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Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the YEAR ENDED MARCH 31 1963 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1964

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Annual Report of the
Department of Social Welfare
for the
YEAR ENDED MARCH 31
1963
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1963
  Victoria, B.C., November 1, 1963.
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the year ended
March 31, 1963, is herewith respectfully submitted.
W. D. BLACK,
Minister of Social Welfare.
Office of the Minister of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
 Department of Social Welfare,
Victoria, B.C., November 1, 1963.
The Honourable W. D. Black,
Minister of Social Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Social Welfare for the year ended March 31, 1963.
E. R. RICKINSON,
Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
 DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE
April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Hon. W. D. Black Minister of Social Welfare.
SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
E. R. Rickinson Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
J. A. Sadler Director of Social Welfare.
R. J. Burnham Assistant Director of Social Welfare.
DIVISIONAL AND INSTITUTIONAL ADMINISTRATION
J. McDiarmid. Departmental Comptroller.
Miss M. K. King Superintendent of Child Welfare.
F. G. Hassard Superintendent, Brannan Lake School for Boys.
Miss W. M. Urquhart Superintendent, Willingdon School for Girls.
Dr. P. W. Laundy Director of Medical Services.
E. W. Berry Chairman, Old-age Assistance and Blind Persons'
and Disabled Persons' Allowances and Supplementary Assistance.
Mrs. M. Miller Personnel Officer.
G. P. Willie Superintendent, Provincial Home.
N. S. Brooke ( Casework Supervisors, Social Assistance and
Mrs. J. P. Scott \     Rehabilitation Division.
D. W. Fowler Training Supervisor.
Mrs. M. Titterington Supervisor, Social Service Department, Division
of Tuberculosis Control.
A. A. Shipp Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions.
REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
Miss M. Jamieson Administrator, Region I.
H. E. Blanchard Administrator, Region II.
R. I. Stringer Administrator, Region HI.
W. J. Camozzi Administrator, Region IV.
V. H. Dallamore Administrator, Region V.
A. E. Bingham Administrator, Region VI.
W. H. Crossley Administrator, Region VII.
CONSULTANTS
C W. Gorby Juvenile Delinquency Prevention Services.
Miss A. E. Mann Medical Social Work.
Mrs. C. Mackenzie Office Procedures.
F. S. Hatcher Rehabilitation.
Miss B. W. Snider Research.
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Part I.—General Administration—
Director of Social Welfare     9
Assistant Director of Social Welfare  12
Part II.—Regional Administration—
Region I  15
Region II  16
Region III  18
Region IV  22
Region V  23
Region VI  26
Region VII  29
Part III.—Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division—
Social Allowances Section  3 3
Child Welfare Division..  39
Medical Services Division  5 8
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowances, Disabled Persons' Allowances, and Supplementary Assistance  61
Part IV—Institutions—
Brannan Lake School for Boys      77
Willingdon School for Girls  82
Provincial Home, Kamloops  8 6
Welfare Institutions Board  8 9
Part V.—Social Work Services—
Division of Tuberculosis Control and Pearson Poliomyelitis Pavilion  94
Part VI.—Accounting Division  97
  Report of the Department of Social Welfare
PART I.—GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE
J. A. Sadler
Welfare services as supplied by this Department have an impact on every community in the Province. Aged people facing financial difficulties, children unwanted
in their homes, and families needing guidance turn to the Department for help.
In the following pages are details of the work carried out by the divisional and
field staffs.
Balance and co-ordination of all efforts to assist persons in this Province who
need help are necessary functions. Resources must be planned for and provided,
but it is essential that no one group in a community receives benefit to the detriment
of some other services to some other groups. To maintain a balanced service, it is
necessary to allot the efforts of the staff and the funds available to where the greatest
needs arise.
During the past year, concentration on child welfare and family problems has
taken place. All familities in receipt of assistance are not necessarily in need of
casework services, but guidance is often essential, otherwise we have a deteriorating
family effect which ultimately may make it necessary to remove children from the
family and place them in the care of the Province.
Rehabilitation is essential when a person is in need of retraining or extra training to make him available for work. The effects of automation are being felt, and
the untrained and handicapped persons are finding more and more difficulty in
obtaining employment. These people must be helped to readjust, otherwise they
would become a permanent charge on the community. The rehabilitation team and
committes throughout the Province are concentrating on this phase of the programme of the Department.
Child welfare work has increased, but it must be borne in mind that more and
more of the population in the Province is under the age of 15 years. In other
words, we have more youngsters in our Province this year who must begin to make
their own way in life and who in many instances need help and guidance. These
youngsters do not come wholly from familities in low-income groups but do represent a cross-section of the community.
The number of aged persons is increasing, but again this year less of these
individuals over the age of 70 years have needed help in the way of supplementary
assistance from the Department. The trend for such extra help continues downward, and with increasing pensions and superannuation plans this trend should
continue.
The number of persons and familities being helped through social allowance
is approximately the same as last year. This is a large group, but, of course, does
not consist of the same people from month to month. Table II shows that 61,565
cases were opened during the year and 60,798 cases closed. If the figures remained
constant with few new cases opened and no cases closed, alarm could be felt because
it would mean that we had in the Province a large number of persons who were
being carried on long-term public assistance.    Fortunately this is not the case.
 I 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The demand for institutional and health care remains nearly constant, and
those being helped are mostly aged and infirm. These people can no longer remain
in their own homes, and their care must be subsidized at either the boarding-home
or nursing-home level.
In order to learn more about the families and people who are being helped, the
Research Consultant has carried on surveys in various parts of the Province to make
sure that the type of assistance which the Department is giving is of the best and
is focused to the needs of the families themselves.
Some families present problems, and the Department is carrying out research
projects and working with these families in an endeavour to change their patttern
of living so that the children in these families will not continue in the same manner
as their parents and will have the opportunity of becoming well-integrated citizens.
The tables which follow show the case load by number, categories, movement
in the case load itself, and the number of cases involved. Each figure represents
an individual, whether it be a baby awaiting adoption, an elderly person ill and in
need of help, or an unemployed bread-winner facing family problems as well as
financial need. These are the people the Department has been working with during
the past year.
Table L-
-Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
as at March 31st for the Years 1962 and 1963
Category
1962
1963
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Centi
1,325
28,026
684
8,420
31,262
2,261
7,362
795
1.7
35.0
0.9
10.5
39.0
2.8
9.2
1.0
1,601
28,793
678
8,312
29,628
2,380
8,139
808
2.0
35.8
Blind Persons' Allowance2  ._ _	
0.8
10.3
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance2. _	
36.9
3.0
Child Welfare        -	
10.1
1.0
80,135
100.0
80,339
100.0
1 Percentage may not add to 100.0 due to rounding.
2 Includes Old-age Assistance Board figures which are not shown in regional reports.
Table II.—Movement in Case Load during Fiscal Year 1962/63
Major Category of Service
Cases Opened during Year
Cases Closed during Year
Number
Per Centi
Number
Per Cent
2,178
61,565
314
1,099
5,141
10,396
8,491
532
2.4
68.6
0.3
1.2
5.7
11.6
9.5
0.6
1,902
60,798
320
980
5,249
12,030
7,714
519
2.1
67.9
Blind Persons' Allowance  _ — 	
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Old-age Assistance        _	
0.4
1.1
5.9
13.4
Child Welfare -   - -	
8.6
0.6
89,716
100.0
89,512
100.0
i Percentage may not add to 100.0 due to rounding.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1962/63
I 11
Table III.—Number of Cases by Category and as a Percentage of Population
as at March 31st for the Years 1962 and 1963
1962
1963
Category
Number
Per Cent of
Population
(1,629,082)
Number
Per Cent of
Population
(1,695,000)
1,325
28,026
684
8,420
31,262
2,261
7,362
795
0.08
1.72
0.04
0.52
1.92
0.14
0.45
0.05
1,601
28,793
678
8,312
29,628
2,380
8,139
808
0.09
1.70
0.04
0.49
1.75
Disabled Persons' Allowance!   _	
Child Welfare                      _	
0.14
0.48
0.05
80,135
4.92
80,339
4.74
i Includes Old-age Assistance Board figures which are not shown in regional reports.
The Family Division was reconstituted and is now known as the Social Assistance
and Rehabilitation Division. Another casework supervisor was appointed, and this
Division has the responsibility of concentrating on rehabilitative measures and on
the needs of families who are in receipt of assistance. The Child Welfare Division
has been given the responsibility of supervising the guidance and help extended to
families who are not in receipt of assistance but who have problems where children
are involved.
Emergency welfare services have been much to the fore during the past year,
and under the guidance of the Civil Defence Welfare Supervisor the staff has
co-operated to the fullest extent, although many extra hours of work and additional
responsibilities have been called for in this task.
The Co-ordinator, Juvenile Delinquency Prevention Services, submitted his
preliminary report, giving an analysis of juvenile delinquency in the rural areas of
the Province. The two metropolitan areas of Victoria and Vancouver were not
included in the report.
The Office Consultant completed the revision of the Policy Manual, and in continuing the devlopment of efficient office methods and procedures in the Department visited many offices throughout the Province.
This year the Federal Government, for the first time, participated with grants
from the Department of National Health and Welfare to assist in staff development,
training, and certain studies.
In expressing appreciation of the co-operation and help given by other Government departments, municipal officials, private agencies, and other organizations,
I should mention that this help has been constant, and particularly do I wish to
thank the members of the committees which have been operating with the aim and
purpose of assessing how best the needs of the people requiring the services of the
Department can be met.
 I  12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE
R. J. Burnham
It is apparent from the material contained in this Report that our staff has been
under a great pressure of work. In order to help remove some of this pressure and
improve our services to the people of this Province, we have endeavoured to establish better methods in staff development and training, provide more consultative
services to field staff, improve on the content of manuals, streamline office administration, and develop a constructive rehabilitation programme.
Our staff is faced with a most complex and demanding job, and, therefore, staff
development is recognized as a most important part of our programme, and we hope
to improve on this during the next few years. This year we had two regional meetings—one held in Prince George for Regions III, V, and VII and one in Nanaimo
for Regions I, II, and VI. Each of these meetings had speakers from the School
of Social Work at the University of British Columbia, who provided the staff with
some very worth-while material. A conference was also held for the district supervisors, and at this time Mr. John Morgan, from the University of Toronto, was the
main speaker. He was able to provide the group with much constructive thinking
on administration in public welfare.
We were able to send four members of our staff to the University of British
Columbia this year on bursaries of $1,600, and to assist three others of our staff
who were attending the School with $500 each. We hope to increase this number
during the next few years through the help of Federal training grants.
Senior stenographic staff are now being provided the opportunity of meetings
on a regional basis, and the purpose of these is to assist in improving their performance in the field offices.
Supervisory refresher courses are being considered, in order to better equip our
staff for the carrying of this important job.
Consultative services to the field staff have been a part of our programme for
many years, and there is a need to improve and increase this area of our work. We
were pleased to have Mr. Norman Brooke appointed to the staff of the Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division, and one of his responsibilities is to visit field
offices to provide consultative services. Other divisions in our Department have
increased this service to the field and are planning to develop it further.
A good deal of work went into the revision of a large part of our manuals,
which are a vital tool to our staff and help increase efficiency to a marked degree.
Here again, because of the complexity of our work, it can be readily seen that manuals are essential as fast references for field staff.
Mrs. Mackenzie, our Office Consultant, visited a number of offices this year,
not only to assist staff in office administration, but also to study the ever-changing
problems to see where new office routines have to be developed to cope with these
changes. Where changes in routine appear necessary, these, of course, must be
incorporated in our Office Manual. Mrs. Mackenzie has, in the course of the year,
managed to rewrite several sections of this manual. It can readily be seen that this
work has a direct impact on the whole field operation because good office management permits our social-work staff to spend a maximum amount of their time with
the people who require their services.
Work has continued in the field of rehabilitation. A few years ago an experimental programme of rehabilitation was set up in Nanaimo, and on proving worth
while was expanded to Chilliwack and then to Prince George. A start has been
made in New Westminster, and plans are to expand into Surrey.   Much rehabilita-
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 13
tion work is being done in a number of the offices in Region III. Our staff here
have developed a programme to co-ordinate their efforts with those of other related
services, in order to offer better rehabilitation opportunities for people on assistance.
I should like to again express a sincere appreciation to all members of our staff
for their co-operation with this office.
TRAINING DIVISION
D. W. Fowler
The Training Division has had an active year in both recruitment and training
of staff. Our turnover continues to be heavy, due in part to staff members going
on to obtain professional education. Much of our time between classes is spent
interviewing prospective staff members.
On January 1, 1963, we moved to our new quarters at 800 Cassiar Street,
where we have excellent accommodation, including two large lecture rooms, which
provides adequate space for teaching sessions and our library. We have been able
to purchase a number of new books this year, and these have been described in our
" Library Notes."
A new Assistant Training Supervisor was appointed on May 1, 1962, in the
person of Mrs. Isobelle Esau, M.S.W. Mrs. Esau brings to the job a rich background of experience obtained with the field staff in our Creston office, the Adoption Placement Section, and latterly as Casework Supervisor with Provincial Mental
Health Services.
During the year we conducted seven Part I in-service training courses, involving a total of 45 persons. These ranged in size from two groups of 2 persons to one
of 13. We also had six groups return for Part III of their training, which involved
57 persons, ranging in size from 4 to 24 participants.
We are still faced with the problem of heavy staff turnover and lack of trained
workers. The increase in enrolment in all schools of social work should provide
some increase in trained staff, and the Federal welfare grants programme will enable
us to expand our present resources to provide financial assistance to staff members
to obtain professional training.
The following table shows the total social-work staff employed for the fiscal
years ended March 31, 1962, and March 31, 1963:—
University
Trained
In-service
Trained
Total
Total staff, March 31,1962       	
90
+3
159
—3
249
93
156
249
Staff appointed, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963 _ 	
14
12
49
40
63
Resignations, deaths (2), and transfers (1), April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
52
Total staff, March 31, 1963 (excluding institutions)	
95
5
165
3
260
Brannan Lake School for Boys and Willingdon School for Girls	
8
Totals ■ >	
100
168
268
L
 I 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The following table shows the total social-work staff, according to degrees and
training, as at March 31, 1963:—
Men Women Total
Master of Social Work	
Master of Social Work lacking thesis _
Bachelor of Social Work  	
Social Work Diploma-
One year of training at the School of Social Work but no degree 	
Two years of training at the School of Social Work but no degree 	
Staff on educational leave toward Bachelor of Social Work and (or) Master
of Social Work  	
In-service trained —   —
Totals	
5
3
18
3
7
1
81
122
6
2
21
20
9
3
3
82
146
11
5
39
23
16
4
7
163
268
During the year under review there was a total of 196 separations, and appointments numbered 199. Of these separations, 52 were social workers. The separations were due to the following reasons:—
Domestic	
To further education
Temporary only
To accept other employment
HI health	
Died	
To travel	
Transferred	
Services unsatisfactory .„
To accept municipal job
Retired	
10
6
5
13
1
2
2
1
10
1
1
Total
52
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 15
PART II.—REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
REGION I
Miss M. Jamieson, Regional Administrator
Since the 1961/62 Annual Report there have ben no changes in the boundaries for Region I. The total land area of this region is approximately 13,000
square miles, which includes Vancouver Island, Gulf Islands, and a small section of
the Mainland bordering the Johnstone and Queen Charlotte Straits. The total
population, including Indians on reserves, is 291,072 (preliminary population estimates by Social Welfare Regions 1961 Census), which is 17.9 per cent of the
population of British Columbia.
In November, 1962, the social-worker staff was decreased when one half-time
municipal social worker resigned and was not replaced. During the year there
were a number of clerical and social-worker staff changes but no increase in establishment. The region was served by 36 social workers, 3 district supervisors, 1
assistant district supervisor, 2 municipal administrators, and 1 Regional Administrator.
The following tables show case-load figures as at March 31, 1963, by category
and location of offices (Table I) and numerical and percentage comparison of case
load by categories for the year 1961/62 and 1962/63 (Table II) :—
Table I.—Administrative Offices with Distribution of Case Load by Category
of Services at at March 31, 1963
Category
Alberni
Courtenay
Duncan
Nanaimo
Saanich
Victoria
City
Victoria
District
Total
25
28
21
134
57
265
Social Allowance	
311
340
274
513
189
590
429
2,646
Blind Persons' Allowance	
3
12
11
12
6
23
4
71
Disabled Persons' Allowance
28
38
26
57
42
82
69
342
Old-age Assistance 	
112
160
90
298
110
260
156
1,186
Old-age Security Supplemen
tary Social Allowance	
325
477
425
828
632
1,714
937
5,338
Child Welfare. 	
250
209
192
299
134
1,084
Health and Institutional	
11
14
21
30
35
47
60
218
1,065
1,278
1,060
2,171
1,014
2,716
1,846
11,150
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region I for the Fiscal Years 1961/62 and 1962/63
1961/62
1962/63
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
199
3,005
66
328
1,244
5,819
972
215
1.7
25.4
0.6
2.8
10.4
49.1
8.2
1.8
265
2,646
71
342
1,186
5,338
1,084
218
2 3
Blind Persons' Allowance    .
06
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
3 6
Old-age Security Supplementary Social Allowance	
Child Welfare    ._  	
47.8
9 6
Health and Institutional _	
1 8
Totals _ _ 	
11,848
100.0
11,150
100.0
 I 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
In 1962/63 the total case load decreased by 698 cases or 5.88 per cent
(11,848+226—924=11,150). The weight of decrease showed in Social Allowance and Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance categories. In the
Social Allowance group there were several factors—an improved employment
situation, logging operations open during the mild winter, and winter works programme. Total assistance to unemployed employables dropped sharply from
1961/62 to 1962/63.
The Family Service and Child Welfare case load increased during the year,
which is some indication of the stress in family life under present unsettled conditions.
In Nanaimo the rehabilitation project has developed into a vocational rehabilitation committee (Public Health Department, National Employment Service, Department of Social Welfare, and other community services), which is functioning
efficiently for the benefit of persons needing this special service as an aid to employment and self-support.
Emergency welfare services for the civil defence and disaster programme form
part of the social workers' duties now, and all members of staff will be receiving
training in this aspect of their work.
Various staff-development meetings were held during the year—an interregional conference in Nanaimo for Regions I, II, and VI in November, 1962, and
a supervisors' institute in Victoria in February, 1963; also representatives from
Child Welfare and Family Service Division, Social Assistance and Rehabilitation
Division, and Old-age Assistance Board visited district offices during the year, a very
helpful service to field staff.
Once again I wish to thank the various community organizations, private
agencies, and municipal officials for their interest and co-operation during the past
year. This appreciation is shared by the regional staff, whom I commend for their
loyalty to the Department and their diligence in carrying out their duties.
REGION II
H. E. Blanchard, Regional Administrator
I beg to submit the following report of the activities of the Department of
Social Welfare in Region II for the fiscal year 1962/63.
Public welfare in the geographic area of British Columbia known as Region II
is administered from municipal and Provincial offices as follows:—
Amalgamated offices (municipal offices under the charge of municipal
administrators): District of Burnaby, District of Coquitlam, New
Westminster City, City and District of North Vancouver, District of
Richmond, Vancouver City, and District of West Vancouver.
District offices (Department of Social Welfare offices under the charge
of district supervisor, serving unorganized areas and per capita
municipalities): New Westminster district office, serving unorganized areas and the municipalities of Delta, Fraser Mills, Port Coquitlam, and Port Moody; Powell River district office, serving the
District of Powell River and surrounding area, including Texada
Island; Vancouver district office, serving unorganized areas of University of British Columbia Endowment Lands, North Arm of Burrard Inlet, Howe Sound, Cheakamus Valley, Sechelt Peninsula, and
Ocean Falls and adjacent coast.   __               	
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 17
Table I following shows the distribution of the total case load into the several
categories covering the two fiscal years 1961/62 and 1962/63. The increase of
the total for 1962/63 over the previous year is the lowest it has been since 1958/59.
However, a comparison of the changes in the total number of cases in the individual
services reveals a continued significant increase in Social Allowance cases. The
decrease in Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance cases offsets other
increases, but there is a very significant increase in the number of Child Welfare
cases over the previous year. This increase of 221 cases in Region II is made up
in the main of an additional 93 children in care and 83 more unmarried parent
cases than were recorded at the end of the fiscal year March 31, 1962. The importance of this observation is the work load involved in the type of case. The average
Child Welfare case is much more demanding of worker time than is the average
Old Age case.
Table II shows the same categories of cases as distributed among the several
administrative offices in the region.
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region II as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1961/62 and 1962/63
Category
1961/62
1962/63
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
217
11,566
0.6
34.9
1.0
10.5
44.3
3.0
5.0
0.7
254
12,090
188
323
3,336
13,964
1,037
1.883
0.8
36.9
Blind Persons' Allowance .. _ _.
321
3,470
14,683
1,009
1,662
226
1.0
10.0
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance
Disabled Persons' Allowance..     	
Child Welfare     _	
41.9
3.1
5.6
231                    0.7
Totals
33,154
100.0
33.306         1         100.0
Table IL-—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region II as at March 31, 1963
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Totals
Category
Mar.
31,
1963
Mar.
