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Fourteenth Annual Report British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31 1962 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1963

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
HOSPITAL INSURANCE ACT
Fourteenth Annual Report
British Columbia Hospital
Insurance Service
JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31
1962
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1963
  Victoria, B.C., January 24, 1963.
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Fourteenth Annual Report of
the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service covering the calendar year 1962.
ERIC MARTIN,
Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance.
 British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service,
Victoria, B.C., January 24, 1963.
The Honourable E. C. Martin,
Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to present herewith the Report of the British Columbia
Hospital Insurance Service covering the calendar year 1962.
D. M. COX, F.A.C.H.A.,
Deputy Minister of Hospital Insurance.
 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES AND HOSPITAL INSURANCE
British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service
The Honourable Eric Martin, Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance.
Senior Administrative Staff
D. M. Cox, F.A.C.H.A., F.C.I., F.C.I.S., Deputy Minister of Hospital Insurance.
*L. F. Detwiller, A.F.C., M.A., M.H.A., M.A.C.H.A., M.R.S.H,
Assistant Deputy Minister.
W. J. Lyle, F.C.I.S., Manager, Hospital Finance Division.
A. W. E. Pitkethley, Esq., Manager, Hospital Construction and Planning Division.
J. W. Mainguy, M.H.A., Manager, Hospital Consultation and Inspection Division.
W. A. Fraser, O.B.E., E.D., M.D., CM., F.A.C.S., Medical Consultant.
K. G. Wiper, Esq., Administrative Assistant.
W. D. Burrowes, B.A., Director, Research Division.
* Resigned June 1, 1962, to accept position of Consultant Administrator, Health Sciences Centre, University
of British Columbia.
  CONTENTS
General Introduction
British Columbia General Hospitals (Comparisons of Growth).
The Hospital Insurance Act	
The Hospital Act	
Page
. 9
. 10
. 11
.  11
Persons Entitled to or Excluded from the Benefits under the Hospital Insurance
Act  11
Entitled to Benefits  11
Excluded from Benefits  12
Hospital Benefits Available in British Columbia-
In-patient Benefits-
Emergency Services and Minor Surgery-
Application for Hospital Insurance Benefits-
Hospital Insurance Coverage outside British Columbia.
12
12
13
13
13
The Hospital Rate Board and Methods of Payment to Hospitals  13
Organization Chart	
Organization and Administration-
Hospital Finance Division—
Hospital Accounting..
  15
  14
  14
  16
Hospital Claims  17
Hospital Construction and Planning Division  20
Hospital Projects Completed during 1962  21
Hospital Projects under Construction at Year-end  22
Projects in Advanced Stages of Planning  22
Additional Projects Developed through Various Planning Stages  23
  23
  27
  28
  29
  29
  30
  31
  32
  32
  32
  33
  33
  33
  33
Statistical Data  34
Table I.—Patients Separated (Discharged or Died), Total Patient-days and
Proportion Covered by British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service,
British Columbia Public Hospitals Only, 1949-62 (Excluding Federal,
Private, and Out-of-Province Hospitalization)  35
7
Hospital Consultation and Inspection Division-
Medical Consultation Division	
Administrative Assistant	
Third Party Liability Section_
Eligibility Inspectors' Section..
Research Division	
Public Information	
General Office	
Hospitals as Defined under the Hospital Insurance Act.
Public Hospitals..
Outpost Hospitals.
Federal Hospitals..
Private Hospitals (Providing General Hospital Services).
Rehabilitation, Chronic, and Convalescent Hospitals	
 L 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Page
Table Ha.—Patients Separated, Total Days' Stay, and Average Length of
Stay According to Type and Location of Hospital for B.C.H.I.S.
Patients Only, and Days of Care per Thousand of Covered Population, 1949-62  3 6
Table Hb.—Summary of the Number of B.C.H.I.S. In-patients (Including
Rehabilitation Patients) and Short-stay Patients, 1949-62  37
Table III.—Patients Separated, Total Days' Stay, and Average Length of
Stay in British Columbia Public Hospitals for B.C.H.I.S. Patients
Only, Grouped According to Bed Capacity, Year 1962  37
Table IV.—Percentage Distribution of Patients Separated and Patient-days
for B.C.H.I.S. Patients Only, in British Columbia Public Hospitals,
Grouped According to Bed Capacity, Year 1962  37
Charts  38
I.—Percentage Distribution of Days of Care by Major Diagnostic Groups,
1961  39
II.—Percentage Age Distribution of Male and Female Hospital Cases and
Days of Care, 1961  40
III.—Percentage Distribution of Hospital Cases by Type of Clinical Service,
1961 -  41
IV.—Percentage Distribution of Hospital-days by Type of Clinical Service,
1961 -  42
V.—Average Length of Stay of Cases in Acute-care Hospitals in British
Columbia by Major Diagnostic Groups, 1961 (Excluding Newborns) 43
Hospitalization by Diagnoses According to the Canadian List of Diseases
and Causes of Death, 1961  44
Statement of Receipts and Disbursements for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31,
1962  47
 Fourteenth Annual Report of the British Columbia
Hospital Insurance Service
GENERAL INTRODUCTION
Donald M. Cox, F.A.C.H.A., Deputy Minister of Hospital Insurance
On December 31, 1962, the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service completed its fourteenth year of operation. During the year the Service continued to
ensure that the residents of British Columbia were provided with a good standard
of hospital services. Payments to hospitals were at their highest level since the
inception of the Provincial programme on January 1, 1949. It is estimated that
in the current fiscal year the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service will pay
over $57,000,000 toward hospital expenses incurred by British Columbia residents,
the equivalent of approximately $35 for each man, woman, and child living in the
Province. Daily payments to British Columbia hospitals in 1962 averaged $157,000;
during 1949 payments averaged $50,000. It is of interest to note that approximately $450,000,000 has been paid toward the hospital expenses incurred by residents of the Province during the past fourteen years.
The Province's vast programme of major hospital construction continued unabated. During the year seven major projects were completed at an estimated cost
of over $6,000,000. These included the 195-bed nurses' residence and training-
school at the Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster; the new 72-bed Cariboo Memorial Hospital at Williams Lake; new laboratory and laundry buildings
for St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver; a new hospital at Fort St. John of 68 beds;
and a 16-bed addition to the Queen Alexandra Solarium, Victoria. In addition,
two other projects, costing over $3,600,000, were due to finish early in the new
year. These were the 187-bed Nanaimo Regional General Hospital and completion
of the top floor of the Prince George Regional Hospital, which will bring 28 beds
into operation. Other British Columbia centres which had major hospital projects
at various stages of completion at the year-end included Grand Forks, McBride,
Victoria, Powell River, Burns Lake, Salmon Arm, Queen Charlotte City, Terrace,
and New Westminster. The Provincial Government provides grants representing
one-half the approved costs of construction, and total commitments toward those
hospital-construction projects which were either completed or under way in 1962
were approximately $7,500,000. A further twenty-eight British Columbia communities were actively engaged in the planning of additional hospital facilities and
major renovations.
The year 1962 also saw continued progressive development of the rehabilitation programme, introduced in September, 1960. It was estimated that during the
year 75,000 patient-days would be covered under the programme, at a cost of over
$1,000,000 to the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service.
During 1962 the advice of the medical profession was sought in regard to a
wide range of matters. These included development of the rehabilitation programme, utilization studies in hospitals with expansion problems, development of
construction plans for specialized hospital services, and so forth.   By mutual agree-
 L 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ment with the Canadian Medical Association (British Columbia Division), the College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia, and the Faculty of Medicine
of the University of British Columbia, requests from this Service for advice and
information are sent to the executive director of the Canadian Medical Association
(British Columbia Division). I should like to record my appreciation of the fine
co-operation extended by the medical profession and of the assistance provided by
individual members.
I wish also to express appreciation of the assistance given by the Laboratory
Advisory Council and the Radiological Advisory Council. The work of the Councils has been a tremendous help in the improvement of laboratory and radiological
facilities in hospitals, and in evaluating requests for grants in aid of purchases of
equipment.
In view of the considerable interest shown in the B.C.H.I.S. display at the
British Columbia Hospitals' Association annual conference, held in Penticton in
October, some of the data have been reproduced on the following page. Reports
prepared by the various divisions on work undertaken in 1962 appear under
" Organization and Administration."
BRITISH COLUMBIA GENERAL HOSPITALS
(COMPARISONS OF GROWTH)
Gross Salaries Patient-days (Adult and Children)
1958   $31,500,000        1958   2,322,796
1962  $45,000,000        1962   2,650,000
Per cent increase since 1958     43        Per cent increase since 1958  14
Per cent increase since 1948  364        Per cent increase since 1948  80
Total Employees (Full Time) Number of Patients
1958   11,932        1958  237,000
1962   14,250        1962  280,000
Per cent increase since 1958     19        Per cent increase since 1958  18
Per cent increase since 1948  119        Per cent increase since 1948  79
British Columbia Population Bed Capacity
1958   1,544,000 1958   7,555
1962   1,650,000        1962   8,900
Per cent increase since 1958  6.8        Per cent increase since 1958  18
Per cent increase since 1948    52 Per cent increase since 1948  67
Gross Operating Expenditures Gross per Capita Expenditures
1958   $44,900,000        1958  $29.10
1962   $63,000,000        1962  $38.20
Per cent increase since 1958     40        Per cent increase since 1958     31
Per cent increase since 1948  294        Per cent increase since 1948  155
British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service, 1949 to 1962, Inclusive
Paid in claims  $450,000,000
Construction Grants  35,000,000
Equipment grants  4,800,000
Daily payments to British Columbia Hospitals now  157,000
 HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE,  1962
L 11
THE HOSPITAL INSURANCE ACT
This is the Statute which authorizes British Columbia's hospital insurance plan,
and under which the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service is established.
Its main provisions may be summarized as follows:—
(1) Generally speaking, every permanent resident who has made his home in
British Columbia for at least three consecutive months is entitled to benefits under the Act.
(2) Approved hospitals are paid an all-inclusive per diem rate for medically
necessary in-patient care rendered to qualified British Columbia residents
who are suffering from an acute illness or injury, and those who require
active convalescent and rehabilitative care. The payment made to a hospital by the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service amounts to $1
less than the per diem rate approved for the particular hospital, and the
patient is responsible for paying the remaining dollar. The Provincial
Government pays the dollar-a-day charge on behalf of Provincial social
welfare recipients.
(3) The wide range of in-patient benefits and the emergency out-patient and
minor surgery services, provided under the Act, are described on the following pages.
(4) Qualified persons who are temporarily absent from British Columbia are
entitled to the benefits described elsewhere in this Report (p. 13) for a
maximum period of three months, if they are admitted to an approved
hospital within the first three months following their departure from the
Province.
THE HOSPITAL ACT
One of the important functions of the British Columbia Hospital Insurance
Service is the administration of the Hospital Act. The Deputy Minister of Hospital
Insurance is also the Chief Inspector of Hospitals for British Columbia under this
Statute.
The Hospital Act controls the organization and operation of hospitals, which
are classified as follows:—
(1) Public hospitals—non-profit hospitals caring primarily for acutely ill
persons.
(2) Private hospitals—generally privately owned and profit-making units.
This category includes:—
(a) Small general hospitals, most of which are operated in remote
areas by industrial concerns primarily for their employees.
(£>) Nursing homes, most of which are operated for profit by private
operators or companies. Several are operated as non-profit organizations
by religious and other groups.
(3) Rehabilitation, chronic, and convalescent hospitals—these are non-profit
hospitals approved under Part III of the Hospital Act, primarily for the
treatment of persons who will benefit from intensive rehabilitative care.
PERSONS ENTITLED TO OR EXCLUDED FROM THE BENEFITS
UNDER THE HOSPITAL INSURANCE ACT
Entitled to Benefits
A person is entitled to benefits if he qualifies as a beneficiary under the Hospital
Insurance Act. Generally speaking, a person is a beneficiary if the provision of hospital care is a medical necessity, and if he proves to the satisfaction of the Deputy
 L 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Minister of Hospital Insurance that he qualifies under one of the following categories:—
(a) He is the head of a family, or a single person, who has made his home in
the Province and has lived continuously therein during the preceding three
consecutive months; or
(b) Having qualified under item (a), he leaves the Province and returns after
an absence of less than twelve months and resumes residence within the
Province; or
(c) He is living within the Province and is a dependent of a resident of the
Province.
During the three-month residence qualification period, a person is permitted to
be temporarily absent from British Columbia for a total of one month without incurring any postponement of the date on which he becomes a beneficiary.
With regard to item (c) above, a dependent is either the spouse of the head
of a family or a child under 21 years of age who is mainly supported by the head
of a family.
Generally speaking, if a man's wife and dependent children arrive in British
Columbia after he does, they are entitled to assume his residential status as of the
date of their arrival.
The foregoing general description may be varied somewhat by the special
arrangements that are in effect regarding persons who move to British Columbia
from other Provinces.
Excluded from Benefits
Some of the main classes of persons either permanently or temporarily excluded
from benefits are as follows:—
(a) A person who works full or part time in British Columbia but who resides
outside the Province; or
(b) A resident who leaves British Columbia temporarily and fails to return
and re-establish residence within twelve months, or who establishes his
home elsewhere; or
(c) An inmate of a Federal penitentiary;  or
(d) A resident who receives hospital treatment provided under the Workmen's
Compensation Act, or a war veteran who receives treatment for a pensionable disability; or
(e) Persons entitled to receive hospital treatment from the Government of
Canada or any other government; for example, members of the armed
forces or Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
HOSPITAL BENEFITS AVAILABLE IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
In-patient Benefits
In addition to standard-ward accommodation with meals and necessary nursing services, a beneficiary may receive any of the other services available in the
