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Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1962 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1963]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1962
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31, 1962.
ROBERT W. BONNER, Q.C.,
Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce.
 The Honourable Robert W. Bonner, Q.C.,
Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31,
1962.
THOMAS L. STURGESS,
Deputy Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce.
 Report of the Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce
For the Year Ended December 31, 1962
FOREWORD
As the economic recovery that had commenced in mid-year 1961 gathered
momentum in 1962, many sectors of British Columbia business and industry recorded gains that exceeded all expectation.
Underlying the success of the 1962 business year were buoyant marketing
conditions for the Province's leading exports, assisted by further devaluation of the
Canadian dollar; the bringing into production of additional plant capacity that had
been under construction the previous year; and the surprising strength of the home
and apartment building section of the construction industry.
The higher level of business activity during the year was reflected in a rise in
employment, a relative drop in unemployment (measured by the percentage of the
labour force unemployed), and a sizeable boost in labour income. A moderate
yet persistent increase in prices occurred, partly as a result of the higher cost of
imports, but the increase for the year was little more than that which had been
experienced in 1961.
Highlighting the primary sector of the economy was the sizeable increase in
mineral production that took place as a result of the opening of new mines. These
mines, principally copper and iron, have been brought into production largely to
serve markets in Japan. Also contributing to the rise in mineral production was
the first full year's operation of the Western Pacific Products and Crude Oil pipe-line,
which provided a market for the Province's crude petroleum.
In forestry, many sectors of the industry operated at or near full capacity in
response to increased demand for pulp, lumber, and plywood. The timber scale for
the year was up approximately 15 per cent over a year ago. Emphasizing the
favourable outlook for the pulp and paper industry is the continuing expansion of
mill facilities, including the announcement of a 50-million-dollar pulp-mill for the
Prince George area, scheduled for completion in 1965. This will be the second
pulp-mill to be located in the Interior of the Province, the first having been established at Castlegar in 1960.
The fishery industry enjoyed an above-average year, highlighted by the record
catch of pink salmon. The value of production for the year of nearly 95 million
dollars is the best since 1958, and would have been even more impressive had it
not been for the disappointing Adams River sockeye run. An interesting sideline
to this year's fishing activity was the resumption of whaling. Over 700 whales were
reported caught by the newly formed Western Canada Whaling Company, a firm
established jointly by British Columbia Packers Limited and Taiyo Gyogyo Company of Japan.
The over-all value of manufacturing production in the Province topped the
2-billion-dollar mark for the first time, with the final figure reaching 2.14 billion
dollars. The increase is attributable to increased capacity, both new and additions
to existing plant, and also to favourable marketing conditions for many manufactured commodities.
5
 P 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Exports through British Columbia customs ports registered a 15-per-cent
increase over last year, reflecting in part the shipment of Prairie grain to China but
also increased shipments of British Columbia products—namely, pulp, oil, natural
gas, and mineral concentrates.
In the electric-power field, attention during the year was focused on the huge
Peace River power project, where three tunnels are being driven to divert the river's
flow during construction of the dam. A major contract is to be let for the dam
proper in 1963.
The outlook for the British Columbia economy in 1963 appears generally
bright. Results compiled from the Bureau of Economics and Statistics executive
opinion poll suggest continuing good business conditions, with increases over this
year's level anticipated for many branches of business and industry.
Following in this Report are summaries of the activities of the various divisions
of this Department—namely, the Bureau of Economics and Statistics; the Industrial and Trade Office; the Data Processing Division; British Columbia House,
London, England; and British Columbia House, San Francisco, Calif. The objectives and organization of the British Columbia Research Council are recorded
likewise.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1962
P 7
BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND  STATISTICS
Before proceeding to review the work accomplished by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics during 1962, it may be useful to explain that the Bureau is a
fact-finding and advisory body. It has two primary functions: the first is to provide
economic counsel and, when necessary, to conduct investigations into economic
questions affecting the Province; the second function is to collect and compile economic statistics of interest to the Province.
To ensure technical proficiency, the Bureau has endeavoured to follow the
policy of building up a small corps of professionally trained persons who can be
relied upon to perform a variety of difficult economic analyses. It has also been
the policy to make the services of the technical personnel continuously available to
all other departments of the Government.
Since other Government agencies are also concerned with the collection of
statistics, a series of working agreements designed to prevent overlapping or duplication has been arranged in recent years between this Bureau and the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, as well as with the Provincial Departments of Mines
and Petroleum Resources, Labour, Provincial Secretary, Health Services and Hospital Insurance, and Social Welfare. During 1962 the essential statistical services
performed for the other Provincial departments as well as for the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce were maintained. A description
follows of the various services performed during the year.
ECONOMIC RESEARCH
One of the Bureau's functions is to provide economic counsel to the Government. This is done partly through the medium of a weekly report to the Premier
and to the Minister of each department. This report reviews significant events and
developments in the field of economics. As well, from time to time, technical assistance is given to the various branches of the Government as it is requested. There
are many publications prepared to keep government and industry informed on current business conditions. The two most widely distributed are the Monthly Bulletin
of Business Activity, containing a brief description of current changes in monthly
business indicators, plus statistical tables and charts, and the Annual Summary of
Business Activity, recording the past year's performance and including numerous
charts and historical series illustrating the economic position of the Province. In
recent years an executive opinion poll has been conducted at the end of each year
to gauge the outlook of industry for the coming year.
Many requests are received for information dealing with the Provincial economy
from private individuals, corporations, trade-unions, newspapers, business publications, and Boards of Trade. The Bureau's files and library contain much of the
information requested, but often special surveys and considerable research are
necessary.
The annual study of wage rates for selected occupations in the metropolitan
areas of Vancouver and Victoria and centres in northern and southern areas of the
Province was again prepared and published. The Civil Service Commission, as well
as other Government agencies and the public, was provided with these comparative
wage rates.
 P 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1960,1961, and 1962
Unit or
Base
Period
1960
1961
1962
Preliminary
Estimates
Mining—■
Total value of production  	
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
M f.b.m
M f.b.m
Tons
Tons
$000
Cases
$000
$000
$000
$000
Gallons
000 kwh.
Tons
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
Units
$000
Number
Number
Number
1949=100
1949 = 100
1949 = 100
1949=100
1949=100
1949 = 100
1949=100
1949 = 100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
$000
179,596
50,657
9,584
38,662
10,293
15,993
18,830
1,531
7,696
673,311
7,074,486
5,305,118
2,124,000
1,150,000
53,983
632,089
127,051
1,913,674
958,904
440,321
333,829,000
13,408,383
12,557,705
396,480
1,668,360
283,498
245,111
1,224,800
.    195,712
13,857
18,018,609
573,000
524,000
49,000
114.7
117.2
107.7
117.6
175.6
70.4
81.8
121.1
125.9
117.6
106.4
1,957,000
181,080
45,371
8,965
42,314
11,494
15,368
19,875
1,900
9,712
685,000
6,875,222
5,352,259
2,232,000
1,144,000
78,758
1,410,574
133,480
1,983,068
1,080,751
421,885
336,808,000
13,086,326
13,072,665
395,040
1,664,309
264,152
248,806
1,240,900
207,558
11,167
20,433,555
586,000
536,000
50,000
112.3
116.8
102.1
118.6
188.0
71.1
71.1
113.4
129.5
118.3
97.0
1,995,000
216,800
50,000
Copper   	
31,500
28,100
16,000
17,000
19,500
Petroleum, crude   	
17,100
10,800
Forestry—
Total value of production  	
780,000
7,918,000
5,940,000
2,414,000
Paper production   .   ...
Fisheries—
1,210,000
95,000
1,815,609
Agriculture—Farm cash income 	
140,000
2,132,642
External trade—
1,244,750
443,930
Internal trade—
359,403,000
Electric power generated 	
Railway freight loaded and received in British
14,468,529
14,000,000
Sales of life insurance	
404,600
1,784,000
316,000
263,794
Capital investment—
1,271,800
237,123
New residential units completed	
11,920
23,089,746
Employment—
599,000
558,000
41,000
Employment indices (based on firms with fifteen
or more employees)—
AH employment  -	
115.7
121.1
Iron and steel products  	
113.0
122.5
Pulp and paper 	
Mining    	
198.3
76.5
76.3
Transportation, storage and communication
114.4
136.6
Trade ....      	