31,
1962
37
894
25
298
1,682
87
455
72
25
262
3
90
309
29
156
11
30
1,017
24
351
35
419
14
146
664
19
125
2
37
115
24
232
8
101
394
47
195
45
169
6
72
313
35
396
32
15
58
3
36
353
17
60
23
254
12,278
323
3,336
13,964
1,037
1,883
231
217
8,751
246
2,274
9,040
680
m
11,566
Blind Persons' Allowance	
12
182
682
47
142
21
4
100
412
35
190
14
321
3,470
Old   Age   Security   Supplementary
14,683
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Child Welfare
41     19
194|    95
37|      9
1,009
1,662
226
Health and Institutional- 	
12|	
Totals           	
3,550
885
2,133
1,130
1,550
421
1,013
20,991
1,068
565
33,306
33,154
i Carried in Vancouver by Children's Aid Societies. See report of Superintendent of Child Welfare.
 I 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Emergency Shelters
During the winter of 1962/63 the shelter facilities operated by the private
agencies in Vancouver were sufficient to take care of those single transient men
who required this service, so there was no need to supplement on an emergency
basis. However, the matter of assisting a certain type of single unemployed transients in the Greater Vancouver area is a problem that has to be faced. In the case
of a hard-core group of such men, there is reason to believe that the cash assistance
given is not appropriately used. The answer appears to lie in hostel arrangements,
wherein such men can be housed and fed in lieu of a cash allowance.
In New Westminster, where the shelter functions as a temporary home to permit time to process the applications of single transient men, a very successful operation was organized and supervised on our behalf by the Salvation Army. This year
meals were served and an average of 140 men per month were accommodated for
varying lengths of time up to approximately one week.
Group-living Home
January, 1963, saw the opening of Cathkin House, the first group-living home
to be established by the Department of Social Welfare in Region II. It is located
in Burnaby, and through the Burnaby Social Service Department is supervised by
the Child Welfare Division. The location is such that full use can be made of the
Mental Health Services, also located in Burnaby Municipality.
The home has capacity for six boys, and by March 31, 1963, five boys were
in residence.
Doukhobors
During this year a large number of Sons of Freedom Doukhobors decided to
trek from their homes in the West Kootenay to the Agassiz prison, where some of
their members were incarcerated. They subsequently arrived in Vancouver during
January, 1963, and additional staff was provided by the Department of Social
Welfare to deal with the approximately 180 cases, totalling about 500 persons.
I would like to thank the private agencies and the municipal welfare departments for their co-operation during the year. A sense of common purpose among
our several agencies assists greatly in our common task of helping people.
I would like to give special credit to the staff of the Department of Social Welfare. Clerical persons, social workers, and supervisors have worked well individually and collectively. The support we have all received from senior administration has been much appreciated.
REGION III
R. I. Stringer, Regional Administrator
I beg to submit the following report on the activities of the Department of
Social Welfare in Region III for the fiscal year 1962/63.
There have been no changes in the regional boundaries. The region extends
from the International Border to Wells Gray Park and from Revelstoke and district
to Bralorne.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 19
There were no new offices opened, and the Lillooet office, which was opened
last year, continues to function, although supervision, continuity of staff, and the
size of the district (approximately 10,000 square miles) presents many additional
problems for the two social workers and the supervisor in Kamloops.
Social welfare services are provided from seven Provincial offices—one each
located at Lillooet, Kamloops, Salmon Arm, Vernon, Kelowna, Penticton, and Oliver
—and from four city-administered amalgamated offices in the Cities of Kamloops,
Vernon, Kelowna, and Penticton. Services in the Municipalities of Armstrong,
Enderby, North Kamloops, Revelstoke, Salmon Arm, and Summerland are provided
by the nearest Provincial district office and paid for by the municipality concerned
on a per capita basis.
There were signs of a rising economy during the year, and this was particularly noticeable in the tourist industry. With the opening of the Rogers Pass on
July 30, 1962, the region experienced an all-time high in the number of visitors
holidaying in or passing through the area. Lumbering, cattle and sheep raising,
fruit growing and packing, manufacturing, and the service industries all made some
gains.
This economic improvement was reflected in the Social Welfare case loads, and
it became increasingly important that the social workers spend as much time as
possible on the rehabilitation of the considerable numbers of individuals and families capable of reaching greater social and economic independence when extended
some assistance from our Department and other community agencies.
From the following table it can be noted that the Social Allowance case load
decreased from 35.4 to 34.2 per cent of the total case load, an actual decrease from
3,392 to 3,229 cases. A large part of this decrease was in the case load of employable persons. A total of $820,669.13 was granted to employable persons, a decrease
of 17 per cent over the preceding year. The total case load also decreased from
9.582 to 9,453, a reduction of approximately 1 per cent. In addition to this decrease in case load, there were 27,753 cases opened and closed, 16.7 per cent less
than the year before.
Unfortunately this improvement in the economic categories was not matched
in the child-in-care case load, which rose from 574 to 681, an increase of 107 children in care or 19 per cent during the year. A spot review of the reasons for taking
100 children into care revealed that 25 children were neglected by parents, 22 parents in an institution (4 in hospital and 18 in gaol), 17 transferred in from other
districts, 15 adoptions pending, 11 children unmanageable, 2 each under the Juvenile
Delinquents Act because the guardian was ill and because the mother was taking
training under Schedule M, and an unmarried mother. One each retarded child and
parent deceased.
One of the reasons for the over-all increase is due to dropping ratio of adopting
parents to children available for adoption. When adoption homes are not immediately available for children free to be adopted, it is, of course, necessary to take
them into care until a permanent adoption home becomes available.
It has been said many times that the family is the basic unit of our society and
that its strengths and weaknesses affect the operation of our entire democratic
society. This belief is shared by a majority of people, and for this reason many
agencies in all levels of government and many private or quasi-private agencies have
as one of their goals the improvement, strengthening, or supporting of the family
unit, or substituting for it when it ceases to function. These agencies are found in
the fields of religion, education, mental health, public health, business, and service
clubs to mention only a few.
 I 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The British Columbia Department of Social Welfare provides a number of
services, which, for statistical convenience and other reasons, are divided into groups
and given categorical names. However, they all have as their main concern the
welfare of the individual, the family, and the community. Therefore, going back
to the concern expressed about the number of children being taken into care, I believe
that a strengthening of our casework services, both when Social Allowance is in pay
and when it is not, would tend to keep the number of children in care to a minimum.
This involves not only working with the families directly concerned, but also coordinating our efforts with the many other community agencies who are just as
concerned as we are with family strengths, but who have resources or services not
available within any public welfare department.
With all this in mind, and because the rising economy makes it particularly
appropriate, the staff of this region, under the guidance and encouragement of our
senior administration, have made a particular effort to get social assistance recipients back to work. This is always a day-to-day part of the Social Welfare Department's work, but, where possible, efforts were stepped up and liaison was increased
with other concerned community agencies.
There were a number of goals in mind, and they included recognition of the
general benefits of economic independence (social, psychological, physical, etc.)
and the benefits to the community as a whole in increased earnings and decreased
drain on the public purse, but underlying all this was the goal of improved opportunity for the survival and growth of family life. Family income derived from productive labour cannot alone work miracles in preserving family life, but in its
absence small problems have a tendency to become large ones.
With the willing participation of the Provincial Health Branch and the National
Employment Service, local employment committees were formed or reactivated in
Kamloops, Vernon, Kelowna, and Penticton. Each of these committees function
slightly differently, but they all have the same goal—that is, helping the unemployed
to become the employed.
Whether there is a small or large number of unemployed, whether the employment market is falling or rising, there are certain areas in which casework services
and employment committees can be productive. First, at any time there are always
some unfilled jobs because properly trained or qualified applicants are not available.
Likely unemployed persons can be directed to, and, if necessary, given financial
assistance for, qualifying training or education. Second, some persons are unable
to accept available employment because of physical disability and can be referred
to, and again, if necessary, given financial assistance for, necessary medical care or
physical retraining. Third, some unemployed have low motivation and may respond
to casework therapy. Success in these last two groups is, of course, also dependent
on the infrequently considered fact that in the employment market there is some
elasticity at the margin. In other words, there are always some employment positions which employers have a choice as to whether they need to fill them or not.
Obviously this elasticity at the margin applies to an even greater extent in self-
employed positions.
There have already been encouraging results, and the concentration of effort
and the co-ordination of available resources will undoubtedly prove of increasing
value as time goes on. At the same time it will complement the day-by-day work
of the individual social worker.
Before closing, and while on the subject of the day-by-day work of the individual social worker, I would like to pay special tribute to these particular staff
members. The problems they overcome are as individual as the clients who present
them, and this is one of the reasons it is difficult to measure their productivity.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 21
Mr. G. A. Reed, the district supervisor, Vernon, who, like the other district supervisors in the region, has devoted much time and energy to the local Employment
Rehabilitation Committee, acknowledges these values in a recent report to the
Regional Administrator:—
" While this emphasis on formal rehabilitation deserves support and acknowledgment, I feel that we should not allow it to cause us to lose sight of the informal
rehabilitation that is part of our everyday job. Perhaps because it is so much a part
of our everyday job, and because it is one of the cornerstones of our social-work
philosophy (helping people to help themselves), we fail to turn the spotlight on this
informal rehabilitation. There is a tendency in all of us to seek out the more elaborate things and to gloss over the simple acts we take for granted. Simply, this is
saying that every day in simple ways we are doing rehabilitation in one form or
another that we do not take credit for.   It is basic to our job."
In closing, may I thank all the staff, both clerical and professional, for the
fine job they are doing and also say to them that I hope that the future will see
ever-increasing job satisfaction.
Table /.-
-Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region III as at March 31,1963
tn
1
a
CA
a
c
c
o
c
Category
s
rt
O
tr.
°
o
3 1
c
a.
UJ
>
0
"rt H
C/r<
o
E
u
>
W-tr
r-4-J
o
Cr.t:
"rt
O
Ui
123
35
40
96
16
?8
17
355
680
197
263
?95
134
783
213
381
704
395
184
3,229
Blind Persons' Allowance  ,	
18
5
6
9
2
13
1
6
4
2
66
Old-age Assistance	
139
79
82
170
31
189
50
126
69
101
1,036
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance
377
219
127
439
66
578
200
356
279
303
2,944
Disabled Persons' Allowance __..,..
22
43
17
51
16
40
13
45
24
36
307
Child Welfare   	
481
140
113
79?
49
149
197
1,421
95
23
13
6
17
3
9
15
8
1
Totals 	
1,863
731
65411,369
202
584
1,262
645
745
772
626
9,453
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region III for the Fiscal Years 1961/62 and 1962/63
Category
1961/62
1962/63
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
291
3,392
71
1,046
3,091
291
1,302
98
3.1
35.4
0.8
10.8
32.3
3.1
13.5
1.0
355
3,229
66
1,036
2,944
307
1,421
95
3.7
Social Allowance  -
Blind Persons' Allowance	
34.2
0.7
10.9
31.2
Disabled Persons* Allowance  _	
Child Welfare   	
3.2
15.1
1.0
Totals	
9.582       !       100.0
9,453
100.0
 I 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REGION IV
Walter J. Camozzi, Regional Administrator
Projections south and north-east of the Arrow Lakes, the 49th parallel, and the
Rocky Mountains outline the unchanged boundaries of Region IV.
There have been no administrative changes. A Regional Administrator at Nelson, three district offices supervised by district supervisors at Nelson, Cranbrook,
and Trail, with sub-offices at New Denver, Fernie, Creston, Golden, Castlegar, and
Grand Forks respectively, are served by 23 social workers and 15 clerical staff. Two
social workers and a clerk-stenographer were brought on staff in October when the
Doukhobors went on their rampage, but this increase was more apparent than real
since one worker left fairly quickly to follow them to Vancouver and extra administrative processes, etc., nullified this apparent increase.
The " Pavilion " at New Denver still offers a facility, but there is a diminishing
demand locally. Miss Reynolds, the matron, affords quality nursing service, but
it is administrationally awkward, and experienced and good replacements for staff
become increasingly difficult to find.
This year again over-all numbers in the region are down, as are costs. Increased
movement of people is not as expected, even though the Blueberry-Paulson Cut-off
and the Rogers Pass highways offer splendid communication.
The year was one of opportunity for staff development. The staff enjoyed the
visits of the Office Consultant, Personnel Officer, and Chief Inspector of Welfare
Institutions. Although the Assistant Director and the Deputy Superintendent of
Child Welfare came to the Trail and Nelson districts because of the Doukhobor
fiasco, they took time for staff discussions. One supervisor attended the Canadian
Conference on Social Work in Winnipeg, and a worker attended the British Columbia Conference on Social Work in Vancouver. The supervisors' institute, which
followed the Civil Defence Course in January, was a tremendous success.
The winter works programme was put to great use by the Trail office. In fact,
that office helped place Nelson area men to work on it. Trail has also developed
a co-ordinating committee to help difficult cases for employment placement. The
local Council of Women has a survey under way to determine the need for home-
maker services.
Better accommodation was secured for the New Denver staff in our own buildings there. Better accommodation was arranged for in the Creston office, too, on
the main floor of the Government Building.
Staff morale is good. New workers tend to be younger and there is a good
spirit. To them, their older colleagues, supervisors, and the clerical staff, which
especially in recent times has taken on greater responsibilities, many thanks. I also
wish to thank other Government departments and municipal and Federal officials
for their help to us and to private organizations who, with us, wish to serve the public
good, and finally my sincere appreciation to the Honourable Minister and to senior
administration, who were immediately available and helpful in this, my first, year of
administration.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 23
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative offices
of Region IV as at March 31,1963
Category
M
o
o
,-Q
c
a
U
s
o
i-i
u
->
s
u
Ua
Vi
M
Ih
0
-a
l-H
a
a
o
m
13
Z
a
ZQ
O
H
45
540
6
101
331
28
180
20
6
319
1
83
220
27
82
1
9
120
3
43
167
18
26
3
5
158
7
85
250
23
26
7
26
554
4
124
430
34
102
15
11
106
6
32
199
TO
31
4
20
376
9
127
370
48
120
26
122
2,173
36
595
1,967
188
Child Welfare   _ -	
567
76
Totals ' _	
1,251
739
389
561
1,289
399
1,096
5,724
JaWe //.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories in Region IV as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1961/62 and 1962/63
Category
1961/62
1962/63
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
118
2,267
39
634
2,098
176
569
71
2.0
38.0
0.7
10.6
35.1
2.9
9.5
1.2
122
2,173
36
595
1,967
188
567
76
2.0
38.0
0.6
10.4
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance .
Disabled Persons' Allowance 	
Child Welfare   ... 	
34.5
3.3
9.9
1.3
Totals	
5,972
100,0
5,724
100.0
REGION V
V. H. Dallamore, Regional Administrator
I beg to submit the following report of the activities of the Department of
Social Welfare in Region V for the fiscal year 1962/63.
Boundaries of Region V have remained unchanged during this fiscal year and
so have the boundaries between districts. The region is served by seven district
offices, situated one each in Dawson Creek, Fort St. John, Quesnel, Vanderhoof, and
Williams Lake, and two in Prince George. In the latter city one handles unemployed
employable applicants for social assistance only and the other office handles the
remaining categories.   The Regional Administrator's office is also in Prince George.
The fiscal year was entered with optimism, arising out of the fact that total case
load changed little in the previous year and staff had been increased. However, an
increase in case load became apparent in the last month of the previous fiscal year
and continued until a new high was reached in January of 1963. In the nine months
from April 1, 1962, to January 31, 1963, the case load of 5,656 became a case load
of 6,956. Fortunately there was a slight decrease during the next two months, so
that the case load at the end of the fiscal year totalled 6,574.
The actual increase in total case load during the fiscal year under review was
918 or 16.2 per cent.
Table I below shows the case loads by general categories for this fiscal year
and last.
 I 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region V as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1961/62 and 1962/63
Category
1961/62
1962/63
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
229
2,827
51
429
946
59
4.0
50.0
0.9
7.6
16.7
1.0
240
3,567
51
467
886
77
1,241
45
3.6
54.2
0.8
7.0
13.6
1.2
Child Welfare _ ■ ■   	
1,070      |        18.9
45      |          0.8
18.9
0.7
Totals     —	
5.656      !      100.0
6.574      1      100.0
The greatest increase was in Social Allowance, in which category it amounted
to 740 cases, an increase of 26.2 per cent.
The services in next greatest increase were those in the various categories of
Child Welfare, and in this case the total was 171 cases, an increase of 16 per cent.
Social Allowance, which made up 50 per cent of the total case load at the beginning of the fiscal year, comprised 54.2 per cent of the total case load at its end.
Child Welfare retained its proportion of the total case load, 18.9 per cent.
A comparison with the case-load statistics of the Province as a whole with
those in Region V is interesting and points up the unique character of this northern
area. The Provincial case load increased by only 204 (0.25 per cent) during the
year, the Social Allowance case load increased by 2.7 per cent, and the Child Welfare case load increased by 10.6 per cent. These increases are all considerably less
than those in Region V.
A further comparison may be made by viewing the distribution of case loads
at the end of the fiscal year. At that time Social Allowance comprised 35.8 per cent
of the Provincial case load and 54.2 per cent of the regional one. Child Welfare
was 10.1 per cent of the Provincial case load and made up 18.9 per cent of the
regional. On the other hand, Old-age Assistance, Old Age Security Supplementary
Social Allowance, and Blind Persons' Allowances made up 51 per cent of the Provincial case load and only 22.5 per cent of the total case load in Region V.
The population of Region V is younger than it is throughout the Province in
general, and consequently a greater proportion of our efforts must be given to the
more demanding cases involving families with financial need and problems of child
welfare.
The case load by major categories in each district office at the end of this fiscal
year may be seen in Table II below.
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices of
Region V as at March 31,1963
Category
Dawson
Creek
Fort
St. John
Prince
George
Main
Prince
George
Sub
Quesnel
Vanderhoof
Williams
Lake
Total
32
872
3
73
187
24
222
8
88
385
4
60
111
4
237
14
48
462
10
129
232
17
347
1,166
32
451
3
68
118
11
157
3
11
100
11
49
125
7
129
29
131
20
88
113
14
149
6
240
3,567
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Old-age Assistance	
Old Age Security Supplementary
Social Allowance 	
Disabled Persons' Allowance
Child Welfare                         	
51
467
886
77
1,241
Health and Institutional	
45
Totals  	
1,421    |      903
1,259    |    1,166
843
432
550
6,574
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 1 25
From Table II above it may be seen that the two Cariboo offices of Quesnel
and Williams Lake had a total of 1,393 cases. Those two offices had a case load
of 1,334 at the end of the previous fiscal year, and thus it may be seen that their
total case load increased by 59 cases only during the current one. That increase
amounted to 4.4 per cent.
The North Central Interior offices of Prince George Main, Prince George Sub,
and Vanderhoof had a total of 2,857 cases on March 31, 1963. Their caseload one
year previous totalled 2,498, and thus the increase during the fiscal year 1962/63
amounted to 359.   That made an increase of 14.8 per cent.
The Peace River offices of Dawson Creek and Fort St. John had a total case
load of 2,324 at the end of the fiscal year, and a case load of 1,824 at the end of the
previous fiscal year. The increase in those two offices was 27.4 per cent, a figure
well above the regional average of 16.2 per cent.
Although the increase in the Peace River area was general to all categories,
it was particularly notable in the category of Child Welfare. The number of these
cases increased from 334 to 459 during the year, and that increase of 125 cases
amounts to 37.4 per cent. In the North Central Interior offices the increase in Child
Welfare amounted to 4.8 per cent, and in the Cariboo offices it amounted to 8.5 per
cent.
It is also well to notice that increase in Social Allowance cases in the Peace
River were greater than elsewhere, being 37.8 per cent in the Peace River area,
26.9 per cent in the North Central Interior area, and 5.2 per cent in the Cariboo.
Social Allowance cases included inordinate numbers of single transient men seeking
employment in the construction projects of the area, and since a great many of them
congregated in downtown Dawson Creek, there was a natural concern by many
local residents. A men's hostel would appear of some advantage in handling this
matter, and possibilities of establishing such were pursued with prospect of success
in the next fiscal year.
It was in Prince George that resources were developed. In May, 1962, a
second receiving home was opened and a group-living home for girls known as
" K Kottage " established. The latter was made possible through the sponsorship
of the Nechako Kiwanis Club. With a capacity of six, it was home to four girls by
the end of the fiscal year.
Another development in Prince George was the creation of a rehabilitation
committee comprised of representatives of the local health unit, National Employment Service, and our Department. With the guidance and consultative help of the
Rehabilitation Service, Vancouver, the committee began reviewing cases of handicapped persons in October, 1962.
In the Prince George sub-office, which handles unemployed employable applicants for Social Allowance, a study of clients' needs and services provided to them
was pursued. It is anticipated that a report of the findings will be made in a few
months.
Promoted from social worker to assistant district supervisor in Prince George
as of May 1, 1962, Mr. R. K. Butler was again promoted to the position of district
supervisor and transferred to Dawson Creek August 27, 1962, where he replaced
Miss Eileen Evans upon her resignation. On December 17, 1962, Mr. Douglas
Mack was made assistant district supervisor in Prince George.
Many persons and organizations in the region are giving help and encouragement to staff, and our sincere thanks go out to them.
 I 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REGION VI
A. E. Bingham, Regional Administrator
Region VI celebrated its 10th birthday in May of the year under review. The
region was set up on May 1, 1952, and the first Regional Administrator was Miss
Mary King, who is now the Superintendent of Child Welfare. One may ask, what
is a social welfare region and what purpose does it serve?
