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Mental Health Services Branch PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED MARCH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1964

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 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES
AND HOSPITAL INSURANCE
Mental Health Services Branch
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED
MARCH 31
1963
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1964
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Annual Report of the Mental Health
Services Branch, Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance, for the
year ended March 31, 1963.
ERIC MARTIN,
Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance.
Office of the Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Victoria, B.C., January 23,1964.
 Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Mental Health Services Branch,
Vancouver, B.C., January 22, 1964.
The Honourable Eric Martin,
Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Mental Health
Services Branch for the twelve months ended March 31, 1963.
A. E. DAVIDSON, B.A., M.D., F.A.P.A.,
Deputy Minister of Mental Health Services.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
PART I.—HEADQUARTERS
Page
Report—Director of Mental Health Services  7
Report—Business Manager  19
Report—Personnel Officer  34
Report—Supervisor of Psychiatric Social Work  38
Report—Director of Nursing Services  42
Report—Medical Records and Statistics  45
PART IL—CREASE CLINIC OF PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE
AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
Report on Crease Clinic—Medical Superintendent  47
Report on Provincial Mental Hospital—Medical Superintendent  50
Report on Treatment Services—Clinical Director  68
Statistical Tables—Crease Clinic  70
Statistical Tables—Provincial Mental Hospital  81
PART III.—THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL AND
THE TRANQUILLE SCHOOL
Report—Medical Superintendent     94
Statistical Tables—The Woodlands School  109
Statistical Tables—The Tranquille School  116
PART IV.—PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME
Report—Medical Superintendent  117
Statistical Tables   119
PART V.—GERIATRIC DIVISION
Report—Medical Superintendent  121
Statistical Tables—Valleyview Hospital, Essondale  130
Statistical Tables—Dellview Hospital, Vernon  136
Statistical Tables—Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace  140
PART VI.—MENTAL HEALTH CENTRES
Report—Director of Mental Health Centre, Burnaby  144
Report—Director of Mental Health Centre, Victoria  159
Report—Director of Mental Health Centre, Kelowna  162
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 Report of Mental Health Services Branch
For the Twelve Months Ended March 31, 1963
PART I.—HEADQUARTERS
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
A. E. Davidson, M.D., Deputy Minister of Mental Health Services
and Director of Mental Health Services
The various units of the Mental Health Services Branch have continued to
provide an effective service for an increasing number of patients during the fiscal
year 1962/63. At the same time there has been an increase in the amount of services provided in these units together with improvement and modification in many
of the programmes and treatment procedures. In addition, there have been many
increases of service at the community level, some of these within the structure of
the branch organization and some at the local or community level.
As indicated in the accompanying chart, there are four main divisions of service within the Mental Health Services Branch. These are the Mental Hospitals
Division, the Geriatric Division, the Schools for Mental Defectives Division, and
the Community Services Division. The first three of these divisions provide the
in-patient or hospital-care programme for the majority of mentally ill and mentally
retarded who are hospitalized in this Province. The Community Services Division
provides diagnostic, consultative, and therapeutic services to many patients in various parts of the Province who do not require hospital care but who can attend and
receive their attention on an out-patient basis.
STATISTICAL COMMENTS
During the fiscal year 1962/63, 4,248 patients were admitted to the units of
these three divisions. This is an increase of 54 patients over 1961/62. It is to
be noted, however, the yearly admissions to hospitals have been showing a gradual
and steady increase over the past 10 years. This has occurred in spite of the
increase in services to the mentally ill in the community by the provision of mental
health clinics, private psychiatric services, patients admitted to psychiatric wards
in general hospitals, etc.
Table 1.—Showing Patients in Residence in the Various Institutions of the Provincial Mental Health Services, April 1,1962, and March 31,1963, Together with
Increase or Decrease.
Institution
In Residence, Apr
1,1962
In Residence, Mar.
31, 1963
Increase (+)
Men
Women
Total
Men
Women
Total
Decrease (—)
110
1,464
283
791
153
248
106
293
145
1,242
561
139
472
126
255
2,706
283
1,352
292
720
232
293
91
1,484
149
706
275
252
106
295
127
1,256
582
143
477
127
218
2,740
149
1,288
418
729
233
295
— 37
+34
— 134
The Woodlands School        	
—64
The Tranquille School   	
+ 126
+9
+ 1
+2
Dellview Hospital, Vernon  .	
Totals  	
3,448
2,685
6,133
3,358
2,712
6,070
—63
 D 8
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Table 2.—Showing in Summary the Admissions and Population Increase of the
Mental Health Services Branch for the 10-year Period April 1, 1953, to
March 31, 1963.
Year
Total
Admissions
Admissions
65 Years
and Over
Admissions
15 Years
and Under
Voluntary
Admissions
Population
Increase
Index of
Increase
1953/54.
1954/55.
1955/56.
1956/57.
1957/58 .
1958/59 .
1959/60.
1960/61..
1961/62 .
1962/63.
Totals.
2,437
2,492
2,855
2,270
2,936
2,993
3,296
3,924
4,193
4,248
347
348
392
385
442
425
506
580
557
554
32,094
4,536
169
71
58
57
106
135
182
254
200
_213
17445~
834
884
1,153
1,083
1,012
1,118
1,316
1,695
2,023
2,086
13,204
215
88
26
—78
38
-90
20
42
— 156
—63
42
8.82
3.53
0.91
—2.87
1.29
— 3.00
0.61
1.07
— 3.72
— 1.48
The types of patients admitted to the various units of the Mental Health Services Branch include those who are more seriously ill and require a longer period
of care and treatment, and also many for whom active and intensive therapy will
enable them to return very quickly to the community. The separation rate from
the hospitals is one indication of the very active programme carried out in these
institutions. During the year 4,311 patients were separated from our various hospitals. This resulted in a net decrease of 63 patients in the total resident population
in all institutions during the year. We are gratified that it is possible to provide the
standard of programme and care and still be able to maintain our total accommodation at this level.
The total resident population of the three units of the Mental Hospitals Division—namely, the Crease Clinic, Provincial Mental Hospital at Essondale, and
Provincial Mental Home at Colquitz—at the end of the year was 3,107. This is
a reduction of 137 patients compared to the figure at the end of the previous
fiscal year.
Admissions to the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital continued to
be very high. A total of 3,717 patients was admitted during the year 1962/63,
compared with 3,661 in 1961/62. This is an increase of 56 over the previous
year. However, it is to be noted that this figure, compared to the admission rate
in the year 1952/53 of 2,512 and to the admission rate in 1957/58 of 2,739,
indicates a very rapid increase in the treatment programme in these institutions.
Of the total admissions to the Provincial mental hospitals, 1,953 were first
admissions and 1,770 were readmissions. The ratio of patients admitted to
hospital on a voluntary basis continues to be very high. Approximately 70 per
cent of all admissions to the Crease Clinic during this past year were admitted
voluntarily, whereas about 44 per cent of those admitted to the Provincial Mental
Hospital do so of their own volition. A considerable increase is noted in the number
admitted from penal institutions or from the Court to the Provincial Mental
Hospital. One hundred and twenty-one such patients were admitted under these
arrangements during 1962/63. These patients require an increased amount of
supervision in order to cover the security aspects. The majority of these are
treated and returned to the penal institution as soon as possible. When this figure
is compared to the figure of 10 patients admitted by Order in Council 10 years
ago, it gives some indication of the increase in service in this area.
 HEADQUARTERS D 9
During the year the gradual transfer of patients from the Provincial Mental
Home at Colquitz continued. The policy to eventually close out this institution
has been pursued. One hundred and thirty-four patients were transferred from
Colquitz to the various institutions on the Mainland. This left 149 patients
resident at Colquitz at the end of March, 1963.
The two units of the Schools for Mental Defectives Division—namely, The
Woodlands School and The Tranquille School—have shown a total increase of 62
in the resident population this year. This has been made possible by the gradual
increase in accommodation at The Tranquille School and the transfer of patients
there from The Woodlands School. This has enabled an increasing number to
be admitted to The Woodlands School from the waiting list. At present all
admissions are direct to The Woodlands School. Altogether, 210 patients were
admitted during the fiscal year. An increased amount of service is provided in
the area of mental retardation through the 30-day admission programme, enabling
patients to be admitted for observation, assessment, and consultative purposes.
The Geriatric Division, consisting of Valleyview, Skeenaview, and Dellview
Hospitals, continues to provide a very active and useful service for psychiatric
patients in the aged population. At the end of the year there were 1,257 patients
in these three units. This total shows an increase of only 12 more in residence
than at the beginning of the year. Altogether, 321 patients were admitted during
the past fiscal year. The demand for admission to these units continues to be
quite high, but it has been possible to accommodate all those urgently requiring
care in these facilities.
The three units of the Community Services Division have provided an increasing amount of service to the areas which they serve. Some of these areas are
served by the travelling clinic working out of each of the three stationary mental
health clinics. Patients seen by these clinics do not require active hospital care.
A total of 1,496 patients was seen in the three clinical areas. Of this total, 930
of the patients seen were adults and 566 were children. Nine hundred and forty-
six of these patients were accepted into the treatment programme, this total
consisting of 660 adults and 286 children.
MAJOR EVENTS AND TRENDS
Expansion and modification of existing services and development of new
services have taken place during the fiscal year 1962/63.
The open-ward policy has continued to develop in all institutions. This
programme provides an opportunity for patients to enjoy freedom and privileges
comparable to those which they are used to under normal home circumstances.
At the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital, 34 wards out of a total of
44 wards are now open. Over 2,000 patients of approximately 3,000 patients in
residence have this privilege. At The Woodlands School six wards are entirely
open. There are a number of locked wards where many of the patients have the
privilege of going out on the grounds by themselves. In Valleyview Hospital two
wards operate entirely on an open-ward basis, while at Dellview and Skeenaview
Hospitals one ward each functions in this manner.
The after-care programme at the Provincial Mental Hospital has been
operative actively this past year. This programme provides a follow-up service
to patients who are discharged from hospital to the Metropolitan Vancouver area.
The patients are supported during their period of adjustment from hospital to
community life. This enables patients to be discharged from the hospital earlier
than they otherwise might.    In some instances, patients who could not otherwise
 D 10 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
leave hospital have the opportunity of being given a trial. At the end of the year,
863 patients were registered in the after-care programme, compared to the 381
who were registered at the beginning of the fiscal year. There are plans to try
to increase and expand this service so that patients discharged to other areas of
the Province will receive similar service.
The boarding-home care programme is very closely associated with the
after-care programme. Patients who do not require continuation of their hospital
care have the opportunity of being placed in the community with some measure of
supervision. Many of these patients continue to show improvement following
their placement in boarding homes and are eventually able to be discharged from
boarding home to resume their life in their own community. At the year's end
approximately 180 patients from hospital were living in boarding homes located
in various centres in the Lower Mainland.
Further expansion is being undertaken in the development of a more active
rehabilitation programme. With a more active-treatment programme, the ordinary
hospital chores do not provide adequately for job training in preparation to leave
hospital. Many patients require planned programmes while they are in hospital
to prepare them for their eventual return to the community. It is necessary to
plan the working programme in keeping with the individual patient's personality
make-up and background and also in keeping with what is being planned for the
patient after he leaves hospital. This programme may include working situations
about the hospital or various types of work and training in the hospital industrial
therapy department and occupational therapy department. A co-ordinator of
rehabilitation was appointed to the staff of the Provincial Mental Hospital, effective
February, 1963, to develop and co-ordinate this rehabilitation programme.
The gradual abandonment of the Provincial Mental Home at Colquitz has
been proceeding satisfactorily during the past fiscal year. No patients have been
transferred to Colquitz for the past 18 months, and patients in this institution
have been gradually transferred to other hospital units on the Mainland. Transfers
are gradual as it is desired to effect this move without increasing the accommodation
problems in these other institutions. The Provincial Mental Home at Colquitz
originally accommodated 298 patients. At the end of the fiscal year 149 patients
were in residence. This movement will continue, and it is hoped it will be possible
to complete the closure of Colquitz within the next fiscal year.
At the same time that this move is taking place, planning is proceeding for
the development of improved psychiatric facilities in Victoria for the people of
Vancouver Island. These facilities will provide accommodation for modern
diagnosis, care, and treatment of patients on an out-patient and in-patient basis.
Expansion of facilities of The Tranquille School has continued with a view to
developing a multi-purpose type of hospital-school facility. It will thus be possible
to provide care for an increasing variety of patients in this School. At present,
patients are not admitted directly to The Tranquille School but are transferred from
The Woodlands School. Mentally retarded patients are admitted directly to The
Woodlands School, where facilities for diagnosis, assessment, treatment, education,
and programming exist. When assessment is completed and the resources at The
Tranquille School are considered adequate, then these patients may be transferred
to Tranquille. This expansion at The Tranquille School has enabled an increasing
number of mentally retarded patients to be accepted from the waiting list.
The new Okanagan Mental Health Centre was opened at Kelowna in August
of 1962. This service is located in office space provided in the Health Centre in
Kelowna.   This space was officially opened in December of 1962.   The staff for
 HEADQUARTERS D  11
this clinic consists of a psychiatrist, psychologist, social worker, mental health
nurse, and the necessary clerical staff. Dr. F. E. McNair, formerly Director of
the Mental Health Centre in Burnaby, was appointed to be the first Director of
this new Okanagan Mental Health Centre. This is the first instance where
psychiatric personnel have been located in areas of the Province outside of the
Vancouver and Victoria areas.
This clinic presently serves three health units—namely, the North Okanagan
Health Unit, the South Okanagan Health Unit, and the South Central Health Unit.
It provides a variety of services, mainly consultative and therapeutic services, for
those who do not require hospitalization. The clinic visits regularly the cities of
Penticton, Kelowna, Kamloops, Vernon, Salmon Arm, and Revelstoke.
Since the clinic has been operative, a psychiatric ward has been developed
at the Kelowna General Hospital. This provides a facility for the treatment of
many patients requiring a short period of hospitalization. Thus it is possible for
patients who would formerly have been treated only at facilities in the Lower
Mainland to now enjoy the opportunity of receiving the necessary treatment for
their condition in their own community. It is hoped that the developments in the
mental health field in the Okanagan area will serve as a model for the development
of programmes in other areas of the Province. Plans are presently developed to
proceed with similar mental health centres. One is planned for the Kootenay
region, to be centered in Trail. This clinic will serve three health units—namely,
the East Kootenay, West Kootenay, and Selkirk Health Units. In addition, our
planning has been proceeding for the development of the North Island Mental
Health Centre, to be located in Nanaimo, and which will serve in a similar way the
Upper Island Health Unit and the Central Vancouver Island Health Unit.
The new Patients' Estates Act was proclaimed and became effective in July
of 1962. While this Act is not administered by the Mental Health Services Branch,
nevertheless it does apply to and affect many of the patients who are admitted and
resident in the units of this Branch. Formerly all patients admitted to mental
institutions were considered mentally incompetent. Under this new Act, persons
admitted to mental institutions are only declared incompetent when the Medical
Superintendent considers the patient's mental condition to be such as to make it
desirable to apply for a certificate declaring him to be mentally incompetent. It is
thus possible for a person who is unfortunate enough to develop a mental illness
to be admitted to hospital for treatment without losing all of his civil rights. This
is certainly in keeping with modern psychiatric thinking and is a definite step forward
in mental health legislation.
Some of the major items of renovation and construction carried out by the
Public Works Department for our Branch were as follows:—■
(1) The renovation of the Riverside Annex Building at the Provincial Mental
Hospital, Essondale. This building was partially destroyed by fire in
January, 1962. A complete renovation was carried out in this building.
Patients were able to reoccupy this facility in April of 1962.
(2) The reconversion of the building formerly known as Nurses Home 2
at The Woodlands School. These renovation changes produced a building containing satisfactory office accommodation and was designed to
accommodate the administrative and medical staff at The Woodlands
School. In addition, the research laboratory and beauty-parlor are
located in this building.   This building was occupied in October of 1962.
(3) Construction of a new building at the Provincial Mental Hospital,
Essondale, to accommodate the telephone exchange and the employees'
 D  12
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
credit union offices. The portion of the building utilized by the credit
union was occupied June 19, 1963, and the portion of the building
accommodating the telephone exchange was occupied on November 4,
1962.
(4) Construction of the new Industrial Therapy Building at the Provincial
Mental Hospital, Essondale. The work on this building has continued
throughout the year, and at the end of the fiscal year was nearing completion. Plans were being arranged to occupy this building early in the
next fiscal year.
Opening of the Industrial Therapy Building, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, May
30, 1963. Left to right: R. Herring, Supervisor, Industrial Therapy; Dr. T. G. Caunt, Medical
Superintendent; Dr. A. E. Davidson, Deputy Minister of Mental Health Services; the Honourable E. C. F. Martin, Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance.
GENERAL COMMENTS
Active efforts have been made through the year to orientate the public to
activities being carried on in the various units of the Mental Health Services by
arranging for visits of groups to such institutions. Such visits include various
groups from the university, schools, service organizations, P.-T.A. groups, etc.
By these multiple visits, a large number of the public become more familiar with
the activities and services of the Mental Health Services Branch. In addition, they
also become more aware of the nature and some of the aspects of mental illness
and mental health. More specifically a tour of the Provincial Mental Home at
Colquitz was arranged for members of the press on January 18, 1963. The first
open house was held at The Tranquille School on June 27, 1962.   Carnival day
 —
HEADQUARTERS D 13
was held at the Provincial Mental Hospital at Essondale. This event gave the
opportunity for a large representation from the public to attend and to observe
at first hand some of the activities within a mental hospital.
The services rendered by members of the Canadian Mental Health Association and the Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia are very
valuable and very much appreciated. Many members of both groups serve in a
voluntary capacity in the mental hospitals and schools for retarded. These members work very closely with patients in these hospitals and bring to these patients
an interest which is otherwise not available. Their work and contribution,
particulary in regard to their Christmas gift programme, are very noteworthy.
They have also participated in the various visits and tours of big groups to these
institutions. In this and in their many other activities they are able to promote
and stimulate interest and concern in the problem of the mentally ill and the
mentally retarded.
The 32nd graduation exercises of the Department of Nursing Education
were held in the Vincent Massey Junior High School auditorium in New Westminster on the evening of April 25, 1962. One hundred and sixteen student
nurses, consisting of 92 women and 24 men, received their diplomas in psychiatric
nursing. This diploma signifies their successful completion of the two-year
training programme in the field of psychiatric nursing and qualifies them for registration with the Council of Psychiatric Nurses. The graduation speaker, Dr.
William C. Gibson, Professor of the Department of the History of Medicine and
Science, University of British Columbia, gave a very stimulating address to the
graduating class.
The annual meeting of the Council of Psychiatric Nurses was held on April 30,
1962, and a special meeting of the council was held on September 28, 1962.
One hundred and forty-eight psychiatric nurses have been licensed by the council
during the fiscal year. At the present time 1,251 nurses are licensed under the
Psychiatric Nurses Act. This includes 1,239 psychiatric nurses and 12 nurses
in mental deficiency.
The Council of Psychiatric Nurses has agreed to the establishment of a
travelling bursary in honour of the distinguished work of the council's first chairman, Dr. A. M. Gee, in furthering the interests and professional stature of the
psychiatric nurse and nurse in mental deficiency in British Columbia. The purpose
of this bursary will be to provide a worthy representative of the psychiatric nursing
profession of British Columbia with an opportunity to acquire and exchange
knowledge and skills through study, training, and observation in an outstanding
training and research centre which will be of value to him and his colleagues in
providing improved nursing care for the mentally and emotionally disturbed.