Construction	
119.8
100.9
2,116,000
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1962
Economic Indicators in British Columbia
P 9
280
260
240
220
200
180
160
140
120
100
60
60
40
20
BUILDING PERMITS
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YEARS
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TRANSPORTATION
During 1962 the transportation function of the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics was primarily involved in the preparation and presentation of a statement
to the United States Interstate Commerce Commission hearings on the proposed
merger of the " northern lines " railways group, composed mainly of the Great
Northern, Northern Pacific, and Burlington Railways. The statement explained
that at present there is a small number of American rail carriers serving the limited
number of direct rail connections to the United States. If the merger were allowed
without any conditional clauses, the number of participating carriers would be greatly
reduced and the present competitive balance would be seriously changed to the disadvantage of the British Columbia shipper. The Province, while not voicing opposition to the merger, proposed a condition that would maintain present competition
as a minimum and allow for further development of rail competition at the border.
West Coast hearings were held throughout the late spring with a Bureau representative in attendance. The record was closed in July, and participating lawyers were
asked to submit their arguments by January, 1963, with the examiners' report
expected during the summer of that same year.
The Bureau is studying the Canadian Pacific Railway's request to discontinue
passenger service on its Kettle Valley line between Spences Bridge, B.C., and Leth-
bridge, Alta. Application has been made by the Government to appear at any
hearings when and where the Board of Transport Commissioners decides to hold
them.
The second and third volumes of the report of the McPherson Royal Commission on Transportation were released in 1962. As in the first volume, the second
volume continued to show thoughts parallel to the British Columbia submission to
the Commission. The third volume proved to be a selection of ten studies the
Commission had prepared by independent consulting firms in order to make some
of its recommendations.
The Bureau continued to provide its usual service to other Government departments, business, and industry in rate and developmental matters.
EXTERNAL TRADE
During 1962 the external-trade statistics compiled in the Department continued
to be used by other Provincial Government departments and agencies, business,
libraries, individuals, universities, and other organizations. Current interest in the
possible entry of the United Kingdom into the Common Market and the trade potential of markets in the Orient made 1962 a particularly busy year.
Two special reports, " Export Opportunities in the Far East" and " United
States Market Opportunities for British Columbia Businessmen," were prepared and
published as part of a new series on trade opportunities in the countries bordering
the Pacific Ocean. A third publication in this series will be released in January,
1963, tided " Canada's Trade with Countries of the Pacific." Other reports scheduled will cover Australia and New Zealand, Hawaii and Alaska, the west coast of
South America, and the west coast of Central America. This series is designed to
stimulate the interest of British Columbia businessmen in exporting to these areas
by presenting factual data. Also published and distributed to some 600 subscribers
was the Department's 1961 "Preliminary Statement of External Trade."
Other activities included preparation of statistical and written material for use
in monthly and annual reports. In addition, numerous requests regarding imports
and exports of specific commodities were answered.
 P  16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The following two tables have been changed considerably from previous years.
The table of exports for British Columbia products has been revised to conform
with the export classification system established by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics,
Ottawa, in January, 1961. It should be noted that these export figures differ from
the regularly published figures since they include exports of products considered to
be principally of British Columbia origin shipped through all Canadian ports and
exclude products originating in other Provinces exported through British Columbia
customs ports.
The import table shows imports through British Columbia customs ports and
includes products which are transhipped to other Provinces. These figures are similar to regularly published figures but are the final revised values.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1962
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 P 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICS
The Bureau is responsible for the collection, analysis, interpretation, and
publication of statistical information. In addition, it assists other departments in
the compilation of statistical information and in establishing uniform statistical
methods throughout the service. Following is a brief outline of the Bureau's activities in these fields.
Co-operative Statistical Agreements
Over the years the Bureau of Economics and Statistics has entered into several
co-operative statistical agreements with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, the object
being to eliminate wasteful duplications of collection and to improve the over-all
efficiency of surveys. Fields of co-operation include practically all branches of the
Bureau's work where regular statistical collection is involved.
Conferences between the Provincial and Federal statistical bureaux are now
held on a regular basis. As a consequence, it is anticipated that continued progress
toward the elimination of duplication will be made. In respect to forestry statistics,
a meeting with Federal authorities will be held in March, 1963, to determine ways
to improve coverage and collection of returns. Co-operative agreements have resulted in savings to governments, to union secretaries, and to private industry.
British Columbia Cost-of-food Survey
A cost-of-food index and food budget for Vancouver, Victoria, and New
Westminster was prepared in March, June, and September of 1962. However, in
September it was decided to stop preparation of the index and food budget for
Vancouver and New Westminster since the principal user, the Vancouver office of
the Health Branch of the Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
does not now require these statistics from this Department. Through a co-operative
arrangement the Vancouver Health Branch now receives prices from the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics office in Vancouver.
However, food prices will continue to be collected in the Victoria area and
supplied to the Victoria office of the Health Branch, although comparisons with
Vancouver and New Westminster prices will not be prepared on a quarterly basis.
Forestry
The Bureau continued to analyse and disseminate data relating to economic
facets of the forest industry. This industry comprises the most important industrial
group in the Province and with a net value of production in 1962 estimated at
$780,000,000 accounts for 35 per cent of the net value of all commodity-producing
industries. In 1962 the industry produced approximately 65 per cent of the lumber
sawn in Canada, 20 per cent of the pulp, and 80 per cent of the plywood. Also in
1962 the industry provided employment for about 75,000 persons and paid them
$350,000,000 in salaries and wages.
British Columbia's most important primary industry—the logging industry—
cut an estimated 7,918 million board-feet of timber during 1962, an increase of 15
per cent over the 1961 harvest of 6,875 million board-feet and 12 per cent over the
previous all-time high of 7,074 million board-feet recorded in 1960. Accelerated
activity in the lumber industry, coupled with a light fire season, has resulted in much
of the increase. A breakdown of the 1961 data shows that operations in the Coast
region accounted for 3,952 million board-feet, with hemlock the leading species at
1,408 million board-feet, followed by Douglas fir at  1,057 million board-feet.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1962
P  19
Interior operations cut the remaining 2,923 million board-feet, with Douglas fir the
leading species at 1,043 million board-feet, followed closely by spruce at 1,008
million board-feet.
During 1962 British Columbia's lumber industry produced an estimated 5,940
million board-feet of lumber, representing an increase of 11 per cent above the total
of 5,352 million board-feet sawn in 1961. A regional analysis shows that Interior
mills in 1945 produced only 20 per cent of the lumber sawn in British Columbia.
In 1962 they produced almost 50 per cent of the total.
The pulp and paper mills of the Province during 1962 used an estimated 2,400
thousand cords of pulpwood and 1,600 thousand cords of waste wood (sawmill and
veneer-mill chips, etc.) to produce an estimated 2,400 thousand tons of pulp. Over
half of the pulp produced was used in the Province, to produce 1,200 thousand
tons of paper. The pulp and paper industry is one of the fastest-growing industries
in British Columbia. In 1950 the net value of the industry accounted for 13 per
cent of the total net value of the forest industry; now it accounts for about 25 per
cent of the total net value.
During 1962 the industry—all sectors—spent an estimated $170,000,000 on
capital and repair expenditures. Next year should see this figure significantly increased as many of the projects announced in 1962 get fully under way.
The following table shows the principal statistics of the industry for 1960, the
latest year for which complete statistics are available:—
Principal Statistics of the Forest Industries in British Columbia, 1960
Industry
Establishments
Employees
Salaries
and
Wages
Cost of
Fuel and
Electricity
Cost at
Plant of
Materials
Used
Value of
Factory
Shipments
Value
Added by
Manufacture!
No.
No.
21,0002
$000
93,144
$000
$000
28,689
$000
304,978
$000
276,289
Sawmills   	
Sash, door, and planing mills	
Veneer and plywood mills	
1,187
202
18
35
65
25,454
3,522
6,034
1,337
1,040
102,054
14,273
26,725
5,911
4,148
6,134
1,181
1,638
173
295
201,371
48,278
47,800
8,187
9,179
368,184
71,522
82,891
16,043
17,213
160,679
21,845
34,827
7,683
Other wood industries3.  _
7,485
Sub-totals, wood indus-
1,507
37,387
153,111
9,421
314,815
555.853
232.519
14
32
8,695
1,714
49,335
7,177
13,842
314
94,437
21,253
256,731
37,353
148,647
Other paper  and   allied  Indus
15,856
Sub-totals,   paper  and
allied industries	
46
10,409
56,512
14,156
115,690
294,084
164,503
68,796
302,767
459,194
1,154,915
673,311
1 Value added by manufacture (net value):  Value of factory shipments plus or minus changes in inventories
of finished goods and goods in process, less cost of materials, fuel, and electricity.