hospital, which may include:—
Laboratory and X-ray services.
Drugs, biologicals, and related preparations (with a few exceptions).
Use of operating-room and caseroom facilities.
Use of anaesthetic equipment, supplies, and routine surgical supplies.
Use of radiotherapy and physiotherapy facilities where available.
Other approved services rendered by employees of the hospital.
(Note.—Private or semi-private rooms cost more to maintain than standard
wards, and a patient is required to pay extra for such accommodation.)
 hospital insurance service, 1962 l 13
Emergency Services and Minor Surgery
The following benefits are also provided in British Columbia public hospitals
to beneficiaries who do not require in-patient care:—
Emergency treatment within twenty-four hours  of being  accidentally
injured.
Operating-room or emergency-room services for minor surgery, including
application and removal of casts.
The hospital charges beneficiaries $2 for each visit, and the remainder of the
cost is paid by the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service.    However, if the
patient received treatment from a private physician, he is responsible for paying the
doctor's services, as such charges are not payable by the Hospital Insurance Service.
Non-beneficiaries are required to pay the full hospital charge for such services.
APPLICATION FOR HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS
At the time of admission to hospital, a patient wishing to apply for coverage
under the hospital insurance programme is required to make an application for
benefits. The hospital is responsible for verifying the patient's statements regarding
length of residence, etc., to determine if the patient is a qualified resident as defined
in the Hospital Insurance Act and regulations. Payment of the account is then
requested by the hospital from the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service,
which may reject any account where either the patient's status as a qualified resident,
or the medical necessity for his receiving hospital care benefits, has not been satisfactorily established.    (See Eligibility Section.)
HOSPITAL INSURANCE COVERAGE OUTSIDE BRITISH COLUMBIA
In accordance with the regulations under the Hospital Insurance Act, coverage
was provided during 1962 to 3,430 residents of British Columbia while temporarily
absent from the Province. Further information regarding out-of-Province hospitalization will be found in the statistical tables which appear later in the Report.
THE HOSPITAL RATE BOARD AND METHODS
OF PAYMENT TO HOSPITALS
The Hospital Rate Board, appointed by Order in Council in January, 1951, is
composed of the Deputy Minister of Hospital Insurance, the Hospital Finance Manager, and the Hospital Consultation and Inspection Manager. The purpose of the
Board is to advise the Deputy Minister in regard to the rates of payments to hospitals.
A system of firm budgets for hospitals, which has been in use since January 1,
1951, provides for a review of hospitals' estimates by the Rate Board. Under the
firm-budget procedure, hospitals are required to operate within their approved budgets, with the exception of fluctuation in days' treatment and other similar items.
They are further advised that deficits incurred through expenditures in excess of
the approved budget will not be met by the Provincial Government. The value of
variable supplies used in patient-care has been established. It is generally recognized that the addition of a few more patient-days does not add proportionately to
patient-day costs, because certain overhead expenses (such as heating, etc.) are not
affected. However, some additional supplies will be consumed, and it is the cost
of these variable supplies which has been determined. When the number of days'
treatment provided by the hospital differs from the estimated occupancy, the budgets are increased, or decreased, by the number of days' difference multiplied by the
 L 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
patient-day value of the variable supplies. Individual studies and additional budget
adjustments are made in those instances where large fluctuations in occupancy
involve additions or reductions in stand-by costs.
Over 95 per cent of all hospital accounts incurred in British Columbia are the
responsibility of the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service. Cash advances
to hospitals are made on a semi-monthly basis, so that hospitals are not required to
wait for payment until patients' accounts are submitted and processed by the British
Columbia Hospital Insurance Service. Qualified patients are charged $1 per day,
which is deductible when calculating payments to hospitals from the Service. Nonqualifying residents are charged the hospitals' established per diem rates, which are
all-inclusive; that is, the daily rate covers the cost of all the regular hospital services,
such as X-ray, laboratory, operating-room, etc., provided to patients, in addition to
bed, board, and nursing care.
ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION
The British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service is a branch of the Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance. The administrative head is the
Deputy Minister of Hospital Insurance.
The following reports give a brief outline of the work carried out during 1962
by the various divisions and offices which comprise the administrative structure of
the Branch.
Hospital Finance Division
W. J. Lyle, F.C.I.S., Manager
Hospital accounting, and payment of hospital claims, are the two main functions
of the Hospital Finance Division. The Division is also responsible for the approval
of equipment grants, and in 1962, after a review of 4,200 applications received from
hospitals, it recommended grants of $815,000 on equipment costing over $2,500,000.
During 1962 the Division Manager attended two meetings in Ottawa of the Advisory
Council on Hospital Insurance and Diagnostic Services, which is the advisory body
to the Minister of National Health and Welfare. The Manager was also asked by
the Federal authorities to act on a working party which was given the task of solving, from the point of view of the Federal-Provincial Agreement, a problem relative
to ancillary operations of hospitals. The working party held two meetings in
Ottawa, and the resulting recommendations were subsequently accepted by the
Advisory Committee on Hospital Insurance and Diagnostic Services in November,
1962.
At the end of 1962, only one public hospital in British Columbia had failed
to make application to have its employees included under the Municipal Superannuation Act, which was made applicable to hospitals in British Columbia from July 1,
1960. It is hoped that this hospital will complete arrangements to participate during
the coming year. Close liaison was continued between the Division Manager and
the Commissioner of Municipal Superannuation in respect to the application of the
Act to hospital personnel, and the postponement of retirement for certain employees
who reach retirement age.
The Division Manager continued to perform duties as a member and secretary
of the Hospital Rate Board, and to represent the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service on the Radiological Advisory Council, which acts in an advisory capacity on the development of radiology services and purchase of equipment by general
hospitals. He also participated in meetings of the Advisory Committee on Medical
Radiography, which was appointed to assist in the development plans for the new
Institute of Technology being constructed in Burnaby.
 HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE,  1962
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 L 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The following is an outline of the duties, activities, and responsibilities of the
two sections of the Finance Division.
Hospital Accounting
G. L. Morris, C.A., Supervisor
The work of the Hospital Accounting Section falls into two main categories:
(a) the detailed inspection, in the field, of the financial records of the hospitals for
purposes of verification of annual and other financial statements, and (£>) the assembly of relevant information and preparation of tabulations and other data for use
by the Hospital Rate Board in its reviews of hospitals' estimates. In carrying put
the inspection duties, visits were made at least once during 1962 to eighty-seven
public hospitals, the individual visits extending from three days to four weeks. The
gross expenditures of public hospitals, as approved by the Hospital Rate Board, for
the year 1962, amounted to $61,000,000.
Other functions performed by the Hospital Accounting staff included:—
(a) The tabulation of monthly statistical and financial reports from hospitals,
and the correlating of these with the approved budgets.
(b) The calculation of the semi-monthly cash advances to be made to hospitals.
(c) Checking and amending annual financial and statistical reports prepared
by hospitals for the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and the Department
of National Health and Welfare.
(rf) The provision, on request, of accounting assistance and instruction to
smaller public hospitals in the Province.
(e) The carrying-out of accounting reviews and cost studies of nursing homes,
upon the request of the Social Welfare Department, for welfare payment
purposes.
(f) The auditing of accounts of hospital-construction projects, to determine
the amount of construction grants payable by the Province.
During 1962, construction projects, involving expenditures in excess of $1,500,-
000, were audited and the required statements prepared for the Federal Government,
in order that Federal construction grants could be claimed on behalf of the hospitals.
During the year, investigations were made of financial and statistical records
of certain designated hospitals falling within the scope of the rehabilitation programme, to determine the basis of payment on behalf of B.C.H.I.S. patients covered
in such hospitals. As the plan is further developed and the number of approved
hospitals providing this type of rehabilitation treatment is extended, a further increase
is expected in the volume of work of this nature to be undertaken by this Section.
Experience during the first few years' operation of the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service, indicated that operating costs required serious consideration
when planning new hospitals and additions to existing hospitals. In order to ensure
that plans for new hospitals or hospital additions are prepared with economical and
efficient operation in mind, a system of pre-construction operating budgets is used.
The procedure requires a hospital to prepare an estimate of staff and other costs,
based upon a reasonable occupancy for the new area. These estimates are submitted to the British 'Columbia Hospital Insurance Service and are reviewed by the
Hospital Rate Board in the same manner as normal operating estimates. It is essential that the estimated operating costs of the new hospital, or new addition, compare
favourably with other hospitals actually in operation. Where the hospital's pre-
construction operating estimates do not indicate a reasonable operating cost, it is
necessary for the hospital board to revise its construction plans, to ensure efficient
and economical operation.   Once a satisfactory pre-construction operating estimate
 HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE,  1962 L 17
has been agreed upon by the hospital officials and the British Columbia Hospital
Insurance Service, the hospital board is required to provide written guarantees relative to the projected operating cost. It is considered that this method of approaching the operating picture for proposed hospital facilities ensures more satisfactory
planning, efficient use of hospital personnel, and an economical operation.
Under the terms of the Federal Hospital Insurance and Diagnostic Services Act,
whereby the Federal Government shares in the costs of in-patient care in this Province, monthly payments are made to the Province by Ottawa, based on advances to
hospitals made by the Province during the previous month. These payments are
later taken into account when the total amount payable by the Federal Government
is determined for the calendar year. The final calculation for the year is based on
the annual audited financial reports of each public hospital, after the hospitals' records have been inspected by accountants from this Section and approved by Federal
Treasury auditors. Compilation of the necessary data required by the Federal
authorities for purposes of the final settlement is highly complex, and involves a
considerable amount of detailed work before agreement on the amount shareable in
respect of each financial year is reached. A number of changes were introduced by
the Federal Government in the 1962 Annual Statistical and Financial Returns, and
a complete, detailed Departmental analysis of salaries and expenses, previously not
required from the smaller hospitals, is now required from all hospitals with 50 beds
and over.
In addition to the growing volume of work relating to the financial operations
of hospitals, arising out of the Federal-Provincial plan, there was a notable increase
during 1962 in the number of observations and inquiries received from Ottawa and
channelled through this office. These related to the statistical data reported by hospitals in Part I of the Annual Return of Hospitals, with the object of attaining more
complete standardization and correlation of statistics throughout Canada.
The Annual Report on Hospital Statistics, issued by the Department of Health
Services and Hospital Insurance, and covering the administration of the Hospital Act
for the preceding year, is prepared by this office.
Hospital Claims
W. J. Wade, Supervisor
The Hospital Claims Section is responsible for processing Admission/Separation Records (accounts), which hospitals submit for each patient, and approving
for payment all acceptable claims. Every claim is checked by this office, whether
it is payable by the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service or by the patient
or other agency. 1962 was another year of active production; approximately 1,340
claims, and an average of over 450 emergency-service or minor-surgery account
forms, were processed during each working-day.
In addition to the normal processing of hospital claims, the planning and reviewing of procedures was continued during the year. This was necessary in order to
devise methods of meeting the increasing volume and complexity of handling claims,
due to amendments to the eligibility requirements of other Provincial plans, as well
as changes in statistical procedures implemented as a result of the Federal-Provincial
Agreement.
The five-part interleaved carbon Admission/Separation Record was redesigned,
to be placed in use after January 1, 1963.
A brief outline of the work and duties performed by the various sections of
Hospital Claims follows.
 L 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Admission Control Section reviews each Application for Benefits made by
patients who claim to be qualified for benefits under the Hospital Insurance Act.
Details of residence are checked with the verifying documents, and discrepancies
referred back to the hospital or to the Eligibility Inspectors. Over 7,500 hospital
claims, or some 2.4 per cent of the total received from hospitals, were returned for
further information. Advice and assistance were given to hospital admitting staffs
on the proper methods of obtaining and recording the patient's residence information and employment history. This was carried out by correspondence, by actual
visit to the hospital, or by attendance at hospital regional meetings.
The Accounts Payment Section verifies the charges made to the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service, and ensures that all information shown on each claim
is completed for statistical purposes and that it is charged to the correct agency,
such as the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service, Workmen's Compensation
Board, Department of Veterans' Affairs, or other Provinces and Territories. During
the year an average of 500 queries per month on accounting matters were addressed