The in-service training programme for special school counsellors, which is
arranged by the Vancouver School Board, continued to receive support from the
Mental Health Services Branch. Financial assistance for this programme is provided through mental health grants. Many staff members of various disciplines
from the various units of the Mental Health Services Branch contribute to this
programme by providing lectures, clinics, demonstrations, etc. During this past
year 10 teachers have taken this course. Since this training programme was
commenced eight years ago, 73 teachers, mostly from Metropolitan Vancouver,
have received their training in this area.
The Mental Health Services Branch continues to participate in the activities
of the Alcoholism Foundation of British Columbia and the Narcotic Addiction
Foundation of British Columbia by having representation on the board of directors
 D 14 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
of each foundation. Dr. R. W. Harrington has been the representative on the
Alcoholism Foundation and Dr. A. E. Davidson on the Narcotic Addiction Foundation. These two foundations deal specifically with the problems relating to
alcohol and drug addiction. In both of these there is the opportunity to give
consideration and assistance to the psychiatric implications.
There have been many important changes in professional staff throughout the
service. The following senior staff appointments were made during the year:
Dr. K. J. Davies appointed to the position of Director of the Mental Health Centre,
Burnaby, June 1, 1962; Dr. F. E. McNair appointed to the position of Director
of the Okanagan Mental Health Centre, Kelowna, July 1, 1962; Dr. C. Gregory
appointed to the position of Director of the Mental Health Centre, Victoria, July
11, 1962; Dr. F. G. Tucker returned from New York after a year's study in the
field of administrative psychiatry to reassume the position of Clinical Director at
the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
There has been a number of resignations and retirements of staff members
from the Service, but special mention should be made of the following. Miss V. M.
Sanders, Superintendent of Nurses at The Woodlands School, retired from the
Service in October of 1962. Miss Sanders joined the nursing service 31 years ago
and served as Superintendent of Nurses at The Woodlands School for 22 years.
Mr. John Fraser, Postmaster at the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital
at Essondale, retired on superannuation, May, 1962. Mr. Fraser joined the staff
of the Provincial Mental Hospital 37 years ago and had been employed in the
position of Postmaster for some 32 years. Mr. Charles Bradford retired on superannuation in January, 1963, after having completed 38 years of service. Mr.
Bradford had been employed as a physiotherapist in the Centre Lawn Building,
Provincial Mental Hospital at Essondale. These three employees were all presented
with a certificate of meritorious service by the Honourable Eric Martin. Over the
many years these three had made a considerable contribution to the programme
carried out in the Mental Health Services. The experience which they have had
in the performance of their work in the different areas of the Mental Health
Services is difficult to replace.
MENTAL HEALTH GRANT
The Government of Canada, through the Department of National Health and
Welfare, made available to British Columbia a Mental Health Grant " to assist in
an extended programme for the prevention and treatment of mental illness, including rehabilitation and free treatment." This was the 15th year that this Mental
Health Grant had been made available.
The Mental Health Grant provided for 1962/63 was $791,004. In common
with all the agencies utilizing health grants, the officers of the Mental Health Services
Branch met with senior officials of the Provincial Health Branch and the Department of National Health and Welfare in August, 1962, to reduce project proposals
for 1962/63 in accordance with the decreased funds which the Federal officials
indicated were then available for allocation. This accounts for the fact that the
Branch did not utilize the same high proportion of the Federal allocation as in
previous occas:ons. Projects to the value of $657,116.77 were submitted to and
approved by the Department of National Health and Welfare. Expenditures
vouchered by the year's end totalled $625,319.68. The details of these expenditures
are provided in tabular form in the Business Manager's report on page 33.
 HEADQUARTERS
D  15
Of the 19 active projects this year, nine provided assistance to the programme
of the Mental Health Services Branch of the Province. At the University of British
Columbia there were four research projects supported, including a new one under
the aegis of the Department of Psychiatry devoted to epidemiologic studies of
hospitalized psychiatric illness.
The graduate programme of the Department of Psychiatry at the University
continued to receive support for various clinical supervisors, together with some
secretarial assistance. The psychiatric out-patient department of the Vancouver
General Hospital, which is associated with the University Department of Psychiatry
and its teaching programme, continued to receive support in the payment of salaries
of selected professional and clerical members of the staff.
The mental hygiene programme of the Metropolitan Health Committee of
Greater Vancouver continued along previous lines without any significant change.
A new project was approved this year to permit the establishment of a mental
hygiene programme for the Greater Victoria Metropolitan Board of Health. This
programme is now well established.
The study of the combined course in psychiatric and general nursing, which
was conducted under the asgis of the Mental Health Services Branch, was concluded,
and the final report was compiled and submitted to the Department of National
Health and Welfare.
The British Columbia Epilepsy Society received funds to assist in defraying
the salaries required to operate its clinical service. The Children's Foundation
received a grant to assist in the payment of salaries to two professional members
of its staff.
The usual short-term courses for professional members of the Mental Health
Services Branch were provided. The funds for these are now obtained from the
Professional Training Grant, which is administered by the Health Branch.
An important development this year was the provision of a bursary to permit
Mr. John W. Borthwick, a psychologist employed at the Provincial Mental Hospital,
to attend the two-year course in hospital administration given by the University of
Toronto. The funds for this bursary have been allocated from the Professional
Training Grant.
COMPARATIVE SUMMARY OF INCREASES AND DECREASES IN RESIDENT POPULATION BY MAJOR DIVISIONS OF MENTAL HEALTH
SERVICES BRANCH, 1953/54 TO 1962/63.
Fiscal Year
Provincial
Mental
Hospitals
Schools for
Mental
Defectives
Geriatric
Division
Crease
Clinic
Total
1953/54	
+ 62
+44
+2
-70
-49
-135
—253
—71
—247
— 100
+ 104
+19
+19
+ 14
+76
+ 86
+93
+75
+73
+62
+50
-1
+25
-10
—31
+26
— 11
+24
—21
+ U
-37
+215
1954/55                              	
+ 88
1955/56                   	
+15
+9
— 15
—30
+ 156
+59
+7
+ 12
+26
1956/57	
—78
1957/58                                  	
+38
1958/59	
—90
1959/60	
+20
1960/61	
+42
1961/62 	
1962/63           .              	
— 156
—63
 D 16                         MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1962/63
COMPARATIVE SUMMARY OF TOTAL PATIENTS UNDER CARE FOR
MAJOR DIVISIONS OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES BRANCH BY
FISCAL YEARS, 1953/54 TO 1962/63.
Fiscal Year
Provincial
Mental
Hospitals
Schools for
Mental
Defectives
Geriatric
Division
Crease
Clinic
Total
1953/54 	
5,040
5,051
5,247
5,335
5,408
5,377
5,458
5,530
5,803
5,853
1,278
1,263
1,278
1,275
1,373
1,481
1,740
1,868
1,960
2,023
1,255
1,292
1,330
1,287
1,349
1,373
1,459
1,587
1,642
1,677
1,499
1,606
1,894
1,721
1,714
1,744
1,705
1,846
1,876
1,912
9,072
9,212
9,749
9,618
9,844
9,975
10,362
10,831
11,281
11,465
1954/55                    	
1955/56    	
1956/57	
1957/58..  	
1958/59           	
1959/60  —
1960/61	
1961/62  	
1962/63              	
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES,
APRIL 1, 1962, TO MARCH 31, 1963
Psychiatric
Division
Schools for Men-
tal Defectives
Geriatric
Division
Total
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.      F.
T.
In residence, April 1,1962	
On   probation,   carried   forward
from 1961/62          	
1,857
213
7
1,387
407
1
3,244
620
8
944
12
700
10
1,644
22
647
9
598
16
1,245
25
3,448
234
7
2,685
433
1
6,133
667
8
On  escape, carried forward from
1Q61/67
.....
_t__
Total as at April 1,1962
Admisisons—
First admissions to Mental Health
2,077| 1,795
3,872
956|    710| 1,666
656|    614
1,270
3,689| 3,119|   6,808
1,043
128
699
910
204
733
1,953
332
1,432
64
3
45
66
1
31
130
4
76
159
5
1
150
5
1
309
10
2
1,266
136
1,126
210
2,392
346
1,510
Readmissions to different institu-
Readmissions to same institution ...
745J     765
1,870
124
1,847
52
3,717
176
112
133
98
14
210
147
165|     156
66 j      20
321
86
2,147
323
2,101
86
4,248
409
Transfers in 	
Total admissions to indi-
1,994
1,899
3,893
245
112
357
231
176
407
2,470
2,187
4,657
Total under care	
Separations—■
Discharged in full — 	
Died	
On probation but not discharged...
4,0711 3,694| 7,765
1,2011    8221 2,023
887|    790| 1,677
5,840| 5,216| 11,0561
1,848
108
189
4
1,741
66
448
1
3,589
174
637
5
82
9
15
64
4
10
146
13
25
15
190
22
15
133
22
30
323
44
1,945
307
226
4
1,820
203
480
1
3,765
510
706
5
2,149
198
2,256
55
4,405
253
106
116
78
17
184
133
227
7
170
16
397
23
2,482
321
2,504
88
4,986
409
Total separations from in-
dividual institution	
2,347
3,311
4,658
222
95
317
234
186
420
2,803
2,592
5,395
Net increase or decrease	
In residence, March 31,1963	
— 133]    — 4|—137
+37|   +25|   +62
+6|     +6|  +12
—90|  +27
-63
1,724| 1,383
!
3,107
981
725| 1,706
1
653
604
1,257
3,358
2,712
6,070
1 Total under care for all Mental Health Services includes total as at April 1, 1962, plus the total admissions
to individual institutions minus transfers out.
 HEADQUARTERS
D 17
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION IN INDIVIDUAL INSTITUTIONS,
APRIL 1, 1962, TO MARCH 31, 1963
Psychiatric Division
Crease Clinic
Provincial Mental Hospitals
Total
Essondale
Colquitz
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
M.
F.
T.
110
145
255
1,464
212
6
1,242
407
1
2,706
619
7
283
1
1
285"
1,857
213
7
1,387
407
1
3,244
620
On   probation,   carried   forward
from 1961/62	
On escape, carried forward from
1961/62	
8
Total as at April 1, 1962
110
145
255
1,682
1,650
3,332
2,077
1,795
3,872
Admissions—•
First admissions to Mental
518
31
212
575
45
270
1,093
76
482
525
97
487
335
159
463
860
256
950
1,043
128
699
910
204
733
1,953
332
1,432
Readmissions to different institutions  	
Readmissions to same institution 	
761
4
890
2
1,651
6
1,109
120
957
50
2,066
170
1,870
124
1,847
52
3 717
Transfers in	
176
Total admissions to individual institution	
765
892
1,657
1,229
1,007
2,236
1,994
1,899
3,893
Total under care	
875
1,037
1,912
2,911
2,657
5,568
285
4,071
3,694
7,765
Separations—
Discharged in full	
Died 	
On probation but not discharged 	
Escaped but not discharged	
765
3
877
1
1,642
4
1,082
99
189
3
864
65
448
1
1,946
164
637
4
1
6
1
1,848
108
189
4
1,741
66
448
1
3,589
174
637
5
768
16
878
32
1,646
48
1,373
54
1,378
23
2,751
77
8
128
2,149
198
2,256
55
4,405
253
Total  separations  from
individual institution.
784
910
1,694
1,427
1,401
2,828
136
2,347
2,311
4,658
Net increase or decrease	
-19
—18
-37
+20
+ 14
+34
-134
— 133
-4
— 137
In residence, March 31, 1963 	
91
127
218
1,484
1,256
2,740
149
1,724
1,383
3,107
 D  18
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION IN INDIVIDUAL INSTITUTIONS,
APRIL 1, 1962, TO MARCH 31, 1963—Continued
Schools for Mental Defectives
The Woodlands School,
New Westminster
The Tranquille School,
Tranquille
Total
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
»
M.
*
T.
In residence, April 1, 1962	
On   probation,   carried   forward   from
1961/62	
791
12
561
10
1,352
22
153
139
292
944
12
700
10
1,644
22
Total as at April 1, 1962—	
803
571, |  1,374
153
139
292
956
710
1,666
Admissions—
First   admissions   to   Mental   Health
64
3
45
66
1
31
130
4
76
	
	
64
3
45
66
1
31
130
Readmissions to different institutions
Readmissions to same institution	
4
76
Total admissions 	
U12
7
98
5
210
12
126
9
135
112
133
98
14
210
147
Total admissions to individual
119
103
222
128
7
135
245
112
357
Total under care 	
922
674
1,596
281
146
427
1,201
822
2,023
Separations—■
81
9
14
64
4
10
145
13
24
182"
126
1
1
1
1
-L
7
82
9
15
64
4
10
146
■Died
13
On probation but not discharged	
25
104
112
78
14
2
4
3
106
116
78
17
184
133
Total separations from individual institution	
2116
92
308
6
3
9
222
95
317
Net increase or decrease	
-85
+21
—64
+ 122
+4 | +126
+ 31
+25
+62
706
582
1,288
275
143
418
981
725
1,706
Geriatric Division
Valleyview Hospital,
Essondale
Dellview Hospital,
Vernon
Skeenaview
Hospital,
Terrace
Total
M.
'■
T.
M.
*•
T.
M.
M.
-
T.
248
8
472
16
720
24
106
1
126
232
1
293
647
9
598
16
1,245
On probation, carried forward
from 1961/62                   	
25
Total as at April 1,1962
256
488
744
107
126
233
293
656
614
1,270
Admissions—
First   admissions   to   Mental
113
3
1
113
5
1
226
8
2
33
2
37
70
2
13
159
5
1
150
5
1
309
Readmissions to different in-
10
Readmissions to same institution	
2
117
31
119
19
236
50
35
10
37
1
72
11
13
25
165
66
156
20
321
Transfers in	
86
Total admissions to individual institutions...
148
138
286
45
38
83
38
231
176
407
Total under care	
404
626
1,030
152
164
316
331
887
790
1,677
Separations—
Discharged in full	
Died -	
On  probation   but  not   discharged	
HI
117
18
11
105
18
22
222
36
4
39
3
4
28
4
8
67
7
34
1
H5
190
22
15
133
22
30
323
44
Total separations	
Transfers out 	
146
6
134
15
280
21
46
36
1
82
1
35
1
227
7
170
16
397
23
Total separations from
individual institution
152
149
301
46
37
83
36
234
186
420
Net increase or decrease.. 	
+4
+5
+9
+1
+1
+2
+6
+6
+ 12
In residence, March 31, 1963	
252
477
729
106
127
233
295
653
604
1,257
 HEADQUARTERS D  19
BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT
F. A. Matheson, Business Manager
Attached hereto are the financial reports of the British Columbia Mental
Health Services Branch for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1963.
The reports of the in-patient care units, comprising Crease Clinic, Provincial
Mental Hospital, The Woodlands School, The Tranquille School, Provincial Mental
Home, Valleyview Hospital, Dellview Hospital, and. Skeenaview Hospital, are included in Tables A through J, inclusive, while Tables K, L, M, and N present those
of the Community Services, Department of Nursing Education, and General Administration respectively.
The over-all daily average population as illustrated in Table A reads 6,095.15,
a decrease of 112.15 from the previous year. Population decrease is most marked
in the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, where the average population dropped
from 2,824.58 in 1961/62 to 2,719.32 in 1962/63, or a total of 105.26.
Maintenance expenditures continue to rise, the 1962/63 total of $16,354,-
798.43 indicating an increase of $521,799.29 over the $15,832,999.14 recorded in
1961/62, and is made up of $493,685.81 in salaries and the balance of $28,113.48
in supplies and operating expenses. As a result of the upward trend in maintenance
expenditure, the gross and net daily per capita costs rose to $7.35 and $6.44 respectively, or increases of 36 and 40 cents over 1961/62.
Maintenance revenue, on the other hand, decreased from $2,150,802.56 in
1961/62 to $2,025,854.46, or a drop of $124,948.10 between the two-year totals.
Produce valued at approximately $500,000 was purchased during the year
from the Department of Agriculture farm operations at Essondale, Colquitz, and
Tranquille.
A detailed statement is also appended to this report listing assistance from the
Federal Government totalling $625,319.68 in the form of health grant projects.
The expenditure of these funds assisted our programme appreciably in providing
equipment, personnel, and staff-training.
On October 12, 1962, a severe windstorm hit the Lower Mainland. As a
result of this storm, the Essondale area and The Woodlands School were without
power from 12.40 a.m. on October 13th to 2.30 p.m. on October 14th, approximately 26 hours. The lack of power caused a great deal of inconvenience in the
operation of the institutions concerned, but fortunately without any serious consequences.
On the afternoon of Sunday, Decmber 30, 1962, a transite water-line in the
service tunnel of the West Lawn Building at the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, broke, flooding the tunnel to a depth of 9 feet. As a result, the power and
lights were off in the Centre Lawn Building, and power only in the West Lawn
Building from 2.30 to 11.30 p.m. Ventilation in both these buildings was off until
the following Friday. Water service, however, was off for only one hour. Fortunately the flooding was confined to the tunnel, and no water was in any of the patient
areas, kitchens, or dining-rooms on the ground floor.
The Safety Committee for the Essondale area was reorganized, and it now includes representatives from the Provincial Mental Hospital, Valleyview Hospital,
Colony Farm, and the Department of Public Works.
Our facilities for the handling and storage of garbage at the Provincial Mental
Hospital, Essondale; Valleyview Hospital, Essondale; and The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, have been a matter of concern, not only to us, but also to the
Medical Health Officer, for some time.   I am happy to be able to report that the
 D 20 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Public Works Department has appointed an architect to study this problem and to
draw up plans for the improvement of these facilities.
Mr. D. R. McCallum, of the business office at The Woodlands School, was
appointed to the position of Business Manager at the Mental Health Centre, Burnaby, on October 1, 1962, succeeding Mr. T. L. Brown, who resigned.
Plans have been completed for the closure of the Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, by transferring the patients to other institutions. The first transfer of
patients was made on April 2, 1962, and by March 31, 1963, the patient population
had been reduced by 134 patients.
I regret to advise that on October 19, 1962, a fire occurred in a room in the
staff house at the Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz. This room was occupied by
a male nurse who had just retired. He was severely burned as a result of this fire.
This matter was turned over to the police.
I am pleased to be able to report that again this year, in addition to maintaining
the buildings, grounds, equipment, and furnishings of all our institutions in a satisfactory manner, and the purchase of a considerable amount of furniture and equipment, both new and replacement, a great deal of planning and major improvements
were also carried out. Some of the main items of interest in this regard are as
follows:—
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.—The new Credit Union and Telephone Exchange Building was completed and the change-over to the automatic
telephone system for the Essondale area was made on November 30, 1962. The
Honourable W. N. Chant, Minister of Public Works, officially opened this new
building on December 4, 1962.
Plans and specifications for the renovation of the West Lawn Building kitchen
and dining areas have been completed and approved.
Plans and specifications for new fire-escapes for the Centre Lawn Building
have been completed and approved.
Work in connection with the new incinerator at Colony Farm has been completed, and it is now operating.
After careful consideration, it was decided that the Hillside Building was not
worth renovating, and tenders have been called for its demolition. The Public
Works Department is presently working on plans for a replacement building.
Work in connection with the planning for the new medical clinic is proceeding.
Pay phones have been installed in public areas and in nurses' homes.
A new suite of offices for the Social Service Department was constructed on
East 1 in the Crease Clinic.