Region VI is a working group of field offices, both provincial and municipal,
serving the public in the Fraser Valley and the Fraser Canyon up to Boston Bar. It
was set up as a means of providing the best in social welfare services quickly and
efficiently. This is achieved in part by decentralization, which is the making of
authority available at local level. As far as possible, all decisions relating to individual persons are made within the region. Another advantage to the regional
system is that it gives scope to adjusting services to meet individual circumstances.
There are differences from one part of the Province to another, such as living conditions, employment opportunities, and the cost of living.
The regional boundaries have not changed during the 10-year period. The
region extends eastward from the City of White Rock and the Municipalities of
Surrey and Pitt Meadows along each side of the Fraser River to approximately Boston Bar and the summit of the Hope-Princeton Highway. According to information supplied by school districts, the population of the region is 183,000. This is
an increase of 70,000 during the 10 years the region has been in existence.
The region is served by five Provincial district offices and Surrey Social Welfare
Department, a municipal amalgamated office. The Provincial offices are located
in White Rock, Langley, Haney, Abbotsford, and Chilliwack. The Chilliwack district office has a sub-office at Hope, and the Abbotsford district office operates a
sub-office in Mission.
The Municipality of Surrey has its own social welfare department. The Provincial Government provides one-half the staff of social workers plus a casework
supervisor. In September of the year under review the Surrey Social Welfare Department moved into the new Surrey Municipal Hall. This splendid building assists
greatly in the provision of social welfare services to the residents of Surrey.
At March 31, 1963, the region was staffed with 34Vi social workers, 1 assistant
district supervisor, 4 district supervisors, 1 municipal administrator, and 1 Regional
Administrator. It is interesting to compare this with the 17 social workers, 3 district supervisors, and 2 municipal administrators shown in the first regional report
tabled 10 years ago.
Three main divisions can be made of the services provided during the year—
Categorical Aid, Social Assistance, and Family and Child Welfare Services.
The categorical assistance provides benefits, based on average need, to identifiable groups of needy people who can demonstrate need within terms of legislation.
These are shown in Table I as Blind Persons' Assistance, Old-age Assistance, Old
Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance, and Disabled Persons' Assistance.
Almost one-half of our regional case load is composed of categorical assistance.
It is interesting to note the slight decrease in categorical assistance to persons
age 65 and over during the past two years. Census figures show that this age-group
residing in the region has increased by 57.9 per cent during the past 10 years.
One aspect of this work with this group that is not often heard about is the
work done by our staff in the placement of elderly persons in boarding homes, private hospitals, or arranging alternate care by housekeeper service.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 27
Social Allowance serves as a residual resource for people who are insufficiendy
cared for through other programmes and provisions. In the year under review,
Social Allowance was granted for two main groups—the unemployable individual,
or the family in which the father was not able to work, and the employable individual,
or the family in which the father is able to work if work is available.
The needs of this financially dependent group vary greatiy. Personal inadequacies exist, and supplementary services are needed along with financial assistance.
Many of these people have long-term disabilities and social problems.
In Table I we see that at March 31, 1963, there were 4,231 Social Allowance
cases in the region. Of these, 1,341 were employable persons. The unemployed
man who does not have a skill, or if his skill is no longer needed, requires a lot of
help and encouragement. It is a difficult time for him and most disheartening. He
needs vocational and social counselling to assist him back into the work force.
The Family Service and Child Welfare case load increased by 324 cases during
the year. There are two factors which played a part in this increase. First, there
is an increasing number of children in the region. According to the 1951 Census,
there were 30,870 children in the region between the ages of 5 and 19 years. In
1961 the same group numbered 57,362, or an increase of 85.8 per cent. Second,
there is a broadening of services to children. In the year under review, Family
Service became the administrative responsibility of the Child Welfare Division, and
there is an emphasis on the prevention services as well as protection services for
children. Family Service, in general terms, is help given parents with problems
which affect the parents' ability to provide proper care and guidance for their
children.
Child Welfare services given in the region during the year included services
and protection to children in care, to children of unmarried parents and their mothers,
to children placed in adoption homes, and to children involved in or threatened by
social situations which placed them in jeopardy.
During the year, 264 children were taken into care in the region. Of these,
167 were separated from their parents by Court because of neglect, deprivation, or
other harmful influence. Housekeeper services were extended wherever possible to
prevent needless separation of children from their parents.
Ninety-one children were placed on an adoption basis in the region during the
year; 83 were placed in homes of Protestant faith and 8 in homes of the Roman
Catholic faith.
What happens to children who are in our foster-home programme over long
periods of time? One file shows what social workers and foster-parents can and
do accomplish. In March a ward turned age 21 and was discharged. The ward
was in care 16 years, and at the time of discharge was on an education course at
the University of British Columbia. Bursary scholarships and summer earnings
paid fees at the University, and maintenance was extended by the Department of
Social Welfare.   At the time this report is tabled, this ward is teaching school.
The staff are called upon to cope with complex human problems. So that they
might be kept up to date with developments in the problem-solving process, several
training institutes were held. An inter-regional conference was held in November
at Nanaimo. The theme was " Case-load Management," and the institute leader
was Mr. G. W. Pepper, Assistant Professor of the School of Social Work, University of British Columbia.
In January the supervisors and the Regional Administrator attended a workshop on administration, given by John S. Morgan, of the Toronto School of Social
Work.
 I 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
If an emergency or disaster occurs in a community involving Vancouver or the
Fraser Valley, regional staff would be called upon to assist, providing emergency
welfare services. With this in mind, five of the staff attended an Emergency Welfare
Services Course in January.
The joint rehabilitation survey made in Chilliwack during the previous year
resulted in the selection of 60 cases as a demonstration group of rehabilitation cases.
These were social welfare recipients who had health problems, long-term disabilities,
marginal skills, and social problems. At the end of the year, 21 of the 60 cases were
considered rehabilitated and 8 were still under review. One young person seriously
handicapped by a congenital deformity may have qualified for public assistance for
the next 40 years. At the time this report is tabled, he is training on the job as a
radio and television benchman. This was accomplished through the concerted efforts
of medical, social, and vocational professionals working as a rehabilitation team.
A local rehabilitation committee was set up in Chilliwack in the year under
review to assist in the rehabilitation of disabled persons in that area, whether in
receipt of public assistance or not.
Four Provincial offices again co-operated with the Provincial Mental Hospital
in a programme of placement of selected patients in approved boarding homes; one
of the persons so cared for had been a patient of the Provincial Mental Hospital for
30 years.   This patient is co-operative and has adjusted well in the boarding home.
The region provided field placements and skilled supervision for five students
from the School of Social Work for the 1962/63 University term.
An important development in our work was a new policy worked out with the
Indian Affairs Branch. This policy came into effect in this region on January 1,
1963. It allows us to extend social welfare services to the Indian living off the
reserve. This is a significant step as some Indians are moving from reserves into
urban centres.
We appreciate very much the help extended during the year by municipal officials, school authorities, public health personnel, and many other community people.
A special word of appreciation to the members of the Department in this region
and the social workers and clerical staff employed by municipalities for their helpful
co-operation.
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region VI as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1961/62 and 1962/63
Category
1961/62
1962/63
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
183
4,024
60
1,251
4,068
322
1,196
117
1.6
35.9
0.5
11.1
36.3
2.9
10.7
1.0
251
4,231
66
1,221
3,954
336
1,452
3
2.2
36.8
0 6
10.7
34.3
Disabled Persons' Allowance 	
Child Welfare                                                	
2.8
12.6
002
Totals                         -
11,221
100.0
11.514          innn
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 29
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices of
Region VI as at March 31,1963
Category
Abbotsford
Chilliwack
Haney
Langley
Surrey
White
Rock
Total
19
838
16
249
899
78
235
1
129
1,043
16
278
680
64
408
26
450
5
139
404
36
153
1
14
481
10
128
468
40
157
1
62
1,245
16
364
1,231
99
454
1
174
3
63
272
19
45
251
4,231
Blind Persons' Allowance  	
Old-age Assistance...  	
Old Age Security Supplementary Social
Allowance  _ _	
Disabled Persons' Allowance 	
Child Welfare 	
66
1,221
3,954
336
1,452
 -     1      	
3
Totals	
2,335
2,618
1,214
1,299
3,471
577
11,514
REGION VII
W. E. Crossley, Regional Administrator
There was no change in the regional area this past year. The region covers
the area embraced by Milbanke Sound on the south to the Alaska Border on the
north and from the Queen Charlotte Islands east to the village of Endako. Figures
obtained in May, 1963, indicate that the population in the region is increasing
quickly, with our regional population at the end of 1961 believed to be 51,163
people. Of this number, nearly 7,000 are Indians on reserves, which is more than
one-fifth of the Indians on reserves in the Province as a whole. The Municipality
of Terrace is the fastest-growing area in the region, as is indicated by the fact that
in the past year the building permits estimated per capita in Terrace were second
only to Prince George, the highest in the Province.
The economic conditions in the region this year vary from east to west. In the
Prince Rupert-Kitimat-Terrace area the economy was quite buoyant with jobs available. In January of this year the Alaska ferry system connecting Prince Rupert
and Alaska opened, so that toward the end of the year there was an appreciable
increase in the number of tourists passing through the region to utilize this new
system. This will no doubt become a factor of economic importance. In the
eastern portion of the region however, the weather conditions made it impossible to
work in the bush, so that there was a grave slump in the number of people employed
in the lumber activities. This led to an increase in the Social Allowance case loads
in the Smithers and Burns Lake area.
This past year has seen some improvement in standards of services extended.
In the Prince Rupert office, due to increased staff becoming more and more effective, there has been a considerable drop in the case load and an over-all increase
in the standards of the social work extended. There has been also in the region as
a whole an increase in the citizen interest and participation of a positive nature in
the work of the Department, which has been most heartening. However, in the
Smithers-Burns Lake area the case loads have increased, bringing a great deal of
pressure to bear on the staff, who are to be commended on their efforts to maintain
an adequate level of services.
In the matter of office accommodation, a great stride was made this year when
the Prince Rupert office moved to new efficient quarters located on the main floor
of " Friendship House " when this building was completed in January. Since the
other floor is partially devoted to a dormitory for transient men, which we utilize
for our cases, and since the building is a centre of activity for Alcoholics Anonymous and other community groups, we are in a very strong position to participate
whole-heartedly in these positive citizen efforts.   With the Burns Lake office moving
 I 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
to new quarters in 1960 and the Smithers office moving to new quarters in 1961,
all offices in the region are in suitable accommodation, with the exception of the
Terrace office, where the space being utilized will require reorganization.
There have been some highlights in the region this year which have been encouraging. In Prince Rupert the Indian project mentioned in last year's report has
continued, with further research and with some success emerging in the application of intensive casework to a selected case load of Indian familities living in an
urban area. The participation of the staff in community endeavours has increased
tremendously. The district supervisor is a member of two local committees doing
work with children in the community. There is a Youth Guidance Committee,
made up of school personnel, local employers, and National Employment Service
representatives, studying the problem of school drop-outs and endeavouring to help
the individual children affected. This year a professional committee has become
active in the diagnosing and treating of learning and behaviour problems presented
by children in the school system. The district supervisor of our Department and
public health and school personnel make up this committee. The Friendship House
Association formed a sub-committee who are now busily engaged in raising funds
to develop resources for children. Their first project is a receiving home; then-
second project will be a home for girls. A receiving home for infants with a capacity
of four was opened in Prince Rupert in late March of this year.
In Terrace the Christian Welfare Council, a group of local citizens after reorganizing their membership, has now become a very positive body, which will,
I believe, accomplish its goal of opening a receiving home for our Department to
use for children in need of this service. The Old Age Pensioners Association is
also busily engaged studying what type of housing it will provide for citizens in this
area. We have met with them several times in this respect. This year a television
station opened in Terrace covering the Kitimat and Prince Rupert areas. This
medium becoming available has been a very positive step, and the Department has
participated in several programmes of a public information  nature.
In Smithers progress was made in October when a worker was appointed to
undertake the special Indian project sponsored jointly by our Department and the
Federal Indian Affairs Branch, to work closely with the people on reservations to
try to strengthen the family life and overcome other conditions leading to neglect
of children on reserves. By the end of the fiscal year this project was already
proving valuable. The two Indian projects mentioned have meant the attendance
at several meetings of the workers concerned and myself with the Joint Federal-
Provincial Committee on Indian Affairs. These meetings have been both educational and productive.
In the Smithers area another encouraging development was the opening of the
" Gardiner Home," a group-living home for teen-age boys who have serious difficulties. The home is licensed to take six boys and will serve as a Provincial
resource for this difficult-to-place group.
In the Burns Lake area there has been a growing citizen interest in the work
of the Department, but the receiving-home project mentioned in last year's report
came to a halt when the priest heading the project was transferred; the new incumbent has not as yet had time to take on the project.
There were no staff increases in the region this year, with the exception of the
Indian Project Worker. After a period of relative stability there were staff changes
in both the Prince Rupert and Terrace offices, which meant some reorganizing of
case-load services.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 31
The staff-development programme shared with the Child Welfare Division,
started last year, continued successfully this year. Miss Allen, of the Unmarried
Parents Section, came to Terrace and gave a one-day institute, entitled " Working
with Unmarried Parents," for the professional staff in the region, followed in July
by Mr. T. D. Bingham, Deputy Superintendent of Child Welfare, who also gave a
one-day institute in " Protective Services for Children" to the regional staff.
A further staff-development programme was enjoyed at our joint regional conference with Region V in Prince George in November, when Miss F. McCubbin, of
the School of Social Work at the University of British Columbia, presented a two-
day institute in " Casework in Public Assistance." There is no doubt that as a
result of these meetings the staff skills and interest in serving their clients were both
increased and heightened.
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region VII for the Year 1962/63 as at March 31, 1963
Category
Burns
Lake
Prince
Rupert
Smithers
Terrace
Total
10
101
14
27
82
7
66
50
376
15
97
181
23
218
24
193
18
72
93
19
30
187
10
30
77
12
114
857
57
Old-age Assistance .....   —  —	
Old Age Security Supplementary Social Allowance _._	
226
433
61
Child Welfare                                      .    ..           	
120      1       204
3      |           6
608
4      |         10
23
Totals —  	
311      ]       970
542
556
2,379
Referring to the above table, there is an increase in Burns Lake of 24 Social
Allowance cases and 6 Child Welfare cases. The increase was compensated partly
by a drop of 5 cases scattered throughout the remainder of the case load to bring
the total increase to 25 cases.
In Prince Rupert there was an encouraging continued drop in the total cases
carried of 93 cases. Social Allowance dropped 125 cases, whilst Child Welfare
dropped 8 cases. It will be noted, however, that Family Service cases showed a
very healthy increase of 25 cases, which, together with minor increases in other
categories, brought the final decrease to 93 last year. The increase in Family
Service shows that the staff, with more time available, are now doing some preventive work.
In the Smithers case load, due to economic conditions previously mentioned,
the total increase in Social Allowance cases was 45. There were, however, numerous small increases in other categories, which reduced the total increase in the case
load to 9 cases.
In the Terrace area there was a decrease in the case load of 31 cases. The
major decreases were in Social Allowance, with 32 cases less, and in Old-age Assistance, with 13 cases less. Increases which partially offset these were Child Welfare,
up 7 cases, and Family Service, up 4 cases. We believe that the decrease in Social
Allowance is due to two factors—an improved economic climate in the Terrace area
as well as a specialized Social Allowance Worker developing skills in assisting people
back to work.
 I 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Cas Load by Major Categories in Region VII as at March 31st
for the Years 1961/62 and 1962/63
Category
1961/62
1962/63
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Family Service    	
88
945
64
237
466
55
591
23
3.6
38.2
2.6
9.6
18.9
2.3
23.9
0.9
114
857
57
226
433
61
608
23
4.7
36.0
Blind Persons' Allowance _ 	
2.3
9.8
18.2
2.6
Child Welfare            	
25.5
0.9
Totals —  	
2,469
100.0
2,379
100.0
This table, which gives a contrast on a regional basis between the total cases in
the region at the end of the comparative fiscal years, shows one or two significant
facts. The increase in Family Service cases took place in Prince Rupert and indicates the proper utilization of staff in that area. The decrease in the percentage of
Social Allowance cases from 38.2 per cent in the previous year to 36 per cent this
year is largely due to the decrease in this case load in Prince Rupert. This is a
very healthy trend. The always tragic increase in Child Welfare cases is a result
of an almost unavoidable increase in the number of children in care in most offices
in a region where the population is expanding rapidly and includes a large Indian
population.
In the year past we have again received excellent co-operation from the municipal staffs in Terrace, Kitimat, and Prince Rupert, the per capita municipalities in
the region who administer Social Allowance. We have also received helpful cooperation from the police, the medical profession, school authorities, community
organizations, municipal governments, barristers, as well as many others who have
helped us serve those in need. The staff members are to be congratulated on their
efforts to serve their clients. On behalf of the Department I extend my thanks to all
these groups and individuals in the region.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 33
PART III.—SOCIAL ASSISTANCE AND
REHABILITATION DIVISION
R. J. Burnham, Assistant Director of Social Welfare
SOCIAL ALLOWANCES SECTION
Social assistance is a comprehensive provision enabling financial maintenance
and supporting services to be available to disabled and unemployed persons and to
families lacking a bread-winner.
During the year under review, assistance was provided for an average of 60,000
single persons, heads of families, and dependents monthly, representing a total average case load of 27,556. Some 59,400 applications for assistance were processed,
an average of approximately 227 per social worker. A proportion of this was
accounted for by single unemployed transient men who have made application for
help to social welfare offices throughout the Province as they have moved about in
search of employment. In order to prevent duplication of assistance to this group,
it has been necessary to administer assistance on a voucher basis, and this has occasioned added strain on staff time. Some 3,000 persons are cared for monthly in
boarding and nursing homes.
The over-all amount of assistance (Table IV) is reduced approximately 2 per
cent from the year 1961/62, but represents a high figure in relation to the general
prosperity of the Province. It is believed this is attributable in part to the changes
in the employment needs in modern technology, which call for increasingly higher
levels of education and skill. Chronic dependency to a lesser extent is a contributing factor. This is the tendency of some of those in receipt of assistance to give
up effort on their own behalf, and becomes more marked in its effect the longer
assistance is continued. A considerable amount of effort is devoted to overcoming
this problem. The large numbers of cases closed each month, shown in Table II,
for March, 1963, testifies to the very high and constructive level of staff activity in
helping services, as well as to the continuing effort on their own behalf of the bulk
of unemployed recipients.
In Table III the numbers of recipients are broken down for the various regions
and local areas into which the Province is divided for administrative purposes. The
rate of assistance as compared with the previous year is decreased in five of the
seven regions, slighdy increased in a sixth, and markedly increased in the remaining
region, which embraces the Cariboo, Prince George, and Peace River areas.
The level of staff effort in this programme, not only in the administration of
financial help, but in providing the attendant rehabilitative and other constructive
services, is remarkable when it is measured into account that they must be responsible for all other categories of service.
 I 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table I.—Case Load and Number of Persons Assisted by Month
for Fiscal Year 1962/63
Heads of
Families
Dependents
Single
Recipients
Total
Case Load
April, 1962	
11,448
34,045
16,329
61,822
27,777
May, 1962  	
11,260
32,952
16,068
60,280
27,328
June, 1962  	
11,153
32,765
16,026
59,944
27,179
July, 1962  	
10,561
30,634
15,271
56,466
25,832
August, 1962	
10,306
29,511
15,349
55,166
25,655
September, 1962	
10,408
28,831
14,375
53,614
24,783
October, 1962	
10,421
30,115
15,363
55,899
25,784
November, 1962	
11,006
32,178
16,228
59,412
27,234
December, 1962	
11,686
34,174
16,807
62,667
28,493
January, 1963	
12,179
36,043
16,857
65,079
29,036
February, 1963 _	
12,102
36,232
17,082
65,416
29,184
March, 1963.	