to British Columbia hospitals. In 1962 a total of 310,839 accounts was paid, compared to 307,005 in 1961 and 300,119 in 1960.
The Social Welfare Records Section continues to maintain the alphabetical file
of all Health Services Identification Cards issued to welfare recipients in this Province. Over 27,700 hospital accounts incurred by welfare recipients were checked
to this file to determine eligibility for hospital benefits. This file is also used by the
Department of Social Welfare as a source of information. During the year, Health
Services Identification Card duplicates were received for every recipient of social
welfare in British Columbia. Some 56,000 cards were filed in two new steel cabinets, replacing the five wooden files in use since 1948. Since the replacements were
issued, renewals and new cards have increased the number filed to over 75,000.
The Voucher and Key-punch Sections are responsible for batching and vouch-
ering the checked accounts, in order to determine the amounts payable to each hospital, and for the punching of an I.B.M. card for each account. The cards are
punched daily to record statistical, financial, and medical data, and are also used to
tabulate remittance listings of payments due to hospitals.
The Out-of-Province Section handles all claims for hospital accounts incurred
by British Columbia residents in hospitals outside the Province. This includes establishing eligibility and the payment of claims. During 1962 a total of 3,420 accounts,
amounting to $588,868, was paid on behalf of qualified residents who were hospitalized in the other Provinces and Territories of Canada and the continental United
States, including Alaska and Hawaii; Australia; Austria; China; Denmark; East
Africa; England; Fiji Island; France; Holland; Italy; Japan; Mexico; Norway;
Spain; Sweden; Switzerland; and West Germany. Correspondence arising from
all out-of-Province accounts totalled 12,859 letters and forms.
This Section also compiles up-to-date hospital rate schedules for every approved
hospital in Canada.
The Filing Section sorted and filed an average of 3,900 documents and letters
daily, an increase of 100 daily over last year. During the year all 1961 hospital
accounts were microfilmed by the Central Microfilm Bureau; 595,345 documents
were photographed on 20,400 feet of film. In addition, the out-of-Province " paid "
and " rejected " accounts and general correspondence were microfilmed, totalling
35,844 documents on 1,300 feet of film. This annual microfilming effects a considerable saving in office space, which would normally be taken up with sixty-five
filing-cabinets for documents.
 HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE,  1962
L 19
Williams Lake
The new 72-bed Cariboo Memorial Hospital was officially opened
August 24, 1962, by the Minister of
Health Services and Hospital Insurance.
MAJOR HOSPITAL PROJECTS
COMPLETED OR UNDER
CONSTRUCTION IN
1962
Fort St. John
On December 12, 1962, the Minister officially opened
the new 68-bed Providence Hospital.
Under Construction
Nanaimo:  A new 160-bed hospital     mmmmm
(to open January 6, 1963).
Victoria: A 195-bed addition and
a 20-bed psychiatric unit at the
Royal Jubilee Hospital.
Grand Forks: A new 30-bed hospital.
McBride:  A new 21-bed hospital.
Powell River: A 38-bed addition
plus an addition for a new laundry, laboratory and therapy departments, etc.
Prince George: Completion of unfinished areas to provide 28 beds.
New Westminster: Construction of
a new laundry and maintenance
building at the Royal Columbian
Hospital.
Also new staff residences at McBride, Burns Lake, Salmon Arm,
Queen Charlotte City, and Terrace.
Completed
Williams Lake: A new 72-bed hospital.
Fort St. John: A new 68-bed hospital.
New Westminster: A new 195-bed
nurses' residence and training-
school for the Royal Columbian
Hospital.
Surrey: Expansion of the boiler
plant and laundry.
Vancouver: New laboratory and
laundry buildings at St. Paul's
Hospital.
Victoria: A 16-bed addition to the
Queen Alexandra Solarium, and
installation of two high-pressure
steam-boilers at St. Joseph's Hospital.
•'••  I-
VlCTORIA
Construction of the new 195-bed addition to the Royal
Jubilee Hospital is expected to be completed in the summer of 1963.
{See page 22 for details.)
 L 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Hospital Construction and Planning Division
A. W. E. Pitkethley, Manager
The primary responsibilities of this Division may be summarized as follows:—
(a) Working with hospital boards of management, and hospital construction
planning committees, in the development of programmes for the construction of new hospital facilities, as well as additions to existing facilities, and
recommending such programmes for approval.
(->) Providing a consultative service to hospitals planning new hospital facilities, renovations, or additions to existing buildings.
(c) Processing and recommending for approval, applications for Provincial
grant assistance toward the cost of capital construction and improvements.
Preparing applications for submission to the Federal Government for
Federal grants toward the cost of construction projects.
This Division is also responsible for the administrative supervision of the Mar-
pole Provincial Infirmary in Greater Vancouver and the branches in Victoria and
Haney. The manager of the Division serves as secretary of the Advisory Board of
Management of the Provincial Infirmaries. (These institutions have a total bed
capacity of 284 beds, and had an average occupancy rate of 66.5 per cent during
1962.)
A great deal of time is spent in reviewing plans of proposed building projects.
Special attention is given to the interrelationship of the various departments of the
hospital building, to ensure a layout arrangement that can provide a high standard
of patient-care, efficient and economical operation, and adequate service and clinical
facilities. In planning hospital facilities, recognition is given to the need and method
for future expansion. Careful attention is given to the extent of mechanical facilities
proposed for hospital buildings. These include structural, plumbing, electrical,
heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and heat-recovery systems. Hospital boards
are provided with a complete consultative planning service through this Division and
through the co-operation of Health Branch personnel, members of the medical and
nursing profession, and other divisions of the British Columbia Hospital Insurance
Service. The Provincial Health Branch renders assistance through the Division of
Public Health Engineering, the Nutrition Consultant, the Technical Supervisor of
Clinical Laboratory Services, the Technical Supervisor of Radiology, and the Provincial Public Health Officers. In addition, the Professor of Pa;diatrics at the Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, assists in the review of plans for
pediatric and nursery facilities. Hospital plans are also referred for review and comment by the Chief of the Hospital Design Division, Department of National Health
and Welfare, Ottawa. The Construction and Planning Division maintains liaison
with the Canadian Medical Association (British Columbia Division) and the Faculty
of Medicine of the University of British Columbia. It is gratifying to note a continued interest and an active participation by hospital medical staffs in the planning
of construction projects.
During the year the Division continued to benefit through the co-operation of
the Public Works Department, which assigned an architect on a full-time basis.
The Manager of this Division again served on the two working parties established under the chairmanship of the Chief of the Hospital Design Division, Ottawa.
One working party studies accommodation problems of hospitals for the chronically
ill, with a view to the development of construction standards for this type of hospital,
and the other studies the revision and expansion of the general hospital construction
standards, originally published in 1948.
 HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE,  1962 L 21
The Hospitals Committee of the Architectural Institute of British Columbia,
formed in 1958 to discuss and resolve problems arising out of hospital projects which
relate to the Institute members, continued to act in an advisory capacity to the Construction and Planning Division.
The Manager of this Division addressed the Okanagan hospital regional meeting in Merritt on September 22, 1962, on the subject of " Implications of Community
and Regional Planning."
(a) Hospital Projects Completed during 1962
Providence Hospital, Fort St. John.—-On December 12, 1962, the Honourable
Eric Martin officially opened the new 68-bed hospital at Fort St. John. The building
is a reinforced-concrete structure consisting of two floors and a basement. Portions
of the basement and some wards are left unfinished for future expansion. A boiler
plant constructed in 1958 has been enlarged and will continue to serve the new
building. The new hospital replaces the old hospital building, part of which dates
back to 1931.
Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster.—On May 31, 1962, the Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance formally opened the new residence
and training-school. The building is in two sections, the residence nine stories
and the school two stories. The residence provides living accommodation for 195
student-nurses in single bedrooms. The teaching areas include lecture rooms, a
science room, and an auditorium.
Surrey Memorial Hospital.—A project was completed in 1962 at the Surrey
Memorial Hospital which included the expansion of the hospital's boiler plant and
laundry.   In addition, a stand-by heating-boiler was installed in the boiler plant.
St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver.—On November 7, 1962, the Sisters of Charity
of Providence announced the opening of the new diagnostic laboratory and the new
laundry department. The buildings are reinforced-concrete structures. The laboratory includes over 25,000 square feet, allocated to diagnostic laboratory facilities for
h-ematology, bio-chemistry, pathology, bacteriology, E.E.G. and E.C.G., and an
out-patient diagnostic area.  The laboratory building is air-conditioned throughout.
St. Joseph's Hospital, Victoria.—Installation was completed on two high-
pressure steam-boilers. These boilers replaced the existing obsolete boiler units,
and are of sufficient capacity to provide steam for the proposed new laundry plant
and new hospital wing.
Queen Alexandra Solarium, Victoria.—Early in 1962 an addition was completed to provide 16 additional beds and partially finished areas for future bed
requirements.
Cariboo Memorial Hospital, Williams Lake.—On August 24, 1962, the Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance officially opened the new Cariboo
Memorial Hospital. The building has an initial capacity of 72 beds; the top floor
is partially completed and contains space for 36 beds when required in the future.
This hospital is unique, as it is the first hospital in Canada to install an aseptic air
system for the operating-rooms. A large percentage of the air circulated through
the operating-rooms will be reused after being filtered, tempered, and sterilized in
an air-sterilizing unit, using ultra-violet rays. This method reduces the cost of heating and air-conditioning the operating-rooms. The new hospital building replaces
the old 30-bed frame hospital built in 1918.
 L 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(b)  Hospital Projects under Construction at Year-end
Nanaimo Regional General Hospital.—Construction of a new 160-bed hospital,
plus semi-finished areas for 27 future beds. In addition, the sixth floor will be left
unfinished to provide for a future increase in bed accommodation. To be officially
opened in January, 1963.
Royal Jubilee Hospital, Victoria.—Construction of an addition to provide 195
beds, 31 of which will be left initially in a semi-finished condition. The project
includes new radiotherapy and X-ray departments.
There is also a 20-bed addition to the psychiatric unit. The new addition will
have provision for recreation facilities, as well as a patients' dining area. Alterations
will be carried out in the existing unit. The net gain in beds, as a result of the addition, will be 18.   It will be officially opened early in 1963.
McBride and District Hospital.—Construction of a new 21-bed hospital, plus
a 10-bed nurses' residence. The new hospital will replace the existing building,
which is over 30 years old.
Boundary Hospital, Grand Forks.—Construction of a new 30-bed hospital.
Partially finished space will also be provided for 5 further beds when required in
the future.  The building is of reinforced-concrete construction.
Powell River General Hospital. — Construction of a 38-bed addition to the
existing hospital, plus an addition for laboratory, physiotherapy, and occupational-
therapy departments, and a new laundry and maintenance shops. The beds in the
existing building, as a result of the renovations programme, will be decreased to
79, which will include 18 beds to be classed as rehabilitation beds. The new bed
capacity will total 117 beds.
Burns Lake and District Hospital.—Construction of a 15-bed staff residence
of two stories, including a suite for the matron.
Shuswap Lake General Hospital, Salmon Arm.—Construction of a new 7-bed
staff residence of frame construction.
Queen Charlotte Islands General Hospital.—Construction of a 15-bed staff
residence of two-story frame construction. The new residence will replace the
inadequate accommodation now located in the basement of the hospital.
Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster.—Construction of a new laundry
and maintenance building. The new two-story building is of reinforced-concrete
construction and will be connected to the main building by a tunnel.
Mills Memorial Hospital, Terrace.—Construction of a 7-bed addition to staff
residence.
Prince George Regional Hospital. — Completion of areas in the hospital to
provide space for 28 additional beds.
(c) Projects in Advanced Stages of Planning and for Which Working Drawings and
Specifications Are Completed or Are in Process of Preparation
Mission Memorial Hospital.—New 55-bed hospital.
Royal Inland Hospital, Kamloops.—Construction of 152-bed addition to hospital, plus construction of a new 108-bed nurses' residence and training-school.
Project out to tender at year-end.
Nicola Valley General Hospital, Merritt.—Construction of a new 37-bed hospital, plus 7-bed staff residence.  Tenders under review at year-end.
Quesnel General Hospital.—Construction of a new wing which will increase
the capacity by 31 beds and provide additional space for 22 beds in an unfinished
area. Renovations and additions are also planned for the existing hospital buildings.
Tenders under review at year-end.
 HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE,  1962 L 23
Langley Memorial Hospital, Murrayville. — Construction of a new 81-bed
hospital.
Squamish General Hospital.—Construction of an 8-bed staff residence.
Vernon Jubilee Hospital. — Construction of a new boiler plant and laundry
building.
Fort Nelson General Hospital.—Construction of a new 33-bed hospital, plus
an 8-bed nurses' residence.
St. Joseph's Hospital, Victoria.-—Phase II of building programme, including Sisters' quarters, administration and emergency department enlargements, transformer
vault and electrical distribution system, laundry building, and kitchen renovations.
(d) Additional Projects Developed through Various Planning Stages in 1962
King's Daughters' Hospital, Duncan: New hospital.
Vernon Jubilee: Additions and renovations.
St. Joseph's Hospital, Victoria: Additions and renovations.
St. Joseph's Hospital, Comox: Additions and renovations.
Sunshine Coast, Sechelt: New hospital.
100 Mile House:   New facility.
Prince Rupert General Hospital: Addition and alterations.
Richmond Hospital: New facility.
Gorge Road Hospital, Victoria: Addition.
Ladysmith General Hospital: Addition and alterations.
Kelowna General Hospital:  Renovations and extensions.
North Vancouver General Hospital: Conversion of old hospital building for
rehabilitation care.
Creston Valley Hospital:   Addition and improvements.
Medical Sciences Centre, University of British Columbia:  New hospital.
St. Paul's, Vancouver: Emergency department.
Tofino General Hospital:   Addition and renovations.
St. Vincent's, Vancouver:   Addition and renovations.