Ward D 3 in the Centre Lawn Building was completely renovated.
The contractor completed the construction of the new Industrial Therapy
Building, and it will be put into operation during April, 1963.
Three replacement drying tumblers have been purchased and installed in the
laundry.
Valleyview Hospital.—Contract, in the amount of $275,308, was let by the
Public Works Department for the renovation of Valleyview Buildings 1, 2, and 3.
Work in connection with this contract was started during March, 1963.
Requisitions for the furnishings and equipment for Valleyview Buildings 1, 2,
and 3 have been completed and forwarded to the Purchasing Commission.
New dish-washers have been installed on Wards V.V. 4 and 5.
Dellview Hospital.—Contract was let by the Department of Public Works for
the installation of a new fire-alarm system.
 HEADQUARTERS
D 21
Skeenaview Hospital.—A new telephone system was installed.
The installation of a new fire-alarm system was completed.
The Woodlands School.—The conversion of Nurses' Home No. 2 to administrative offices was completed.
The Tranquille School.—New fire-escapes have been constructed for the
Beaverdell Building and the Main Building.
The old stores section in the Central Building has been converted to a patients'
dining-room and new furniture purchased for this area.
All work in the Greaves Building has been completed, and this unit is now
ready to receive patients.
A new stairway to the tunnel in the Main Building was constructed.
Tenders were called for the renewal of the mechanical equipment in the
boiler-house.
A new station wagon was purchased to replace the old ambulance.
Mental Health Centre, Kelowna.—Alterations to the Public Health Building,
Kelowna, to provide facilities for our Mental Health Centre were completed, and
it was officially opened on December 28, 1962.
FINANCIAL TABLES
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence Each
Year, the Total Amounts Spent for Maintenance, and the Gross
Yearly and Daily per Capita Cost, 1953/54 to 1962/63.
Institution
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Yearly
per Capita
Cost
Daily
per Capita
Cost
1953/54
The Woodlands School	
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam ....
Home for the Aged, Vernon	
Home for the Aged, Terrace.. —
Crease Clinic    —	
Totals for the year 	
1954/55
The Woodlands School	
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz..	
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam
Home for the Aged, Vernon	
Home for the Aged, Terrace—	
Crease Clinic	
Totals for the year	
1955/56
The Woodlands School _
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam ....
Home for the Aged, Vernon 	
Home for the Aged, Terrace	
Crease Clinic  _ 	
Totals for the year 	
1956/57
The Woodlands School 	
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam	
Home for the Aged, Vernon	
Home for the Aged, Terrace	
Crease Clinic  	
Totals for the year 	
1,150.76
3,491.15
285.28
469.13
228.26
293.19
235.16
6,152.93
1,204.60
3,517.75
285.74
527.33
230.72
296.42
238.63
6,301.19
1,219.45
3,508.79
285.30
539.27
229.62
287.30
257.96
1,232.48
3,503.60
284.81
541.83
232.58
288.45
232.85
$1,768,922.31
4,393,682.65
421,622.61
683,511.48
378,006.20
330,968.40
788,302.36
$8,765,016.01
$1,811,848.81
4,685,444.76
426,786.04
739,859.92
368,726.10
328,553.97
860,673.73
$9,221,893.33
$2,032,263.32
5,377,708.34
428,248.27
797,392.10
371,438.14
351,087.68
935,501.07
6,327.69        |      $10,293,638.92
$2,246,193.06
5,851,370.53
446,497.91
831,370.73
402,867.14
350,880.96
996,288.31
$1,537.18
1,258.52
1,477.93
1,456.98
1,656.03
1,128.85
3,352.20
$1,424.53
$1,504.11
1,331.94
1,493.62
1,403.03
1,598.15
1,108.41
3,606.73
$1,666.54
1,532.64
1,501.05
1,478.65
1,617.62
1,222.02
3,626.54
$1,822.50
1,670.10
1,567.70
1,534.38
1,732.17
1,216.43
4,278.67
$1,463.52        |
$4.21
3.45
4.05
3.99
4.54
3.09
9.18
$3.90
$4.12
3.65
4.09
3.84
4.38
3.04
9.88
$4.01
$4.55
4.19
4.10
4.04
4.42
3.34
9.91
$1,626.76        |        $4.44
$4.99
4.58
4.30
4.20
4.75
3.33
11.72
6,316.60        |      $11,125,468.64
$1,761.31
$4.83
 D 22
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence Each
Year, the Total Amounts Spent for Maintenance, and the Gross
Yearly and Daily per Capita Cost, 1953/54 to 1962/63—Continued.
Institution
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Yearly
per Capita
Cost
Daily
per Capita
Cost
1957/58
The Woodlands School  -	
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.-
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz. _
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam	
1,266.21
3,410.79
285.36
538.56
231.34
288.63
235.31
$2,484,024.86
5,716,745.90
460,863.85
898,225.93
395,584.86
379,826.63
1,077,897.96
$1,961.78
1,676.08
1,615.03
1,667.83
1,709.97
1,315.96
4,580.76
$5.37
4.59
4.42
4.57
4.68
3.61
Crease Clinic 	
12.55
6,256.20
$11,413,169.99
$1,824.30
$5.00
1958/59
1,377.31
3,301.84
282.99
539.13
226.33
282.92
236.88
$2,968,725.50
6,088,091.20
488,028.69
961,921.63
410,529.00
386,804.84
1,149,344.46
$2,155.45
1,843.84
1,724.55
1,784.22
1,813.86
1,367.19
4,852.01
$5.91
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale—
5.05
4.72
4.89
4.97
3.75
13.29
Totals for the year  	
6,247.40
$12,453,445.32
$1,993.38
$5.46
1959/60
226.80
3,135.48
1,395.44
53.74
283.50
560.16
230.92
285.18
$1,233,254.59
6,672,849.09
3,443,231.64
400,957.24
523,480.74
1,400,239.30
444,975.54
412,230.25
$5,437.63
2,128.17
2,467.49
7,461.06
1,846.49
2,499.71
1,926.97
1,445.51
$14,86
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale —
The Woodlands School	
5.81
6.74
The Tranquille School, Tranquille..
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
Valleyview Hospital, Port Coquitlam
Dellview Hospital, Vernon          	
20.39
5.05
6.83
5.26
3 95
6,171.22
$14,531,218.39
$2,354.68
$6 43
1960/61
237.72
3,008.02
1,415.30
126.01
287.16
695.41
232.05
290.70
$1,313,678.32
6,775,567.11
3,637,555.12
542,556.16
518,591.72
1,754,500.08
448,792.02
417,856.55
$5,526.16
2,252.50
2,570.17
4,305.66
1,805.93
2,522.97
1,934.03
1,437.41
$15.14
6.17
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale..
11 80
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
Valleyview Hospital, Port Coquitlam
4.95
6.91
5.30
3.94
6,292.37
$15,409,097.08
$2,448.85
$6.71
1961/62
241.92
2,824.58
1,351.62
250.33
284.90
736.29
230.38
287.28
$1,344,906.48
6,927,591.07
3,639,782.25
657,736.27
507,315.85
1,848,097.68
464,314.47
443,255.07
$,5559.30
2,452.61
2,692.90
2,627.47
1,780.68
2,510.01
2,015.43
1,542.94
$15.23
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale	
The Woodlands School 	
The Tranquille School, Tranquille
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
Valleyview Hospital, Port Coquitlam
6.72
7.38
7.20
4.88
6.88
5.52
4.23
Totals for the year 	
6,207.30
$15,832,999.14
$2,550.71
$6.99
1962/63
Crease Clinic 	
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale—
The Woodlands School          _  .
236.68
2,719.32
1,365.03
307.13
214.18
724.07
232.55
296.21
$1,371,120.17
7,058,027.01
3,817,685.18
779,642.07
478,229.75
1,939,191.04
469,458.08
441,445.13
$5,793.14
2,595.51
2,796.78
2,538.48
2,232.84
2,678.18
2,018.74
1,490.31
$15.87
7.11
7.66
6.95
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
Valleyview Hospital, Port Coquitlam _.
6.12
7.34
5.53
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace..    .   _   .
4.08
Totals for the year	
6,095.15
$16,354,798.43
$2,683.25
$7.35
 HEADQUARTERS
D 23
Table B.—Summary Statement Showing the Gross and Net per Capita
Cost of Patients in All Mental Health Services Institutions for
the Year Ended March 31, 1963.
Gross operating costs—
Crease Clinic     $1,371,120.17
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale       7,058,027.01
The Woodlands School, New Westminster       3,817,685.18
The Tranquille School, Tranquille  779,642.07
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz  478,229.75
Valleyview Hospital, Port Coquitlam       1,939,191.04
Dellview Hospital, Vernon  469,458.08
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace  441,445.13
Gross costs of all institutions  $16,354,798.43
Less collections remitted to Treasury       2,025,854.46
$14,328,943.97
Daily average population     6,095.15
Gross per capita cost, one year  $2,683.25
Gross per capita cost, one day  7.35
Net per capita cost, one year     2,350.88
Net per capita cost, one day  6.44
Revenue (Patients' Maintenance Collections) of the Mental Health Services
for the Past 10 Years
1953/54  $1,300,056.89      1958/59  $1,838,158.33
1954/55  1,343,848.02      1959/60  1,821,810.53
1955/56  1,358,708.26      1960/61  1,906,847.71
1956/57  1,546,266.32      1961/62  2,150,802.56
1957/58  1,724,046.70      1962/63  2,025,854.46
Table C.—Expense Statement of the Crease Clinic of Psychological
Medicine, Essondale, for 12 Months Ended March 31, 1963
Salaries, Supplies, and Operating
Expense
Net Vouchered
Expenditure as
per Public
Accounts
Services and
Supplies from
Public Works
Department
Actual Cost
of Operation
Yearly per
Capita Cost
Salaries _   —	
Office expense  	
Travelling expense	
Office furniture and equipment 	
Heat, light, power, and water 	
Medical care  _.
Dietary   _	
Laundry.	
Gratuities  _	
Patients'library 	
Transportation 	
General supplies	
Occupational and recreational therapy
Burials  	
General expense 	
Buildings, grounds, etc. 	
Less rent deductions1 _	
Totals  	
$1,025,248.22
4,211.17
3,636.95
2,299.00
24,000.00
82,713.25
117,629.75
9,600.00
2,637.50
640.81
4,051.05
26,383.71
18,176.94
60.00
497.66
3,592.18
1,318,193.83
$52,926.34
$1,025.
4,
3,
2,
24.
82,
117,
9,
2,
4,
26,
18,
I
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211.17
636,95
299.00
,000.00
,713.25
629.75
,600.00
,637.50
640.81
,051.05
,383.71
,176.94
60.00
497.66
,926.34
592.18
$52,926.34       $1,371,120.17
$4,331.79
17.79
15.37
9.71
101.40
349.47
497.00
40.56
11.15
2.71
17.12
111.48
76.80
.25
2.10
223.62
15.18
$5,793.14
i Formerly applied to general expense section.
 D 24
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1962/63
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 D 28
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Table H.—Expense Statement of the Valleyview Hospital, Port
Coquitlam, for 12 Months Ended March 31, 1963
Salaries, Supplies, and
Operating Expense
Net Vouchered
Expenditure
as per
Public Accounts
Services and
Supplies from
Public Works
Department
Actual Cost of
Operation
Yearly per
Capita Cost
$1,396,446.35
7,334.71
2,000.69
62,800.00
81,174.35
231,677.70
19,000.00
216.00
5,002.00
76,739.67
1,507.14
1,500.00
2,462.34
$1,396,446.35
7,334.71
2,000.69
62,800.00
81,174.35
231,677.70
19,000.00
216.00
5,002.00
76,739.67
1,507.14
1,500.00
2,462.34
52,551.22
1,221.13
$1,928.61
10.13
Travelling expense —	
	
2.76
86.73
112.11
319.97
26.24
.30
6.91
105.98
2.08
2.07
3.40
52,551.22
72.58
1,221.13
1.69
Totals	
$1,886,639.82
$52,551.22
$1,939,191.04
$2,678.18
' Formerly applied to general expense section.
 HEADQUARTERS
D 29
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 HEADQUARTERS
D 31
Table K.—Expense Statement of the Community Services for
12 Months Ended March 31, 1963
Mental Health Centre, Burnaby
Salaries __■	
Office expense	
Travelling expense 	
Office furniture and equipment _
Heat, light, power, and water....
Medical care 	
Dietary 	
Laundry 	
Transportation 	
General supplies	
Occupational and recreational therapy..
Incidentals and contingencies	
Buildings, grounds, etc.	
$392
3
9
1
17
13
5
1
2
2
1
2
38
,735.97
,345.12
,799.19
,004.56
,309.12
,794.68
,961.76
,500.00
,240.77
,239.64
,420.71
,529.83
,701.14
Total.
$492,582.49
Mental Health Centre, Victoria
Salaries	
Office expense	
Travelling expense 	
Office furniture and equipment
Medical care 	
Incidentals and contingencies
Total	
Mental Health Centre, Kelowna
Salaries	
Office expense 	
Travelling expense 	
Office furniture and equipment.
Medical care 	
General supplies	
Incidentals and contingencies ...
Total.
$49,822.06
518.68
1,647.04
1,769.59
4,423.56
565.50
$58,746.43
$16
1
1
7
3
1
,410.60
,189.72
,544.88
,989.10
,795.15
800.5-7
456.99
$33,187.01
Grand total, $584,515.93.
 D 32 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Table L.—Expense Statements of the Rehabilitation Centres
for 12 Months Ended March 31,1963
Vista Rehabilitation Centre
Salaries  $10,059.25
Office expense  52.91
Heat, light, power, and water  885.56
Dietary   3,951.49
General supplies  263.12
Incidentals and contingencies  330.93
Buildings, grounds, etc.  358.83
Total     $ 15,796.27
Venture Rehabilitation Centre
Salaries _.- $7,364.05
Office expense  680.84
Travelling expense 1. 212.51
Heat, light, power, and water  1,950.13
Dietary  8,124.51
General supplies  1,354.35
Incidentals and contingencies  468.49
Buildings, grounds, etc.  1,685.13
Total     $21,840.01
Grand total, $37,636.28.
Table M.—Expense Statement of General Administration, Mental
Health Services Branch, for 12 Months Ended March 31, 1963
Salaries  $ 168,249.73
Office expense  4,532.13
Travelling expense  6,996.57
Office furniture and equipment  306.92
Incidentals and contingencies  1,484.35
Subscription, Social Service Index  284.72
Total  $ 181,854.42
 HEADQUARTERS D 33
Table N.—Expense Statement of the Department of Nursing Education,
Essondale, for 12 Months Ended March 31, 1963
Salaries  $730,252.40
Office expense         6,717.43
Travelling expense   572.17
Office furniture and equipment  814.14
Medical care  63.14
Dietary          7,518.96
Laundry          5,000.00
General supplies .       14,136.89
Incidentals and contingencies         1,615.37
Less rent deductions  18.99
Total  $766,671.51
Expenditure Made under Federal Health Grants for Province of
British Columbia, Year Ended March 31, 1963
Assistance to Provincial Mental Hospitals—
Equipment      $2,939.75
Staff salaries ..   295,330.29
  $298,270.04
The Woodlands School, New Westminster—
Equipment      $4,069.82
Staff salaries  126,463.59
     130,533.41
Assistance to  the  Geriatric Division   (Valleyview,  Dellview,  and
Skeenaview)—Staff salaries         1,330.00
Mental Health Centre, Burnaby—Staff salaries         5,050.00
Division of Nursing Education—Staff salaries         2,450.00
Study of combined course in psychiatric and general nursing—Staff
salaries          1,100.00
Consultant staff, Mental Health Services Branch—Staff salaries         4,476.00
Assistance to the Department of Psychiatry       19,346.58
Neurological Research Unit at University of British Columbia—
Electroencephalographic effects of psychic energiz-
ers and their possible relationships to adrenergic mechanisms in the brain  $18,400.00
Epidemiologic  studies  in  hospitalized  psychiatric
illness        4,922.61
Neurobiological analysis of behaviour     17,413.49
Central amines of psychoactive drugs     12,980.58
       53,716.68
Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Psychiatry       10,315.00
Metropolitan Health Committee, Vancouver—Mental hygiene programme        39,396.28
Greater Victoria Board of Health—Mental hygiene programme         2,240.00
Assistance to the epileptic programme in British Columbia         7,589.88
Assistance to the Children's Foundation       12,200.00
Medical film library  437.26
General personnel training—Postgraduate training       36,868.55
Total  $625,319.68
 D 34 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
PERSONNEL REPORT
J. Dowling, Personnel Officer
The approved establishment of the Mental Health Services Branch increased
by 19 positions in the fiscal year. The quarterly average of persons on staff, excluding students, rose from 3,061 to 3,107, an increase of 46 persons actually on the
payroll. Recruitment has kept pace with separations in all classifications. The
position of the Branch in respect to numbers of employees in the various professional classifications has improved.
Over-all staff turnover has increased fractionally, but this is attributable to
closure action in the Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz. The rate of turnover in
the psychiatric nursing classifications is practically the same as in the preceding
fiscal year, but the rate of turnover amongst registered nurses has decreased.
Detailed figures are provided in Tables A to E following.
The general shortage of psychiatric nurses is being relieved by the employment
of nurses on a part-time (three days per week) basis. Fifty-one nurses were so
employed as of March 31, 1963.
A review of all senior nursing supervisory positions was conducted by the
Civil Service Commission and facilitated by Branch officials.
Difficulty in recruiting senior professional staff has delayed the expanded use
of The Tranquille School facility. Staff was, however, provided for one additional
ward, and the outlook is good to staff for capacity operation in the next fiscal year.
An extensive training programme was carried on throughout the year. Full
particulars are given elsewhere in this Report. The Personnel Officer participated
in a post-basic course offered to Charge and Assistant Charge Nurses by the Department of Nursing Education.   Sixty-four nurses received this supervisory training.
Arrangements were made to accommodate 10 occupational therapy interns
from Eastern universities, as well as 18 from the University of British Columbia.
The Personnel Officer participated in the following:—
(1) A survey of technical staff in the radiology services of the Branch.
(2) A survey of staff requirements as related to the needs of an ageing patient
population in the Dellview Hospital at Vernon.
(3) A revision of administrative procedures arising out of
(a) the decentralization of the community services;
(b) a further decentralization of the pay and personnel functions,
which were formerly concentrated in the Crease Clinic and Provincial
Mental Hospital administration.
(4) Planning for the disposition of staff which will become redundant upon
the closure of the Colquitz institution.
(5) A reorganization of the food-service function in the Provincial Mental
Hospital. This action displaced 13 male nurses engaged in food-service
work. The men were returned to the nursing service, and a retraining
programme for them was undertaken.
(6) A review of the clinical psychology classification structure with a view to
providing some recognition to those having the doctorate degree.
(7) A review of pay procedures in effect for student psychiatric nurses and
the implementation of a number of changes.
(8) A study of the medical records admission procedures in all units of the
Branch. A committee report recommending a new system was presented
and accepted.