2 Estimated.
3 Does not include the furniture industry.
Source:  Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa.
Mining
The Bureau collects and compiles production statistics on all minerals, with
the exception of coal, natural gas, and petroleum. These statistics are published in
detail in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
The preliminary estimate of mineral production in British Columbia for 1962 is
approximately $217,000,000, up 20 per cent from the 1961 value of $181,079,785.
This is the highest value ever attained for a single year. The previous record set
was in 1956, when the value reached $190,067,465.
 P 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The principal metals, consisting of gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc, account
for 56 per cent of the total and are expected to have a value of $122,300,000, compared with $109,325,484 in 1961. The greatly increased copper production is
responsible for most of this increase, although the value of zinc is also slightly
higher than the previous year. Gold and silver have about the same value as in
1961, while lead shows a decrease.
A significant increase occurred in the miscellaneous metals, from $18,651,608
in 1961 to an anticipated $24,500,000. Most of this increase is a result of the new
iron properties now producing and shipping to Japan. As some of these properties
were not operating the full year, the value for 1963 can be expected to be much
greater.
The industrial-mineral section shows an increase from $15,367,661 in 1961 to
$17,000,000 in 1962. The greatest part of this gain is attributed to larger shipments
of asbestos.
Structural materials have a value of approximately $19,500,000, roughly equal
to the value for 1961.
Although coal production was down in 1962, the total value for fuels was
considerably higher than for 1961. Fuels now account for approximately 16 per
cent of the total value of mineral production. The value of natural gas delivered to
pipe-line increased from $8,818,891 to $9,900,000, while the value of natural-gas
liquid by-products remained roughly the same at $900,000. A big increase is noted
for crude petroleum following completion of the products and crude-oil pipe-line
that connects the Peace River area with the existing fine to the Coast at Kamloops.
Crude petroleum, which had a value of $1,900,401 in 1961, increased to an estimated value of $17,100,000 in 1962.
The devaluation of the Canadian dollar has also contributed to the increased
value of mineral production as the prices received for much of British Columbia's
minerals are largely or entirely based on the United States prices.
Labour
Increasing demand for data in the broad field of labour statistics continues to
necessitate a growing volume of work relating to this function of the Bureau.
Following the pattern established with the formation of the Federal-Provincial
arrangement concerning labour statistics in this Province, the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics again completed the statistical sections of the Annual Report of the
British Columbia Department of Labour. The sections relating to the year 1961
and the first ten months of 1962 are contained under the heading of "Statistical
Report on Trades and Industries" in the Annual Report of the Department of
Labour for the current year.
As a means to provide a reference source for data concerning trade-
unions, steps were taken during the year to further integrate Federal and Provincial
records relating to trade-union organizations in British Columbia. As a result of
close co-operation on the part of departments concerned, comprehensive and up-
to-date files have now been completed, and will be maintained as a valuable asset
to the work of this and other departments.
Projects completed during the year included the following:—
(1) The 1962 survey of British Columbia salary and wage rates in industry
and business, by various areas.
:      (2) A wage and salary comparison prepared for the Civil Service Commission,
Victoria, B.C.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1962
P 21
(3) Statistical sections for the 1962 Annual Report of the British Columbia
Department of Labour.
(4) A survey of organized labour in British Columbia, completed together
with a directory of trade-unions and labour organizations, for the Department of Labour.
(5) A survey of clerical salary rates in the Vancouver area, tabulated for the
Vancouver Board of Trade.
(6) Preliminary tabulations and preparatory work in the processing of information dealing with conditions of labour outlined in the provisions of
working agreements on file with the British Columbia Department of
Labour.
And continuing work in the maintenance of current labour statistics in use by the
Bureau.
The following table shows the estimated annual labour income totals in British
Columbia for the years 1947 to 1962, the figures for the years subsequent to 1957
having recently been revised on the basis of new source material:—
Estimated A nnual Labour Income in British Columbia
Year Annual Income
1947  $641,000,000
1948   794,000,000
1949   825,000,000
1950   915,000,000
1951  1,072,000,000
1952  1,214,000,000
1953  1,279,000,000
1954  1,302,000,000
Year
1955.
1956
1957.
1958
1959
1960
1961.
1962.
Annual Income
$1,426,000,000
1,649,000,000
1,765,000,000
1,763,000,000
1,873,000,000
1,957,000,000
1,995,000,000
2,116,000,000
Source:  Estimates of Labour Income, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa.
MARKET RESEARCH
Keen interest is being shown by business and industry in the market potential
of the Province, and a large and varied number of requests is received for market
data and assessments of industrial and commercial opportunities.
The Bureau of Economics and Statistics is continually on the alert to detect
products which present a good opportunity for local manufacture, and in this connection has prepared several industry studies. A systematic search and analysis of
the Bureau's extensive manufacturing data is currently under way to assist in locating new opportunities.
Another aspect of market research which has continued to receive attention
relates to the study of specific are^s of the Province.    (See under Publications.)
PUBLICATIONS
Periodical
Monthly Bulletin of Business Activity.—This publication contains special articles of current interest and also incorporates a monthly review of current changes in
the principal segments of the Provincial economy.
Summary of Business Activity in British Columbia.—This publication is a
companion to the Monthly Bulletin. It summarizes the current year's economic
picture and presents historical series relating to business activity in the Province.
 P 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Business Outlook.—This publication is issued at the end of the current year
and indicates business conditions during the past year and the outlook for the coming year.   It is based on a survey of 150 of the major companies in British Columbia.
External Trade.—Statistics covering in detail all commodities imported or
exported through British Columbia customs ports having an aggregate value of
$50,000 and over.
British Columbia Trade Index.—This publication lists the manufacturers in
British Columbia, together with their products.   A new issue was released in 1962.
British Columbia Facts and Statistics.—Portrays graphically some of the salient
features of British Columbia's economy and describes its geography, government,
and judiciary and educational systems.
Salary and Wage Rate Survey.—This annual publication summarizes salary
and wage rates in selected clerical, professional, and trade occupations in business
and industrial establishments for metropolitan Vancouver and Victoria, Southern
Interior, and northern centres.
Establishing a Business in British Columbia.—This publication gives to prospective investors information relating to the establishment of a business in British
Columbia.   It has been revised to May, 1962.
British Columbia Regional Index.—This index contains available statistics on
a wide range of subjects covering all areas of the Province. It is in the course of
revision, and pending completion of the project as a whole, sections will be released
individually.
Special
Petrochemicals Study, 1962.—This publication was released early in the year.
It is a preliminary evaluation of the possibilities for petrochemical manufacture in
the Province.
Pig Iron and Iron by Direct Reduction.—This publication was released in October, 1962. It is a study of the possible applications of new methods of producing
iron from characteristic British Columbia iron-ore deposits.
United States Market Opportunities for British Columbia Businessmen.-—■
Published in July, 1962, this publication was prepared with the purpose of encouraging British Columbia and other Canadian exporters to examine more intensively
the possibilities for expanding and diversifying exports to the United States.
Exports Opportunities in the Far East.—Published in August, 1962. This
publication has a purpose similar to the above, and deals with Japan, China, the
Philippines, and other South-east Asia countries.
Area Surveys.—The following have been released to date: The Kelowna region
in 1962, Kamloops and district in 1961, Chilliwack and district in 1960, and Hope
and district in 1959. Special emphasis is placed on the present state of commercial
and industrial development, and on the favourable opportunities for further expansion in each area.
Population Trends in British Columbia.—Published in December, 1962, this
publication points out the changes which have taken place in the make-up of the
population in British Columbia since 1951, and describes the general characteristics
of the population at the time of the 1961 Census of Canada. It features two population distribution maps—one for the Province as a whole and another for the Lower
Mainland and southern tip of Vancouver Island.
(Note.—A complete listing of Bureau publications is contained in the Department's " List of Publications," obtainable free of charge.)
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1962 P 23
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE OFFICE
Activity of this office centres on the promotion of new industrial and commercial enterprises throughout the Province, assistance to established businesses when
required, and development of the domestic and export trade. The office also provides industry with data on location-sites, land-use maps, availability of raw materials, and information on the services offered by the British Columbia Research
Council on matters concerning industrial and scientific research.
This work is carried out in co-operation with other Provincial Government
departments, Federal Government departments, Boards of Trade, Chambers of
Commerce, the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, industrial commissions, railway industrial agents, and foreign trade representatives in Canada and overseas.