Royal Jubilee Hospital, Victoria:  Renovations.
Vancouver General Hospital: Replacement or renovation of Willow and Laurel
Pavilions.
White Rock District Hospital:  Replacement or addition.
Cariboo Memorial Hospital, Williams Lake: Nurses' residence.
Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster: Emergency department
building.
Bulkley Valley District Hospital, Smithers: Addition.
Trail-Tadanac Hospital:  Laboratory.
St. Joseph General Hospital, Dawson Creek:   Completion of top floor.
Summerland General Hospital: New hospital.
Holy Family Hospital, Vancouver:   Addition.
Hospital Consultation and Inspection Division
J. W. Mainguy, M.H.A., Manager
The staff of this Division provides a consultative service to hospitals on problems of administration and operation in all departments. The Division is also
responsible for the licensing and inspection of private hospitals, including both private acute hospitals (all but one of which are operated in remote areas of the Province by industrial companies) and private hospitals giving nursing-home type care
to the aged sick, most of which are privately owned and operated for profit.
 iuc
tfMO^
Major Hospi
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Mission, Kamloops, Que
Mile House, Prince Rupert, L
White Rock, Williams Lake
Creek, Summerland, Tofino,
Columbia, Holy Family, St. \
Road, St. Joseph's, Royal Jubi
{See pa,
Note.—These are architects' perspecti1
may not represent the actua
Merritt
(Architects:   Thompson, Berwick & Pratt, Vancouver.)
(Architect
 Developed
id Other
uring
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; the early planning stages, and they
building when completed.
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(Architects:   Thompson, Berwick & Pratt, Vancouver.)
 L 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Manager of the Division continued as a member of the Working Party on
Hospital Standards, which met in Ottawa during the year.
The Division worked with the Finance Division in analysing and reviewing
hospital estimates, including pre-construction operating estimates for projects being
planned, and in this connection the Manager continued as a member of the Hospital
Rate Board. Hospital society by-laws were reviewed with the Administrative Assistant, and advice was given to hospitals on medical staff by-laws, rules and regulations, and on other aspects of hospital accreditation. During 1962 the Division's
consultants visited fifty-five individual public hospitals to provide consultation and
inspection services. Most visits required from one to three days in the hospital, and
in some cases two members of the staff were involved. In addition to this work, a
member of the staff spent a total of five weeks with the various shifts of the nursing
service in four general hospitals, in order to keep abreast of the day-to-day problems which arise in this important department.
Working with the Provincial Fire Marshal, the Inspector of Electrical Energy
of the Department of Public Works, and the Inspector of Elevators, Department of
Labour, the staff of the Division checked hospital standards of safety and fire precautions.
The Division Manager continued to serve as the B.C.H.I.S. representative on
the Laboratory Advisory Council, which advises the Government on the development
of laboratory services in public hospitals, including the setting-up of regional pathology services, the appropriate selection of equipment, and the training of laboratory
technologists. With the advice of the Council, approval in principle was given during the year to the establishment of a regional pathology service in the north-west
region. When this service commences, it will bring to six the number of regional
pathology services.
Advice was given to hospitals on disaster planning, and plans submitted by
hospitals were reviewed by a committee on which this Division, the Health Branch,
and Provincial Civil Defence authorities were represented. A member of the Division attended the Hospital Administrators' Conference on Emergency Health Services at Arnprior.
As in previous years, the Division worked in conjunction with Health Branch
personnel on many matters. Contact was maintained with the Medical Health
Officers, and with the Technical Supervisor of Clinical Laboratory Services and the
Technical Supervisor of Radiology, of the Health Branch, who also visit hospitals
to provide advice and assistance in respect to the work of these two departments.
The Health Branch Nutrition Consultant assisted the Division in providing advice
on dietary problems in public and private hospitals.
During the year eighty-five visits for consultation and inspection were made to
private hospitals, including three visits by the Nutrition Consultant. This figure
excludes numerous visits made during the construction of new private hospitals.
The services of a part-time consulting dietician for work with private hospitals were
discontinued at the end of 1961 with the resignation of the incumbent. As a result,
the number of visits to provide specialist advice on food service was considerably
reduced.
New private hospital beds licensed for the aged sick totalled 324; however,
one 18-bed unit closed during the year, and the net bed addition therefore totalled
306 beds. The Provincial total of licensed private hospital beds was 2,447 in sixty-
five hospitals devoted to this type of care. By comparison, in 1957 there were 1,758
beds in fifty-four establishments. As reported in 1961, the conversion of buildings,
such as dwelling-houses, to private hospitals, is not permitted unless such buildings
 HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE,  1962 L 27
meet the construction standards for new private hospitals. Facilities in the process
of conversion in 1961 were allowed to continue to license. It is significant to note
that of the 324 new beds licensed in 1962, all but 17 beds were in buildings newly
constructed for the purpose of giving nursing-home type care. Approval in principle
was granted for the construction of an additional 451 beds involving ten facilities.
Applications were received for a number of additional projects. During the year
121 persons or groups approached the Division with detailed inquiries into the
requirements for obtaining a licence to operate a private hospital.
The number of beds in private acute hospitals remained at 76 beds in five
hospitals, four of which are operated by individual concerns.
The Registered Nurses' Association assisted the Division in screening the credentials of prospective private hospital superintendents. During the year, meetings
were held with representatives of the Pharmaceutical Association of British Columbia, and the Division of Narcotic Control of the Department of National Health and
Welfare, to study means of improving the handling of drugs in private hospitals.
An associated responsibility of the Division is to arrange for the placement, by
the Social Welfare Department, of welfare patients who no longer need to remain
in acute general hospitals, but must be admitted to nursing-home facilities because
their needs are beyond what can be given in their own homes. The Division is
involved only when service is requested by the acute hospital. In 1962 social welfare offices placed 130 cases under this arrangement.
Medical Consultation Division
W. A. Fraser, O.B.E., E.D., M.D., CM., F.A.C.S., Medical Consultant
The Medical Consultation Division is responsible for determining the medical
eligibility for hospital insurance coverage of all patients admitted to hospital, both
in-Province and out-of-Province, from the information contained on the Admission/
Separation Records submitted by each hospital. In the processing of these records,
particular attention is given to surgical procedures, discharge diagnoses, and length
of hospital stay. In addition, the discharge diagnoses and surgical procedures are
coded and checked in accordance with the International Statistical Classification of
Diseases, Injuries, and Causes of Death, with a basic breakdown into services, for
bed-requirement studies.
During the year it was necessary to cope with the problem of staff shortage,
brought about by illness, resignations, annual leave, and difficulties experienced in
obtaining replacements. Through a considerable effort on the part of the depleted
staff, which was determined to keep abreast of the increasing work load, the situation was ably handled until such time as additional staff was obtained.
The Chief Supervisor of Medical Records and Medical Coders, who is a registered nurse as well as a medical-record librarian, carries out an over-all scrutiny of
medical coding and medical eligibility of all hospital claims. In addition, visits are
made to hospitals, with particular attention to the various medical-record departments, to discuss and advise on medical coding and admission problems, and
B.C.H.I.S. requirements. Visits were made to the following hospitals during the
year: Chilliwack General Hospital; Fraser Canyon Hospital, Hope; Lady Minto
Hospital, Ashcroft; Ladysmith General Hospital; Nanaimo General Hospital;
Nicola Valley General Hospital, Merritt; Squamish General Hospital; St. Bartholomew's Hospital, Lytton; St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver; St. Vincent's Hospital,
Vancouver; and Vancouver General Hospital.
 L 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Surveys were carried out for medical research and statistical purposes and
included:—
(1) Study on accident cases hospitalized in British Columbia.
(2) Study on perinatal mortality.
(3) Study on pregnancy and newborn morbidity and mortality.
During the year medical inspection trips to a number of hospitals were carried
out. The British Columbia Medical Association appointed three doctors from its
membership, along with the Medical Consultant, to conduct qualitative studies at
these hospitals, with the object of assuring proper utilization of hospital beds and
facilities for the benefit of patients. The Faculty of Medicine of the University of
British Columbia, the Canadian Medical Association (British Columbia Division),
and the College of Physicians and Surgeons, have been most co-operative in rendering assistance to this Service.
The rehabilitation programme continued to progress and develop. Dr. Brock
Fahrni, Associate Professor, Faculty of Medicine of the School of Rehabilitation
Medicine, at the University of British Columbia, again provided invaluable assistance
in all phases of the plan's development. During 1962 two additional facilities were
brought into the plan—Holy Family Hospital, Vancouver (54 beds), and Kelowna
General Hospital, Kelowna (8-bed unit). A short summary of patients cared for
during 1962 follows.
Summary of Patients Cared For in 1962 under the Rehabilitation Plan
(Excluding Pearson Poliomyelitis Pavilion)
Adults—
Total number of patients treated and discharged in 19621  1,078
Number of patients under treatment at present      200
Total  1,278
Average length of stay 59.2 days
Children—
Total number of patients treated and discharged in 19621        38
Number of patients under treatment at present        25
Total        63
Average length of stay 249.2 days
1 Many of these patients were readmitted for follow-up treatment, but all such admissions are not shown in
the total.
Administrative Assistant
K. G. Wiper
The drafting of legislation, regulations, and Orders in Council is one of the
main responsibilities of the office of the Administrative Assistant, and in the performance of these duties a close working relationship exists between this office and
the Attorney-General's Department.
Hospital societies may apply to the Administrative Assistant for assistance in
connection with the drafting of hospital constitutions and by-laws, and their application. This work is carried out in conjunction with the Hospital Consultation and
Inspection Division. Changes in hospital by-laws are reviewed by this office prior
to their submission for Government approval as required under the Hospital Act.
A set of model by-laws has been developed for use by hospitals, as a guide in making
revisions.
 HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE,  1962 L 29
Collaborating with the Water Rights Service of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, and the Chief Electoral Officer of the Provincial Secretary's Department, the Administrative Assistant provides guidance to committees
in unorganized territory which are establishing hospital improvement districts. Such
districts are necessary for the raising of funds by money by-laws, in areas outside
cities or municipalities, for the construction of new hospital facilities or the improvement of existing buildings. At the end of 1962 there were thirty-three hospital improvement districts in operation and a number of others in the process of formation.
Material which outlines the procedure required for the establishment of a hospital
improvement district is available upon request.
As in previous years, considerable time was spent in 1962 on matters related
to the Federal-Provincial hospital insurance arrangements. Methods of streamlining
administrative procedures and improving liaison were discussed with officials of the
Federal Government, at meetings held in Ottawa and Victoria.
The Administrative Assistant is also responsible for the over-all supervision of
the Third Party Liability and Eligibility Sections.
Third Party Liability Section
J. W. Brayshaw
The hospitalization reports that are completed by hospitals for every patient
admitted with accidental injuries are processed by the Third Party Liability Section.
This Section also handles the arrangements under which the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service receives reimbursement from public liability insurance companies, and self-insured corporations, for hospital expenses paid by this Service on
behalf of accident victims. The Senior Eligibility Inspector in Vancouver, Mr.
H. E. Drab, is responsible for maintaining a third-party liability clearing-house for
the convenience of solicitors and insurance adjusters in the Greater Vancouver area.
Up-to-date information regarding the hospitalization of accident victims is available
through the Vancouver office, and negotiations may be carried out in person or by
telephone, thus avoiding the necessity of corresponding with the head office in
Victoria.
Eligibility Inspectors' Section
P. A. Bacon
In order to ensure that only qualified British Columbia residents receive hospital insurance benefits, the staff of the Eligibility Section review all applications for
benefits made by, or on behalf of, persons admitted to hospital. A detailed check
is made of all doubtful applications, resulting in the rejection of a considerable number of claims for hospital insurance benefits made by unqualified persons.
Eligibility Inspectors visit hospitals on a regular schedule to see that the
B.C.H.I.S. eligibility procedures are being properly carried out. These Inspectors
also assist in the training of hospital admitting staff members. In this regard, regional
meetings are held in a number of centres for the purpose of holding panel discussions
with hospital personnel, to deal with problems connected with the admission of
patients to hospitals, and their status under the Hospital Insurance Act.
This Section has provided the great majority of employers in British Columbia
with a supply of certificates on which an employee's length of employment can be
certified. The Inspectors maintain close liaison with these firms, to ensure their
continuing co-operation in providing their employees with this form of proof of
residence for hospital insurance purposes.
 L 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Research Division
W. D. Burrowes, BA.(Hons.), Director
The main functions of this Division are:—
(1) To survey the geographical areas in the Province, in terms of population
and economic growth, so as to advise the administration of the need for
new construction of hospital beds by type of service:
(2) To compile and maintain a body of statistics derived from the processing
of Admission/Separation Records, and from other sources, showing the
pattern of hospitalization in the individual hospitals and school districts,
and to make special compilations as required by other divisions of this
Service and by other agencies:
(3) To analyse the patterns and trends of morbidity in the Province as a whole,