 HEADQUARTERS D 35
Table A.—Summary Showing Over-all Staff Totals in Relation to
Separation and Recruitment
Staff recruited, excluding students      844
Staff separated, excluding students      802
Increase        42
Total staff, excluding students, as of March 31, 1963  3,095
Total staff, excluding students, as of March 31, 1962  3,053
Increase        42
Quarterly staff average, excluding students, 1962/63  3,107
Monthly staff average, excluding students, 1961/62  3,061
Increase        46
Male        Female Total
Student enrolment as of March 31, 1963       74        172        246
Student enrolment as of March 31, 1962       64        181        245
Change  +10        —9        +1
Student monthly average, 1962/63  237
Student monthly average, 1961/62  251
Change  — 14
Table B.—Breakdown by Classification of Recruitment and Separation
Activity for the Mental Health Services, Excluding Student Psychiatric Nurses.
Recruited Separated
Physicians      27 24
Medical interns     12 12
Registered nurses      28 23
Female psychiatric nurses  170 144
Male psychiatric nurses      45 47
Female psychiatric aides  137 173
Male psychiatric aides    122 123
Teachers        3 3
Occupational therapists     11 9
Recreational therapists        6 3
Industrial therapists       7 8
Psychologists      14 12
Social workers     18 16
Dieticians        1 1
Cooks        3 6
Kitchen helpers      61 51
Clerks      15 17
Stenographers      43 43
Trades        2 3
Laundry-workers      22 19
Miscellaneous professional     10 10
Miscellaneous technical       5 3
Miscellaneous      82 52
Totals   844 802
 D 36
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Table C.—Summary of Staff Turnover
By Major Classification
Classification
1961/62
1962/63
Change
Student psychiatric nurses _
Male psychiatric nurses	
Female psychiatric nurses...
Registered nurses	
Per Cent
22.4
9.4
29.8
30.0
Per Cent
15.6
9.8
29.7
21.2
Per Cent
—6.8
+ •4
— .1
Note.—Item 1 has been calculated against the monthly average and other items have been calculated against
the year-end staff totals.
By Pay Division
Pay Division
Temporary Relief
Staff Included,
1961/62
Temporary Relief
Staff Excluded,
1962/63
General Administration	
Department of Nursing Education*	
Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
The Woodlands School	
The Tranquille School	
Valleyview Hospital	
Dellview Hospital	
Skeenaview Hospital	
Mental Health Centres	
Over-all turnover..
Per Cent
19.0
12.3
16.4
16.6
23.1
18.5
22.5
19.7
Per Cent
11.4
23.2
15.1
47.7
18.2
19.4
23.6
26.2
14.5
25.8
18.0
18.6
i Student nurses not included.
Note.—Percentages calculated against year-end staff totals.
Table D.—Comparison of Staff Totals by Unit with Totals for the
Preceding Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year 1961/62
Fiscal Year 1962/63
Positions
in Establishment as of
Mar. 31,
1962
Number on
Staff as of
Mar. 31,
1962
Positions
in Establish-
ment as of
Mar. 31,
1963
Number on
Staff as of
Mar. 31,
1963
37
55
106
37
56
91
38
55
106
35
56
93
198
184
199
184
In-patient care—
285
1,152
80
763
174
413
80
62
273
1,129
81
760
90
393
81
62
284
1,153
80
766
189
413
80
62
277
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale— —
1,137
63
777
The Tranquille School    .   . - -     __
113
402
80
62
Total of vote                             	
3,009
2,869
3,027
2,911
3,207
325
3,053
245
3,226
325
3,095
246
Totals.                      -     .         	
3,532
3,298
3,551
3,341
 HEADQUARTERS
D 37
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 D 38 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SUPERVISOR OF
PSYCHIATRIC SOCIAL WORK
Miss A. K. Carroll, Provincial Supervisor
The year 1962/63 has been an active and challenging one for all social
workers in the social service departments of the divisions of the Mental Health Services. The dynamic growth and development of the concept of community-centred
psychiatric services and the application of its principles to mental health social work
has resulted in much refocusing in relation to services and also in an extensive
relocation of social services and social-work staffs. In addition, a re-emphasis of
social-work purposes, contribution, and services in the mental health field has been
necessary. Such major changes have involved some experimentation with organizational and administrative structures in social service departments and has required
the development of new and related procedures.
Notable in regard to refocus in social service has been the activity in preadmission work evident throughout all the institutions as well as those social service
activities related to after-care and family and boarding-home care services. All
these services are largely community-based. As a result, staff has been relocated
to after-care, boarding-home, and consultative responsibilities.
During the past year the work of the consultant has been concerned largely
with services related to study and analysis of programme elements and advisement
and direction related to programme-planning organization and services, and the
utilization, development, and procurement of staff.
FUNCTIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF CONSULTATIVE RESPONSIBILITIES
Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic
The chief social worker in this division requested consultative services in
relation to integrating the brief services and admissions sections in both the Crease
Clinic and Centre Lawn Building of the Provincial Mental Hospital into an interdisciplinary team approach to an intake and discharge service. This has already
begun to function in the Crease Clinic, and services at intake are now being
extended to cover the preadmission phase. Services during this phase are directed
toward assessing the priority for admission and treatment and, wherever possible,
to using community resources to prevent a precipitate or unnecessary admission.
In a recent study, completed by the admission and discharge section of the
social service department in Centre Lawn, it was ascertained that the intake of
patients into this unit numbered 2,454 and that social workers in this section completed full social studies on 25 per cent of intake. Additionally, they reviewed the
case files on all patients being admitted. Thus they isolated the social problems and
dealt with those situations which could be alleviated, ameliorated, or solved by
offering brief services. Those patients having complex and problematical social
situations were referred to the social service section extending sustained services to
patients and their families. Social problems which could not be isolated at the point
of the patient's admission were usually picked up later at ward rounds or by referral
from the psychiatrist, nurse, relative, or the patient himself. This section of the
social service department in addition covered, by offering some form of brief social
services, 90 per cent of all patients discharged from this unit.
In addition to discharge social services, social workers in Centre Lawn unit
covered on an average of 40 patients per month in after-care social services in the
 HEADQUARTERS
D 39
After Care Clinic. Additionally, after-care social services were extended to an
average of 15 patients per month who for valid reasons could not attend the After
Care Clinic.
The consultant and the chief social worker, Provincial Mental Hospital and
Crease Clinic, have undertaken to study the organization and utilization of social
services in this large admission and discharge unit of the Provincial Mental Hospital.
The services of the consultant in relation to social work in the long-term units
of East and West Lawn have been concerned with after-care and boarding-home
social services and related to advice, reorganization, the standard possible under
present conditions, and the utilization of the present staff. The activity of social
workers in these units in the areas of after-care and boarding-home care is worthy
of note. East Lawn social workers followed 306 patients of 667 discharged to After
Care. Of this number, 89 patients were given social services on a regular basis and
105 on an emergency basis; 81 patients were prepared for transfer to boarding-home
placement and 26 patients discharged on six months' probation were placed in
boarding homes with follow-up services, comprising two or three interviews before
transfer to municipal social service departments. West Lawn social workers were
active, with 64 per cent of all patients discharged and followed up on an average
of 32 patients per month.
Responsibility for co-ordination of the family care and boarding-home programme has rested with this officer since the inception of the programme. The
appointment of the co-ordinator and the able planning and services which she has
brought to the programme has helped crystallize standards, policies, services, and
procedures. Also, the programme has been considerably expanded. Since its
inception, 420 patients have had planned placements made for them, in some instances with a foster family and in the larger instance in boarding homes.
The Woodlands School
In close working relationship with the Medical Superintendent and the chief
social worker, the consultant has submitted for administrative approval and implementation two projects: one to provide foster-home care in co-operation with the
Department of Social Welfare for mildly retarded children resident in The Woodlands School; the other for boarding out of the trained and socialized adult retardate
resident in The Woodlands School. It is hoped that both projects may be implemented within the next fiscal year.
Valleyview Hospital
Consultative services to this division have concerned the organization of social
services, particularly in relation to preadmissions and discharge services. The
boarding-home programme has continued in development. Programme policy and
procedures in relation to the use of these particular resources and the relationship
of these to the office of the Public Trustee are being developed. The readily available services of the co-ordinator of the boarding-home programme have helped to
elevate standards of care and supervision in the boarding homes used by the Mental
Health Services. Co-operative policies in community health and welfare agencies
have begun to be defined. This is resulting in more appropriate referrals for admission and better co-operation between Valleyview Hospital and community health and
welfare agencies. This is a positive movement toward the development of community-based and more comprehensive services for aged persons in the community.
 D 40 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
After Care Clinic
During the fiscal year the patient population in After Care doubled from 400
to over 800 patients in attendance and in receipt of social services, some of which
were brief in nature and others of a more sustaining quality. These services are
brought to the patients by the social workers in the Provincial Mental Hospital and
Crease Clinic under the supervision of the chief psychiatrist of the After Care Clinic
and the supervisor of After Care Social Services, who, with a public health nurse,
function as a stationary after-care team. Last year 46 per cent of patients registered
in After Care received social services.
The social work supervisor in this clinic, under the chief psychiatrist, has
assumed responsibility for the formulation of policies in relation to co-operative
services with Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic, City of Vancouver Social
Service Department, Medical Section, and the Department of Social Welfare, Burnaby and North Vancouver. Direct administrative responsibility has been assumed
for supervision of the clinical clerical detail, filing, format of case files, the compilation of lists of patients daily in attendance at the clinic, and the follow-up of patients
failing to keep their clinical appointment. As the clinic proceeds to develop, much
of the latter detail would be the responsibility of an augmented clerical staff. During
the past year, consultation was afforded on a relatively continuing basis to the Metropolitan Health Committee and the Victorian Order of Nurses. Co-operative services
were carried on between the aforementioned health agencies as well as with the
Y.W.C.A. for groups of patients.
The contribution of the consultant has been in relation to social service organization, administration, and standards of services in after-care clinics.
Mental Health Centres, Victoria, Burnaby, and Kelowna
The services of the consultant have been requested in some instances in regard
to the structuring of social-work positions, intake facilities and procedures, policy
formulation, manual revision, and utilization, development, and procurement of staff.
The consultant service to divisions as referred to above entailed an expenditure
of 51.8 per cent of the consultant's monthly man-hours of work.
Personnel and Recruitment for Social Service Departments,
Mental Health Services
Whereas in the past recruitment of social workers to the Mental Health Services
has been contingent upon the availability of Federal mental health bursaries, this year
six social workers were recruited on graduation from schools of social work. Additionally, social workers who were recipients of Federal mental health bursaries
returned to staff. Of this group of 10 workers, 6 bursary students were drawn from
the social service staffs of the Mental Health Services and 4 were recruited from
outside the service. The values of this aid to postgraduate social-work education are
inestimable as 90 per cent of senior social-work personnel in the Mental Health
Services had all, or a portion, of their postgraduate education through receipt of
these Federal bursaries.
Professional Education and Staff Development Programme
A responsibility of the consultant in this area is to develop a variety of field-
work placements in the Mental Health Services to be used in the training of social-
work students in the School of Social Work, University of British Columbia.   Last
 HEADQUARTERS
D 41
year a total of 16 students was placed within the Mental Health Services—11 in the
Provincial Mental Hospital, Crease Clinic, and the After Care Clinic, and 5 in the
Mental Health Centre, Burnaby. Altogether 11 social workers in the Mental Health
Services participated as instructors. Of the 11 students placed in the Provincial
Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic, 5 were recruited to positions on staff.
It was possible during the year to send 17 of the social service staff of the
Mental Health Services to institutes and seminars.
 D 42 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF NURSING SERVICES
Miss B. J. Mitchell, Director of Nursing Services
THE DEPARTMENT OF NURSING EDUCATION
The Department of Nursing Education continued its efforts to improve the
nursing educational programme. Mrs. E. Paulson capably acted as Associate
Director of Nursing Education during the absence of Miss M. Lonergan at the
University of Washington. I found it a rewarding challenge to again become involved with the on-going educational programmes through my closer association
with the instructors. Lectures were given to the psychiatric nursing students and
post-basic students, and the usual orientation and interviews were held with the
clinical course students.
Psychiatric Nursing Programme
Student census—
April 1, 1962  245 (181 women and 64 men)
March 31, 1963  253 (178 women and 75 men)
Enrolled   154 (108 women and 46 men)
One hundred and seven students (81 women and 26 men) completed the
programme, an increase of 13 over the previous year. It is to be noted that the
withdrawals dropped to 37 (27 women and 10 men) from a high of 55 last year.
A few changes were made in the curriculum content in an attempt to improve
the correlation of the theory in psychiatric nursing with ward practice. Medical
nursing was introduced in the Second Term Block since students are assigned to
geriatric wards following classes. The classroom course which deals with the students' responsibilities in regard to administrative routines and formerly given in the
Third Term Block was incorporated into the First and Second Term Blocks.
Individual clinical assignments for the greater part of the next academic year
were planned for each student. The number of placements for women students on
night duty was reduced from 11 to 6. Vacation periods and statutory holiday
adjustments were stabilized. These changes simplified record-keeping and made it
possible for students to plan ahead for their vacation.
Affiliate Programme
The instructor in charge of the affiliate programme attended the Schools of
Nursing Conference. She discussed with the Directors of Nursing Education (general hospital schools) a change in the enrolment dates, whereby there would be two
four-week periods when no affiliates would enrol. These would be times when
instructors and senior staff are on vacation.
Two hundred and twenty-seven students completed the 12-week programme.
Clinical Programme for Registered Nurses
Ten registered nurses enrolled in October, 1962, and all completed the programme. Four obtained nursing positions at the Crease Clinic and Mental Hospital,
Essondale.
Psychiatric Aide Programme
During the period October 15, 1962, to March 1, 1963, six two-week orientation courses for psychiatric aides were offered to 74 aides (46 women and 28 men)
from Valleyview Hospital and the Crease Clinic and Mental Hospital.
 HEADQUARTERS
Post-basic Programme for Senior Nursing Staff
D 43
A refresher course which commenced in March, 1962, continued for eight
months. The nurses received 64 hours of classes. Guest lecturers from the community assisted, with emphasis on the care and training of mentally retarded and
physically handicapped, the geriatric patient and the psychiatric patient in the community.   Of the 85 men and women who enrolled, 65 completed the course.
Another refresher course was given to 11 psychiatric nurses previously employed as kitchen stewards. The course consisted of 70 hours of instruction in
psychiatric nursing, medical nursing, pharmacology, and nursing procedures and
four weeks of guided experience in two clinical areas.
Faculty
During the year clinical instructors were actively engaged in studying and
reviewing the present course content and methods of classroom and clinical instruction. Three committees involved were concerned with (a) developing a student
experience record; (b) unifying ward teaching programmes; (c) integration of
curriculum content; and (d) evaluation of effectiveness of present teaching methods.
Consultation visits were made to the units in the Lower Mainland as usual,
and during May I spent one week visiting the units in Kelowna, Vernon, and Tranquille. As a result of a concern of senior nursing personnel at the Crease Clinic and
Mental Hospital with the increased need and demand for nursing services, a study
of various nursing activities was begun in order to compile data and recommendations for the more effective use of nursing personnel. The participation of all levels
of staff will enhance the value of the project. Since the Superintendent of Nurses
at The Woodlands School was attending the University of British Columbia, more
time was spent with the Acting Superintendent and her staff in an advisory capacity.
COMMITTEE AND EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES
The Unit Nursing Conference was held monthly, and the members concentrated
on more efficient use of standing and task committees for special projects, such as
reviewing the eligibility list policies, changing the uniforms for nursing personnel, and
revising nursing procedures.
The Nursing Liaison Committee's major achievement was the mutual orientation programme for senior nursing and other personnel between the public health
agencies and the Mental Health Services.
Thirty-six nurses attended institutes, and 67 nurses participated in one-day
orientation programme to a public health agency. Four senior nurses were enrolled
in a university programme with the assistance of mental health bursaries.
Employment of Psychiatric Nurse Graduates
August, 1962, Class
February, 1963,
Class
Women
Men
Total
Women
Men
Total
Number in class   	
50
10
60
39
17
56
Number employed in Mental Health Services—
Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital	
14
16
10
5
1
2
19
17
12
15
6
13
3
9
5
18
15
The Woodlands School	
18
Totals             -         	
40
8
48
34      1       17
51
 D 44
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
COMMUNITY AND PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES
The number of well-known nurses who visited the Mental Health Services for
an orientation was noteworthy. They included Dr. Muriel Uprichard and Dr. Helen
Mussalem for the Royal Commission on Health, Miss Lyle Creelman of the World
Health Organization, and the nursing directors from the Mental Health Division,
Washington State.
As a result of several general hospitals' concern for expanding and (or) developing psychiatric units, I was encouraged to increase my knowledge of psychiatric
services in general hospitals and to share my experience with the nursing personnel
in the Kelowna General, Royal Jubilee, and Lions Gate Hospitals.
The Mental Health Grant Project No. 609-5-136 was concluded this year.
During the spring and early summer, meetings of the Advisory and Steering Committees were held, and the final report written by the co-ordinator, Miss Alice Wright,
was reviewed. In February I was invited to attend a meeting of the Sub-committee
on Personnel, Mental Health Division, in Ottawa for a discussion of the report.
 HEADQUARTERS D 45
REPORT OF THE CONSULTANT IN MEDICAL RECORDS
AND STATISTICS
Miss A. D. Dingle, Consultant in Medical Records and Statistics
Since the position of Consultant in Medical Records and Statistics was established in 1961 and the appointment made on June 1, 1961, increasing use has been
made of the services thus available.
An interesting development in the medical records area was the acceptance of
the Medical Records Supervisor of the Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease
Clinic for a year's training in the School for Medical Record Librarians of the
Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster, under a Federal grant. It is anticipated that this training will provide basic medical record knowledge and an increased understanding in personnel management. It should also provide a source
for staff in-service training in the future.
CONSULTATION TO UNITS
Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic
Due to the absence of the Medical Records Supervisor, considerable time was
spent in this area in consultation with the Hospital Administrator and others
regarding staff changes and proposed reorganizations.
At the request of the Deputy Minister, a review was made of all admissions
to the Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic, for a period of six months,
to ascertain the type of escort service used to bring patients to the hospitals.
Data sheets were designed for a study of patients admitted to the Crease Clinic.
The study is being made by the admitting officer and will be continued for one year
on a sample group of patients.
The Woodlands School and The Tranquille School
A brief visit was made to The Tranquille School in September, 1962, to learn
something of the function of this unit and to advise regarding the maintenance
of the medical records. As the number of patients is increased, it is hoped that
medical records staff will be provided. At present these duties are being performed
by a switchboard operator who is also a typist.
Geriatric Units
A review of the statistical data collected on the patients in Valleyview Hospital
was made. The form used was revised to conform to the new requirements of the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics and to provide more meaningful data.
Mental Health Centres
At the request of and with the assistance of the Directors of the three Mental
Health Centres, a review was made of the statistical material being gathered at the
Burnaby Centre, and a revision was commenced. New monthly return forms were
designed and put into use. The basic statistical material was given close study, and
new forms are being designed.
A visit was made to the Mental Health Centre in Victoria to review the functions of this unit and to discuss the records of the newly opened adult clinic.
 D 46 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Following the opening of the Mental Health Centre at Kelowna, a brief orientation was given to the secretary.
STATISTICS
The Dominion Bureau of Statistics revised its forms for collection of statistics
from in-patient mental hospitals in Canada. To conform to this change, which was
effective January 1, 1963, new cards had to be designed for use in British Columbia.
Assistance was provided for two studies being made by members of the Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia.
Co-operation is being given to Dr. A. Barbeau, Director of the Neurogenetic
Centre, University of Montreal, in a research project on Huntington's chorea.
With the development of planning for community mental health facilities,
requests are being received for statistics regarding admissions to the Mental Health
Services from various local areas.