BRANCH PLANT AND MANUFACTURING UNDER
LICENCE INQUIRIES
During the year this office continued to direct letters to selected contacts, suggesting the establishment of branch plants in British Columbia or alternatively having their products manufactured under licence. The response to these letters has
been gratifying. Some firms requested more detailed information on the Province's
economy, and several contacted wanted to know more about the market potential.
Sixty inquiries were received from British Columbia manufacturers on manufacturing under licence, and several of these are being followed up at the present
time. Licence manufacturing proposals were received from England, Eastern Canada, United States, and West Germany.
COMPOSITE INDUSTRIAL MAP OF THE FRASER VALLEY AREA,
LOWER MAINLAND REGION
A new composite industrial map of the Fraser Valley was published during the
year. This map indicates the occupied, zoned, and potential heavy- and light-
industrial lands in fourteen municipalities. It comprises an area from Port Coquitlam to Hope, and also shows the main highways, railway lines, natural-gas line, oil
pipe-line, and other facilities serving the area. The map is on the same scale as and
adjoins the recently published composite industrial map of the Metropolitan Lower
Mainland area. Both of these popular maps may be purchased for $1 per copy,
which includes the 5-per-cent social services tax.
HANDICRAFT DIRECTORY
Copies of the eleventh edition of this directory were distributed through the
year to retail and wholesale firms, resorts, and other outlets. The directory lists
producers in British Columbia who are interested in finding a market, and who are
in a position to supply reasonable demands. The usual contact was made with
Eastern Canadian Provinces interested in handicraft development. Four show-cases
of British Columbia handicrafts are still on display in the Empress Hotel in Victoria,
and additional crafts were sent to our office in British Columbia House, San Francisco. During the year a series of regional displays was exhibited at the Government Information Centre at 787 Hornby Street, Vancouver. The displays were
organized by the Department with the assistance and co-operation of Mrs. E. B.
 P 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Marshall, Chairman, Crafts Committee of the Community Arts Council, Vancouver.
The December exhibit featured crafts produced by Vancouver Island producers.
Some of the items exhibited during the year included weaving, ceramics, silver jewellery, copperwork, and Indian crafts.
BRITISH COLUMBIA INDUSTRIAL DESIGN COMMITTEE
During the year under review the British Columbia Industrial Design Committee was active in working with designers and manufacturers in promoting good
design throughout the Province.   Some of the Committee's activities included:—■
(a) Organization and holding of the first British Columbia schools' industrial
design competition.
(b) A photographic exhibition in the secondary schools of Vancouver of the
1960 design award winners from the Council of Industrial Design in
Britain. This included night-school students and was viewed by 7,000
students.
(c) Instrumental in having a local manufacturer offer a student award for a
competition to be held in the Vancouver Vocational Institute.
(d) Commenced the compilation of a bibliography of industrial design books
and magazines available in British Columbia libraries.
The Committee includes representation from the Federal Department of Trade
and Commerce; Provincial Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and
Commerce; Department of Education; University of British Columbia; Canadian
Manufacturers' Association; Vancouver Board of Trade; Vancouver School of Art;
British Columbia Research Council; Association of Professional Engineers of British
Columbia; Canadian Association of Consumers; Architectural Institute of British
Columbia; and Community Arts Council of Vancouver.
The purpose of the Committee is to encourage appreciation of industrial design
and its importance as a factor in production and marketing of British Columbia
products.
REGIONAL INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Requests for this survey during the year were so numerous that a revised edition
was printed. The survey lists many investment opportunities in the fields of hotel
and motel requirements, housing developments, warehousing, and wholesale and
retail outlets. The suggestions were submitted by various Boards of Trade and
Chambers of Commerce throughout British Columbia and have aroused much interest on the part of people who have capital to invest in British Columbia.
CANADA-UNITED STATES DEFENCE PRODUCTION SHARING
Interest continues high in this field, notwithstanding the keen competition
offered by United States firms. However, some British Columbia firms were able
to bid successfully on United States defence contracts. Our office in British Columbia House, San Francisco, continued to work closely with Mr. R. Robinson, the
Federal Government representative in Los Angeles, on developing this programme.
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS' TRADE AND INDUSTRY COUNCIL
During the year the fourteenth annual conference was held in Niagara Falls,
Ont., with the Industrial Commissioner acting as secretary-treasurer of the Council.
Some of the topics discussed included incentives for industrial research, the weight
of taxation on local business, and Canada and the Common Market.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1962
P 25
The aims of the Council are: To provide interprovincial consultation and
co-operation on matters of trade and industrial development; to supply traders and
manufacturers from Canada and abroad with a nation-wide Provincial service in
these fields; and to promote greater understanding throughout Canada of the
economic conditions affecting the development of each of the Provinces and all
of Canada.
British Columbia exhibit, Chicago International Trade Fair.
CHICAGO INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR
From July 25th to August 12th British Columbia was represented at the Chicago International Trade Fair by an industrial exhibit (see illustration). The British
Columbia exhibit effectively told the story of the industrial expansion taking place
in the Province. The fair was held in the magnificent new $35,000,000 McCormick
Place Building, which is completely air-conditioned and covers an area of approximately 10 acres. Seven hundred and fifty exhibitors, including twenty-five nations
of the world, were in attendance. Some 600,000 visitors passed through this one
building. Publicity arrangements were exceUent. Departmental representatives
were given free time on stations WBBM, WGN, and WAAF in Chicago. Radio
stations at Racine, Wis., and Aurora and Decatur, 111., also provided fifteen minutes'
free time for advertising purposes. Press releases and import opportunity bulletins
listing British Columbia manufacturers wishing to export to the Chicago area were
published free each day. Fair officials also made follow-up telephone calls to
seventy-five manufacturers who had been contacted prior to the Department's
 P 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
attendance at the fair. Press, radio, and other free services resulted in numerous
inquiries on travel, settlement, investment, and industrial opportunities in British
Columbia.
REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
During the year considerable regional development work was carried out by
members of the Department, who provided information to officials of Boards of
Trade and Chambers of Commerce on various methods they could utilize to encourage the establishment of new businesses and industries in areas throughout the
Province. Several of these organizations were provided with samples of industrial
brochures to assist them in the preparation of their own publications. The regional
investment opportunities survey mentioned previously is an example of assistance
on a regional basis. Compiling this particular survey necessitated contacting 118
Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce in ten regional areas of British
Columbia. Periodic field trips were made by the Industrial Commissioner and the
Field Representative, and the usual liaison was maintained with all regional groups
interested in industrial development. Groups contacted included officials of Boards
of Trade and Chambers of Commerce, transportation and utility companies, banks,
and municipal departments.
COMMON MARKET TIMBER DELEGATION, MAY 5 TO 25,  1962
The delegation, consisting of thirty-three members of the Common Market
timber trade, visited British Columbia as guests of the British Columbia Government, British Columbia Lumber Manufacturers' Association, and the Plywood
Manufacturers' Association of British Columbia. The details of their tour of British
Columbia's forest industry were arranged by the Department in co-operation with
the British Columbia Lumber Manufacturers' Association, Plywood Manufacturers'
Association of British Columbia, and the forest industry, under the chairmanship
of Mr. B. M. Hoffmeister, President of the Council of Forest Industries.
The purpose of the tour was to enable the delegation to meet with local lumber
operators for an exchange of ideas with a view to improving the sale of British
Columbia forest products in the European Common Market.
Common Market importers and trade association representatives were no
strangers to British Columbia Douglas fir, which is a traditional material for such
joinery applications as the manufacture of exterior window shutters. European
specifiers and consumers, however, were less familiar with British Columbia hemlock
and western red cedar, two of the prime species of the British Columbia Coastal
forests, and western white spruce from the Northern Interior. The favourable reaction of the delegates to these woods as material for construction, joinery, and decoration applications was therefore extremely encouraging to producers, who are keen
to expand and diversify the construction market, both structural and decorative, for
British Columbia lumber and plywood.
During the tour the delegation was divided into seven working groups. The
first week each group toured a large integrated lumber operation on Vancouver
Island. The second week of the tour was devoted to first-hand study of lumber-
processing operations in the Vancouver-New Westminster area. The delegation then
visited the Northern Interior lumber operations in the Prince George area and ended
their tour with a three-day symposium at Harrison Hot Springs.