as revealed by the statistics derived from the Admission/Separation Records and by other available data.
During the year, bed-requirement studies were undertaken for the districts of
Kelowna, Castlegar, and Cranbrook, and reports presented for each. At the end
of the year, studies were in progress on Haney district in the Lower Mainland area,
and on Sidney, Vancouver Island.
The patterns of mechanical tabulation used in preparing the annual tables of
morbidity statistics had to be substantially revised, in order to provide for preparation of the new series of ten standard tables recommended for all Provinces by the
1961 meeting of the Federal Sub-committee on Quality of Care, Research, and Statistics. The revised tables for 1961 were compiled and presented in the form of a
bulletin, which was issued at the end of the year. Further studies in the field of
morbidity statistics were being planned when the year ended.
The interest shown in statistics of accident cases by several Provincial and
Federal departments, and by the British Columbia Safety Council, stimulated a special effort in this phase of Provincial morbidity statistics.
Tables for 1960, derived from a special machine tabulation, were compiled
and issued in bulletin form with limited circulation. This led to increased demand
for subsequent data, and accordingly an enlarged bulletin entitled " Statistics of
Hospitalized Accident Cases, 1961," was prepared, and issued in December.
The work involved in preparing statistics of accident cases focused attention
on the need for revising the classification and codes in current use in this Service.
A revised classification of accidents was accordingly drawn up by adaptation of the
" E " classification of accidents given in the International Classification of Diseases,
and was recommended to the Medical Consultant for use in 1963.
In view of the important contribution made by Indians to hospital utilization in
certain areas, and the incomplete recording of their geographical distribution in the
1961 census, a detailed record of the numbers and location of Indians on reserves
at the end of 1961 was prepared during the year. This work was possible only
through the helpful co-operation of the Indian Agents.
Among the many tables of 1961 population census results, which were received from the Dominion Bureau of Statistics during the year, were tables of the
age and sex distribution of population of every enumeration area in the Province.
At the end of the year, arrangements were being made with the Bureau of Economics and Statistics of the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and
Commerce to use these figures to prepare age and sex distributions for school
districts, which would be invaluable to this Service, and to other departments and
agencies involved in the study of school district populations.
 HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE,  1962 L 31
As a result of consultation between this Division and other divisions within
the Service, certain revisions of the Admission/Separation Record used by hospitals
for reporting to the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service were accepted for
introduction in 1963.
As in previous years, this Division prepared and issued an Alphabetical Listing
of Place Names in British Columbia with Geographical Code, a publication which
has created considerable interest.
In March the Division lost the services of Miss E. L. Macklin, B.A., who had
acted temporarily as head of the Division. Mr. W. D. Burrowes, B.A.(Hons.),
assumed the position of Director of this Division in April, and Miss Brenda Morrison, B.A., M.S.(Statistics), joined the staff in September.
Public Information
R. H. Thompson
The areas of responsibility in the continuing development of public information
activities fall into three main categories—hospitals, the general public, and in-
service. The various methods by which these requirements were met during 1962
are outlined in the following report:—
Regular editions of the B.C.H.I.S. Bulletin, an administrative aid used to clarify
policy and procedural changes, were prepared and distributed to ninety-three hospitals. In addition, sixty-one private hospitals were added to the mailing list during
the year, as it was felt that much of the material in the Bulletin would be of value
to nursing-home personnel.
Two 16-mm. films were added to the film library, bringing to seven the number
of instructional films now available for use by hospitals as part of their in-service
training programmes. The film subjects include hospital sepsis and fire evacuation
procedures, and twenty-five individual screenings were booked during the year.
At the request of some of the hospitals, an " Out-patient Benefits " slip was
printed, and pads of 100 slips were made available to hospitals for distribution to
patients. The slip defines " emergency treatment" and " minor surgery " and clarifies for the patient why the hospital charges more for the latter service. Also in
response to requests, the pamphlet " Information on the B.C. Hospital Insurance
Service for the Hospital Executive and Trustee," first issued in 1956, was brought
up to date and reprinted.
A Departmental display was prepared for exhibit purposes at the Victoria
Industrial and Agricultural Exhibition in May. The same display, with minor alterations, was used at the annual conference of the British Columbia Hospitals Association, held in Penticton in October. Two pictorial panels were also prepared, through
the co-operation of eighty of the Province's general hospitals, and presented to
the Association by the Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance. The
mounted and framed panels, made up of photographs of British Columbia hospitals,
will be hung in the Association's headquarters in Vancouver.
To keep the public aware of various developments in the Provincial plan and
the hospital field, press releases were issued on the payment of hospital accounts;
the grant-in-aid programme for construction, renovations, and equipment; the
awarding of contracts; and the opening of new hospitals. Feature articles were
written for publication in the British Columbia Government News. This office also
co-ordinated the publication of a pilot study of professional utilization, prepared by
the Metropolitan Hospital Planning Council, and a reprint of the Council's study of
emergency department utilization in Lower Mainland hospitals, first issued in 1961.
 L 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Other duties included replying to all letters of general inquiry; summarizing
reports; maintaining the newspaper-clipping file; preparing amendments to the
Manual of Policy, Administration, and Procedure; writing special material for
directories and civic pamphlets, etc.; and editing and preparing the Fourteenth
Annual Report.
General Office
C. R. Leighton
As in previous years, the General Office continued its function of supervising
administrative expenditure. This includes processing vouchers and warrants and
initiating requisitions. It also entails close liaison with various offices of the Department of Finance.
Departmental estimates are co-ordinated in this office, and because of the
considerable amount of detail required, preliminary work on estimates usually
commences in September.
A new duty, following upon the Government's safety programme, requires the
Supervisor to act as liaison officer between the Department and the Accident Prevention Co-ordinator appointed by the Government. In addition, part of the duties
of Departmental Personnel Officer have been assumed by the General Office
Supervisor.
The office continued in its capacity as liaison between the Provincial Infirmary
Superintendent and the Mount St. Mary authorities.
The monthly comfort allowance received by all Provincial Infirmary patients
was paid to the Mount St. Mary patients, Victoria, by this office. In December it
was raised from $5 to $7.50 per month, the amount set as the uniform rate for all
Provincial institutions.
HOSPITALS AS DEFINED UNDER THE HOSPITAL INSURANCE ACT
Part I
Hospitals defined as such under section 2 of the Hospital Act:—
(a)  Public Hospitals
Armstrong and Spallumcheen Hospital, Armstrong.
Arrow Lakes Hospital, Nakusp.
Bella Coola General Hospital, Bella Coola.
Bulkley Valley District Hospital, Smithers.
Burnaby General Hospital, Burnaby.
Burns Lake and District Hospital, Burns
Lake.
Campbell River and District General Hospital, Campbell River.
Cariboo Memorial Hospital, Williams Lake.
Castlegar and District Hospital, Castlegar.
Chemainus General Hospital, Chemainus.
Children's Hospital, Vancouver.
Chilliwack General Hospital, Chilliwack.
Creston Valley Hospital, Creston.
Cumberland General Hospital, Cumberland.
Enderby and District Memorial Hospital,
Enderby.
Esperanza General Hospital, Esperanza.
Fernie Memorial Hospital, Fernie.
Fort Nelson General Hospital, Fort Nelson.
Fraser Canyon Hospital, Hope.
Golden  and District  General  Hospital,
Golden.
Grace Hospital, Vancouver.
Grand Forks Hospital, Grand Forks.
Kelowna General Hospital, Kelowna.
Kimberley and District Hospital, Kimberley.
King's Daughters' Hospital, Duncan.
Kitimat General Hospital, Kitimat.
Kootenay Lake General Hospital, Nelson.
Lady Minto Hospital, Ashcroft.
Lady Minto Gulf Islands Hospital, Ganges.
Ladysmith  and  District  General  Hospital,
Ladysmith.
Langley Memorial Hospital, Murrayville.
Lillooet District Hospital, Lillooet.
Lions Gate Hospital, North Vancouver.
McBride and District Hospital, McBride.
Maple Ridge Hospital, Haney.
Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Rossland.
Matsqui,  Sumas,  and Abbotsford  General
Hospital, Abbotsford.
Michel Hospital, Michel.
Mills Memorial Hospital, Terrace.
Mission Memorial Hospital, Mission City.
Mount St. Joseph's Hospital, Vancouver.
 HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE,  1962
L 33
Nanaimo General Hospital, Nanaimo.
Nicola Valley General Hospital, Merritt.
Ocean Falls General Hospital, Ocean Falls.
Penticton Hospital, Penticton.
Pouce Coupe Community Hospital, Pouce
Coupe.
Powell River General Hospital, Powell River.
Prince George Regional Hospital, Prince
George.
Prince Rupert General Hospital, Prince Rupert.
Princeton General Hospital, Princeton.
Providence Hospital, Fort St. John.
Queen Alexandra Solarium for Crippled
Children, Victoria.
Queen Charlotte Islands General Hospital,
Queen Charlotte City.
Queen Victoria Hospital, Revelstoke.
Quesnel General Hospital, Quesnel.
Rest Haven Hospital and Sanitarium, Sidney.
Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster.
Royal Inland Hospital, Kamloops.
Royal Jubilee Hospital, Victoria.
R. W. Large Memorial Hospital, Bella Bella.
St. Bartholomew's Hospital, Lytton.
St. Eugene Hospital, Cranbrook.
St. George's Hospital, Alert Bay.
St. John Hospital, Vanderhoof.
St. Joseph General Hospital, Dawson Creek.
St. Joseph's General Hospital, Comox.
St. Joseph's Hospital, Victoria.
St. Martin's Hospital, Oliver.
St. Mary's Hospital, Garden Bay P.O.
St. Mary's Hospital, New Westminster.
St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver.
St. Vincent's Hospital, Vancouver.
Shuswap Lake General Hospital, The, Salmon Arm.
Slocan Community Hospital, New Denver.
Squamish General Hospital, Squamish.
Summerland General Hospital, Summerland.
Surrey Memorial Hospital, North Surrey.
Tofino General Hospital, Tofino.
Trail-Tadanac Hospital, Trail.
University Health Service Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver.
Vernon Jubilee Hospital, Vernon.
Victorian Hospital, Kaslo.
West Coast General Hospital, Port Alberni.
White Rock District Hospital, White Rock.
Windermere District Hospital, Invermere.
Wrinch Memorial Hospital, Hazelton.
{b)  Outpost Hospitals
Red Cross Outpost Nursing Station, Alexis
Creek.
Red Cross Outpost Nursing Station, Atlin.
Red Cross Outpost Nursing Station, Bamfield.
Red Cross Outpost Nursing Station, Blue
River.
Red Cross Outpost Nursing Station, Edge-
wood.
Red Cross Outpost Nursing Station, Hudson
Hope.
Red Cross Outpost Nursing Station, Kyuquot.
Red Cross Outpost Nursing Station, Masset.
Stewart General Hospital, Stewart.
(c)  Federal Hospitals
Veterans' Hospital, Victoria.
Shaughnessy Hospital, Vancouver.
Coqualeetza Indian Hospital, Sardis.
Miller Bay Indian Hospital, Prince Rupert.
Nanaimo Indian Hospital, Nanaimo.
R.C.A.F. Station Hospital, Holberg.
Part II
Private hospitals which are defined as such under section 7 of the Hospital Act,
and with which the Province has entered into an agreement requiring the hospital
to furnish the general hospital services provided under the Hospital Insurance Act:—
Bralorne Private Hospital, Bralorne.
Cassiar Asbestos Corporation Private Hospital, Cassiar.
Gold Quartz Hospital, Wells.
Hollywood Hospital Ltd., New Westminster.
Medical-Dental Hospital Unit, Vancouver.
Port Alice Private Hospital, Port Alice.
Part III
Rehabilitation, chronic, and convalescent hospitals, as defined under section 25
of the Hospital Act:—
G. F. Strong Rehabilitation Centre, Vancouver.
The Gorge Road Hospital, Victoria.
Holy Family Hospital, Vancouver.
Pearson Hospital (Poliomyelitis Pavilion),
Vancouver.
Queen   Alexandra   Solarium   for   Crippled
Children, Victoria.
Shaughnessy Hospital, Vancouver.
Veterans' Hospital, Victoria.
 L 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICAL DATA
The tables on the following pages represent statistical data compiled by the
Hospital Finance Division. The data deal with the volume of hospital insurance
coverage provided to the people of British Columbia through the British Columbia
Hospital Insurance Service. In 1962 there were eighty-seven public general hospitals approved to accept B.C.H.I.S. patients, the same number as in 1961. In addition, care was provided in eight outpost hospitals, six Federal hospitals, and five
private hospitals. Also approved as of September 1, 1960, were four public rehabilitation hospitals, one Provincial rehabilitation hospital, and rehabilitation-care
areas in two Federal hospitals which also provide general hospital care. Data for
the year 1962 have been estimated from reports submitted by hospitals to November 30th, and are subject to revision when actual figures for the year are submitted.
Table I shows that a total of 264,243 B.C.H.I.S. adults and children patients
were discharged from British Columbia hospitals in 1962, an increase of 5,191 or
2.0 per cent over the previous year. This table also shows that 95.7 per cent of the
total patients separated from British Columbia hospitals in 1962 were covered by
hospital insurance, compared to 95.8 per cent in 1960 and 96.1 per cent in 1961.
The second part of the table indicates in 1962 that the British Columbia Hospital
Insurance Service paid public hospitals in British Columbia for 2,507,217 days of
care for adults and children, an increase of 15,960 or 0.6 per cent over 1961.
As shown in Table IIa, the average length of stay of B.C.H.I.S. adult and children patients in British Columbia public hospitals during 1962 was 9.49 days. The
major contributing factor to the increase from 1,806 days of care per thousand
population in 1961 to 1,813 in 1962 has been the continued increase in the number
of hospital beds resulting from the intensive hospital-construction programme of
recent years.
 HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE,  1962
L 35
Table I.—Patients Separated (Discharged or Died), Total Patient-days
and Proportion Covered by British Columbia Hospital Insurance
Service, British Columbia Public Hospitals Only, 1949-62 (Excluding
Federal, Private, and Out-of-Province Hospitalization).
Total Hospitalized
Covered by B.C.H.I.S.
General Hospitals
Rehabilitation
Hospitals
Adults
and
Children
Newborn
Adults
and
Children
Newborn
Total
Total
Patients separated—
1949
164,964
172,645
181,160
188,355
200,893
206,992
216,743
227,359
228,917
236,859
245,766
260,775
270,568
276,616
1,682,196
1,766,680
1,795,438
1,916,486
2,041,615
2,162,002
2,198,863
2,239,646
2,277,567
2,322,796
2,407,134
2,546,357
2,607,900
2,627,873
26,272
26,205
27,096
28,675
30,712
31,984
33,190
35,118
37,376
38,374
39,039
39,599
38,226
37,700
213,874
212,979
214,285
214,701
220,208
226,031
227,674
233,402
240,872
244,429
248,074
249,273
240,207
273,488
191,236
198,850
208,256
217,030
231,605
238,976
249,933
262,477
266,293
275,233
284,805
300,374
308,794
314,316
1,896,070
1,979,659
2,009,723
2,131,187
2,261,823
2,388,033
2,426,537
2,473,048
2,518,439
2,567,225
2,655,208
2,795,630
2,848,107
2,901,361
	
