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Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT for the Year Ended… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1964

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 Minister of Mines and
Petroleum Resources
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
for the Year Ended December 31
1962
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1963
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES
VICTORIA, B.C.
Hon. W. K. Kiernan, Minister.
P. J. Mulcahy, Deputy Minister.
J. W. Peck, Chief Inspector of Mines.
S. Metcalfe, Chief Analyst and Assayer.
Hartley Sargent, Chief, Mineralogical Branch.
K. B. Blakey, Chief Gold Commissioner and Chief Commissioner,
Petroleum and Natural Gas.
J. D. Lineham, Chief, Petroleum and Natural Gas Conservation Branch.
 Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Mineral Industry of the Province for the year 1962
is herewith respectfully submitted.
W. K. KIERNAN,
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources Office,
March 31, 1963.
 Howard Allan Sharp, engineering assistant with the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Branch, British Columbia Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, died from asphyxiation by hydrogen sulphide gas at
2 p.m. on March 6, 1963, in the Peejay oilfield, 53 miles north of Fort
St. John. Mr. Sharp was witnessing a production test being conducted
on the well Sinclair et al Peejay d-39-E, and became exposed at 9.30
a.m. to a lethal concentration of the gas when he opened the thief hatch
of an oil-storage tank. Mr. Sharp is survived by his wife, Janet Grace,
his son, Kevin David, born July 6, 1960, and his daughter, Lynda Christine, born January 7, 1962.
Mr. Sharp was born in Shaunavon, Sask., on August 31, 1935, and
was educated there and at Maple Creek. At the time of his death he was
enrolled as an engineering pupil with the British Columbia Association
of Professional Engineers. After working with Royalite Oil Company
Limited for five years as draughtsman and geological and engineering
assistant, he joined the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources
at Dawson Creek on March 31, 1958. Mr. Sharp was transferred to the
field office at Charlie Lake in June, 1960.
 CONTENTS
Introduction,
Review of the Mineral Industry.
Paoe
A9
A 10
Statistics—
Methods of Computing Production	
Co-operation with Dominion Bureau of Statistics	
Table I.—Mineral Production—Total to Date, Latest Decade, and
Latest Year	
Table II.—Total Value of Production, 1836-1962	
Table III.—Quantity and Value of Mineral Products for Years 1953 to
1962	
Table IV (Graph).-
1836-1962	
-Mineral Production of British Columbia—Value,
Table V (Graph).—Mineral Production of British Columbia—Quantity,
1836-1962	
Table VI.—Production of Principal Metals, 1858-1962	
Table VIIa.—Production, 1961 and 1962, and Total to Date, by Mining
Divisions—Summary	
Table VIIb.—Production, 1961 and 1962, and Total to Date, by Mining
Divisions—Principal Lode Metals	
Table Vile.—Production, 1961 and 1962, and Total to Date, by Mining
Divisions—Miscellaneous Metals	
Table VIId.—Production, 1961 and 1962, and Total to Date, by Mining
Divisions—Industrial Minerals	
Table VIIe.—Production, 1961 and 1962, and Total to Date, by Mining
Divisions—Structural Materials	
Table VIIIa.—Quantity and Value of Coal per Year to Date	
Table VIIIb.—Quantity and Value of Coal Sold and Used	
Table IX.—Coke and By-products Production for Years 1895 to 1925
and by Years 1926 to 1962	
Table X.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1962	
Table XI.—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for Operations of
All Classes	
Table XII.—Average Number Employed in the Mining Industry, 1901—
62	
Table XIII.—Lode-metal Mines—Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and
Gross Value, 1901-62	
Table XIV.—Lode-metal Production in 1962	
A 13
A 15
A 17
A 17
A 18
A 20
A 21
A 22
A 24
A 26
A 28
A 32
A 34
A 36
A 37
A 38
A 39
A 43
A44
A 45
A46
Table XV.—Lode-metal Mines Employing an Average of Ten or More
Persons during 1962	
A 51
A 5
 A 6 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
Page
Departmental Work  A 52
Administration Branch  A 52
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)  A 52
List of Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders in the Province A 53
Gold Commissioners' and Mining Recorders' Office Statistics, 1962 A 54
Coal, Petroleum, and Natural Gas  A 55
Analytical and Assay Branch  A 56
Inspection Branch  A 5 8
Mineralogical Branch  A 59
Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch  A 61
Grub-staking Prospectors  A 63
Mining Roads and Trails  A 68
Museums  A 69
Rock and Mineral Specimens  A 69
Publications  A 69
Maps Showing Mineral Claims, Placer Claims, and Placer-mining Leases A 69
Joint Offices of the British Columbia Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources and the Department of Mines and Technical
Surveys, Canada  A 70
Topographic Mapping and Air Photography  A 71
Department of Mines and Technical Surveys  A 73
Geological Survey of Canada  A 73
Field Work by the Geological Survey in British Columbia, 1962  A 73
Publications of the Geological Survey  A 74
Mines Branch  A 74
Mineral Resources Division  A 74
Lode Metals        1
Reports on Geological, Geophysical, and Geochemical Work  130
Placer  136
Structural Materials and Industrial Minerals  145
Petroleum and Natural Gas  166
Inspection of Lode Mines, Placer Mines, and Quarries  237
Coal  256
Inspection of Electrical Equipment and Installations  279
Lode-metal Deposits Referred to in the 1962 Annual Report  289
 CONTENTS
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Photographs
Jedway open pit	
Jedway primary crusher under construction	
Nicola rocks near Basque	
Rockslide south of Spatsum	
Bethlehem mill	
Bethlehem mill	
Craigmont open pit	
Craigmont mill, office, and shops	
Violamac Mines Limited—workings on Victor vein	
Silver Ridge from the northeast	
AN/FO explosive factory at the Sullivan mine	
Exploration camp, Catface Mountain	
Western Mines Limited—portal of 1200 adit	
BA CNP Fernie d-42-I well	
Richfield Pure Pt. Roberts 6-3-5 well	
Drawings
1. Geology of part of Thompson River valley	
2. Regional graben pattern in southwestern British Columbia.
3. Guichon Mines Limited—plans of adits	
4. Friday Creek Development Co. Ltd.—surface geology	
5. Queen Victoria mine—plan and section	
6. Magnetite properties, north central Vancouver Island	
7. Power River group	
8. F.L., Ridge, and Cordova magnetite deposits	
9. Western Mines Limited—part of 1200 level	
10. Kennedy Lake area	
11. Albeta Mines Ltd.—underground geology	
12. Sunro mine, 5300 level	
13. Limestone in Kennedy Lake area	
14. Petroleum and natural-gas fields, 1962	
15. Petroleum and natural-gas pipe-lines	
A 7
Pace
12
12
33
33
48
48
52
52
81
81
86
106
106
174
174
.Facing 31
  44
58
62
72
97
99
-Facing 101
-Facing 109
-Facing 113
  126
128
152
177
179
 A 8 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1962
Page
16. Footage drilled in British Columbia wells, 1959-60  181
17. Footage drilled in British Columbia wells, 1961-62  182
18. Petroleum and natural-gas production, 1954-62  184
19. Average dust counts obtained each year since 1937  249
 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTER
OF MINES AND PETROLEUM
RESOURCES, 1962
Introduction
A report of the Minister of Mines of the Province of British Columbia has been
published each year from 1874 to 1959. Beginning in 1960, it is the Report of the
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
The Annual Report records the salient facts in the progress of the mineral
industry, also much detail about individual operations, including those undertaken
in the search for, exploration of, and development of mineral deposits, as well as
the actual winning of material from mineral deposits.
The Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources now
contains introductory sections dealing with Statistics and Departmental Work, followed by sections dealing with Lode Metals; Placer; Structural Materials and
Industrial Minerals; Petroleum and Natural Gas; Inspection of Lode Mines, Placer
Mines, and Quarries; Coal; and Inspection of Electrical Equipment and Installations at Mines and Quarries, each with its own table of contents. A table listing the
properties described, in geographic groupings, precedes the index.
An introductory review of the mineral industry and notes at the first of several
of the main sections deal generally with the industry or its principal subdivisions.
Notes in the various sections deal briefly with exploration or production operations
during the year or describe a property in more complete detail, outlining the history
of past work and the geological setting as well as describing the workings and the
mineral deposits exposed in them. Some notes deal with areas rather than with a
single property.
The work of the branches of the Department is outlined briefly in the section
on Departmental Work. This section is followed by notes dealing briefly with the
work of other British Columbia or Federal Government services of particular interest
to the mineral industry of British Columbia. Information concerning mine operations and some of the activities of the Inspection Branch of the Department of Mines
and Petroleum Resources is contained in the section on Inspection of Lode Mines,
Placer Mines, and Quarries, early in the section on Coal, and in the section on
Inspection of Electrical Equipment and Installations at Mines and Quarries.
The section on Statistics begins with an outline of current and past practice in
arriving at quantities and calculating the value of the various products.
A 9
 Review of the Mineral Industry, 1962
The year 1962 was marked by a high level of activity and of production in
almost all phases of the mineral industry of British Columbia. The total value of
products, $229,276,385,f the greatest for any year to date, exceeds the previous
record year, 1956, by more than $40,000,000. Record production of copper, iron,
asbestos, natural gas, and petroleum with high production of most other products
and prices, that were generally good, account for the increase. Metals made up 69.6
per cent of the total; industrial minerals, 6.2 per cent; structural materials, 9.3 per
cent; and fuels, 14.9 per cent.
The Canadian dollar was at a discount in the United States throughout 1962,
reaching a low of less than 92 cents in June. Thereafter it ranged between 92 and
93 cents. Consequently, British Columbia producers of minerals for export gained
by the Canadian premium on United States funds, which for the year averaged almost
7 per cent.
As consequences of price movements in the United States and of the exchange
premium, the prices of gold, silver, copper, zinc, and iron were significantly higher
than in 1961. The United States price for silver began to rise in the latter part of
1961 and rose further in 1962. The average for 1962, 116.029 cents an ounce in
Canadian funds, is much higher than for any previous year, including 1919, when
the previous record of 105.57 cents was reached. The prices for copper, lead, and
zinc in the United States were quite steady throughout 1962. Copper rose about
half a cent, and zinc and lead fell about half a cent a pound. Lead had fallen late
in 1961 and fell a further half cent early in 1962, but regained half a cent in November. The average price in Canadian funds for lead was 0.71 cents a pound below
the 1961 price, for copper the price was higher than 1961 by 2.18 cents a pound,
and for zinc higher than 1961 by 0.73 cents a pound.
Gold and silver were produced in lesser quantities than the averages for the
preceding decade, although the high price gave silver a value close to the decade
average. Lead and zinc both exceeded the decade averages in quantity; lead fell
below and zinc exceeded the decade average value.
Copper output established new records in quantity and value. The previous
records were for 1929 quantity, 102,793,669 pounds; value, $18,612,850, compared with 1962 quantity, 108,979,144 pounds; value, $33,209,215. The 1962
output was more than three times that of 1961, and reflects the first full year of
production of the Craigmont mine, increased capacity of Phoenix Copper Company,
and the beginning of production at the Sumo and Coast Copper mines. Bethlehem
Copper Corporation started " tuning up " in December, but shipments of copper
did not begin until 1963. Phoenix, Sunro and Coast Copper, and Bethlehem are
expected to operate at capacity throughout 1963, and it is apparent that a new record
for copper production will be set.
Compared with 1961, iron production increased 34 per cent in quantity. The
increase reflects production from three new mines, Brynnor Mines Limited, Jedway
Iron Ore Limited, and Zeballos Iron Mines Limited, and increased production by
Texada Mines Limited. The four mines shipped concentrates averaging from 62
to 66 per cent iron.   Higher average grade of concentrates combined with the ex-
* By Hartley Sargent, Chief of the Mineralogical Branch.
t See note page A14 re adjustment in asbestos pricing in 1962 and preceding years.
A   10
 REVIEW OF THE MINERAL INDUSTRY,  1962
A 11
change premium gave a significant increase in the average price per ton, and combined with the increase in quantity gave a total value more than 50 per cent greater
than that of 1961. The total value for iron includes $533,199 for by-product concentrates converted to pig iron at the Sullivan mine, and brings the combined value
of iron concentrates exported from and used in British Columbia in 1962 to $18,-
326,911. This is by far the greatest value for iron for any year to date and puts it
in the fourth place among the metals and also fourth of any mineral product, exceeding oil by $710,000.
The lode-metal mining industry produced just over 11,000,000 tons of ore, of
which open-pit copper and iron mines produced nearly one-half.
Industrial minerals established a new record in 1962. The gain came mainly
from an increase of about 18 per cent in asbestos. Sulphur sales declined slighdy
in quantity and more in value. Gains were recorded in fluxes and in granules.
Structural-materials production exceeded 1961 and the ten-year average but did not
reach the 1957 value.
The fuels group, including coal, petroleum, natural gas, and liquid by-products
of natural gas, recorded a great increase over previous values because of a great
increase in oil and a considerable increase in natural gas. However, coal continued
to decline in quantity and in value. Oil production in 1962 was 9,747,729 barrels,
compared with 1,810,984 barrels in 1961, and production of natural gas was 108,-
699,997 thousand cubic feet in 1962, compared with 95,967,110 thousand cubic
feet in 1961. The outstanding increase in oil marks the first year of operation for
the Western Pacific Oil and Products pipe-line, bringing British Columbia output
to the market in the populous southwestern part of the Province. The combined
value for fuels rose to $34,000,000, compared with $11,000,000 as the annual
average for the preceding decade. The group contributed almost 15 per cent of the
total value of mineral products in 1962, coal contributing 2.7 per cent; natural gas,
about 4.5 per cent; and oil, 7.7 per cent.
Exploration for copper was pursued actively in northwestern British Columbia,
on Vancouver Island, and in the Merritt-Highland Valley area. Exploration for iron
was done mainly on Vancouver Island and the Queen Charlotte Islands. Molybdenum was the objective of much work in central British Columbia. The improved
price for silver stimulated activity in the Alice Arm area, and two projects looking
toward the discovery of deep silver-lead-zinc ore were started in the Slocan district.
Exploration for lode metals included much diamond drilling. Increasing use was
made of geophysical and geochemical surveys.
A campaign of airborne magnetometer surveying was carried on at the joint
expense of the Geological Survey of Canada and the Department of Mines and
Petroleum Resources. This work was done with a nuclear precession magnetometer
in northern Vancouver Island, primarily as a research project with the objective of
solving problems of airborne magnetometer surveying in areas of high relief.
In the non-metallic field, interest was shown in magnesite in the East Kootenay
district and interest was revived in coal at Bowron River.
In northeastern British Columbia, drilling for oil and gas was at an accelerated
rate—320 wells were started, compared with 207 in 1961. The total footage drilled
was 1,554,408 feet, compared with 1,074,243 feet in 1961. Of the 1962 drilling
in proven fields, close to 64 per cent was classed as development, almost 14 per cent
as exploratory outpost, and 22 per cent as exploratory wildcat wells. Of the holes
completed in 1962, ninety-six were abandoned as dry wells, 163 were completed
as oil wells, and seventy-seven as gas wells; 212 new oil wells and thirty-seven new
gas wells were placed on production.   Intensified development drilling for oil in the
 A 12 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1962
latter part of 1961 and in 1962 was stimulated by the construction of the Western
Pacific Products and Crude Oil pipe-line, which provides access to the market in
the southwestern part of the Province.
The number of lode-mineral claims recorded was 20,602, compared with 19,064
in 1961, and the number of certificates of work issued was 22,957, compared with
16,665 in 1961. Revenue from the sale of free miners' certificates and from recording fees, lease rentals, etc., amounted to $316,672.60, compared with $295,608.88
in 1961.
Revenue to the Government from iron ore subject to royalty amounted to
$92,282.17, paid on 369,128.7 long tons of iron concentrates.
Revenue to the Government from petroleum and natural gas amounted to
$22,214,283, including rentals, fees, and miscellaneous, $7,183,276; sale of Crown
reserves, $11,364,734; royalties—gas, $1,260,419; oil, $2,265,167; processed
products, $108,737; miscellaneous fees, $31,950.
At the end of 1962 land held for petroleum and natural gas amounting to
27,665,218 acres was mainly in northeastern British Columbia, but also included
holdings in the Groundhog Basin, Chilcotin River, and Flathead River areas. An
additional 600,000 acres was held in Hecate Strait and Georgia Strait.
The average number employed through 1962 in placer, lode, coal, industrial-
mineral, and structural-material mining was 11,560. Major expenditures by those
branches of the industry included: Salaries and wages, $53,693,063; fuel and electricity, $9,315,324; process supplies (inclusive of explosives, chemicals, drill-steel
lubricants, etc.), $10,802,386; Federal taxes, $11,413,763; Provincial taxes,
$5,861,606; municipal and other taxes, $1,235,473; levies for workmen's compensation (including silicosis), unemployment insurance, and other items, $2,259,-
387. Dividends amounted to $24,394,297. The lode-mining industry spent $34,-
274,698 in freight and treatment charges on ores and concentrates. Returns from
some operators in the metal-mining and industrial-mineral sections of the industry
indicate that they spent $59,089,281 on roads, new construction, machinery, major
repairs, and alterations, plus cost of goods, materials, and supplies not chargeable
to fixed-assets account. Some of this latter amount is duplicated in the cost of fuel
and electricity used and process supplies.
Returns from twenty-seven operators in the petroleum and natural-gas industry
show the following expense items: Salaries and wages, $1,829,108; fuel and electricity, $190,235; process supplies, $3,222,413.
In addition to the expenditures shown in the preceding paragraph, and to the
information on revenue to the Government contained in an earlier paragraph, the
Canadian Petroleum Association presented the following estimates of expenditures:
(1) Exploration—(a) geological and geophysical work, $7,500,000, (b) exploratory drilling, $14,900,000; (2) development drilling, $17,500,000; (3) operation
of wells and flow-lines, $3,900,000; (4) operation of gas plants, $1,500,000; (5)
capital expenditures, $5,500,000; (6) general—(a) taxes excluding income tax,
$500,000, (b) additional items not including capital expenditure, land acquisition,
nor overhead, $3,000,000.
 Statistics
The statistics of the mineral industry are collected and compiled and the statistical tables for this Report are prepared by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics,
Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce.
The tabulated statistics are designed to cover mineral production in quantity
and value, employment, principal expenditures of the mineral industry, and dividends paid. The data are arranged so as to facilitate comparison of the production
records for the various mining divisions, and from year to year (1951, 1958).*
In the 1960 Report, Tables I and II were given new forms, Table VIII has been
amalgamated with Table VII, and subsequent tables were renumbered.
From time to time, revisions have been made to earlier figures as additional
data became available or errors came to light.
METHODS OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION
The tables of statistics recording the mineral production of the Province for
each year are compiled from certified returns made by the operators, augmented by
some data obtained from the Royal Canadian Mint, from the operators of custom
smelters, and from the records of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch of the
Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources. The values are in Canadian funds.
Weights are avoirdupois pounds and tons (2,000 lb.) and troy ounces.
Metals
Prior to 1925 the average prices for gold and copper are true average prices,
but, as a means of correcting for losses in smelting and refining, the prices of other
metals were taken at the following percentages of the year's average price for the
metal: Silver, 95 per cent; lead, 90 per cent; and zinc, 85 per cent. For 1925 and
subsequent years the value has been calculated using the true average price and the
net metal contents, in accordance with the procedures adopted by the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics and the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
Placer Gold
The value of placer gold in dollars is obtained from returns received annually
from the operators (1958) and other sources. A fineness of 822V^ is taken for
crude placer gold (p. A 16) if Mint records of the actual fineness are not available.
Prior to 1962 the fineness 822Vi has been used for all placer gold reported.
Lode Metals, Gross and Net Contents, and Calculated Value
The gross contents are compiled from the returns made each year by the producers and for any metal are the total assay contents, obtained by multiplying the
assay by the weight of ore, concentrates, or bullion.
The value for each principal metal is calculated by multiplying the quantity
(gross for gold, net for silver, copper, lead, and zinc) by the average price for the
year. The net contents are calculated by taking a percentage of the gross content:
in lead ores and concentrates and zinc concentrates—silver, 98 per cent; lead, 95
per cent; zinc, 85 per centf of the total assay content; and in copper concentrates,
* In these notes, references such as (1958) are to this section of the Report of the Minister of Mines for the
year indicated, where additional information will be found.
t For zinc concentrates shipped to foreign smelters the net contents are calculated as the assay content less
eight units of zinc per ton of concentrate.
A   13
 A 14 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1962
95 per cent of the silver and the total assay content of copper less 10 pounds per
ton of concentrates.
Other metals, including by-product metals refined in British Columbia and
iron, tin, and tungsten exported as ores and concentrates, are treated similarly,
except that quantities and values for several are as reported by shippers for sales
in the year. The value of by-product iron ore used in making pig iron at Kimberley
has been computed from the value per ton of ore of comparable grade, at the point
of export from British Columbia, 1960 and 1961 valuations have been recalculated
on this basis.
Industrial Minerals and Structural Materials
Prices for these materials approximate the price at the point of origin. From
1953 to 1961 asbestos was valued at the shipping point in North Vancouver. For
1962 the value has been taken as the value at that pricing point less the shipping
cost from the mine to North Vancouver. The values for the preceding years have
also been reduced by the amount of the shipping charges.
Average Metal Prices
The methods of computing prices have varied because of changing conditions
(1958). The prices are now arrived at by methods given in footnotes to the table
of average prices on page A 16.
Fuel
Coal
All coal produced, including that used in making coke, is shown as primary
mine production (1959, tables renumbered in 1960). Washery loss and changes
in stocks, year by year, are shown in the table " Collieries of British Columbia, Production and Distribution by Collieries and by Districts " (p. 258).
Natural Gas*
Commercial production of natural gas began in 1954. The production shown
in Tables I, III, and VIIa is the total dry and residue gas sold; that is, the quantity
delivered to the main transmission-line. The quantity is net after deducting gas used
on leases, metering difference, and gas used or lost in the cleaning plant. The gross
well output is shown in Table 12, page 222. The quantity is reported as thousands
of cubic feet at standard conditions (standard conditions—14.4 pounds per square
inch pressure, 60° F. temperature up to and including the year 1960, and thereafter
14.65 pounds per square inch pressure, 60° F. temperature).
Natural-gas Liquid By-products*
This heading covers condensate removed from natural gas in preparation for
transmission through the main gas pipe-line. The by-products consist of butane
and propane. Prior to the 1962 Report the by-products included butane, propane,
and condensate/pentanes plus. Beginning with the 1962 Report, the figure for liquid
by-products covers only butane and propane, natural gasoline in quantity and value
being included with petroleum. Figures for the preceding years have been brought
to conformity with the new practices.
* For petroleum, natural gas, and liquid by-products, production figures are supplied by the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Branch of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources and are compiled from the monthly
disposition report, and Crown royalty statement filed with the Department by the producers.
 statistics
A 15
Petroleum*
Production of petroleum began in 1955, and is shown in Tables I, III, and VHa.
The quantity is " net sales " (see Tables 11 and 14, pp. 221 and 226), reported in
barrels (35 imperial gallons=1 barrel). See preceding paragraph re natural
gasoline.
CO-OPERATION WITH DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS
In the interests of uniformity and to avoid duplication of effort, beginning with
the statistics for 1925, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and the various Provincial
Departments have co-operated in the collection and processing of mineral statistics.
Producers of metals, industrial minerals, structural materials, coal, and petroleum and natural gas are requested to submit returns in duplicate on forms prepared
for use by the Province and by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
So far as possible both organizations follow the same practice in processing
the data. The final compilation by the Dominion Bureau is usually published considerably later than the Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources
for British Columbia. Differences between the figures published by the two organizations arise mainly from the facts that the Dominion Bureau bases its quantities
of lode metals on returns made by smelter operators, whereas the British Columbia
mining statistician uses the returns covering shipments from individual mines in
the same period, and the Dominion Bureau uses average prices for metals considered
applicable to the total Canadian production, whereas the British Columbia mining
statistician uses prices considered applicable to British Columbia production. Peat,
included under the classification of fuel by the Dominion Bureau, has not been
regarded as mineral or fuel, and accordingly has not been included in the British
Columbia statistics of mineral production.
* For petroleum, natural gas, and liquid by-products, production figures are supplied by the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Branch of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources and are compiled from the monthly
disposition report, and Crown royalty statement filed with the Department by the producers.
 A 16
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
Average Prices Used in Valuing Provincial Production of Gold,
Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, and Coal
Year
Gold,1
Crude.
Oz.
Gold.
Fine.
Oz.
Silver,
Fine.
Oz.
Copper,
Lb.
Lead.
Lb.
Zinc.
Lb.
Coal.
Short
Ton
1901	
$
17.00
19.30
23.02
28.37
28.94
28.81
28.77
28.93
29.72
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
30.22
28.78
28.78
29.60
31.29
30.30
28.18
28.31
27.52
28.39
28.32
27.59
27.94
27.61
27.92
29.24
30.77
$
20.67
23.47
28.60
34.50
35.19
35.03
34.99
35.18
36.14
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
36.75
35.00
35.00
36.00
38.05
36.85
34.27
34.42
34.07
34.52
34.44
33.55
33.98
33.57
33.95
35.46
37.41
Cents
56.002 N.T.
49.55  „
50.78 „
53.36 ,.
51.33  „
63.45
62.06  „
50.22  „
48.93  „
50.812 „
50.64 „
57.79 ..
56.80 .,
52.10  „
47.20  „
62.38
77.35
91.93  .,
105.57  „
95.80  „
59.52  .,
64.14
61.63  „
63.442 „
69.065 „
62.107 „
56.37 „
58.176 ..
52.993 „
38.154 ..
28.700 „
31.671 „
37.832 „
47.461 ..
64.790 „
45.127 „
44.881 .,
43.477 „
40.488 „
38.249 „
38.261 ..
41.166 „
45.254 „
43.000 „
47.000 „
83.650 ..
72.000 „
75.000 Mont.
74.250 U.S.
80.635 ..
94.55  „
83.157 „
83.774 „
82.982 „
87.851 „
89.373 „
87.057 „
86.448 „
87.469 ,.
88.633 „
93.696 „
116.029 „
Cents
16.11 N.T.
11.70  „
13.24
12.82
15.59 „
19.28  ,.
20.00  „
13.20
12.98
12.738 .,
12.38
16.341 „
15.27
13.60 „
17.28  „
27.202 „
27.18  ..
24.63
18.70  „
17.45
12.50  „
13.38  „
14.42  „
13.02  „
14.042 „
13.795 „
12.92
14.570 ..
18.107 .,
12.982 „
8.116 „
6.380 Lond.
7.454 „
7.419 ..
7.795 „
9.477 „
13.078 „
9.972 „
10.092 „
10.086 „
10.086 „
10.086 „
11.75
12.000 ..
12.550 „
12.80
20.39
22.35 U.S.
19.973 „
23.428 „
27.70  „
31.079 „
30.333 „
29.112 „
38.276 „
39.787 ,.
28.031 „
23.419 „
27.708 „
28.985 „
28.288 „
30.473 „
Cents
2.577 N.T.
3.66 „
3.81
3.88  „
4.24  „
4.81  .,
4.80  „
3.78  ,.
3.85
4.00  ..
3.98  .,
4.024 „
3.93  „
3.50  „
4.17  ..
6.172 ..
7.91
6.67 „
5.19  „
7.16  ..
4.09
5.16  „
6.54
7.287 „
7.848 Lond.
6.751 .,
5.256 ..
4.575 „
5.050 ,.
3.927 „
2.710 „
2.113 „
2.391 „
2.436 „
3.133 ,.
3.913 „
5.110 ..
3.344 „
3.169 „
3.362 „
3.362 ,.
3.362 „
3.754 „
4.500 „
5.000 ,.
6.750 „
13.670 ,.
18.040 „
15.800 U.S.
14.454 „
18.4
16.121 „
13.265 „
13.680 „
14.926 „
15.756 ,.
14.051 „
11.755 „
11.670 „
11.589 „
11.011 „
10.301 „
Cents
$
2.679
1902 „	
1903	
1904	
1905	
19 06 	
19 07	
3.125
1908	
1909	
1910	
4.60 E. St. L.
4.90  „
5.90  ..
4.80  „
4.40  „
11.25
10.88  „
7.566 „
6.94
6.24
6.52  „
3.95  „
4.86  ,.
5.62  „
5.39  „
7.892 Lond.
7.409 „
6.194 „
5.493 „
5.385 „
3.599 „
2.554 „
2.405 „
3.210 .,
3.044 „
3.099 ..
3.315 „
4.902 ,.
3.073 „
3.069 „
3.411 ..
3.411 „
3.411 „
4.000 „
4.300 „
6.440 „
7.810 .,
11.230 ..
13.930 „
13.247 U.S.
15.075 „
19.9
15.874 „
10.675 „
10.417 „
12.127 „
13.278 „
11.175 „
10.009 „
10.978 „
12.557 „
11.695 „
12.422 „
1911	
1912	
1913	
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
4.464
1919	
1920	
1921	
1922	
1923	
1924	
1925	
1926	
1927	
1928 	
1929  	
1930	
1931 	
4.018
1932	
3.795
1933 	
1934	
1935	
1936	
1937	
1938	
1939 	
1940	
1941	
1942 . .,	
1943 	
1944	
1945	
1946	
4.68
1947	
5.12
1948	
6.09
1949 	
6.51
1950	
6.43
1951	
1952	
6.46
6.94
1953	
6.88
1954	
7.00
1955	
6.74
1956 	
6.59
1957	
6.76
1958 	
7.45
1959	
7.93
I960	
6.84
1961	
7.40
1962	
7.43
1 Unrefined placer gold, average price per ounce, is taken as $17 divided by $20.67 times the price of an
ounce of fine gold.
Prices for fine gold are the Canadian Mint buying prices. Prices for other metals are those of the markets
indicated, converted into Canadian funds. The abbreviations are: Mont.=Montreal; N.Y.=New York;
Lond.=London;   E. St. L.=East St. Louis;   and U.S.=United States.
Prior to 1925 the prices for gold and copper are true average prices, but the prices of other metals were
taken at the following percentages of the year's average price for the metal: Silver, 95 per cent; lead, 90 per
cent;  and zinc, 85 per cent.
 Table I.—Mineral Production: Total to Date, Latest Decade,
and Latest Year
Total Quantity to Date
Total Value
to Date
Total Quantity, 1953-62
Total Value,
1953-62
Quantity,
1962
Value,
1962
Gold-
Silver _
Copper,.
Lead	
Zinc	
Principal Metals
-placer, crude 	
lode, fine   _ —
..oz.
-OZ.
-OZ.
..lb.
...lb.
..lb.
Totals.
Miscellaneous Metals
Antimony lb.
Bismuth    lb.
Cadmium.
Chromite-
Cobalt
Iron concentrates .
Magnesium	
Manganese	
Mercury..
— lb.
.tons
Jb.
-tons
 lb.
..tons
Jb.
Molybdenite (M0S2)	
 lb.
. lb.
Platinum	
Selenium 	
_ lb.
Tin 	
Tungsten (WO3)-.
Other	
Totals _
Industrial Minerals
Arsenious oxide	
lb.
Rp.ntnnite
Diafomitfi
Fluorspar  _	
Fluxes      '
Gypsum and gypsite
Hydro-magnesite. 	
tons
Iron oxide and ochre „
Magnesium sulphate	
Mica	
.-tons
tons
lb.
Natro-alunite „
Perlite 	
tons
Phosphate rock 	
Sodium carbonate	
tons
tons
Talc	
.tons
Totals
Structural Materials
Clay products	
Cement,
Lime and limestone „
Rocks.
—tons
-tons
—tons
 tons
Stone,   tons
Not assigned 	
Totals 	
Sand and gravel -
Fuels
Coal3 __  tons
Natural gas—■
To pipe-line M s.c.f.
Liquid by-products*  bbl.
Petroleum crude  bbl.
Totals	
Grand totals	
5,224,235
16,026,856
437,347,023
3,121,339,212
13,918,259,800
11,866,502,762
96,629,855
466,148,590
272,255,037
536,449,766
1,060,106,263
1,008,279,885
61,335
2,059,312
76,882,215
420,875,327
3,133,170,503
4,077,880,754
13,439,869,3961-
42,691,896
5,638,950
29,523,851
796
1,730
9,722,803
204,632
1,724
4,163,662
52,171
14,188,497
749
1,405
731
14,469,474
16,019,324
327
,413
,223
295
420
476
184
668
,609
,198
,105
,462
,858
,389
,426
,751
,079
215,700,8831
11,222,
9,717!
43,250
32;
75,886,
88,
32!
10,409,
46,
10,570,
30.
134,
1,
11,137,
38,663:
4,477:
15,807,170
1,820,653
14,839,726
8,634,010
75
9,023
13,907,044
13
7,471,968
11,132,374
22,019,420
285,933
194,127
791
2,044
35,341
3,723,397
179,281
2,294,572
2,253
18,108
13,894
522
1,112
3,842
10,492
4,757,974
1,805
7,867,372
27,911,414
1,071,826
,201
,006
020
,858
,310
964
863
,547
402
536
050
352
818
398
120
894
983
723
871
134,762,9161-
273,
61,814
2,394:
i6:
55:
784:
6,195:
2,466:
9,299:
27:
155,
254
185:
9,
11.