Judging from orders of substantial amounts placed during the tour and the
general reactions of the delegates, prospects for increased sales of rough sawn lumber and plywood, particularly in Northern Europe, appear good.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1962 P 27
WESTERN SPACE AGE INDUSTRIES EXPOSITION,
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., APRIL 25 TO 29,  1962
The Trade Office, in co-operation with British Columbia House in San Francisco, arranged for a small composite display of selected items from the secondary
industries of the Province. Numerous interested inquiries were received, and the
result should prove beneficial in the development of trade between our Province
and the California market area.
CANADIAN SAMPLES SHOW (B.C.), VANCOUVER,
OCTOBER 16 AND  17,  1962
The Trade Office of the Department, in co-operation with the Federal Department of Trade and Commerce, the B.C. Products Bureau of the Vancouver Board
of Trade, and the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, organized and staged the successful Canadian Samples Show (B.C.). Forty-
seven British Columbia industries exhibited a wide range of consumer goods to the
sixty United States buyers from the Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Seattle market
areas.
The Department would like to express its gratitude to Mr. A. Scoten, of the
B.C. Products Bureau of the Vancouver Board of Trade, the co-ordinator of the
Samples Show, and his committee for a job well done. It was unfortunate that many
British Columbia manufacturers of consumer goods failed to seize the opportunity
to participate in the Samples Show. Many firms that displayed obtained sample
orders, and most plan to follow up the excellent contacts with sales tours of the
market areas concerned.
1964 BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR
Announcement of the 1964 British Columbia International Trade Fair was
made in the Throne Speech at the opening of the 1962 Legislative Assembly. The
Trade Fair is sponsored by this Department in co-operation with the associations
interested in trade promotion in British Columbia.
The Minister appointed Mr. W. J. Borrie, chairman of Pemberton Securities
Ltd. and past president of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, as president of the
board of directors of the 1964 British Columbia International Trade Fair. The
Minister announced also that Mr. D. H. Mollison, of this Department, had again
been loaned to the Trade Fair organization as general manager.
The governments of all countries doing business with Canada have been invited
to participate, and their support has been requested to help in obtaining exhibits of
firms selling their products or wishing to sell their products in Western Canada.
It will also offer an opportunity for Canadian manufacturers and exporters to display
their merchandise to the large group of buyers and visitors attending the fair.
With time to plan and the outstanding success of the previous Trade Fair as
background, it is expected that the 1964 event will assume even greater international importance and make another substantial contribution to the trade development of British Columbia.
DEVELOPMENT OF EXTERNAL TRADE
The Trade Office has continued its close co-operation with the regional offices
of the Department of Trade and Commerce in Vancouver, B.C. Products Bureau
of the Vancouver Board of Trade, members of the Vancouver consular corps, and
 P 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
other organizations interested in the development of British Columbia's external
trade. The Administrative Assistant has continued his visits to secondary industries
of the Province to ascertain what products could be exported to foreign markets.
New overseas markets for numerous products have been found, and many additional
firms have been included in the Canadian Exporters Directory. Through the close
co-operation of the United States Chief Appraiser of Customs in Seattle, we have
been able to obtain favourable import duties on numerous British Columbia manufactured goods.
An example of the co-operation between the Trade Office and representatives
of the consular corps in Vancouver resulted in the establishing of a new industry in
the Province manufacturing dehumidifiers for use in its commercial fishing industry.
The dehumidifiers are fabricated and assembled in Victoria, using a component part
which is imported from the United Kingdom.
TRADE AND INDUSTRY BULLETIN
During the year under review the Bulletin completed thirteen years of continuous publication, listing trade inquiries, licence manufacturing opportunities, and
news of commercial interest. The increased use of the Bulletin by the trade representatives of other nations bears out the importance of this publication to the commercial and industrial organizations in Western Canada. The circulation of the
Bulletin has increased to 825 copies per month.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1962 P 29
DATA PROCESSING DIVISION
The Data Processing Division continued to operate as the data-processing centre
for those departments of the Government requiring the services of electronic equipment to handle computing and large-scale statistical or accounting procedures.
To meet the diversified needs of the Government service, a varied installation
of punched-card equipment is rented on a monthly basis. Although no charge is
made for this work, accurate job costs are maintained through a job time-sheet system, enabling the Division to assess the value of work done for each department,
study machine utilization, and check the operating efficiency of both operators and
equipment.
For operating purposes, the Division is divided into seven sections, each responsible for a unit of work, which is determined by the volume and nature of work
involved. At present the following are in operation: General Statistical; Liquor
Control Board; Forest Service; Health and Welfare; Quarterly, Semi-annual, and
Annual Reports; Computing; and Key Punch Sections. Each of these sections is
controlled by a senior operator, who is responsible for the particular unit of work.
In addition, the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service and the British
Columbia Forest Service maintain key-punch sections, and the output from these
sections is processed in this Division. Similarly, a large volume of punched cards is
received from the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, for the preparation of
monthly and annual reports on external trade and Provincial employment.
The Division is equipped with one 650 computer, seven alphabetic printers,
one numeric printer, six sorters, two gang summary punches, two end printing document originating machines, one alphabetic interpreter, two numeric collators, one
multiplying punch, one facsimile poster, eight punches, seven verifiers, and one forms
burster.
To operate the equipment, a well-trained staff must be maintained, and presently consists of a Chief Supervisor, assistant supervisor, computer programmer,
computer console operator, five senior machine operators, seven machine operators,
one key-punch supervisor, eleven key-punch operators, and one senior clerk-stenographer. In addition, three members of the Liquor Control Board staff are attached
to the Division to handle clerical functions necessary to the processing of their work.
All applications for new jobs on the computer are submitted to the Electronic
Data Processing Committee for approval. The writing of programmes for new and
approved programmes to be processed in the Computer Section is handled by programmers from the departments concerned, and are tested and debugged with the
assistance of our staff programmer.
Details as to the value of work done for each department are outlined in the
accompanying tables.
 P 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Comparative Cost Statement
Department and Branch
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
Agriculture—
$1,662.62
8,078.91
$4,641.61
$6,007.51
$3,649.45
$3,948.16
$4,641.61
$6,007.51
$9,741.53
$3,649.45
$3,948.16
Attorney-General—
$553.94
851.66
327.42
9,740.77
30,269.84
$1,389.90
$1,061.39
$430.07
1,227.01
174.34
7,592.25
25,089.79
$1,184.86
183.66
7,338.24
26,748.51
1,249.51
245.31
7,712.19
33,025.47
892.07
26.63
7,288.62
30,414.67
$34,513.46
$35,455.27
$41,743.63
$43,622.38
$39,683.38
Education—
$1,703.73
1,620.81
$1,349.43
5,035.64
1,393.93
$3,672.38
7,378.33
1,123.76
$1,497.93
8,199.65
1,138.54
$1,236.75
Tests, Standards, and Research	
10,914.06
1,060.66
Inspector of Schools and School Services
2,942.81
Totals-.- 	
$3,324.54
$7,779.00
$12,174.47
$10,836.12
$16,154.28
Finance—
$1,308.39
922.22
	
I
$2,230.61
Forest Service—
$3.79
49,243.21
$117.90
30,804.47
162.10
$3,102.63
28,632.44
$3,227.54
64,380.45
281.66
$1,479.73
60,932.19
1,056.01
685.90
Totals    	
$49,247.00
$31,084.47
$31,735.07
$67,889.65
$64,153.83
Health Services and Hospital Insurance—
  1 	
$601.96
21,780.58
$39.06
19,616.98
$8.39
$13,476.98
$23,364.74
22,518.09
$13,476.98
$23,364.74
$22,382.54
$19,656.04
$22,526.48
Highways—
$1,638.29
1,577.90
137.48
$2,030.14
15,103.09
$275.03
37.12
	
$275.03
$3,353.67
$17,170.35
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce—Bureau of Economics and Sta-
$12,188.18
$14,869.98
$8,153.18
$7,031.32
$7,032.74
$3,384.33
$4,016.77
$654.55
$768.59
$452.88
Lands—
Surveys and Mapping, Legal Surveys Di-
$25.22
$8,832.13
15.05
10,143.23
4,154.73
$16,954.04
$164.77
10,478.65
Water Rights Branch Administration ...