All planning, review, and revision of statistical procedures are done with the
assistance of Miss A. E. Scott, Research Officer, Division of Vital Statistics, whose
guidance and advice are invaluable. Excellent co-operation is also received through
Miss Scott from the staff of the Division of Vital Statistics in Victoria in the use of
their I.B.M. equipment. In all the work entailed in the collection of statistical data,
the medical records staff in all units have given willing co-operation.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
D 47
PART II.—CREASE CLINIC OF PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE
AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
REPORT OF THE CREASE CLINIC OF
PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
T. G. Caunt, Medical Superintendent
The Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine completed its 12th year of service
to the mentally ill of British Columbia with the fiscal year ended March 31, 1963.
The treatment policy has continued as established originally, mainly to provide
residential intensive treatment care for those patients who are believed capable of
benefiting from four months or less of psychiatric treatment.
We continue to screen prospective patient admissions to the Crease Clinic, first
by the community doctor, then by the Crease Clinic admitting doctor, regarding their
suitability for treatment. Crease Clinic social service workers are providing an
additional community preadmission screening service in limited areas to further
assist in the proper selection of patients considered suitable for treatment in the
Crease Clinic.
All departments of the Crease Clinic have operated efficiently and at capacity,
with improvements noted in each area.
Each year more of the mentally ill of British Columbia make use of the special
psychiatric services provided by the Crease Clinic. Again it is noted that the voluntary patient admission rate to the Crease Clinic shows an increase, as does the
number of patients admitted who retained their civil rights while receiving treatment
in the Clinic. The number of patients who were discharged fit to return to the
community on completion of their treatment also shows an increase.
Examination of the following table, which is a summary of population in the
Crease Clinic for the year, shows that the number of patients admitted was 1,657.
The previous year's total was 1,632 admissions.
Male
Female
Total
In residence, April 1,1962  _ _  	
Admissions—
First admissions       	
Readmissions to a different institution of Mental Health Services	
Readmissions to same institution  -   _ 	
Admissions direct from Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale 	
Total admissions    _ 	
Total under care _    	
Separations—
Discharged in full	
Discharged direct to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale _...
Discharged direct to Valleyview Hospital 	
Died    	
Total separations   _    	
Net increase or decrease     	
In residence, March 31, 1963   _   _. _
110
518
31
212
4
-19
91
145
575
45
270
2
-18
127
255
1,093
76
482
6
765  |   892  |  1,657
875
1,037     1,912
765
14
2
3
877
32
1
1,642
46
2
4
784      910  |  1,694
-37
218
There were 1,170 voluntary patient admissions to the Crease Clinic during the
year. This is 70.6 per cent of the admissions and is 0.8 per cent more than in the
previous year.
 D 48 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
A total of 1,694 separations is noted for the year. Of these, 46 patients (14
men and 32 women) were admitted to the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale,
for continued treatment, or 2.72 per cent of the discharges. This compares with 3.55
per cent in the previous year. One thousand six hundred and forty-two or 97.15 per
cent of the Crease Clinic patients were discharged directly to the community.
One thousand four hundred and twenty-three or 85.88 per cent of the 1,657
patients accepted for treatment in the Crease Clinic retained and were capable of
exercising their full civil rights during the course of then treatment.
Only 234 patients (107 men and 127 women) or 14.12 per cent were, in the
opinion of the Clinical Director, too sick mentally to look after themselves or their
own affairs.
Dr. W. J. G. McFarlane continued as admitting officer throughout the year.
Dr. A. R. Yarrow has been acting director of the rehabilitation and after-care
programme at 445 West 13 th Avenue, Vancouver, replacing Dr. R. W. Harrington,
who left the Provincial Mental Health Service.
Operating-room
Miss A. Parsons, supervisor of this department, reports an average number
of surgeries and consultations during the year.
Surgical Procedures
General major surgeries   106
General minor surgeries   175
Neurological surgeries   18
Orthopaedic surgeries  104
Genito-urinary surgeries   95
Ear, nose, and throat surgeries  8
Eye surgeries   3 8
Plastic surgeries   47
Chest surgeries  17
Dental surgeries   51
Application of plaster casts with anaesthetic  10
Blocks  4
Examinations under anaesthetic  2
Total number of consultations done in the operating-room  3,079
Follow-up care consultations done at Valleyview  245
Arrangements were made for the resident surgeon to complete consultations at
The Woodlands School since the beginning of this year.   These have numbered 56.
The Bird respirator, which was purchased early in the year, has been used
extensively for post-operative patients.
Department of Neurology
Dr. Kenneth Berry, who was appointed director of this department on October
15, 1962, reports expansion of activities during the year.
The Department of Neurology continues to provide a basically consultative
service in clinical neurology, electroencephalography, and neurosurgery to the
Provincial Mental Hospital, Crease Clinic, Mental Health Centre (Burnaby), and
The Woodlands School. New activities initiated in this year include regular weekly
brain-cutting sessions in conjunction with the Department of Pathology and attendance and occasional participation in neurology, neurosurgery, and neuropathology
rounds and clinico-pathological conferences at the Vancouver General Hospital.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL D 49
As in previous years, lectures and demonstrations have been given to students in
nursing and to a group of electroencephalography technicians, a total of six lectures
having been given.
Clinical neurological consultations in the year totalled 344, a 2.8-fold increase
over the previous year.
Investigative procedures carried out in the departments subsequent to clinical
investigation included 14 lumbar punctures, 75 pneumoencephalograms, 11 perimetric examinations, 2 myelograms, and 2 caloric tests.
A total of 1,313 electroencephalograms were carried out, 34 more than ;n the
previous year. Of these, 463 were from the Provincial Mental Hospital, 425 from
the Crease Clinic, 215 from The Woodlands School, 91 from the Mental Health
Centre (Burnaby), and the remainder from Oakalla Prison, the British Columbia
Penitentiary, the Haney Correctional Institution, New Haven, the Brannan Lake
School, the Girls' Industrial School, and some hospital outpatients.
Neurosurgical consultations done by Dr. Frank Turnbull numbered 43, a
3.9-fold increase over the previous year, and these led to operative procedures in
21 cases, including 5 exploratory burr-holes, 10 arteriograms, 1 thalamotomy, 3
craniotomies, 1 removal of an infected tantalum plate, and 1 removal of degenerated polyethylene shunt-tubing.
Library
The librarian, Mrs. Reeves, has made efforts this year to co-ordinate the
Crease Clinic library with other Mental Health Services libraries. The medical-
book collections of Mental Health Centre and The Woodlands School were shipped
to Crease Clinic for cataloguing, and card catalogues were set up. A union catalogue is being maintained at Crease Clinic, including holdings of all three libraries.
Assistance was also given to the School of Nursing library, where a new librarian
had been appointed who required instructions in cataloguing and indexing. Improvements in the library office were made by the installation of a new lighting
system and a reference desk for the abstracts and indexes.
An attempt was made to provide the outlying areas with more reading material
from the patients' library. Books were shipped to Skeenaview and Dellview Hospitals, and deposits of books were placed in different areas at Essondale. Patients
at Crease Clinic library have made increasing use of reference material and the
newly started picture file.
Medical Library
Book collection   2,877
Books bought       144
Total collection  3,021
Patients' Library
Book collection  4,294
Books bought       231
Books donated      229
Total collection  4,754
Current journal subscriptions         21
Circulation of books  6,029
 D 50
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL,
ESSONDALE
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
T. G. Caunt, Medical Superintendent
The year ended March 31, 1963, saw the completion of the 90th year of
continuous service provided for the mentally ill of British Columbia by the Provincial
Mental Hospital.
Movement of Population
The number of patients who were admitted, treated, and discharged has again
increased and is greater than in any previous year. A total of 2,066 patients was
admitted directly from the community. This figure does not include patients transferred to this Hospital from other units of the Mental Health Services Branch or
patients who were returned from probation. It will be noted 97 patients were
transferred from the Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, which is being closed.
The following table gives a summary of the movement of population for the
Provincial Mental Hospital for the year ended March 31, 1963:—
Male
Female
Total
1,464
212
6
1,242
407
1
2,706
619
7
Total as at April 1, 1962 _   	
1,682
525
97
487
14
97
4
5
1,650
335
159
463
32
15
3
3,332
Admissions—
860
256
950
46
Transfers from Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz — _   	
97
19
8
1,229
1,007
2,236
Total under care    	
Separations—
2,911
1,082
4
99
30
20
189
3
2,657
864
2
65
19
2
448
1
5,568
1,946
6
Died                  ..     	
164
Transferred to geriatric units     	
49
22
637
4
1,427
+20
1,484
1,401
+ 14
1,256
2,828
+34
In residence, March 31,1963.     ...
2,740
Although the year saw the greatest number of patients admitted to the Provincial Mental Hospital during the past 90 years, the short- and long-term patient-
treatment programmes have been actively continued. The rate of patient discharge
to the community has continued to be excellent.
The total number of patients in residence at March 31, 1962, was 2,706, and
the total in residence on March 31, 1963, was 2,740, an increase of 34 patients.
There would have been a reduction in the number of patients in residence, as there
has been during the past seven years, but for the patients transferred from the
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL D 51
The percentage of deaths to the number under treatment was 2.9. The percentage of discharges to admissions (exclusive of deaths) was 119.6. The average
daily patient population was 2,719.32. This is a reduction of 105.26 from the
previous year, when the daily average population was 2,824.58.
This year 100 Order in Council patients were admitted. In addition, patients
are admitted for short periods by warrant from the Courts for treatment, evaluation,
or assessment. British Columbia Penitentiary inmates are accepted as patients at
the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, when duly certified under the Mental
Hospitals Act of British Columbia.
A new service has been instituted whereby Dr. McGregor, of the Provincial
Mental Hospital medical staff, visits Oakalla Prison Farm weekly to screen inmates
regarding their suitability for admission for treatment at the Provincial Mental
Hospital.
During the year the admission of Federal cases requiring psychiatric treatment
increased from the previous year's total of 176. As in previous years, the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Indian Affairs were the Federal
Government departments most frequently requesting our services. On March 31,
1963, the following Federal cases were in residence:—
Department of Veterans Affairs  132
Imperial veterans (D.V.A.)        1
Indian Health Services     41
Yukon Territorial Government       7
British Columbia Penitentiary    Nil
Total  181
The monthly rate of patient admissions from the community to the Provincial
Mental Hospital continues to increase, although the number of psychiatrists in
community private practice and the psychiatric facilities in the community are
gradually increasing.
The average monthly admission rate, which was 113.91 in 1959, 133.25 in
1960, 150 in 1961, and 169 in 1962, is now 172.16 in 1963.
All departments have functioned efficiently and at capacity, and all proven
and accepted types of therapy are available and continue to be used.
General Comments
I wish to take this opportunity of expressing my deep appreciation for the
splendid co-operation and assistance I have received at all times from the Honourable Eric Martin, Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance; Dr. A. E.
Davidson, Deputy Minister of Mental Health Services; all the divisions of the Mental
Health Services Branch; all departments of Government and community services
associated with the welfare of our patients. I wish to thank all staff members of the
Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine and the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, for their loyalty and devotion to duty.
I wish to commend the Clinical Director, Dr. F. G. Tucker, the medical staff,
and the members of the treatment team for the high level of skills exhibited in their
treatment of patients. The high level of psychiatric nursing now practised at
Essondale would be difficult to surpass anywhere.
We have an excellent medical-specialist consultant service, and I would like to
thank these 16 physicians for the superior type of medical services they have
provided.
 D 52 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
The After Care Centre at 445 West 13 th Avenue, Vancouver, has continued
to be a useful and successful operation, caring for hundreds of patients who otherwise
might have had to be returned to hospital. Dr. A. R. Yarrow is Acting Director.
The unit provides an after-care service for probated or discharged patients. The
unit staff and treatment teams from the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, find the demand for this service in the community is constantly
increasing. Dr. Yarrow also supervises the " Vista " and " Venture," female and
male half-way houses located in Vancouver. These units provide a useful service
and assist in patient rehabilitation.
Grounds privileges are extended wherever this is indicated and is possible, in
keeping with the patients' physical and mental conditions. Today 34 of the total
of 44 male and female wards are open.
At present over 2,150 of the male- and female-patient population at the Crease
Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, have free access to the hospital
grounds. This figure includes over 80 per cent of the male patients who enjoy this
privilege.
Tremendous impetus has been given to our patient rehabilitation services with
the appointment of Mrs. A. E. Coppard as Co-ordinator of Rehabilitation.
Many of our departments are recognized as training centres for students. We
are pleased to report that this year the Department of Laboratories (Dr. G. A.
Nicolson, Director) received commendation for the laboratory facilities and staff by
a committee from the Canadian Medical Association, and our training-school for
technicians received the commendation and full approval for the training of laboratory technologists.
The Essondale Pharmacy Department shows some expansion, and a useful
monthly bulletin of information for our medical and nursing staff is now issued by
the Chief Pharmacist, Mr. K. Woolcock.
The completion of the new, fully modern and equipped Industrial Therapy
Building this year at Essondale will again enable Mr. R. Herring, Supervisor, to
gather his many departments under the one roof. The Industrial Therapy Department makes a great contribution to the Hospital in the training of patients as well
as in the manufacture and repair of thousands of items of Hospital property.
The patients' relatives and friends are encouraged to visit the Hospital, and
each year larger numbers visit the Hospital and larger numbers of patients visit the
community, especially during week-ends and holidays. Their visiting is much appreciated by the patients and staff. In addition, we are appreciative of the visits to
Hospital made by community groups, ex-servicemen's organizations, and the splendid job done at Essondale by the hospital volunteers of the Canadian Mental Health
Association.
It is a pleasure for me to report at this time that, in addition to the many
improvements made in psychiatric treatment and care, improvements are constantly
being made in the patients' housing, shelter, and surroundings through building
alterations, painting, decorating, furnishings, and beautification of the surrounding
many acres of Hospital grounds.
1963 has indeed been a full year, an eventful year, and a successful year.
Women's Nursing Division
For the Women's Division of Nursing, under the direction of Mrs. M. L.
McKay, Superintendent of Nurses, the year which ended March 31, 1963, has been
one in which the tempo of activities has increased and diversified, particularly in
the ward situation.   It has also been a period in which consolidation of organiza-
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL D 53
tional changes has occurred, as well as a reassessment of the goals of patient-care.
This has been necessary due to a changing philosophy within the Hospital, which
has stressed the rehabilitative aspect of treatment and has involved more and more
the community outside the Hospital, as well as more fully utilizing the facilities
within.
In keeping with this trend, the five senior nursing supervisors are attempting to
build up programmes, specific to their areas, which lead toward more independence
of patients through teaching them to care for themselves and to take greater responsibility for their own actions. Patients of long-term hospitalization are involved in
groups who concern themselves with current events, beauty culture, sewing, cooking, dramatics, etc. They are also taken to visit department stores, post offices,
libraries, the art gallery, and to events at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre. These
programmes are designed with the objective in view of increasing the self-confidence
and consequently the ability of each to interact comfortably in social situations.
A " boarding home " project was organized in East Lawn Building in Decem-
ver with the Social Service Department. This consisted of simulating, on one ward,
the less restricting atmosphere of a community boarding home. In this area 10
patients were given limited supervision and as much as possible the responsibility
for their own actions and decisions. At this date, seven patients have been placed
in boarding homes as a result of this project, and nursing staff are convinced of the
merit of such programmes.
In all buildings, male and female patients continue to mix at different entertainments on the wards of each. As a result, there is a continued improvement in
their appearance and social behaviour.
Due to these changes and along with them is the development of different
concepts of nursing care. Team nursing is now employed on all wards of the Crease
Clinic and is proving a very satisfactory medium for providing the patients with the
greater security of individual care. It also provides more satisfaction for nursing
personnel in terms of patient-staff relationships, in providing better guidance and
supervision of junior staff members, as well as serving as a means of drawing the
total Hospital team into a more unified type of planning for the treatment of each
individual patient.
In Centre Lawn this type of nursing assignment is being developed on the
admission ward, and it is expected to be implemented on the other wards in this
building in the future.
In North Lawn the two infirmary wards continue to have a small number of
patients on a more or less permanent basis, with movement in and out on an
average of approximately 60 guests a month, who come from all other areas within
the Mental Hospital, Valleyview, and The Woodlands School.
The patients come to these wards with a variety of conditions; many are
acutely ill and require expert nursing care. This presents many problems, and to
meet the demands of this situation a continuing informal programme of day-to-day
teaching has been necessary.
During the year the Central Supply Department has continued to expand its
services, and these have extended to all Hospital areas, with the exception of Riverside and the Crease Clinic. As a result of this department, standards of patient-care
are considerably safer, equipment is used more economically and is kept in good
repair. Examples of the volume passing through the department are the 16,377
sterile trays which are processed during the year or the 60,247 needles processed,
13,708 of this number requiring to be sharpened.
 [
D 54 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
A central linen room was opened in the Crease Clinic in the past year, bringing
the total to two at this Hospital. It has already been proved to be a most efficient
as well as economical way of handling and distributing supplies, and consequently
was welcomed by nursing staff.
This department continues to be deeply concerned with the preparation of all
personnel, and every effort is made to encourage its members to increase their
knowledge, whether through in-service lectures, short courses at institutes, or to
seek the broader preparation offered in universities. In the past year 11 psychiatric
nurses attended the post-basic course of 64 hours presented by the School of Nursing. Five psychiatric nurses attended the five-day institute in group psychotherapy
sponsored by the British Columbia Psychiatric Nurses' Association. One head
nurse completed the course in unit administration offered by the Registered Nurses'
Association, in which another is currently enrolled, while a third will commence
the course in the coming year. One head nurse also completed the three-month
affiliation course presented at this Hospital. One supervisor attended the six-month
clinical course in psychiatric nursing, also presented at the Hospital, while a second
supervisor has been on leave to attend the 10-month diploma course presented by
the University of British Columbia.
It is interesting to note that in 1952 the Director of Nursing, with a Bachelor
of Nursing degree, was the only staff member within the nursing service to have
university preparation. At this date, out of a supervisory group of 24 (including
the Superintendent of Nurses) two have a Bachelor of Nursing degree and seven
have had a 10-month diploma course from a university. This interest in education
has further extended to the ward level, where one head nurse has completed a 10-
month diploma course in teaching and supervision at university, and, as mentioned
previously, another head nurse has received a diploma for completion of the course
in administration of nursing units, in which two others are currently enrolled. There
is also one staff nurse within the department who has her Bachelor of Science in
Nursing.
Men's Nursing Division
Mr. R. H. Strong, Chief Psychiatric Nurse, reports steady advances in knowledge of mental illness and its treatment, with more emphasis on group therapies.
Various forms of therapy with mixed patient groups and mixed nursing treatment teams have been carried out.
In the Crease Clinic a progressive relaxation group and a young adult group
have been treated under medical supervision.
In the acute-treatment areas of the Provincial Mental Hospital, nursing staff
have been involved in mixed therapeutic groups in art and crafts, and gardening.
Group therapy in the continued-treatment areas of West Lawn and Riverside
emphasizes remotivation, reactivation, and resocialization. At Riverside 19 psychiatric nurses provide leadership to 19 groups involving a total of 225 patients.
The supervisory psychiatrist and nursing supervisor meet the group leaders
regularly to assess progress. An evaluation of a group of 218 patients showed that
43 per cent had been discharged to the community or to boarding homes and 52
per cent had shown considerable improvement. These results were believed to be
attributable to the interest and concentrated attention of the nursing staff.