16i
118,
50,648,
34;
285,913
134,437
675
863,411
142,554
1,229,157
1,112
"27264,628
46,260,390
113,796,608
32,256,216
29,711,042
110,082,367
8,706,725
 7,010,452
■ I   347,823,8001-
3,839,371
4,377,630
14,596,200
123,414,931
103,016
136,161,251
414,891,356
1,821,195
15,889,791
569,796,907
33,915,721
307,479
26,863,664
10,547,691
414,891,356
1,821,195
15,889,791
■ |   630,883,7711-
,.|4,769,040,766[-
1,724,947
70,930,206
68,895,371
131,044,731
398,078,015
471,594,794
3,456
156,847
6,186,937
108,979,144
335,282,537
413,430,817
$
100,550
5,867,175
7,178,641
33,209,215
34,537,454
51,356,376
1,142,268,0641-
1132,249,411
5,547,678
3,887,243
23,775,316
69,376,824
250
9,500
10,482,381
1,043
5,296,019
30,639,526
4,455,253
153,471,0331
1,931,397
228,601
2,086,692
1,793,847
3,476,467
650,941
748,223
507,494
3,839,513
18,326,911
2,902,850
375
442,640
"535;537
-I 27,303,543
61,792,406
2,145,067
24,595
2,468,412
1,954,329
3,462,317
36,820
11,120
55,133
6,511
211
62,743
18,251
147,900
27,224,770        239,191     2,934,725
10,297,360
57,062
10,228
228,477
311,902
443,700
99,119,8361-
14,283,454
20,065,389
63,371,557
14,798,702
16,424,792
72,849,704
1,039,852
397,435
559,028
1,897,272
17,757,391
8,023
2,507,438
7,112,890
1,513,579
1,284,301
8,862,767
85,290
188,549,9961-
73,944,448
33,915,721
307,479
26,863,664|'
825,339
108,699,997
464,036
59,747,729'
21,366,265
6,133,986
10,226,323
96,347
17,617,0566
135,031,3121-
I 34,073,712
1,718,440,2411
1229,276,3857
1 See note under " Industrial Minerals and Structural Materials," page A14.
2 Rubble, riprap, and crushed stone.
3 Quantity from 1836 to 1909 is gross mine output and includes material lost in picking and washing.   From
1910 and subsequent years the quantity is that sold and used.
4 Butane and propane.
5 8,900,284 barrels of crude petroleum sold and 847,445 barrels of condensate/pentanes plus produced.
6 Value to producer of $16,845,302 for crude petroleum and $771,754 for condensate/pentanes plus.
1 Does not include 75,880.4 tons of peat moss valued at $2,703,064.
Table II.—Total Value of Production, 1836-1962
1836-1910     $375,474,891
1911-20      331,334,419
1921-30
1931-40
1941-50
1951
533,190,993
521,179,200
941,352,650
176,865,051
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
A 17
$171,203,321
152,840,132
152,893,626
173,852,478
188,853,229
170,992,567
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
$144,952,994
147,638,139
177,354,648
179,786,043
229,276,385
Total  $4,769,040,766
 A 18
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1962
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——
 A 24                  MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
Table VIIa.—Production, 1961 and 1962, and
Division
Period
Placer Gold
Principal
Lode Metals
Miscella-
neous
Metals
Industrial
Minerals
Structural
Materials
Quantity1
Value
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1981
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
Oz.
4
141
1,758
2,271
658
734,967
645
1,668
2,604,590
48
$
117
3,853
37,106
66,404
19,938
17,364,658
18,860
47,918
53,992,669
1,404
$
5,095
48,299
11,745,593
$
$
$
85,576
104,685
1,249,630
16,050
4,537
296,256
733,870
562,814
6,069,182
7,296,141
7,296,141
9,398
102
37,483,446
720,827
700,689
40,327,330
562,122
20,325
16,842
10,228
198,490
23,730
10,141
12
44
20,531
242,238
351
1,347
468,450
847,454
56,145,948
56,585,577
1,857,817,757
3,557,806
3,352,115
48,153,863
3,692,712
4,239,322
128,941,014
900
1,226,495
975,839
12,261,549
59,539
107,450
634,097
8,822
10,766
108,002
162,427
610,950
607,175
6,149,772
611,288
500,762
5,054,630
110,928
249,246
203,701
5,112,315
114,986
89,178
1,681,389
33,876
25,887
865,207
637,651
702,513
9,272,402
216,995
332,182
2,087,594
132,255
165,840
1,620,997
1,907,459
1,817,992
35,322,447
183,675
203,273
3,136,272
5,086,910
4,745,898
74,328,643
37,031
12,625
507,765
346,610
414,864
3,971,656
51,450
95,579
1,120,235
35,911
25,972
1,316,121
73,175
131,550
2,474,377
183,562
256,384
7,350,549
61,975
106,928
1,034,460
116,386
92,088
1,929,971
4,553,416
4,539,748
52,089,656
48,131
 66,164
469
18
11,268
526
5,074
1
15
27,571
72
30
50,184
82
115,662
29
486
604,106
2,105
860
1,248,151
936
2,323,897
1
3,044,837
101,646
6,528,308
9,742,161
11,160,051
65,001,948
4
6,316
3,787,608
3,760,290
130,454,321
577,450
887,213
8,683,470
15,505,864
14,174,936
194,458,264
417,194
470,893
1,706,186
1,855,744
23,910,483
26,338,944
34.002
13,613
17,393,123
119,560
38,072
51,089,477
79
91,891
1,893,549
48,350
11,583,623
10,009,514
66,966,386
909,050
942,255
42,371,177
3,194,037
2,902,850
10,570,105
5,129
19,445
32,317
778,100
866
4
19,300
117
17,512
81,638
114,437
106,890
894,261
New Westminster—
3,585
16
88,988
488
11,608
243,614
234
278
807
53,739
4,764
8,129
23,604
1,426,264
10,050
1,542
15,633,718
11,460
309,573
383,600
4,117,902
13
221
3
374
5,013
88
1,020
Similkameen	
7,582
2
3
12,151
164,477
58
75
288,286
11,053,917
185,244
1,651
120,003,362
344,680
190,039
210,835,087
5,970,229
5,340,469
190,060,354
86,043
34,984
82,906,262
4,634,683
5,171,932
213,648,383
375
129,036
18,558
488,057
825,561
167,459
186,541
3,234,905
4,603
105,569
1,229,400
366
9,397
Vancouver.— 	
Vernon	
851
24,260
35,774
101,426
65,799
6,448,314
39,613
1,008,371
182
10
5,306
292
2,705
72,282
188,345
9,500
3,978
60
60
188,306
1,401,250
1,399,060
35,526,625
2,718,566
4,972,725
5,025,619
119,306,687
1,574,464
10,350,025
11,870,155
11,653,713
145,642,411
628
15,680
35,437
2,089,321
4,344,142
53,658,033
Totals
77
1,577,738
2,095
18,178,798
1,586,244
12,850,495
1961
1962
To date
3,416
3,456
5,224,235
99,884
100,550
96,029,855
109,225,600
132,148,861
3,343,239,541
19,239,888
27,303,543
215,700,883
12,927,432
14,283,454
134,762,916
19,878,921
21,366,265
347,823,800
p onlri'    1Q
M   9 817 m
•   196?  2 688 n-
for the major placer-producing mining divisions was:  Atlin, 1898;  Cariboo, 1858;  Lillooet, 1874;   Quesnel, 1858.
2 Quantity from 1836 to 1909 is gross mine output and includes material lost in picking and washing.    For
Cariboo, 1942; Fort Steele, 1898;  Kamloops, 1893;  Liard, 1923; Nanaimo, 1836; Nicola, 1907;  Omineca, 1918;
Osoyoos, 1926;  Similkameen, 1909;  Skeena, 1912.
 STATISTICS
A 25
Total to Date, by Mining Divisions—Summary
Fuels
Coal
Petroleums
Natural Gas
(Direct to Pipe-line)
Liquid By-products'!
Division
Totals
Quantity2
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Tons
$
Bbl.
$
M S.C.P.
$
Bbl.
$
$
90,788
7,452,978
20,337,868
82,454
24,577
55,726,807
1,490,399
1,321,649
290
1 100
100,612,501
1,404
1,363,947
834,716
734,531
5,979,805
5,255,540
238,310,671
64,212,795
63,629,179
53,924,438
1,918,120,514
4,343,619
4,049,505
65,535,247
3,635,936
4,275,975
132,353,782
637,680
703,000
15,087
59,765
17,000
12,501
688,357
19,611,064
2,062
1,389
98,237
1,810,984
69,747,729
15,889,791
2,710,701
17,617,056
26,863,664
95,967,110
108,699,997
414,891,356
8,818,891
10,226,323
33,915,721
473,048
464,036
1,821,195
82,592
96,347
307,479
21,590,445
39,445,324
130,119,309
3,920,799
3,926,130
134,022,346
76,009
736,814
801,294
299,319,780
14,824,791
83,534
13,602,330
74,142,313
411,089,483
16,598,706
15,337,976
240,136,339
8,813,046
8,226,531
87,742,809
159
1,719
1,375
11,080,176
64,024
63,276
2,778,209
1,894.492
125
23,924,483
2,929,524
37,941,699
6,850
454,307
5,760
515,357
432,762
41,214,430
480,583
617,625
1,122
5,008
56,338,655
35,999
25,972
12,719,759
346
2.774
76,007
133,651
4,617,442
19,553,725
142,527,344
528,242
934,480
36
116
220,346,282
6,199,663
6,833,938
194,339,116
202,429
127,072
84,896,267
9,289,525
9,817,09*
273,200,030
48,423
66,1 64
2,992,671
4,972,785
6,600,143
129,896,135
15,360,726
18,985,254
 1	
265,856,362
919,142
825,339
136,161,251
6,802,134
6,133,986
569,796,907
1,810,9841   2,710,701
9,747,729|17,617,056
15,889,791|26,863,664
95,967,110
108,699,997
414,891,356
8,818,891
10,226,323
33,915,721
473,948
464,036
1,821,195
82,592
96,347
307,479
179.786,043
229,276,385
4,769,040,786'
3 All petroleum sales including well-head sales, refinery sales, and condensate/pentanes plus.
* Butane and propane.
5'Re "not assigned," see footnotes under Tables Vila and VIIc. ;
\See footnotes 5 and 6, page A 17.
Note.—For individual metals, industrial minerals, and structural materials, see Tables VIIb, VIIc, VIId, and
VIIE.
 A 26
MINES
AND
PETROLEUM RESOURCES
REPORT
1962
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 a 32             mines and petroleum resources report, 1962
Table VIId.—Production, 1961 and 1962, and Total
Division
Period
Asbestos
Barite
Diatomite
Fluxes (Quartz
and Limestone)
Granules (Quartz,
Limestone, and
Granite)
Quantity
Value*
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
Tons
$
Tons
$
Tons
%
Tons
%
Tons
%
214
211
2,014
8,817
10,228
55,010
48
168
Fort Steele—
Golden.. .	
8
15,478
6,511
194,119
80
151,388
57,062
2,393,940
Greenwood— .
Kamloops
Liard
1,790,502
1,540,319
45,113
55,133
285,933
8,648,503
10,297,360
61,814,006
Nanaimo	
12,459
17,386
704,819
19.445
32,317
778,100
New Westminster-
Nicola
839
841
8,004
6,612
69,487
17,512
17,563
114,437
106,890
894,261
7,601
8,174
Omineca	
40,869
45,350
619,380
170,995
196,100
2,817,548
9,459
10,800
69,608
138,578
187,500
978.869
Vancouver
Vernon	
601,019
1.050,722
29,692
418,606
7
7
76
60
60
1,000
Not assigned	
Totals
9,605
157,080
1961
1962
To date
45,113
55,133
285,933
8,648,503
10,297,360
61,814,006
15,478
6,511
194,127
151,388
57,062
2,394,020
214
211
2,014
8,817
10,228
55,010
53,335
62,743
3,723,397
190,500
228,477
6,195,863
17.463
18,251
179,281
253,015
311,902
2,466,547
i Value f.o.b. mine, not including containers; see also note under " Industrial Minerals and Structural Materials," page A14.
2 Arsenious oxide:  Omineca, 1928, 16,997 lb., $340;  Osoyoos, 1917-30 and 1942, 22,002,423 lb., $272,861.
s Bentonite:  1926-44, 791 tons.
4 Fluorspar:  Greenwood, 1918-29 and 1942, 35,309 tons, $783,578; Osoyoos, 1958, 32 tons, $1,386.
SHydromagnesite: Atlin, 1915-16, 1,450 tons, $20,325; Clinton, 1921, 803 tons, $7,211.
6 Iron oxide and ochre:  Golden, 1927-39, 27 tons, $920; Nelson, 1948-50, 7,292 tons, $55,901;  Vancouver, 1918-50, 10,669
tons, $97,389; Victoria, 1923, 120 tons, $840.
i Magnesium sulphate: Clinton, 1918-20, 1,923 tons, $39,085; Kamloops, 1918—42, 8,742 tons, $193,967; Osoyoos, 1915-19,
3,229 tons, $21,300.
8 Natro-alunite:  1912-27, 522 tons.
 statistics
to Date, by Mining Divisions—Industrial Minerals
A 33
Gypsum and
Gypsite
Mica
Sulphur
Other
Value
Division
Totals
Period
Division
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Tons
$
Lb.
$
Tons
$
$
$
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
1961
1962
To date
Alberni.
9,3988
9,398
Atlin.
20,3255
20,325
16,842
10,228
198,490
250,000
8,025
Cariboo.
10,013,800
143,012
30013
Clinton.
873
6,236
156,1915 7 11
162,427
610,950
607,175
6,149,772
611,288
500,762
5,054,630
40,730
36,206
324,811
610,950
607,175
5,833,974
Fort Steele.
112,878
298,824
459,900
443,700
2,659,414
16,89410
Golden.
147,900
931,246
1,2706 12
783,5784
2,323,897
1,246,918
6,323,178
424,700
2,075
203,0557 11
6,528,308
11,160,051
9,742,161
65,001,948
52,681
57,787
191,218
1,093,658
862,691
3,187,942
Liard.
5,12912
5,129
19,445
32,317
778,100
Nanaimo.
Nelson.
17,512
81,638
114,437
106,890
894,261
55,9016
New Westminster.
Nicola.
2,407
10,050
10,050
11,4602 9
11,460
309,573
383,600
4,117,902
1,588,800
25,938
295,5472 4 7
250
1,700
16,8583
18,558
41.624
8,841
5,292
632,689
178,678
101,426
65,799
5,921,504
1,229,400
101,426
65,799
6,448,314
Vancouver.
634,250
10,815
97,3896
Vernon.
160,500
3,978
3,978
60
60
188,300
1,401,250
1,399,060
35,526,025
612
30,2266 12
140,125
139.906
1,401,250
1.399.060
Not assigned.
3,567,632|35,526,625
153,300
147,900
459,900
443,700
9,299,402
250,000
8,025
242,377
239,191
4,757,974
3,207,284
2,934,725
50,648,723
12,927,432
14,283,451
134,762,916
1961
1962
To date
Totals.
2,294,572
12,822,050
185,818
1,703,527
aPerlite:  1953, 1,112 tons, $11,120.
io Phosphate rock:  1927-33, 3,842 tons.
ii Sodium carbonate:  Clinton, 1921-49, 9,524 tons, $109,895; Kamloops, 1931-35, 968 tons, $9,088.
12 Talc:  Golden, 1927, 5 tons, $356;  Lillooet, 1916-36, 296 tons, $5,129; Victoria, 1919-35, 1,504 tons, $29,386.
is Volcanic ash:  Cariboo, 30 tons.
First production: Arsenious oxide, 1917: asbestos, 1952; barite, 1940; bentonite, 1926; diatomite, 1928; fluorspar, 1918;
flux, 1911; granules, 1930; gypsum and gypsite, 1911; hydromagnesite, 1904; iron oxide and ochre, 1918; magnesium sulphate,
1915; mica, 1932; natro-alunite, 1912; perlite, 1953; phosphate rock, 1927; sodium carbonate, 1921; sulphur, 1916; talc, 1916.
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A 35
 A 36 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
Table VIIIa.—Quantity1 and Value of Coal per Year to Date
Year
Tons
(2,000 Lb.)
Value
Year
Tons
(2,000 Lb.)
Value
1R36-S9
41,871
15,956
15,427
20,292
23,906
32,068
36,757
28,129
34,988
49,286
40,098
33,424
55,4582
55,4582
55,4592
91,334
123,362
155,895
172,540
191,348
270,257
299,708
255,760
315,997
238,895
441,358
409,468
365,832
462,964
548,017
649,411
759,518
1,152,590
925,495
1,095,690
1,134,509
1,052,412
1,002,268
999,372
1,263,272
1,435,314
1,781,000
1,894,544
1,838,621
1,624,742
1,887,981
2,044,931
2,126,965
2,485,961
2,362,514
2,688,672
3,314,749
2,541,698
$149,548
56,988
55,096
72,472
85,380
115,528
131,276
100,460
124,956
176,020
143,208
119,372
164,612
164,612
164,612
244,641
330,435
417,576
462,156
522,538
723,903
802,785
685,171
846,417
639,897
1,182,210
1,096,788
979,908
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,824,687
2,693,961
2,734,522
3,582,595
4,126,803
4,744,530
5,016,398
4,832,257
4,332,297
4,953,024
5,511,861
5,548,044
7,637,713
7,356,866
8,574,884
11,108,335
8,071,747
1912
3,211,907
2,713,535
2,237,042
2,076,601
2,583,469
2,436,101
2,575,275
2,433,540
2,852,535
2,670,314
2,726,793
2,636,740
2,027,843
2,541,212
2,406,094
2,553,416
2,680,608
2,375,060
1,994,493
1,765,471
1,614,629
1,377,177
1,430,042
1,278,380
1,352,301
1,446,243
1,388,507
1,561,084
1,662,027
1,844,745
1,996,000
1,854,749
1,931,950
1,523,021
1,439,092
1,696,350
1,604,480
1,621,268
1,574,006
1,573,572
1,402,313
1,384,138
1,308,284
1,332,874
1,417,209
1,085,657
796,413
690,011
788,658
919,142
825,339
$10,786,812
1RfiO
1913
1014
9,197,460
1Rfi1
7,745,847
1R67
1915 .
1916
7,114,178
1Sfi3
8,900,675
1864
1917 -
8,484,343
1865
1918	
1910
12,833,994
1866
11,975,671
1867
1920. _
13,450,169
1868
1071
12,836,013
1R69
1922
10?3
12,880,060
1870
12,678,548
1871
1924
9,911,935
1872     	
107*
12,168,905
1873
10?S
11,650,180
1874
1927
1928
1070
12,269,135
1875.	
1876 .	
12,633,510
11,256,260
1877
1Q30
9,435,650
1878
1011
7,684,155
1870
103?,
6,523,644
1880 _ _    .
1933
1034
5,375,171
1881
5,725,133
188?
1935
1936
1037
5,048,864
1883
1884
5,722,502
6,139,920
188S
1938
1030
5,565,069
1886
6,280,956
1887
1040
7,088,265
1888
1Q41
7,660,000
1889
1047
8,237,172
1890
1043
7,742,030
1R01
1944
8,217,966
1R07
1945          	
6,454,360
1893
1046
6,732,470
1894
1°47
8,680,440
1895
1048
9,765,395
1896
1040
10,549,924
1897
1950.-      -
10,119,303
1898
1951
10,169,617
1899
1<"7
9,729,739
1900 -
1Q53
9,528,279
1901
10^4
9,154,544
1907
1955-
1056
8,986,501
1903
9,346,518
1904
10*7
7,340,339
1905
loss
5,937,860
1906
10*0
5,472,064
1907
1060
5,242,223
1908
1061
6,802,134
1909
1062
6,133,986
Totals	
1911 .
136,161,251
$569,796,907
1 Quantity from 1836 to 1909 is gross mine output and includes material lost in picking and washing.   For
1910 and subsequent years the quantity is that sold and used.
2 A combined total for 1871, 1872, and 1873 has previously been noted in Annual Reports and the above
breakdown is estimated.
 Table VIIIb.—Quantity1 and Value of Coal Sold and Used2
Mining Division and Period
Total Sales
Used under
Company
Boilers
Used in
Making
Coke
Total Sold and Used
Cariboo—
Total to 1950.  -	
Tons
257
Tons
33
Tons
1
Tons
290
$
1,100
Total to date ...     .	
257    |
33
290
1,100
Fort Steele—
Total to 10M1
31,287,472
7,014,784
619,828
532,289
2,006,789
145,624
14,698
10,788
9,704,778
2,195,744
200,190
191,454
42,999,039
9,356,152
834,716
734,531
166,468,348
1951-60 -	
1061
58,606,978
5,979,805
1962	
5,255,540
Total to date               	
39,454,373
2,177,899
12,292,166
53,924,438
236,310,671
Kamloops—
Total to 1950    	
14,348
739
15,087
59,765
Total to date     .  —	
14,348
739
15,087
59,765
Liard—
Total to 1950
58,417
36,083
2,062
1,389
266
20
58,683
36,103
2,062
1,389
325,395
1951-60..	
1961
	
333,461
17,000
1962                          -   -   .
12,501
97,951
286
98,237
688,357
Nanaimo—
Total to 1950                     	
67,181,037
1,951,075
76,009
83,534
4,280,602
11,071
558,985
72,020,624
1,962,146
76,009
83,534
278,647,173
1951-60                               	
19,134,499
1061
736,814
1967                                 	
801,294
Total to date—          	
69,291,655
4,291,673
558,985
74,142,313
299,319,780
Nicola—
Total to 1950
2,731,340
9,016
159
125
188,884
2,920,224
9,016
159
125
10,985,359
1951-60        	
91,725
1061
1,717
1962
1,375
Total to date	
2,740,640
188,884    1    .
2,929,524
11,080,176
Omineca—
Total to 1950
214,126
202,931
5,850
5,760
4,095
218,221
202,931
5,850
5,760
1,034,134
1951-60                              	
1,616,775
1961
64,024
1962
63,276
Total to date   	
428,667
4,095
432,762
2,778,209
Osoyoos—
Total to 1050
1,177    I
1,122
5,008
Total to date                    	
1,122    |
1,122
5,008
Similkameen—
4,055,080
212,781
346
349,235
4,404,315
212,781
346
18,426,725
1951-60
1,124,226
1961
 .
2,774
1962	
Total to date
4,268,207
349,235    |	
4,617,442
19,553,725
Skeena—
Total to 1950                     	
36
36
116
Total to date-	
36
36
116
Provincial totals—
Total t" 1050
105,543,235
9,426,670
704,254
623,097
6,830,643
156,715
14,698
10,788
10,263,763
2,195,744
200,190
191,454
122,637,641
11,779,129
919,142
825,339
475,953,123
1951-60          	
80,907,664
1061
6,802,134
1962                                   	
6,133,986
Total to date
116,297,256
|    7,012,844
12,851,151
136,161,251
|    569,796,907
1 For differences between gross mine output and coal sold refer to table " Production and Distribution by
Collieries and by Districts " in section headed " Coal " or " Coal-rnining " in this and preceding Annual Reports.
2 The totals " sold and used " include:—
Sales to retail and wholesale dealers, industrial users, and company employees.
Coal used in company boilers, including steam locomotives.
Coal used in making coke.
A 37
 A 38
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
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 STATISTICS
A 39
Table X.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1962
Dividends Paid during 1961 and 1962
1961
Bralorne Pioneer Mines Ltd  $642,040
Cassiar Asbestos Corporation Ltd  2,376,000
Craigmont Mines Ltd       	
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of
Canada, Ltd.   16,380,368
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. Ltd  489,326
Giant Mascot Mines Ltd       	
Highland-Bell Ltd  160,750
Nimpkish Iron Mines Ltd       	
Reeves MacDonald Mines Ltd  467,600
Sheep Creek Mines Ltd  187,500
Others   16,655
1962
$642,540
2,376,000
893,972
18,018,452
582,781
174,387
161,200
860,750
467,600
206,250
10,365
Totals.
$20,720,239      $24,394,297
Dividends Paid Yearly, 1917 to 1962, Inclusive
Year
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
Amount Paid
$3,269,494
2,704,469
2,494,283
1,870,296
736,629
3,174,756
2,983,570
2,977,276
5,853,419
8,011,137
8,816,681
9,572,536
11,263,118
10,543,500
4,650,857
2,786,958
2,471,735
4,745,905
7,386,070
10,513,705
15,085,293
1938    12,068,875
1939    11,865,698
1940    14,595,530
Year Amount Paid
1941   $16,598,110
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
13,627,104
11,860,159
11,367,732
10,487,395
15,566,047
1947    27,940,213
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
37,672,319
33,651,096
34,399,330
40,921,238
32,603,956
22,323,089
25,368,262
35,071,583
36,262,682
24,247,420
14,996,123
16,444,281
1960    20,595,943
1961    20,720,239
1962    24,394,297
Total  $667,560,408
 A 40
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
Table X.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1962—Continued
Lode-gold Mines1
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Arlington _  	
Athabasca  — 	
B ayonne   .
Bralorne Mines Ltd.2  _
Bralorne Pioneer Mines Ltd.2	
Belmont-Suri Inlet    	
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Co. Ltd —
Cariboo-McKinney Con. M. & M. Co.	
Canadian Pacific Exploration (Porto Rico)	
Centre Star  	
Fairview Amalgamated 	
Fern Gold Mining & Milling Co. Ltd	
Gold Belt Mining Co. Ltd  	
Goodenough (leasers) 	
Hedley Mascot Gold Mines Ltd. _ —
Island Mountain Mines Ltd    _	
I.X.L.   	
Jewel-Denero 	
Kelowna Exploration Co. Ltd. (Nickel Plate) —
Kelowna Mines Hedley Ltd. - 	
Kootenay Belle Gold Mines Ltd	
Le Roi Mining Co	
Le Roi No. 2 Ltd 	
Lome (later Bralorne)  	
Motherlode  	
Mount Zeballos Gold Mines Ltd	
Nickel Plate (Hedley Gold Mining Co. Ltd.)	
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C. Ltd.2	
Poorman     —  	
Premier Gold Mining Co. Ltd., 	
Privateer Mine Ltd  	
Queen (prior to Sheep Creek Gold Mines Ltd.)
Relief Arlington Mines Ltd. (Second Relief)	
Reno Gold Mines Ltd  .  	
Sheep Creek Gold Mines Ltd.7 	
Silbak Premier Mines Ltd 	
Spud Valley Gold Mines Ltd. — 	
Sunset No. 2    	
Surf Inlet Consolidated Gold Mines Ltd 	
War Eagle	
Ymir Gold	
Ymir Yankee Girl	
Miscellaneous mines	
Total, lode-gold mines	
Erie
Nelson.
Tye Siding.
Bridge River	
Bridge River	
Princess Royal Island.
Wells	
Camp McKinney..
Nelson  	
Rossi and	
Oliver	
Nelson	
Sheep Creek ,.
Ymir	
Hedley	
Wells	
Rossland	
Greenwood....
Hedley	
Hedley	
Sheep Creek...
Rossland	
Rossland	
Bridge River.
Sheep Creek...
Zeballos.	
Hedley
Bridge River..
Nelson	
Premier	
Zeballos	
Sheep Creek...
Erie 	
Sheep Creek-
Sheep Creek-
Premier	
Zeballos	
Rossland	
Surf Inlet	
Rossland	
Ymir	
Ymir..
Gold 	
Gold	
Gold 	
Gold 	
Gold 	
Gold _ 	
Gold  _
Gold  	
Gold 	
Gold-copper	
Gold...._ 	
Gold	
Gold __ 	
Gold	
Gold ....... _	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold _	
Gold 	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold-copper	
Gold-copper	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold 	
Gold _ _
Gold _	
Gold	
Gold  _
Gold _	
Gold	
Gold _ 	
Gold  ...
Gold	
Gold  	
Gold  	
Gold-copper	
Gold  _...
Gold-copper	
Gold	
Gold 	
Gold 	
$94,872
25,000
25,000
,759,500
,527,425
,437,500
,679,976
565,588
37,500
472,255
5,254
9,375
668,5953
13,731
,290,553
,491,2363
134,025
11,751
,040,000
780,000*
357,856
,475,000
,574,640
20,450
163,500
165,000
,423,191
,048,914
25,000
,858,0755
,914,183
98,674
308,0003
,433,6403
,796,8758
,425,0005
168,000
115,007
120,279
,245,250
300,000
415,0023
108,623
$80,629,295
1 The gold-copper properties of Rossland are included in this table.
2 Early in 1959 Bralorne Mines Ltd. and Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C. Ltd. were merged under the name of
Bralorne Pioneer Mines Ltd., and dividend payments for 1959 and subsequent years are entered under the new
company listing.
3 Includes " return of capital " and " liquidating " payments.
* Former Kelowna Exploration Company Limited; changed in January, 1951.
5 Up to and including 1936, dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company Limited were derived from
operations of the company in British Columbia. Subsequent dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company
Limited have been derived from the operations of subsidiary companies in British Columbia and elsewhere and
are not included in the figure given. In 1936, Silbak Premier, a subsidiary of Premier Gold Mining Company,
took over the former gold operations of that company in British Columbia. Dividends paid by Silbak Premier
are given above.
6 In several years, preceding 1953, company revenue included profits from operations of the Lucky Jim zinc-
lead mine.
1 Since March, 1956, company name is Sheep Creek Mines Ltd.
 STATISTICS A 41
Table X.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1962—Continued
Silver-Lead-Zinc Mines
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc.
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc.
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc.
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Siiver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc.
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc-	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc.	
Silver-lead-zinc
$10,000
Base Metals Mining Corporation Ltd.  (Mon-
Field 	
586,1431
97,200
Greenwood	
48,000
Bell                                                           . ..
388,297
New Denver_  	
Salmo	
25,000
Canadian Exploration Ltd. ,'.,	
11,175,400
5,500
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd.                                       	
Trail
532,679,8222
5,203
Field 	
Smithers	
50,000
35,393
Spillimacheen 	
Cody	
Hall Creek	
179,263
45,668
8,904
132,464
Highland-Bell Ltd	
B eaverdell	
Similkameen	
2,111,840
Horn Silver 	
6,000
400,000
Iron Mountain (Emerald) 	
Jackson  	
Salmo	
Retallack	
20,000
20,000
213,000
50,000
80,000
Sandon	
Slocan City ._	
6,000
10,257
Three Forks _	
70,500
Cody	
71,387
45,088
72,859
Cody	
Kimberley 	
Sandon   	
Slocan City 	
North Star 	
No. One   	
497,901
6,754
110,429
1,438,000
142,2383
Payne 	
Sandon...	
Greenwood   	
Alamo 	
Rambler	
Queen Bess     	
Rambler-Cariboo   ....	
25,000
467,250
4,033,050
334,992
125,490
566,000
637,500
Reco     	
Ruth Mines Ltd.   .
St. Eugene   	
Cody 	
Sandon	
Moyie	
Invermere	
Sandon	
1,267,600
1,715,333
10,365
2,734,688
88,000
Spokane-Trinket...	
Standard Silver Lead _	
Hazelton _ 	
Ainsworth	
Silverton	
Retallack	
Beaton 	
Sunshine Lardeau Mines Ltd	
Torbrit Silver Mines Ltd	
164,000
390,000
64,000
850,000
135,000
20,000
30,867
592,515
278 620
Utica  	
Kaslo	
Wallace Mines Ltd. (Sally)	
Beaverdell	
Silverton 	
Retallack 	
Ainsworth.	
Whitewater        	
70,239
Total, silvp.r-1p.arl-7inr. mines
$565,445,019
1 Includes $466,143 " return of capital" distribution prior to 1949.
2 Earnings of several company mines, and custom smelter at Trail.
3 Includes $10,504 paid in 1944 but not included in the yearly figure.
* These two properties were amalgamated as Silversmith Mines Limited in August, 1939.
 A 42 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
Table X.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1962—Continued
Copper Mines
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Britannia M. & S. Co.i      	
Britannia Beach	
Greenwood 	
Texada Island 	
Merritt 	
Copper Mountain	
Copper	
Copper	
Copper	
Copper  	
$18,803,772
615,399
Cornell     	
8,500
Craigmont Mines Ltd. 	
Granby Cons. M.S. &P. Co.2	
893,972
29,873,226
Copper	
Copper	
Copper	
175,000
Hall Mines    	
Nelson 	
233,280
261,470
$50,864,619
i The Britannia Mining and Smelting Co. Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Howe Sound Company
(Maine), paid the dividends shown to its parent company. On June 30, 1958, consolidation between the Howe
Sound Company (Maine) and Haile Mines Inc. became effective, bringing into existence Howe Sound Company
(Delaware). The Britannia mine became a division of the new Howe Sound Company, and in August Britannia
Mining and Smelting Co. was liquidated voluntarily.
2 The Granby Consolidated Mining Smelting and Power Company dividends commenced in 1904 and cover
all company activities in British Columbia to date. The figure includes all dividends, capital distributions, and
interim liquidating payments, the latter being $4,500,000, paid, in 1936, prior to reorganization.
Coal Mines
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Nanaimo  	
Telkwa  	
Coal.	
$16,000,000
Bulkley Valley Collieries Ltd	
Coal 	
Coal 	
Coal	
Coal 	
24,000
18,536,721
Canadian Collieries Resources Ltd.	
Nanaimo .   	