140,168
144,959
150,116
154,336
169,167
189,713
199,774
208,293
209,485
222,046
234,783
249,423
259,052
264,243
1,430,646
1,476,615
1,467,102
1,569,974
1,712,878
1,954,823
2,005,165
2,041,854
2,076,336
2,169,897
2,275,127
2,434,152
2,491,257
2,507,217
84.9
84.0
82.9
81.9
84.2
91.7
92.2
91.6
91.5
93.7
95.5
95.6
95.7
95.5
85.0
83.6
81.7
81.9
83.9
90.4
91.2
91.2
91.2
93.4
94.5
94.8
95.5
95.4
24,640
23,943
24,172
25,023
27,830
29,483
31,515
33,174
34,963
37,045
38,480
38,980
37,558
36,463
200,585
193,307
187,891
184,160
197,100
213,587
212,514
217,252
223,079
232,390
239,871
241,157
231,043
262,858
93.8
91.4
89.2
87.3
90.6
92.2
95.0
94.5
93.5
96.5
98.6
98.4
98.3
96.7
93.8
90.8
87.7
85.8
89.5
94.5
93.3
93.1
92.6
95.1
96.7
96.7
96.1
96.1
164,808
1950 - -.-    .    ..
168,902
1951
	
174,288
1952.                                 ~~
179,359
1951
196,997
1954.--.                 .   -  -	
	