12,012
35,625
16,774
64,411
28,786
Table II.—Comparative Figures of Cases Opened and Closed
March, 1961
March, 1962
March, 1963
Opened
Closed
4,737
4,636
4,422
4,928
4,446
4,673
Table III.—Comparative Totals by Region and Unorganized and Organized Territory of Recipients and Dependents in March, 1963, 1962, and 1961
PROVINCIAL MUNICIPAL
Mar.,   Mar.,   Mar., Mar., Mar., Mar.,
1963     1962     1961 1963 1962 1961
Region I—
Alberni       315       337       313      Alberni   183 128 142
Courtenay   1,165    1,188    1,326      Courtenay __.._  100 125 125
Duncan        341      329      331      Central Saanich   37 44 44
Nanaimo   1,000    1,166      986      Duncan   135 114 126
Victoria _..      528       636      590      Esquimalt  _..__  132 162 137
Nanaimo  519 581 788
North Cowichan   268 300 265
Oak Bay  48 49 46
Port Alberni   446 396 384
Saanich   480 506 600
Victoria  1,396 1,492 1,686
3,349   3,656   3,546                                               3,744 3,897 4,343
   ■    7,093    7,553    7,889
Region II—
New Westminster.....      65        86        55      Burnaby    2,499 2,419 2,403
Vancouver     470      466      448      Coquitlam      746 669 998
Westview      105        78         99      Delta      342 347 290
New Westminster  1,679 1,677 1,553
N. Vancouver City      617 483 551
N. Vancouver District     374 309 335
Port Coquitlam      261 321 278
Port Moody      163 197 182
Powell River     277 187 199
Richmond       660 766 701
Vancouver 15,393 14,785 14,318
West Vancouver       98 92 129
640  630  602
23,109 22,252 21,937
23,749 22,882 22,539
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 35
Table III.—Comparative Totals by Region and Unorganized and Organized Territory of Recipients and Dependents in March, 1963, 1962, and 1961—Continued
PROVINCIAL MUNICIPAL
Mar.,  Mar,.  Mar., Mar., Mar., Mar.,
1963     1962     1961 1963 1962 1961
Region III—
Kamloops   1,417    1,432    1,896      Armstrong    38 37 22
Kelowna       556      506      623      Enderby   33 40 27
Lillooet       424      552            Kamloops   638 574 427
Penticton   1,059    1,033       929      Kelowna   418 409 310
Salmon Arm      546      610      562      North Kamloops _.. 311 366      —
Vernon _      _            592      746      902      Penticton _  883 925 690
Revelstoke    149 83 84
Salmon Arm District... 209 251 252
Summerland  170 169 152
Vernon  _ _ 411 395 354
4,594   4,879   4,912
Region IV—
Cranbrook  _.. 832 1,021 1,115
Creston    783 735 640
Fernie   133 99 112
Grand Forks   255 290 212
Nelson  809 1,085 859
New Denver  249 229 171
Trail    524 620 606
3,585   4,079   3,715
3,260
3,249
2,340
Cranbrook 	
Fernie 	
271
119
       93
575
107
95
27
172
339
107
686
831
131
98
Greenwood	
Kimberley     	
Nelson 	
Rossland	
Trail 	
11
176
419
81
212
28
92
326
130
889
1,382
2,108
2,525
Region V—
Fort St. John ...
Dawson Creek .
Prince George .
Quesnel	
Vanderhoof	
Williams Lake .
606 302 323
1,130 944 652
1,579 1,338 1,354
651 655 577
211 273 289
634 506 608
4,811
4,018
3,803
Chilliwack City	
2,965
2,251
1,847
Region VI—
320
714
      107
264
679
131
327
628
122
566
1,118
_     151
1,037
1,017
951
483
_     156
190
... 3,887
310
445
1,101
145
971
1,084
810
455
177
175
4,503
298
456
Chilliwhack Tp. .
1,083
Haney	
Langley City	
Langley Township
Maple Ridge	
Matsqui	
Mission District
Mission Town	
Sumas	
Surrey —	
White Rock	
140
867
1,146
843
498
133
220
4,153
310
Kitimat 	
1,141
1,074
1,077
9,866 10,164
9,849
Region VII—
. ..     170
199
304
487
125
184
414
497
97
55
580
280
88
596
370
59
     220
556
104
949
Smithers   	
Terrace    	
Terrace 	
556
1,050
1,115
1,192
915
1,054
1,564
7,854   8,128    7,252
4,967   6,187    6,240
Dawson Creek  979 1,009 739
Fort St. John   198 107 106
Prince George   1,209 802 691
Quesnel  __ 579 333 311
7,776   6,269    5,650
11,007 11,238 10,926
1,965   2,169   2,756
64,411 64,426 63,252
 I 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IV.—Expenditures by the Province for Social Allowances,
Medical Services, etc.
Fiscal Year
1960/61
Fiscal Year
1961/62
Fiscal Year
1962/63
Basic Social Allowances   	
Repatriation, transportation within the Province, nursing- and
boarding-home care (other than tuberculosis), special allowances and grants
Emergency payments, such as where a family may lose its home
by fire or similar circumstances  	
Municipal and Provincial cases—
(a) Tuberculosis,   boarding-,   nursing-,   and   private-home
cases         ._ _	
(b) Transportation of tuberculosis cases	
(c) Comforts allowance for tuberculosis cases 	
Hospitalization of social assistance cases	
$21,406,719.50
3,020,886.15
50,492.14
319,920.87
2,170.00
4,825.00
14,269.55
$25,365,840.91
3,240,890.05
16,860.76
262,494.56
1,553.86
5,002.00
13,796.90
$24,782,325.09
3,119,601.81
11,352.44
206,513.48
1,394.75
4,335.65
11,629.30
Gross Social Allowance costs as per Public Accounts
Less municipal share of costs and sundry credits	
Net Social Allowances       . 	
Administration and operation of New Denver Pavilion ,
Medical services and drugs	
Totals 	
$24,819,283.21
2,545,723.88
$28,906,439.04
3,437,805.71
$28,137,152.52
3,081,287.10
$22,273,559.33
22,303.13
4,087,943.73
$25,468,633.33
19,708.73
4,123,807.86
$25,055,865.42
20,766.83
4,109,238.36
$26,383,806.19
$29,612,149.92
$29,185,870.61
For the fiscal year 1962/63 the Province received from the Federal Government re:—
Unemployment Assistance Agreement  $13,028,732.59
Welfare assistance to immigrants  68.70
Sundry   4,803.88
Total  $ 13,033,605.17
REHABILITATION
It is recognized increasingly that the concepts of the employability and unem-
ployability of the individual are related to employment opportunity as well as to
actual physical, mental, or social disability. Given unlimited employment opportunity, severely disabled people are, in fact, employable. On the other hand, where
there is a restriction in employment opportunity, people who are mildly handicapped
or who are less favoured in knowledge and skills may find themselves less employable. Under these conditions the motivation of the individual becomes a more important factor. The social worker can often resolve the problem of insufficient
motivation, but it is usually not in his hands to provide employment opportunity.
A comprehensive rehabilitative programme must combine provision of opportunity
for employment, opportunity for health restoration, and opportunity for education
and training with social-work services, including skilled casework, oriented to helping the individual take advantage of available opportunity. Such a comprehensive
programme for disabled people has been continued from the previous year on a
project basis in Nanaimo, Chilliwack, and Prince George. Representatives of the
National Employment Service, Provincial Health Department and Department of
Social Welfare, meeting at regular intervals, screen and process selected cases.
Casework services are provided by the Department of Social Welfare. A number
of disabled people have been successfully rehabilitated by this means, and the experience that has been gained is being applied on a more general basis.
Mention must also be made of comprehensive rehabilitative efforts made by
the staff of the various other offices throughout the Province, formal and informal,
in co-ordination with other agencies and disciplines.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 37
Apart from this, large numbers of employed and unemployed persons are
assisted daily throughout the Province as a part of the regular services associated
with provision of assistance. It is statistically impossible to show what actual proportion of cases closed may be directly or indirectly owing to the efforts of staff in
personal interrelationship with assistance recipients. It can reasonably be considered that thousands of persons are benefited to at least some extent in this way.
Specific rehabilitative services have included individual counselling and referrals for training under the Provincial vocational training programme. The latter
may make provision for payment of maintenance, tuition, books, and travelling
expenses on behalf of successful candidates. Approximately one in five of those
accepted for training were social assistance recipients.
As more training facilities become available under the present building programme, it is anticipated that the opportunities of this Department for successful
rehabilitation services will be increased.
FAMILY SERVICE
Family services basically involve provision of skilled personal help intended
to strengthen family life, to assist in the resolution of personal problems, and to
generally foster sound social and character development. During the year, responsibility for family services to persons not in receipt of assistance was transferred to the
Child Welfare Division, and it is anticipated that this will be to the particular advantage of the social assistance programme in enabling attention to be focused more
directly on the problem of the social assistance recipient. In the social assistance
programme the basic purpose of family services is to prevent or to ameliorate the
consequence of prolonged dependence on public assistance. These consequences
constitute an extremely critical public concern in its programmes for the prevention
of social breakdown with its high costs in delinquency and crime, mental illness,
child neglect, and continued future public dependency.
A particular concern has been centred on family separation and desertion. This
problem is intensified by economic stress, which tends to break weaker family ties.
The first concern of the social worker is prevention of family breakdown and, failing
this, restoration of family units. When these are not possible, the wife is required
to seek legal maintenance. In practice the deserting husband is usually difficult to
locate, and when found cannot too often be successfully obliged to provide maintenance.
A great deal of staff effort is devoted to the problems of planning and placement for elderly citizens requiring some form of institutional care. It is hoped that
in time a study can be undertaken to determine the adequacy of present facilities in
meeting their needs and the extent to which improved provisions might be made for
their care in their own homes.
OLD AGE SECURITY
Requests received from the Old Age Security Division for assistance to elderly
persons who are encountering difficulties with documents or correspondence in completing applications for Old Age Security, from April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963,
are as follows:—
Pending as at April 1, 1962 Nil
Received during fiscal year  14
Total case load  14
Total reports completed  10
Requests cancelled     3
Requests pending at March 31, 1963     1
 I 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
GENERAL
During the year 30 Boards of Review were held, of which 19 were in favour of
the applicant.
CONCLUSION
The Social Assistance and Rehabilitation Division wishes to give its thanks to
all Provincial and municipal staff, including clerical personnel, who have so ably
carried forward the work of this programme. Thanks are especially owing to the
field social workers, who have given so very generously of their energies and professional skills on behalf of both the public and of the social assistance recipient.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 39
CHILD WELFARE DIVISION
Miss Mary K. King, Superintendent
FAMILIES NEED SERVICE
There is a tendency in our concern to give service to children out of their own
homes to become so involved with the problem of what to do with the juvenile
delinquent, the emotionally disturbed, or behaviour-disordered child, and the
mentally and physically handicapped child that sight is lost of the family from which
the child comes and to whom he belongs. The importance is also lost of the broader
social needs which, if met, could prevent to a large measure the need to remove
children from their own homes.
Children are born into families and grow up in families, where they are shaped
and moulded. The need, then, is to help families provide a sound, healthy environment in which their children may grow to physically and emotionally healthy adulthood. This means families having work and adequate incomes, living in healthy
communities, and having their own needs met sufficiently well to enable them to give
loving and understanding care to their children. It requires emotional maturity and
great strength of character to meet the daily stress and frustration created by lack of
work, marginal income, poor housing, ill health, and lack of wholesome recreational
and social activities. Yet many families who are least well equipped emotionally
and physically to raise their children amid such frustrations must try to do so. We
will not prevent children from coming into conflict with the law as juvenile delinquents or help children remain and be cared for and treated in their own homes
unless we have primary concern for the needs of the family and how these can best
be met on a broad social basis and in individual situations.
PREVENTIVE AND TREATMENT SERVICE NEEDED
One way of providing a part of this service would appear to be the provision,
on a broad community basis, of an educational programme of preparation for marriage and parenthood. Family service and child-care agencies and public welfare
departments have attempted to provide parent education programmes through group
discussions and individual counselling. Within the limits of their size and structure,
they have proven the value of such programmes.
However, these agencies can only touch a small number of the young adults and
families who require help in assuming the responsibility of marriage and parenthood.
This would appear to be a need requiring broad community concern and action.
2,562 Children Admitted to Care
The fact that, of the 2,562 children admitted to the care of the Superintendent
of Child Welfare and three Children's Aid Societies this year, 1,375 were apprehended under the Protection of Children Act for reason of neglect and 86 were
committed under the Juvenile Delinquents Act (see Table VII) indicates the size
of the problem and the need for a preventive programme to help parents assume
the responsibilities of marriage and parenthood. There is need for such a preventive
programme to be undertaken, while at the same time counselling and environmental
services to families who are already in trouble need to be increased and intensified.
A good deal has been learned about methods of reaching and working with these
families, known as the " multi-problem family." It will take time and money to put
the necessary programmes into effect, but the time and money spent should result
 I 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
in a lessening of the juvenile delinquency problem and in the number of children
removed from their own homes.
SERVICE GIVEN TO FAMILIES
During the past fiscal year 2,178 families (who were not in receipt of financial
assistance) were given a casework service (see Table I). In the majority of these
families the service needed was of a protective nature as conditions of child neglect
or potential neglect existed. Three hundred and fifty-two other families received
services through the provision of custody reports for the Supreme Court; immigration
reports for the Department of Citizenship and Immigration for children under 18
years of age entering British Columbia from other countries to live with persons other
than parents; and legitimation reports for the Division of Vital Statistics (see Table
II). A further service is given to families through the meeting of requests for service
from the Family Allowances Division (see Table III).
DIVERSITY OF PLACEMENT RESOURCES
There is a growing need for a diversity of placement resources to meet the needs
of the increasing number of children who are being cared for each year. Eight
thousand five hundred and twenty-two children were cared for by the Superintendent
of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies during the past fiscal year. This was
an increase of 812 over the previous year. Six thousand three hundred and thirty-
six children remained in the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies at the end of the fiscal year March 31, 1963, an increase of 684
children (see Table IV).
A large number of these children can best be cared for in family foster homes.
Some children require temporary care while the mother is ill or family conditions and
relationships are such that the child needs to be placed elsewhere or while the child
is receiving special medical care or is awaiting placement in an adoption home (see
Table VIII). Other children require permanent foster-home care when they cannot
return to their own home or are not legally free or physically and mentally fit for
adoption placement. Of the 2,186 children who were discharged from the care of
the Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies during the past
fiscal year, only 1,302 were returned to their own families and 402 were discharged
through completion of an adoption or through placement in an adoption home (see
Tables IX and X).
A more intensive service is being asked of our foster-parents for many children
as an increasing number of children are requiring special care. For example,
statistical figures for 1962/63 show that roughly one-third of the children in care
as at March 31, 1963, were between the ages of 12 and 17 (see Table VI). This
is the most difficult age to work with as many of the children are unable to establish
relationships with adults due to early emotional deprivation and physical neglect
and many have formed behaviour patterns that are difficult to live with. In the
younger age-group, where 25 per cent of the children were between the ages of 6
and 11 (see Table VI), an increasing number were admitted to care who were
emotionally disturbed, mentally ill, or subnormal. It is becoming necessary, therefore, to plan an educational and training programme for foster-parents and to
financially reimburse foster-parents for the kinds of service being requested of them.
Placement resources (including correctional institutions and hospitals) other
than foster homes were used by 435 children in the care of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies during the past fiscal year.   Sixty-three
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 41
of these children received treatment for emotional disturbance in one of the seven
treatment centres used (see Table VII).
The foregoing figures do not include the children who lived in family-group
homes operated by the Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies.
In co-operation with the Mental Health Services Children's Clinic, the Department
of Social Welfare opened a third group-living home to care for and treat six boys
between the ages of 11 and 16 years. Central City Mission also opened its third
group-living home, which has a similar purpose.
The number of special placement resources is slowly growing in both the public
and private child welfare programmes. However, there continues to be an urgent
need for treatment resources for the emotionally disturbed and mentally ill child
and for the young adolescent and older boy whose poor behaviour pattern is so
strongly established that he requires a long-term residential care which provides
a well-structured therapeutic programme. It is expected that during the next year
further gains may be made toward establishing these resources.
MAINTENANCE COSTS
The cost of maintaining children in the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and three Children's Aid Societies was $4,286,872.86, an increase of $470,-
579.05 over last year. Collections from various sources, including parents, pensions,
and workmen's compensation, were $913,818.49, an increase of $135,000.48 over
the previous year (see Table XIII).
This increase in cost is related to the increase of 416 in the number of children
admitted to care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies
during the past year (see Table VII).
PROGRESS OF CHILDREN
Most of the children coming into care of a child-caring agency and remaining
in care have suffered emotional and physical deprivation. Many of these children
overcome this difficult start and find a satisfactory place for themselves in life. Seven
wards of the Superintendent of Child Welfare were able to attend university during
the past fiscal year, and 37 wards achieved training through a vocational programme.
Other older children achieved a place in life satisfying to themselves and to their
foster-parents.
One hundred and sixty-four wards of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies were discharged from care at 21 years of age. Fifty-five
girls were discharged from care when they married. Twenty-two children died during this fiscal year for reasons such as pneumonia in infancy, accident, and other
serious physical illnesses.
An increasing number of children are being adopted by their foster-parents.
During the past year 77 wards of the Superintendent of Child Welfare were adopted
in this way. Many of these children were children with special needs and might not
have found the security of a permanent home if the foster-parents had not become
so fond of them that they wished to have them as their own through adoption.
NEW LEGISLATION
The Family and Children's Court Act and Training-schools Act were passed by
the Legislature, to become effective July 1, 1963. The Family and Children's Court
Act will make the Court a Court of Record, emphasize the need for service to the
family as a preventive measure, make provision for increased community participa-
 I 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
tion through a structured community committee, and emphasize the need for local
community placement resources in which boys and girls can be held in their own
communities for observation and study pending a recommendation being made to
the Court for disposition of the case.
The Training-schools Act, among other measures, will provide for provisional
and final release to be under Provincial jurisdiction.
It is recognized by many that the so-called juvenile delinquent is like any other
child with problems, with the exception that he has come into conflict with the law
and is better known to the community than the mentally ill or emotionally disturbed
child. However, the cause of the problem is basically the same, stemming from
family disturbances and disruption, and the treatment of the problem is similar in
that it involves casework service to the family and the provision of diversified placement resources and treatment.
Because of this it is not practical to separate the services for the younger so-
called delinquent child (under 16 years of age), who has come into conflict with the
law, from the main stream of a child welfare programme. Courts have given recognition to this by the increasing number of children being committed to the care of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies under the Juvenile
Delinquents Act. Eighty-six children were committed to the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies this fiscal year, as against 54 in
the previous year and 63 in 1960/61 (see Table VII).
There were, as well, amendments to the Children of Unmarried Parents Act
during the past fiscal year. The major amendments made provision for a three-party
agreement among the mother, putative father, and Superintendent of Child Welfare
in the form of a lump-sum cash settlement and for the rescinding of an affiliation
order made under the Act.
MORE UNMARRIED MOTHERS SERVED
Two thousand seven hundred and eighteen unmarried mothers were served during this fiscal year by the Department of Social Welfare and three Children's Aid
Societies. This is an increase of 79 over the previous year. The Department of
Social Welfare field staff served 1,182 (an increase of 77), while the three Children's
Aid Societies worked with 1,536 unmarried mothers, a similar number to the previous year. There will be some duplication in these figures as some of the unmarried
mothers were known to both the Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid
Societies.
Seventy-three maintenance orders, 97 agreements, and 17 cash settlements were
made during this fiscal year. This was a considerable increase over last year, as was
the amount of money collected, $126,606.90.
CHILDREN BORN OUT OF WEDLOCK
There were 116 more children born out of wedlock this fiscal year than in the
previous year, but 9 less were born than in the fiscal year 1960/61. The largest
number of children were born to mothers in the 20-29 age-group (see Table XIV).
CHILDREN PLACED FOR ADOPTION
Nine hundred and forty-one children were placed for adoption during this fiscal
year. Five hundred and eighty-four children were placed by the Department of
Social Welfare and 357 by the three Children's Aid Societies (see Tables XVI and
XVII).   Although placements increased by 77 (Department of Social Welfare, 51;
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 43
three Children's Aid Societies, 26), all children available for adoption could not be
placed due to an increase in the number of children available for adoption and a
continuing shortage of adoption homes. There were, in fact, 64 children (Department of Social Welfare, 12; three Children's Aid Societies, 52) of white racial origin
and under 1 year with no problems of health living in foster homes and awaiting
adoption placement as at March 31, 1963.
ADOPTION HOMES AVAILABLE
There were 101 adoption homes (Department of Social Welfare, 26; three
Children's Aid Societies, 75) available for placement at the end of this fiscal year
(see Table XV). This is a very narrow margin to work within, and it is hoped
that the situation may be improved during the next fiscal year through special
measures being planned.
RELIGIOUS FAITH OF HOMES IN WHICH CHILDREN PLACED
Five hundred homes of the Protestant faith, 81 homes of the Roman Catholic
faith, 2 homes of the Hebrew faith, and 1 of the Confucian faith were used for adoption placement of children during the past fiscal year by the Department of Social
Welfare (see Table XVI). The Catholic Children's Aid Society used 63 homes,
making a total of 144 Roman Catholic homes used by the Department of Social
Welfare and Catholic Children's Aid Society. This is an increase of 41 Roman
Catholic homes, and it is hoped that this trend may continue.
CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
One hundred and seventy-two children with special needs were placed for adoption during this fiscal year by the Department of Social Welfare. This is one-third
of the children placed by the Department for adoption and an increase of 5 over last
year. Eighty-three of these children were of interracial origin or origin other than
white, 42 had health problems, and 47 were over 1 year of age (see Table XXI).
Included in the health problems were heart murmur, club foot, prematurity, slow
development, anaemia, and several instances of mental retardation in the familial
history.
We are most appreciative of the assistance and co-operation of the Health
Centre for Children. Apart from the thorough investigation which is undertaken
in specific cases, the counsel and interpretation by the staff to us and the prospective
adopting parents are of inestimable value. The evaluations obtained from the Health
Clinic has enabled us to free for suitable placement a child who otherwise might
never have known the security of an adoption home.
COMPLETED ADOPTIONS
One thousand four hundred and nine adoptions were completed during this
fiscal year. Of these, 840 were Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid
Societies placements (Department of Social Welfare, 522; Children's Aid Societies,
318), 75 were private placements, 418 were step-parent, and 76 were other relative
adoptions (see Table XXII). It is gratifying to note that the private placements
continue to decrease each year. There were 33 less this year than in the previous
fiscal year. It is believed that this is due to a better public understanding of the
purpose of the adoption legislation and the use of social agencies in adoption placements.