Nanaimo	
828,271
7,065
$35,396,057
Aggregate of All Classes
Lode-gold mining
$80,629,295
Silver-lead-zinc mining and smelting  565,445,019
Copper-mining  50,864,619
Coal-mining  35,396,057
Miscellaneous, structural, and placer gold  17,851,625
Total
$750,186,615
Note.—The term " miscellaneous " noted in each class of dividend covers all payments of $5,000 and under,
together with payments made by companies or individuals requesting that the item be not disclosed.
In compiling the foregoing table of dividends paid, the Department wishes to acknowledge the kind assistance
given by companies, individuals, and trade journals in giving information on the subject.
 STATISTICS
A 43
Table XI.—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for
Operations of All Classes
Class
Salaries and
Wages
Fuel and
Electricity 1
Process
Supplies 1
Lode-mining2  - —
Placer-mining   	
$42,912,392
169,975
3,123,207
1,829.108
2,864,545
4,632,944
$5,813,426
32.697
307,987
190,235
992,347
2,168,867
$8,755,480
8.519
480,078
„      petroleum and natural gas   	
3,222,413
487,489
1,070,820
Totals, 1962            	
555,522,171
50,887,275
52,694.818
49,961,996
48,933,560
".6,409,050
57,266,026
51,890,246
48,702,746
55,543,490
62,256,631
52,607,171
42,738,035
41,023,786
38,813,506
32,160,338
26,190,200
22,620,975
23,131,874
26,051.467
26,913,160
26,050,491
23,391,330
22,357.035
22,765,711
21,349,690
3 7,887,619
16,753,367
$9,505,559
8.907,034
7,834.728
7,677,321
8,080,989
8,937,567
9,762,777
9,144.034
7.128,669
8.668,099
8,557.845
7.283,051
6,775,998
7,206,637
6,139,470
5,319.470
5.427,458
7,239,726
5,788,671
7.432,585
7.066,109
3,776,747
3,474,721
3,266,000
3,396,106
3,066,311
2,724,144
2,619.639
$14,024,799
Totals, 1961    	
1960    	
1959 	
1958  	
17,787,127
21,496,912
17,371.638
15,053,036
1957	
24,257,177
1956..	
1955	
1954-               	
22,036,839
21,131.572
19,654,724
1953 	
1952-_     .            	
20,979.411
27,024,500
1951...                 	
24,724,101
1950. ..	
17,500,663
1949 	
1948	
1947  	
1946 	
1945	
1944
1943..,    	
1942.              ..                _     ..
17,884,408
11,532,121
13,068,948
8,367,705
5,756,628
6,138,084
6,572,317
6,863,398
1941        	
1940  	
1939    _ 	
7,260,441
6,962,162
6,714,347
1938     	
1937-..            	
6,544,500
6,845,330
1936    	
1935
4.434,501
4.552.730
Grand totals, 1935-62	
$1,072,873,770
$182,207,163
$382,540,119
i In some cases this detail is not available and is included in a total that contains expenditures on fixed assets
plus cost of goods, materials, and supplies not chargeable to fixed assets.
2 Prior to 1962 this included data related to the principal lode metals as detailed in Table I. The lode metals
classed as miscellaneous metals in Table I were previously included under the heading " Miscellaneous Metals
and Industrial Minerals."
Note.—" Process Supplies " include explosives, chemicals, drill-steel, lubricants, etc.
 A 44 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
Table XII.—Average Number Employed in the Mining Industry,1 1901-62
'c
6
lit
u
CL
Lode-mining
H
S5
O
C
u
c
o
U
c
M
U
"33
E
w
a
Coal-mining
Structural
Materials
G
Year
u
n
u
o
-o
<
o
rW
a
c
D
>
o
Si
<
o
H
SJ2
I|
O w
«
o
1905	
	
2,736
2,219
1,662
2,143
2,470
1.212
1,126
1.088
1.163
1.240
3.948
3,345
2.750
3.306
3.710
3,983
3,943
3,694
3,254
3,709
3,594
3,837
4,278
4.174
4.144
5,393
5,488
4,390
4,259
3.679
2,330
2.749
3.618
4,033
5.138
4,341
4,587
5,176
4,978
3.576
808
854
911
2,461
2,842
2,748
3,041
3,101
3,137
3,278
3,127
3,415
2,862
4,432
4,713
5,903
5,212
5,275
4,950
4,267
3,708
3,694
3,760
3.658
4,145
4,191
4,722
931
910
1,127
1,175
1,280
1,390
907
1,641
1,705
1,855
1,661
1,855
1,721
1,465
1.283
1,366
1,410
1,769
1,821
2,158
3,974
4,011
4,264
4,453
4,407
4,805
3,769
6,073
6,418
7,758
6,873
7,130
6,671
5,732
4,991
5,060
5,170
5,247
5,966
6.349
7,922
7,356
7,014
7,759
8,117
2,680|l,303
2,704|1,239
2,567|1,127
2,184|1,070
2,472|1,237
2,435|1,159
2,472|1,364
2.773|1,505
2.741|1,433
2,709|1,435
3,357|2,036
3,290|2,198
2,626|1,764
2,51311.746
8,788
7,712
1908       	
124
122
120
268
170
9.767
1910 -	
9.672
11,467
1911	
10.467
10,967
10,949
1914	
493
647
412
492
843
460
536
376
377
536
931
724
900
652
827
766
842
673
690
921
827
977
1,591
2,120
1,916
1,783
1,530
1,909
1,861
1,646
1,598
1,705
1,483
1,357
1,704
1,828
1,523
324
138
368
544
344
526
329
269
187
270
288
327
295
311
334
413
378
326
351
335
555
585
656
542
616
628
557
559
638
641
770
625
677
484
557
508
481
9,906
1915        	
9,135
1917   	
10,453
10,658
1919  	
9.637
10,225
1920	
299
415
355
341
425
688
874
1,134
1,122
1,291
T.124
1,371
1,303
1.252
1.004
939
489
212
255
209
347
360
348
303
327
205
230
132
199
103
105
67
75
99
2,074
1,355
1,510
2,102
2,353
2,298
2,606
2,671
2,707
2.926
2,316
1,463
1,355
1,786
2,796
2,740
2,950
3,603
3,849
3.905
3,923
3,901
2,920
2,394
1,896
1,933
1,918
3,024
3,143
3,034
3,399
3,785
4,171
3,145
2.644
2,564
2,637
2.393
1,919
1,937
1,605
975
1.239
1,516
1,680
2.840
1.735
1,916
2,469
2,052
1,260
10,028
1921	
2,16316.885
9,215
1926 	
4.712|1,932
4,342|1,807
3.894|1,524
3.828J1.615
3,757|1,565
3,646|1,579
3.814J1.520
3,675|1.353
3,389|1,256
2,95711,125
6,644
6.149
5.418
5,443
5,322
5,225
5,334
5,028
4,645
4,082
3,608
3,094
2,893
2.971
2.814
3,153
2,962
2,976
2,874
2,723
2,360
2,851
2,839
2,430
2,305
2,425
2,466
2,306
2,261
1,925
1,681
1.550
1.434
1,478
1,366
1,380
1,086
1,056
1,182
942
778
9,393
9,767
9.451
10,581
14.172
1927 	
14,830
1928  	
15,424
1929	
966|2,948
832|3,197
581|3,157
542|2,036
531|2,436
631|2,890
907|2,771
720|2,678
1,168|3,027
919|3,158
996|3,187
1,04812,944
1,025|3,072
960|3,555
891|2,835
849|2,981
822|2,834
672|2,813
960[3,461
1.126J3.884
1,20313,763
1,259|3,759
1,30714.044
1,51614,120
1,371|3,901
1,129|3,119
1,09113,304
1,043|3,339
838|3,328
62513,081
618|3,008
64813.034
15.565
1930	
14,032
1631   	
834|2,297
900J2.255
1.335J3.121
1,72914,525
1,497|4,237
1,840|4.799
1,818[5,421
2,266|6,115
2,050|5,95R
2,104|6,027
1,823|5,724
1,504|4,424
1,699|4,093
1,825|3,721
1,750|3,683
1,817|3,735
2,238|5,262
2,429|5.572
2,724|5,75R
2,415|5,814
3,695|7,480
3.923|8,004
2,589|5,734
2,520|5,164
2.553|5.117
2.827J5.464
2,447|4,840
1.809I3.728
380|12,171
1932	
2,628
2,241
2,050
2,145
2,015
2.286
980
853
843
826
799
867
344|10,524
1933       	
408|11,369
1934   	
360|12,985
1935	
754|13,737
825|14,179
1937	
938|16,129
1938	
2,088|    874
2.167|    809
2.175|   699
2,229|    494
1,892|    468
2,240|    611
2,150|    689
1.927J    503
1,773|    532
1,694|   731
1,594|    872
1.7611    545
369|16,021
561|15,890
1940	
647|15,705
1941	
422|15,084
1942	
262|13,270
1943       	
567|12,448
1944	
628|12,314
586|11,820
1945	
1946   	
679|11,933
1947      	
869]14,899
1948         	
754|16,397
1949	
626|16,621
1950	
1,745
1,462
1,280
516
463
401
660|16,612
1951	
491|17,86S
1952        	
529|18,257
634|15,790
584|14,12t?
722|14,102
854|14,539
1953         	
1.154
396
1954         	
1,076|   358
1.100|   378
968|    398
1,020|    360
826|   260
765|   291
8941    288
1956  	
1957	
474[13,257
1958	
446|11,201
1959	
1.761
1,959
1,582
2,238
3,608
3,741
3,367
3,922
459|10,779
1960	
86
1.782
589|11,541
1961	
74|1,785
3511,684
626|3,118|   7051    237
950|3,358     548     228
|   571111,034
1962     	
|    51711,560
.
I
1 Mining industry includes all branches of the mineral industry except petroleum and natural gas.
2 The average number employed in the industry is the sum of the averages for individual companies. The
average for each company is obtained by taking the sum of the numbers employed each month and dividing by
12, regardless of the number of months worked.
 STATISTICS
A 45
Table XIII.—Lode-metal Mines—Tonnage, Number of Mines,
Net and Gross Value,4 1901-62
Year
Tonnage1
Number
of
Shipping
Mines
Number
of Mines
Shipping
over 100
Tons
Gross Value
as Reported
by Shipper2
Freight
and
Treatment2
Net Value
to
Shipper3
Gross
Value of
Lode
Metals
Produced*
1901	
1902	
1903	
1904	
1905	
1906	
1907	
1908	
1909	
1910	
1911	
1912	
1913	
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919	
1920	
1921	
1922	
1923	
1924	
1925	
1926	
1927	
1928	
1929	
1930	
1931	
1932	
1933	
1934	
1935	
1936	
1937	
1938	
1939	
1940	
1941	
1942	
1943	
1944	
1945	
1946	
1947	
1948	
1949	
1950	
1951	
1952	
1953	
1954	
1955	
1956	
1957	
1958	
1959	
1060	
1961	
1962	
926,162
009.010
288,466
461.609
706,679
963,872
805,614
083,606
057,713
216,428
770,755
688,532
663.809
,175,971
,720,669
,229,942
,797,368
912,516
,146,920
215,445
586,428
592,163
447,672
413,912
849,269
775,327
416,411
241,672
977,903
804,276
549,622
354,904
063.775
,141.744
,927,204
381,173
145,244
.377,117
212,171
.949,736
,007,937
,894,844
,786,864
879,851
377,722
705,594
,011.271
762,321
,125,460
,802.482
972,400
,174,617
660,281
.513,865
126,902
827,037
282,436
,402,198
990,985
,242,703
,392,161
,212,106
119
124
125
142
146
154
147
108
89
83
80
86
110
98
132
169
193
175
144
121
80
98
77
86
102
138
132
110
106
68
44
75
109
145
177
168
185
211
217
216
200
126
48
51
36
50
75
97
118
112
119
95
80
63
53
70
59
57
60
67
59
64
78
75
74
76
79
77
72
59
52
50
45
51
58
56
59
81
87
80
74
60
35
33
28
37
40
55
62
49
48
32
22
29
47
69
72
70
118
92
99
92
96
76
32
31
27
32
33
51
54
58
64
58
48
40
34
40
40
28
44
31
39
45
$48,617,920
40,222,237
45.133,788
50,004,909
52,354,870
50,494,041
37,234,070
29,327,114
34,154,917
48,920,971
81,033,093
118,713,859
99,426,678
108,864,792
142,590,427
140,070,389
94,555,069
106,223,833
119,039,285
125,043,590
95,644.930
83,023,111
92,287,277
114,852,061
112,488,918
137,759,188
I
$4,663,843
4,943,754
4.416,919
6,334,611
5,673,048
5,294,637
3,940,367
2,877,706
2,771,292
2,904,130
4,722,010
18,585,183
19,613,185
22,113,431
25,096,743
30,444,575
27,815,152
29,135,673
30,696,044
31.933,681
30,273,900
28,068,396
27,079,911
29,505,158
30,304,050
34,274,698
$38,558,613
27,750,364
29,070,075
34,713,887
21,977,688
10.613,931
7,075,393
13,976,358
20,243,278
25,407.914
30,051,207
43,954.077
35,278,483
40,716,869
43,670,298
46,681,822
45,199,404
33,293.703
26,449,408
31,383,625
46,016,841
76,311,087
100,128.727
79,814,604
86,751.361
117,493,684
106,601,461
66,739,892
77,088,160
88,343,241
93,110,262
65,370,185
54,955,069
65,208,728
85,346,903
82,184,868
103,484,490
$13,287,947
11,136,162
11,579,382
12,309.035
15,180,164
17,484,102
16,222,097
14,477,411
14,191,141
13.228,731
11,454,063
17.662,766
17,190,838
15,225.061
19,992.149
31,483,014
26.788,474
27,595,278
19,756,648
19,451,725
12,925.448
19,228,257
25.348,399
35,538,247
46,200,135
51.508,031
44,977,082
48.281,825
51.720,436
41.292,980
22,900,229
19.705,043
25,057,007
34,071.955
40,662,633
43,813,898
62,950.536
53,878,093
63,554.092
61,735,604
62,607,882
59,694,192
52,651.868
39,369,738
48,724,001
56.653,485
93,124,847
121,696,891
107,775.413
113,464,619
147,646,989
144,151,515
123,619.837
120,829.789
138,145.095
143,546,586
119,409,764
100,591,049
100,549.519
125,674,531
123,913,897
153,378,622
1 Includes ores of iron, mercury, nickel, tungsten, and silica (flux).
2 Data not collected before 1937.
3 Previous to 1937 the shipper reported " Net Value at Shipping Point," no indication being given as to how
the net value was computed. From 1937 on, the shipper has reported " Gross Value," from which deduction of
freight and treatment gives " Net Value."
4 Gross value calculated by valuing gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, mercury (1938-44. 1955), and nickel
(1936-37, 1958-62) at yearly average prices, and iron (1901-03, 1907, 1918-23, 1928, 1948-62) and tungsten
(1939-45, 1947-58) at values given by operators.
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 STATISTICS
A 51
Table XV.—Lode-metal Mines Employing an Average of Ten
or More Persons during 19621
Days
Operating
Tons
Average Number
Employed
Mine
Mill
Mined
Milled
Mine
Mill
Shipping Mines
Bluebell (Cons MiSCo of Canada Ltd.)   	
235
365
320
274
101
365
365
171
365
251
270
310
365
243
154
307
117
313
252
270
251
252
300
365
323
365
263
365
125
365
245
63
365
364
240
80
365
288
359
117
284
3~65
356
258
350
275
237,742
149,998
702,809
40,061
66,449
1,850,252
144,009
82,589
311,443
468,979
501,400
166,430
398,691
14,480
1,835
212,412
62,584
672,008
740
554,699
417,779
2,583,068
1,089,363
369,509
237,742
149,998
716,054
40,061
66,449
1,850,252
144,009
148,055
311,443
468,979
501,400
166,430
384,894
14,480
208,670
62,584
672,008
222
306
118
118
84
372
114
35
132
102
325
80
146
31
11
84
7
36
10
69
87
851
218
24
39
11
36
23
39
45
15
13
25
15
Bralorne Pioneer Mines Ltd. (Bralorne Division).	
Brynnor Mines Ltd. and Kie Mine Co. Ltd.	
17
43
9
3
Craigmont Mines Ltd. (including Pooley Bros.)	
Cowichan Copper Co. Ltd. (Sunro mine)..	
Empire Development Co. Ltd. and Mannix Co. Ltd.
32
17
18
Giant Mascot Mines Ltd. (Pride of Emory mine)	
H.B. (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada Ltd.)       	
24
12
34
27
11
6
12
Mother Lode (Consolidated Woodgreen Mines Ltd.)..
7
33
554,699
417,448
2,583,068
1,103,693
369,509
16
Reeves MacDonald Mines Ltd.	
Sullivan (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada Ltd.)	
19
318
37
39
Non-shipping Mines
Bethlehem Copper Corp. Ltd	
1
Bethlehem Copper—Floods Mining & Aggregate Co.
Ltd  -'     	
Kennco Explorations (Western) Ltd	
i The average number employed includes wage-earners and salaried employees.   The average is obtained
by adding the monthly figures and dividing by 12, irrespective of the number of months worked.
 Departmental Work
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
The Administration Branch is responsible for the administration of the Provincial laws regarding the acquisition of rights to mineral and to coal, petroleum,
and natural gas, and deals with other departments of the Provincial service for the
Department or for any branch.
Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-Mining Recorders, whose
duties are laid down in the Mineral Act and Placer-mining Act, administer these
Acts and other Acts relating to mining. Mining Recorders, in addition to their own
functions, may also exercise the powers conferred upon Gold Commissioners with
regard to mineral claims within the mining division for which they have been appointed. Similar duties may be performed by Mining Recorders with regard to
placer claims but not in respect of placer-mining leases. Recording of location and
of work upon a mineral claim as required by the Mineral Act and upon a placer
claim or a placer-mining lease as required by the Placer-mining Act must be made
at the office of the Mining Recorder for the mining division in which the claim or
lease is located. Information concerning claims and leases and concerning the ownership and standing of claims and leases in any mining division may be obtained
from the Mining Recorder for the mining division in which the property is situated
or from the Department's offices at Victoria, and Room 101, 739 West Hastings
Street, Vancouver. Officials in the offices of the Gold Commissioner at Victoria
and the Gold Commissioner at Vancouver act as Sub-Mining Recorders for all
mining divisions. Sub-Mining Recorders, who act as forwarding agents, are appointed at various places throughout the Province. They are authorized to accept
documents and fees, and forward them to the office of the Mining Recorder for the
correct mining division. Officials and their offices in various parts of the Province
are listed in the table on page A53.
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)
Transcripts of all recordings in Mining Recorders' offices throughout the Province are sent to the office of the Chief Gold Commissioner in Victoria twice each
month, and include the names of lessees of reverted surveyed mineral claims. These
records and maps showing the approximate positions of mineral claims held by
record and of placer-mining leases may be consulted by the public during office
hours at Victoria and at the office of the Gold Commissioner at Vancouver, Room
101, 739 West Hastings Street. The maps conform in geographical detail, size, and
number to the reference and mineral reference maps issued by the Legal Surveys
Branch of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, and the approximate position of mineral claims held by record and of placer-mining leases are
plotted from details supplied by the locators. Provision has been made to supply
the general public, on request to the office of the Chief Gold Commissioner, with
copies of the maps.   The charge for these maps is $1.25 for each sheet.
A 52
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 53
List of Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders in the Province
Mining Division
Location of Office
Gold Commissioner
Mining Recorder
Alberni '
Atlin	
Quesnel	
Clinton -
Cranbrook  	
Golden.	
T. G. O'Neill	
T. R. McKinnon	
F. E. P. Hughes	
R. H. Archibald	
E.L. Hedley	
R. E. Manson	
T. G. O'NeUl.
Atlin.             	
Cariboo  	
Clinton	
Fort Steele	
Golden	
T. R. McKinnon.
F. E. P. Hughes.
R. H. Archibald.
E. L. Hedley.
R. E. Manson.
R. Macgregor.
Kamloops   _	
Victoria  ..
LUlooet	
Nanaimo  	
Nelson  	
New Westminster.	
Merritt  .	
Smithers	
Penticton —
Revelstoke 	
Princeton	
D. Dalgleish  	
R. H. McCrimmon.
E. B. Offln    ...
W. H. Cochrane	
K. D. McRae     	
D. Dalgleish.
Liard 	
LUlooet	
E. B. Offln.
W. H. Cochrane.
K. D. McRae.
J. F. McDonald      	
G. C. Kimberley.
Nicola
T. S. Dobson	
G.H. Beley	
T. S. Dalby 	
W. T. McGruder	
B. Kennelly	
T. H. W. Harding 	
W. E. McLean  	
T. S. Dobson.
G. H. Beley.
T. S. Dalby.
W. T. McGruder.
Similkameen 	
B. Kennelly.
T. H. W. Harding.
Slocan	
Kaslo	
Rossland	
Vancouver	
W. E. McLean.
W. L. Draper.
Vancouver	
J. EgdeU	
G. F. Forbes	
R. H. McCrimmon	
Mrs. S. Jeannotte (Deputy).
G. F. Forbes.
E. J. Bowles.
 A 54
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1962
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 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 55
Coal, Petroleum, and Natural Gas
The Administration Branch is responsible for the administration of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act and for the Coal Act. Information concerning applications for permits and leases issued under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act and
concerning the ownership and standing of them may be obtained upon application
to the office of the Chief Commissioner, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Victoria, B.C. Similar information may be obtained respecting licences
and leases issued under the Coal Act. Maps showing the locations of permits and
leases under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act are available, and copies may be
obtained upon application to the office of the Department of Mines and Petroleum
Resources, Victoria, B.C. Monthly reports listing additions and revisions to permit-
location maps and listing changes in title to permits, licences, and leases and related
matters are available from the office of the Chief Commissioner upon application
and payment of the required fee.
Coal Revenue, 1962
Licences—
Fees       $600.00
Rental  5,419.45
  $6,019.45
Leases—
Fees   Nil
Rental  $94.50
Cash in lieu        Nil
94.50
$6,113.95
At the end of 1962, 27,665,218 acres, or approximately 43,000 square miles,
of Crown petroleum and natural-gas rights, issued pursuant to the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Act, were held in good standing. This acreage, held by operators
ranging from small independent companies to major international ones, comprised:—
297 permits   17,374,307
3 natural-gas licences  84,499
26 drilling reservations  471,487
2,821 leases (all types)   9,734,925
27,665,218
Petroleum and Natural-gas Revenue, 1962
Rentals and fees—
Permits   $2,138,070
Drilling reservations        126,149
Natural-gas licences  2,086
Petroleum, natural-gas, and petroleum and
natural-gas leases     4,916,971
Total rentals and fees     $7,183,276
 A 56
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
Sales of Crown reserves-
Permits 	
  $ 1,208,400
Drilling reservations     3,067,675
Leases     7,088,659
Total Crown reserve sales  $11,364,734
Royalties—
Gas   $1,260,419
OH      2,265,167
Processed products        108,737
Total royalties
Miscellaneous fees	
3,634,323
31,950
Total petroleum and natural-gas revenues  $22,214,283
ANALYTICAL AND ASSAY BRANCH
By S. W. Metcalfe, Chief Analyst and Assayer
Rock Samples
During 1962 the chemical laboratory in Victoria issued reports on 2,163 samples from prospectors* and Departmental engineers. A laboratory examination of
a prospector's sample generally consists of the following: (1) A spectrographic
analysis to determine if any base metals are present in interesting percentages; (2)
assays for precious metals and for base metals shown by the spectrographic analysis
to be present in interesting percentages. The degree of radioactivity is measured
on all samples submitted by prospectors and Departmental engineers; these radiometric assays are not listed in the table below.
The laboratory reports were distributed in the following manner among prospectors who were not grantees, prospectors who were grantees under the Prospectors' Grub-stake Act, and Departmental engineers:—
Samples
Spectrographic
Analyses
Assays
1,674
233
256
1,671
233
91
4,018
538
Departmental engineers  	
830
Totals                         	
2,163
1,995
5,386
Samples submitted to the laboratory for identification are examined by the
Mineralogical Branch of the Department. During the year 101 such samples were
examined.
Petroleum and Natural-gas Samples
Reports were issued on fifty-one samples. Of this number, forty-three were
samples of formation waters from wells being drilled for gas and oil in the Province;
two were samples of wet mud on which water analyses could not be performed;
three were samples of oil; two were suspected oil seeps; and one was a deposit from
• A reasonable number of samples are assayed, without charge, for a prospector who makes application for
free assays and who satisfies the Chief Analyst that prospecting is his principal occupation during the summer
months.   A form for use in applying for free assays may be obtained from the office of any Mining Recorder.
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 57
the engine of a Government vehicle.    Thirty-nine spectrographic analyses were
reported on samples in this category.
Coal Samples
Reports were issued on fifty-five samples of coal submitted by the Purchasing
Commission for proximate analysis and calorific value.
Miscellaneous Samples
Reports were issued on ninety samples of a miscellaneous nature. One hundred
and forty-four assays and thirty-seven spectrographic analyses were reported in this
category.
For the British Columbia Research Council, five coals were ashed and spectro-
chemical determinations of germanium and gallium were made upon the ash; one
deposit in a water system was examined and found to be a mixture of hydrous aluminum oxides; four different cement samples were spectrographed; and pellets of
calcium chloride were spectrographed for minor elements present.
For the Purchasing Commission, two samples of anti-freeze were examined.
For the Department of Agriculture, seven samples of marl were analysed for
their content of oxides of calcium and magnesium; one sample of water was analysed
and the dissolved salts spectrographed.
For the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, a deposit in three plastic
tubes was examined and found to be crystallized paraffin.
For the Department of Highways (Materials Testing Branch), six water samples were analysed; eighteen clays were spectrographed and analysed for sodium
chloride and hygroscopic water, and four other clays were analysed for sodium
chloride only; water-soluble salts were determined in a gravel sample; one crusta-
tion was spectrographed and found to be mainly calcium carbonate; three sediments
were spectrographed—two were found to be clay and one calcium carbonate.
For the Department of Recreation and Conservation (Fish and Game Branch),
the gritty material in a paste and the crankcase oil from a Department vehicle were
examined and found to be corundum in each instance, and the gritty material in a
valve-grinding paste was found to be a mixture of corundum and carborundum.
For the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, the Water Rights
Branch submitted four water samples for determination of phosphorus pentoxide;
the Forest Service submitted one gasoline sample for the determination of its lead
content, and seven gravel samples for the determination of water-soluble sodium
chloride and calcium chloride; the Grazing Division submitted five soil samples for
the determination of arsenic, and one sample of a wood preservative for a determination of the major base metals present.
For the Victoria Metropolitan Board of Health, a residue in water was found
to contain mainly iron.
For citizens of the Province, four water and two salt deposits from a saline lake
were analysed; one clay was identified as illite; one natural-gas sample from the
Sooke River was analysed; one sample of resin was identified; a dark-brown sediment in well water was found to contain mainly manganese; and a chip of wood
stained purple was examined.
X-ray Powder Diffraction Analyses
One hundred and seventeen analyses of this type were performed for identification purposes.
 A 58 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
Examination for Assayers
Four Provincial Government examinations for certificates of efficiency were
held in Victoria during the year, when eight candidates were granted licences to
practise assaying in the Province, six of them after having written supplemental
examinations.
INSPECTION BRANCH
Organization and Staff
Inspectors and Resident Engineers
J. W. Peck, Chief Inspector ; Victoria
Robert B. Bonar, Deputy Chief Inspector of Mines Victoria
L. Wardman, Senior Electrical Inspector of Mines Victoria
E. R. Hughes, Senior Inspector of Mines Victoria
R. J. Craig, Senior Inspector of Mines, Silicosis Control Vancouver
J. E. Merrett, Inspector and Resident Engineer Vancouver
A. R. C. James, Inspector and Resident Engineer Vancouver
J. D. McDonald, Inspector and Resident Engineer Nelson
D. R. Morgan, Inspector and Resident Engineer Fernie
David Smith, Inspector and Resident Engineer Kamloops
W. C. Robinson, Inspector and Resident Engineer Prince Rupert
S. Elias, Inspector, Silicosis Control .Vancouver
The Inspectors are stationed at the places listed and inspect coal mines, metalliferous mines, and quarries in their respective districts. They also examine prospects, mining properties, and roads and trails. The Silicosis Control Inspectors make
dust and ventilation surveys at all mines and quarries.
E. R. Hughes supervised the Department's roads and trails programme and
prospectors' grub-stakes.
Instructors, Mine-rescue Stations
Arthur Williams Fernie Station
W. H. Childress Nelson Station
R. H. Robertson Kamloops Station
W. High (part time)  Cumberland Station
Board of Examiners for Coal-mine Officials
Robert B. Bonar, Chairman and Secretary Victoria
A. R. C. James, Member .Vancouver
D. R. Morgan, Member Fernie
R. B. Bonar, A. R. C. James, D. R. Morgan, and the mine-rescue instructors
for the district in which an examination is being held form the Board for granting
certificates of competency to coal-miners.
An Inspector is empowered to grant provisional certificates to coal-miners for
a period not exceeding sixty days between regular examinations.
Board of Examiners for Shiftbosses (Metalliferous Mines)
Robert B. Bonar, Chairman Victoria
A. R. C. James, Member ___Vancouver
J. E. Merrett, Member Vancouver
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 59
The Board conducts written examinations in various mining centres for applicants for underground shiftboss certificates. The Board is also empowered to grant
provisional certificates without examination under such conditions as the Board
considers necessary.
MINERALOGICAL BRANCH
Field work by officers of the Mineralogical Branch includes geological mapping
and examinations of mineral deposits and studies related to ground-water and
engineering geology. The results are published partly in the Annual Report of the
Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources and partly in a series of bulletins. The
Mineralogical Branch supplies information regarding mineral deposits and the
mineral industry, in response to inquiries received in great number. The activities of
the Branch also include identification of rock and mineral specimens submitted
directly by prospectors and others, or through the Analytical Branch.
Professional Staff
On December 31, 1962, the professional staff included the following engineers
classified as geologists or mineral engineers: H. Sargent, Chief of the Mineralogical
Branch; M. S. Hedley, S. S. Holland, J. W. McCammon, N. D. McKechnie, G. E. P.
Eastwood, J. T. Fyles, A. Sutherland Brown, J. M. Carr, W. G. Jeffery, W. C. Jones,
A. F. Shepherd, and J. E. Hughes. In November, 1961, Dr. Jeffery went on leave
for a year in order to go to Ghana on a Canadian External Aid mission. R. W. Yole
was employed for a month mainly on stratigraphic studies of Palaeozoic limestones on
southern Vancouver Island.
Technical editing of the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum
Resources and of other publications was directed by M. S. Hedley. Copy for printing was prepared by and under the direction of Mrs. Rosalyn J. Moir. Messrs.
Hedley and Holland assisted in directing and supervising field work. Most of the
other members of the professional staff are assigned to mapping the geology of
selected areas and of mineral deposits. Mr. McCammon is responsible for studies
of industrial minerals and structural materials, and Mr. Shepherd for records and
library.
Field Work
A. Sutherland Brown completed mapping the geology of the Queen Charlotte
Islands at the scale of 1:50,000. The area mapped in the past five field seasons,
some 3,840 square miles, excludes the considerable part of Graham Island, where
unconsolidated material completely masks the bedrock.
J. M. Carr devoted the major part of the field season to studying the western
contact of the Guichon batholith over a length of 11 miles, where it is within 1 to 2
miles of the Thompson River, from near Martel northward. Pyrite mineralization
is widespread in the area, and several large gossans in schist are exposed along the
western side of the river. Copper mineralization occurs locally, mainly at the Red
Hills property and near Spatsum. Magnetite in small bodies associated with skarn
is known in a few places close to batholithic rocks.
A considerable part of the season was spent within the Guichon batholith in the
vicinity of Gnawed Mountain mapping part of the margin of the Bethsaida porphyry
stock and the adjacent breccias and copper occurrences. The extent of the stock
north of Gnawed Mountain has not been determined but was found to be less than
had been anticipated.
 A 60 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
Nine properties in the Kamloops-Highland Valley-Merritt area were visited and
data for short notes were collected.
G. E. P. Eastwood spent the major part of the field season mapping the Draw
Creek pit of the Brynnor mine and mapping in the mine belt. Study of the rock
sequences and over-all structure supports lithologic correlation of the major volcanic
sequence with the Karmutsen Group, and the limestone and tuffaceous rocks, including the exposures in Draw Creek pit, with the Quatsino Formation. Recognition of
the dissimilarity of this limestone and the Palaeozoic limestones contributed to this
conclusion.
The remainder of the field season was spent mainly at Zeballos, where the F.L.
magnetite deposit being mined by Zeballos Iron Mines Limited was studied in some
detail and the Ridge and Cordova magnetite deposits were examined. Four days
were devoted to visiting the Power River magnetite occurrences, studying the local
geology, and logging diamond-drill core.
J. T. Fyles mapped the Duncan Lake area at 2,000 feet to the inch, and examined mineral deposits in that area, about 10 miles from east to west and 20 miles
from north to south. Work in this area and in an area including Ainsworth and
extending north on Kootenay Lake was started in 1960.
Replacement lead-zinc mineralization of the type developed at the Duncan
Lake mine appears to be confined to the Duncan anticline, where it is localized in
particular types of dolomite and siliceous dolomite at folds and shears that are subsequent to the main anticline.