The appointment of Mr. D. Smith as Job Placement Officer from the male
nursing staff in November, 1962, and the later appointment of Mrs. Coppard as
Co-ordinator of Rehabilitation have already produced results in the more effective
and planned use of patients' capabilities.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL D 55
The nursing staff are more acutely aware of changing concepts and philosophies and are continually seeking more information through participation in in-
service lectures as well as making more use of library facilities. Charge and
assistant charge nurses attended a series of post-basic lectures to a total of 64
hours offered by the School of Psychiatric Nursing. In addition, a psychiatric aide
orientation programme was offered by the School. Each group attended 10 days
of lectures, and to date 36 male aides who had no previous training have completed
the course. Their obvious interest and improvement in their service has more than
justified the efforts of their instructors.
Six of our psychiatric nurses were fortunate to receive leave of absence in order
to attend an institute on group psychotherapy at Harrison Hot Springs Hotel from
October 3 to 9, 1962. The institute was sponsored by the British Columbia Psychiatric Nurses' Association and was led by Dr. Bach, from California. This was
an exhausting but interesting and valuable experience, and the participants are
looking forward to attending the second half of the institute, scheduled for May 5
to 10, 1963.
Eleven former dining-room stewards were reorientated to the nursing service
after an absence from this service for periods ranging from 10 to 18 years. Lectures were conducted for this group specifically for two weeks in the classroom, followed by an intensive four-week period of ward experience and clinical lectures by
supervisors.   They are due to be ready for duty on April 16, 1963.
All nursing staff continue to participate in fire lectures as offered by the Fire
Department.
Twenty-nine escorts from the male nursing service were provided to escort
15 patients throughout the year to various other hospitals across Canada or other
agencies who would be responsible for the patients. This required 174 working-
days. In addition, numerous other patients were escorted by this department to
boats, trains, aeroplanes, and buses.
The grounds supervisor interviewed 2,974 patients for grounds privileges during the year (1,584 male and 1,384 female).
Orientation periods and tours were provided for several groups of public
health nurses to Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic. This was part of
a reciprocal arangement with the Metropolitan Health Services of Greater Vancouver, in which they provided four sessions of orientation for Mental Health Services senior nursing personnel to their various units in the Greater Vancouver
health area.
The ambulance service requirements exceed by more than double the 8 hours
daily that it is staffed.
Department of Psychology
At the end of September Mr. John Borthwick, Director, was granted leave of
absence to take training in hospital administration. Mr. Alan Clark took over the
direction of the department. Because of a relatively favourable number of well-
qualified staff, the department has been able to provide more comprehensive services in group psychotherapy and expanded research activity in addition to its commitments in psychological testing, nursing education, and staff orientation.
During the year a total of 139 lectures was given, mostly within the framework of instructional programmes for nurse trainees but included as well talks
delivered to other Hospital personnel and visiting groups.
A total of 3,645 psychological tests was administered, the great majority being
used in the preparation of written reports about patients.    In all, 690 such reports
 D 56 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
were prepared, representing a slight decrease over the number submitted during the
previous year. This small decline was in part attributable to more realistic criteria
being established for the acceptance of referrals for testing and in part due to the
department's extended application in the areas of group psychotherapy and research.
Altogether, 844 group meetings were conducted. This year saw the continuation of an intensive group programme for young acutely ill schizophrenic patients in
Crease Clinic. As an additional service in this unit, a second programme of group
therapy was established for the neurotically ill patients. This year also saw some
expansion of therapeutic services within the Provincial Mental Hospital in the
further establishment of nurse-led groups and in the development of group discussions and activation sessions for patients thought suitable for discharge.
As indicated, interest in the area of research has also increased. A total of
eight studies was undertaken during the year—three examining the efficacy of therapeutic measures, two relating to the utility of certain psychological tests, two others
concerning the elaboration of specific psychiatric defects, and one assessing various
actuarial data available on the mental hospital patient.
The department has continued an affiliation with the University of British
Columbia in repeating, for a third summer, an internship programme designed to
familiarize the prospective graduate clinical student with the duties and demands
facing the psychologist working in a clinical setting.
Social Services
The Social Service Department, under the direction of Miss Dorothy R. Begg,
reports a year of activity for social workers in all units of the Provincial Mental
Hospital and Crease Clinic. Two developments within the institutional services
which had marked implications were the increasing use of the after-care facilities
for treatment of discharged patients and the growth and expansion of the boarding-
home programme. Social workers were involved in both programmes—in the
After Care Clinic as members of the psychiatric teams which were assigned from
the various Hospital units on an average of one-half day a week for follow-up services, and in the boarding-home project for the selection, assessment, and preparation of patients for placement. The appointment of a co-ordinator to this latter
service was important in consolidating social-work responsibilities.
During the previous year the Brief Services and Admissions Sections in both
the Crease Clinic and the Centre Lawn Building had been reorganized under senior
social-work personnel with a view to more adequate distribution of social services
within the units. This arrangement has been particularly effective in the Centre
Lawn Building. By assuming responsibility for brief and accelerated social services related largely to admission and discharge needs of patients and also by undertaking responsibility for admission studies and evaluations, this section facilitated
treatment and rehabilitation planning for many patients. Furthermore, it enabled
other social-work staff to offer continuing services to the complex social problems
frequently encountered in this area.
In all units the need to engage in skilful assessments, to give social services
(both case and group), and to offer appropriate referral services to children and
adolescent patients remained of primary importance.
In the Centre Lawn Building, social services to this group were co-ordinated
by a senior member of the staff who, in addition to regular interviews concerned
with individual problems of adjustment, conducted weekly sessions with the group.
Results to date have been satisfactory in terms of generally improved morale on the
part of group members.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL D 57
Similarly in the Crease Clinic, the social group worker was active with a group
of teen-aged patients who were experiencing problems associated with adolescence,
such as immaturity, school and career difficulties, and difficulties in relationships
with parents. In addition to discussion periods on a twice-weekly basis, the group
participated in recreational activities assisted by the recreational-therapy staff.
In addition to the above, other groups were conducted by various members
of the Crease Clinic social-work staff, generally, however, on a ward basis at the
request of the ward physician. Reality oriented, the groups provided an opportunity for discussions on problems on in-hospital adjustment and discharge.
As in former years, some groups were concerned with services to relatives.
Group-work services were extended to patients registered in after-care, which programme developed as a continuation of groups originating within Hospital or
Crease Clinic. Worthy of note is one group comprised of housewives who met regularly with the social group worker to discuss problems associated with return to
home and community. For some members who were experiencing difficulty in
renewing social relationships, the group provided the only regular contact outside
their families.
In the long-term treatment areas, considerable emphasis was placed on the
assessment and preparation of patients for placement in boarding care under the
supervision of the Hospital.
The results of the programme concerned with the boarding-out of socially
acceptable but mentally disabled persons were highly satisfactory. Work during the
year was directed toward solidifying earlier experimentation and demonstration
together with expansion within well-defined policies established co-operatively with
other government departments and community resources. Service responsibilities
included supervision of both patients and boarding-home proprietors, in the latter
instance to ensure an equable standard of patient-care as well as to enhance understanding of the needs of mentally handicapped persons.
As of March 31st, 145 patients, many of whom had histories of lengthy hospitalization, were accommodated in 23 boarding homes located throughout the
Lower Mainland. It is to be noted that the rate of return to hospital for members
of this group for either physical or psychiatric reasons was below that of the national
average of 15 per cent, and, furthermore, that in certain instances patients were
enabled, following fairly prolonged periods in supervised boarding care, to advance
to more independent living situations in which they were partially self-supporting.
The work of the department with respect to its major function of providing
social and casework services to or on behalf of patients is numerically illustrated
in the statistical summaries for the year.
Social-work staff located throughout the various units of the Provincial Mental
Hospital were active with 2,974 patients, of which total 527 were brought forward
from the previous year and 2,447 were opened during the year. Contact was
terminated with 2,657 cases, leaving a total of 317 patients who were carried forward. This is fairly consistent with the 1961/62 statistics, the only difference being
an increase of 94 patients during 1962/63. Work with this group entailed approximately 11,000 interviews on the part of social-work staff.
In the Crease Clinic 1,454 patients received social services, representing a
reduction of 37 cases in comparison with the previous year. Of this total, 140 were
brought forward from 1961/62, 1,314 were opened to service during the year,
1,323 were closed, and 131 were carried forward. The provision of services to this
group involved the Crease Clinic staff in some 8,000 interviews.
 D 58 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Educational responsibilities toward the community, personnel from other clinical disciplines, and the profession itself were assumed by members of the social-
work staff through speaking engagements, lectures, and orientation sessions. Nine
students from the School of Social Work, including five who were enrolled in the
B.S.W. or first year of professional training and four M.S.W. or second-year students were accepted for field-work instruction and experience. The inclusion of a
qualified social group worker within the departmental establishment made it possible
for the first time to offer field-work practice to students interested in that particular
aspect of the job. The over-all programme which was devised for the orientation
and training of this group of students received the full approval and support of the
School of Social Work and, in addition, proved to be of considerable recruitment
value in attracting applications from the student body.
Occupational Therapy
The Occupational Therapy Department, under the leadership of Miss June
Archer, has experienced a year of steady progress and a continued sense of growth
within the Hospital.
Programming has largely focused on group activities, and efforts have been
made to increase the social competence of patients. In developing programmes,
the occupational therapist has utilized all forms of group techniques to facilitate
the maximum group participation and communication.
Nursing staff accompanying patients to the department have been encouraged
to participate in such activities, and this has led to better understanding between
the various disciplines.
Orientations in the therapeutic use of activities have been scheduled on a
regular basis for groups of affiliate and Provincial and Mental Hospital student
nurses. Practical participation has proved a valuable means of acquainting the
students with basic principles and has led to more effective involvement in the
department setting.
The activities of daily living programme has continued to show good results.
It is now considered a valuable source as an assessment and retraining area for
patients requiring intensive domestic rehabilitation before discharge to their homes
or to boarding-home care.
An essential part of the programme is the opportunity patients have to visit
the shops in the community and other community facilities, such as the library,
post office, or laundromat. We are indebted to the volunteer organization for
making their station wagon available for these excursions.
During the year 33 patients attended the activities of daily living programme.
Of this number, 9 have been discharged to their homes, 13 have been discharged
to boarding homes, and 1 patient found her own apartment before leaving Hospital.
Six patients returned to wards and 4 still remain in the unit.
In connection with the boarding-home programme, the Occupational Therapy
Department has been pleased to have several of the boarding-home operators visit
the departments. These visits have enabled them to seek advice regarding activity
and crafts available for patients in their homes.
At a request from the Tuberculosis Society in Vancouver, patients from the
Provincial Mental Hospital undertook the task of helping with the society's Christmas
seal project. Three hundred and fifty thousand seals were folded and boxed by
patients in ward and department groups. It was felt that this was an excellent
project for the more regressed patients, for whom it is often difficult to find useful
and meaningful activities.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL D 59
The second stage of the project was carried out at the society's headquarters
in Vancouver, where patients stuffed and stuck addressed labels on the mailing
envelopes. Since the society's headquarters accommodated only 30 patients, the
groups rotated daily to allow the maximum number of patients the opportunity
of working in such a setting. The project was completed in five weeks by over
100 male and female patients from various rehabilitation groups in the Hospital.
The value of this undertaking can be measured by the enthusiastic response and
interest shown by all involved. It is hoped that other projects of this kind, particularly community-orientated work, will assist the patients to make the transition from
hospital to community life.
In November widespread interest was shown in the first fall art exhibition,
which was organized by representatives of the occupational therapy and nursing
staff. Paintings, ceramics, and wood carvings, many of them achieving a high
standard of craftsmanship, were on display for two days. The exhibits provided
an opportunity for staff and patients to contribute to the community life of the
Hospital by sharing a common interest.
The annual sale held in Pennington Hall on Wednesday, December 5th, was
again successful and realized $2,762.
During the year educational responsibilities have involved staff members in
lectures, demonstrations, and orientations to allied disciplines and to many visiting
groups. Miss Ogden gave a series of six lectures to the students at the School of
Rehabilitation Medicine, University of British Columbia, on the application of
occupational therapy in a psychiatric setting.
As in previous years, seven graduate students from the Universities of Toronto,
McGill, and Manitoba were accepted for clinical training. Each student spent nine
weeks gaining experience in the practical application of occupational-therapy techniques. It is encouraging to note that three of these students have subsequently
accepted positions on staff.
Recreational Therapy
The Recreational Therapy Department, under the directorship of Mr. G. G.
Maxwell, has experienced a period of change and adjustment to new trends in
patients' therapy. Further development of the unitization plan, establishment of
unit activities committees, and greater interest in and use of socio-recreation techniques by occupational therapy, psychologist, nursing staffs, and the Canadian
Mental Health Association volunteers have altered and in some respects enhanced
the role of the department.
Just as the opening of wards and the extension of ground privileges to more
and more patients have increased participation in casual, voluntary recreational
opportunities, so growth in the number of therapy groups has brought about a considerable addition to the number of scheduled sessions planned for specific groups.
Picnics, special outings, Stanley Park trips, fishing expeditions, car rides,
mystery bus trips, cook-outs, exhibition ball games between patient and visiting
community teams, and regular recreation swimming periods made the spring and
summer season especially exhilarating.
Two hundred patients attended the Shrine circus at the Pacific National
Exhibition. More than twice that number paid day-long visits to the Pacific
National Exhibition. Free group admission to numerous special exhibits and
events was arranged through the courtesy of the Vancouver Exhibition Association.
The appointment of a part-time music therapist relieved the department
of the necessity of providing music for church services.
 D 60 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
During the year a new sports field, located between the Lougheed Highway
and Pitt River Road, was opened.
The pitch-putt golf course has been extended, and a new backstop and softball
diamond have been erected on the grounds west of Crease Clinic.
Two shuffleboards have been installed—one at Riverside and one at Pennington Hall—through the courtesy of the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Canadian Legion.
Two pianos have been purchased through the Patients' Comfort Fund for the East
Lawn Building.
Delegates attending the Pacific Northwest Conference of the National Parks
and Recreation Association made a special tour of the Hospital.
Co-operation with neighbouring Provincial institutions brought visiting inmate
groups from Oakalla and the Haney Correctional Institution to perform in variety
concerts and dance orchestras for Hospital events.
The Hospital swimming-pool has been made available to the Coquitlam
Recreation Commission for community leadership and water-safety activities.
Patients' School
The patients' school has continued to provide a very useful service under
the direction of the teacher, Mr. G. Williamson. It was open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
on regular school-days for a total of 228 days. Seventy-two patients—42 adults
and 30 adolescents, 40 male and 32 female—were enrolled during this period.
Fifty-five of these attended the regular daily classes, and the 17 who were unable
to do so received instruction on the wards. The average daily attendance was
15 students, with an average period of attendance of 7.4 weeks per patient.
During the year 28 students were discharged.
The school continued to provide a diversified programme of teaching designed
to meet the individual needs of the patient. This included regular classroom
instruction for the 8 students enrolled in the primary grades, for the 14 in the
intermediate grades, and for the 8 in the senior grades. A class for new Canadians
was also maintained for the 3 patients who wished to improve their English.
Wherever possible, emphasis was placed on a course of studies that would aid
the patient after discharge.
The number of those who took advantage of the many correspondence courses
available increased appreciably. Thirty-nine patients, or more than half the total
enrolment, advanced their education by this means. Courses leading toward high-
school graduation were  undertaken by the majority.
In June, 1962, and with the approval of the Department of Education in
Victoria, the school was set up as a special examination centre for departmental
examinations. This greatly facilitated matters for those students writing June
finals and August supplemental for their accredited academic year.
Physiotherapy
The Physiotherapy Department, under Mr. Borge Dahl, reports reorganization
of service facilities during the past year.
Mr. C. Bradford, chiropodist, retired on December 31, 1962. On March 1,
1963, he was appointed part time to meet the great need for chiropody treatment
for two days each week.
Physiotherapy services for Crease Clinic, Centre Lawn (male), West Lawn,
and Riverside were concentrated in the Crease Clinic.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL D 61
A small physiotherapy unit was established in North Lawn to meet the increased
demands for service, since the infirmary wards were established there.
The East Lawn unit has been expanded to serve this building and Centre
Lawn (female).
New and improved equipment has enhanced the value and increased the
range of service provided by this department.
A total of 12,976 treatments to 1,897 patients has been given during the year.
Department of Radiology
This department, under the direction of Dr. J. W. Jackson, continues to provide
a wide-range diagnostic service.
The change of two wards in the North Lawn Building to infirmary wards has
increased the number of examinations done at this unit by almost 1,000.
The total number of films taken in the department during the year was 16,243;
this includes 2,667 staff chest films.
Department of Laboratories
This department, under the direction of Dr. G. A. Nicolson, reports increased
activity during the past year.
The total number of procedures performed is 62,283, an increase of 3,955
over the previous year. This increase was fairly evenly distributed throughout the
departments of chemistry, bacteriology, haematology, and histology. In chemistry
there was a significant increase in the number of liver-function tests, serum electrolyte, serum iron, and ceruloplasmin determinations performed. In bacteriology there
was a sharp increase in the number of miscellaneous smears and tuberculosis cultures
carried out. In haematology there was an increase in the number of serological
tests for syphilis performed. The incidence of positive tests remains at approximately 1 per cent. The histology department showed increased activity due to
renewed interest in neuropathology, necessitating the performance of a markedly
increased number of special staining procedures. Routine sections remained high,
reflecting the fact that 223 autopsies were performed. This produced an autopsy
rate of 75 per cent, which is exceptionally high.
The technician training programme has produced an additional candidate for
certification by examination by the Canadian Society of Laboratory Technologists.
During the year our laboratory facilities and the competence of our technical staff
were investigated by a committee from the Canadian Medical Association, and our
training-school for technicians received their commendation and full approval for
the training of laboratory technologists.
Pharmacy Department
The Pharmacy Department, under the direction of Mr. K. Woolcock, has been
active in meeting increasing demands for service.
Ten sub-units now enjoy a pharmaceutical programme, governed by a Council
on Therapeutics. The most recent drugs—particular emphasis being placed on
ataractics—are evaluated for efficiency. Having passed this extensive study and
approved of by the Council, they are made available throughout the services.
Through the co-operation of the Council of Therapeutics, Mr. Woolcock has
devised a bulletin on a monthly basis. It comprises information of general interest
to all medical and nursing areas.    In it is contained factual statements regarding
 D 62 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
the over-all policies, additions, deletions, and information pertinent to pharmaceutical activities.
Optical Department
Mr. H. H. Woodbridge, optometrist, reports an increased demand for optical
services.
During the year a total of 1,127 procedures were carried out, consisting of
639 refractions, 308 major repairs, and 180 minor repairs and adjustments.
Dental Department
The Dental Department, under the direction of Dr. W. C. Cusack, has been
active in all fields of dentistry during the year. Every effort was made to keep up
with the demands for fillings, treatments, extractions, and dentures that came into
the dental clinic.
The demand for dentures for discharge cases increased considerably. The
majority of the cases were completed prior to discharge, but the remainder were
handled as out-patients.
There were a number of calls for ward visits, about 12 in all for the year.
Thirty-five problem cases were handled at the operating-room for extractions,
making a total of 416 extractions being performed. Four oral-surgery cases
requiring preparation of the mouth for dentures were also handled in the operating-
room.
An autoclave was obtained to add to our equipment in the dental clinic.