 I 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REVOCATION OF CONSENT
One mother applied to the Supreme Court of British Columbia under section
8, subsection (5), of the Adoption Act for revocation of her consent. The decision
was made by the Supreme Court that it was in the best interest of the child to be
adopted, and the mother was therefore not permitted to revoke her consent.
CONCLUSION
This past year has been a busy and hard-pressed one for the field and divisional
staff of the Department of Social Welfare and for the three Children's Aid Societies.
The devotion to duty and quality of service given by staff requires special commendation, as does the service given by our " other staff "—the foster- and group-living-
home parents.
All agencies are concerned with the urgent need to increase our service to
families and to children in their own homes and to provide, as well, a service that
will educate young people and married couples for family living and the rearing of
children.   It is expected that this coming year will see some advance in this regard.
The large problem to be faced of preventing family breakdown and treating
those who have failed is one to be shared by the community and Government. Each
has a part to play, and desired goals can be achieved most quickly and satisfactorily
by co-ordinated planning. The community, through the provision of private family
service agencies, Children's Aid Societies, Association for Retarded Children, treatment centres such as The Children's Foundation, Sevenoaks, St. Euphrasia's School,
and group-living homes, as provided by the Central City Mission, is already, with
some Government financial support, making an excellent contribution to the development of the total programme. Heavy demands will continue on both community
and Government in order to fully stem the tide of removal of children from their own
homes and to provide psychiatric and social treatment for children who are mentally
or emotionally ill or whose behaviour pattern is such that special care is required.
In concluding this report I would like to thank all those who have contributed
to Family and Child Welfare Services in this Province during the past year.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 45
STATISTICAL TABLES
List of Tables
Table I.—Family Services Cases.
Table II.—Services Related to Protection of Children.
Table III.—Requests Received from Family Allowances Division.
Table IV.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies.
Table V.—Number of Children in Care by Legal Status, Region, Societies, and
Other Agency Supervision.
Table VI.—Children in Care by Age-group.
Table VII.—Number of Children Admitted to Care by Legal Status.
Table VIII.—Reasons for Admissions to Care.
Table IX.—Number of Children Discharged from Care by Legal Status.
Table X.—Reasons for Discharge.
Table XI.—Reasons for Discharge by Legal Status.
Table XII.—Children Receiving Institutional Care.
Table XIII.—Maintenance Costs.
Table XIV.—Number of Children Born out of Wedlock in British Columbia.
Table XV.—Adoption Homes Awaiting Placement, in Which Placement Made and
Closed.
Table XVI.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Social
Welfare by Religion.
Table XVII.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Social
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies.
Table XVIII.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Social
Welfare by Type of Placement.
Table XIX.—Age of Child Placed for Adoption by Department of Social Welfare.
Table XX.—Child of Interracial Origin and Origin Other than White.
Table XXI.—Number of Children with Special Needs Placed for Adoption.
Table XXII.—Number of Legally Completed Adoptions.
Table I.—Number of Family Service Cases (Not in Receipt of Financial Assistance
from Department of Social Welfare) Served by Department of Social Welfare
during the Fiscal Year 1962/63 and as at March 31, 1963.1
Total at
Beginning
of Month
Opened
Closed
Total at
End of
Month
Total at
End of
Same
Month
Previous
Year
April, 1962	
May, 1962	
June, 1962	
July, 1962	
August, 1962	
September, 1962..
October, 1962—_
November, 1962 _
December, 1962..
January, 1963 __
February, 1963 ....
March, 1963	
1,325
1,352
1,375
1,408
1,432
1,455
1,450
1,495
1,512
1,491
1,502
1,538
162
201
184
167
187
202
203
171
110
175
208
208
135
178
151
143
164
207
158
154
131
164
172
145
1,352
1,375
1,408
1,432
1,455
1,450
1,495
1,512
1,491
1,502
1,538
1,601
1,289
1,291
1,292
1,275
1,275
1,254
1,244
1,239
1,270
1,297
1,299
1,325
1 This table was formerly shown in Family Service Section of the Family Division's annual report.
 I 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Cases1 Receiving Services from Department of Social Welfare and Children's Aid Societies2 Related to Protection of Children, by Type of Service, for
the Fiscal Years 1961/62 and 1962/63.
Type of Service
Opened during
Year
Carried during
Year
Incomplete at
End of Year
1961/62
1962/63
1961/62
1962/63
1961/62
1962/63
Custody    	
Repatriation	
Immigration...    	
82
127
57
4
75
150
53
11
121
147
73
6
111
159
71
11
36
9
18
39
14
18
3
Totals      .
270
289
347
352
63
74
i Cases are the number of family units receiving services on behalf of their children.
2 Children's Aid Societies are Vancouver Children's Aid Society, Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, and Children's Aid Society of Victoria.
Table III.—Requests Received from Family Allowances Division,
April 1, 1962, to March 31, 19631
Received during fiscal year  36
Referrals pending April 1, 1962     1
Total number of requests referred
Referrals completed	
37
33
Referrals pending March 31, 1963
1 This table was formerly shown in Family Service section of the Family Division's annual report.
Table IV. — Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and
Children's Aid Societies1 during and as at the End of the Fiscal Year 1962/63
Superintendent of Child Welfare	
Vancouver Children's Aid Society  1,886
Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver   1,010
Children's Aid Society of Victoria      631
During
1962/63
4,995
Totals
3,527
8,522
At Mar. 31,
1963
3,763
1,356
811
406
2,573
6,336
1 Children's Aid Societies are Vancouver Children's Aid Society, Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, and Children's Aid Society of Victoria.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 47
Table V.—Number of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and of
Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status, by Region,1 Societies,2 and Other
Agency8 Supervision as at March 31, 1963.
P.C.A.
Wards
Before
Court
J.D.A.
Wards
Other
Agency
Non-
wards,
Wards,
and
Before
Court
O.P.
Wards
Non-
wards
Total
Superintendent of Child Welfare
Region I   	
308
451
509
161
427
429
295
26
55
58
29
54
49
18
43
12
19
12
17
13
10
26
12
17
8
7
13
2
8
7
4
6
11
2
57
48
42
7
42
65
21
460
586
Region III   	
652
221
553
580
Region VII  	
348
Totals                                           _   -
2,580
147
89
289
9
126
13
7
85
38
38
22
282
37
1
3,400
228
135
S.C.W. children under other agency supervision
S.C.W. and agency wards supervised by another
Total children in care of Superintendent of Child Welfare                 _
2,816
298
146
123
60
320
3,763
Vancouver Children's Aid Society
1,072
37
1
40
z
103
1
102
1,318
Vancouver C.A.S. children in other agency su-
37
Vancouver C.A.S. children in other Province	
1
Total children in care of Vancouver
1,110
40
103
1
102
1,356
Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver
Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver
C.C.A.S. Vancouver children in other agency
630
46
63
1
3
48
1
19
763
48
C.C.A.S. Vancouver children in other Province...
Total children in care of Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver .   ..
676
64
3
48
1
19
811
Children's Aid Society of Victoria
210
27
10
29
1
81
3
39
6
372
C.A.S. Victoria children in other agency super-
34
Total  children in  care of  Children's
237
10
30
81
3
45
406
Total children in care of Superintendent   of   Child   Welfare   and   three
4,839
412
179
355
65
486
6,336
i Region is an administrative unit of the field service of the Department of Social Welfare.
2 Societies are Vancouver Children's Aid Society, Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, and Children's Aid Society of Victoria.
3 Other agency is the Director of Child Welfare in a Province other than British Columbia.
 I 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VI.—Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid
Societies1 at March 31, 1963, by Age-group for the Fiscal Years 1961/62 and
1962/63.
Age-group
Superintendent
of Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's Aid
Society
Total
1961/62
1962/63
1961/62
1962/63
1961/62
1962/63
1961/62
1962/63
1961/62
1962/63
Under 3 years 	
3- 5 years 	
6—11 years	
12-17 years2	
18-20 years2	
438
430
920
1,089
375
i     601
493
1,015
1,246
408
244
166
306
475
94
309
166
282
424
175
159
114
176
i     251
72
210
121
178
214
88
35
42
83
159
24
50
41
109
180
26
876
752
1,485
1,974
565
1,170
821
1,584
2,064
697
Totals 	
3,252
3,763
1,285    |  1,356
1
772
811
343
406
5,652
6,336
1 Children's Aid Societies are Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, Catholic Children's Aid Society of
Vancouver, and Children's Aid Society of Victoria.
2 In the 1961/62 Annual Report these two age-groups were headed " 12-18 years " and " 19-21 years "
respectively. This was an error only in the heading, and, therefore, the statistical figures are correct and are
comparable.
Table VII.—Number of Children Admitted to Care of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies1 by Legal Status during the Fiscal
Year 1962/63.
Legal Status
Superintendent of Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Apprehended under Protection of Children Act
Committed under Juvenile Delinquents Act _
948
67
555
192
4
331
136
2
69
1
99
13
114
3
1,375
86
1,069
Other Provinces' wards .... '
25
3
32
Total of new admissions  .. _ ._
1,595                530                208
229                2,562
Other agency wards, non-wards, and before the
Court—transfer of supervision2	
148
1
71                    30
59        f          308
Total of new admissions and transfers
1,743                   601                   238
1                          1
288
2,870
1 Children's Aid  Societies are Children's Aid  Society of Vancouver,  Catholic  Children's  Aid  Society  of
Vancouver, and Children's Aid Society of Victoria.
2 In previous years the inter-agency transfers for supervision were not differentiated in the total of the
admissions.    If they had been the new admissions would have been 2,185 and the transfer of supervision 269
for 1961/62. ...
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 49
Table VIII.—Reasons for Admissions of Children to the Care of Superintendent
of Child Welfare during the Fiscal Year 1962/63
Reason Number of children
Neglect	
Desertion of one or both parents .
Illness of parent	
Death of mother	
Rehabilitation of parents	
Transient child	
Minor unmarried mother	
Behaviour of child	
Medical care	
Physical handicap or mental retardation.
Education and training.
Awaiting adoption placement
Marital problem	
440
74
230
21
118
64
24
168
23
21
58
254
78
Sub-total
At request of other Provinces1	
Other agency wards, non-wards, and before the Court transferred
to Superintendent of Child Welfare for supervision2	
Total	
1,573
22
148
1,743
1 In previous years the admissions at the request of other Provinces were not differentiated in the total of
the reasons for admission to care.
2 In previous years the other agency wards and non-wards transferred for supervision were not differentiated
in the total of the reasons for admission to care.
Table IX.—Number of Children Discharged from Care of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and of Children's Aid Societies by Legal Status during the Fiscal
Year 1962/63.
Legal Status
Superintendent of
Child Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid Society
Catholic
Children's Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's Aid
Society
Total
330
40
260
59
447
22
176
2
23
(2)
269
4
43
2
58
(2)
58
2
28
1
52
(2)
98
3
577
45
393
59
872
31
Total direct discharges from
care  	
Other agency wards, non-wards, and
before the Court discharged to own
agency3  „	
1,158
74
474
56
163
36
182
43
1,977
209
Total discharges and discharges to own agency	
j
1,232                    530
1
199
225
2,186
1 Children's Aid Societies are Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, Catholic Children's Aid Society of
Vancouver, and Children's Aid Society of Victoria.
2 Included in " Before the Court."
3 In previous years the discharges to own agency were not differentiated in the total of discharges from care.
If they had been, the direct discharges would have been 1,872 and the discharge to own agency 186 for the fiscal
year 1961/62.
 I 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table X.—Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies1 for the Fiscal Year 1962/63
Reasons for Discharge
Superintendent of
Child Welfare
Vancouver
Children's Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's Aid
Society
Total
Wards
93
39
6
136
30
20
137
42
10
7
29
67
24
36
18
2
4
18
15
2
10
11
4
12
1
24
2
11
164
55
Deceased    	
17
195
68
Other agency guardianship terminated
Other Province guardianship terminate
Returned to other agency ..- 	
i         	
93
24
194
Totals                  	
461
215
69
65
810
Before the Court (Protection of
Children Act)
131
127
3
2
1
59
21
1
4
58
1
1
51
211
Order under section 8 (6) (a), (6)
Deceased  	
178
4
2
Returned to other agency	
6
I
Apprehended but not presented . 	
59
Totals            	
323
26
59
52
460
Non-wards
21 years of age    .
Married (female)	
1
1
378
68
146
117
24
2
1
50
7
12
1
85
14
7
2
1
1
1
To parents or relations	
659
206
43
Other.. _ 	
5
Totals                   —  _ 	
448
289
71
108
916
1,232
530
199
225
2,186
i Children's Aid Societies are Children's Aid Society of Vancouver,  Catholic Children's Aid Society of
Vancouver, and Children's Aid Society of Victoria.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1962/63
I 51
Table XL—Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies1 by Legal Status for the Fiscal Year 1962/63
Reasons for Discharge
Protection of
Children Act
Juvenile
Delinquents
Act
Under Supervision of Other
Agency, within
or without
Province
Total
Wards
131
51
17
137
68
173
8
38
25
4
20
93
24
21
164
55
Deceased _ _    .___
17
195
68
Other Province guardianship terminated
93
24
194
Totals     	
577
46
187
810
Before the Court (Protection of Children Act)
Withdrawn from Court  	
186
178
3
2
1
59
25
1
5
211
Order under section 8 (6) (a), (6) 	
178
4
2
Returned to other agency.  	
6
Apprehended but not presented   	
59
Totals 	
429
......
31
460
Non-wards
21 years of age	
1
1
1
654
206
1
4
5
42
1
1
1
Deceased       .
1
659
206
Returned to other agency 	
Other  	
43
5
Totals 	
868
48
916
1,874
46
266
2,186
1 Children's Aid Societies are Children's Aid Society of Vancouver,  Catholic Children's Aid Society of
Vancouver, and Children's Aid Society of Victoria.
 I 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XII.—Children in Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid
Societies1 Receiving Institutional Care as at March 31,1963
Institution
Superintendent of
Child
Welfare
Vancouver
Children's
Aid
Society
Catholic
Children's
Aid
Society,
Vancouver
Victoria
Children's
Aid
Society
Total
Correctional Institutions
Brannan Lake School 	
Willingdon School for Girls	
Oakalla and Haney Correctional Institution-
Detention  —   	
Young Offenders' Unit	
British Columbia Penitentiary...
Fort Saskatchewan Gaol	
Totals  	
Health Institutions
Sunny Hill Hospital .
General hospitals._
Woodlands, Provincial Mental Hospital, and Crease
Clinic   	
Coqualeetza Indian Hospital-
Queen Alexandra Solarium.....
Alouette Private Hospital	
United Church Home 	
Maywood Home._
Our Lady of Mercy Home-
Totals	
Educational Institutions
Jericho Hill School 	
Private boarding schools-
Indian residential schools-
Alberta Bible Institution	
Totals __- 	
Residential Institutions
St. Mary's Hostel _
St. Christopher's School. 	
Rainbow Christian Fellowship 	
Central City Mission Youth Residence-
Central City Mission Farm	
Y.W.C.A  	
Working Boys' Group Home-
Sisters of Service	
Totals-
Treatment Centres
Children's Foundation	
St. Euphrasia's School	
Sevenoaks 	
Harterre House, Montreal	
St. Joseph's Vocational School, Winnipeg-
Secret Harbour Farms, Washington— _
Central City Mission Group Home	
Totals  _	
Grand totals..
29
26
29
2
2
90
33
2
42
4
14
42
1
61
13
2
2
17
7
12
241
7
6
14
2
1
10
1
15
10
32
27
« I
13
5
12
11
17
91
57
46
41
36
55
3
2
4
2
143
2
16
68
2
106
11
25
44
1
81
21
9
5
"1
4
2
42
11
26
21
"l
3
1
63
435
i Children's Aid Societies are Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, and Children's Aid Society of Victoria.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 53
Table XIII.—Cost of Maintaining Children in Care of Superintendent of Child
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies1
Gross cost of maintenance of children in Child Welfare
Division foster homes	
  $ 1,896,261.61
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance of
children in care of Children's Aid Societies     2,253,658.20
Gross cost of transportation of children in care of Superintendent   21,614.05
Gross cost of hospitalization of newborn infants being
permanently planned for by Superintendent  44,239.00
Grants to sundry homes  71,100.00
Gross expenditure 	
Less collections	
$4,286,872.86
913,818.49
Net cost to Provincial Government as per Public
Accounts 	
$3,373,054.37
1 Children's Aid Societies are Children's Aid Society of Vancouver,  Catholic Children's Aid Society of
Vancouver, and Children's Aid Society of Victoria.
Table XIV.—Number of Children Born Out of Wedlock in British Columbia by
Age-group of Mother during the Fiscal Years 1961/62 and 1962/63
Age-group of Mother 1961/62 1962/63
Under 15 years  16 19
15-19 years   772 781
20-24    "  752 800
25-29    "  406 454
30-39    "       474 488
40 years and over  65 59
Totals ___  2,485 2,601
 I 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 55
Table XVI.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Social Welfare, by Religion of Adopting Parents and by Region, for the Fiscal Year 1962/63
Region i 2
Religion
Protes
Roman
tant
Catholic
91
12
157
22
77
17
29
9
38
6
S3
8
22
6
1
2
1
Hebrew
Confucian
Total
Region I   _
Region II	
Region III  _ _.	
Region IV   	
Region V  _ 	
Region VI _.  	
Region VII 	
Children's Aid Society of Victoria..
Outside Province 	
Totals    _
500
81
103
180
94
38
44
91
28
2
4
584
i Region is an administrative unit of the field service of the Department of Social Welfare.
2 Region includes Children's Aid Society of Victoria and outside Province.
Table XVII.—Number of Children Placed for Adoption by Department of Social
Welfare and Children's Aid Societies1 for the Fiscal Years 1961/62 and 1962/63
197
Regions2	
Children's Aid Society of Vancouver	
Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver     36
Children's Aid Society of Victoria     98
1961/62
  533
331
1962/63
584
191
63
103
  357
Totals.
864
941
r Children's Aid Societies are Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, and Children's Aid Society of Victoria.
2 Region is an administrative unit of the field service of the Department of Social Welfare.
Table XVIII.—Number of Adoption Placements Made by Department of Social Welfare, by Specific Type of Placement and by Region,1 for the Fiscal Year 1962/63
Regioni 2
Type of Placement
Long-term
Probation3
One-year
Probation
Foster
Home to
Adoption
Total
Region I __
Region II.	
Region III	
Region IV	
Region V	
Region VI	
Region VII-
Children's Aid Society of Victoria..
Outside Province  	
98
154
71
34
35
79
21
1
4
4
23
23
4
8
Totals..
10
497
77
103
180
94
38
44
91
28
2
4
584
1 Region is an administrative unit of the field service of the Department of Social Welfare.
2 Region includes Children's Aid Society of Victoria and outside Province.
3 These are placements of children with health or other problems requiring a longer period of probation.
 I 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XIX.—Ages of Children Placed for Adoption by Department of Social
Welfare during the Fiscal Year 1962/63
Unde
15 da
1 m
3 mi
6 mi
1 ye
2 ye
3
Age
r 15 days	
Number of
Children
175
ys but under 1 month  __
70
Dnth but under 3 months	
113
3nths but under 6 months       _ _
Dnths but under 12 months  	
     66
         ___.       42
ar	
                  29
ars	
20
                 11
4
.                                                  13
5 ,
6 ,
       6
14
7
                 2
8 ,
9 ,
,            7
.                                                                 6
11    ,
3
12    ,
3
15    ,
.                          L'Ai:                                                         1
19    ,
2
20    ,
                           1
Total	
  584
Table XX.—Children of Interracial Origin and Racial Origin Other than White
Placed for Adoption by Department of Social Welfare According to Sex of the
Child and Religion of the Adopting Parent during the Fiscal Year 1962/63.
Sex
Religion of Adopting Parent
Male
Female
Totals
Protestant
Roman
Catholic
Confucian
Total
16
1
4
2
1
14
1
19
3
5
2
1
1
9
1
3
35
4
9
4
1
1
1
23
1
4
28
3
8
4
1
1
1
16
1
3
7
1
1
7
1
35
4
9
4
1
Native Indian and Chinese	
1
1
23
Japanese 	
1
4
Totals 	
39
44
83
66
16
1
83
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 57
Table XXI.—Number of Children with Special Needs Placed for Adoption by
Department of Social Welfare during the Fiscal Year 1962/63
Interracial origin and origin other than white     83
Health problems     42
Over 1 year of age     47
Total
172
Table XXII.—Number of Legally Completed Adoptions by Type of Placement, by
Region and Children's Aid Society,1 during the Fiscal Year 1962/63
Type of Placement
Region2 and Society
Agency
Relative
Private
Total
Stepparent
Other
I                     .                .               	
89
188
54
51
47
54
39
47
97
27
28
36
46
13
10
13
2
2
15
11
6
4
17
2
2
11
16
4
150
II _ _   ._      	
J15
Ill              	
85
rv _	
83
v   	
109
VI       .	
127
VII  _  	
62
Totals    	
522
294      |        59
56
931
204
36
78
74      |          8
12
38                9
15
2
2
301
50
127
Totals  - - —
318
124              17
19
478
840
418              76
75
1,409
(494)
i Children's Aid Societies are Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, Catholic Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, and Children's Aid Society of Victoria.
2 Region is an administrative unit of the field service of the Department of Social Welfare.
 I 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MEDICAL SERVICES DIVISION
P. W. Laundy, M.D., Director
The Medical Services Division has had, as usual, a busy year. Our main activities have been directed toward improving our present programme.