Visits were made to five properties outside the area mapped, and data for short
notes were collected.
S. S. Holland continued the study of jade occurrences by examining the occurrences of bedrock and alluvial jade (nephrite) on Ama Creek, a tributary of Bridge
River.
Placer-mining was investigated along Bridge River, and in the Likely-Keithley
Creek, Wells, Beggs Gulch, and Germansen Creek areas.
Lode-mineral property examinations included the Golden Contact on McGil-
livray Creek, the Stella (Endako Mines Limited) south of Endako, the Cariboo Gold
Quartz mine, the Skarn group at Copper Creek, and the Three Hills group at
Skeena Crossing.
A geological reconnaissance was made north of Stewart in the Salmon River-
Cascade Creek area. The conclusion was reached that the volcanic rocks have
undergone more severe deformation and that the structure is probably more complex
than indicated in the published reports. This is an area of great interest for mineral
exploration and prospecting (to the end of 1961 it had produced 11.7 per cent
of the lode gold and 9.6 per cent of the silver produced in British Columbia).
Geological work, prospecting, and production are seriously hampered by the state
of the roads. Early in 1962 a flood on the Salmon River, within Alaska, washed
out some 3 miles of the road by which the area is connected with Stewart. The
road northward from the Silbak Premier mine has been washed out at a point 3
miles south of the Big Missouri mine.
J. E. Hughes carried the studies* begun in 1961 in the eastern part of the
Stone Range westward into the Sentinel Range of the Rocky Mountains and into
the Liard plain. The exposures in a strip along the highway were mapped at 4
miles to the inch from Mile 390 to Mile 520; that is, from Summit Lake near
* A mimeographed summary report on this work may be obtained from the Chief of the Mineralogical
Branch for the sum of 35 cents (plus tax).
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 61
Mount St. Paul to the Smith River. Within this length, six separate sections of
Devonian and adjacent Palaeozoic strata were examined.
W. C. Jones made detailed examinations and mapped two sites for dams
proposed on the lower reaches of Clearwater River.
A start was made in the study of 220 miles of dykes in the lower Fraser
Valley, concerning the stability of the dykes under specified flood conditions.
Both projects are for the Fraser River Board; Mr. Jones acts in an advisory
capacity in the dyke study.
A beginning was made in the study of rock stability in open-pit and underground mines. Most of the open-pit mines now operating and one underground
mine were visited. A study is being made of the use of certain geophysical equipment as a means of evaluating the stability or predicting failure of rock slopes.
J. W. McCammon investigated the following industrial-mineral and structural-
material deposits: Talc south of Cawston; stone and marble quarries, Nelson area;
magnesite at Perry Creek and Brisco; dolomite at Bull River; asbestos at Sidmouth;
limestone near Terrace and near Kennedy Lake. Short visits were made to barite
deposits, Windermere area; asbestos deposits, Cassiar; fluorite-barite showings
along the Alaska Highway; molybdenite deposits at Glacier Gulch, Endako, and
Boss Mountain.
N. D. McKechnie examined numerous mining and exploration operations in
southern British Columbia, including Vancouver and Quadra Islands, and collected
data for reports on fourteen of the properties.
R. W. Yole, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of British Columbia, whose
thesis is on Palaeozoic limestones on southern Vancouver Island, spent a month
for the Mineralogical Branch amplifying data on recognized Palaezoic limestones.
He contributed to correlating the limestone in the Kennedy Lake area, with the
Quatsino Formation considered to be of Upper Triassic age.
An airborne magnetometer survey was made of northern Vancouver Island,
lying west of 127 degrees west longitude. The southern boundary was in part 50
degrees 15 minutes north latitude, and continued southeasterly to include Brooks
Peninsula on the west coast. Our Department shared the flying cost of this project
with the Geological Survey of Canada. The magnetic data are being compiled by
the Geological Survey. This project was undertaken in part to assist in developing
the application of airborne magnetometer surveys in areas of moderate to high
relief.   A nuclear precession magnetometer was used, mounted in a Beaver aircraft. *
PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS BRANCH
The Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch is responsible for the administration
of the " Regulation Governing the Drilling of Wells and the Production and Conservation of Oil and Natural Gas," made pursuant to the Petroleum and Natural
Gas Act. The regulation provides for the use of efficient and safe practices in the
drilling, completion, and abandonment of wells; for the orderly development of
fields discovered within the Province; and for the conservation and prevention of
waste of oil and natural gas within the reservoir and during production operations.
Estimates of reserves of oil and natural gas are made twice a year, at the
end of June and the end of December. Crown reserves for oil and natural gas,
disposed of by public tender, are evaluated prior to sale. Comprehensive records
of all drilling and producing operations are maintained and made available for
♦Eight map-sheets based on this work have been produced and are obtainable from the Department of Mines
and Petroleum Resources, Victoria, or the Geological Survey of Canada, 739 West Hastings Street, Vancouver,
for 25 cents a sheet.
 A 62 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
study, or are published, for the use and benefit of those interested in the development of the oil and natural-gas industry in British Columbia.
Investigations are made of complaints of property damage resulting from
drilling and producing operations and from geophysical-work programmes.
Staff
J. D. Lineham, Chief of the Branch Victoria
R. R. McLeod, Senior Reservoir Engineer and member of the
Board of Arbitration , Victoria
W. L. Ingram, Senior Development Engineer Victoria
S. S. Cosburn, Senior Petroleum Geologist Victoria
K. C. Gilbart, Reservoir Engineer Victoria
G. V. Rehwald, Reservoir Engineer Victoria
P. K. Huus, Reservoir Assistant—  Victoria
M. B. Hamersley, Development Assistant Victoria
D. L. Griffin, Petroleum Geologist Victoria
D. M. Callan, Petroleum Geologist Victoria
J. F. Tomczak, Statistician  Victoria
L. A. Inman, Production Clerk Victoria
G. E. Blue, District Engineer Charlie Lake
H. B. Fulton, Field Geologist Charlie Lake
D. L. Johnson, Field Engineer Charlie Lake
H. A. Sharp, Field Technician Charlie Lake
M. A. Churchill, Field Technician Charlie Lake
D. A. Selby, Field Technician Charlie Lake
The total Branch staff numbered twenty-five at the end of the year, excluding
two unfilled positions, of whom sixteen were employed at headquarters and nine
in the field office at Charlie Lake. Four other persons were employed, in various
capacities, on a casual basis.
Staff Changes
In 1961 there was one resignation from the professional staff and one from
the technical staff.
A. N. Lucie-Smith, former supervisor of the Reserves and Evaluation Section,
resigned on October 15th to move to Australia.
T. A. Mackenzie, former supervisor of the Statistics and Well Records Section,
resigned on August 15th.
J. F. Tomczak joined headquarters staff as statistician on November 21st.
L. A. Inman joined headquarters staff as production clerk on August 20th.
D. A. Selby joined the field staff as field technician on January 16th.
Administration
The Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch was reorganized in 1962 to decrease
the number of sections from five to three. The Reservoir Engineering Section
assumed the responsibilities of the Reserves and Evaluation Section, and those of
the Statistics and Well Records Section were transferred to the Development Engineering Section. The Branch now is subdivided for administrative purposes into
three sections, each of which is headed by a supervisor who is responsible for a
specific phase of Branch work. These sections and respective section heads are
as follows: Reservoir Engineering, R. R. McLeod; Development Engineering,
W. L. Ingram;  and Geology, S. S. Cosburn.
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 63
The field office at Charlie Lake, which includes sample-washing and core-
storage facilities, is under the supervision of G. E. Blue.
Board of Arbitration
Chairman: A. W. Hobbs, solicitor, Department of the Attorney-General.
Members: R. R. McLeod, engineer, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources; S. G. Preston, agrologist, Department of Agriculture.
The Board of Arbitration, responsible to the Minister of Mines and Petroleum
Resources, held no hearings in 1962.
Five applications pending at the end of 1962 were adjourned until 1963 at
the request of the solicitor for the owner. Of four applications concerning right
of entry made in 1962, three were pending at the end of the year, and one was
settled by agreement between parties.
Conservation Committee
Chairman: Vacant. Members: N. D. McKechnie, mineral engineer, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources; M. H. A. Glover, economist, Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce.
A. N. Lucie-Smith was chairman until October 15th, the effective date of his
resignation from the service.
No official business was referred to the Conservation Committee during the
year.
GRUB-STAKING PROSPECTORS
Under authority of the Prospectors' Grub-stake Act the Department has provided grub-stakes each year since 1943 to a limited number of applicants able to
qualify. The normal maximum grub-stake is $300, with an additional amount up
to $200 for travelling expenses. A limited number of experienced prospectors of
proven ability may be granted top priority grub-stakes of as much as $400, plus a
maximum of $300 for travelling expenses, where prospecting is to be done in
approved areas where air transportation is necessary. Items such as guns, fishing-
gear, stoves, boats, and outboard motors are not a legitimate charge against the
grant and must be provided by the applicant. Costly items such as geophysical
survey equipment, mineralights, Geiger counters, berylometers, packsack diamond
drills, two-way radios, horses, and packsaddles are not expendable in any one season
and cannot be accepted at full cost against the grant, but a reasonable rental charge
may be considered.
To qualify at the present time, the Department requires that the applicant shall
be a bona fide prospector holding a free miner's certificate. He must be a British
subject, between the ages of 18 and 70 years, and must have resided in British
Columbia during the year preceding the date of application. He must be able to
identify common rocks and minerals. He should have bush experience and be
physically and mentally fit. He must agree to abide by the regulations which the
Department may make. The grub-staked prospector is provided with maps, a current list of prices of metals and ores, and the latest Departmental information circulars on prospecting and related matters.
It is required that in order to obtain the maximum grub-stake he agree to spend
at least sixty days actually prospecting in the area of his choice in British Columbia
considered favourably by officers of the Department. If he prospects a lesser time,
the grant will be reduced proportionately. The grub-stakes are not intended for
week-end prospecting or for short trips from a home base. The grant is usually
made in two payments: the first at the beginning of the season, and the second after
he has completed sixty days in the field and has submitted a diary.   In the past,
 A 64
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1962
rebates have been recovered from grantees to whom payments have exceeded the
proper amount for the time and effort devoted to prospecting. A field engineer is
employed, who contacts as many prospectors as he is able during the field season
and gives advice and direction to those who need it. Grantees are permitted a reasonable number of free assays.
The grub-stakes are granted with the object of mamtaining the search for mineral occurrences with mine-making possibilities. Any discoveries made, staked,
and recorded are exclusively the grantee's own property. The grants are not intended
for the purpose of exploring and developing occurrences already found, but one
year is allowed to prospect ground that has been staked by a grantee while on a
grub-stake. The grantee must not accept pay from other sources for services rendered during the period credited to the grub-stake.
It is recognized that competent and experienced prospectors are capable of
looking after themselves in wilderness areas. Nevertheless, experience has shown
that less hazard may result when prospecting is done by two or three men in a team.
A man working alone may be injured or be taken seriously ill and, if alone, he may
have to endure extreme hardship and pain.
Grub-stake grantees are not working for the Government but are self-employed
and are not covered under the provisions of the Workmen's Compensation Act.
Therefore, it is recommended that prospectors make their own arrangements concerning insurance coverage to provide for medical and other expenditures that may
be incurred in the event of an accident.
The grants are intended only to assist grantees to go out and prospect and are
not intended for the support of dependents. Therefore, applicants who are married
and have dependents are required to give assurance that their dependents will be
adequately provided for during the time the applicant is absent in the field.
Statistical information covering the grub-stake programme since its inception
is given in the following table:—
Grub-stake Statistics
Field Season
Approximate
Expenditure
Men
Grub-staked
Samples and
Specimens
Received at
Department
Laboratory
Mineral
Claims
Recorded
1943-
1944..
1945-
1946..
1947_
1948..
1949-
1950-
1951-
1952...
1953-
1954-
1955-
1956-
1957...
1958...
1959-
1960_
1961_
1962-
$18,500
27,215
27,310
35,200
36,230
35,975
31,175
26,800
19,385
19,083
17,850
19,989
21,169
20,270
22,000
24,850
21,575
28,115
29,175
26,730
90
105
84
95
91
92
98
78
63
50
41
48
47
47
46
47
38
50
47
52
773
606
448
419
469
443
567
226
255
251
201
336
288
163
174
287
195
358
309
233
87
135
181
162
142
138
103
95
137
95
141
123
183
217
101
211
202
241
325
189
Samples and specimens received from grub-staked prospectors are spectrographed, assayed, and tested for radioactivity. Mineralogical identifications are
made on request.
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 65
Seventy-six applications were received in 1962, and fifty-two grub-stakes were
authorized. Three of the grantees were unable to go out, and they returned their
initial payments. Grantees who were unable to complete the terms and conditions
of the grant received only partial payment. Thirteen prospectors were given grants
for the first time, and five proved unsatisfactory. A few grantees used aircraft for
transportation to their prospecting areas. Three grantees received injuries in the
field but were able to complete the season. One grantee was taken seriously ill and
was unable to continue prospecting; fortunately he was accompanied by a partner
who took care of him and brought him out to receive medical attention.
D. H. Rae again gave able service in interviewing applicants and was able to
contact twenty-eight grantees in the field. The following notes have been largely
compiled from Mr. Rae's observations while the in the field and from information
provided in the diaries of the grantees.
Alberni Mining Division.—In the Nahmint River area a chalcopyrite-magnetite
occurrence was prospected close to a granodiorite-limestone contact; at the headwaters of Handy Creek a granite-limestone contact received some attention. In the
Sarita River valley near Bamfield many mineralized shear zones were observed.
At Mount Blenheim a granite-limestone contact was examined; at the headwaters
of the south Sarita River a large pyritized shear zone was seen and a quartz vein
containing stibnite, in granite. In upper Corrigan Creek valley, near Mount Olsen,
a large shear zone showing a network of tiny quartz stringers mineralized with pyrr-
hotite was uncovered, and along south Corrigan Creek to the headwaters of Nitinat
River a wide sheared quartz porphyry dyke was seen mineralized with quartz, chalco-
pyrite, and pyrrhotite. Some work was done off Dewney and Coleman Creeks near
Alberni Canal, where quartzite containing finely disseminated pyrite and minor
amounts of pyrrhotite and chalcopyrite was prospected.
Atlin Mining Division.—Ten miles west of mile 118 on the Haynes road, mineralization of bornite, chalcopyrite, and minor amounts of hematite was found in an
area underlain by greenstone and quartzite; serpentine containing narrow veinlets
of asbestos fibre was investigated. In the Squaw Creek valley, and near its headwaters, malachite was found in granodiorite; and along a limestone-serpentine contact, good-grade asbestos fibre. Near the head of the main branch of Squaw Creek
a copper deposit was discovered, prospected, and staked. Near mile 87 on the
Haynes road another strong zone, well mineralized with chalcopyrite, was reported,
as well as a large gossan area containing some galena. Near Stuhini Creek several
gossans and heavily pyritized volcanics were prospected. Near Sittakanay Mountain, stibnite float was found and considerable quartz containing scattered pyrite
and limonite. Some work was done close to Mount Manville and at the base of
Mount Strong. At the south end of Teslin Lake, parallel quartz veins in grey granite
showed mineralization of chalcopyrite, cuprite, and native copper, with malachite
and minor bornite. Crystalline limestone in the area showed some free gold. Near
Hall Lake, and close to Dawson Peaks, copper and silver mineralization was found
across good average widths.   Some claims were staked on these showings.
Cariboo Mining Division.—Some work was done on Spanish Mountain, where
quartz veins in alaskite were mineralized with pyrite, galena, and some free gold.
Some work was done in the Willow River area east of Strathnaver, near Barry and
Alces Creeks, and at Stony and Stevens Lakes. Prospecting was carried on at
Dragon Mountain and in the Slough Creek area. Some work was done in the vicinity
of Ahbau Lake. Some work was also done along the Parsnip River, 10 miles southeast of the Hart highway, and around Scovil Flats, Modeste Lake, and Snowshoe
Lake.   In the southern Groundhog area a wide quartz vein carrying fair gold values
 A 66 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1962
was uncovered. Considerable work was done in the valley of Bounding Creek,
which flows northwest into Goat River, and within a 3-mile radius of the junction
of Milk and Goat Rivers.   Nothing of economic interest was found.
Clinton Mining Division.—Some work was done southwest of Kleena Kleene,
in the Bluff Lake area, where gold values were reported, on the west fork of Ho-
mathko River, and adjacent to Tatlayoko Lake. Some work was done in the Poison
Mountain area on rock exposures showing some cinnabar, and cinnabar was panned
from Churn Creek. Considerable work was done between Yalakom River and
Churn Creek. Work was done at Dog Creek, China Gulch, French Bar Creek, Red
Mountain, near Quartz Mountain, and Quartz Mountain Creek.
Fort Steele Mining Division.—A little work was done near Wasa Creek.
Greenwood Mining Division.—Some inconclusive work was done near Wilkinson Creek, Sterling Creek, Campbell Creek, and northeast of Baldy Mountain.
Kamloops Mining Division.—At Copper Creek, on the north side of Kamloops
Lake, a considerable amount of work was done on a wide shear zone in which bornite
and native copper were visible. Five miles east of Savona a great deal of work was
done in an area in which disseminated bornite was found in basalt and copper values
in a syenite dyke. Three miles northwest of Walhachin work was done on a low-
grade copper deposit. Narrow quartz stringers containing minor amounts of galena
were reported east of Black Pool. At Miledge Creek, 17 miles north of Blue River,
some vermiculite was found in mica schist. In the upper Thunder River valley,
quartz veins were found associated with a garnet-skarn rock. At the south end of
Adams Lake heavy sulphides were uncovered in schists. A magnetite deposit near
White Lake was investigated.
Liard Mining Division.—Some work was done in the vicinity of Tatsho Creek
and on the upper Tanzilla River. Southeast of Dease Lake heavily pyritized grano-
diorite and some shear zones were investigated. Between Tanzilla and McBride
Rivers some magnetite float was picked up—search failed to find it in situ. Much
work was accomplished from a base camp on Tucho Lake, at the headwaters of
Denetiah Creek, near the Pitman River divide, and east of Lamarque Pass. Nothing
of commercial importance was reported. Some work was done near Poorman Lake,
up the Blue River where a large sulphide body was uncovered, and some asbestos
float picked up. Careful prospecting within a 10-mile radius of the Cassiar asbestos
mine came up with two finds, one molybdenite and the other asbestos, both of which
are currently under option and being developed. Some work was done close to
Juniper Mountain and Mount Pendleton. Work was also done between the south
end of Dease Lake and Telegraph Creek, around Grass Mountain, Glenora Creek,
and Winter Creek. The headwaters of Racing River was prospected. At the head
of the Iskut River field work was continued near Ealue and Kluea Lakes, and near
Todagin Lake a zone containing considerable malachite stain and disseminated
copper sulphides was prospected.
LUlooet Mining Division.—Some work was done on Peridotite Creek up the
Yalakom River. On Ama Creek on the lower Bridge River, semi-jade was found
along a serpentine-granite contact, and in La Rochelle Creek valley a jade-like
material was found in serpentine. Some short-fibre chrysotile asbestos was found
one-half mile west of Moha and disseminated chalcopyrite in quartz on McKay
Creek on a granite-serpentine contact. On the east side of the Fraser River, 15
miles north of Lytton, some tetrahedrite was reported along a fault zone. Southeast
of Birkenhead Lake a large sulphide zone was found, and in the Gates River valley
interesting values were found in zinc and copper. A shear zone was prospected in
the Phair Creek valley off lower Cayoosh Creek.
1
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 67
Nanaimo Mining Division.—A little work was done up French Creek, where
narrow quartz veins were found in sedimentary rock.
Nelson Mining Division.—Some work was done in the Priest River area, near
Monk Creek, Ripple Mountain, North Star Creek, and Corn Creek.
New Westminster Mining Division.—In the Coquihalla River area some work
was done up Sowaqua Creek. On the east side of Ladner Creek narrow quartz
veins were reported to carry values in silver. Nine Mile Creek valley received some
attention, and near Lear narrow gold-quartz veins were prospected. Some work
was also done near Silverdaisy Creek, near Boston Bar Creek, and in the Anderson
River valley. Some work was done on a sulphide zone on Norrish Creek near Hatzic.
Near Falls Lake off the upper Coquihalla Valley a showing containing minor amounts
of chalcopyrite and molybdenite was found in gneissic granite. More work is
planned on this showing. Molybdenite float was reportedly found in the region of
Jones and Lorenzetta Creeks.
Nicola Mining Division.—West of Stump Lake a mineralized outcrop showing
chalcopyrite, bornite, and tetrahedrite in quartz-carbonate rock was prospected and
staked. Similar showings northeast of Stump Lake were also investigated and work
done northeast of Peterhope Lake. Narrow quartz veins containing minor copper
and molybdenite were uncovered east and south of Nicola Lake.
Omineca Mining Division.—On Huckleberry Mountain (Tahtsa reach) a stock
of monzonite porphyry and its contact rocks were found to contain disseminated
chalcopyrite. This ground will be further investigated. From a base camp on
Chikarnin Creek 2Vi miles from Eutsuk Lake a considerable amount of work was
done. One mineralized contact zone contained pyrite with minor amounts of chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, and magnetite. At the east end of Surel Lake minor amounts
of molybdenite were observed along a contact zone. Some work was also done on
Martin Creek, Musclow Lake, and the south fork of Chikamin Creek. Considerable
detailed information was obtained from a group of young prospectors working from
McDonnell Lake to Coal Creek at the head of the Zymoetz River, south to Burnie
Lake, where large boulders containing pyrite and chalcopyrite were found, and in
the Seven Sisters area. Encouraging signs of mineralization were scarce. At Sinkut
Mountain granite and white limestone were observed. North of Hulatt grey limestone and volcanics were observed; northeast of Endako and in the Stern Lake area
granite and volcanics.
Some work was done near Granite Creek (Manson area), in Skeleton Gulch,
along the Wolverine Range, and on the south side of Germansen Lake. Some work
was also done at Mount Milligan, where quartz veins along a contact were prospected, and in an area east of the Nation River bridge on the Manson Creek road.
Claims were staked on the north slope of Mount Sidney Williams, northwest
of Trembleur Lake, on narrow to fairly wide veins of asbestos fibre in serpentine.
Float of similar mineralization was found a mile from the main showings. More
work will be done in this area.
Considerable work was done west of Smithers, and a low-grade copper deposit
was staked and prospected on the southwest flank of Hudson Bay Mountain.
Osoyoos Mining Division.—Some work was done west of Osoyoos and south
of Richter Pass. Work was done on Mount Kobau, and claims were located near
Apex Mountain in an area where there were numerous outcrops of massive pyrrhotite. From a base camp 20 miles west of Peachland, work was done north of Mount
Kathleen, along Trout Creek, and north of Crescent and Whitehead Lakes. On Tre-
panier Creek several massive sulphide bodies of interest were discovered.
 A 68 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
Revelstoke Mining Division.—An occurrence of molybdenite was reported 30
miles north of Revelstoke, on the Big Bend highway.
Similkameen Mining Division.—On Railroad Creek mineralized sediments were
prospected, and a narrow copper-bearing vein was uncovered. On upper Sutter
Creek pyritized sediments containing narrow veins mineralized with galena and a
wide well-mineralized fracture zone were prospected. Further work in this area is
merited.   Some inconclusive work was done west of Otter Creek and near Hedley.
Skeena Mining Division.—Prospecting was done along the northern coastline
at Porcher Island (Edye Pass), Larcom Island, and Observatory Inlet. On Strohn
Creek, flowing into Meziadin Lake, narrow veins mineralized with molybdenite,
galena, and tetrahedrite were found. Near Mercer Lake, at Athlow Bay, on the
west coast of Graham Island, an attempt was made to locate the source of copper-
iron float. On Kahylskt (Burnt Bridge) Creek east of Bella Coola encouraging
mineralization of molybdenum, lead, and copper was found.
Slocan Mining Division.—Some work was done in the Lardeau district, mainly
at the headwaters of Poplar, Cascade, and Tenderfoot Creeks.
Vancouver Mining Division.—In Jervis Inlet, at the head of Queens Reach,
prospecting was done on Mount Alfred.
Vernon Mining Division.—In Creighton Valley gneissic rock containing minor
amounts of pyrrhotite and pyrite was prospected, and a small amount of work was
done in the Monashee Creek valley. In Whiteman Creek valley search was made
for better-grade deposits of fluorite. Near Sugar Lake work was done in the basins
of Kate, Sugar, Schunter, Specht, and Currie Creeks.
MINING ROADS AND TRAILS
Provision is made in the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources Act
whereby the Minister may, with the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council,
authorize the expenditure of public funds for the construction or repair of roads and
trails into mining areas. Assistance on a half-cost basis may also be provided on
roads and trails to individual properties.
Requests for road and trail assistance must be made to the Department before
the commencement of work. The type of access upon which assistance may be
given depends upon the value of the property, the stage of development, and the
amount of work to be done. A trail is sometimes sufficient for initial exploration,
and a tractor-road may be adequate for preliminary work. Subsequent development might warrant assistance on the construction of a trunk-road. A carefully
drawn sketch or plan of the location of the road is required to be submitted and,
where warranted by the amount of assistance requested, a report on the property by
a professional geological or mining engineer may be required. An engineer from
the Department may be required to report on the property before a grant is made
and to inspect the road after the work has been done.
Total mileages and disbursements under " Grants in Aid of Mining Roads and
Trails " during the fiscal year ended March 31, 1963, were as follows:—
Mining roads and trails—                                        Miles cost
Construction and reconstruction     54 $102,866.93
Maintenance  167 20,227.22
Bridges—
Construction and reconstruction  53,500.00
Maintenance   16,944.45
Total         $193,538.60
 DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 69
In addition to the above, work was continued on the Stewart-Cassiar road.
This road is being constructed under the " Roads to Resources " agreement between
Canada and British Columbia. The construction is supervised by the Department
of Highways on behalf of the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources. At
the north end of the road, construction of the 26.6-mile section from the Tanzilla
River to the Stikine River was completed and a ferry crossing was installed on the
Stikine. The 24.76-mile section from the Stikine River to Eddontenagon Lake was
completed in September, and the 40.12-mile section from Eddontenagon Lake to
Burrage River was 40 per cent completed when work was suspended for the winter
at the end of October. At the south end of the road the Bear Pass contract was
extended to include 3 miles northeasterly from Bitter Creek. At the end of the
season this work was 97 per cent completed. The 31.87-mile section between
Strohn Lake and the lower crossing of the Bell Irving River was 46 per cent
completed.
MUSEUMS
The Department has a large exhibit of mineral and rock specimens in the Douglas Building, Victoria; collections are also displayed in the joint office in Vancouver
and in the offices of the Inspectors of Mines in Nelson and Prince Rupert.
Specimens from the collection in Victoria, accumulated in a period of more
than sixty years, are displayed in cases on the fourth floor of the Douglas Building.
The collection includes specimens from many of the mines and prospects in the
Province, and also specimens of type rocks and special minerals from British
Columbia and elsewhere.
British Columbia material includes specimens collected by officers of the
Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources and specimens donated by property-
owners. The collection also includes type specimens purchased from distributors.
Other valued specimens or groups of specimens have been donated or loaned to
the museum.
ROCK AND MINERAL SPECIMENS
Information regarding collections of specimens of rocks and minerals available
to prospectors and schools in British Columbia may be obtained from the Chief of
the Mineralogical Branch.
PUBLICATIONS
Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources, bulletins,
and other publications of the Department, with prices charged for them, are listed
in the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources List of Publications available
from the Chief of the Mineralogical Branch.
Publications may be obtained from the offices of the Department in Victoria
and elsewhere in the Province. They are also available for reference use in the
Department's library (Mineralogical Branch) at Victoria, in the joint office in Vancouver, and in the offices of the Inspectors of Mines in Nelson and Prince Rupert,
as well as in public libraries.
MAPS SHOWING MINERAL CLAIMS, PLACER CLAIMS, AND
PLACER-MINING LEASES
From the details supplied by the locators, the approximate positions of mineral
claims held by record and of placer-mining leases are shown on maps that may be
inspected in the central records offices of the Department of Mines and Petroleum
 A 70 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1962
Resources in Victoria and in Vancouver. Copies of these maps may be obtained on
request. The boundaries of surveyed claims and leases are shown on the reference
maps and other maps of the British Columbia Department of Lands, Forests, and
Water Resources.
JOINT OFFICES OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES
AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES AND THE DEPARTMENT OF MINES
AND TECHNICAL SURVEYS, CANADA.
The Provincial Department's Inspector and Resident Engineer, the Gold
Commissioner and Mining Recorder for the Vancouver Mining Division, and the
officers of the Federal Geological Survey occupy one suite of offices. All official
information relating to mining is available to the public in the one suite of offices at
739 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 1.
The services offered to the public include technical information on mining, the
identification of mineral specimens, distribution of Federal and Provincial mining
publications, a reference library, a display of rocks and minerals, and a central
records office.
 Topographic Mapping and Air Photography
Under the direction of the Surveyor-General, the Surveys and Mapping Branch
of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources is responsible for official
maps and Crown land surveys. The following paragraphs outline a few achievements of the Legal Surveys, Topographic, Geographic, and Air Divisions of the
Surveys and Mapping Branch during 1962.
The Legal Surveys Division received field notes covering twenty-three lots
surveyed under the Mineral Act and 598 lots surveyed under the Land Act. New
large-scale (mostly 1 inch to 500 feet) composite maps showing subdivision surveys
were prepared for the Gulf Islands (forty-six sheets), Revelstoke (four sheets),
Smithers (four sheets), Burns Lake (three sheets), and Hazelton and Clinton (one
sheet each). Field work recorded by Legal Surveys Division included town lot
surveys of six lots at Savona, six at Sointula, one at Westbank, and eight at the
University of British Columbia. Rural lot surveys were undertaken at Ootishenia,
Nelson, Pemberton, Tulameen, Howser, 100 Mile House, Cheakamus, and Isle
Pierre.
One field crew of the Topographic Division established survey control for
fifteen standard National Topographic map-sheets in the vicinity of Babine, Takla,
Nation, and Germansen Lakes, while another crew operating from the motor-vessel
" B.C. Surveyor " completed photo identification of 236 triangulation stations from
Jervis Inlet to Douglas Channel. Also twenty-three new second-order control
stations were established in the lower Fraser Valley between Chilliwack and
Vancouver. Among the large-scale mapping projects completed were Liard River
(sixty-eight sheets at scale of 1 inch to 1,000 feet), Stuart Lake Pondage (nine
sheets at 1 inch to 1,320 feet), McGregor River Pondage (six sheets at 1 inch to
1,000 feet), and Skeena River (eleven sheets at 1 inch to 500 feet).
New maps reproduced and printed by the Geographic Division numbered eight
in 1962. Northwest British Columbia, the sixth and final sheet of the l-inch-to-10-
miles regional series, was published in three editions. These were: Map 1b (plani-
metric), Ibl (landforms in grey or light sand), and Ibls (special brown land-
forms). New seven-colour National Topographic sheets showing up-to-date land-
status detail and contours were printed at 1:250,000 scale for Victoria (92 B-C),
Alberni (92 F), and Vancouver (92 G), and at l-inch-to-2-miles scale for Creston
(82F/SE), and Slocan (82F/NW).
Federal Government mapping agencies reproduced seven Provincial topographic manuscripts; sixty black, blue, and white provisional sheets; and sixty-
three full-colour National Topographic maps, all at 1:50,000 scale.
A modest increase in the price of maps was made in November. However,
further adjustments were anticipated in 1963 to conform with price changes to
become effective January 1, 1963, for maps printed by the Federal Government.
Slightly under 20,000 aerial photographs were exposed by the Air Division.
Among the special projects completed were eighty-one photographs of Strathcona
Provincial Park for the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources. Mining
and oil and natural-gas companies accounted for 12,052 aerial photographs borrowed or purchased from the Air Division in 1962. This represents nearly one-
third of the total volume of loans and reprints to the general public.
The mapping and compilation sections of the Air Division continued to produce
interim sheets at l-inch-to-20-chains scale for the Surveys and Inventory Division
A 71
 A 72
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1962
of the Forest Service.   Sixty final tracings, covering 2,875 square miles of cadastral
detail, were completed for public distribution.
Indexes 1 to 18 showing published maps, air-photo cover, Departmental
reference maps, and manuscripts are contained in the envelope attached to the back
cover of the 1962 Annual Report of the Lands Service and Water Resources Service.
Further inquiries may be made to the Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch,
Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources, Victoria, B.C.
 Department of Mines and Technical Surveys
The Canadian Government Department of Mines and Technical Surveys performs many functions related to mining and the mineral industry in general. The
Mines Branch, Geological Survey of Canada, Surveys and Mapping Branch, and
Mineral Resources Division are services of the Department of direct interest to the
mineral industry. Brief reference to the work of the Surveys and Mapping Branch
in British Columbia is made in the preceding note headed " Topographic Mapping
and Air Photography." A note on the Geological Survey of Canada follows this
paragraph and is followed by notes on the Mines Branch and the Mineral Resources
Division.
