis
Society and two chapters of the I.O.D.E.—Mount Garibaldi and Municipal Chapters—have continued to provide funds for emergencies and special needs. This help
has been invaluable. Thanks are also due to the community agencies and other
Governmental departments, on whose co-operation we are dependent.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1961/62        K 93
PART VI.—ACCOUNTING DIVISION
J. McDiarmid, Departmental Comptroller
The functions of the Accounting Division are to control expenditures, process
accounts for payment, account for revenue, forecast expenditures, and prepare the
Departmental estimates of revenue and expenditure in their final form.
The gross expenditure for the Department increased $4,555,500 or 8.9 per
cent over the fiscal year 1960/61. The Department of Social Welfare reflects an
increase in gross dollar expenditure over a period of three years amounting to
$16,208,100.
The underlisted table of expenditure shows little change in expenditures relating
to administration or institutions over the previous fiscal year. However, field service
expenditures have increased $241,100, which is largely due to an increase in staff
over the fiscal year 1960/61.
Maintenance of dependent children shows an increase of $451,700 or 13.4 per
cent over 1960/61. This increase is due to a greater number of children in care and
higher rates paid for special home care.
Medical services reflect an increase of $86,200, due to an increase in the
number of persons eligible, which amounted to 1.1 per cent over 1960/61.
The expenditure on Social Allowances accounted for the main increase within
the Department. This amounted to $4,075,300, being an increase of 16.3 per cent
over 1960/61. Beneficiaries increased during this period by 1.9 per cent.
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowance, etc., which are the second largest
section of expenditure, show a decrease of $311,400, which is accounted for by
reason of a small decrease in number of beneficiaries in receipt of Old-age Assistance
and a larger decrease in the number of beneficiaries in receipt of Supplementary
Social Allowance within the Old Age Security and Old-age Assistance categories.
Proportion
of Total Gross Welfare Expenditure
Main Service
1960/61
1961/62
Value
Per Cent
Value
Per Cent
$554,400
913,700
1,507,900
3,364,600
4,552,800
24,957,300
15,619,700
1.1
1.8
2.9
6.5
8.8
48.5
30.3
$567,000
913,700
1,749,000
3,816,300
4,639,000
29,032,600
15,308,300
1.0
Institutions..	
1.6
3.1
6.8
Medical services, drugs, optical, etc	
8.3
51.8
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowance, Disabled
Persons'  Allowance,   and  Supplementary   Social
27.3
Totals  	
$51,470,400
100.0
$56,025,900
100.0
The centralization of Social Allowance cheques issued from Victoria continues
to be of benefit to the field. During 1961/62, child welfare payments to foster-
mothers were placed on I.B.M. operations, which decreased the work load of the
Accounting Division and allowed the Division to take over additional duties without
an increase in staff.
Twenty per cent of the vehicles operated by the Department were replaced, and
additional vehicles were purchased for the use of the field service staff. Mileage
travelled on Government business by Government-owned and privately owned vehicles on a mileage rate was in excess of 1,000,000 miles.
 Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1962
1,260-1062-2979
  

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