The comprehensive dental care programme for children under 13 years now
uses the same basic procedures and fee schedule as are followed for adults. This
change-over was made possible with the generous assistance of the Preventive Dental
Division of the Health Department, which several years ago helped to develop the
dental care programme for younger dependents of social assistance recipients in the
community.
This has been facilitated by a revision of the Dental Authority form. The
form, though of necessity somewhat elaborate, is preferred by the dentists. The
British Columbia dental association continues to administer the dental service for
the under-13-year-olds.
Reference to Table V shows that there has been a steady increase in the amount
of prophylactic dental work carried out. This is encouraging. It is also to be noted
that there has been a decrease in the dentures and extractions provided. This was
anticipated and suggests that perhaps the backlog of persons in need of this service
is being reduced.
Reference to the tables shows there has been an increase of some $11,000
expended on services compared with the same period last year. This undoubtedly
would have been considerably more except for the decline in numbers of persons
receiving benefits. As eligibility requirements have not changed, this in itself may
be considered a healthy sign.
The provision of glasses and optometric examinations proportionately have
shown a slight increase per person eligible.
Transportation services have expanded. This is probably due in large measure
to the greater number of persons outside the urban centres who require specialized
treatment in Vancouver. This in turn involves our Division in making arrangements
for local transportation and accommodation. It is anticipated that as more specialists take up practice in areas outside Victoria and Vancouver some of these referrals
will be made on a more regional basis.
The tables also show that the number of prescriptions and the cost of drugs
has increased proportionately, almost more than any item despite the decreased
number of persons eligible.
The administration and study of this generous drug benefit receives much
attention by this Division and the Drug Advisory Committee.
The Department continues to place an increasing emphasis on the rehabilitative principle. This approach is believed to be equally appropriate to the solution
of difficulties within the family setting or to the encouragement and activation within
the convalescent home or hospital as it is to the needs of those requiring job training
or placement. The Medical Services Division wishes to co-operate with all concerned to further the social, vocational, and medical rehabilitation of our clients.
In conclusion, I wish to thank for their generous assistance and co-operation
the members of our and other government divisions and departments, the various
agencies, associations, hospitals, social workers, and medical colleagues who are
ever ready to discuss our mutual problems.
The staff of this Division continue to do their best to help to make our programme an effective service to our clients.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 59
STATISTICAL TABLES
Table I.—Gross Costs for the Fiscal Years 1958/59 to 1962/63
Fiscal Year
Medical
Drugs1
Dental
Optical
Transportation
Other
Totali
1958/59-
1959/60-
1960/61-
1961/62 _
1962/63
,1,587,997.03
1,766,536.60
2,120,498.73
2,085,017.09
1,919,184.65
I
$1,281,107.27 |$168,051.06
1,492,138.17
1,704,222.44
1,758,767.53
1,937,506.37
I
279,550.08
508,392.25
548,973.74
513,761.57
$57,050.37
79,632.04
93,874.45
95,768.46
92,191.93
$41,329.60
57,297.87
97,832.33
99,311.32
108,481.58
$21,374.78
22,451.43
30,329.72
33,175.48
39,165.44
$3,156,910.11
3,697,606.19
4,555,149.92
4,621,013.62
4,610,291.54
1 Not included in these figures is the cost of drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare institutions.
Table 11—Payments to British Columbia Doctors (Gross Costs)
Fiscal Year
Medical
Agreement
Immigrant
Other
Total
1958/59-
1959/60..
1960/61-
1961/62..
1962/63.
$1,580,815.44
1,759,646.67
2,114,033.44
2,072,720.58
1,912,970.00
$1,330.62
565.00
226.00
$5,850.97
6,324.93
6,239.29
12,296.51
6,214.65
$1,587,997.03
1,766,536.60
2,120,498.73
2,085,017.09
1,919,184.65
Table III.—Categorical Breakdown of Medical Coverage with Average
Numbers of Persons Eligible
Fiscal Year
Social
Allowance
Child
Welfare
Division
O.A.S. Supplementary Social
Allowance and
Blind
Old-age
Assistance
Disabled
Persons'
Allowance
Total Average
Monthly
Coverage
1958/59..
1959/60-
1960/61-
1961/62.
1962/63.
19,914
25,362
33,751
36,097
32,527
3,814
3,998
4,194
4,462
4,813
36,191
35,860
35,772
34,282
30,152
7,150
7,410
7,216
6,899
6,746
1,516
1,785
1,999
2,123
2,155
68,585
74,415
82,932
83,863
76,393
Table IV.—Drug Costs
Number of Prescriptions
Costs of Medicines
Fiscal Year
Provincial
Pharmacy
Drug-stores
Total
Provincial
Pharmacy1
Drug-stores
Total
l->5f!/ 59
30,140
41,585
43,437
31,969
25,436
534,352
567,222
621,973
649,746
696,364
564,492
608,807
665,410
681,715
721,800
$137,255.34
184,437.87
189,620.86
153,450.36
171,143.02
$1,143,851.93
1,307,700.30
1,514,601.58
1,605,317.17
1,766,363.35
$1,281,107.27
1,492,138.17
1,704,222.44
1,758,767.53
1,937,506.37
1959/60	
1960/61    ..           	
1961/62	
1962/63	
i Not included in these figures is the cost of drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare institutions.
 I 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table V.—Dental Expenses
Fiscal Year
Prophylaxis
Extractions
Dentures
Total
$34,115.73
76,740.07
199,686.63
227,033.02
229,099.47
$12,138.92
26,115.00
65,078.39
74,339.50
64,316.50
1<."5R/59
$121,796.41
176,695.01
243,627.23
247,601.22
220,345.60
$168,051.06
1OTO/60
279,550.08
1060/61
508,392.25
1961/62 -	
548,973.74
1962/63	
513,761.57
Table VI.—Optical Costs
Fiscal Year
Optometric
Examinations
Glasses
Total
19.K/.9
$9,735.50        |        $47,314.87
15,589.00        i          64,043.04
19,252.95       '          74,621.50
19,496.00        |          76,272.46
19.362.37         1           72.829.56
$57,050.37
1". 59/60
79,632.04
1060/61
93,874.45
1961/62                   - -	
95,768.46
1962/63	
92,191.93
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 61
OLD-AGE ASSISTANCE, BLIND PERSONS' ALLOWANCES, DISABLED
PERSONS' ALLOWANCES, AND SUPPLEMENTARY ASSISTANCE
GENERAL
E. W. Berry, Chairman
The Old-age Assistance Act, the Blind Persons Act, and the Disabled Persons
Act are administered by a Board consisting of three members appointed by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council. The Board also considers applications for Supplementary Social Allowance and health services, and grants these additional Provincial benefits where applicable.
With the change in the Supplementary Social Allowance Regulations as of
January 1, 1962, the increase in the Old Age Security pension from $55 to $65
as of February 1, 1962, and the increase in the Old-age Assistance, Blind and Disabled Persons' Allowances effective April 1, 1962, the Board entered the fiscal year
with an extremely heavy load. Although every effort was made to adjust the rates
in pay as quickly as possible, the many aspects of the increases and adjustments were
not cleared away until many months afterward.
The Board continued to determine former Supplementary Social Allowance
cases (those granted prior to January 1, 1962) on the income-ceiling basis and all
new Supplementary Social Allowance cases on the budget-deficit basis. Former
cases who were receiving Supplementary Social Allowance at a decreased rate on the
income-ceiling basis could apply for and be granted an increase on the budget-deficit
basis if they had limited cash assets and otherwise qualified. The Federal Government continued to share on any case where a need was determined for all or a
portion of the Supplementary Social Allowance in pay.
In spite of the extraordinary volume of work handled by the Board, the percentage of staff turnover remained at a minimum. The policy of promotion through
reclassification wherever possible provides incentive for new employees and affords
an excellent reserve of experienced help.
 I 62 BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1963
Old-age Assistance
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received  2,124
Applications granted  1,936x
Applications not granted (refused, withdrawn, etc.)       339
1 Includes some left over from previous year.
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Returned to British Columbia        29
Reinstated      197
Suspended      298
Deaths      237
Transferred to other Provinces        34
Transferred to Old Age Security  1,782
Total number on payroll at end of fiscal year  7,054
(b) Other-Province recipients—
New transfers to British Columbia  100
Transferred to British Columbia  4
Reinstated  2
Suspended  3
Deaths  1
Transferred out of British Columbia  32
Transferred to Old Age Security  31
(c) Total number of British Columbia and other-Province recipients on payroll at end of fiscal year  7,189
Table III.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Not of age	
Unable to prove age	
Not sufficient residence	
Income in excess	
Unable to prove residence
Transfer of property
Receiving War Veterans' Allowance
Information refused	
Application withdrawn.
aber
Percent
53
15.64
1
0.29
3
0.88
97
28.61
1
0.29
4
1.18
15
4.43
38
11.21
74
21.83
27
7.97
10
2.95
10
2.95
2
0.59
Applicants died before grant        27
Whereabouts unknown	
Eligible for Old Age Security	
Assistance from private sources	
Receiving Old Age Security	
Miscellaneous   4 1.18
Totals      339 100.00
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 63
Table IV.—Sex of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Male       870 44.94
Female  1,066 55.06
Totals  1,936 100.00
Table V.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Married      740 38.22
Single      266 13.74
Widows      458 23.66
Widowers        92 4.75
Separated      307 15.86
Divorced        23 3.77
Totals  1,936 100.00
Table VI.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
British Columbia      225 11.62
Other parts of Canada      453 23.40
British Isles      374 19.32
Other parts of British Commonwealth        10 0.51
United States of America      188 9.71
Other foreign countries      686 35.44
Totals  1,936 100.00
Table VII.—Ages at Granting of Assistance
Number Per Cent
Age 65  1,146 59.19
Age 66      258 13.33
Age 67      216 11.16
Age 68      181 9.35
Age 69      135 6.97
Totals  1,936 100.00
 I 64 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Age 65 _
Age 66 _
Number
16
Per Cent
6.75
        34
14.35
Age 67
Age 68 .
33
18.14
        67
28.27
Age 69
77
32.49
Totals	
           237
100.00
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Living alone	
Living with spouse	
Living with spouse and children
Living with children.
Living with other relatives
Living with others	
Table X.—Where New Recipients Are Living
In own home	
In rented house	
In children's home	
In home of other relatives
Boarding
In housekeeping room
In single room (eating out)
In rented suite	
In public institutions	
In private institutions	
Number
Per Cent
749
33.69
677
34.96
63
3.26
227
11.73.
70
3.62
150
7.74
Totals  1,936 100.00
umber
Per Cent
832
42.97
201
10.38
219
11.32
61
3.16
37
1.91
253
13.06
69
3.56
174
8.99
71
3.67
19
0.98
Totals  1,936 100.00
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 65
Table XI.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a) Holding real property of value—
$0 	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500	
$501 to $750	
$751 to $1,000 ___
$1,001 to $1,500
$1,501 to $2,000
$2,001 and up ____
dumber
Per Cent
1,046
54.03
78
4.03
43
2.22
42
2.17
56
2.90
132
6.82
165
8.52
374
19.31
Totals  1,936 100.00
(b) Holding personal property of value—
$0 	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500   196
$501 to $750	
$751 to $1,000	
$1,001 to $1,500	
$1,501 to $2,000	
$2,001 and up	
904
46.69
451
23.29
196
10.12
84
4.34
83
4.29
77
3.98
51
2.64
90
4.65
Totals  1,936 100.00
Table XII.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31, 1963,
Whose Assistance Is Paid by British Columbia
Alberta  31
Saskatchewan  20
Manitoba   14
Ontario   22
Quebec   9
New Brunswick     	
Nova Scotia  5
Yukon Territory     	
Prince Edward Island     	
Newfoundland  1
Total  102
 I 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XIII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the
Amount of Assistance Received (Basic Assistance, $65)
Amount of Assistance
$65 	
$60 to $64.99 ____.
$55 to $59.99	
$50 to $54.99 ___.
$45 to $49.99	
$40 to $44.99 _____
$35 to $39.99	
$30 to $34.99 ____
$25 to $29.99	
$20 to $24.99	
Less than $19.99
Total __.
Per Cent
85.25
3.20
2.50
1.75
1.55
1.55
1.01
1.06
0.61
0.64
0.88
100.00
Blind Persons' Allowances
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received
Applications granted
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc.
1 Includes some left over from previous year.
57
37i
22
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a)
British Columbia recipients—
Suspended 	
Reinstated	
Transferred to other Provinces __
Returned to British Columbia	
Transferred to Old Age Security
Deaths 	
(b)
Other-Province recipients—
New transfers to British Columbia
Retransferred to British Columbia _
Reinstated	
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended
Deaths	
Transfers to Old Age Security	
Suspended
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia	
  518
Other Province     29
34
20
6
1
15
19
1
4
1
4
547
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 67
Table III.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Number Per Cent
Not blind within the meaning of the Act  10 45.46
Income in excess     4 18.19
Applications withdrawn     2 9.09
Died before grant     1 4.54
War Veterans' Allowance  —_ 	
Information refused     1 4.54
Whereabouts unknown     1 4.54
Other      3 13.64
Totals
22
100.00
Table IV.—Sex of New Recipients
Male —
Female
Totals
Number
„ 14
__ 23
._ 37
Per Cent
37.83
62.17
100.00
Table V.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Married       ____
Number
     8
Per Cent
21.63
Single   _        _ _         __    _	
  14
37.82
Widowed      __
     5
13.52
Separated       _
     7
18.92
Divorced            _ __     	
     3
8.11
  37
Totals  	
100.00
Table VI.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Number
_ 15
British Columbia	
Other parts of Canada  11
British Isles     1
United States of America     2
Other foreign countries     8
Other parts of British Commonwealth	
Per Cent
40.53
29.73
2.70
5.41
21.63
Totals.
37
100.00
 I 68 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VII.—-Ages at Granting of Allowance
Number Per Cent
Age 18     4 10.31
Ages 19 to 21      3 8.11
Ages 22 to 30     4 10.81
Ages 31 to 40     3 8.11
Ages 41 to 50      6 16.21
Ages 51 to 60      8 21.63
Ages 61 to 69      9 24.32
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Numb
Living with parents      5
Living alone	
Living with spouse	
Living with spouse and children
Living with children
Living with other relatives
Living with others 	
Totals  37 100.00
Table VIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number Per Cent
Ages 21 to 30     1 5.26
Ages 31 to 40     1 5.26
Ages 41 to 50     2 10.53
Ages 51 to 60     2 10.53
Ages 61 to 69   13 68.42
Total  19 100.00
nber
Per Cent
5
13.52
9
24.31
8
21.62
2
5.41
5
13.52
8
21.62
Totals  37 100.00
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 69
Table X.—Where New Recipients Are Living
In parents' home 	
In own home 	
In rented house 	
In rented suite	
In children's home	
In home of other relatives
In housekeeping room	
In public institutions
Number
__    5
In private institutions	
In single room (eating out)_
Boarding	
Totals
7
9
1
5
1
3
3
1
2
37
Per Cent
13.52
18.92
24.32
2.70
13.52
2.70
8.11
8.11
2.70
5.40
100.00
Table XL—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a) Holding real property of value—                            Number PerCent
$0   30 81.08
$1 to $250     2 5.41
$251 to $500  	
$501 to $750  	
$751 to $1,000  	
$1,001 to $1,500     1 2.70
$1,501 to $2,000  	
$2,001 and up     4 10.81
Totals  37 100.00
(b) Holding personal property of value—
$0   25 67.57
$1 to $250     8 21.62
$251 to $500     1 2.70
$501 to $750  	
$751 to $1,000  	
$1,001 to $1,500  	
$1,501 to $2,000  	
$2,001 and up     3 8.11
Totals  37 100.00
 I 70 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XII.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31, 1963,
Whose Allowances are Paid by This Province
Alberta     3
Saskatchewan     2
Manitoba   	
Ontario      2
New Brunswick      1
Total     8
Table XIII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the Amount
of Allowances Received (Basic Allowance, $65)
Amount of Allowance Per Cent
$65   94.16
$60 to $64.99   1.28
$55 to $59.99   0.91
$50 to $54.99   1.28
$45 to $49.99   0.37
$40 to $44.99   0.55
$35 to $39.99   0.18
$30 to $34.99   0.91
$25 to $29.99     	
$20 to $24.99   0.18
$19.99 and less  0.18
Total  100.00
Disabled Persons' Allowances
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received      423
Applications granted       2061
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc.      272
i Includes some left over from previous year.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 71
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended   164
Reinstated   110
Transferred to other Provinces  9
Returned to British Columbia  3
Transferred to Old Age Security  12
Deaths   56
(b) Other-Province recipients—
Suspended   1
New transfers to British Columbia  21
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended  4
Reinstated     	
Deaths       1
Transferred to Old Age Security    	
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia  2,184
Other Province        65
2,249
Table III.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Not 18 years of age	
Too much income	
Refused information	
Whereabouts unknown	
Unable to meet medical test	
Mental hospital 	
Hospital 	
Nursing home
Application withdrawn
Died before grant
Not sufficient residence	
War Veterans' Allowance	
Allowance under Blind Persons Act
Institution for incurables	
Number
Per Cent
l
0.38
17
6.24
9
3.31
4
1.47
221
81.24
3
1.10
2
0.73
6
2.20
5
1.84
2
0.73
1
0.38
1
0.38
Totals   272 100.00
 I 72
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IV.—Primary Causes of Disability on Accepted Cases
Number Per Cent
Infective and parasitic diseases  8 3.89
Neoplasms   3 1.46
Allergic, endocrine system, metabolic, and nutritional
diseases   1 0.49
Diseases of blood and blood-forming organs  1 0.49
Mental, psychoneurotic, and personality disorders  108 52.40
Diseases of the nervous system and sense organs  54 26.20
Diseases of the circulatory system  5 2.43
Diseases of the respiratory system  3 1.46
Diseases of the digestive system       	
Diseases of the genito-urinary system  ____           	
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissues  1 0.49
Diseases of the bones and organs of movement  15 7.28
Congenital malformations   4 1.95
Symptoms, senility, and ill-defined conditions       	
Accidents, poisoning, and violence (nature of injury) 3 1.46
Totals
Table V.—Sex of New Recipients
Male  -
Female
Totals
206
100.00
dumber
Per Cent
98
47.57
108
52.43
206
100.00
Table VI.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Married               _ 	
Number
     33
Per Cent
16.02
Single           —   -
  149
72.33
Widow      —     	
       8
3.88
Widower            _        ,            •  ■
       2
0.97
Separated       -               '              '■
     11
5.34
Divorced
       3
1.46
  206
Totals 	
100.00
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 73
Table VII.—Birthplace of New Recipients
British Columbia ___   	
Number
     97
Per Cent
47.09
Other parts of Canada     _ _      _   _
     78
37.85
British Isles _          _   _ _ _     _ _ __
     12
5.83
Other parts of British Empire	
United States of America    	
       3
1.46
Other foreign countries „   	
     16
  206
7.77
Totals _ __          _ —_ 	
100.00
Table VIII.—Ages at Granting of Allowance
Ages 18 to 19 -.
Ages 20 to 24 ___.
Ages 25 to 29 ___.
Ages 30 to 34 ___.
Ages 35 to 39 ___.
Ages 40 to 44 ___.
Ages 45 to 49
Ages 50 to 54 ___.
Ages 55 to 59 ___.
Ages 60 to 64 ___.
Ages 65 to 69 —
Ages over 70	
Totals
Number
Per Cent
63
30.61
29
14.07
17
8.25
9
4.36
13
6.31
16
7.76
10
4.86
15
7.28
12
5.82
22
10.68
206
100.00
Table IX.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Ages 18 to 19
Ages 20 to 24
Ages 25 to 29
Ages 30 to 34
Ages 35 to 39
Ages 40 to 44
Ages 45 to 49
Ages 50 to 54
Ages 55 to 59
Ages 60 to 64
Ages 65 to 69 .
Ages over 70 _
Totals
Number
Per Cent
2
3.58
2
3.58
5
8.93
7
12.50
7
12.50
5
8.93
20
35.72
8
14.26
56
100.00
 I 74 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table X.—With Whom Recipients Live
Number Per Cent
Living with parents  127 61.65
Living alone     10 4.85
Living with spouse     30 14.58
Living with spouse and children       3 1.45
Living with children       3 1.45
Living with other relatives     17 8.25
Living with others     16 7.77
Table XI.—Where New Recipients Are Living
In parent's home	
In own house	
In rented house	
In rented suite	
In children's home	
In home of other relatives
In housekeeping room	
In boarding home
In private institutions	
In single room (eating out)
Totals 	
Totals   206 100.00
lumber
Per Cent
127
61.65
26
12.62
7
3.39
5
2.43
4
1.94
17
8.25
5
2.43
6
2.92
8
3.88
1
0.49
206
100.00
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 75
Table XII.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a) Holding real property of value—
$0 	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500_	
$501 to $750	
$751 to $1,000 _.
$1,001 to $1,500
$1,501 to $2,000
$2,001 and up ____
Totals
Number
_. 177
__ 2
„ 3
._ 2
__ 8
__ 3
__ 11
__ 206
Per Cent
85.92
0.97
1.46
0.97
3.88
1.46
5.34
100.00
(b) Holding personal property of value—
$0 	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500.	
$501 to $750	
$751 to $1,000 ___.