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA
By an arrangement made at the time the Province of British Columbia entered
Confederation, geological investigations and mapping in the Province are carried
on by the Geological Survey of Canada. Several geological parties are in the field
each year. Many excellent reports and maps covering areas of British Columbia
have been issued by the Geological Survey of Canada, and they have made available
a great amount of information that has been of much benefit to the mining and
prospecting activities in British Columbia.
A branch office of the Geological Survey of Canada is maintained in Vancouver. Maps and reports on British Columbia can be obtained there. J. E. Armstrong is in charge of this office at 739 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 1.
Field Work by Geological Survey of Canada in British Columbia, 1962
A. J. Baer commenced field work in the Bella Coola (93 D) map-area.
R. B. Campbell completed field work in the Quesnel Lake East Half (93 A,
E. V2) map-area, and began work in the Adams Lake West Half (83 M, W. V2)
map-area.
R. J. Fulton completed his study of the surficial geology of the Nicola (92 I,
E. V2) map-area.
E. C. Halstead continued the study and mapping of the surficial geology of the
Nanaimo and Gulf Islands map-areas (92F/1, E. V2, G/4, C/16, B/13, B/14).
W. W. Hutchison worked in Prince Rupert East Half (103 J, E. V2) and Port
Essington West Half (103 I, W. V2) map-areas to obtain information to aid in a
forthcoming systematic study of the Coast Mountains.
D. W. Hyndman completed his study of sedimentary and metamorphic rocks
in the Nakusp (82 K/4) map-area.
E. J. W. Irish completed field work in the Halfway River (94 B) map-area.
S. F. Learning completed field work in a study of sand and gravel deposits of
the Strait of Georgia area.
H. W. Little completed mapping of the Rossland-Trail (82 F/4) map-area.
B. R. Pelletier continued his Triassic stratigraphic and sedimentation studies
in the Halfway River (94 B) and Trutch (94 G) map-areas.
P. B. Read began a study of the eastern contact of the Kuskanax batholith in
the Poplar Creek (82K/6) map-area.
J. E. Reesor for part of a season continued his studies of granite and associated
metamorphism in southern British Columbia.
D. F. Sangster completed a study of magnetic iron-ore deposits in coastal
British Columbia.
A 73
 A 74
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
D. F. Stott continued his study of Lower Cretaceous stratigraphy in northeastern British Columbia.
H. W. Tipper continued mapping the Taseko Lakes (92 O) map-area.
S. Washkurak and others, in co-operation with the Department of Mines and
Petroleum Resources, made an aeromagnetic survey of northern Vancouver Island
north of 50 degrees and west of 126 degrees 30 rninutes.
J. O. Wheeler began mapping the Big Bend East Half (82 M, E. Vi) map-area.
W. J. Wolfe made a study of metamorphism of the Blue River ultramafic intrusion in the Cassiar district (parts of 104 O and 104 D quadrangles).
Publications of the Geological Survey
A total of thirty-two publications of the Geological Survey of Canada relating
to British Columbia was received by the British Columbia Department of Mines and
Petroleum Resources in 1962.
MINES BRANCH
The Mines Branch has branches dealing with mineral dressing and process
metallurgy, physical metallurgy, radioactivity, and fuels and explosives. A total of
nineteen publications of the Mines Branch pertaining to British Columbia was received in 1962 by the British Columbia Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources. They included tabular pamphlets dealing with coal mines, gold mines, stone
quarries, petroleum refineries, and milling plants in Canada.
MINERAL RESOURCES DIVISION
The Mineral Resources Division, which was a division of the Mines Branch,
has now been transferred from the Mines Branch to the office of the Deputy Minister
of Mines and Technical Surveys.
The Mineral Resources Division publishes studies on mineral resources, mineral economics, mineral legislation, mineral taxation, mining technology, and other
miscellaneous mineral-industry subjects. A total of three publications published
by this Division was received by the library.
 LODE METALS 71
the western slope of Sophie Mountain, 11 miles from Rossland on the Rossland-
Cascade highway.
Mining was done on No. 7 and No. 8 levels. The operation shut down on
April 30, 1962. A total of 2,002 tons of ore was treated at the concentrator,
operating on a one-shift basis for a total of seventy-eight days. The concentrate
was shipped to the Tacoma smelter. The average number of men employed was ten
for a period of four months.  The lease on the property has been dropped.
(49° 117° S.W.)    The Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Grey (The Con-     Company of Canada, Limited, holds ten recorded claims—
solidated Mining    Grey 1 to 10, inclusive—and four under mineral lease.  The
and Smelting Com- property is approximately 2 miles northwest of Rossland, on
pany of Canada,    the lower east flank of Granite Mountain and the north flank
Limited) of Red Mountain.  Access is by means of a road leading from
Rossland to the Red Mountain Ski Lodge. Three men were
employed under the direction of D. W. Heddle doing geological mapping, magnetometer surveying, and electromagnetic surveying.
Gold TRAIL*
(49° 117° S.W.)    This property, owned by W.D. Mining
W.D. Company Limited, was optioned by Casino Gold Mines
Limited from June to September, 1962.   The property was
then bought by F. Donelly, A. Pompu, and R. Ernewin, all of Trail.  The property
is on the west side of the Columbia River, 5 miles south of the old Trail bridge along
the Casino road.
The mine is situated at the east end and on the south side of a westerly trending
intrusion of monzonite, which lies between the Nelson plutonic and Rossland volcanic rocks. The gold occurs in a series of narrow quartz veins which occur along
the north-dipping contact of the monzonite with tuffs on the south. Steep north-
dipping rhyolite dykes can be observed in the mine. Minor mineralization of galena,
sphalerite, pyrite, and arsenopyrite occur with the quartz. Where arsenopyrite
occurs, gold assays up to 3 ounces per ton are obtained. Production for 1958,
1959, and 1960 was 1,435 tons, containing 796 ounces of gold and 272 ounces
of silver.
Casino made a geological survey of the property. In addition, some development work was done on No. 1 level and five diamond-drill holes were drilled from
No. 1 level. The property was managed by R. Ernewin. A total of 959 tons of ore
was shipped to the Trail smelter. An average crew of five men was employed for
four months.
The new owners, F. Donelly, A. Pompu, and R. Ernewin, started mining in
October. Sloping was done above No. 1 level, and 533 tons of ore was shipped to
the Trail smelter.  Two men were employed for three months.
„ NELSONf
topper
(49°  117° S.E.)    This property consists of two Crown-
Queen Victoria     granted mineral claims and seven claims held by record, all
(Great West Mining in the name of Guaranty Trust Co. of Canada, 624 Howe
Corporation Ltd.)   Street, Vancouver.    It lies about Wi  miles northeast of
Beasley and east of Garrity Creek, some 8 miles west of
Nelson.   A road connects the workings with the Nelson-Trail highway.
• By J. D. McDonald.
t By N. D. McKechnie.
 72
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1962
Surface and near-surface workings were made between 1906 and 1927. The
Annual Report for 1961 contains an account of developments since.
In 1962 twelve diamond-drill holes were drilled by Great West Mining Corporation Ltd., of Vancouver, under the direction of F. L. C. Price—six in the vicinity
of the workings and six in a group about 2,000 feet west-southwest of the workings.
The geology in the vicinity is described in Paper 52-13 and Memoir 308 of the
Geological Survey of Canada. The property description on page 35 of the Paper
is reproduced in the Memoir.
The property is in an inclusion in Nelson granodiorite of sedimentary and meta-
morphic rocks about 1V2 miles long in a northeast direction and from one-quarter to
Dalum: mean sea level
SECTION   A-A
I   °?      ■■■■-: ■    .      ,>^;Jj.,0?i:	
:ioo.,        ..  .
A
r-J 1
•••Kv:
LEGEND ' *'"*-*
Nv!aW3 Diorile porphyry
f^gSISkarn
r^rniQuorlzite
^^Gneiss Scaled
"...vFouH
&&3M Aditf*"    ■■'m   ';■:'
'"''=-s£?.-. :■ .. «I2787' '"•'J}"      &
AdiiJ*.:.:-«.;'-,
60 120
I20r-      ,
-   reet
Figure 5. Queen Victoria mine—plan and section.
 LODE METALS 73
one-half mile wide. The age of the rocks is uncertain. Paper 52-13 correlates them
tentatively with the Hall Formation, Middle Jurassic and (?) later; Memoir 308
refers them to a range of probably not older than Carboniferous, but possibly in part
Jurassic.
The geology in the vicinity of the workings is illustrated on Figure 5. The
principal showings and the workings are in a body of garnet-epidote skarn having a
strike of north 15 degrees east and a dip of 20 degrees eastward. The skarn lies in
dark-grey quartzites near their contact with gneiss and greenstone of the Bonnington
complex. Locally, the skarn is in contact with rocks of the complex. Westward,
up dip, the skarn pinches out and another and similar skarn appears in echelon to
the right. Eastward, down dip, the skarn also narrows but terminates against a
fault. However, there is a small exposure of skarn, again in echelon to the right,
about 50 feet lower in elevation than the floor of a small open stope. The skarn at
the eastern end, where the small stope was opened, terminates against faults as
shown. It is not certain that this skarn is part of the main skarn body to the west;
the skarn at the stope contains a very considerable proportion of amphibolite and
little calcite, whereas the skarn west of the fault is rich in calcite and amphibolite is
less prominent.
Sills and minor dykes of diorite porphyry cut sediments and skarn. A little
epidote was seen in the porphyry but no sulphides.
Mineralization consists of chalcopyrite and pyrite with minor bornite and magnetite and is confined to the skarn. The distribution seems erratic. A high-grade
section is exposed about 200 feet west of the upper adit, but it fades into more or less
barren skarn without evidence of a controlling structure within the skarn.
Two post-mineral fault zones strike nearly north-south and dip at 70 degrees
and 55 degrees or less east. The zone at the east end of the skarn bounds the stoping
area; the direction and magnitude of movement are not known. The fault toward
the western end of the skarn has an apparent normal movement. Drill-core intersections with the gneiss on either side indicate a throw of some 30 feet; the other components of the movement are not known. Three more or less north-south striking
faults are exposed east of the workings, as shown on Figure 5.
About 2,000 feet west-southwest of the workings and at nearly the same elevations, six holes were drilled. Of these, four indicated a body of skarn about 40 feet
thick striking a little east of north, dipping flatly eastward, and mineralized with
chalcopyrite and pyrite. The strike length so exposed is about 150 feet. The skarn
pinches westward about 200 feet up dip. The relationship to the principal showing
is not known.
YMIR*
Gold-Silver-Lead-Zinc
(49° 117° S.E.)    Company office, 3669 West Thirty-fifth
Yankee Dundee    Avenue, Vancouver 13.   J. D. Lippmann, president.   Capital:
(Cayzor Athabaska 3,500,000 shares, no par value.   D. C. Smith, exploration
Mines Limited)     superintendent.   Cayzor Athabaska Mines Limited has the
property under option from Yankee Dundee Mines Limited.
The 5- by 12-foot two-compartment raise was continued to the 1625 level of the old
workings.   The raise, which followed the vein at approximately 70 degrees, is 471
feet long, of which 325 feet was driven in 1962.   This work was done by Golac
Tunnel and Drilling Contractors, of Nelson.   An average crew of five men was employed from January to August.
• By J. D. McDonald.
 74 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1962
In the raise, ore and marginal ore were found along a slope distance of 309 feet,
from 162 feet to breakthrough at 471 feet. The oreshoot is very irregular in both
width and grade. Systematic samples were taken over 4- to 5-foot widths. In the
old workings some geological work was done in the Dundee 1200 level winze and the
Yankee Girl 1200 level winze, which were rehabilitated sufficiently to enter. No
work was done in the last five months of 1962.   The option remains in force.
Lead-Zinc
Oxide (New Jersey Zinc Exploration Company (Canada) Ltd.).—(49° 117°
S.E.) This company drilled two diamond-drill holes on the Oxide property, 4 miles
east of Ymir.   A total of 669 feet was drilled.
SALMO*
Erie Creek (49° 117° S.E.)
Gold
This property is leased by G. D. Fox, 1396, 3307 Dahlia
New Arlington      Crescent, Trail, from J.  Russell, Borrega Springs, Calif.
Other lessees are F. Singer and S. Hadler.   The property is
on Rest Creek, 7 miles by road from Salmo.   The lessees, working part time, mined
and shipped 277 tons of ore.
Sheep Creek (49° 117° S.E.)
Silica
K. Belle Enterprise Company Limited, Linden, Alta., has
Kootenay Belle under lease the waste dumps of the old Kootenay Belle mine
from M. Arishenkoff, of Shoreacres. The dump material is
shipped to the Trail smelter for flux, and the gold content is paid for in addition to
the silica. Material was stockpiled near Salmo for shipment during the winter
months. A front-end loader and one truck were used to load and haul the silica
rock to Trail.   Total shipped:   8,712 tons.
F. R. Rotter, of Salmo, is shipping silica rock from the Queen
Queen waste dumps to the Trail smelter for flux, having leased the
mine dumps from Sheep Creek Mines Limited.   This silica
rock is shipped solely as flux material, and no gold content is paid for.   A front-end
loader and truck were used to load and haul the silica rock to Trail.   Total shipped:
19,605 tons.
Aspen Creek (49° 117° S.E.)
Lead-Zinc
Company office, Trail; mine office, Salmo.   D. S. Campbell,
H.B. (The Con-     property superintendent;  R. R. McMichael, mine superin-
solidated Mining    tendent; P. Conder, mill superintendent.   The H.B. mine is
and Smelting Com- on the west side of Aspen Creek, with the main camp on the
pany of Canada,    north side of Sheep Creek, 7 miles by road from Salmo.   The
Limited) ore occurs as lead-zinc replacement of dolomite.   The main
production comes from the No. 1 and No. 2 orebodies, in
which the ore is mined by long-holing from sublevels on the hangingwall and foot-
wall, and is scraped to ore-passes from slusher drifts. The total long-hole footage
for the year was 79,030 feet.   The pillars have been removed from the No. 1 ore-
• By J. D. McDonald.
 LODE METALS 75
body and are included in the long-hole tonnage. This type of mining accounted for
64 per cent of the total production. The remainder is mined in flat-lying orebodies
named X-l and X-2, and No. 4 orebody. Mining is done by slashing and benching
with jacklegs, using a panel system of pillars and stopes. Development: Drifting
and crosscutting, 217 feet; sublevels, 3,530 feet; raising, 2,156 feet; total, 5,903
feet. AN/FO explosive is being used for blasting in all mining except long-holing.
At the end of the year this was 75 per cent of the explosives used.
Underground diamond drilling was 15,963 feet, and surface diamond drilling
was 1,831 feet. Exploration was done from the No. 7 tunnel. The concentrator
treated 468,979 tons of ore during 1962, an average of 39,081 tons per month. This
was the highest in the West Kootenay area. The average number of men employed
was 112, fifty of whom were employed underground.
The mine-rescue team competed in the West Kootenay competition. There
were no lost-time accidents over six days during 1962. This is a continuation of
the outstanding safety record which the H.B. mine has had over the past five years.
T     ,„. Iron Mountain (49° 117° S.E.)
Lead-Zinc
Head office, 700 Burrard Building, Vancouver; mine office,
Jersey (Canadian    Salmo.   R. G. Weber, mine manager; J. W. Robinson, mine
Exploration superintendent;   R. W. Gould, mill superintendent.    This
Limited) company is a wholly owned subsidiary of Placer Development
Limited. The property is reached by two roads which leave
the Nelson-Nelway highway 4 and AV2 miles respectively south of Salmo, the north
road being the main access road. The lead-zinc concentrator is beside the Nelson-
Nelway highway and is served by a conveyor system from the underground crusher
at the mine. The mine, offices, and camp are located on the summit between Sheep
Creek and Lost Creek.
All production came from the Jersey lead-zinc mine. The majority of production is now coming from relatively thin and locally steeply dipping beds, and is
being mined by conventional open stoping with jacklegs and slushers above the
trackless mine, and is hauled from chutes or loading points to the coarse-ore bin on
surface. The trackless production was 276,297 tons; the remainder was 18,931
tons from the track mine, 13,108 tons from the open pit, and 25,296 tons from
pillar recovery.
The pillar recovery programme is continuing on the retreating basis. Stope
backs are standing up well, with the large spans being left after pillar removals.
To assist the management in assessing rock stresses in pillar removal, C.I.M. Consultants, of Toronto, did some rock mechanics work at the Jersey. Three methods
of rock stress observation were employed: visual observation, rock bolt dynamometers, and photoelastic strain gauge disks. The main programme consisted of
using the strain gauge disks. The disks are cemented to the rock with a special
cement in predetermined locations. The direction of stress or changes in the intensity of stress can be read visually with the use of a polaroid glass. Three separate
areas of the mine were instrumented with disks, which were read regularly and the
readings noted. There were no sudden changes in the readings, and in general they
indicated very little change in rock stress patterns.
Total development was 7,722 feet, consisting of 1,282 feet of 16- by 16-foot
drifting, 5,832 feet of subdrifting, and 608 feet of raising.
AN/FO explosive was in continued use during the year and constituted 55 per
cent of the total explosives used.
 76 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
Surface exploration consisted of geological mapping, diamond drilling, and
stripping. Two diamond-drill holes were drilled on the Otter group of claims on
the east side of fifty-six Crown-granted claims which comprise the company's holdings on Iron Mountain. These holes were vertical, and the total footage was 2,497
feet. On the west side of Quartzite Ridge two holes were drilled, one on the TK5
mineral claim and the other on the Mastadon mineral claim, with a total footage of
1,781 feet. Bulldozer stripping was done in selected areas on the TK and Truman
groups of mineral claims.
The concentrator treated 384,894 tons of ore during 1962. Concentrates were
shipped to the Bunker Hill smelter at Kellogg, Idaho.
The mine-rescue team competed in the West Kootenay Mine Rescue Competition at Riondel. The property continued its excellent safety record of the past four
years, having only one lost-time accident over five days during 1962. The average
number of men employed was 154, of whom fifty-five worked underground.
NELWAY
Lead-Zinc
(49° 117° S.E.) Company office, 410 Metropolitan Build-
Reeves MacDonald ing, 837 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 1; mine office,
Mines Limited* Remac. L. M. Kinney, Metaline Falls, Wash., general manager; F. R. Thompson, manager; W. Pollock, mine superintendent; J. M. McDearmid, mill superintendent. Capital: 3,000,000 shares, $1
par value. The Reeves MacDonald mine is on the Pend d'Oreille River, on the
Nelway-Waneta road 4 miles west of Nelway. Lead-zinc replacement orebodies in
limestone have been developed from the 1900 main haulage level.
The major development and stoping is below the 1900 level in the Reeves
orebody. There was no tonnage from the O'Donnell orebody. Mining has been
completed in the B.L. orebody. In the No. 4 orebody, tonnage is being produced
on a small scale. Mining is done with long-hole machines, drilling down-holes from
horizontal slots. These slots are slashed to the ore outline and are at 50-foot intervals. On three levels, instead of slashing a horizontal slot, hanging and footwall
subdrifts have been driven and the drilling done from the sublevel. In all cases, a
vertical slot is taken out along the main longitudinal pillar and the down-holes are
blasted to the vertical slot. Drilling is done with 2 Ms-inch (73,710 feet) and 3-inch
(36,361 feet) tungsten carbide bits.
The No. 3 shaft, inclined at 55 degrees, is the main production shaft for the
Reeves orebody below the 1900 level. This shaft was extended another 408 feet to
the 60-foot elevation. This will be bottom for No. 3 shaft as drilling has indicated
a fault zone at the 60-foot elevation known as the Reeves fault. The sinking was
done under contract, and mucking was done with a Cryderman mucker mounted
in the centre compartment. Scram levels will be established at the 650- and 220-
foot levels.
Total development, excluding shaft sinking, was 7,172 feet, consisting of
primary drifting, 2,313 feet; sublevels, 2,189 feet; raising, 1,900 feet; slot raise,
638 feet; shaft stations, 60 feet; sump, 72 feet. A new haulage drift on the 1900
level was completed, connecting the main haulage directly to the coarse-ore bin.
This eHminates the surface track from the 1900 level adit to the coarse-ore bin.
Underground diamond drilling was 4,561 feet. Surface drilling was 2,430 feet
on the company's claims on the south side of the Pend d'Oreille River opposite the
mine. Three holes were drilled to check anomalies found from a geochemical survey.
* By J. D. McDonald.
 LODE METALS 77
The concentrator treated 417,448 tons of ore during 1962. Zinc concentrates
were shipped to the Trail smelter. Lead concentrates were shipped to the smelter
at Kellogg, Idaho. The number of men employed, including staff, was 115, of whom
fifty-two worked underground.
(49° 117° S.E.)   This property, comprising sixteen Crown-
Red Bird (The Con- granted mineral claims and fractions, is held under option by
solidated Mining    The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada,
and Smelting Com- Limited.   Fourteen recorded claims, held by Consolidated
pany of Canada,    adjacent to the Red Bird group, are included in the group.
Limited)* The property is on the south side of the Pend d'Oreille River
and adjacent to claims belonging to Reeves MacDonald
Mines Limited. It is accessible by 14 miles of road north from Metalline Falls,
Wash., to the International Boundary (via the Gardner Cave-Frisco Standard road)
and then approximately 2 miles to the No. 1 adit. A geological description of the
property is contained in British Columbia Department of Mines Bulletin No. 41.
Recent exploration by the Consolidated company has been directed toward
finding primary sulphide mineralization beneath zones of rusty gossan carrying
secondary lead and zinc minerals which are exposed on surface and in the No. 1
adit. On the basis of regional geological studies and the experience at the Reeves
MacDonald mine, it is expected that the longest dimension of mineralized zones on
the Red Bird will be parallel to the plunge of the lineations and dragfolds in the
surrounding rocks. These plunge at moderate angles to the southwest. It is also
expected that limestone and dolomite on the property occur in a moderately plunging isoclinal syncline which is open to the west. Not enough work has been done
to prove or disprove these conclusions. In extending the No. 1 adit and in diamond
drilling, an interlayered sequence of limestone and mica schist was encountered.
The rocks resemble infolded parts of the Reeves limestone and underlying Truman
member. They are offset by a number of northerly trending cross-faults. No sulphides have been found, and oxidized material continues to an elevation of 2,260
feet above sea-level or 1,070 feet below the surface.
A total of 692 feet of drifting and crosscutting done under contract was completed in September.  An average crew of nine men was employed for three months.
On completion of the development, three diamond-drill holes were drilled with
a total footage of 1,956 feet. An average crew of eight men was employed for two
months. The property was completely shut down in December. F. D. Gill was
geologist at the property.
NORTH KOOTENAY LAKE
Riondel (49° 116° N.W.)t
Silver-Lead-Zinc
Company office, Trail; mine office, Riondel.   J. B. Donald,
Bluebell (The Con- property superintendent; N. Anderson, mine superintendent;
solidated Mining    T. F.  Walton, mill superintendent.    This property is at
and Smelting Com- Riondel, on a small peninsula V/i miles long, on the east
pany of Canada,    shore of Kootenay Lake, 6 miles by road north from the
Limited) Southern Trans-Provincial highway at Kootenay Bay ferry-
landing.   The mine is serviced by No. 1 shaft, inclined at 35
degrees.   The levels are at intervals of 150 vertical feet.   All levels service the Koo-
• By J. D. McDonald and J. T. Fyles.
t By J. D. McDonald.
 78 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
tenay Chief zone on the south, with No. 2 level and No. 5 level extending north to
the Bluebell and Comfort zones.
Mining methods are open stoping and cut-and-fill stoping with deslimed tailings.
Longitudinal pillars are being recovered using cut-and-fill methods, and sill pillars
are being recovered using square sets and deslimed tailings fill. A total of 56,449
cubic yards of tailings was placed in the mine.
Development work was done in all three zones. Crosscutting on No. 9a level
was slow, due to heavy ground, thermal water, and carbon dioxide gas. Pre-grouting
of ground before tunneling was found to be effective, but slow. Development work
in 1962: Drifting and crosscutting, 4,938 feet; raising, 3,713 feet; total, 8,651 feet.
Diamond drilling consisted of 13,553 feet of core hole and 7,650 feet of grout hole.
Present pumping is at the rate of 4,100 imperial gallons per minute. Main
pump stations are on No. 5, No. 8, and No. 9a levels. Total pumping capacity is
3,400 horsepower on all pumping intallations.
The main ventilation system consists of four 48-inch dual-duty aerofoil fans
installed in parallel, exhausting from the main ventilation raise at the south end of
the Kootenay Chief zone. Installed capacity is 200,000 cubic feet per minute exhausting from the mine. In addition, a fan rated at 70,000 cubic feet per minute is
installed on No. 5 level at the Bluebell zone and exhausts through the Comfort zone.
There are twenty-seven auxiliary fans, aerofoil type, sizes 15, 19, and 24 inches, with
a total rated capacity of 144,600 cubic feet per minute. Total capacity for installed
fans, both main and auxiliary, is 414,600 cubic feet per minute. For stand-by
power there are three diesel units, two 375 kva. and one high-speed 187.5 kva. In
power outages these fans supply power to the main fans, auxiliary fans on No. 8 and
No. 9a levels, No. 6 level hoist, and essential pumping on No. 5, No. 8, and No. 9a
level pump stations.
The Cementation Company (Canada) Limited continued its grout programme
until December, 1962. Although the major objective was not entirely achieved, a
number of lesser objectives were. The majority of grout holes were drilled by
diamond drilling, generally AX size holes. The collar gear consisted of a valve big
enough to accept the core barrel, secured to the rock face by adequate rock bolts,
inset at least 3 feet. The casing attached to the valve is up to 10 feet in length,
depending on conditions, and is grouted into place with a sealing pressure of 2,000
pounds per square inch.
Cement grout was the major sealant and was carried to a 2,000-pounds-per-
square-inch sealing pressure, except in areas where the grout-hole collars were in
fractured, incompetent ground. The only other additives used, in very minor
amounts, were sodium silicate and bentonite. Sawdust was injected occasionally to
seal off the leakage of grout in broken zones around the collar of the hole. The
grout-mixing tank was of 30 imperial gallons capacity. The grout mixtures ranged
from a rock penetrating mix of one-half shovel to one-half bag per 30-gallon tank,
to an average grout mix of 3 bags per 30-gallon tank, to a choking mix of 5 bags per
30-gallon tank. In August, 1962, an installation erected near the main portal started
mixing grout on surface and pumping it via a 1-inch pipe-line to the desired location
on No. 8 level or No. 9a level. A standard pattern of grout holes was used in
advance of a drift face, and a core hole was drilled ahead to check the effectiveness
of the grout cover.
Mine-rescue and first-aid classes were held. Two mine-rescue teams competed
in the West Kootenay Mine Rescue Competition at Riondel. The team captained
by P. Rowan won the West Kootenay competition and competed in the Provincial
 LODE METALS 79
competition in Nelson.   The number of men employed at the end of 1962 was 241,
of whom 149 were employed underground.
The concentrator treated 237,742 tons of ore. This was a reduction from previous years, due to a shut-down period from March 6th to April 2nd from lack of
power. The power shortage was caused by the blasting of the east tower of the
Kootenay Lake power span by terrorists on March 6th. This created a very serious
power shortage until a temporary span was completed on April 2nd.
RETALLACK-THREE FORKS*
Silver-Lead-Zinc
(50° 117° S.E.)    Company office, 519 West Mission, Kel-
Caledonia (North-   logg, Idaho; mine office, Retallack.   This is a private com-
west Mining        pany consisting of three partners, E. B. Olds, D. G. Lehn,
Partnership)        and D. M. Russell, of Kellogg, Idaho.  The property consists
of fourteen Crown-granted mineral claims which were optioned in May, 1961, from Mrs. G. E. McCready, of Kaslo.   In April, 1962, work
was again started on the 200-foot raise to connect No. 3 level to No. 2 level.   After
driving a short distance the raise was stopped, at a total length of approximately 100
feet.   Operations were shut down and the option was dropped in the spring of 1962.
A total of 131 tons of stockpiled ore was shipped to the Carnegie concentrator.
(50° 117° S.E.)   Company office, Box 509, Kaslo.  This is
Antoine (Antoine   a private company of five partners, L. N. Garland, V. J.
Silver Mines)       Dresser, H. Friedrich, E. Friedrich, and H. Loewentraut.
L. N. Garland is mine manager. The property consists of the
Antoine group of five Crown-granted and three recorded mineral claims.   Also held
under option is the Soho group of eight Crown-granted mineral claims at the headwaters of McGuigan Creek, at an elevation of 7,000 feet. Three miles of road was
constructed from the end of the Rambler mine road to the Antoine mine.   The
Rambler road is 6 miles long with twenty-seven switchbacks and connects with the
Kaslo-New Denver highway 3 miles east of Three Forks.
Work commenced on the property in May when 5 tons of supplies were flown
in by helicopter to the 7,000-foot elevation. This allowed an early start on the
property as 10 feet of snow at this time prevented access on the ground. The main
No. 5 level was opened for 1,000 feet; the Antoine shaft was retimbered; a
compressor-house, powder magazine, and a 12- by 40-foot bunk-house and cookhouse were built. The road was started in August and completed in early September.
All the equipment was then hauled in to the mine and sufficient supplies to operate
until June, 1963, when the road could be opened again. Four men were employed,
all partners in this operation. It is the intent of the men to work all winter and to
snowshoe or ski out and in once a month. Ore will be stockpiled, and trucked out
in the summer months. The ore contains high silver values. A geological description of the property is contained in Geological Survey of Canada Memoir 184, by
C. E. Cairnes.
(50° 117° S.E.)   Company office, 800, 675 West Hastings
Wellington (Blue   Street, Vancouver 2; mine office, Retallack.   E. L. Borup,
Star Mines Limited) president;   C. E. Lind, manager.   The property is above
Retallack, at an elevation of 4,300 feet, and is reached by
2.3 miles of road which leaves the Kaslo-New Denver highway at Retallack.   Slashing and retimbering of the east Matheson adit was completed in October;  1,040
* By J. D. McDonald. :
 80
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
feet of drift was slashed, and rails, water and air lines, and ventilation-pipe were
extended to the face. The crosscut was driven 310 feet in 1962. Heavy flows of
water hampered development work. The average number of men employed for the
year was ten. In August the road to the property was widened and the switchbacks
opened. The road work uncovered a vein below the present camp, and this was
being investigated in December.
SANDON*
Silver-Lead-Zinc
Silversmith, Richmond-Eureka, etc.
(Carnegie Mining
Corporation
Limited)
(49° 117° N.E.) Company office, 416, 25 Adelaide Street
West, Toronto; mine office, New Denver. A. W. White,
president; J. C. Black, manager. Capital: 5,000,000 shares,
no par value. This company is controlled by Violamac Mines
Limited. The property consists of forty-six Crown-granted
and six recorded claims and fractions which include the
Silversmith, Slocan Star, Richmond-Eureka, Ruth-Hope, and
Slocan King mines on Sandon Creek, south of Sandon.
In the Ruth-Hope mine, lessees E. Perepolkin and son shipped 9.5 tons of ore
to the Trail smelter and 302 tons to the Carnegie mill.  The operational period was
eleven months.   Other lessees were H. E. Singel and B. Fried, who shipped 15 tons
of crude ore.
The concentrator operated on a one-shift part-time basis for a total of forty
operating days with two men employed. The total amount of ore treated was 1,715
tone, made up of ore from the Victor, 1,094 tons; Ruth-Hope, 302 tons; Fisher
Maiden, 188 tons; Caledonia, 131 tons.
(49°   117° N.E.)     Syndicate office, New Denver;   mine
Silmonac (Silmonac office, New Denver.   This syndicate is composed of three
Syndicate) companies—Silver Standard Mines Limited, Moneta Porcu
pine Mines Ltd., and Violamac Mines Limited. Each company has equal voting rights, with one vote each. Violamac will manage the
exploration work; J. C. Black, mine manager. The syndicate has the fifty-nine
Crown-granted claims and fractions in the Sandon area formerly held by Kelowna
Exploration Limited. In addition, it has limited mining rights on four Carnegie
claims. The exploration drive is to explore the Silversmith-Hope lode at an elevation of 4,000 feet. Mine plant and surface installations are located at what was
formerly the Ruth No. 5 level. The installations were started in November and were
completed in December.   It is reached by 2 miles of road from Sandon.
The No. 5 level was slashed for a distance of 300 feet. From a point along the
drift a crosscut will be driven approximately 600 feet to the main lode and then a
drift will be driven along, or parallel to, the lode. A 2,300-volt power-line and a
compressed-air fine were brought to the mine plant from the Carnegie power plant.
For a two-month period a total of fifteen men was employed, of whom six were
underground.
(49° 117° N.E.) Company office, 416, 25 Adelaide Street
West, Toronto; mine office, New Denver. A. W. White,
president; J. C. Black, mine manager. Capital: 1,000,000
shares, $1 par value. Violamac Mines Limited is controlled
by New Dickenson Mines Ltd. The Victor mine is 2V2. miles by road northwest of
Sandon, or 21/i miles by road southeast of Three Forks.
Victor (Violamac
Mines Limited)
* By J. D. McDonald.
 f
—
Violamac Mines Limited—workings on Victor vein; Lone Bachelor at left.
Silver Ridge from the northeast; Sandon in valley bottom and above it the
Ruth and Hope mine dumps.
 82 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
Operations were suspended in January, 1962, and resumed for a month in
June. The length of this salvage operation was two months, with the men employed
averaging twelve. A total of 589 tons was shipped to the Carnegie concentrator.