The details of dental procedures for the year is as follows:—
Total number of patients seen  3,906
Number of recorded examinations      702
Number of extractions  2,146
Number of fillings   1,580
Number of prophylaxis and treatments      851
Number of denture fittings  1,221
Number of X-rays      199
Number of processed dentures       244
Number of repairs      263
Number of dentures marked      577
Number of gold castings         65
Chaplain
Rev. John O'Neil, E.D., B.A., L.Th., the Protestant chaplain, has continued
to provide regular services. He has been of great help and comfort to our
patients. A certified professional hospital chaplain, he has completed 10 years' full-
time service.
Rev. R. J. Filer, the chaplain from Valleyview Hospital, has provided weekly
Protestant services, visiting and counselling, and comfort to the critically ill patients
in the North Lawn area of the Provincial Mental Hospital.
Rev. W. S. Lacko, S.J., has continued to come in from New Westminster and
to provide a service for the Roman Catholic patients of the Crease Clinic, the
Provincial Mental Hospital, and Valleyview Hospital every Sunday. In addition,
he has continued to visit the patients regularly and to provide last rites and comfort
to all critically ill patients. During the year Father Lacko conducted the service
of dedication for the graduating class of the School of Nursing.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL D 63
During the year two new services were provided and have been of real help
both in the religious field and otherwise in the Hospital. The first was that when
the musical therapist retired from the service and the Recreational Therapy Department was no longer able to provide music for the church services, a part-time
organist was engaged. This has proved to be far more satisfactory than any
previous arrangement. The second was when one of the ladies of the volunteers
of the Canadian Mental Health Association took on the task of arranging for
various choirs from churches in the Greater Vancouver area to attend every
Sunday morning at either the Roman Catholic or the Protestant service and assist
with the music. This has been greately appreciated both by the chaplains and
by the patients.
The work of the chaplains has been greately facilitated by the ready co-operation and help of all members of the Hospital staff.
Business Administration
The Hospital Administrator, Mr. N. K. Barr, reports a year during which
some major and many minor changes have taken place. The major changes have
included the opening of the Automatic Switchboard Building and the bringing into
operation of the new garbage-disposal unit.
The opening of the automatic switchboard has greatly facilitated communication within the Hospital and has enabled the switchboard operators to render
much improved service to both incoming and outgoing callers, a result of which
has been a noticeable improvement in public relations. The introduction of pay
telephones has been highly successful and has met particularly with the approval of
members of our staff.
We have, during the year, tried to improve the appearance of our patient
areas by introducing more attractive furniture and by using more imagination in
the use of colour, not only by painting, but by the installation of new floors and
fibreglass drapes. The latter have so far met with unqualified success both with
respect to their colour and appearance and with respect to the way in which they
are standing up.
The inauguration of a second shift in the laundry has done much to overcome
some of the problems arising from the volume of linen to be processed. This
second shift has enabled the laundry to be closed on Sundays. The setting-up of
a central linen room in the Crease Clinic continues a pattern which, it is hoped,
will be followed in each of our buildings, since the control of linen usage and the
satisfying of ward demands are virtually solved by these linen rooms. In the
business office the introduction of a posting-machine has done much to smooth
out and streamline the posting of accounts. Physical changes in the office enable
us to give an improved service to our patients.
It was on October 13th that the severe storm hit Greater Vancouver and hit
our Hospital. The Hospital suffered from power stoppages and large fallen trees.
The excellent work done by members of our staff did not in any way curtail essential
services to our patients.
The installation of radio receivers in our vehicles has done much to improve
the efficiency of our Transportation Department. The increased rate of admissions
and discharges has imposed a considerable burden on this department, such that,
notwithstanding the economies effected by the radios, there has been a 15-per-cent
increase in gas consumption over the past three years without any corresponding
increase in staff.
 D 64 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Audio-Visual Department
Mention was made in the previous Annual Report of reorganizing the 16-mm.
recreation shows. This has brought about excellent results due to the careful
selection of films. It is particularly true of The Woodlands School area, where more
children's programmes have been selected. Educational films are in great demand.
These are being provided not only from our own library, but also from outside
agencies, with a view to aiding in teaching.
During the year 144 35-mm. movies were shown to 35,155 patients at
Pennington Hall, and 50 such movies were shown at The Woodlands School to
11,584 patients. The 16-mm. ward shows at Essondale, Riverside, and Valleyview
were shown 331 times to 19,121 patients. In addition to this, there was also a
weekly 16-mm. show given at The Woodlands School, Allco Infirmary, Haney,
Provincial Home at Kamloops, and Tranquille by our own staff.
The educational film library now has 400 registered borrowers, who used
1,750 films from our library.
Industrial Therapy Department
Mr. R. Herring, the department head, has had a busy year and has watched
with eager anticipation the building of the new Industrial Therapy Building. The
old building was burned down in 1955, at which time the department was spread
throughout the Hospital. Now, with the exception of the uniform and linen repair
sections, the department will be concentrated in this one magnificent building.
The new building will not only provide much improved space, equipment, and
facilities, but will also provide a new electronics department and a new spray-
painting booth with its bake ovens.
The following are the significant statistics for the year:—
Total patients employed in trade-shops  2,168
Patients progressed to hospital work level        74
Patients discharged to community      102
The following figures indicate the productivity of this department:—
Manufactured Items Repaired Items
Dry-goods Section         58,202 	
Mending Section   101,046
Tailoring Section          6,897 15,795
Mattress and Canvas Section           6,641 1,652
Printing Section  1,622,284 	
Machine and Metalsmithing Section          2,271 945
Cabinet-shop              391 1,822
Upholstery Section              219 1,087
Uniform Section           8,330 11,968
Shoe Section              677 10,881
Laundry
This department, under Mr. R. T. Lewis, the laundry manager, has continued
to operate smoothly under the two-shift six-day work-week. During the year
9,560,770 pounds of linen went through the department and 110,500 pounds of
dry cleaning were processed. This amounted to 5.3 pounds per patient-day for
Essondale, The Woodlands School, Valleyview, and Mental Health Centre.
Considerable efforts have been made to improve the laundry service to all
areas, and many small changes have been made in Laundry Department procedures
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL D 65
to effect this. The creating of a central linen room in the Crease Clinic has resulted
in an excellent linen service in this building, proving this to be the best system
of linen distribution.
The close liaison between the laundry manager and the wards has enabled
the finding of simple solutions to numerous problems.
Medical Records
This department is under the direction of Mrs. P. West, who this year attended
the medical record librarians' course at the Royal Columbian Hospital.
With the opening of the Mental Health Centre at Kelowna and the adult
clinic in Victoria, the Medical Records Department has provided these centres
with copies of discharge summaries relating to patients returning to those areas.
It was necessary during the year to perform some changes made by the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics with respect to providing statistical data; this
involved the revision of our statistical cards.
Research projects during the year included a survey of the use of escorts
accompanying patients on admission to our Hospital and a continuing survey on
170 admissions to the Crease Clinic covering a period of one year from the date
of the patient's admission. In addition, the department assisted a medical student
undertaking a research project.
The new legislation with respect to the Patient's Estates Act involved the
review of active patients' records by medical staff to determine the patient's capability. A procedure was set up calling for a prompt assessment of all patients being
admitted in so far as the requirements of this Act are concerned.
The continued increase in the rates of admission and discharge necessitated
the addition of one staff member to the department.
Dietary Department
Mrs. M. E. Marr, our dietetics administrator, is in charge of this department.
During the year the following volume of meals wase served:—
Total general-menu meals served to Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital patients  2,834,159
Total special-diet meals served to Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital patients      277,267
Total general-menu meals served to Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital staff      173,824
Total special-diet meals served to Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital staff  2,437
Total of all meals served  3,287,687
Total raw-food cost per meal was 33.30 cents, an increase over last year of
raw-food costs amounting to .06 cent per meal.
During the year the last of the nursing staff seconded as stewards to this
department was replaced by dietary personnel. Planning for the complete takeover of dietary functions by the Dietary Department continued during the year,
and plans for effecting this completely in the East Lawn Building were approved
at the end of the year. These plans will relieve the Nursing Department in this
building of dietary functions, and it is anticipated that this will prevail eventually
throughout the Hospital.
3
 D 66 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1962/63
Efforts continue to be made to improve the food service to patients both with
respect to the variety of food served and to the physical facilities available to
patients in the kitchens and dining-room areas. To this end, tray service to patients
has been implemented in the Centre Lawn Building, a heated food-wagon service
has been extended in one of the West Lawn dining-rooms, the use of brighter
paint colours has been implemented, and floors have been retiled.
Efforts are made to improve the equipment in the kitchens and, during the
year a considerable amount of equipment was installed. This has been particularly
noticeable in the Riverside Building, where major pieces of equipment installed
included a griddle range, deep fryers, and an electric bake oven, thus making it
possible to improve upon the variety of food served in this area. The purchase of
new dining-room furniture in some areas has done much to enhance their appearance.
Volunteer Services
The volunteer service, through its co-ordinator, Mr. G. Dodsworth, has
maintained a high standard of service throughout the year.
Although the number of volunteers has shown a slight reduction, the services
provided have expanded and the quality has increased. We have had 139 volunteers
visiting a minimum of one day per week, giving a total of 28,000 hours of their
time. In addition to this, we now have 40 students from Lester Pearson High
School visiting in Crease Clinic, Centre Lawn, and Valleyview Hospital one day or
evening per week. There are also several organizations who provide service,
although not one of direct contact with the Hospital.
Apparel-shops.—It is significant to note that while the shops are now open
five days per week, the volume of business has decreased. With the shorter hospitalization, patients are not requiring as much clothing supplied.
663 male patients received      1,773 articles
1,732 female patients received      9,275 articles
2,395 patients received   11,048 articles
In addition to this, approximately 5,000 prizes were provided to wards for
parties and the annual carnival day.
Volunteer service is provided in every unit of the Mental Hospital and the
Crease Clinic, as well as Valleyview Hospital. In addition to this service, two
wards, A 3 and A 4, have been adopted throughout the year by the Lake Cowichan
Branch of Canadian Mental Health Association and the Vancouver Association
^f Insurance Women respectively. These organizations provide gifts, prizes,
games, and refreshments regularly for the residents of the wards.
The special volunteer visiting programme developed with the Nanaimo branch
of the Canadian Mental Health Association has worked out extremely well, with
much preadmission contact now being made in the community. Plans are now being
formulated to develop this or a similar service in other community areas.
During the year, members of nine community organizations visited the
Hospital under the auspices of this department for a total of 275 persons.
Two large meetings of the volunteers were held in April and September.
The first was held in the Crease Clinic, where Dr. Walsh spoke about the "Action
for Mental Health " report. This was followed by a tour of Crease Clinic. The
second was held in the Queen Elizabeth Theatre, where Dr. Gibson, of the University of British Columbia, was the key speaker. One hundred volunteers from
all over British Columbia attended.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
D 67
The Christmas gift programme this year was the biggest success to date.
Twelve thousand Christmas gifts were received at the Volunteer Centre for distribution to all the patients. In addition to this, we co-operated with the staff of the
Hospital in planning the unit Christmas parties. This was the first such venture
involving the community and inviting relatives and friends to participate, and it
went very well.
Mrs. M. Larson and Mrs. J. Humphreys (volunteers) have been responsible
for over 300 patients from East Lawn going out to lunch in private homes in
Vancouver and district. Many of these patients have not been out of hospital for
years, and their responses to having lunch in a home have been most interesting.
In addition to this, Mr. Hugh Pickett, manager of Famous Artists, has
provided us with 240 free tickets for our patients to attend concerts and shows at
the Queen Elizabeth Theatre, Orpheum, and Theatre Under the Stars. He has
remarked subsequently that our patients are a pleasure to have in attendance, and
our staff are very good and well organized
We have managed to provide transportation facilities for patients at the
Activities of Daily Living Unit to go shopping, as well as weekly drives for the
patients of the North Lawn Building.
Two ethnic groups are functioning satisfactorily in the Hospital. A group of
Polish volunteers visit their countrymen in the Colony Farm unit twice a month,
and the Japanese Unit church women entertain the majority of our Japanese
patients once a month, bringing with them films from their homeland and special
delicacies which are normally unavailable in hospital.
The most significant development with the volunteer service area has been
the acquisition of Mrs. Mildred Franklin as supervisor of volunteers for the Canadian Mental Health Association. She has an office within the Volunteer Centre at
Essondale and has been an enormous help in managing the many and varied details
of such a large and extensive programme.
Civil Defence
The Essondale Civil Defence Planning Committee continued to hold regular
monthly meetings.
Orientation lectures continued to be given to incoming student classes.
Following a report on a survey of Hospital buildings with relation to their
value as a protection against blast and fallout, plans have been completed for
emergency evacuation to safe areas within the Essondale area.
Through attendance at meetings with the Greater Vancouver Target Area,
contact with community civil defence organizations has been maintained.
More locally, special personnel have been allotted as a contribution to the
organization of Civil Defence Sector No. 2, which covers the Essondale area.
One member of the Committee attended an Institute on Emergency Welfare
Services at Victoria.
 D 68 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
TREATMENT SERVICES
F. G. Tucker, Clinical Director
There has been a continuing and expanding demand upon the treatment
facilities at Essondale during the year. Admissions from the community to the
Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic were 2,066 and 1,651 respectively,
and together represent an increase of 50 per cent in our admission rate over the
past five years.
Such simple statistics belie the problem with which such an increase in
admissions confronts us; for example, it is both desirable and necessary that the
period of hospitalization be short. During this time, not only must arrangements
be made by family or social agency to meet the immediate crisis in the family, but
efforts may be required to be directed to modify the patient's environment and
planning must be undertaken for his early return and follow-up.
During the past year the after-care programme inaugurated in November,
1961, under Dr. R. W. Harrington, and presently directed by Dr. A. R. Yarrow, has
continued to expand in order to deal in part with this problem. Thirteen visiting
teams, consisting of two doctors, a social worker, and psychiatric nurse, spend a
half-day session each at the After Care Clinic each week, whilst the resident team
continues to give emergency treatment and act as consultants and educators in
mental health for the community. At the year's end 863 patients were registered
in after-care, compared with 381 on March 31, 1962, and were seen on an average
of once or twice a month. Prescriptions dispensed for medically indigent patients
in after-care and on probation rose from 506 to 917 a month in the past year.
It is impossible to assess objectively the success of this programme, but there is
little doubt the patients have been maintained in the community and have functioned
at a higher level than would have been possible without these sustaining services.
" Venture " as a facility is now overcrowded, and alternative accommodation for
after-care will have to be found. It is also most desirable that these services be
extended into the Lower Fraser Valley region. Further, a much closer liaison
with the public health service and the social agencies both before, during, and after
admission of patients to Hospital is essential.
The high admission rate to Hospital probably results from a simple increase
in the population of the Province, improved case-finding by general practitioners
and other agencies, extension of public knowledge of mental illness, and a high rate
of return to Hospital. If the latter figures are to cease to climb, and if we are to
continue to discharge our long-term patients, it is apparent that considerable
retraining of patients must be undertaken. We were therefore happy to have Mrs.
A. Coppard appointed to the new position of Co-ordinator of Rehabilitation in
December, 1962. Mrs. Coppard brought with her from the United Kingdom
considerable experience in rehabilitation of long-term mental hospital patients,
and by the year's end we were in an advanced stage in planning a comprehensive
rehabilitation programme. Developing community interest and Federal and Provincial Government financial participation, together with the new Industrial
Therapy Building and Hillside Buildings, augur well for providing the wherewithal
to develop new concepts in the rehabilitation of our patients. It is anticipated that
the focus of long-term areas will be working with the " well part of the patient"
and the development of improved vocational and social skills in a realistic setting.
In providing the therapeutic hospital milieu for long-stay patients, every attempt
must be made to have the patient's day resemble a realistic day of work and
recreation, of obligation and reward, similar to that which he would expect in
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL D 69
the community. Two prime objectives of the rehabilitation programme will be
the fusion of resources for psychiatric and physically disabled persons and a very
close involvement in the total Provincial rehabilitation developments.
We have received excellent co-operation from many of the physicians of the
Province in making prior arrangements and providing information on patients to
be admitted. However, a mental hospital cannot maintain an open door for admissions in the ill-defined field of psychiatric practice without being swamped. Some
form of preadmission screening and observation would be most advantageous.
The following categories of patients posed special difficulties—the emotionally
disturbed adolescent, the criminally insane, and the alcoholic. One hundred Order
in Council patients were admitted during the past year in spite of the provision of
weekly consultant services by Dr. McGregor to the Oakalla Prison, a service which
has been of mutual benefit to both parties. Our resident Order in Council patients
on March 31, 1963, were 42.
One hundred and thirteen patients under 18 years of age were admitted to the
Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic, 46 of whom were under 14 years.
Their special needs have been met in a limited way by special group activities, and
mention must be made of the excellent work of Mr. Williamson, our schoolteacher, in this regard. However, separate facilities are necessary for their adequate
treatment. Alcoholism for its part with other forms of addiction remains a major
social and psychiatric problem, requiring special consideration in the coming year.
Development of North 3 and South 3 wards in the North Lawn Building as
infirmary areas has provided better nursing facilities for these patients. Medical
and surgical care is of high order in spite of this, and our consultants have provided
the Hospital with outstanding service. Further consolidation of infirmary patients
in North Lawn is planned.
The traditional therapeutic services have been well maintained or improved.
Occupational therapy and recreational therapy have been imaginative and creative
in many new projects. Amongst them may be mentioned the Activity and Daily
Living Unit, in which severely regressed patients again become accustomed to
everyday living. Thirty-three patients attended this unit, of whom 9 were discharged
to their own homes and 13 to boarding homes, a most rewarding result. The
nursing services continue to develop increasing insights, new skills, and versatility
in care of patients. Heavy demands have been made upon the Social Service
Department. However, they have taken an active part in after-care, and the
boarding-home programme continues to be a success under their aegis, and group
work continues in addition to other routine duties. Physiotherapists continue to
be difficult to recruit, but a good service was provided by outstanding efforts of
our two therapists and by some reorganization of the department.
This year the volunteer services have been further refined to meet the specific
needs of the patients, and their help has been invaluable. Perhaps special commendation should go to the teen-age groups from Lester Pearson High School
working with our adolescent patients. These young girls have demonstrated a
remarkable aptitude for work in the mental health field.
In all it has been a year of heavy demands and high expectations for the
therapeutic team, which at times must have seemed overwhelming. If we are to
keep pace with evolving concepts of social psychiatric practice, we must be prepared to adapt constantly and if necessary revolutionize existing services to meet
demands.
 D 70
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1962/63
STATISTICAL TABLES
CREASE CLINIC
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Crease Clinic, April 1, 1962,
to March 31, 1963
Male
Female
Total
110
518
31
212
4
1*5
575
45
270
2
255
Admissions—
1,093
Readmissions to a different institution of Mental Health Services...
76
482
6
765
892
1,657
875
1,037
1,912
Separations—i
765
14
2
3
877
32
1
1,642
46
2
Died
4
784
910
1,694
Net increase or decrease
In residence, March 31,1963
—19
91
—18
127
—37
218
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
D 71
Table 2.—First Admissions to Crease Clinic by Health Unit and School
District of Residence and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
School District No. 1
6
2
2
1
5
1
2
4
1
4
5
4
1
3
4
12
1
2
4
1
3
2
3
11
6
5
10
3
44
4
11
166
34
23
1
2
5
2
2
1
1
7
1
5
1
1
5
3
10
2
i
1
7
6
1
2
7
1
3
11
9
4
52
6
24
194
48
38
1
8
7
4
1
7
2
3
11
1
5
10
1
4
2
8
7
22
2
1
3
5
8
9
3
5
18
1
9
16
19
7
96
10
35
360
82
61
Simon Fraser,  New  Westmin.
ster—
School District No. 40 	
"   43	
North Fraser Valley, Mission—
School District No. 42  .  .