Hydraulic Investigation   	
$7,983.75
13,062.73
6,635.54
3,427.11
Totals      - —-
$10,643.42
$7,983.75
$13,087.95
$23,145.14
$27,016.69
Provincial Secretary—
$9,100.04
186.19
5,834.41
$10,593.36
3,049.54
5,797.66
$12,050.62
1,649.42
5,634.42
$10,355.73
6,787.40
4,048.60
	
$8,821.04
2,513.35
Civil Service Commission	
P.S. Medical Plan  	
3,452.38
10.84
Totals  	
$15,120.64
$19,440.56
$19,334.46
$21,191.73
$14,797.61
Recreation and Conservation—Parks
$32.78
$464.67
$4,583.06
Social Welfare—Accounts Division	
$12,121.14
$14,576.99
$19,057.94
$23,948.08
$17,277.51
Municipal Affairs—Regional Planning	
$433.98
$561.37
	
Commercial Transport—Industrial Transport     -	
$181.96
$40.03
$178,845.05
$1,860.04
$229,744.19
$1,012.10
Grand totals —	
$159,128.06
$164,761.00
$235,809.07
1
1                        1
  P 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
UTILIZATION   OF   COMPUTER
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1962 P 33
OFFICE OF THE AGENT-GENERAL FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA,
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, LONDON, ENGLAND
GENERAL
Since assuming office as Agent-General, Dr. J. V. Fisher visited Belgium, The
Netherlands, France, West Germany, Switzerland, and Italy in order to promote
British Columbia exports to continental Europe, and more particularly to attract
capital for the development of secondary industries within the Province. The response had was gratifying, and there is every reason to assume that, in addition to
investments already made, further and substantial investments may be anticipated.
Profound changes in the marketing of goods are to be expected as a result of
the proposed entry of Great Britain into the European Common Market. Every
effort is being made to establish close liaison with mercantile and banking organizations in both the United Kingdom and Europe to ascertain possible developments
and to determine the best ways and means to adjust Provincial trade to changed
European conditions. Competition in Europe is extremely keen, and more aggressive salesmanship by British Columbia producers is urged, particularly because the
purchasing power of continental Europe has increased greatly and because quality
products are in high demand.
Interest by investors is decidedly keener, and the potentials of British Columbia's future export markets are becoming more obvious and therefore more attractive.
Current conditions in the United Kingdom are not as buoyant as some months
ago. Notwithstanding increased exports, domestic consumption is lower, the rising
number of unemployed is causing serious concern, and domestic purchasing power
has decreased to the point where buyer resistance is clearly evident. Every effort,
however, is being made to ensure that the level of British Columbia exports to the
British Isles is increased, and if not, at least maintained.
SETTLEMENT
Inquiry respecting setdement in the Province has increased from last year.
This is perhaps occasioned by the fact that unemployment throughout Canada improved over corresponding periods of a year ago. The Office replied to some 654
letters regarding immigration, and over the counter and by telephone attended to
300 inquiries.
SCHOOL-TEACHERS
Again the facilities of the Office were placed at the disposal of the Department
of Education during the spring months in the recruitment of school-teachers. Unfortunately the system is such that this Office is not able to record the actual number
of teachers going forward.
STAFF
The staff situation remained static throughout the year, there being no changes.
VISITORS
Some 3,623 visitors from British Columbia registered at British Columbia
House, and mail handled on their behalf totalled 22,086 pieces. Both these are
substantial increases over last year. It was very noticeable that many of the visitors
were in the younger age brackets, indicating an early desire to see new places, cus-
 P 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
toms, and ways of life of other peoples before settling down to business or professional life.
FILMS AND PUBLICITY
Distribution of British Columbia films in the United Kingdom for the year
ended December, 1962, amounted to some 427 screenings to audiences totalling
30,851. In the first two months of the year no films were sent out for the reason
that labour disputes slowed up the postal service and parcel post was temporarily
suspended in London. A few additional films have been received, which has helped
very much to enable us to maintain a respectable film library. We find, however,
that through continual use by clubs, business groups, etc., in the hands of unskilled
operators, the films become badly worn, and it is a constant battle to keep them
presentable. We require to have two copies of each film so that we may maintain
a good copy to be shown by ourselves, using our own operator, who is experienced.
While this might be considered an additional expense, it does at least ensure that
when film showings under the auspices of the Government are given, they will be as
near perfect as possible. It is intended greatly to increase the number of our own
showings next year, particularly through the medium of the new exhibition hall and
tourist office.
Our principal method of publicizing British Columbia continues, of course, to
be the monthly News Letter. Many favourable reports are received on the quality
of this publication. Because of increasing interest in British Columbia evinced by
continental countries, the circulation is being expanded gradually to include readers
in certain of these countries. During this year, steps have been taken to build up a
readership in West Germany, which will be expanded as experience dictates.
RENOVATIONS IN THE INTEREST OF PUBLICITY
Appreciating the need to publicize British Columbia products in London in
line with existing Government policy, certain renovations were effected during the
year in the accommodation in British Columbia House. For years the large library
has been used as a visitors' lounge and reading-room. During a large part of any
one year this accommodation has proved too generous and, it was felt, could be used
more effectively. Consequently, a smaller room adjoining has been completely renovated and refurnished, and is now a very attractive visitors' lounge where are displayed local newspapers, reports, and magazines, and facilities are offered for writing,
use of telephone, and, in all, affords an appropriate place in which to meet friends.
This has released the larger accommodation, which has also been remodelled in the
form of an exhibition hall. This room comprises some 600 square feet and is available to British Columbia industry for the display of British Columbia products. It is
designed with the most modern form of lighting, with outlets of generous proportion
to enable displays to be effectively lighted. This room is versatile enough that it
can be used for film shows, lectures, meetings, and similar functions. It immediately
adjoins the suite of offices occupied by the Agent-General and his staff, so that
inquiries about trade and industry displays can be readily answered. It is hoped
that industry in the Province will take advantage of these facilities as a show window
for the sale of its products in the United Kingdom.
In addition to the above, and again in line with policy, a large ground-floor
area adjoining the entrance to the building has been recaptured from an outgoing
tenant, and this will likewise be used for the display of British Columbia products.
Plans have been drawn to modernize and equip this space for this purpose. The
plans also envisage the building of a mezzanine floor, which will further augment the
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1962
P 35
display space to be made available. The ground-floor area will comprise some 1,340
square feet, and the mezzanine some 915 square feet. These arrangements will
make available a ground-floor display window, which should prove of inestimable
value. It is hoped that exhibitors, when considering this matter, will be influenced
by the fact that the address of the building is No. 1 Regent Street, perhaps one of
the most prominent addresses in the West End of London, easily accessible to customers, agents, distributors, etc., interested in buying British Columbia products in
the United Kingdom.
Renovations at British Columbia House, London, showing space available for
display of British Columbia products.
TOURISM
Envisaged in the above conversion affecting the ground floor is the incorporation of a small tourist office devoted to publicizing the attractions of the Province
and designed to work through travel agents in encouraging tourist traffic to the Province. During 1962 both the Canadian and United States Governments have opened
large ground-floor tourist offices. Their experience to date indicates a growing interest in travel to North America. Many moneyed residents of the United Kingdom
have for years gone abroad to continental countries, Bermuda, the West Indies, and
to South Africa. These are looking for new discoveries, and it is confidently felt that
the efforts of the above-mentioned tourist offices will result in growing interest in
travel to North America. Our participation would be complementary to that of both
offices, with the object of encouraging travel agents and, through them, the travelling
public to include British Columbia in North American itineraries.
 P 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ADMINISTRATION
In the interests of efficiency, economy, and health, the central heating plant was
converted to oil. The new system, being completely automatic, has freed the house
staff for other duties. It also was found necessary to install a water-softening plant.
The water is taken from our own well, but because of its chalky nature it proved
very hard, injurious, and far too costly on water-pipes and related equipment.
Certain leases have been renewed during the year, and rental fees, being fully
in line with those asked for in London's West End, provided a gratifying increase
in revenue.
SELLING BRITISH COLUMBIA PRODUCTS IN EUROPE
During 1962 there was very litde more effort than was put forward in previous
years by British Columbia manufacturers to sell in the United Kingdom and other
European markets. It is urged that individual firms and trade associations in British
Columbia make plans for entry into these markets. Producers of foodstuffs and
manufacturers from other Provinces of Canada are coming over in increasing numbers to make first-hand surveys of the requirements of the market, price structures,
and to establish sales oudets and distribution channels.
The best way of breaking into new markets and keeping the goodwill of existing
markets is for more British Columbia businessmen to make personal visits and, once
contacts are organized, meticulously to maintain the continuity of supply with frequent liaison.
The year 1962 was interesting for the reason that there was a definite upsurge
in the variety of agricultural products from British Columbia shipped into this market. During this year substantial shipments of fresh peaches, cherries, apricots,
honey, and fresh frozen loganberries and blackberries arrived in the United Kingdom
market. The reception of these products was so favourable that it is hoped British
Columbia producers will increase their acreage so that this trade can be expanded.