219,1%
1955 _  _
231,289
1956...           	
241,467
1957... -
244,448
1958                               	
259,091
1959...                   	
273,263
1960  - 	
196U  	
197
1,079
1,355
287,903
296,610
1962.          .. -	
300,706
Patient-days—
1949 .                           	
1,631,231
1950                                        ..    	
1,669,922
1951
1,654,993
195?
1,754,134
1953                                      -
1,909,978
1954                                  -	
2,168,410
1955
2,217,679
1956
-     -
2,259,106
1957 .                            -
2,299,415
1958                                  	
2,402,287
1959 -
20,571
78,585
85,806
2,514,998
1960    -..-  —
2,675,309
19611       _
2,722,300
19622                     _	
2,770,075
Percentage of total, patients separated—
1949
86.2
1950
84.9
1951
	
	
83.7
1952
82.6
1953                                          _
	
85.1
10S4
	
91.7
1955
92.5
1956
	
	
92.0
1957                               	
	
91.8
1958
  	
94.1
1959
	
	
95.9
1960
95.8
19611
96.1
19622
95.7
Percentage of total, patient-days—
1949
	
86.0
1950 .
	
84.4
1951
	
82.3
1952
	
82.3
1953                                            ..   -
	
84.4
1954                                            .    _
90.8
1955
	
	
91.4
1956
91.3
1957                                     _
	
91.3
1958
	
93.6
1959
	
94.7
I960...       _ -
95.0
19611                                	
	
95.6
19622.                         	
	