$1,001 to $1,500
$1,501 to $2,000
$2,001 and up	
Totals
149
38
8
3
2
1
2
3
206
72.31
18.44
3.88
1.46
0.98
0.49
0.98
1.46
100.00
Table XIII.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31,
1963, Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Alberta       	
9
Saskatchewan       __   _   	
__              ___                    7
Manitoba   _ __    _   _
_   __                                6
Ontario   _    -       	
8
Ouebec 	
3
New Brunswick ___   	
Nova Scotia  	
1
Yukon       	
                             1
Total	
  35
 I 76 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XIV.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to
the Amount of Allowance Received (Basic Allowance, $65)
Amount of Allowance Per Cent
$65    94.88
$60 to $64.99  1.16
$55 to $59.99  0.84
$50 to $54.99  0.76
$45 to $49.99  0.76
$40 to $44.99  0.49
$35 to $39.99  0.36
$30 to $34.99  0.40
$25 to $29.99  0.18
$20 to $24.99  0.04
$19.99 and less  0.13
Total  100.00
General Information re Old Age Security Category
Disposition of Applications
New applications received  816
Reapplications received  191
Applications granted  6981
Applications not granted (refused, withdrawn, deal, etc.)   470x
1 Includes some left over from previous year.
Total Number in Receipt of Supplementary Social Allowance
as at March 31, 1963
British Columbia cases  24,672
Other-Province cases        891
Total   25,563
MEMBERS OF THE BOARD
The following are the members of the Old-age Assistance Board of the Province of British Columbia:—
Chairman:   Mr. E. W. Berry.
Members: Mr. J. A. Sadler, Director of Social Welfare; Mr. H. E. Blanchard,
Administrator, Region II, Department of Social Welfare.
CONCLUSION
In concluding this report the Board wishes to express its sincere appreciation
for the loyal and efficient work of the office and field staffs throughout the year and
for the continued co-operation of other departments of Government and many outside agencies.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 77
PART IV.—INSTITUTIONS
BRANNAN LAKE SCHOOL FOR BOYS
F. G. Hassard, Superintendent
I beg to submit the annual report for the Brannan Lake School for Boys for the
period ended March 31, 1963.
The following table shows the statistics for the fiscal years 1953/54 to
1962/63:—
Fiscal Year
■*t
-.
c.
as
in
•*
IT)
a\
VJ
in
tn
in
CTs
00
in
■-%
00
1/1
a*
o
VO
o.
in
vo
■*-,
8
ON
VO
^_
ve
ON
c.
VO
$
Number in School, April 1st   	
Number A.W.O.L., April 1st   .
101
4
1
2
4
96
15
2
131
9
19
129
1
152
2
3
164
1
162
5
175
188
3
1
173
4
3
Number in Crease Cilnic,April 1st	
Number in Provincial Mental Hospi-
1
1
49
313
85
398
21.4
387
3
1
43
1
250
94
344
27.3
366
4
3
Number on extended leave, April 1st
2
33
17
1
14
27
34
33
105
17
122
13.9
119
15
2
2
171
32
203
15.8
126
9
19
33
Number of new admissions  	
143
24
167
14.4
212
1
17
222
40
262
15.3
237
2
3
1
14
210
75
285
26.3
265
1
240
52
292
17.8
283
5
34
284
82
366
22.4
342
307
103
Total number of admissions	
Percentage of recidivism .....  	
410
25.1
372
Number A.W.O.L., March 31st
1
27
49
43
1
33
1
173
185
67,473
5.7
62
60
	
1
Number in Provincial Mental Hospital, March 31st
96
102.4
37,383
9.5
432
164
152
55,516
6
122
1
175
173
63,233
5.8
61
188
181
65,927
5.1
77
Number in School, March 31st	
131
101.9
37,198
(!)
239
129
137.6
50,371
8.3
124
152
144
52,576
7.7
156
162
159
58,079
6
105
190
185
67,392
Average length of stay in months
Total A.W.O.L. during the fiscal year
5.5
802
1 Not recorded.
2 Involving 62 boys.
During the fiscal year there were 307 admissions and 103 recidivists, making a
total of 410 admitted to the School. There was a 25.1 percentage rate of recidivism.
Twenty-two of the recidivists were committed for the third time and two for the
fourth time. Two hundred and sixty of the boys admitted were Protestant, 144
Roman Catholic, 2 of other religion, and 4 religion unknown. Sixty-eight of the
total number of boys admitted during the year were of native Indian status.
Range of Age upon Admission
Age in Years
9 years __
10 "    __.
11 "    __.
12 "    __.
13 "    __
Number of Boys
.___. 1
____      3
____      7
34
Age in Years Number of Boys
14 years   73
15 "    110
16 "    111
17 "    63
The average age upon admission was 15.1 years.
 I 78
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Supervising Agencies of Boys Admitted
Department of Social Welfare	
Provincial Probation Branch	
Vancouver Probation Service	
Family Court for Greater Victoria
Indian Department
Number
of Boys
58
161
87
34
41
Children's Aid Society  13
Catholic Children's Aid Society  4
Family and Children's Service  5
Indian Department and Provincial Probation Branch  2
Department of Social Welfare and Provincial Probation Branch  1
New Westminster Police  1
None  3
Of this number, 32 were wards of the Superintendent of Child Welfare, 12 of
the Children's Aid Society, 4 of the Catholic Children's Aid Society, 6 of the Family
and Children's Service, and 1 of the Indian Department.
The 410 boys admitted were committed from the following Juvenile Courts:—
Agassiz	
Alberni	
Alert Bay	
Alexis Creek.
Armstrong ___.
Ashcroft	
Bella Coola _.
Burnaby
Number
of Boys
__ 3
__ 1
_ 6
_ 1
__ 1
_ 1
__ 1
_. 18
Burns Lake     2
Campbell River     2
Castlegar     3
Chemainus     4
Chilliwack  13
Cloverdale   11
Coquidam     6
Courtenay     2
Cranbrook     3
Creston      1
Dawson Creek     4
Duncan
Fernie _.
Field
Fort St. James
Golden	
Grand Forks...
Haney 	
Hazelton 	
Hope	
Invermere 	
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Kelowna 	
4
2
1
11
2
1
1
1
3
4
8
1
2
Keremeos    __
Number
of Boys
l
Kitimat  	
___ -      4
Ladner    _
3
Ladysmith 	
     1
Langley  .   	
       2
Lillooet       -
3
Lower Post	
2
Lumby      _
     2
Lytton	
1
McBride	
     1
Masset           .     .._                       2
Matsqui      _ __
     1
Merritt 	
Mission City   _ _
1
     3
Nanaimo    	
      12
Nelson ___   	
     8
New Westminster _
     3
North Vancouver 	
  16
100 Mile House	
     2
Oliver   2
Osoyoos   1
Penticton  5
Port Alberni  2
Port Edward  2
Port Hardy  2
Port Moody  2
Port Coquidam  1
Powell River  3
Prince George  6
Prince Rupert  10
Quesnel  2
Revelstoke  1
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 79
Richmond ___ _ —_ __
Number
of Boys
     8
Ucluelet	
Vancouver	
Vanderhoof   ___.
Vernon 	
Victoria 	
West Vancouver	
Number
of Boys
       1
Rossland _ _ 	
Salmon Arm  _
     1
     8
91
     5
Sechelt     _ _
     2
     4
Smithers	
Squamish
     3
1
40
     1
Terrace
1
White Rock	
     2
Tofino	
     1
Williams Lake	
  10
Of the 410 boys committed to the School during the year, 327 were for offences
against property, 19 against persons, and 64 for other offences which included incorrigibility.
Of the 307 new admissions during the year, 51 of the boys were never tried on
probation but were committed to the School on their first appearance before the
Court.
There were 372 boys released from the School during the year. The average
length of stay of boys in the School was 5.5 months.
Of the 372 boys discharged during the year, less than 50 per cent of them—
namely, 164—went to homes wherein they had both parents. This indicates that
less than 50 per cent of the total committals to our School are boys from homes
wherein both natural parents are living.
Sixty-two boys accounted for the 80 A.W.O.L.s. The difference between the
two figures is due to the fact that some of the same boys went A.W.O.L. two or more
times during the year.
Six hundred and twenty-four individual boys were worked with in the School
during the fiscal year.
MEDICAL AND DENTAL TREATMENT
Fillings 	
X-rays	
Extractions 	
Partial dentures	
Complete upper dentures
Denture reline	
Dentures repaired	
Prophylaxis	
Trimmings	
Root canal filling	
Dressings	
957
37
273
21
3
1
14
2
4
1
3
One hundred and ninety-three boys received the above dental work.
There were the usual number of minor accidents and only one of a serious
nature, when a boy accidentally cut his wrist with an axe.
In early spring of this year there was a minor epidemic of strep throats. Thirty-
three boys were hospitalized at the School hospital, and approximately 60 others,
as well as the School staff, were given oral penicillin.
Four hundred and sixteen boys were tuberculin-tested, of which 43 were positive.   However, X-rays showed that none of them had tuberculosis.
The usual large number of boys were treated for minor ailments, etc. These
are not listed in the report but are kept on record.
The 410 boys admitted during the year had physical examinations.
 I 80 BRITISH COLUMBIA
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1962/63
Salaries   $281,822.70
Office expense  3,194.52
Travelling expense  1,053.79
Office furniture and equipment  146.87
Heat, light, power, and water  24,480.12
Medical services   12,838.75
Clothing and uniforms  8,329.31
Provisions and catering  62,740.35
Laundry and dry-goods  13,209.04
Equipment and machinery  543.79
Medical supplies  1,509.22
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  4,662.09
Maintenance and operation of equipment  2,195.20
Transportation  4,708.98
Motor-vehicles and accessories  2,370.50
Incidentals and contingencies  4,279.79
Repairs to furnishings and equipment  691.67
Training programme expense  4,455.97
;    - $433,232.66
Board      $2,244.00
Rentals        3,245.04
Sundry   199.20
         5,688.24
$427,544.42
Add decrease in inventory—
Inventory as at March 31, 1962  $17,154.50
Inventory as at March 31, 1963 -     13,049.14
         4,105.36
Add Public Works expenditure  $59,076.61
Less rental  912.00
       58,164.61
$489,814.39
Per capita cost per diem:   $489,814.39-=-67,392=$7.27.
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts  $420,298.12
Add—
Decrease in inventory     $4,105.36
Maintenance receipts       1,006.30
Salary adjustments       6,240.00
Public Works expenditure   $59,076.61
Less rentals  912.00
     58,164.61
       69,516.27
$489,814.39
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 81
Groups of boys continued to assist service clubs with community projects and
churches with property improvements.
During the late fall and up to Christmas, as in previous years, boys spent many
hours of work renovating and repairing hundreds of used toys collected by the
Nanaimo Parent-Teacher Association for distribution by the Salvation Army with
its Christmas hampers.
Two classes of boys were graduated by the Dale Carnegie Mid-Island Chapter,
thanks to the members of that group.
Although our sports programme is chiefly designed for competitive sports within
our School, we did have a number of outside school teams, church groups, and
service clubs play exhibition games with our boys here—softball, soccer, basketball,
and volleyball. The boys continued to enjoy many outside activities in the Nanaimo
district, such as attending lacrosse and hockey games at the local arena, etc. Community groups provided passes for boys of our School to attend many musical and
other entertainment functions in Nanaimo. Boys are taken out to church services
in the Nanaimo district each Sunday.
Improvements have been carried out on our grounds and the vegetable gardens
expanded. Our forest nursery has been increased and now includes in the neighbourhood of three-quarters of a million fir seedlings, the majority of which are transplants
—2-year-old stock. The boys continue to show a real interest in this work, and in
our opinion it is a very worth-while project.
We had some very interesting visitors during the year—a number of Parent-
Teacher groups, teachers' counsellors, members of the ministerial association, and
two government representatives from Nigeria—all of whom were interested in correctional programmes.
I wish to thank all staff members, clergymen, service clubs and other organizations, including other departments of government, both municipal and provincial,
private agencies, and individuals who have shown an interest in the boys by helping
the School with its programme of rehabilitation. The School is greafly indebted to
all these persons, and their assistance has been appreciated by the administration.
L
 I 82
BRITISH COLUMBIA
WILLINGDON SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
MlSS WlNNIFRED M. URQUHART, SUPERINTENDENT
Another year has rolled by in the history of the Province's training-school for
girls. The following table sets out in figures the variations over the last 10 years,
the period starting with 1959/60 being in the new school:—
Fiscal Year
8
->r
O.
in
in
\
•-■
m
VD
m
r-
vp
Ov
oo
in
0O
Ov
o
ve
m
Ov
VD
O
VP
Ov
C<1
vD
VD
Ov
VD
\
SP
Ov
37
4
v1)
(1)
(!)
(l)
60
8
68
11.8
64
5
10
(!)
(!)
(!)
2
32
37.8
13,780
(M
(!)
32
5
(1)
43
7
12
47
12
60
11
71
15.5
55
13
62
13
58
7
66
9
91
5
9
81
13
94
13.8
100
11
77
11
82
Number A.W.OX., April 1st 	
Number in Oakalla, April 1st
Number in Crease Clinic, April 1st
Number on extended leave, April 1st
Number on special leave, April 1st
Number of new admissions _ 	
Number of recidivists   	
11
59
7
66
10.6
75
7
11
84
19
103
18.4
87
11
4
66
15
81
18.5
72
9
3
96
10
106
9.4
79
5
22
54
15
69
21.7
56
7
12
66
14
80
17.5
70
12
1
94
7
101
Percentage of recidivists  	
Number of releases     _ _
Number A.W.O.L.,March 1st      	
6.9
99
17
3
66
51.4
18,765
10.6
124
2
47
41.1
15,036
8.5
232
62
46.2
16,871
11.6
187
4
9
11
22
82
73.4
26,783
11.4
213
12
Number in Provincial Mental Hospi-
43
30.5
11,136
(!)
(!)
1
58
51.6
18,851
12.4
187
91
76.5
28,010
10,4
147
77
74.0
26,994
10.3
210
87
80.0
Total inmate days  	
Average length of stay (in months)
Total A.W.OX. during fiscal year __
29,216
12.5
195
1 Not known.
The hundred and one girls admitted included seven recommitted for a second
term. Ninety-eight girls received an outright release from the School, and one
girl died. Along with these figures it should be noted that 43 girls were returned
to the community on a trial basis, and 13 of this group had to be brought back in
to continue their training before a full release could be considered. A quarter of
our population still continues to be native Indian girls.
Range of Age upon Admission
Age
12 years
13 „
14 „    .
Number
of Girls
23
Age
15 years .
16 „
17 „
Number
of Girls
__   22
_ 30
._ 18
Charges were as follows:—
Incorrigibility     55
Breach of probation (generally following a charge of incorrigibility)     14
Theft  10
Breaking and entering
Infraction of liquor laws       6
Sexual immorality       5
Truancy        3
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 83
Prostitution   1
Creating a disturbance  1
Forgery   1
Committing mischief  1
Total   1051
i Three girls received two individual charges.
The 101 girls were committed from the following Juvenile Courts:-
Agassiz
Number
of Girls
1
Langley      _
Number
of Girls
       1
Alberni	
Alert Bay
1
3
Lower Post	
Merritt
2
     1
Burnaby
2
Nanaimo             _
     2
Campbell River1
1
New Westminster
     3
Chilliwack
4
3
2
1
3
     4
North Vancouver
3
Cloverdale
Penticton	
     1
Coquitlam	
Cowichan
Port Hardy	
     1
Powell River ____   	
     1
Cranbrook 	
Dawson Creek	
Prince Rupert	
Richmond	
Skeena (Masset)	
Sooke  	
Vancouver ___ 	
Vernon	
5
     3
Duncan __   __
     1
     1
Esquimalt	
     2
     1
Fort St. John	
Hazelton 	
2
1
2
1
___    1
27
     3
Kamloops	
Kelowna
Victoria1 	
White Rock	
9
     1
Ladner
Williams Lake _    	
     2
1 One girl was committed from two Courts on the same date.
Our present medical programme is satisfactory. We appreciate the excellent
service provided by the Cambie Clinic and particularly Dr. T. MacKenzie. The
Vancouver General Hospital out-patient department and emergency department
are still used when necessary. Six unmarried mothers were confined during the
year. The Venereal Disease Clinic examined 457 girls (this included a number of
repeat examinations on girls following running away);  28 received treatment.
Dr. M. A. Menzies, from the Provincial Mental Health Centre, has continued
to spend two afternoons a month at the School, and this service is of real value.
Our findings in this field point more and more to the fact that the majority of our
population is not in need of concentrated psychiatric treatment, and that those who
do should be cared for in a centre completely oriented to psychotherapy, and
should not be in the training-school during the period of treatment.
We were pleased to be able to add an additional social worker to our staff,
which has made it possible to explore rehabilitation and employment resources in
the community and supervise a small group of girls on special leave. Stability in
staff has remained high, with no changes in our cottage supervisors. Our hair-
dressing instructress resigned after five years, and our chief supervisor, after 14
years, left to be married. We accepted a young man to fill the chief supervisor's
position, and we are pleased to report he is fitting in very well.
 I 84 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The casework supervisor and the Superintendent attended the Civil Defence
Welfare Course, and the casework supervisor attended the district supervisors' conference. The two caseworkers attended the regional conference in Nanaimo.
Twelve staff members took advantage of the British Columbia Corrections Association institute and attended as many sessions as possible at their own expense.
Institutional work tends to isolate, and it is therefore of considerable value both
to our work here and as a part of the Department when staff are able to participate
in such meetings.
The programme is constantly being reviewed and additional courses and activities added. About half the girls attend academic classes and complete a school
grade while with us. Eight or ten girls are fully employed learning hairdressing,
and the same numbers learning sewing at all times. Other girls are busy in the
kitchen and doing general housework. All girls take physical education and health
and personal development, and attend the showing of films from the visual education department. During the year we had two courses in modelling and self-
improvement. These girls presented a fashion show for the entertainment of delegates' wives and lady delegates at the British Columbia Corrections Association
institute in the Bayshore Inn in November. A group of girls also assisted as models
at a fashion show for a local United Church and were thrilled to model along with
a professional model. This does much to build up their self-esteem and overcome
self-consciousness. In June the girls presented their annual gymnastic display to
a capacity audience. The Waitress Course was repeated several times during the
year, as was also the St. John Ambulance First-aid Course. Church services are
held regularly for both Protestant and Roman Catholic girls. The swimming-pool
continues to be a source of pleasure and an asset with real therapeutic value. One
hundred and five Red Cross Swimming Awards, 5 Royal Life-saving Bronze Medallions, and 1 Award of Merit were earned during the year.
Our boarding home operated every successfully for 10 months, but had to be
closed when the house was sold. The girls who had this experience have continued
to do well in the community. This was a valuable experiment, and one which we
would be happy to repeat.
Volunteers have continued to play a real part in our School life. The Elizabeth Fry Society still provides visitors for lonely girls, holds monthly parties at
the School, and takes 40 girls for an annual picnic. The various religious denominations not only come on Sunday for services, but come in during the week for
friendly visits with the girls and staff. An outside team of young people, boys and
girls, comes every Wednesday evening for a competitive game with our teams. We
are most grateful to all these friends who give so freely of their spare time to help
our girls both here and after they leave the School.
Outside groups, including social workers, student-nurses, Mental Health Clinic
staff, Probation Officers, and interested citizens, continue to visit, and while this is
time-consuming, it is a valuable media for interpreting the School programme and
the needs of the juvenile who finds herself in trouble with the law.
I take this opportunity to thank all who have in any way assisted in the operation of the School during the year.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 85
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1962/63
Salaries  $194,712.91
Office expense .  2,800.19
Travelling expense  1,157.97
Heat, light, power, and water  24,536.30
Medical services  3,829.00
Clothing and uniforms  5,512.72
Provisions and catering  36,343.20
Laundry and dry-goods  326.30
Good Conduct Fund  1,722.85
Equipment and machinery  1,637.68
Medical supplies  1,953.57
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  2,670.26
Maintenance and operation of equipment  1,368.44
Transportation   2,920.63
Vocational and recreational supplies, etc.  2,018.83
Incidentals and contingencies  1.00
Boarding-out care  1,925.25
Less—
$285,437.10
Board   $ 1,818.00
Rentals      2,160.00
3,978.00
$281,459.10
Add decrease in inventory—
Inventory at March 31,
1962 _-  $10,655.70
Inventory at March 31,
1963      10,030.17
      $625.53
Public Works expenditure  32,487.88
       33,113.41
$314,572.51
Per capita cost per diem: $314,572.51 -f-29,216-=$10.77.
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts  $277,044.10
Add—
Maintenance receipts      $167.00
Salary adjustments      4,248.00
Decrease in inventory        625.53
Public Works expenditure  32,487.88
       37,528.41
$314,572.51
 I 86 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PROVINCIAL HOME, KAMLOOPS
G. P. Willie, Superintendent
Increased public interest in the problems and care of older people has resulted
in more inquiries and personal tours of the Provincial Home, they being in favour
of the care provided and the programme of activities.
As pensions and other benefits increase for the aged, applicants appear to
manage longer on their own, with the result that the ones who are admitted need
more specialized attention and require accommodation on the ground floor, they
being border-line infirmary cases.