Orders for small fruits received at this office alone could not be filled because sufficient tonnage was not available in British Columbia.
At the Canadian Food Section of the Ideal Home Exhibition in March there
were only two exhibitors from the Province—B.C. Tree Fruits, with a most effective
display of apples, and Hodgson Bee Supplies, showing " Bee Cee " honey. Both
these displays attracted much attention, and this medium for introducing British
Columbia products is recommended for the consideration of our growers, canners,
and packers.
It is apparent that much more could be done in the sale of British Columbia
products both in the United Kingdom and in European countries, especially in the
case of tinned salmon, frozen vegetables, tinned vegetables and fruits.
TRADE INQUIRIES FROM BRITISH COLUMBIA
During the first eleven months of 1962 seventy-two British Columbia firms
made inquiries through this Office. In some cases this Office was able to prepare
the way for direct sales, but it is emphasized that such measures are only introductory and the producers or manufacturers in British Columbia must ensure that the
impetus of a continuing sales programme be maintained.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1962 P 37
TRADE INQUIRIES FROM EUROPE
Inquiries were received from various countries during the first eleven months
of 1962, and a breakdown follows:—
United Kingdom  207
France  16
Germany  47
Netherlands  21
Scandinavia  26
Italy  17
Switzerland   15
Belgium  13
Other countries       5
Total  367
The above inquiries cover a wide range of products from firms and individuals
wishing to sell their products in Western Canada, establish branches, or buy from
British Columbia sources.
During the year seven British firms opened sales offices or appointed agents in
Vancouver; one Scottish firm has announced its intention of establishing a branch
manufacturing plant; a newspaper group has acquired controlling interest in three
newspapers in the Fraser Valley; and a film company in British Columbia has established a film-distribution office in London.
Three lumber export groups from Interior mills have established agencies
throughout the United Kingdom; two British Columbia firms have concluded licence
manufacture agreements in the United Kingdom, whereby their products will be
manufactured and royalties remitted to British Columbia. British Columbia honey
entered the United Kingdom market by the appointment of agents in London, Glasgow, Belfast, and Stockholm.
LICENCE MANUFACTURE
This Office informed the Department'during the year of over 100 inquiries,
mostly from the United Kingdom, but also from German, French, and Scandinavian
firms, who are looking for factories in Western Canada capable of manufacturing
products or use their processes under a licence manufacture agreement.
A great opportunity exists for those firms in the Province who have a surplus
plant capacity to conclude such agreements. This is an excellent method of introducing secondary industries into the Province and would be of great help in expanding the economy.
CONSTRUCTION SUPPLIES AND METHODS
It is felt that an opportunity exists for either a new company or existing building and construction supply-houses to take advantage of the many new materials
and construction methods which are being devised in Europe. Details of these have
been forwarded to the Department in Victoria.
BUSINESS EMIGRATION
Inquiries have continued over the past year from businessmen, both small and
large, who wish to become established in British Columbia. These inquiries range
from small shopkeepers to companies with substantial sterling funds which they wish
to invest.
 P 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Good use has been made of a booklet published by the Department in Victoria
entitled " Regional Investment Opportunities in British Columbia." This presents
in general terms the gaps in the economy in various districts in the Province and is
an excellent method of creating interest for these business inquirers. During the
year fourteen such businessmen were advised by this Office and assisted in their
establishment by letters of introduction to be presented after then arrival in the
Province.
COMMON MARKET TIMBER DELEGATION
The Industrial and Trade Secretary at British Columbia House accompanied a
group of Europeans to British Columbia, all representing timber importing firms
throughout five of the Common Market countries. The delegates on this tour were
as follows: Six from Holland, seven from Belgium, eight from Germany, five from
Italy, and seven from France.
The delegation was organized jointly by the Government, the British Columbia
Lumber Manufacturers' Association, and the Plywood Manufacturers' Association
of British Columbia. Mr. W. A. Townsley, of the B.C.L.M.A. office in London,
also accompanied the delegation. The tour included visits to forest operations,
lumber-mills, plywood plants, etc., on Vancouver Island, the Lower Mainland, and
in the Prince George area. The results of this delegation are that substantial orders
were placed with the Province, and continuing business will show that it was really
well worth while. At the conclusion of the delegation's visit, the Industrial and
Trade Secretary remained in the Province and visited various centres on the Coast,
the Peace River District, and the Okanagan Valley.
SALES SURVEY DELEGATIONS TO CANADA
Considerable interest has been shown in Scodand, Birmingham, and the Midlands, and amongst timber users and agents in France, Belgium, Holland, and the
United Kingdom, in the organization of liaison visits to Canada. This Office is
keeping in close touch with these groups as British Columbia will be the focal point
of their itineraries.
OTHER DELEGATIONS
There were several delegations visiting European countries and Britain during
the year. A good number of British Columbia businessmen were included amongst
the members of these delegations, as follows: Vancouver Board of Trade Mission
to Scandinavia and the United Kingdom, April 29th to May 20th; Mission to Europe
for Promotion of Frozen Fish Sales, October 5th to November 1st (one British
Columbia member); Canadian Government Timber Delegation to Europe, September 7th to 30th (five British Columbia members); and Canadian Cattlemen's Tour
of Europe, June 14th to July 2nd (eight British Columbia members).
1964 BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR
In collaboration with the directors of the fair in British Columbia, the promotion of the Trade Fair to be held in Vancouver in 1964 was commenced. Contact
with Canadian Trade Commissioners, Chambers of Commerce, and individual firms
in the United Kingdom and Europe has been maintained. Although too early to
predict, it is felt that considerable space will be required for both governmental and
private-enterprise exhibits.
 '
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1962 P 39
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER FOR TRADE AND TOURISM
FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE,
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.
In addition to the work of the Commercial Representative in this report,
requests have been received by mail and by personal interviews with Americans
interested in British Columbia under the following headings:—
Establishment of Businesses in British Columbia (284 inquiries).   This
covers a very wide range, from small businesses to large corporations
interested in the projected growth and economic future of British
Columbia.
Mining, Prospecting, Gas, Oil, and Power Development.   Iron Ore, Sulphur, Cattle, Lumber Products, Coal and Coke for Export.   The
inquiries came from brokers dealing with companies in the Far East.
Investments in Stocks and Bonds, Land, and Revenue Property.   British
Columbia as a Place to Retire, particularly on Vancouver Island,
Gulf Islands, and Lower Mainland.
Establishment of Summer Homes.   Americans desirous of spending part
of each year in British Columbia.
Yachting.
Hunting and Fishing.
Employment.   Over 400 inquiries, mostly by skilled workers.
Families  Desirous   of   Having   Their   Children   Raised   by   Canadian
Standards.
Families Wishing to Have Their Children Receive Their Education in
British Columbia.
People Searching for Land for Agricultural Purposes.
Camping, Touring, and Holidaying in British Columbia.
During the past year 210 inquiries have been received regarding the purchase
of farm lands or the acquisition of Crown lands.  The end result from these inquiries
is seldom learned, but it is known that seven families have moved to British Columbia to settle on the land.
In April the Commercial Representative arranged the exhibits in the Western
Space Age Exposition and assisted in directing buyers to the Samples Show, when
British Columbia House co-operated with the Canadian Consulate General to select
buyers to go to Vancouver for this event.
Contacts made by British Columbia House in California show interest in
British Columbia, not only in exports and imports, but in future plans for possible
entry into business in British Columbia, either directly or under licence manufacture.
At the five major fairs and exhibitions in California, British Columbia House
received many inquiries regarding the purchase of farm land and the acquisition of
Crown land from people attending the British Columbia booth. The inquiries at
these exhibitions are not limited to the establishment of farms, but are of a general
nature regarding the establishment of homes and settlement in British Columbia.
The co-operation of Mr. T. J. B. Robinson, the liaison officer with the Canadian Department of Defence Production in Los Angeles, who has assisted British
Columbia House in defence work, particularly in the Los Angeles area, where
contacts cannot be made by this office on a daily or weekly basis, is appreciated very
much. By arrangement with Mr. Robinson, he sends all bids direct to firms for
tender, thus eliminating the time loss in process:ng the material for tender.
 P 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The offices of the Canadian Consulate General and the Canadian Immigration
Service in San Francisco and Los Angeles, including the officers of the Canadian
Foreign Trade Service, have also given excellent co-operation.