	
95.5
1 Amended as per final reports received from hospitals.
2 Estimated, based on hospital reports to November 30, 1962.
 L 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IIa.—Patients Separated, Total Days' Stay, and Average Length of
Stay According to Type and Location of Hospital for B.C.H.I.S.
Patients Only, and Days of Care per Thousand of Covered Population, 1949-62.
Total
Adults
and
Children
Newborn
B.C. Public
Hospitals
Adults
and
Children
Newborn
Other B.C. Hospitals
Including Federal
and Private
Adults
and
Children
Newborn
Institutions
Outside B.C.
Adults
and
Children
Newborn
Patients separated—
1949  	
1950  -
1951—- __	
1952. 	
1953	
1954  	
1955.  	
1956  -
1957 	
1958 - 	
1959  -	
1960  	
19612	
19623-- —-	
Patient-days—
1949 -- _....
1950-  _ rt„.
1951  	
1952  	
1953 	
1954 —	
1955 	
1956  	
1957 - _
1958 	
1959  	
I960-.
19612...
19623...
Average days of stay—
1949- -	
1950   	
1951.  	
1952 	
1953 ..  _
1954 	
1955  	
1956	
1957 - 	
1958 _ _.	
1959	
1960 ..--	
19612-
1962 3_.
149,280
154,643
159,739
164,379
180,149
199,974
209,999
219,218
221,585
236,770
251,393
263,889
272,275
277,358
498,121
564,222
551,954
663,149
14,344
046,087
100,386
141,445
188,765
332,502
474,974
632,442
,695,358
,715,997
10.03
10.11
9.71
10.12
10.07
10.23
10.00
9.77
9.88
9.85
9.85
9.98
9.90
9.79
24,989
24,336
24,587
25,492
28,381
29,761
32,035
33,783
35,813
37,924
39,257
39,406
37,968
36,911
203,197
196,333
190,948
187,923
200,738
215,507
215,980
221,022
228,875
238,112
244,615
244,480
233,794
265,753
8.13
8.07
7.76
7.37
7.07
7.24
6.74
6.54
6.39
6.28
6.23
6.20
6.16
7.20
140,168
144,959
150,116
154,336
169,167
189,713
199,774
208,293
209,485
222,046
234,783
249,423
259,052
264,243
1,430,646
1,476,615
1,467,102
1,569,974
1,712,878
1,954,823
2,005,165
2,041,854
2,076,336
2,169,897
2,275,127
2,434,152
2,491,257
2,507,217
10.21
10.19
9.77
10.17
10.13
10.30
10.04
9.80
9.91
9.77
9.69
9.76
9.62
9.49
24,640
23,943
24,172
25,023
27,830
29,483
31,515
33,174
34,963
37,045
38,480
39,488
37,558
36,463
200,585
193,307
187,891
184,160
197,100
213,587
212,514
| 217,252
223,079
232,390
239,871
241.157
231,043
262,858
8.14
8.07
7.77
7.36
7.08
7.24
6.74
6.55
6.38
6.27
6.23
6.19
6.15
7.21
7,093
151
7,617
173
7,308
171
7,431
161
8,173
229
7,602
199
8,313
361
9,473
457
10,023
668
12,506
665
13,908
514
11,5571
241
10,244
151
9,965
168
45,960
1,146
65,326
1,288
62,771
1,155
68,892
974
75,518
1,353
66,960
1,251
75,599
2,271
79,428
2,740
93,980
4,299
141,925
4,113
173,343
2,818
169,40U
1,417
176,470
878
175,630
895
6.48
7.59
8.58
7.44
8.59
6.75
9.27
6.05
9.24
5.91
8.81
6.29
9.09
6.29
8.38
6.00
9.39
6.44
11.35
6.19
12.46
5.48
14.66
5.90
17.23
5.80
17.62
5.33
2,019 |
2,067
2,315
2,612
2,809
2,659
1,912
2,050
2,077
2,218
2,702
2,909
2,979
3,150
21,515
22,281
22,081
24,283
25,948
24,304
19,622
20,163
18,449
20,680
26,504
28,889
27,631
33,150
10.66
10.78
9.54
9.29
9.24
9.14
10.26
9.84
8.88
9.45
9.S1
9.93
9.27
10.52
198
220
244
308
322
79
159
159
182
214
263
267
259
280
1,466
1,738
1,902
2,789
2,285
669
1,195
1,030
1,497
1,609
1,926
1,906
1.873
2,000
7.40
7.90
7.79
9.06
7.10
8.47
7.52
6.48
8.23
7.51
7.32
7.14
7.23
7.14
1 Includes rehabilitation cases paid by British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service.
2 Amended as per final reports received from hospitals.
3 Estimated, based on hospital reports to November 30, 1962. Estimated patient-days (including newborn
days) per thousand of population covered by British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service: 1949, 1,528; 1950,
1,548; 1951, 1,496; 1952, 1,527; 1953, 1,600; 1954, 1,733; 1955, 1,720; 1956, 1,688; 1957, 1,626; 1958, 1,665;
1959, 1,724; 1960, 1,804; 1961, 1,806; 1962, 1,813. (1954 and subsequent years based on assumption that total
population is covered by British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service. Patient-days include rehabilitation
patient-days from September 1, 1960.)   Population figures revised according to latest census figures.
 HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE,  1962
L 37
Table IIb.—Summary of the Number of B.C.H.I.S. In-patients (Including
Rehabilitation Patients) and Short-stay Patients, 1949-62
Total Adults,
Children, and
Newborn
In-patients
Estimated
Number of
Emergency and
Minor-surgery
Patients
Total
Receiving
Benefits
1949   	
174,269
178,979
184,326
189,871
208,530
229,735
242,034
253,001
257,398
274,694
290,650
303,492
311,322
315,624
29,000
44,502
47,656
46,767
52,582
63,621
70,553
76,375
83,530
91,883
100,292
107,312
(2)
(2)
203,269
1950   	
1951  - _	
223,481
231,982
1952                      -
236,638
1953          .
261,112
1954  	
293,356
1955                          	
312,587
1956  	
329,376
1957-        ....    .
340,928
1958    -	
366,577
1959	
390,942
1960    	
410,804
196U        _	
311,322
19623 - _ , _. .
315,624
Totals -	
3,413,925
814,073
4,227,998
i Amended as per final reports received from hospitals.
2 Not available.
3 Estimated, based on hospital reports to November 30, 1962.
Table III.—Patients Separated, Total Days' Stay, and Average Length
of Stay in British Columbia Public Hospitals for B.C.H.I.S. Patients
Only, Grouped According to Bed Capacity, Year 1962.1
Bed Capacity
Total
250 and
Over
100 to 249
50 to 99
25 to 49
Under 25
Special
Hospitals
Patients separated—
Adults and children	
Newborn  	
Patient-days—
Adults and children.—	
Newborn .,  	
Average days of stay—
Adults and children	
Newborn 	
264,243
36,463
2,507,217
262,858
9.49
7.21
97,733
11,066
1,155,634
91,153
11.82
8.24
75,482
11,742
649,091
79,961
8.60
6.81
34,519
6,878
276,204
47,809
8.00
6.95
39,133
4,959
295,919
32,125
7.56
6.48
10,614
1,247
79,333
8,299
7.47
6.66
6,762
571
51,036
3,511
7.55
6.15
1 Estimated, based on hospital reports to November 30, 1962.
Table IV.—Percentage Distribution of Patients Separated and Patient-
days for B.C.H.I.S. Patients Only, in British Columbia Public Hospitals, Grouped According to Bed Capacity, Year 1962.1
Bed Capacity
Total
250 and
Over
100 to 249
50 to 99
25 to 49
Under 25
Special
Hospitals
Patients separated—
Adults and children -
Newborn—  	
Patient-days—
Adults and children	
Newborn —	
Per Cent
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
Per Cent
36.98
30.35
46.09
34.67
Per Cent
28.57
32.20
25.89
30.42
Per Cent
13.06
18.86
11.02
18.19
Per Cent
14.81
13.60
11.80
12.22
Per Cent
4.02
3.42
3.16
3.16
Per Cent
2.56
1.57
2.04
1.34
i Estimated, based on hospital reports to November 30, 1962.
 L 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
CHARTS
The charts on the following pages have been prepared by the Research Division.
The statistical data shown in these charts are taken from the annual tabulation of the
information shown on Admission/Separation Records submitted to the British
Columbia Hospital Insurance Service by all hospitals designated as acute. The
charts give a general idea of the relative importance of the various hospital services
(medical, surgical, etc.); they also provide some insight into morbidity in British
Columbia.
It should be noted that the Canadian diagnostic list used for the tables on pages
44 to 46 is a more detailed listing than the diagnostic groups shown on the charts.
Both lists are based mainly on the International Statistical Classification of Diseases,
Injuries, and Causes of Death, prepared by the World Health Organization (1957
edition).
 HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE,  1962
L 39
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L 43
Chart V.—Average Length of Stay of Cases in Acute-care Hospitals in
British Columbia by Major Diagnostic Groups, in Descending Order,
1961 (Excluding Newborns).
Diseases of the circulatory system
Neoplasms
Diseases of the bones and
organs of movement
Congenital malformations
Diseases of the blood and
blood-forming organs
Allergic, endocrine system,
metabolic, and nutritional diseases
Diseases of the nervous system
and sense organs
Certain diseases of early infancy
Mental, psychoneurotic, and
personality disorders
Infective and parasitic diseases
Accidents, poisonings, and
violence
Diseases of the skin and
cellular tissue
Diseases of the digestive system
PROVINCIAL AVERAGE
LENGTH OF STAY
Diseases of the genito-urinary
system
Deliveries and complications of
pregnancy, childbirth, and the
puerperium
Diseases of the respiratory system
Symptoms, senility, and ill-
defined conditions
Supplementary classification for
special admissions
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 HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE,  1962 L 47
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE
FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31,  1962
Administration—
Salaries         $423,383.22
Temporary assistance   1,225.15
$424,608.37
Office expense  36,270.02
Travelling expense  29,339.47
Office furniture and equipment  2,203.45
Printing and publications  3,109.23
Tabulating and rentals  2,691.00
Motor-vehicles and accessories  2,241.09
Incidentals and contingencies  209.79
Technical surveys   5,906.51
$506,578.93
Payments to hospitals—
Claims   $54,665,384.53
Vancouver General Hospital re out-patients
(Hospital Insurance
Act, sec. 29)   328,483.39
$54,993,867.92
Less collections, third-party
liability  250,101.21
  $54,743,766.71
Less—
Chargeable to Government of Canada $25,697,550.94
Miscellaneous receipts 3,959.99
     25,701,510.93
     29,042,255.78
Grants in aid of construction of hospitals       3,206,349.83
Total hospital insurance  $32,755,184.54
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1963
735-1162-3789
 

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