The effect of this can be seen by the increase in medical services; more patients
are admitted to the city hospital for longer periods, there being 47 admittances during
the year, of which 7 received major operations. Five residents were supplied with
dentures, and 13 received eye examinations, with 9 being supplied with glasses. In
addition to services from the clinic under contract, the services of a urologist and a
dermatologist successfully treated patients. Laboratory services, X-rays, electrocardiograms, etc., are facilities available to residents. Lack of case histories hinders
emergency treatment in many cases.
During the year 70 applicants were admitted. Thirty-eight residents expired
and 33 took leave of absence or a voluntary discharge, thus showing a loss of 1;
however, the per capita cost per diem shows a slight decrease.
The maintenance of the buildings and grounds received some attention. Increased parking space, new curbs, and black-top have improved the front area.
Wards 1, 2, 10, and 11 and the dispensary were painted. A handrail has been
installed in the centre of the main stairway, and the ceiling of the basement has been
tiled, along with other various repairs.
Some equipment was purchased for the hospital ward, making conditions more
pleasant for the patients and staff. Most of the furniture was renovated, with many
chairs re-covered and beds and bedside tables repainted.
With a continued programme of entertainment, religious wants fulfilled, good
food and accommodation, plus excellent medical service, result in a more active,
interested, and happy resident. A number of men have been rehabilitated and now
care for themselves, indicating that when admitted this, then, is not the last stopping-
place for the aged.
I wish to thank staff members, co-workers, senior administration, and all others
who assisted with the care of our residents.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE, 1962/63 I 87
EXPENDITURE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1963
Salaries   $ 108,313.42
Office expense  509.51
Travelling expense  99.54
Medical services  9,505.06
Clothing and uniforms  709.29
Provisions and catering  30,133.68
Laundry and dry-goods  6,500.10
Equipment and machinery  456.64
Medical supplies  3,333.62
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  847.51
Maintenance and operation of equipment  1,602.42
Transportation  499.51
Burials   4,627.50
Incidentals and contingencies  2,314.34
$169,452.14
Less—
Board         $576.00
Rent  300.00
 .- 876.00
$168,576.14
Add Public Works expenditure         9,434.29
$178,010.43
Per capita cost per diem: $178,010.43-r-43,647-=$4.08.
Pensions paid to Government Agent, Kamloops, $93,979.29.
 I 88 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts     $26,857.87
Add—
Maintenance receipts—
Pensions   $93,979.29
Municipalities        3,175.15
Transfers   from   Provincial   Home
Trust Account       6,054.02
Receipts from Government of Canada under the Unemployment
Assistance Agreement     46,329.09
Salary adjustments        3,684.00
     153,221.55
$180,079.42
Add Public Works expenditure         9,434.29
Less—
Pensioners' comforts      $9,521.55
Proportion of excess of disbursements over receipts for Tranquille Farm       1,981.73
$189,513.71
11,503.28
$178,010.43
Inmate-days
Inmates in the Home, April 1, 1962  118
Inmates admitted during the year     70
        188
Inmates discharged     33
Inmates deceased     38
  71
Total number of inmates, March 31, 1963        117
Total number of inmate-days  43,647
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 89
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS BOARD
A. A, Shipp, Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions
I submit herewith the annual report of the Welfare Institutions Licensing Act
for the year 1962. As licences are issued on the basis of the calendar year, this
report covers the period from January 1, 1962, to December 31, 1962.
LICENCES
A total of 854 licences was issued during the year, of which 658 were renewals
and 196 were new licences. Of the licensed institutions, 108 were either closed or
had a change of operator, requiring new licensing. There were 271 new applications
for licensing, and 279 pending applications were closed, 83 of which were either
withdrawn or refused. Case load at December 31, 1962, totalled 948, of which 746
were licensed institutions and 202 files pending.
BOARD MEETINGS
Twelve Board meetings were held during the year, members of the Board
finding that there was better continuity to the work of the Board with the more
frequent meetings.
Miss Alice Carroll, Provincial Consultant of Psychiatric Social Work, was
appointed to the Board during the year, bringing Board membership to a total of
six.    Other members remained the same as for 1961.
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS FOR CHILDREN
A. Full-time Care of Children
. ■ _      Institutions for Child-care
During the year one institution, which had been operating for many years,
ceased to function as a full-time operation for the care of children. One new licence
was issued for a specialized institution giving short-term care to retarded children.
Number of institutions licensed in 1962 _._. L  9
Number of children cared for        265
Total days' care  60,178
Private Boarding Homes
The number of privately operated licensed boarding homes for children continues to decrease, having dropped from 58 to 20 during the past eight years. The
majority of these homes are in the Lower Mainland area, and are under the supervision of the two Children's Aid Societies.
A close check is made of newspaper advertisements advertising for children to
board, and many of these homes are found to be unsuitable for licensing. These
homes also are investigated by the Vancouver Children's Aid Society.
Number of children's boarding homes licensed in 1962  20
Number of children cared for ll ; 60
Total days' care -.__- -  13,764
 I 90 BRITISH COLUMBIA
B. Day Care of Children
Foster Day Care
During the year the number of licensed homes increased slightiy, but the number of children given care in these homes dropped almost one-half, and the total
number of days' care given dropped by almost one-third. We are reasonably sure
that the need for this type of care has increased rather than decreased, and we are
presentiy trying to learn under what circumstances children who are not being placed
in licensed homes are being cared for.
Number of foster day-care homes licensed in 1962  32
Number of children cared for        157
Total days' care  14,898
Kindergartens, Play-schools, etc.
The number of licensed kindergartens continues to increase, and it has been
noted that many of the newer licences are for kindergartens in the smaller communities of the Province.
Training for kindergarten supervisors continues to be given by the Adult
Education Department of the Vancouver School Board, by the University of Victoria
Evening Division, and by the Extension Department of the University of British
Columbia.
Number of pre-school centres licensed in 1962  291
Number of children registered        14,226
Total days' care  1,215,154
Schools for Retarded Children
During the year one school closed because of a lack of pupils, and two more
were taken over by local School Boards.
In addition to the day schools, the various local chapters of the British Columbia Association for Retarded Children are active in promoting sheltered workshops
and vocational training for those retardates who are no longer able to attend their
schools.
Number of schools licensed in 1962   28
Number of children registered        516
Total days' care  65,216
MATERNITY HOMES
During 1962 Our Lady of Mercy Home completed its change of programme,
and as of December 31, 1962, had closed its nursery completely.
Number of homes licensed in 1962  3
Number of mothers cared for        489
Number of infants cared for  13
Total days' care (mothers and children)  29,013
AGED-CARE
A total of 288 boarding home for elderly persons was licensed during the year,
an increase of approximately 34 per cent over the previous year. The majority
of those homes which, until the change in the legislation in 1961, did not require
licensing have now been seen, and licences have been issued or are in process of
being approved.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 91
Number of homes licensed during 1962  288
Number of persons cared for  5,860
Total days' care  1,246,891
UNEMPLOYED ADULTS
There was no change in the number or function of these institutions during
the year.
Number of homes licensed during 1962  6
Number of persons cared for     5,958
Total days' care  32,867
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL DISCHARGEES
For the past several years this office has been co-operating with the Mental
Health Services in finding boarding-home placements in the community for the improved mentally ill. Many of these people have been returned to the community
and have been placed in licensed boarding homes, where they have adjusted quite
well with the other guests.
During the past year, however, four homes have been licensed specifically to
give this form of care, and it is expected that this number will increase rapidly as
the programme develops.
Number of homes licensed during 1962  4
Number of persons cared for  34
Total days' care  10,093
SUMMER CAMPS
It has been noted over the past few years that the majority of summer camps
are paying more attention to their physical standards, and these are showing consistent improvement.
There has been an increase in the number of privately operated camps, most
of which offer riding as one of their main attractions. The facilities at most of
these camps are of good standard, and the supervision is excellent.
Number of summer camps licensed in 1962  83
Number of persons cared for     26,897
Number of attendance days  351,298
CONCLUSION
Sincere thanks and appreciation are extended to all who helped with the
administration of this Act.
 I 92
BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICAL INFORMATION
Table I.—Showing a Comparative Summary of Information Regarding
Licensed Welfare Institutions
1959
I960
1961
1962
Children—Total Care (Excluding Summer Camps)
Number licensed—
Institutions    —
Boarding homes  _ _	
Capacity—
Institutions.        	
Boarding homes  _	
Number of children under care—
Institutions    	
Boarding homes  —  	
Number of days' care—
Institutions   	
Boarding homes	
Summer Camps
Number licensed  _ 	
Capacity    __	
Number of persons attending   	
Number of attendance days  _ __
Children—Day Care
Number licensed—
Kindergartens    	
Schools for retarded children   -
Foster day care  _  _	
Capacity—
Kindergartens    	
Schools for retarded children    	
Foster day care   _
Number of children enrolled—
Kindergartens    — —.	
Schools for retarded children :._ 	
Foster day care       .—~
Number of attendance days—
Kindergartens.....   . . 	
Schools for retarded children	
Foster day care   	
Adults—Infirm and Unemployable
Number licensed     .	
Capacity  	
Number of persons cared for   	
Number of days' care   -  	
Adults—Employable
Number licensed   	
Capacity  _ 	
Number of persons under care.   —
Number of days' care  - _  __
Women—Maternity
Number licensed  .... 	
Capacity (mothers and infants)  — —
Number of persons under care—
Mothers	
Infants  _ _ 	
Number of days' care   	
Provincial Mental Hospital Dischargees
Number licensed	
Capacity   	
Number of persons under care   -	
Number of days' care      —
7
39
242
92
312
107
70,762
24,914
77
5,283
25,735
235,846
251
27
36
7,034
542
170
12,182
501
358
1,055,073
63,547
30,820
174
2,824
3,862
867,864
5
64
396
16,754
2
116
373
282
29,796
7
30
217
78
223
86
47,544
20,265
76
5,308
23,753
205,556
249
27
34
7,221
518
84
12,942
469
291
1,135,696
57,149
20,182
196
3,058
4,385
1,026,783
6
164
8,680
49,268
3
115
390
259
30,903
9
30
243
76
287
75
67,343
18,308
77
5,750
26,023
248,295
265
31
28
7,764
695
135
13,614
630
302
1,121,022
76,034
21,237
215
3,368
4,710
992,824
6
171
5,502
40,368
3
125
394
191
31,263
9
20
239
60
265
63
60,178
13,764
83
6,324
26,897
351,298
291
28
32
8,383
618
98
14,226
516
157
1,215,154
65,216
14,898
288
4,294
5,860
1,246,891
6
171
5,958
32,867
3
125
489
13
29,013
4
31
34
10,093
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 93
Table II.—Case Load Showing the Total Number of Licensed Institutions
and Pending Applications, 1962
LICENSED
Jan. 1,
1962
New
Licences
Closed
Carried
Forward,
Dec. 31,
1962
Children—total care—
28
8
77
257
25
34
186
34
6
3
5
2
9
62
S
8
95
3
4
16
3
31
6
10
41
1
17
10
83
Children—day care—
288
27
32
Aged—•
240
Institutions	
Adults—employable_.  . ._             -
37
5
3
4
Totals
658
196
108
746
PENDING
Jan.1,
1962
New
Cases
Closed
Carried
Forward,
Dec. 31,
1962
Children—total care—
Boarding homes	
Institutions	
Camps._
Children—day care—
Kindergartens..
Schools for retarded children _
Foster day care 	
Aged-
Boarding homes .	
Institutions	
Adults—employable	
Maternity homes.-
Provincial Mental Hospital dischargees..
Totals	
5
32.
60
8
.19
81
2
3
210
7
1
9
71
4
25
146
3
271
13
71
10
25
144
4
2
279
4
1
28
60
2
19
83
1
1
202
V," "..   I
-  -
'■::.■! ' :
.
- r, -.-i
...     ...
 I 94 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PART V.-—SOCIAL WORK SERVICES
DIVISION OF TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL AND
PEARSON POLIOMYELITIS PAVILION
Mrs. M. Titterington, Casework Supervisor
The optimism that prevailed for some years among lay people following the
discovery and use of drugs in the treatment of tuberculosis and the subsequent
reduction in mortality and morbidity rates is becoming somewhat dampened as
statistics level off and new problems present themselves. Tuberculosis is still the
major health problem in all parts of the world, and there are still epidemics of
tuberculosis here and there in specific geographical areas in Canada and within
certain family groups. There is a growing conviction that every individual should
have a tuberculin test, and that all positive reactors should be followed as potential
cases in the future. To achieve this, a continual educational programme is essential,
not only by those in the health field, but by those in other disciplines, such as social
welfare.
Antimicrobial therapy has shortened the period of hospitalization required by
many patients, but there are problems in this area, too—particularly in relation to
individual intolerances and bacilli becoming resistant to the antimicrobial drugs.
Drug therapy for tuberculosis is unlike the mild " three pills per day " prescribed for
many other diseases in that many patients are prescribed injections and as many as
20 pills per day, and this therapy usually has to be continued for a period of two
years. Many patients have considerable discomfort in following this routine. The
patient who lapses in taking the prescribed pills regularly and as long as prescribed
is the one who incurs the danger of developing resistant bacilli, and when he infects
others with resistant bacilli, their disease becomes a problem to treat, and these
contacts may be deprived of the benefit of the drug therapy. The unstable patient
who leaves hospital before he is medically discharged is, of course, more likely to
be neglectful in continuing drug therapy consistently. Constant research is being
carried on in this field, and new drugs and combinations of drugs found to combat
the difficulties.
Dr. G. F. Kincade's annual report indicates that in 1962 there were about
21,000 people who are known to have tuberculosis living in the Province of British
Columbia, 4,800 of whom are Indians. (The Indians not of white status are looked
after by the Indian Health Service.) About 19,000 of known cases are considered
to be inactive. Each of the diagnostic clinics has a special case register in which is
recorded all pertinent information for the cases in which the disease is active or who
are considered to be of the high-risk group. This group includes active cases of
tuberculosis, those inactive less than two years, quiescent cases, and suspects, as well
as all cases under treatment with antituberculous drugs. These cases total about
2,600, of which 1,250 are on the drugs as out-patients.
In 1962 the number of new cases discovered was 530, and, in addition, 80
inactive cases became active, making a total of 610 active cases. Four hundred and
thirty-four cases (includes a few patients with other diagnoses) were admitted to
Pearson Hospital and Willow Chest Centre, compared with 501 cases in 1961.
There was a slight increase in the number of children admitted to Sunny Hill Hospital with tuberculosis, there being 44 children admitted in 1962, compared with 41
in 1961. However, the number of days' care for these patients in 1962 was 1,337
less than in 1961.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63 I 95
Most of our tuberculosis patients are men over 45 years of age who have single
status, which includes those who are widowers, separated, or divorced. In 1962,
54.8 per cent of patients admitted to our sanitaria were over 50 years of age, or 64
per cent of our male population. Less than one-third of our patients were female,
but the age ratio was the opposite to the male, only 30 per cent being over 50 years
of age. This means that again during the past year our female patients were chiefly
the ones who had families, often with young children. Assistance with planning for
the care of the children so the mother could be admitted to hospital for treatment
absorbed time out of proportion to the number of such cases.
The question is often asked regarding the length of time a patient is required
to stay in hospital for treatment of tuberculosis. While each case is unique in itself
and it is difficult to generalize, an examination of 1962 statistics indicates that of
412 discharges in 1962 (excluding the discharges through death) over 56 per cent
were discharged within 6 months, over 35 per cent from 6 to 12 months, and over
8 per cent over a year. Twenty-one patients left hospital against medical advice,
and three were given disciplinary discharges. Two hundred and thirty-five were to
continue antimicrobial treatment following discharge.
A start has been made in the development of a physical fitness programme
before discharge in a few selected cases, in order that patients will be more prepared
for normal activity within a reasonable time after discharge.
There were five new patients admitted to the Pearson Poliomyelitis Pavilion in
1962. These patients had a variety of diseases requiring treatment and care similar
to that given to the poliomyelitis cases, but none of these had poliomyelitis. However, the social problems presented by these illnesses were similar to those of
poliomyelitis.
Long before it is realistic, many patients in our Poliomyelitis Pavilion, especially
those who have families, begin talking about returning home and, through direct or
indirect communication, indicate their fear of having to remain in hospital for the
rest of their lives. When one of these patients reaches a stage when he or she might
return home and reassume at least a partial role as father or mother, many steps must
be taken before a home-care plan may be completed, and the success of the plan
depends on the co-operation of many different professional disciplines, community
agencies, the patient's own family, and the patient himself. It is important for the
social worker to assist in co-ordinating these services and to assist in giving the patient
emotional support throughout the various protracted steps leading to finalization of
the plan.
The Social Service Department has some direct or indirect contact with every
patient who is admitted or discharged, although the bulk of social-work time is given
to the patients referred for specific problems, whether in-patient or out-patient, particularly where there are family or personality problems. There were 452 cases
referred during the past fiscal year, a number of which were reopened several times.
One hundred and forty-four tuberculosis patients and 12 patients in the Poliomyelitis
Pavilion received comforts allowance for varying periods of time. Because of alcoholism and drug addiction, an increased number of comforts allowances for tuberculosis patients had to be administered. These patients with character disorders create
many problems for themselves and others and demand considerable time. It would
appear that treatment in a custodial setting, if this were possible, might be more
constructive and more effective in controlling their disease.
In addition to the comforts allowances of approximately $5,000, we disbursed
$649.28 in voluntary funds (excluding special Christmas donations). There were
2,197 interviews with patients and their relatives and 2,865 collateral interviews,
which includes consultations with other professional disciplines and with community
 I 96 BRITISH COLUMBIA
agencies. The statistical volume is somewhat less than during the previous fiscal
year, but staff changes were in part responsible. Considerably more time was spent
with individual cases with positive results.
During the past fiscal year, staff members have assisted in the educational
programme of the School of Social Work as well as that of the nursing students that
come to the Division for the tuberculosis affiliation programme.
I wish to extend our thanks for the assistance and co-operation of the many
individuals and private groups who have helped in so many ways throughout the
year, as well as private social and health agencies and various Governmental departments, on whose co-operation we depend in helping our patients.
 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE,  1962/63
I 97
PART VI.—ACCOUNTING DIVISION
J. McDiarmid, Departmental Comptroller
The gross expenditure for the Department of Social Welfare during the fiscal
year April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963, amounted to $55,970,500.
Comparing the period of 1962/63 with the previous fiscal year 1961/62, there
is a decrease in expenditure of $55,400, or one-tenth of 1 per cent in the gross
expenditure recorded in 1961/62.
The sections, administration, institutions, and field service have increased in
expenditure over the previous fiscal year by $153,700, due to a small increase in
numbers of staff employed by the field service and a general salary increase granted
in 1962.
The balance of expenditures are welfare payments made direct to recipients
or expenditures made on their behalf, such as medical, drugs, maintenance in homes,
foster homes, etc., which amounted to $52,587,100. In this area the expenditure
decreased by $209,100 from the expenditure of $52,796,200 made in the fiscal
year 1961/62.
Viewing the reduction of $209,100 experienced in 1962/63, it is noted that
while payment made for maintenance of dependent children increased $470,600
and payment of pensions to the aged and handicapped increased by $142,200, there
was a reduction in medical services, drugs, etc., of $30,400 and in the Social
Allowance section of $791,500.
Proportion of Total Gross Welfare Expenditure
Main Service
1961/62
1962/63
Value
Per Centi
Value
Per Cent
$567,000
913,700
1,749,000
3,816,300
4,639,000
29,032,600
15,308,300
1.0
1.6
3.1
6.8
8.3
51.8
27.3
$579,000
944,800
1,859,600
4,286,900
4,608,600
28,241,100
15,450,500
LO
1.7
3.3
7.7
8.2
50.5
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowance, Disabled Persons'  Allowance,  and  Supplementary
Social Allowance for the aged and handicapped	
27.6
Totals
$56,025,900
100.0
$55,970,500
100.0
i Percentages may not add to 100.0 due to rounding.
Amount
Percentage
of Total
Increase or
Decrease ( —)
over Previous
Year
Administration _
$579,000
11,699,900
43,691,600
1.0
20.9
78.1
2.1
5.2
—1.5
Totals       .     - -               	
*.S.970.5n0     1         100 0
—0 1
 I 98 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Division continued its policy of visiting and instructing the field offices
wherever possible.   Representation was made at headquarters and regional meetings.
During 1962/63 the motor-vehicle fleet was increased by the purchase of six
additional cars, bringing the total number of Government-owned cars operated by
the Department of Social Welfare to 109 vehicles. In addition, some personnel in
the Department continue to operate privately owned vehicles on a mileage basis.
During 1962/63 some 20 cars were required to be replaced. These vehicles,
for the most part, were placed in the northern areas of the Province. A close check
was made of all Government cars to ensure that each vehicle was equipped with
safety belts, first-aid kits, and, where required, with shovels, chains, tow ropes, and
other essentials that may be considered as necessities in the operation of cars in the
more remote parts of the Province.
The Accounting Division entered into an arrangement with the Department of
Highways whereby it took over the inspection of all Government-owned vehicles
operated by the Welfare field staff throughout the northern, Kootenay, and Okanagan
areas of the Province. This service by the Department of Highways has proven to be
of considerable saving in both money and personnel time.
The Accounting Division has acquired a copy machine and is supplying a copy
service to the various divisions of the Department. It is found that considerable
typing time is saved by this operation. The Division is running some six to eight
thousand copies per month, giving a quick and relatively inexpensive service to the
Department of Social Welfare.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1963
1,560-1163-1720
  

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