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AND TRADE PROMOTION
During 1962 British Columbia House maintained continuous liaison with the
procurement offices of the United States Department of Defence (Navy, Army, and
Air Force) in the San Francisco area and with the Canadian Department of Defence
Production liaison officer in Los Angeles. Invitations for bid and requests for
proposal were forwarded to British Columbia firms whenever suitable bid items
were located in the various procuring offices. Several British Columbia firms have
been successful in obtaining contracts under the Canada-United States Defence
Production Sharing Programme.
The United States Department of Defence and the Governments of the thirteen
Western States sponsored a Western Space Age Industries and Engineering Exposition in the San Francisco Cow Palace from April 25 to 29, 1962. British Columbia House arranged to make 600 square feet of exhibit space in this exposition
available to British Columbia companies primarily interested in the defence programme and in the California market generally. Ten companies took advantage of
this opportunity to display their products and personally meet with the procurement
officers and purchasing agents of San Francisco and other centres of California.
Unfortunately only five British Columbia firms had representatives in attendance
at the exposition. These five representatives felt that the exposure their products
received along with the personal contact they were able to make with the United
States Department of Defence buyers and prime contractors under the Defence
Production Programme made their participation very much worth while.
The State of California, soon to be the most populous State in the Union, continues to receive a substantial share of the United States Department of Defence
appropriations, and it appears that there will be always increasing opportunities for
British Columbia firms to obtain a greater volume of defence production work,
particularly as subcontractors to the prime contractors of California. In 1963
British Columbia House plans an intensive campaign among the prime contractors
in the Bay area on behalf of British Columbia firms interested in defence production.
At the end of November, 1962, forty-eight British Columbia firms had indicated
a desire to participate in the Canada-United States Defence Production Sharing
Programme.
In addition to the Western Space Age Industries and Engineering Exposition
in San Francisco, trade-promotion activities included participation in a joint British
Columbia House trade and tourism exhibit. This exhibit, manned by the Tourist
Representative and the Commercial Representative, was displayed at the Southern
California Exposition and San Diego Fair at Del Mar, at the California State Fair
in Sacramento, and at the Los Angeles County Fair in Pomona. These three exhibitions had a total attendance in excess of 2,000,000 persons, and the British Columbia exhibit received favourable comment at each show.
Many inquiries were made at the British Columbia exhibit, and these generally
were concerned with emigration to British Columbia, land settlement, agricultural
prospects, small business and resort development, and employment opportunities in
a wide range of occupations, including many professional occupations.
While full-time attendance at these exhibitions would not be particularly
advantageous to the Commercial Representative, participation did enable him to
spend some time in San Diego, Sacramento, and Los Angeles calling on financial
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1962 P 41
houses, manufacturers, and importers. Interest in British Columbia is generally
high in all the major population centres of California, and numerous inquiries have
been received requesting information on the projected industrial and economic
growth of the Province.
British Columbia House, San Francisco, co-operated with the Canadian Consular and Trade Commissioners' offices in California, the Vancouver Board of
Trade, the Canadian Manufacturers' Association (British Columbia Division), and
the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce in arranging for
a group of California buyers to attend a showing of consumer goods manufactured
in British Columbia. The Samples Show took place in October in Vancouver. The
buyers showed great interest in the products displayed, and at the end of November
several firms have indicated that definite sales agreements will be concluded before
the end of the year.
The results obtained from the Western Space Age Exposition and the Vancouver Samples Show again point up the vital importance of direct personal contact
between manufacturer and prospective buyer. British Columbia House is pleased
to report that there is a steady increase in the number of British Columbia manufacturers visiting the San Francisco and Los Angeles market areas and trusts that
this trend will continue.
At the end of the year there will be a wide range of British Columbia products
being promoted in California. These include products of wood, plastic paper,
textiles, and metals, along with British Columbia handicrafts and food products.
The acquisition of duplicating equipment in the latter part of 1962 will enable
British Columbia House to carry out a sustained promotion programme in the form
of bulletins and newsletters to their numerous contacts in California.
Throughout the year the Commissioner and the Commercial Representative
continued to make personal contacts with investors, manufacturers, and exporters,
many of whom have indicated that future plans include British Columbia-based
operations.
INVESTMENT IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
British Columbia House received many inquiries from groups and individuals
with considerable amounts of money to invest in the Province. The great potential
of the Province coupled with a premium United States dollar are encouraging factors
to large and small investors.
 P 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL
The Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce is ex officio
chairman of the board of management of the British Columbia Research Council,
and as such presided at regular meetings of the board throughout the year. The
laboratories and offices of the Council are located on the campus of the University
of British Columbia in Vancouver.
The broad objectives of the British Columbia Research Council are to provide
scientific and technical services not otherwise available to the industry of the Province, and to conduct basic studies leading to the establishment of new industries and
the development of the natural resources of British Columbia. In order to meet
these objectives, the Research Council, through its laboratories, provides a wide
range of services and facilities to industries of all types. The work carried out by
the Council generally falls into a number of categories, as follows:-—■
(1) Fundamental or Basic Research.
(2) Product and Process Research and Development.
(3) Industrial Trouble-shooting.
(4) Specialized Testing.
(5) Approvals Testing.
(6) Economics and Industrial Market Research.
(7) Operations Research.
The Research Council was established in 1944 with a few employees working
in provisional quarters in University buildings. Because of industry's demand for
research services, the staff now numbers over seventy, working in a modern well-
equipped three-story laboratory building. The improvement in business conditions
in the Province during 1962 was reflected in an increase in the Council's earned
income to about $375,000 from the 1960 and 1961 levels of about $300,000.
In addition to its contract work, the Research Council receives a substantial
portion of its annual budget, $250,000 in 1962, from the Government of British
Columbia through the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce. It also receives a limited amount of financial assistance from the National
Research Council and other organizations. It is thereby possible for it to extend to
Provincial industry many additional services, such as free technical information, and
to carry out some investigations of importance to the Provincial economy. A new
extension to the free technical information service was added with the appointment
to the staff of an industrial engineer. This was made possible through a grant from
the National Research Council. Contract research services available at the British
Columbia Research Council were broadened during 1962, especially in the fields of
stream and air pollution, odour control, sonic testing, and electronics. Through the
programme of contacts with industry throughout the Province, it brings the fruits
of research a little closer to industry's door.
During 1962 the board of management of the Research Council consisted of
the following:—
The Honourable R. W. Bonner, Minister of Industrial Development, Trade,
and Commerce of the Province of British Columbia, Victoria, B.C.
(chairman).
F. E. Atkinson, Assistant Director, Canada Agriculture Research Station,
Summerland, B.C.
E. W. Bassett, Deputy Minister of Lands, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1962 P 43
Dr. J. J. R. Campbell, Department of Dairy Science, University of British
Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
E. L. Harrison, Executive Assistant to the Chairman, MacMillan, Bloedel and
Powell River Limited, 1199 West Pender Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
G. H. D. Hobbs, President, Western Canada Steel Limited, 450 South-east
Marine Drive, Vancouver, 15, B.C.
R. M. Hungerford, President, Clayburn-Harbison Limited, 1690 West Broadway, Vancouver 9, B.C.
J. E. Liersch, Vice-President, Canadian Forest Products Limited, 999 West
Pender Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
F. D. Mathers, President, Royal City Foods Limited, 12 Front Street, New
Westminster, B.C.
Dr. D. M. Morrison, 3666 Marine Drive, West Vancouver, B.C.
P. J. Mulcahy, Deputy Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Dean D. M. Myers, Faculty of Applied Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
C. H. McLean, President, British Columbia Telephone Company, 768 Seymour
Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
R. D. Perry, Vice-President and General Manager, The Consolidated Mining
and Smelting Company of Canada Limited, Trail, B.C.
Dr. G. L. Pickard, Director, Institute of Oceanography, Vancouver 8, B.C.
H. B. Simpson, President, S. M. Simpson Limited, Box 220, Kelowna, B.C.
The Honourable J. Sinclair, President, Lafarge Cement of North America
Limited, 1051 Main Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.
T. L. Sturgess, Deputy Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, Victoria, B.C.
Dr. John P. Tully, Scientific Director, Pacific Oceanographic Branch, Fisheries
Research Board of Canada, Nanaimo, B.C.
H. Wright, Commissioner, Workmen's Compensation Board, 707 West Thirty-
seventh Avenue, Vancouver 13, B.C.
Dr. P. C. Trussell, Director, British Columbia Research Council, Vancouver
8, B.C.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1963
710-163^1597
     

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