A small amount of development and stope exploration was done.
Violamac leased certain sections of the mine. Lessees L. Fried and E. DeRosa
shipped 193 tons of ore to the Carnegie mill and 62 tons of ore to the Trail smelter.
The operational period was eight months. Lessees J. Stewart and E. Anderson
shipped 270 tons to the Carnegie mill and 12 tons to the Trail smelter. The operational period was eight months. Lessees E. Perepolkin and son shipped 42 tons to
the Carnegie mill. The operational period was one month. The total production
from the Victor was 1,168 tons.
(49° 117° N.E.)   Violamac Mines Limited has under option
Slocan Base Metals this group of claims adjacent to the Victor property.   The
(Violamac Mines    adit that was started in 1961 was continued along the vein to
Limited) a point 1,384 feet from the portal. The advance for the year
was 350 feet.   The vein was explored above the level by
driving two short raises and subdrifting along the vein.  The total development was
498 feet:  raising, 126 feet; drifting and crosscutting, 372 feet.   Two men were
employed for six months.
SLOCAN LAKE*
Silver-Lead-Zinc
(49° 117° N.E.)    Company office, 801 Fina Building, 736
Mammoth (Loma   Eighth Avenue Southwest, Calgary;  mine office, Silverton.
Minerals Limited)   D. W. Hilland, president; R. T. Avison, mine manager; C.
Towgood, mill superintendent.   This company had under
lease the holdings of Western Exploration Company Limited, in the Silverton area.
Development consisted mainly of 150 feet of drifting and 400 feet of raising
on No. 9 and No. 10 levels.   Production was from the 970 stope area immediately
below the No. 9 level.   Additional ore was found on the No. 10 level at the junction
of the Mammoth and Buffalo shears.   The ore was trucked from the mine to the
concentrator at Silverton.  The concentrator operated on a one-shift basis for a total
of 185 days.   A total of 7,506 tons of ore was treated—6,494 tons from the Mammoth, 1,012 tons of lessee ore, of which 625 tons came from the Hewitt, 345 tons
from the Enterprise, and 42 tons from the Bosun.   A total of fifteen men was
employed, twelve of whom worked at the mine and three at the mill.
Operations were closed on October 22, 1962, when a new company, Johnsby
Mines Limited, acquired all interests of the Western Exploration Company Limited,
at Silverton. The main shareholders in Johnsby are Rayrock Mines Limited and
Faraday Uranium Mines Limited. The crew from the Mammoth transferred to
Johnsby to work on an extensive development programme on the Standard-
Mammoth lode.
(49° 117° N.E.)   Company office, 509, 25 Adelaide Street
Hecla (Johnsby     West, Toronto; mine office, Silverton.   J. C. Byrne, presi-
Mines Limited)     dent; R. C. Phillips, project engineer; R. T. Avison, mine
superintendent.   This company was formed in November,
1962, as a result of an agreement between Western Exploration Company Limited,
Rayrock Mines Limited, and Faraday Uranium Mines Limited.    The Standard-
Mammoth group of claims, including all the ore reserves developed by Loma Minerals, have been acquired by Johnsby Mines Limited.
♦ By J. D. McDonald.
 LODE METALS 83
An exploration drive is planned to investigate the Standard-Mammoth lode
system, starting about 500 feet above the inner workings of the Standard No. 5 level
and passing about 850 feet below an ore zone on the Hecla claim. The ultimate
objective is a connection with the Mammoth No. 12 level, which is about 200 feet
higher than the new drive. The entire project involves several thousand feet of
underground work. The adit for the Hecla drive, as it is called, is above the Standard No. 5 level at an elevation of 4,170 feet, on the Surprise Crown-granted claim.
Access to the adit is by 1 mile of new road which leaves the old Standard camp at
No. 5 level.
The mine plant and surface installations were started in October and completed
early in December. Power was brought to the plant by a 2,300-volt transmission-
line from the old Standard line. A 7- by 8-foot drift was started in December and
is being driven north 65 degrees east toward the Standard-Mammoth lode. Drift
footage at the end of 1962 was 260 feet. A crew of fifteen men was employed for
two months; six were employed underground.
(49° 117° N.E.)   Company office, 511, 850 West Hastings
Bosun Street, Vancouver 1.   R. Crowe-Swords, president.   Capital:
(New Santiago      3,000,000 shares, 50 cents par value.   The Bosun mine is on
Mines Limited)     the east shore of Slocan Lake, XVi miles south of New Denver on the Nelson-Nakusp highway.   W. H. MacLeod, of
Silverton, did some development work off the winze which was sunk previously.
A small amount of stoping was done on the vein.   A total of 42 tons of ore was
shipped to the Western Exploration mill.
Hewitt (Kopan Developments Limited).—(49° 117° N.E.) Company
office, 906, 11 Adelaide Street West, Toronto. W. W. Dennis, president. Lessees
F. Pho and J. Hichert continued mining below the No. 10 level. A short shaft was
sunk and the ore was hauled to the Western Exploration mill. The total ore treated
was 625 tons.
(49° 117° N.E.) F. Pho and J. Kelly, of Silverton, leased
Enterprise this mine and operated it for five months.   The mine is on
Enterprise Creek, 8 miles by road from the Slocan City-
New Denver highway. Operations ceased in November. The ore was hauled to
the Western Exploration mill.   The total ore treated was 345 tons.
SPRINGER CREEK*
Silver
(49° 117° N.E.)   This group of five claims is owned by Sil-
Anna (Silver King   ver King Mines Limited; mine office, Slocan City.   B. Mara-
Mines Limited)      sek, president and manager.   The property is on the northern
side of Springer Creek, adjoining the Ottawa mine on the east.
It is accessible by 5 miles of good road from Slocan City.
B. Marasek and one man worked on the property for eight months. The ventilation raise from No. 4 level to No. 3 level was completed, a total distance of 120
feet. Diamond drilling consisted of nine holes with a total footage of 940 feet.
A 40-foot crosscut was driven to explore the shear. Two tons of ore was shipped
to the Trail smelter.
* By J. D. McDonald.
 84 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
(49 ° 117 ° N.E.)   Company office, 19 North Bernard Street,
Ottawa (Ottawa     Spokane, Wash.;  mine office, Slocan City.   T. C. Hughes,
Silver Mines        president; C. Thickett, mine manager.   This mine is acces-
Limitcd) sible by 5 miles of good road from Slocan City.   The com
pany started a development programme in March. A ventilation raise was driven from No. 8 level to No. 6 level, a distance of approximately
470 feet, following the dip of the vein. In driving the raise, several lenses of very
high-grade ore were opened up. Some outstanding specimens of native silver were
observed. The ventilation in the mine is now good. On completion of this raise
two small stopes were developed. Drifting on No. 9 level was started on a one-shift
basis. This drift is being driven along the Ottawa shear, to explore the shear and
to intersect the downward extension of the vein on No. 8 level. A total of 500 feet
of drifting has been done, 200 feet in 1962.
An average crew of twelve men was employed for ten months. A total of 740
tons of ore was shipped to the Trail smelter.
(49° 117° N.E.) This group of Crown-granted claims is
Slocan Prince owned by J. K. Pearson, 1728 Thirteenth Street Southwest,
Calgary. The property is at the head of Springer Creek and
is accessible by llVi miles of road from Slocan City. Pearson and one man did a
considerable amount of stripping on the vein, with the idea of trying open-pit mining.
A total of 257 tons was shipped to the Trail smelter, 4 tons of which came from the
Bank of England claim.
CRESTON*
Silver-Lead-Zinc
(49° 116° S.E.)    This property consists of eight recorded
Liz B claims owned by Mrs. E. Barclay, of Nelson.   It is at 3,100
feet elevation on Wildes Creek, 2 miles north of Wynndel.
Mineralization occurs in limestone which dips steeply to the east and strikes north
35 degrees east. The footwall and hangingwall rocks vary from schist to limy schist.
This series of rocks can be traced from the Kootenay Bay-Creston highway up the
hill along the strike for W2 miles, and mineralization is noted in some exposed
sections of rocks.
The main mineral showings occur on the Liz B claims, a distance of 1,000 feet
along strike. The predominant minerals are fine-grained and very light-coloured
sphalerite, fine-grained pyrite, and minor galena. Fairly abundant sphalerite can be
observed in cuts across the mineralized showings.
Seven diamond-drill holes have been drilled on the property. Newmont
Mining Corporation of Canada Limited drilled five holes in 1954, four of which cut
mineralized zones down dip. Sheep Creek Mines Limited optioned the property in
the fall of 1961 and completed their second drill-hole in January, 1962. The option
was dropped in the spring of 1962.
MOYIEf
Gold-Silver
(49° 115° N.W.)    This property is near No. 3 highway, 5
Midway (Moyie    miles southwest of Moyie.    It comprises sixteen mineral
Mines Limited)     claims which were optioned or located by the company in
1962 for exploration, and includes two long adit levels which
have been driven in past years.   A detailed description of the property is included
in the 1933 Annual Report.
• By J. D. McDonald,
t By D. R. Morgan.
 LODE METALS 85
The two adit levels were rehabilitated in 1962, and two short raises were driven
between the levels. Two small shipments of development muck were sent to the
Trail smelter. Other activities were directed to the repair and construction of an ore-
bin and compressor-house on the surface, and a short access road was built from the
highway to the portal of the upper adit. Two men were employed for six months.
The property has been inactive since October, 1962.
Silver-Lead-Zinc
(49° 115° N.W.)    This property is directly south of Moyie,
St. Eugene, St.     and is adjacent to No. 3 highway.   It consists of twenty-three
Eugene Extension,  Crown-granted claims owned by The Consolidated Mining
Aurora and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, and eighty-one
Crown-granted claims owned by the St. Eugene Mining Corporation. The property lies astride the lower Moyie Lake and includes the old
St. Eugene mine area. The two companies conducted a joint exploration programme
in 1962, which included geological mapping and the drilling of three diamond-drill
holes totalling 5,129 feet on the east side of the lake. The drilling was done by contract under the supervision of R. G. Gifford, Cominco geologist. A maximum crew
of eight men was employed on the property.
KIMBERLEY*
Silver-Lead-Zinc
(49° 115° N.W.)    Company office, Box 1510, Station B,
Sullivan (The Con- Montreal 2;  W. S. Kirkpatrick, president.   Western head-
solidated Mining    quarters, Trail;   D. D. Morris, vice-president and general
and Smelting Com- manager.   Sullivan mine office, Kimberley; S. M. Rothman,
pany of Canada,    general superintendent; R. M. Porter, mine superintendent;
Limited) H. J. Chalmers, Chapman Camp, superintendent, Sullivan
concentrator.   The Sullivan mine is on Mark Creek, 2 miles
north of Kimberley, and the concentrator is at Chapman Camp, 2 miles south of
Kimberley.   The holdings include 678 Crown-granted claims and fractions.   The
following report prepared by the management is a synopsis of the operations.
" During 1962 the mine produced and the concentrator treated about 2,583,000
tons of ore.   One major pillar blast of 1,078,000 tons was made in February, 1962.
"Approximately 10,100 tons of slag were loaded and shipped to Trail from the
old smelter site at Marysville, B.C.
"Installation of the new 2500-level crushing plant and a 1500-foot hoisting
conveyor were completed in June, 1962, to handle production from below the 3050
level. Stope production was started on the 2850 level in the latter half of the year.
A new underground hoist for the No. 32 shaft was put into service early in the year.
" The total development footage was 36,910 feet. This included drifting on the
new 2600 and 2700 levels, stope development on the 2850 level and development in
new ventilation circuits to No. 31 and No. 39 shafts.
" The total backfill placed was 617,928 cubic yards. This consisted of 405,393
cubic yards (66%) of planned cave, 203,315 cubic yards (33%) of float rock
placed in 8 stopes below the 3900 level, and 9,220 cubic yards (1%) of development waste.   The float rock placed included 91,452 cubic yards to which 5% iron
* By D. R. Morgan.
 86
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1962
sulfide had been added and 111,863 cubic yards to which no iron sulfide had been
added.
" The ventilation system supplied fresh air and exhausted 900,000 c.f.m. of
air. A new exhaust shaft was put into operation to supplement 3900 level circuits
and to service dumps and transfers below the 3900 level.
" Experimental work included noise suppression by using rubber mufflers on
stopers, and the spark-erosion method of sharpening tungsten carbide bits. The use
of Nitro-Carbo-Nitrate as a blasting agent increased in 1962 and a surface blending
plant was constructed and put into operation late in the year.
" The Sullivan mine had 22 lost-time accidents in 1962 including two fatalities.
There were no lost-time accidents at the Sullivan Concentrator for the second consecutive year. Accident frequency rate at the mine was 14.1 accidents per million
man-hours worked and the severity was 1,299 days lost per million man-hours
worked or a total time loss of 1,939 days.
■f
?  .
AN/FO explosive factory at the Sullivan mine.   (Cominco photo.)
tfekjfi
i M
"At the mine, No. 1 Shaft Section, employing about 130 men, reached 1,094
calendar days (867,638 man-hours) without a lost-time accident. The Surface
Section, employing about 280 men, reached 412 calendar days without a lost-time
accident.
"Ten Sullivan mine and concentrator employees obtained or renewed their
Industrial First Aid certificates. Ninety-nine employees passed St. John's First Aid
examinations. A Sullivan mine team won the East Kootenay First Aid competition
and another Sullivan mine team won the Department of Mines Cup for the East
Kootenay Novice First Aid competition. Eight employees obtained their Mine
Rescue certificates, making a total of 287 since 1930.
 LODE METALS 87
" The concentrator operated 258 days during 1962 at an average of 10,012 tons
of ore per day. Employees at the year-end totalled 771 at the mine and 358 at the
concentrator."
Lead-Zinc
(49° 115° N.W.)   Head office, 410 Metropolitan Building,
Western Explora-    836 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 1; mine office, Remac.
tion (Reeves        L. M. Kinney, Metaline Falls, Wash., general manager; F. R.
MacDonald Mines   Thompson, superintendent.   This property lies between the
Limited) headwaters of the east fork of Mark Creek and Mather Creek.
It is 10 miles north of Kimberley, and can be reached by an
old forestry road leading from the open-pit area of the Sullivan mine.   The property
comprises 110 Crown-granted claims which have been optioned from Western
Exploration Company Limited, of Silverton, and six mineral claims held by record,
at the north end of the group.
A crew of four men slashed and cleared 6,300 feet of line for an electromagnetic survey, and drilled four diamond-drill holes totalling 2,161 feet during the
period June 22nd to October 12th. The work was done by contract, under the
direction of Roy Anderson, chief engineer of the Pend Oreille Mines and Metals
Company, of Metaline Falls.
WASA*
Silver-Lead-Zinc
(49° 115° N.W.)    Registered office, 150 Marine Building,
Estella 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1; mine office, Wasa.   A. G.
(Copper Soo Mining DesMazes, president, Penticton; T. G. Wilson, managing
Company Ltd.) director, Osoyoos; H. Hill & L. Starck & Associates Ltd.,
Vancouver, consultants. This property is near the headwaters of Tracey Creek, 10 miles north of Fort Steele. It is at an elevation of 6,000
feet, and can be reached by an 18-mile road leading from the valley at Wasa. The
property was formerly operated by the United Estella Mines Limited, but was abandoned in 1955 when the company went into liquidation.
The present company acquired an option to purchase the Estella claims in the
summer of 1962. The group consisted of twelve Crown-granted claims and an
additional eight claims held by record. An additional forty-two mineral claims were
staked and recorded on the south and north side of the optioned group. Since that
time the Copper Soo Company has purchased the optioned group and received title
to the whole property.
The present company initiated an exploration programme at the mine in late
September, and both the Estella and Rover levels were rehabilitated. Some 397
feet of crosscutting, drifting, and raising were completed in the vicinity of the No. 2
surface shaft, and an orebody ranging from 3 to 5 feet thick has been exposed. This
will be further investigated. The operation was closed on December 4th and is
expected to be reopened in the early part of 1963.
A maximum crew of eleven men was employed on the property, and a trailer
camp was established near the Estella portal. A number of buildings which were
suitable for workshops and housings for compressors and other machinery on the
surface were repaired.   The underground work was done under contract.
• By D. R. Morgan.
6
 88
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1962
Silver-Lead-Zinc
WINDERMERE
Toby Creek (50° 116° S.E.)*
Mineral King
(Sheep Creek
Mines Limited)
Company office, 6, 490 Baker Street, Nelson; mine office,
Toby Creek. J. R. Pyper, president; J. S. Mcintosh, managing director; J. B. Magee, resident manager. This mine
is at Toby Creek, 28 miles southwest of Athalmer. It is in a
mountain ridge between Toby and Jumbo Creeks, and is
entered by four levels, three of which, numbered 2, 3, and 7, have been driven at
various elevations from the Toby Creek side, and the other, No. 9 level, has been
driven from the Jumbo Creek side. There are also four intermediate levels, Nos. 4,
5, 6, and 8, which do not extend to the surface. The mine is operated by the open-
stope method, and the workings are in four irregularly shaped orebodies known as
the " A," " B," " C," and " D " zones.
The mine produced 212,412 tons of lead-zinc ore in 1962, most of the ore
being mined from the stopes above No. 4 level. The ore was developed and mined
from the " A," " C," and " D " zones on all the levels between No. 2 and No. 7.
Total development included 3,707 feet of drifting and crosscutting, 1,941 feet of
raising, and 29,774 feet of diamond drilling. New development during 1962 included the driving of No. 7, the main haulage level, to the north. No. 9 level, which
was started in 1961 at a lower elevation than No. 7 level, was connected to the No. 7
level by raises. Further development is in progress on No. 7 and No. 9 levels, and
an intermediate level known as No. 8 is being driven between the two levels. Regular ore deliveries are expected from No. 8 and No. 9 levels shortly.
A detailed description of the deposit is included in the Annual Report for 1959.
Since 1959 considerable geological information has been obtained from drilling and
from the new drifts and crosscuts. The orebodies are replacements of dolomite on
the eastern limb and in the trough of a complex tight syncline. The axial plane of
the syncline dips steeply to the west, and the axis plunges at variable angles to the
north and northwest. The syncline has coarse conglomerate in the trough and finegrained massive dolomite on the limbs. A lenticular body of grey argillite locally
separates the dolomite from the conglomerate. Lenses of dolomite occur also
beneath the dolomite along the upper contact of dark-grey slates of the Dutch Creek
Formation. The rocks themselves give little evidence for the synclinal structure,
but extensive drilling and mining has outlined the over-all form of the rock units.
The orebodies are in the dolomite, the thickness of which varies from place to
place and in general is a few hundred feet. The orebodies mined recently have a
wide variety of forms. The largest are pipe-like and steeply plunging. Others are
tabular and apparently follow steeply dipping shears or fractures. Some ore is found
along cross joints more or less perpendicular to the plunge of the syncline, and in
other places ore is in trough-like structures parallel to the fold. Exploration and
development is closely guided by diamond drilling.
During 1962, 3,742 tons of barite was produced mainly from the " C " and
" D " zones above No. 3 level. The reserves in this area are rapidly nearing depletion, and future shipments will be restricted to the lower levels. The barite is sold
in the crude state.   It is trucked to Invermere for shipment by rail.
The mine was ventilated by both mechanical and natural means. Approximately 29,000 cubic feet of air per minute was exhausted from the workings, and
of this quantity 18,000 cubic feet per minute was supplied by a 15-horsepower elec-
* By D. R. Morgan and J. T. Fyles.
 LODE METALS 119
intrude the diorite. It would seem, therefore, that the diorite areas around the mine
belt represent an earlier stage of intrusion of the magma, or possibly intrusion of an
earlier magma.
Both the mine belt diorite and the remainder of the batholith vary in composition in other ways. They vary in their proportion of light and dark minerals, in a
few places being devoid of one or the other. In some outcrops biotite predominates
over hornblende; in others, biotite is subordinate or lacking. Pink feldspar, apparently orthoclase, is common in some areas, but rare or lacking in most; potash feldspar may, however, be more common than the distribution of the pink mineral would
suggest. Thin-sections of a few scattered specimens indicate that the plagioclase
varies in composition, at least from calcic oligoclase to sodic labradorite. It was
not feasible to map any of these variations at the half-mile scale. The quartz-
bearing rocks of the Coast Intrusions are, for convenience, hereafter called grano-
diorite, even though they range from quartz gabbro to quartz monzonite and possibly even granite. Coast Intrusion dykes are commonly quartz bearing, but in the
pit they are predominantly light-coloured gabbro.
The granodiorite is injected by a few small aplite dykes, which are thought to
represent a late stage of the batholithic intrusion.
Both granodiorite and diorite contain many inclusions of andesite and tuff.
The tuff inclusions tend to be restricted to the northwest edge of the mine belt and
to a zone extending from the pit southwest and west to the summit of Mount Dawley;
the two largest are mapped on the summit and on a small creek southwest of the pit.
The andesite inclusions are commonest between the zone of tuff inclusions and the
northwest contact of the batholith. Most show some recrystallization, at least near
the borders, and some grade to diorite. Macroscopically these andesitic inclusions
resemble both Karmutsen volcanics and intrusive andesite, except that amygdules
have not been found in them. If they were intrusive, the distribution would suggest
that they are relics of intrusion of limestone. Limestone inclusions have not been
found anywhere in the batholith.
Contact relations of the batholith vary with the rock intruded and with location.
On the east side of the mine belt there is commonly a 50-foot contact zone in which
gneissic tuffs have been injected lit-par-lit by diorite. Northwest of the pit massive
tuffs grade to massive diorite by an increase in grain size and a general darkening
of the rock. Within tuffs, not more than 200 feet from recognizable diorite, there
is a fringing zone of intrusive breccia about 30 feet wide, striking northeast parallel
with the tuff-diorite contact and exposed intermittently along the northwest wall of
the pit and in a ditch to the southwest. North of the pit there is a narrow zone of
intrusive breccia which is not inside the tuffs but rather along the tuff-diorite contact.
Generally the diorite does not show chilling against the mine belt, but the granodiorite and the dykes do. The contact between the andesite stock and granodiorite
appears sharp and regular south of the pit, but in the small creek to the southwest
the andesite is injected by many tongues of the granodiorite. The granodiorite makes
sharp, even contacts with the dark porphyry of the Bonanza Group. To limestones
along the northwest contact the granodiorite presents both crosscutting and sill-like
relations. A large dyke-like tongue of the batholith extends down the creek east of
Salmonberry Mountain, transecting the limestone and sending wedge-shaped offshoots into it along bedding. East of this tongue, across the northwest slope of
Mount Dawley, the granodiorite-limestone contact is essentially bedded. The granodiorite appears to embay the limestone to some extent on the north slope. Along
the east side of the large delta the contact is steep and crosscutting. A dyke-like
tongue extends about 150 feet into the limestone at the south end of the limestone
exposures.
7
 120 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1962
Late Basalt and Gabbro Dykes
Several dark dykes intrude skarn and other rocks in the pit, and both diorite
and granodiorite to the north. They are dark grey to black on fresh surfaces and
weather brown. The weathered surfaces are commonly rounded and friable. Some
contain coarse pyrite cubes. The margins of the wider dykes are noticeably chilled.
Some dykes resemble the andesitic inclusions, but the brown weathering, chilled
margins, tabular form, fracture pattern related to margins, and apophyses usually
distinguish them. In the pit they show grooving and polishing along faults but are
not noticeably offset. They may therefore be coincident with a late stage of the
faulting.
Metamorphism and Alteration
The Karmutsen Group shows very little macroscopic alteration apart from the
epidote lenses. Slight bleaching is apparent in strongly fractured areas and adjacent
to some of the larger granodiorite dykes. One thin-section from the delta shows an
apparent breakdown of pyroxene to magnetite and chlorite.
The limestones are thoroughly recrystallized, locally becoming very coarse, but
are not generally altered otherwise. Local diopside bands and brucite plates have
been noted in the upper limestone. A small part of the limestone in the pit has been
replaced by serpentine, and a serpentine vein cuts limestone in the northwest face
of Mount Dawley.
The Quatsino tuff has been converted to diorite along the east boundary of the
mine belt and to some extent in the large inclusions to the southwest, and has been
sericitized in some places. But the most spectacular alteration is in the pit, where
most of the banding has been obliterated and a considerable part of the rock has
been altered to garnet-epidote skarn.
A few of the intrusive andesite bodies are irregularly bleached, and the resulting
rock macroscopically resembles massive tuff. This effect was noted in the northwest
wall of the pit and near the west edge of the area, where the highway bends away
from the lake. The mineralogical changes associated with this bleaching have not
been studied.   In the pit the dykes near ore have been partly altered to skarn.
The Coast Intrusions generally show no alteration, but the light colour of many
dykes in the pit appears to be due largely to chloritization and sericitization. These
dykes show very little alteration to skarn. However, a band of the batholith about
200 feet wide adjacent to the contact with the lower limestone east of the delta is
variably altered to epidote and subordinate garnet and pyroxene.
Structural Geology
In general the layered rocks dip southeast, but the Quatsino and Bonanza rocks
have been thrown into at least two syncline-like structures and have been further
deformed by the batholith.  All the rocks have been broken by large and small faults.
The westerly syncline-like structure trends southwest and south through the
summit of Salmonberry Mountain. It has been truncated by a fault in the north
and has not been recognized near Kennedy Lake. It continues beyond the area to
the south. On the west side the beds dip southeast near the fault and are almost flat
farther south. The apparent east limb, outlined by an interrupted band of the upper
limestone, seems to be steep. It is not clear whether this structure is a syncline in
the regional structure or whether it has been produced by the batholith wedging up
the upper limestone to form the east limb of a highly assymetrical fold. The lowest
Bonanza beds are not exposed on the apparent east limb, and the internal structure
of the fold is not known.   Also, the structure is not known immediately north of the
 LODE METALS 121
fault due to scarcity of exposure and lack of recognizable bedding. The band of tuff
north of the fault may represent the tail of the syncline or a part of the regional
southeast-dipping structure isolated by the tongue of the intrusive.
The easterly synchne-like structure is the mine belt, lying between the mine
dump and the south end of Draw Mountain. It appears to be a canoe-shaped structure, outlined by the contact between the Quatsino tuff and upper limestone and
enclosed by intrusive rocks, principally diorite. Exposures in the pit and intersections in diamond-drill holes nearby indicate that the syncline there plunges irregularly northeast. The internal structure of the fold is unknown due to lack of bedding
in the limestone, but tuff banding indicates steep limbs. Deformation appears to
have been more intense than on Salmonberry Mountain. Closure at the north end
of the syncline has not been observed due to lack of exposure on the south end of
Draw Mountain but is suggested by a more northerly strike of the east contact of
the limestone north of Redford Creek. Exposures of diorite at the ends of the
transverse ridge on the south end of the mountain suggest that the syncline is enclosed by diorite. Here also it is not clear whether the fold is part of the regional
structure or a product of forceful intrusion, but at least the irregularities in the tuff-
limestone contact in the open pit would appear to have resulted from deformation
during intrusion.
Apparent wedging action by the batholith is shown in the northwest slope of
Mount Dawley. Along most of this slope, limestone bedding and the contact dip
uniformly southeast, but on the west corner of the mountain above a thick sill that
wedges out to the east, the strike is more southerly and the dip flatter. The southwest end of the block has apparently been pried up.
The Quatsino rocks terminate abruptly at the west foot of Salmonberry Mountain, and a large fault is inferred to separate them from Karmutsen exposures west
of the creek. The abrupt, relatively straight west front of the mountain group would
also suggest a fault. The fault zone itself has not been seen, and too little is known
of the geology west of it to suggest the probable direction and amount of movement.
A second fault has been mentioned as truncating the westerly fold in the north.
It is marked topographically by a deep notch along the north slope of Salmonberry
Mountain. It is exposed in two creek beds as a 25-foot zone of gouge and breccia
in the creek flowing to the Kie mine camp-site. East of this creek and west of the
tuff exposures it has not been identified. The topographic notch dies out where the
tuff ends on the north side, and it is not clear which of several chasms in the lower
limestone represents the continuation of the fault. The fault trace in relation to
topography suggests that the fault dips north at a moderate to fairly steep angle.
The displacement is apparently left hand. If the band of tuff on the north is
synclinal, the north side is upthrown and the fault is probably a high-angle thrust.
Small faults are seen here and there through the area, mainly in creek beds.
One truncates the patch of tuff southwest of the pit on the east. A shear zone in
dark porphyry is exposed for several hundred feet in the bed of the creek south of
Salmonberry Mountain. These and others are thought to be only a small fraction
of the total number of faults and shear zones in the area. A profusion of them
traverse rocks in the open pit.
All of the faults appear to be younger than the Coast Intrusions, and at least
some of those in the open pit have displaced and comminuted magnetite. The
magnetite has also, in part, been grooved and polished along slip surfaces, and some
serpentine has been deposited on them. The late basalt dykes also show some
grooving and polishing, but do not appear to be offset on any faults.
 122 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1962
Economic Geology
The only metalliferous mineral of consequence so far found in the area is magnetite. The main occurrence is in and beside the open-pit mine on Draw Creek, but
four minor occurrences have been found elsewhere in the area. The mine has been
described in the Annual Report for 1961. Briefly, the mineralization comprises an
array of small and large magnetite lenses in tuff and limestone near their mutual
contact at the southwest end of the limestone. Near the lenses the tuff has been
more or less altered to garnet-epidote skarn. The controls of individual lenses are
not apparent. Some small lenses are strung out along a shear zone near the southwest side of the pit, but the magnetite has been comminuted. In a broad way,
however, magnetite deposition appears to have favoured the tuff-limestone contact.
This impression from the open pit and the nearby drilling is strengthened by the
occurrence of magnetite for some 300 feet along the tuff-limestone contact about
half a mile north of the pit.
A few small pods of magnetite occur in limestone about a mile northeast of the
pit, just southeast of the logging-road bridge over Redford Creek, and about 700
feet from the southeast contact of the limestone. A third small occurrence of magnetite is in a skarn zone in batholithic rocks along the east side of the large delta, at
the limestone contact. The occurrence is at the south tip of limestone exposure, in
the re-entrant between a small prong of the intrusive and the main mass. The limestone itself is somewhat sheared in the re-entrant, but shows very little alteration or
mineralization. The fourth small occurrence of magnetite is in the hangingwall of a
30-foot andesite sill in the lower limestone at 1,000 feet elevation on the northwest
slope of Mount Dawley. Magnetite and pyrite coat the sheared upper surface of the
sill, and some magnetite is disseminated in a small felsite body about 25 feet higher
on the hillside.
Gold and copper mineralization is known at several points within a few miles
of the area, but none has been found within it. A small pod of massive pyrite in
limestone on the northwest slope of Mount Dawley assayed: Gold, trace; copper,
0.15 per cent.
Thick deposits of sand and gravel occur along the floor and lower walls of
Draw Valley.
[References: Bancroft, M. F., Geol. Surv., Canada, Mem. 204, 1937, pp.
3-13; Dolmage, Victor, Geol. Surv., Canada, Sum. Rept., 1920, Pt. A, pp. 13-18;
Haycock, Ernest, Geol. Surv., Canada, Ann. Rept., Vol. XV, 1902, Pt. A, pp.
81-90; Hoadley, J. W., Geol. Surv., Canada, Mem. 272, 1953, pp. 9-29; Linde-
man, Einar, Mines Branch, Ottawa, Publ. No. 47, 1910, p. 16; Minister of Mines,
B.C., Ann. Repts., 1902, p. 210; 1960, pp. 108-110; 1961, pp. 104-110; Uglow,
W. L., and Young, G. A., Geol. Surv., Canada, Econ. Geol. Ser., No. 3, 1926, pp.
155-158.]
Iron
(49° 125° S.E.)    Company office, Room 1700, Bank of
Brynnor Mines     Nova Scotia Building, 44 King Street West, Toronto  1;
Limited* British Columbia office, Suite 105, 2256 West Twelfth Ave
nue, Vancouver 9; mine office, Ucluelet. R. V. Porritt,
president; T. R. Wearing, manager; D. W. Burns, mine superintendent; A. W.
Haggerty, mill superintendent; W. I. Nelson, Jr., geologist. This company is a
wholly owned subsidiary of Noranda Mines, Limited. A seven-year contract with
Japanese ore-buyers calls for delivery of 700,000 tons of concentrate per year.
* By G. E. P. Eastwood.
 LODE METALS 123
The mine camp is on the Kennedy highway on the south shore of Kennedy
Lake, about 8 miles from the junction with the Ucluelet-Tofino road. The mine is
reached by 2^ miles of MacMillan, Bloedel and Powell River Limited logging-road,
which leaves the highway about 2 miles east of the camp. The open pit and crusher
building are on the west side of Draw Creek, and the mine office is on the east side.
Crushed ore is trucked 8 miles down Draw Creek and past Maggie Lake to the mill
at New York Point on Toquart Bay.   A deep-sea dock has been built near the mill.
Stripping of overburden and waste rock under contract was completed in May.
The company then proceeded with the mining of ore and intermixed waste by standard benching methods. The benches were approximately 30 feet apart. Down holes
were drilled with a 6-inch C.I.R. Drillmaster and a 9-inch Bucyrus-Erie 40-R rotary
drill, and were loaded with AN/FO. Lifters were drilled with air-tracks and loaded
with 40 per cent Forcite. All blasts were fired electrically. Muck was loaded by two
Dominion and one Bucyrus-Erie shovels into Dart end-dump trucks and hauled to
the crusher or the waste dump.
In the crusher building, trucks dumped directly into a gyratory crusher. The
crushed ore was conveyed by belt to dry magnetic separators. The scalped waste
was conveyed to a separate waste dump; some was sold to MacMillan, Bloedel and
Powell River Limited for road metal. The cleaned ore was stockpiled in an open
shelter, then recrushed in two Symonds cone crushers before being hauled to the mill.
The mill started up on an experimental basis in mid-April and was in essentially
full production by the end of May. Ore dumped through a grizzly was conveyed to
a large storage tower. From the tower it was conveyed to a splitter at the top of the
mill, thence over two weightometers to two Dominion 6 by 12 rod mills, powered by
two English Electric 550-horsepower motors. The oversize accumulated in small
bins and was cleaned out periodically. The undersize, 35 per cent minus 100 mesh,
was pumped to two banks of three Magnetic Engineering and Manufacturing Company 30 by 72 wet magnetic drums. The waste was laundered to Toquart Bay. The
concentrate was pumped to two Allen settling-cones. The cone underflow was
discharged to two Dorrco rotary filters. The cone overflow was settled in a Denver
thickener, the underflow from which was fed to the filters. The cake was conveyed
to the top of a shielded storage pile. From the bottom of the pile a reclaim conveyor
belt rose to a track-mounted tower on the dock. Another conveyor on a boom of the
tower fed the concentrate to a compartment of the ship's hold. By moving the
tower on its tracks it was possible to alternate loading of compartments on opposite
sides of the ship, and so keep it reasonably trimmed. The first ship loaded on May
28th to 30th. The mill treated 716,054 tons of ore, producing 451,623 tons of
concentrate.
A 975-foot vertical hole was drilled southwest of the pit at the site of a proposed shaft.
The supervisory and technical staff totalled thirteen. Office staff numbered
fifteen (including Vancouver office).   Other employees averaged 135.
The regional geology is described on pages 111 to 122, and the pit geology is
described in the Annual Report for 1961. In brief, limestone underlies the eastern
part of the pit and tuff underlies much of the western part. Many sills and dykes of
andesite intrude both tuff and limestone. One andesite stock extends into the
southwest part of the pit, and another is in fault contact with tuff and limestone along
the southeast side. These rocks are intruded by many light-coloured gabbro dykes
that are believed to be related to batholithic rocks of Coast Intrusion type nearby.
 124 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
The tuff appears to underlie the limestone, on a contact that apparently outlines an
irregular northeast-plunging syncline.
The magnetite forms an array of orebodies, lenses, and pockets in tuff and limestone near the tuff-limestone contact. Many of these bodies lie southeast of the pit
or below the level reached by mining in the summer of 1962, and are sketchily known
from the drilling. Two irregular orebodies were at that time exposed in the north
and central parts of the pit, and lenses of ore showed up from time to time along the
southwest side as mining proceeded. The north orebody is the cigar-shaped body
mentioned in the previous report. As exposed on a bench at about 280 feet elevation, it was striking northeast and had a length of 300 feet and a width of 50 feet.
Several small pockets of ore occurred in limestone nearby. The north orebody lies
more or less along the tuff-limestone contact, but transects lobes of the limestone.
The second orebody was exposed along 150 feet of the lift between the 270 and 240
benches. A short section of magnetite and sulphides was exposed in the 300/270
lift 100 feet to the west. The orebody is traversed by many tight, curving fractures
along which the magnetite has been deeply grooved and highly polished, in places
almost to a mirror finish. These slips strike generally northeast and dip southeast
around 50 degrees. Some of the polished surfaces are coated with serpentine, which
in turn is commonly grooved and polished.
Some of the magnetite lenses along the southwest side of the pit appear to be
ranged along a shear zone, and others are scattered through partly altered tuff to the
south of it. They range in size from lenses at least 50 feet long and 30 feet deep to
pods about 5 feet long and a foot across, to irregular pockets about 2 feet across,
and to irregular veins a few inches wide. The shear zone, as exposed in the west wall
of the pit, is a zone of gouge and breccia 8 feet thick traversing a large gabbro dyke.
It there dips 45 degrees northeast, and intermittent exposures showed that it strikes
south 44 degrees east for 300 feet, passing out of the dyke and traversing tuff and
the tip of the andesite stock. Farther southeast it appears to split into several
branches; one of the main branches curves to an easterly strike and steep northerly
dip, and passes into limestone. As it was exposed at the south end of the 240 bench
in June, the shear zone consisted of slices of gabbro, limestone, and of tuff partly
altered to skarn, separated by narrow bands of gouge, breccia, and schist. This
ground-up or sheared rock was largely altered to serpentine, talc, and possibly
brucite. Tongues of magnetite extended up through the gabbro and appeared to
coalesce down at bench level. Nearby, lenses of magnetite in tuff and skarn along
the shear zone were rather thoroughly comminuted.
South of this zone, two relatively large but isolated exposures of magnetite were
seen on the 270 bench, almost on the strike of the shear zone in the andesite stock
but occurring in tuff just southeast of the stock. Other exposures of magnetite south
of the shear zone were small and scattered. Some were narrow bands along one or
both walls of gabbro dykes. Others were pods along the footwalls of north- or
northeast-striking shears. One small pod extended a few feet diagonally down the
south wall of the pit off the end of a small lens of argillite in the tuff. Other pods
were scattered through skarn-bearing tuff without noticeable associated structures.
In summary, magnetite appears to have favoured contacts and various kinds of
fractures. The comminution along shear zones is thought to be due to renewed, post-
magnetite movement.
 LODE METALS 125
Cowichan Lake (48° 124° N.E.)*
Copper
Company office, 764 Cowichan Lake Road, Lake Cowichan.
Alpha, Beta, etc.    Allan H. Harder, president and managing director; George
(Albeta Mines Ltd.) E. Apps, general manager.   The property consists of three
Crown-granted and twenty recorded mineral claims and fractions on the east fork of Robertson River, northwest and southeast of Long Creek,
7 miles south of Mesachie Lake.   Access from the end of the Forest Service road
is by way of four-fifths of a mile of road and a bridge over the river.
The mineral showings were located in 1904. Three original claims—Alpha,
Beta, and Taboga—were Crown-granted in 1910, and although lying within the
Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway belt carry both mineral and surface rights. Results
of various development undertakings are described in the Annual Reports for 1927,
1929, 1930, and 1931.
The present company began work in 1961 with magnetometer surveys. Two
anomalies were found southeast of the original showing at the junction of Long
Creek and Robertson River. Diamond drilling from surface at these anomalies and
at other sites comprised some 4,400 feet. A crosscut adit started on the north side
of Robertson River at 920 feet elevation and 350 feet southeast of the mouth of
Long Creek had been driven on a bearing of north 60 degrees east to a length of
250 feet by late August. About 480 feet of diamond drilling had been done underground. A raise was driven to an elevation of 30 feet above the adit. A plan and
section at the adit is shown on Figure 11.
The rocks are basaltic flows of the Franklin Creek Formation overlain by tuffs
and limestones of the Sutton Formation. Limestone is scarce in the vicinity of the
showings and of the adit; the beds become more numerous and thicker eastward.
The beds strike about east-west and dip steeply both northward and southward.
The beds are cut by three successive intrusive rocks determined megascopically
as granodiorite, granite porphyry, and diorite porphyry. The granodiorite is a
medium-grained, equigranular, crystalline rock composed chiefly of hornblende and
white feldspar, sometimes showing a pink tinge, and quartz. It is appreciably
coarser grained than the other two and so is readily distinguished from them. It
appears to follow irregular fractures in the lavas and sediments, and drill cores indicate that it commonly holds large inclusions of these rocks. The granite porphyry
is younger than the granodiorite and is the principal intrusive rock of the vicinity.
It is grey to green, medium to fine grained, with more or less rounded feldspar
phenocrysts. Surface exposures show that it occupies fractures striking east-west
and dipping 70 degrees south, and striking north 30 degrees east and dipping 65
degrees to the southeast. Distributions in drill cores show that the granite porphyry
may have very low dips, at least locally, and that its masses may take very irregular
shapes. A similar condition obtained with a porphyry at the Cowichan Copper
(Blue Grouse) property at Cowichan Lake, distant 11 miles west of north. Diorite
porphyry, dark grey to green with somewhat irregularly distributed small feldspar
phenocrysts in a fine-grained to aphanitic matrix, is the youngest intrusive rock and
is also younger than the mineralization.   It forms small lenticular bodies.
The lavas and sediments and the granodiorite have been locally silicified and
altered to skarn. The skarns are of four main types—a garnet-epidote skarn, a red
garnetite, a light buff to brown garnetite, and epidotite. There are no obvious
relationships between these types and the original rocks. Magnetite occurs most
commonly with the garnet-epidote skarn but is found also in the others.   Distribu-
* By N. D. McKechnie.
 126
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
 LODE METALS 127
tion of skarn in drill cores indicates that it may form along favourable beds and also
along fractures in tuff, andesite, or granodiorite. In the sublevel from the raise a
narrow dyke of granodiorite was seen to be changed to skarn where it crossed the
skarn zone there. It was apparent that the skam alteration followed a structure
crosscutting the dyke. No skarn was seen in the granite porphyry nor in the still
younger diorite porphyry; presumably these rocks are younger than the skarn
alteration.
Pyrite and chalcopyrite are found locally in the skarn and, like the magnetite,
usually in the garnet-epidote type. Control of the distribution of sulphides is not
apparent, but it is not the same as that of the skarn. At the original discovery,
at the junction of Long Creek and Robertson River, the sulphides occur in skarn
on the hangingwall of an 18-foot-wide granite porphyry dyke striking north 30
degrees east. Skarn on the footwall side of this dyke is barren of sulphides. The
northeastward-striking dyke here joins an east-west striking dyke of the same rock.
At less than 100 feet northeast along the hangingwall of the first-mentioned dyke,
both skarn and sulphides die out and the rock becomes basaltic lava. It is possible
that the mineralization is a pipe-like deposit associated with the junction of the two
dykes. Relationships are obscured by a post-mineral fault striking north 60 degrees
east and dipping 65 degrees southeast which crosses the junction of the dykes; skarn
and sulphides are exposed in the hangingwall of the fault, but granite porphyry is
not. As illustrated on Figure 11, there is an apparent alignment on dip between
sulphides in the skarn at the sublevel and sulphides in skarn in diamond-drill hole
S-8. The intervening granite porphyry is barren. Diamond drilling from surface
on sections 70 feet northwest and 60 feet southeast of the adit sections did not show
this mineralization to continue that far. Sulphide intersections obtained in a drill
section some 250 feet southeast of the adit have not been developed further. Sulphides were cut by two underground holes in skarn about 30 feet ahead of the
adit face.
The sulphides probably follow structures allied to the intrusion of the granite
porphyry. A possible sequence of events is: development of the skarn alteration,
immediately followed by intrusion of granite porphyry accompanied and followed by
the introduction of sulphides, and the intrusion of the post-mineral diorite porphyry
which cuts skarn and sulphides in the sublevel. The results of the work done indicate that within the present working area no structures exist which are likely to lend
much lateral continuity to mineralization. The possibility of mineral pipes remains.
Jordan River (48° 120° S.E.)*
Copper
Company office, 620 Howe Street, Vancouver 1; mine office,
Sunloch and        River Jordan.    Oswood G. MacDonald, president;   J. R.
Gabbro (Cowichan   Bilhngsley, mine manager.   This property is on the Jordan
Copper Co. Ltd.)    River about 1 mile upstream from its mouth and is reached by
a road which leaves the Victoria highway about one-half mile
east of the River Jordan Post Office.   An operating lease was obtained by Cowichan
Copper Co. Ltd. from Sunro Mines Limited (controlled by The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited) to remove ore from eighteen claims
which include the Cave, Central, and River ore zones.
The installation of the crushing, grinding, and concentrating sections of the
underground mill, commenced in 1961, was completed by the end of April, and the
production of concentrates began May 1st.   The initial mill rate of 600 tons per
* By N. D. McKechnie and J. E. Merrett.
 128
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT, 1962
LEGEND
L>^H Mineralized   fracture
En*$$$1 Mineralization
Scale
20 40
Feet
Figure 12. Sunro mine, 5300 level—mineralization outlined by diamond drilling.
 LODE METALS 129
day was increased to 1,000 tons per day by the end of December. As the mill was
underground, special consideration was given to the handling of the concentrate
and mill tailing. Concentrate was loaded into 5-ton-capacity containers mounted
on flat cars and transferred to trucks at the portal. The containers were transported
58 miles to and unloaded onto the covered stockpile at the Hatch Point loading-
dock. The mill tailing was pumped to the portal, a distance of 7,800 feet, in a
6-inch-diameter plastic pipe-line. At the portal pump station the tailing was pumped
an additional 5,000 feet for disposal at tidewater.
The major portion of all development work and ore removal was done in the
" B " and " C " orebodies of the River ore zone. The development work comprised
2,485 feet of drifting, 2,774 feet of raising, and 93 feet of shaft raising. A total of
23,697 feet of diamond drilling was completed in 157 drill-holes in order to determine the mining boundaries of the " B " and " C " orebodies. The total amount of
ore mined was 192,667 tons, of which 149,599 tons was produced by long-hole
stoping. The mill treated 144,009 tons of ore to produce 10,148 tons of copper
concentrate which was shipped to Japan.
A crew of 123 men was employed, of whom ninety-five were employed underground mining or in the crushing and milling operations.
The geology of the property is fully described in the Annual Report for 1950,
pages 180 to 193; a bibliography of prior publications is included. Recent work
is summarized in the Annual Reports for 1957 to 1961.
The property is underlain by lower Eocene Metchosin basaltic flows which are
intruded by sills (?) of lower Oligocene Sooke gabbro. The occurrence is unique
in British Columbia in being the only mineable metalliferous deposit found so far
in Tertiary country rock. The basalt and the gabbro are cut by diabase dykes.
These dykes so closely resemble the basalt that they are virtually impossible to map
in underground workings, although they are readily distinguished in drill core, particularly if the core is dry.
Mineralization consists of chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and pyrite, in that order,
with a little molybdenite. Magnetite is present as a constituent of the basalt—it is
not confined to the mineralized zones.   The sulphides are later than the diabase.
The mineralization is associated with insignificant appearing but persistent
shear zones. The River zone, as exposed in the present limited workings, strikes
west of north and, according to surface drilling, dips about 75 degrees west. Drilling
to date has indicated the zone to have widths of up to 100 feet and a strike length
of 1,100 feet. Mineralization in this zone, mapped on the 5300 level (Fig. 12),
appears to follow three principal sets of fractures: (1) Striking northeast and dipping steeply north; (2) striking northeast and dipping steeply southeast; (3)
striking northwest and dipping steeply southwest.
In the 1950 Annual Report, page 187, it is noted that diabase dykes in the
Jordan River canyon strike northwest and, in lesser numbers, northeast.
 130
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
REPORTS ON GEOLOGICAL, GEOPHYSICAL,
AND GEOCHEMICAL WORK
Reports accepted to the end of 1958 for credit on assessment requirements for
properties held under the Mineral Act and the Placer-mining Act since January 17,
1947, and reports on geochemical surveys accepted since April 6, 1951, are listed
in the Annual Report for 1958. Starting with 1959, each Annual Report lists the
reports accepted during the current calendar year. A copy of each report may be
examined in the office of the Mining Recorder for the mining division in which the
property is located. A second copy of each report is filed in the office of the Chief
of the Mineralogical Branch, Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources,
Victoria.
The property name is that which appears to be in most common use. It is
not feasible to list all the claim names in each property. The author of each report
is given and the principal for whom the report was written.
The co-ordinate given for each report is the southeast corner of the 1-degree
quadrilateral within which the property lies.
Reports Credited for Assessment, 1962
Geographic Position
1° Quadr.
Quarter
49° 115°
N.W.
49°  115°
N.W.
49° 117°
S.E.
49° 117°
S.W.
49° 118°
S.W.
49° 119°
N.W.
49° 119°
S.E.
49° 119°
S.W.
49° 120°
N.W.
Property
Owner or Principal
Author of Report
Date of Submission of Report
Kind of Work
P.M.L. 922, 926, 929, 930	
Hughes and Newmarch.
P. R. Brier and F. C. McConnell.
December 17,1962.
P.M.L. 922, 926, 929, 930...
Hughes and Newmarch.
R. L. Hughes and C. B. Newmarch.
December 17, 1962.
Bell Group..
Great West Mining Corporation Ltd.
Franklin Price.
November 13, 1962.
Grey Group.
The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited.
D. W. Heddle.
November 14,1962.
Boundary Group
Moneta Porcupine Mines, Limited.
R. H. Seraphim.
April 17, 1962.
Dief Group .
The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited,
J. Richardson.
March 9,1962.
Matt Group
Kennco Explorations (Western) Limited.
R. A. Bell and D. B. Sutherland.
December 3,1962.
Olalla Property...
Friday Mines Limited.
R. A. Bell and P. G. Hallof.
January 29,1962.
H.N. 1-12, 15-18; WEN 1-16.	
Skeena Silver Mines Limited.
C. Rutherford.
February 27,1962.
 LODE METALS
Reports Credited for Assessment, 1962—Continued
131
Geographic Position
1° Quadr.
Quarter
49° 120°
49° 121°
49° 121°
49° 124°
49° 124°
49° 125°
49° 125°
49° 126°
49° 126°
49° 126°
50° 115°
50° 116°
50° 117°
50° 120°
50° 120°
50° 120°
S.W.
S.E.
S.E.
S.E.
N.E.
S.E.
N.W.
N.W.
N.W.
N.W.
S.W.
S.E.
N.E.
N.W.
S.W.
S.W.
Property
Owner or Principal
Author of Report
Date of Submission of Report
Whip and Saw Groups	
Texas Gulf Sulphur Company.
W. Holyk.
February 28, 1962.
Rico A, B, and C Groups.
Rico Copper Mines Limited.
T. M. Kerr.
June 29,1962.
Rico D and E Groups...
Rico Copper Mines Limited.
T. M. Kerr.
June 20,1962.
Cruickshank A, B, and C Groups	
Cruickshank Explorations Limited.
P. G. Hallof and R. A. Bell.
July 31,1962.
G.L.M. 3-6 	
D. Lawson, A. Gotfredson, and W. McLeod.
G. I. Maclnnis.
May 18,1962.
H.M. Group.
Noranda Exploration Company, Limited.
M. M. Menzies.
June 26, 1962.
Jay Group
Buttle Lake Mining Company.
J. McCue and D. M. Cannon.
November 13,1962.
Hesquiat Lake North, South, and Satchie.
Paco Resources Ltd.
R. E. Chaplin.
December 6,1962.
Hesquiat Lake; Stewardson Inlet.. 	
Paco Resources Ltd.
H. G. Agnew.
December 6, 1962.
Indian Chief; Prince.
Paco Resources Ltd.
Lynn Woodside.
December 6, 1962.
Aztex-Pyramid Group	
Georgian Gypsum Products Ltd.
J. F. V. Millar.
May 24,1962.
Skyline Group.
T. R. Buckham.
T. R. Buckham.
August 21, 1962.
May Nos. 1-6..
Larrie B. York and Loyd York.
H. C. B. Leitch.
May 5,1962.
Al Group.
Alan E. Swan.
H. H. Cohen.
February 19, 1962.
Chalcocite and Malachite Groups.
Skeena Silver Mines Limited.
W. M. Sirola.
December 10,1962.
Copperado Property.
Toluma Mining and Developing Co. Ltd.
W. B. Montgomery.
August 3,1962.
Kind of Work
 132 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
Reports Credited for Assessment, 1962—Continued
Geographic Position
1° Quadr.
Quarter
Property
Owner or Principal
Author of Report
Date of Submission of Report
Kind of Work
50° 120°
50° 120°
50° 120°
50° 120°
50° 120°
50° 120°
50° 120°
50° 120°
50° 120°
50° 120°
50° 120°
50° 120°
50° 120°
50° 120°
50° 120°
50° 120°
S.W.
N.W.
N.E.
S.W.
S.W.
S.W.
S.W.
S.W.
S.E.
S.W.
S.E.
S.W.
S.W.
S.W.
S.W.
S.W.
Fault 1-24	
Angus MacDonald.
W. M. Sirola.
May 4, 1962.
Fault 25-^10 	
Kerr-Addison Gold Mines Ltd.
W. M. Sirola.
June 8, 1962.
Hay 1-8 _ 	
Mrs. A. MacKenzie.
Henry L. Hill.
April 9, 1962.
H.J. Group
W. D. Barr.
M. K. Lorimer.
Feburary 7, 1962.
Justice Mineral Claims.
Vanmetals Explorations Limited.
C. W. Faessler.
December 5, 1962.
Kim 1-4; Mike 2-5..._ _	
Copper Soo Mining Company Ltd.
A. D. Stanley and H. L. Hill.
May 30, 1962.
Lower Rover Group  _	
General Resources Limited.
C. W. Faessler.
November 26, 1962.
Mint Group
Canf ord Explorations Ltd.
Sherwin F. Kelly.
February 7, 1962.
Pine 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9	
G. L. Oates.
G. L. Oates.
April 4, 1962.
Red, White, and Blue Groups ....
Britmont Mines Limited.
C. W. Faessler.
December 20, 1962.
Roi Group
G. L. Oates.
G. L. Oates.
March 23, 1962.
Soo and Verna Groups 	
Copper Soo Mining Company Ltd.
H. L. HUI.
January 22,1962.
Strike 1-2, Resources 29-30, Rick 9-12...
Earlcrest Resources Limited.
C. W. Faessler.
December 3, 1962.
Tormont and Laron Groups	
Tormont Mines Limited.
C. W. Faessler.
February 12,1962.
Wade Nos. 7 and 15; Tex No. 1 	
General Resources Limited.
P. G. Hallof and D. B. Sutherland.
December 5,1962.
Wade Group   	
General Resources Limited.
C. W. Faessler.
January 12, 1962.
 LODE METALS
Reports Credited for Assessment, 1962—Continued
133
Geographic Position
1° Quadr.
Quarter
Property
Owner or Principal
Author of Report
Date of Submission of Report
50° 120°
50° 120°
50° 120°
50° 121°
50° 121°
50° 123°
50° 126°
S.W.
S.W.
S.W.
S.E.
S.E.
S.E.
S.W.
I
50° 126°    |      S.W.
50° 126°
50° 126°
50° 127°
51° 116°
51° 119°
51° 122°
52° 122°
52° 122°
S.E.
S.W.
S.E.
S.W.
N.W.
N.W.
N.E.
N.W.
Wade Group 	
General Resources Limited.
H. H. Shear.
July 6, 1962.
West Group.
Copper Soo Mining Company Ltd.
Henry L. Hill.
September 12, 1962.
Willy Group 	
Craigmont Mines Limited.
W. S. Pentland.
January 24, 1962.
Rock, K. C, K. W., Viking, Park, Pat	
Kamloops Copper Company Limited.
Henry L. Hill.
March 20, 1962.
Skeena Group
Skeena Silver Mines Limited.
C. Rutherford.
January 15, 1962.
Callaghan Group   	
Huestis Mining Corporation Ltd.
R. E. Chaplin.
August 1, 1962.
Artlish Group 	
O. L. Skogland.
G. A. Noel.
June 15,1962.
Contact Group  _	
O. L. Skogland.
M. J. Young.
May 29, 1962.
Hazel Group .
Camloc Copper Ltd.
C. F. Millar.
November 2,1962.
Martha-Storey Group .
Utah Construction & Mining Company.
J. E. O'Rourke and C. A. Aird.
July 4, 1962.
Alfons 1-3 and Caledonia 4 	
Rio Tinto Canadian Exploration Ltd.
L. B. Gatenby.
March 29, 1962.
A Group.
Newconex Limited.
J. Sullivan.
January 10, 1962.
Sinbad, Roc, and McCorvie Groups
B. Herslev and A. Humphrey.
H. C. B. Leitch.
July 17,1962.
H.P. Group.
American Smelting and Refining Company.
L. A. Hewitt and D. M. Fletcher.
May 14, 1962.
Atlas Group
C. L. Erickson.
J. S. Scott.
January 4, 1962.
D.R.D. Group ._	
Bell Asbestos Mines Ltd.
J. H. Low and H. F. Morrow.
January 11,1962.
Kind of Work
I
X  I  X
 INSPECTION OF MINES 247
oxygen balance due to too much oil in the mixture, as this would permit the burning
of oxygen-deficient products of detonation.
On November 16, 1962, at Texada Iron mine, the hoisting-rope was damaged
when a deflection sheave broke loose.
On November 16, 1962, at the Phoenix Copper open-pit mine, a blast broke
through into unsuspected underground workings over a surface length of 165 feet.
On November 22, 1962, at Britannia, a loaded skip broke free while being
hoisted and lodged in the shaft when the connecting bail to the cage above broke.
On December 10, 1962, at Britannia, a smoldering underground fire was discovered in the No. 8 mine. All persons were evacuated from the mine while mine-
rescue crews installed nineteen stoppings to seal off the area. This sealing was a
success, and the area was eventually reopened. The origin of the fire could not
be determined, but the location was where there had been spillage of Amex during
the loading of a blast-hole round.
On December 17, 1962, at the Craigmont open-pit mine, a fire of unkown
origin destroyed a special truck equipped to service heavy equipment.
PROSECUTIONS
Four prosecutions were instituted under the Metalliferous Mines Regulation
Act, as follows:—
A skip-tender employed by Bralorne Pioneer Mines Limited was charged
under section 21, General Rule 221, for being around moving machinery while
intoxicated and for carrying intoxicating liquor underground. The hearing was
held at Bralorne on February 26, 1962, and the defendant pleaded guilty. He
was fined $15 on each charge and $5 costs, for a total of $35.
The owner of the Coffee Creek mine was charged under section 21, General
Rule 40, for failing to dispose of ten cases of dynamite when the mine closed down
in 1957. The hearing was held at Nelson on April 19, 1962, and the owner pleaded
guilty.    He was fined $100 and costs.
The operator of the Salmo quarry of International Stone and Marble Co. Ltd.
was charged under section 21, Rule 42 (a), for leaving dynamite and blasting-caps
around the quarry unattended for a period of a week. The hearing was held at
Salmo on April 24, 1962, and the defendant pleaded guilty. He was fined $100
and costs.
The agent for Paycheck Mining Co. Ltd. was charged under section 21, Rule
40, for failing to dispose of fifty-three cases of dynamite when the mine closed down
in 1954. The hearing was held at Nakusp on October 1, 1962, and the defendant
pleaded guilty.    He was fined $100 and costs.
The manager of the Black Fox mine was charged under section 21, Rule 40,
for failing to dispose of twenty sticks of explosives when the mine closed down.
The charge was laid in Kaslo in October, 1962, but was later dropped when the
defendant proved that the management of the mine was not his responsibility.
BLASTING CERTIFICATE SUSPENSIONS
There were violations of the provisions of the Metalliferous Mines Regulation
Act in regard to the use of explosives and blasting procedure. Blasting certificates
of a total of seven offenders were suspended for periods ranging from one month
to an indefinite period. The offences were failing to guard a blast properly, leaving
explosives improperly stored, using a too lengthy timing device, and smoking near
explosives.
n
 248
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
EXPLOSIVES USED IN MINES
The table below shows the quantities of explosives and ammonium nitrate
used in metal mines and quarries in British Columbia in 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961,
and 1962:—
1958 Total
1959 Total
1960 Total
1961 Total
1962 Total
1962
Mines
Quarries
High explosives (lb.)	
5,485,000
6,319,000
325,000
30,000
872,000
7,188,000
862,000
1,641,000
7,280,000
2,116,000
169,000
2,647,000
4,522,619
2,013,850
2,429,550
5,921,690
3,898,283
1,502,950
2,349,550
5,108,410
624,336
510,900
190,0000
80,000
813,280
The quantity of high explosives used in 1962 decreased 37 per cent over that
used in 1961. However, this large decrease was more than offset by the increased
use of ammonium nitrate explosives. The use of the slurry type of explosive,
Hydromex (ammonium nitrate, T.N.T., and water), remained about constant, but
the do-it-yourself explosive of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil (AN/FO) continued
its spectacular rise in annual consumption. In 1961 the commercial form of
AN/FO (Amex II) was allowed underground and rapidly replaced the standard
explosives. In 1962 a factory licence was issued to The Consolidated Mining and
Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, to blend ammonium nitrate and fuel oil
for use at the Sullivan mine, this being the first of its kind in British Columbia and
the first factory licence issued in several decades for the Province (see photo, p. 86).
This AN/FO type of explosive has good safety features in that it cannot be detonated by ordinary impact, but there is a danger that its fume characteristics will
change under certain conditions. Thus its use is contingent on a permit being
obtained from the Chief Inspector of Mines, Victoria. For those operators who
wish to blend their own ammonium nitrate and fuel oil, written permission must be
obtained from the Chief Inspector of Explosives, Ottawa.
DUST CONTROL AND VENTILATION
On September 1, 1962, the Department undertook the responsibility of
directly carrying out dust and ventilation surveys in mines, quarries, and concentrators. In the past these surveys had been conducted by officials of the Workmen's
Compensation Board and their reports made available to the Inspectors of Mines.
The new set-up is expected to allow for better co-ordination and processing of any
recommendations resulting from these surveys. Two experienced Silicosis Control
Inspectors, R. J. Craig and S. Elias, were transferred to the Department from the
Workmen's Compensation Board. The high level of co-operation with the Board
made this transfer of responsibility possible without any dislocation of services to the
industry. Due recognition is also given to the work of Donald A. MacLeod, Chief
Inspector, Silicosis Branch of the Workmen's Compensation Board, who retired in
September, 1962. Mr. MacLeod pioneered the work of this Branch since its inception in 1937 and was acknowledged as one of Canada's top authorities on dust
control and ventilation.
A summary of the combined work of the Board and the Department, as prepared by R. J. Craig, Senior Inspector, Silicosis Control, follows:—
1. Sixty-six surveys on dust control were made at forty-seven mines during
1962.
 INSPECTION OF MINES
249
2. The main object of this work is to lower the amount of dust breathed by the
workmen as much as possible. It is not known what concentration of silica dust is
considered safe to breathe without producing silicosis as there are other factors to
consider. Recent research is trying to develop an instrument which will sample
dust selectively so that the dust count and silica analysis will represent the respirable
dust retained in a man's lung. Until a better instrument is developed, the count of
300 particles per cubic centimetre as measured with a konimeter remains a concentration that is obtained under good conditions of ventilation and dust control.
3. Stoper drilling operations still produce higher dust counts than usual in the
mine, and for this reason are kept separate from the other averages. During recent
years smaller-bore machines are being used, and the dust counts have improved.
LEGEND
onr\n
MM
 Stoper drilling
l
1
1
\
Leyner   drilling
—
\v
\     A
\.  /   '■
\
\
All others underground
Crushing  plants
"1"i""^J" Open pit  crushing plants
cc
    Assay grinding rooms
^    1500
l\
i
1     I    1     1
u.
11
I
A' ' '
MM
i i i i
i i i i
O
1 v\
1
\
O
1
1
\
O
1
Id
1
1
r
Q.
—
1
1
\
A          /
</)
1         1
\
l\    !
^    1000
'   ■'"'
\
■■ \   <
i
i \   i
o
1 .■    1
I-'    1
i    >    :
i
1-
1
1   /
i
<
11
i
i\
a.
1
V
i.    /»
u.
1   .
\ / \
o
'A
v    •
i •      —
\
.   ■,
<r
1 / .
\ ,
UJ
CO
j§    500
K
V
\
"•
/    s
V
z
' '•    v
V-
v: -
300
\
.
"-'     \_
\-' iv
—\\
/•
.?.         v_-^
t,^      *.   , *•.
-x--'
0
11
MM
MM
MM
MM
MM
1937     40               45                50              1955             60
YEAR
Figure 19. Average dust counts obtained each year since 1937.
 250 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
The dust counts at these operations used to be 2,000 or more particles per cubic
centimetre of air. Seventy-nine per cent of the surveys made in 1962 gave less than
1,000 particles per cubic centimetre.
4. At leyner, jackleg, and plugger drilling operations underground the dust
concentrations are lower than at stoper drilling operations. Sixty-five per cent of the
surveys gave averages of less than 500 particles per cubic centimetre of air.
5. The averages for all other underground locations are quite satisfactory.
Seventy-seven per cent of the surveys made in 1962 gave averages of less than 300
particles per cubic centimetre. This condition is satisfactory when considering that
most of the men work in this lower dust concentration.
6. Sixty-two per cent of the crushing plants at underground operations showed
an average of less than 300 particles per cubic centimetre. This average has been
kept separate from the open pits this year and remains fairly constant.
7. The drilling operations at open-pit mines are the main source of dust.
During the last few years the use of detergent to wet down the dust during drilling
operations has been introduced at most of the mines. This has resulted in lower dust
concentrations. Fifty-four per cent of the open-pit mines showed an average of less
than 500 particles per cubic centimetre at drilling operations. In the other operations at open-pit mines there is very little exposure to dust. Ninety-one per cent of
the surveys of the general atmosphere in open pits apart from the drilling showed an
average of less than 300 particles per cubic centimetre.
8. The dust concentrations found in the crushing plants at the open-pit mines
are higher than normal due to the coarseness and dryness of the ore which is fed to
the plants. Exhaust systems have been installed and water sprays are used as much
as possible to reduce the dust concentrations. Only 20 per cent of the surveys
at crushing plants gave an average of less than 300 particles per cubic centimetre.
More work on dust control will have to be done at these plants.
9. Seventy-one per cent of the surveys made in assay grinding-rooms gave
averages of less than 300 particles per cubic centimetre. All assay grinding-rooms
are equipped with exhaust systems.
10. The percentage of certificates of fitness in good standing held by the
employers for their workmen who require medical examination was more than 94
per cent.
11. Aluminum-powder prophylaxis treatments for the prevention of silicosis
were given in the dry-houses of two of the mines during the year and were made
available at a third mine to those men who desired it.
12. Figure 19 is a graph showing the median of all the averages in various
operations in the metalliferous mines, obtained each year since 1937.
SHIFTBOSS CERTIFICATES
The Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act, as amended in March, 1960, requires
that every person employed underground be under the daily supervision of an official
who is the holder of a shiftboss certificate issued under this Act. An applicant for
a shiftboss certificate is required to pass an examination on the Metalliferous Mines
Regulation Act and general safe working practices. He must have three years'
practical experience or one year plus a degree in mining engineering. He must also
be the holder of a mine-rescue certificate and a first-aid certificate. A fee of $5 is
charged for the examination.
The Board of Examiners may grant provisional certificates under such conditions as the Board considers advisable. During 1962 seventy-seven provisional
certificates were issued, each good for two years from date of issue.   Examinations
~
 INSPECTION OF MINES
251
for permanent certificates were held in Fernie, Victoria, Bralorne, Jordan River,
Beaverdell, Phoenix, Kimberley, Grand Forks, Merritt, Hope, and Vancouver.
Sixty-nine men received certificates, as follows:—
Cert.
No.
Name
Date
Cert.
No.
Name
Date
8
Leonard W. Bishop	
Larry G. Jacobsen	
Olof Gunner Adolphson     	
Colin Edgar Brown	
Raymond Clifford Rowe...
William Patrick MacDonald	
Harry Bapty	
20-6-62
4-1-62
12-1-62
12-1-62
12-1-62
12-2-62
26-2-62
21-3-62
21-3-62
21-3-62
21-3-62
21-3-62
21-3-62
26-3-62
26-3-62
26-3-62
26-3-62
26-3-62
27-3-62
27-3-62
27-3-62
27-3-62
27-3-62
27-3-62
27-3-62
27-3-62
28-3-62
28-3-62
2-4-62
6-4-62
6-4-62
17-4-62
25-4-62
30-4-62
16-5-62
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
Olaf A. Mathers 	
16-5-62
140
141
142
143
Bruno E. Goetting	
Peter R. Matthew	
Theodor S. Romo	
Noel J. Kirby               	
1-6-62
1-6-62
1-6-62
11-6-62
144
145
146
Robert E. Miller  	
Edwin H. P. Paulett	
1-6-62
1-6-62
1-6-62
147
John Robert Barrie 	
William Betcher   	
Arthur Lewis Burrows 	
William Miles Fergus	
6-7-62
148
6-7-62
149
6-7-62
150
151
Douglas W. Thompson —	
6-7-62
6-7-62
152
6-7-62
153
6-7-62
154
6-7-62
155
156
Clifford J. Simons	
Allan M. Morrison	
John Michael Millner	
6-7-62
6-7-62
157
6-7-62
158
6-7-62
159
William Hogg Graham	
6-7-62
160
Fritz Fred Arthur Westman	
Thomas Manville Waterland	
10-7-62
161
26-7-62
162
26-7-62
163
Edwin O. Fitch	
Michael N. Osoko 	
26-7-62
164
165
Lawrence H. Kniert	
7-8-62
7-11-62
166
7-11-62
167
7-11-62
168
7-12-62
169
Merl A. Rodocker	
7-12-62
170
7-12-62
171
172
Donald L. Lindley  	
William K. Wilson.....	
Charles Eugene Gobert	
Kurt F. Dahlke	
7-12-62
7-12-62
173
MINE RESCUE, SAFETY, AND FIRST AID
The promotion of mine rescue and first aid continued at a high level throughout 1962. Three mine-rescue stations were fully maintained and another on a part-
time basis. An instructor qualified in mine rescue and first aid was available at
each station. Each station is equipped with sufficient self-contained oxygen breathing apparatus to maintain two mine-rescue teams of six men each should any emergency in nearby mines arise. There are also sets of mine-rescue equipment maintained at various mines, either on loan from the Department or owned by the mine.
In 1962 Department-owned equipment totalled fifty McCaa two-hour apparatus
and forty-four Chemox three-quarter-hour apparatus, while that owned by mining
companies totalled forty-three McCaa's and fifty-two Chemox's. Each station also
has auxiliary equipment such as all-service masks, self-rescuers, gas detectors, in-
halators, and a complete set of first-aid equipment. The district instructor makes
a periodic check of mine-rescue and first-aid equipment at mines in his district.
The station at Cumberland was maintained to serve the Tsable River coal mine
with an instructor hired on a part-time basis. In December an underground fire
broke out at Britannia (see Dangerous Occurrences), and the station's supply of
all-service canisters was moved to the mine as a precautionary measure. A truck
is kept at the station for emergency purposes.
The Kamloops station was moved from Princeton in 1961. A mobile unit is
used to give service over a wide area.   Mine-rescue and (or) first-aid training were
 252
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
given at the Kamloops Copper, Phoenix Copper, Giant Mascot, Clayburn-Harbison,
Craigmont, Bethlehem, Cassiar Asbestos, Highland Bell, Bralorne Pioneer, Cariboo
Gold Quartz, Cowichan Copper, and Britannia mines. Classes in mine rescue were
held for prospectors and exploration geologists at Kamloops and Vancouver, with
special emphasis on the dangers of entering abandoned mines. The first-aid classes
held in communities near mines were open to the general public. Emergency calls
consisted of a first-aid case at Kamloops, a highway truck fire, and an underground
fire at Britannia.
The mine-rescue station at Fernie is maintained principally to serve the coal
mines in the area, but assistance in mine-rescue training is also given to personnel
of the Sullivan and Mineral King mines. Thirty-eight candidates completed the
course in mine rescue and were awarded certificates. First-aid classes were fairly
well attended, and twenty-nine persons completed the courses and received awards.
There were no emergency calls for equipment during 1962.
The East and West Kootenay areas have been serviced since 1950 by a mobile
mine-rescue unit stationed at Nelson. Mine-rescue courses were held at the Bluebell, Jersey, H.B., Reeves MacDonald, and Mineral King mines. First-aid classes
were also given at most mines or nearby villages.
A certificate of competency in mine-rescue work is granted to each man who
takes the training course and passes the examination set by the Department. For
those who take a refresher course, a sticker is given for attaching to the certificate.
All mine-rescue men are also entitled to a hat emblem. During 1962, in addition
to the regular teams in training, 117 men took the course and were granted certificates, as follows:—
Certificate No.
Name
Where Trained
Certificate No,
Name
Where Trained
3341
3342
3343
3344
3345
3346
3347
3348
3349
3350
3351
3352
3353
3354
3355
3356
3357
3358
3359
3360
3361
3362
3363
3364
3365
3366
3367
3368
3369
3370
3371
3372
3373
3374
3375
3376
3377
Donald Ian McKinnon	
Terrance John Millar	
Leonard Raymond Root	
Wayne E. Zinger 	
Alexander John Wasnock.—
William Joseph Thomson...
Charles Alfred Hornquist...
Albert Henry Brulotte	
Don Ivon Slavens 	
Victor Lawrence Gleason...
Gordon Peters      _	
John Michael Millner—	
Lionel John Lambie—	
Melvin Victor Maki	
Harold Samuel Aikins	
Douglas Wayne Thompson
Kenneth Lawrence Chatson
James Stanley Whiting	
Andrew Robertson _
George Howard Fedorek....
Walter Strukoff 	
Gerhard F. Bosinski	
William John Durham	
Arthur Wilkinson  _
Howard E. Debnam —
James J. Kermeen — 	
Arthur R. Topp	
Stanley Anthony Wasiewicz
Norman H. McLeod _
George D. Moore	
Ray Schmidt—	
Merl A. Rodocker.	
Cornelius Richert	
William Colin McLoughlin
Wendell Lee McLeod	
Joel Ackert	
John Toften	
Kamloops.
Kamloops.
Kamloops.
Kamloops.
Fernie.
Fernie.
Fernie.
Fernie.
Fernie.
Fernie.
Fernie.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Fernie.
Grand Forks.
Grand Forks.
Grand Forks.
Grand Forks.
Grand Forks.
Grand Forks.
Grand Forks.
Fernie.
Hope.
Hope.
Hope.
Hope.
Hope.
Merritt.
Riondel.
Salmo.
Salmo.
3378
3379
3380
3381
3382
3383
3384
3385
3386
3387
3388
3389
3390
3391
3392
3393
3394
3395
3396
3397
3398
3399
3400
3401
3402
3403
3404
3405
3406
3407
3408
3409
3410
3411
3412
3413
3414
Andrew Wingerak	
Jack Peters	
Basilio Bertucci 	
Adelio Tovani  _	
Emilo Anemone 	
TitoCalzuola  _	
ImreKametler  _.
Richard Karl Grawehr	
Gunter Rentmeister	
ImreTarpal  	
Dennis James Gordon	
Laszlo Paul Riha  	
Ameodeo DeLaurentis	
Ernest Oppliger...  	
Ralph (Raffaele) Grigolette
John (Janos) Ruha	
Oriano Bacci  —
Kurt Stahl	
Heinz E. Kreuzer 	
Paul Heuscher	
Jack Keller	
William Hingsburger 	
Richard Davis Smith	
John Roehricht	
Raymond L. Frederick	
Gaston Chavigny  	
Norman David Long	
Edmund Paul Walters	
Stephen Earl King 	
Bernardus J. T. H. VanRyne
James Scholes Thomson	
Charles M. Campbell	
Thomas E. Dexter	
Gordon A. Boychuk	
Marius VanHerk	
Rene Dupasquier	
Kenneth Ross Gordon	
Salmo.
Fernie.
Mineral King.
Mineral King.
Mineral King.
Mineral King.
Mineral King.
Mineral King.
Mineral King.
Mineral King.
Mineral King.
Mineral King.
Mineral King.
Mineral King.
Mineral King.
Mineral King.
Mineral King.
Salmo.
Salmo.
Salmo.
Salmo.
Salmo.
Ashcroft.
Beaverdell.
Beaverdell.
Bralorne.
Ashcroft.
Ashcroft.
Ashcroft.
Bralorne.
Bralorne.
Bralorne.
Bralorne.
Bralorne.
Bralorne.
Bralorne.
Bralorne.
 INSPECTION OF MINES
253
Certificate No.
Name
Where Trained
Certificate No.
Name
Where Trained
3415
Bralorne.
Bralorne.
Bralorne.
Bralorne.
Bralorne.
Bralorne.
Mineral King.
Britannia Beach.
Britannia Beach.
Britannia Beach.
Riondel.
Riondel.
Riondel.
Riondel.
Riondel.
Riondel.
Riondel.
Riondel.
Riondel.
Riondel.
Riondel.
3436
3437
3438
3439
3440
3441
3442
3443
3444
3445
3446
3447
3448
3449
3450
3451
3452
3453
3454
3456
3457
Carl Otto Walker	
Eric Walter Holdsworth	
Robert Edward LaJavenesse
Ambrose Schwarz	
Bernard E. Schneider	
Allan C. Bruce	
3416
William E. Field -    .
3417
3418
3419
Donald B. Cameron	
Arne Rasmussen	
Riondel.
Wells.
Wells.
3420
3421
George N. Woollett	
Wells.
Wells.
3422
Albert H n R»iss
William A. Prescott-    .. -
Wells.
3423
Pfliil WnnrlilrnfF
Wells.
3424
3425
William Marsh McKenzie—
Stephanus Petrus VanRoo-
Hendrik W. Felderhof.	
3426
3427
Dwight McEwan Collins	
Edwin Alfred Shannon	
3428
3429
George L. Dvorak	
3430
Howard Andrew Simpson	
Donald Ralph Roemer	
3431
3432
Oswald Joseph Rottmann	
3433
Guiseppe Collazzo	
Gregory Stockerl	
Jordan River.
3434
3435
The mine safety associations in different centres of the Province, sponsored
by the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources and aided by company officials, safety supervisors, Inspectors of Mines, and mine-rescue instructors, continued to promote mine-rescue, first-aid, and safety education in their respective
districts.
The Bridge River Valley Mine Safety Association held its annual competition
at Bralorne on April 28, 1962. This was a first-aid meet with events for juniors
and seniors. The senior event was designed for good spectator appeal in that it
demonstrated what could happen if a grandstand collapsed and five people were
injured.   The event was won by a team captained by M. Mitchell.
The Vancouver Island Mine Safety Association held its forty-eighth annual
competition in Cumberland on May 26, 1962. Three teams competed in the
mine-rescue event—two from the Tsable River mine and a visiting team from
Bralorne. The winning team was from the Tsable River mine and was captained
by J. Thomson.
The West Kootenay Mine Safety Association held its sixteenth annual competition at Riondel on June 2, 1962. Four teams took part in the mine-rescue event—
two from the Bluebell mine and one each from the Canadian Exploration and H.B.
mines.  A Bluebell team, captained by P. E. Rowan, took first place.
The East Kootenay Mine Safety Association held its forty-first annual competition at Kimberley on June 9, 1962. Four teams took part in the mine-rescue event
—one each from Michel, Fernie, Kimberley, and Toby Creek. First place was won
by the Mineral King team from Toby Creek, captained by B. A. Maconachie.
The Central British Columbia Mine Safety Association held its fourteenth
annual competition at Kamloops on June 16, 1962. Six teams took part in the
mine-rescue competition—one each from the Highland Bell, Craigmont, Bethlehem,
Britannia, Cariboo Gold Quartz, and Bralorne mines. The Bralorne team, captained by T. W. Illidge, took first place.
At all four preceding meets, competitions were held in first-aid as well as
mine-rescue work. In these competitions, events were held for women and juniors.
There were entries in these competitions from industries and organizations not
necessarily connected with mining.
 254 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
The seventh Provincial mine-rescue competition was held at Nelson on June
23, 1962. The winning teams from the Cumberland, Kimberley, Riondel, and
Kamloops events competed for a trophy and silver trays. The event was won by
the Bralorne Pioneer mine, captained by T. W. Illidge. The team also won a silver
cup which has been donated by the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter
Workers for annual competition for mine-rescue teams from metalliferous mines.
In conjunction with this competition, the Workmen's Compensation Board sponsored the sixth Provincial men's first-aid competition and St. John Ambulance
sponsored the fourth Provincial ladies' first-aid competition. Teams competed
which had won local events at Victoria, Terrace, Vancouver, Kimberley, Kamloops,
Cumberland, and Riondel. The men's winning team was the Warfield Engineering
No. 2 team, captained by K. H. Hill. The ladies' winning team was the Vancouver
First Aid Ski Patrol team, captained by C. Hill.
JOHN T. RYAN TROPHY
In metalliferous mining a new record has been established. The H.B. mine
of The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, had a
zero accident frequency in 1962 and became the only mine in Canada to have
achieved this for the fourth time. This fine accomplishment had its beginning in
1958 and was continued in 1959, 1961, and 1962. Thus the Regional Award
again goes to this mine, and the Dominion Trophy is shared with Quebec Lithium
Corporation, another mine with a zero accident frequency.
In coal-mining the Michel Colliery of The Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company
Limited won the Dominion Ryan Trophy as well as the Regional Award. This is
noteworthy as it is the second time in the history of the competition that the
Dominion Trophy has come to British Columbia.
WEST KOOTENAY MINE SAFETY ASSOCIATION TROPHY
The West Kootenay Mine Safety Association in 1951 donated a safety trophy
for annual competition in order to encourage and promote safety in small mines
not eligible for the John T. Ryan awards. At first the trophy was restricted to
mines in the West Kootenay area, but in 1956 this restriction was removed.
The award is made to the mine having the lowest accident rate and working
a total of from 2,500 to 30,000 shifts per year, one-third of these having been
worked underground. An accident is taken as one which involved more than three
days' loss of time.
In 1962 the award was won by the Benson Lake mine of The Consolidated
Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited. This is an excellent record,
it being the second year of operation for this mine and the second time it has won
the award.
SAFETY COMPETITION, OPEN-PIT MINES AND QUARRIES
The open-pit or quarry industry has become increasingly important to the
economy of British Columbia, but while its safety record has compared favourably
with the rest of the mining industry, there has been little recognition of this fact.
In 1961 the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources instituted a safety
competition for this industry and put up awards and a trophy for annual competition.
The trophy is awarded to the operation having worked a minimum of 75,000
man-hours in the year and having the lowest number of compensable injuries per
million man-hours of exposure.    For those operations which amass over 15,000
 Inspection of Electrical Equipment and Installations
at Mines, Quarries, and Well Drilling Rigs
By L. Wardman, Senior Electrical Inspector
ELECTRIC POWER
In 1962 electric power was used by thirty-seven companies in operations at
thirty-three lode mines, one placer mine, and three collieries. Twenty-nine metallurgical mills were operated. Electric power was also used at twenty-three structural-
material and industrial-mineral mines and quarries. Electric power was used on
sixty-six drilling rigs in drilling on 333 well locations.
LODE-METAL MlNES
At six properties electrical installations commenced in 1962 were completed
and put into service. One power plant formerly in use on the surface was installed
underground, and one power plant taken out of service in 1959 was returned to
service.   Operations at four properties using electric power were terminated.
The kilovolt-ampere generating capacity of mining-company-owned plants
which operated in 1962 is given below:—
Generator Kva.
Prime Mover Capacity
Diesel engines   18,705
Water-wheels   13,385
Steam turbines     1,800
Total  33,890
The electric power produced by the above-mentioned plants amounted to
approximately 576,633,677 kilowatt-hours. The power purchased from public
utilities and from the generating division of The Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Company of Canada, Limited, amounted to 259,004,671 kilowatt-hours. The total
amount of power consumed at lode mines was 835,638,348 kilowatt-hours.
A general breakdown of the connected load follows:—
Equipment Horsepower
Hoists (incline and shaft)   5,770
Hoists (scraper)   7,289
Fans (mine ventilating)   2,408
Pumps (mine unwatering)   6,158
Rectifiers and M.G. sets  6,188
Air compressors (supplying mining equipment)   19,368
Crushing   14,772
Sink float  1,900
Grinding   28,162
Concentrating   15,917
Pumps  (mill)   10,236
Shovels and rotary drills  1,325
Workshops   2,221
Miscellaneous   6,751
12
Total   128,465
279
 280 MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT,  1962
In addition to electrically powered equipment, there was in use approximately
16,916 horsepower of prime movers driving direct-connected or belt-connected
equipment as tabulated below:—
Prime Mover Horsepower
Diesel engines   12,279
Water-wheels      4,597
Gasoline engines   40
Total  16,916
On the haulage systems there were in use 101 battery locomotives, ninety-one
trolley locomotives, and seventeen diesel locomotives.
STRUCTURAL-MATERIAL AND INDUSTRIAL-MINERAL MlNES AND QUARRIES
Electric power was used at twenty-three structural-material and industrial-
mineral mines and quarries. Electric power is purchased from public utilities for
these operations, with the exception of those in remote areas, which, of necessity,
must produce their own power. The capacity of company-owned plants was approximately 3,966 kilovolt-amperes.
Approximately 14,789,200 kilowatt-hours of power was generated and 8,372,-
891 kilowatt-hours was purchased, making a total of 23,262,091 kilowatt-hours of
power consumed.
The distribution of the connected load was approximately as follows:—
Equipment Horsepower
Hoists (incline)   252
Hoists (scraper)   205
Fans (ventilating and dust-collecting)   48
Pumps  1,145
Rectifiers and M.G. sets  38
Air compressors  769
Electric drills and shovels  75
Crushing (includes drying)  5,244
Conveyors  2,930
Screens   906
MiUing   2,613
Workshops  319
Miscellaneous   1,573
Total  16,117
At these properties there was also direct-driven equipment totalling 4,813
horsepower.
One battery locomotive was used for underground haulage.
Coal Mines
There was no increase or decrease in the number of collieries using electric
power.   The distribution of the connected load follows:—
 INSPECTION OF ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 281
Surface  Horsepower
Compressors   3,940
Ventilation  1,03 0
Hoisting      908
Haulage         25
Coal washing and screening  2,015
Pumping         65
Coke production  1,180
Miscellaneous       820
Total     9,983
Underground—
Ventilation      440
Hoisting      264
Haulage      445
Coal-loaders         84
Conveying  2,212
Pumping _-      510
Compressors       425
Borecuts      225
Continuous miners  1,020
Coal-cutters         50
Miscellaneous       670
Total     6,345
Total for surface and underground  16,328
Four battery locomotives and two diesel locomotives were in use for haulage
above and below ground.
A total of 26,983,710 kilowatt-hours of electric power was used for mining
and coal processing.
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS
LODE MINES
Unuk River (56° 130° S.E.)
For many years this company has had a snowslide problem
Granduc Mines at the mine that prevented the erection of permanent build-
Limited ings.   To avoid the danger of slides, an excavation was made
underground to house three 150-kw. 480-volt three-phase
a.c. generators, one 250-kw. and one 350-kw. 2,300-volt three-phase a.c. generators
driven by diesel engines. Three single-phase 150-kva. 2,300-480-volt transformers
connected the 2,300- and 480-volt systems. The equipment supplied by this plant
consists of a 200-horsepower 2,300-volt hoist motor, two 75-horsepower and one
125-horsepower 480-volt pump motors, and one 10-horsepower fan motor in the
mine. In the power-house three 125-horsepower 480-volt air-compressor motors
are supplied. There is also a fourth air compressor driven by a diesel engine. The
exhaust from the diesel engines is carried to the surface by a special ventilation raise.
In addition to the foregoing, a new 300-kw. diesel-driven generator and a 4.5-
kw. Powertronic battery-charger was installed. Five 60-horsepower Flygt pumps
for emergency and stand-by use were installed.
 282
MINES AND PETROLEUM RESOURCES REPORT.  1962
Alice Arm (55° 129° N.W.)
During the summer some work was done at the Torbrit power
Dolly Varden       plant to put it in service for development work at the Dolly
Mines Ltd. Varden mine.   Repair work was done on the control dam.
The penstock pipe-line to the power plant has been retim-
bered.   The power-plant buildings were renovated and the generating equipment
was reinstalled.   The 13,000-volt power-line was rebuilt and the camp distribution
was rewired.
Queen Charlotte Islands
Harriet Harbour (52° 131° S.E.)
A crushing plant, haulage system, mill, and loading-dock was
Jedway Iron Ore     built and put into operation.    At the open pit a pan-feeder
Limited driven by a 20-horsepower 460-volt motor and a jaw crusher
driven by a 200-horsepower 460-volt motor were installed.
In the crushing plant a 4V2-inch jaw crusher and a 4-inch jaw crusher, each driven
by a 150-horsepower motor, were installed.    Other equipment consists of two
feeders, nine conveyors, two screens, and a drum conveyor.
In the mill a rod mill driven by a 400-horsepower 2,300-volt motor was installed. Other equipment consists of a classifier, two magnetic drum separators,
pumps, filter, and conveyors.
The loading-dock system consists of eight feeders and six conveyors.
The power plant for this system consists of three 1,250-kva. a.c. generators
driven by diesel engines.
A trolley haulage system transports the ore from the primary crusher at the
pit to the secondary crusher at the mill. Two trolley locomotives and one battery
locomotive are in use.
Lillooet
Bridge River (50° 122° N.W.)
Bralorne Pioneer Mines Limited.—The grinding section of the new mill was
completed and put into service. Details of the equipment installed are given in the
1961 Annual Report.
Anderson Lake (50° 122° N.E.)
A 100-ton mill was built on the property consisting of the
following equipment:   A jaw crusher driven by a 25-horse-
power motor, two conveyors driven by 5-horsepower motors,
a pan-feeder driven by a 3-horsepower motor, a gyro-crusher
driven by a 30-horsepower motor, a vibrating screen driven
by a 30-horsepower motor, a conveyor driven by a 2-horsepower motor, a ball mill
driven by a 75-horsepower motor, a jig and an amalgam barrel each driven by a
2-horsepower motor, and a Dorclone pump driven by a 5-horsepower motor.
The power plant consists of a 250-kva. 2,300-volt a.c. generator driven by a
diesel engine and a 25-kva. 208/120-volt stand-by unit driven by a gasoline engine.
A bank of three 37V£-kva. 2,300-240-volt transformers connect the two units to
the distribution system. A bank of three 100-kva. 2,300-240-volt transformers,
connected delta-wye to give 440 volts, supply the motors.
Golden Contact
(Cassiar Copper-
fields Limited)
 INDEX
301
Page
lames, H. T .     17
Jamieson Construction Co. Ltd., sand and
gravel  160
Jamieson, Frank  139
Janes, R. H  146
Jedway Iron Ore Limited A 47, 11
electrical installations  282
Jeffery, W. G A 59
Jeletzky, J. A  117
Jericho Mines Ltd.     50
Jersey, 49° 117° S.E A 49, 75
electrical installations  283
Jessie A 47
Jessiman, K.   148
Jib, 52° 131" S.E      13
JO, 55° 130° N.E        9
Johnsby Mines Limited     82
Johnson, Carl E.  141
Page
Johnson, D. L A 62,  170
Johnson, F     63
Johnson, Harold Dean  239
Johnson, J. K.  155
Johnston, H. B  105
joint offices, B.C. Department of Mines
and Petroleum Resources and Department of Mines and Technical Surveys._A 70
Jones, A. L. A 47
Jones, H  103
Jones, W. C A 59
field work A 61
Jordan River, 48" 124° S.E  127
electrical installations  286
Jorgenson, A.  100
Juan de Fuca Mining Company Limited... 104
Justice, 50° 120° S.W     55
K
K. Belle Enterprise Company Limited.A 49, 74
Kamloops area    59
Kamloops Copper Company Ltd. 60, 140
Kamloops Mining Division A 66
Karmutson group    98
Keithley Creek, 52° 121° N.E., placer  142
Kelly, J A 50, 83
Kelly, John  139
Kelowna Exploration Limited     80
Kennco Explorations (Western) Limited,
Endako     17
FAN      68
Galore Creek      7
MATT     67
Minex Development     50
Kennedy, R. W 60, 140
Kennedy Lake area, geology of  111
electrical installations  286
limestone  151
Kent, Corporation of the District of, sand
and gravel  161
Kenville (White Lease), 49° 117° S.E...... A 49
Keremeos area     64
Kermeen, J. S.     69
Keystone   Concrete   Limited,   sand   and
gravel   163
Kid, 58° 131° S.W       7
Kiernan, Hon. W. K  A 2
Kilgard, 49° 122° S.E., clay and shale ..... 149
Kimberley area, electrical installations  284
lode     8 5
placer  143
.A 46, 16
..A 47, 97
     64
Kindrat, P	
Kingfisher, 50° 127° S.E	
King Edward, 49° 119° S.W. .....
King Gething Mines, 56° 122° S.E., coal._ 278
King Midas, 49° 118° S.W A 48
King Midas Mines Ltd A 48, 69
Kinney, L. M 76, 87
Kinvig, Tom  142
Kirbyville Creek, 51° 118° N.W., placer.... 143
Kirkpatrick, W. S     85
Kirkpatrick Sand and Gravel Co. Ltd.,
sand and gravel  161
Kitimat area     14
Kitimat Concrete Products (1961) Ltd.,
sand and gravel  159
Kitsul Bros., sand and gravel  162
Kitsumkalum Lake area     15
Klaanch, 50° 126° S.W     96
Kludash, W  143
Knapp, J     92
Kniert, Kenneth  273
Knudson, L. E   141
Korpack Cement Products Limited, sand
and gravel  159
Kootenay Base Metals Ltd.     15
Kootenay Belle, 49° 117° S.E A 49, 74
Kopan Developments Limited     83
Kotush, P  143
Krall, John  272
Krall, Thomas  271
Kusnir, Paul  274
Lac la Hache area  20
Lafarge Cement of North America Ltd. .94, 149
Laforme, G.  144
Lahay, James  138
Lamb, John ■  100
lamps, safety  263
Lancaster, George  275
Lang, Ernest  142
Langley, Corporation of the Township of,
sand and gravel  162
Larsen, Eric   140
Lasser   Trucking   Company,   sand   and
gravel   160
.268, 269
15
Lawrence, S. J.	
Lazenby, H. S.	
lead, deposits (see table)        ... 290
dividends A 41
price A 16
production A 17-27, A 46
Learning, S. F. A 73
Learmonth, A. J.    22
Lefevre, H. W     70
Lefevre, R     70
Lehigh Portland Cement Company  151
Lehn, D. G    79
Leitch, H. C. B     45
 302
INDEX
Page
Lemieux, Fernand  90
Leonard, G. E   64
Lepp Trucking, sand and gravel  162
Lewis, Glyn  267
Lewis mine, 49° 123° S.W   267
Liard Mining Division A 66
Lightning Creek, 53° 122° S.E., electrical
installations  286
placer  140
Lillooet area  21
electrical installations  282
Lillooet Mining Division A 66
limestone, production A 17, A 18, A 34
Blubber Bay  155
Cobble Hill  156
Fort Steele  154
Kennedy Lake area  151
Popkum  154
Swift Creek  154
Vananda  155
Zymoetz River  153
Lina Creek, 59° 133° N.W., placer  137
Lincoln, 49° 118° S.W   69
Lind, C. E  79
Lindeman, E.  111
Lineham, J. D A 2, A 62, 170
Linton's Construction Co. Ltd., sand and
gravel  163
Lippmann, J. D  73
Lisbon Creek, 49° 115° N.W., placer.  143
Little, H. W 	
Little Lake group	
Little Snowshoe Creek,
placer
52°   121°  N.E.,
Pagb
..A 73
98
142
Littler, Albert    271
Liz, 59° 129° S.W        6
Liz B, 49° 116° S.E     84
lode metal, deposits referred to in report... 289
electric power  279
methods of computing production A 13
lode metals, production	
.....A 17, A 18, A20, A 21, A 22, A 24, A 26
Lodge, 50° 120° N.W     47
Loma Minerals Limited     82
Lorimer, M. K.     55
Lost Creek, 55° 124° N.E., placer  137
Loudon, J. R.
Loudon, William	
Loudon No. 6 mine, 49'
Lougheed   Gravel  Co.
gravel	
Louise Island
124° S.E., coal...
Ltd.,   sand   and
7
268
268
160
13
Louis Salvador & Son, sand and gravel  159
Lucie-Smith, A. N A 63
Lucky Jim, 49° 121° S.W  -....   93
Lucky Strike, 49° 117° S.E A 49
Lulu Island, 49° 123° S.E., cement   149
Lungley, A. F 49, 59
Lynx, 49° 125° N.W  107
Lyon, H A 50
Mc and Mac
McArthur, W. E., Sr A 46, 110
McCammon, J. W  A 59
field work A 61
reports by...146, 149, 150-154, 156, 157, 164
McClay, S. J. O.
McCollough, Hector —
McConachie, Bertram
McConnell, Roy	
McCrae, D. G. 	
McCready, G. E.
105
137
269
238
139
79
McCulloch Creek, 51° 118° N.W., placer 144
MacCulloch, J. P    140
McCutcheon, A. D     93
McDame, 59° 129° S.W., electrical installations   287
McDearmid, J. M.     76
McDiarmid, N. H.  49, 54, 64
MacDonald, Francis J.  148
McDonald Island      16
McDonald, J. D A 58
report by  69-84,147, 164
127
69
138
93
105
MacDonald, Oswood G.
MacDonald, P. 	
MacDonald, R. 	
McDougall, A. J.	
McDougall, J. J.
McGauley   Ready-Mix   Concrete   Com
pany, sand and gravel
McGillivray Gold Mines Ltd.
McGonigle, F. A.	
McGuire, Andrew	
Mclsaac, A. D.	
Mclnnes, John	
159
... 24
21, 22
... 139
... 277
... 273
Mcintosh, J. S. ..
Mcintosh  Sand
gravel
and Gravel,   sand  and
161
McKay, Walter   270
McKechnie, N. D A 59, A 63
field work A 61
reports by 56-59, 61-65,
68-73, 90, 93, 95,  105-110,  125-129
McKee Creek, 59° 133° S.W., placer .  137
McKinney, C  158
McKinney Gold Mines Limited A 47, 66
MacKinnon, R. J.
McLanders, Peter
MacLean, J 	
McLelland, W. A.
McLeod, D.
MacLeod, Donald A. 	
McLeod, R. R.  A 62, A 63,
MacLeod, W. H A 49,
McMahon, J. J.	
McMartin Explorations Ltd. 	
McMichael, R. R 	
MacMillan,   Bloedel   and   Powell
Limited  	
River
89
139
68
55
9
248
170
83
69
141
74
123
46
McNabb, L. O	
McNabb Creek, 49° 123° N.E., building-
stone   148
McNeil, Charles     19
McPherson, William  147, 164
MacRae, N. D     63
McRae Bros. Ltd., sand and gravel  163
McVeigh, Frank   274

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