"   75—	
21
20
16
7
3
7
3
4
1
5
2
3
2
1
15
3
3
2
3
2
2
14
1
9
2
1
4
1
4
32
18
5
6
3
10
5
4
1
1
4
6
1
5
18
2
1
1
3
8
11
2
1
5
4
 2	
"  3   	
 '4
"         "         "5    	
53
38
21
13
School District No. 7
 76	
6
 8
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 47	
 71	
"   72	
"   10     	
17
8
8
West Kootenay, Trail-
School District No. 11.	
"         "         "13    	
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 50	
 51
"         "         "   52
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 14	
 15	
1
1
7
11
 '   17    	
"        " m
 '   23	
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 19	
 54	
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 59	
"          "         "   60
3
3
7
1
"   20  ...
»   22
"          "          "   81
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 24	
"  26
Greater  Victoria  Metropolitan
Boaid of Health-
Greater Victoria—School Dis-
"   29
33
 30     .   ..
Saanich and South Vancouver Island—
School District No. 62.  .    .
"   31	
Cariboo, Williams Lake—
5
School District No. 27	
 63  .
3
„  jjg
"   55.  	
"   64	
Central Vancouver Island, Nanaimo—•
School District No. 65...	
2
Northern   Interior,   Prince
George—
4
School District No. 56	
"   57	
 •   58 ..    .
 66	
   67  . -   -
"   68	
 69     .
3
5
Upper   Fraser   Valley,   Chilli
22
1
20
wack—
 70	
School District No. 32	
 33-..	
"   34	
School districts not covered by
health units—
School District No. 46. .
4
Boundary, Cloverdale—
 73 	
1
School District No. 35	
 36.. ..
 80	
5
"   37--	
1
8
Metropolitan Health Committee,
Vancouver—
Totals
School District No. 38	
553
621
1,174
"  39
 41
"  44. ....
 D 72
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1962/63
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MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Table 6.—First Admissions to Crease Clinic by Marital Status, Mental
Diagnosis, and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Table 7.—Readmissions to Crease Clinic by Marital Status, Mental
Diagnosis, and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Table 8.—First Admissions to Crease Clinic by Religion and Sex,
April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Table 9.—First Admissions to Crease Clinic by Previous Occupation and
Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
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 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
D 81
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Provincial Mental Hospital,
Essondale, from April 1,1962, to March 31,1963
Male
Female
Total
In residence, April 1, 1962 _. 	
On probation, carried forward from 1961/62 .
On escape, carried forward from 1961/62	
Total as at April 1, 1962 	
Admissions—
First admissions .
Readmissions to a different institution of Mental Health Services.
Readmissions to the same institution   	
Admissions direct from Crease Clinic 	
Transfers from Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz .
Transfers from geriatric units
Transfers from The Woodlands School .
Total admissions 	
Total under care _ 	
Separations—
Discharged in full .
Discharged direct to Crease Clinic
Died    	
Transferred to geriatric units
Transferred to schools for mental defectives .
On probation and still out .
On escape but not discharged .
Total separations 	
Net increase or decrease	
In residence, March 31, 1963 	
1,464
212
6
1,682
525
97
487
14
97
4
5
1,229
2,911
1,082
4
99
30
20
189
3
+20
1,485
1,242
407
1
1,650
335
159
463
32
15
3
1,007
2,657
864
2
65
19
2
448
1
+ 14
1,255
1,401        [
2,706
619
7
3,332
860
256
950
46
97
19
8
2,236
5,568
1,946
6
164
49
22
637
4
2,828
+34
2,740
 D 82
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1962/63
Table 2.—First Admissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale,
by Health Unit and School District of Residence and Sex, April 1,
1962, to March 31, 1963.
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
Simon Fraser,  New Westmin
School District No. 1	
4
1
5
ster—•
"  2     _.
5
6
11
School District No. 40	
25
17
42
 '   3 -
2
2
"   43	
6
10
16
"   5	
2
2
North Fraser Valley, Mission—
 18. ...
1
1
2
School District No. 42	
13
11
24
Selkirk, Nelson—
"   75	
6
6
12
School District No. 7-	
2
2
4
"   76	
2
2
4
West Kootenay, Trail—
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 9 —
3
2
5
School District No. 47	
2
5
7
 11	
2
2
4
"   71	
2
7
9
 '   12	
2
2
 72	
1
4
S
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 14	
3
2
5
School District No. 50	
2
1
3
 '   15	
3
3
6
"   51	
1
1
 17	
1
1
"   52	
3
1
4
"         "          "   73
2
2
2
1
4
3
 53	
"   54	
4
4
1
8
"   77	
1
North Okanagan, Vernon—
Peace River, Dawson Creek—■
School District No. 19	
3
3
School District No. 59	
7
3
10
"         "          "   20
3
3
6
"   60  	
4
5
9
 *   21	
1
1
"   81	
1
1
"   22	
2
3
5
Greater Victoria  Metropolitan
 '   78	
2
2
Board of Health-
South Central, Kamloops—
Greater Victoria—School Dis
11
8
3
19
3
trict No. 61  _
14
14
28
"   26  .
Saanich and  South Vancou
 29. . .   .
1
1
ver Island—.
 30	
1
2
3
School District No. 62...	
2
1
3
"   31    	
3
2
5
"   63	
4
1
5
Cariboo, Williams Lake;—
 64    . .
1
1
2
School District No. 27   	
5
6
11
Central Vancouver Island, Na
' 28	
1
1
2
naimo—
School District No. 65   .
7
2
9
George—
' 66   	
1
1
School District No. 55	
2
1
3
 67   	
i
1
2
"         "         "   56
1
11
1
7
2
19
"   68	
ii
8
9
11
20
"   57	
"         "         "   70..	
19
Upper   Fraser   Valley,   Chilli
School districts not covered by
wack—
health units—
School District No. 32	
 33
1
9
3
6
4
15
School District No. 46   .
1
1
 48     	
1
11
"   34	
10
7
17
"  49	
2
2
Boundary, Cloverdale—
 73  	
	
2
2
5
4
9
 74
2
2
"         "         "   36
24
31
SS
"   80	
2
2
4
1
1'
2
1
1
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tee, Vancouver—
1
1
2
Ex-Province -	
16
5
21
School District No. 38	
7
15
22
204
523
Totals -. -	
645
524
1,169
 41	
23
33
56
"   44	
15
22
37
 45	
2
6
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 D 94 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1962/63
PART III.—THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL, NEW WESTMINSTER,
AND THE TRANQUILLE SCHOOL, TRANQUILLE
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
L. A. Kerwood, Medical Superintendent
PATIENT POPULATION
The Woodlands School.—On March 31, 1963, the total cases on register, including cases on probation, was 1,312. There were 1,288 cases in residence at The
Woodlands School.
The Tranquille School.—On March 31, 1963, there were419 cases in residence
at The Tranquille School.
ADMISSIONS
A table showing admissions and discharges is given below. The table also
indicates transfers to Tranquille. A total of 118 pupils was transferred from The
Woodlands School to Tranquille, and 7 pupils were transferred back from Tranquille
to The Woodlands School. The net total transferred to Tranquille was therefore
111.   Of this total, 107 were male pupils and 4 were female pupils.
Admissions— 1961/62 1962/63
Temporary (30-day admissions)    125 189
Certified  52 42
Permanent  44 26
221        257
Extensions to 30-day admissions     261        435
Transfers to Tranquille     225        124
Temporary admissions (including summer 30-day admission programme)—
Extensions to
30-day Admissions       30-day Admissions
April  10 28
May  11 24
June  24 25
July   48 31
August  25 54
September   11 34
October   13 35
November  4 38
December   12 38
January   9 40
February   11 40
March   11 48
Totals        189 435
1960/61   1961/62   1962/63
30-day admissions during year       207        177        189
Extensions to 30-day admissions       136        261        435
Total 30-day admission patient-months     343       438        624
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
Summer 30-day admissions during June, July,
and August	
Extensions to summer 30-day admisisons	
Total 3 0-day admission patient-
months during summer 30-day
admission	
1960/61   1961/62
109
5
114
62
47
109
D 95
1962/63
97
110
207
HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT
The following accomplishments and improvements are singled out for atten
tion:—
(1) The renovation of Nurses Home 2 to Administration Building and the
occupancy of this building in October, 1962. This facility is a great
asset to administration. There are still problems of heat control on
warm days, but we hope that this will soon be remedied.
(2) The establishment of the patients' gratuity programme, which has been
a great boon to the patients and to the therapeutic programme of patients'
training.
(3) The filling of the position of Supervisor of Industrial Therapy and Trades
instruction, which position was very sorely needed. Mr. F. Pecenka was
appointed to this position on February 18, 1963.
(4) The renovation of the Medical Superintendent's former suite into a new
dental suite.
(5) A new serving counter and renovations in the Fraserview dining-room.
(6) Installation of storage cupboards in the Occupational Therapy Department.
(7) New staff toilets in J and K wards.
(8) The setting-up of metal shelving in the former V.T.B. dayroom for a
central linen supply for the Centre Building.
Mention must be made of the retirement of some staff members with long-term
service.
Mr. Carl Hauck, Chief Engineer, retired on December 31, 1962, and was presented with a certificate of meritorious service. We much regret having to report
that he passed away within a month and a half of his retirement.
Miss Violet Sanders, who entered service on October 1, 1931, resigned on
superannuation due to ill health on October 15, 1962. Miss Sanders had the deepest
respect of all her staff and associates. She was an excellent administrator with a
very warm personality. Upon her retirement, she was honoured with the presence
of the Deputy Minister and the Honourable Eric Martin, Minister of Health Services
and Hospital Insurance, who presented her with a certificate of meritorious service.
Mr. A. L. Bowes, Chief Cook, resigned after 24 years of service. Mr. Bowes
was well liked by the patients at the School and by the staff.
Other items of interest occurring during the year are summarized as follows:—
(1) Typhoon "Frieda," which caused approximately $3,700 damage and
uprooted many of the large trees.
(2) The establishment by the Deputy Minister of an Admission-Discharge
Committee to review admission-discharge procedures.
(3) The appointment by the Deputy Minister of a Uniform Committee to
review staff uniform regulations.
 D 96 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
(4) The change of name of our return address from P.O. Drawer 70 to
The Woodlands School, New Westminster. This is a step forward and
an indication of public acceptance of our institution.
(5) The continual patient exodus to Tranquille and the establishment of the
Greaves Building.
(6) The appointment of a joint committee to review garbage-handling facilities at The Woodlands School and Provincial Mental Hospital.
INDUSTRIAL THERAPY
This division, which consists of the Uniform and Mending Department,
Metal Repair Shop, Shoe-shop, and Upholstery-shop, has been very active during
the year in the making and repairing of uniforms, clothing, furniture, hospital
equipment, orthopaedic shoes, patients' shoes, and the preventive maintenance of
appliances.   Some of the production figures are as follows:—
Uniform and Mending Department—
New items made  11,130
Items repaired  50,089
Metal-shop—
New items made  12
Items repaired   1,192
Upholstery-shop—
New items made  210
Items repaired  1,192
Shoe-shop—
Shoe repairs pairs 3,728
New fittings    „ 1,186
Orthopaedic shoes    „ 115
Orthopaedic requirements    „ 535
HAIRDRESSING
Service to patients through the beautician's shop was as follows:—
Boys' haircuts   1,423
Girls' haircuts   3,674
Shampoos   2,216
Sets   2,265
Permanents       183
Scalp treatments       149
Hair treatments         51
Manicures   4
During the year the barber, Mr. S. Biro, averaged 50 haircuts per day.
DIETARY
The Fraserview staff dining-room was renovated and enlarged. A new serving counter has been installed to make service more convenient for the patrons.
Food was supplied for numerous parties and picnics throughout the year.
The largest event was the carnival in September, when food for 1,000 persons was
provided.
Many of the pupils who remained at The Woodlands School during the Christmas season were entertained by the Dietary Department with a special dinner in
the staff dining-room.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL D 97
MEDICAL RECORDS
There have been a number of changes in the Medical Records during the year,
including new records accommodation, which is much appreciated by the staff.
Revised medical consultant services were instituted at The Woodlands School
on January 25, 1963, involving five physicians. A total of 118 cases was seen
during the period from January 25th to March 31st. This service has increased
the work load of the Medical Records Department considerably.
There were 118 patients' records transferred to The Tranquille School during
the year.
New procedures introduced were: (1) Dominion Bureau of Statistics (D.B.S.)
cards were introduced in January, 1963, by Ottawa, and (2) revised daily census
sheet for The Woodlands School.
The following functions have been centralized in Medical Records: (1) Routing of X-ray films; (2) routing of files from other mental health centres to all areas
of The Woodlands School; and (3) duplicating and stationery.
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS
Major projects completed by the Public Works Department during the year
are as follows: (1) Relocation of dental offices to existing Medical Superintendent's
suite; (2) central linen supply in the Administration Building; (3) alterations to
staff dining-room in Fraserview Building; (4) acoustic tile on Ward 7 dayroom
ceilings and lecture-room in the Fraserview Building; (5) staff toilets on J and K
wards; (6) cupboards and sink in Occupational Therapy Department; and (7)
renovation of Nurses Home 2 (Nurses Home 2 is now the Administration Building).
PHARMACY
The pharmacy has been operating efficiently under the direction of Mr. C.
Wells during the past fiscal year.
The Pharmacy Committee has met monthly to discuss pharmaceutical items,
pharmacy problems and requirements.
DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY
Summary of work in the Department of Dentistry comprises the following:—
Number of patients  1,539
Examinations  517
Prophylaxis  266
Scalings  288
Periodontal treatments  233
Fillings  1,170
Dentures  30
Dentures repaired or refined   36
Extractions  534
X-rays  46
Miscellaneous treatments  356
Number of dental procedures  3,476
Number of patients treated on wards  102
4
 D 98 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1962/63
EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT
There were 12 members on the teaching staff during the year.
Extra-curricular activities include participation by all teachers in clubs. Those
operating during the year have been badminton, drama, art, cooking for senior boys,
typing, games, country dancing, creative dancing, train club, and production woodwork. Members of the school staff have been active on committees, such as the
Carnival Committee, preparing materials for conventions, evening activities with
the choirs and the band, acting as panelists at conventions held on Saturdays,
speaking to P.-T.A. and other similar groups. Many of the teachers volunteered to
take pupils " trick-or-treating" on Hallowe'en night. Exhibits were entered in
evening hobby shows. Catholic catechism classes are held twice a week after school,
and supervision and discipline are provided by school staff. Visitors continue to
come to the school in large numbers, and during the year four teachers spent a one-
week observation period in the classrooms, six teachers spent one-day periods
observing, and five student teachers came one-half day each week for observing and
practice teaching. Seventy-five different groups toured the school during the year.
The school band and choir performed on six occasions in the community, and a
number of class picnics were held in June. The annual Christmas concert involved
117 pupils and was a great success.
" Play-to-Learn " Classes
Number of pupils in daily attendance for the year was 72.
Additional equipment this year included a cash register for the grocery-store,
fire-hydrant, chimes for the door, a bicycle, and a record-player.
During Easter week many students visited "Old MacDonald's Farm" and
enjoyed playing with the baby chickens, ducklings, lambs, rabbits, and pony. A pet
corner has been introduced, which includes many budgies, canaries, chipmunks,
and a talking mynah bird.
Field trips included visits to CHAN television "Carousel Show," Stanley
Park, and a special summer project in which 30 boys enjoyed a " play-to-learn"
holiday home at White Rock. Groups of six boys at a time attended the holiday
home for a 10-day period during the months of July and August. The boys enjoyed
their experience and were able to put into practice much that they had learned in
the classroom. The residents of White Rock wrote to the administration indicating
that they had been pleased to have the boys in their neighbourhood and expressing
the wish for their return.
LABORATORY
The move from Pine Cottage to the Administration Building has proved an
inestimably happy one for the laboratory. The excellent layout, the inclusion of the
automatic sterilizer in the wash-up room, and the extra telephone in the working
area have all facilitated the efficient functioning of the laboratory.
The drop in bacteriological work, due in part to the control of Shigella in the
institution and in part to the disruption of this service between May and November
when the old laboratory was semi-dismantled, has permitted the concentration of
time spent in other areas. Thus we have managed to take and examine 305 buccal
smears for sex chromatin. In the region of genetic studies we have assisted the
Department of Genetics, University of British Columbia, by taking 49 blood
samples for chromosome studies.
Total number of tests carried out during the year was 17,016.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL D 99
MEDICAL STAFF
I wish to acknowledge the high degree of competence, skill, and interest
demonstrated by my medical colleagues at The Woodlands School. This continues
to be of a very high order.
NURSING SERVICES
The nursing staff continued to develop their skills and interest in the training
programmes and are bringing much helpful advice on management to the parents
whose children are admitted on a temporary basis. The general level of nursing
care is good.
Female Nursing Division
Education Programmes
1. Psychiatric Students.—From April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963, 122 student
nurses received training at The Woodlands School (38 male and 84 female).
2. Post-basic Clinical Programme for Registered Nurses in Psychiatric Nursing.—In March, 1963, 10 registered nurses affiliated for one week of their six-
month course at The Woodlands School.
3. Post-basic Course for Psychiatric Nurses.—Psychiatric nurses enrolled in
the post-basic programme at Essondale attended lectures in the Fraserview lecture-
room at The Woodlands School. Many assistant charges and charges not enrolled
in the course also attended.
4. Visiting Nurses.—(a) Student nurses from the various general hospitals in
British Columbia spend a three-month affiliation period in psychiatric nursing at
Essondale. During this period they spend one day at The Woodlands School.
There is an average of 25 nurses visiting every six weeks.
(b) Six student nurses from The Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster, continue to visit The Woodlands School each month. This is part of a
two-week leadership programme.
(c) Public health nurses and nursing groups from the University of British
Columbia tour The Woodlands School on various occasions.
Reorganization of Wards
Ward 9, a 41-bed ward, was exchanged with the Men's Division for Ward 2,
a 65-bed ward.
Ward 9 has been changed from a cerebral palsy unit to a male infirmary ward.
Ward 14 was changed from a completely active kindergarten group of 73 cribs
to a combined crib and bed ward.
Summary
We feel the nursing division is improving steadily in both quantity and quality
of service to patients this past year.
This could not have been accomplished without the co-operation of the entire
nursing division and allied departments.
Male Nursing Division
Staff movement this past year shows 19 placements and 15 separations of
permanent-staff members.
Activities have been kept to a good level of participation by all wards. This
has been a constant challenge to staff as we have had an ever-increasing number of
 D 100 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1962/63
more severely retarded pupils being admitted as vacancies occur on the movement
of the better pupils to Tranquille.
The Cub and Scout groups have been held together even though we lost one of
our more valued staff in the resignation of Mr. Webb. Mr. Webb was senior
leader of the Cub group, and we lost a further junior leader on the resignation of
Mr. Counseiller on his transfer to the Highways Department.
We require more general interest in the Cub and Scout movement as the
leaders are left to carry too much of the load in programming for their activities.
At the present time we could use some good volunteer help and a more active
committee.   This is one area for correction this current year.
Teaching and training within the institution has taken on new significance,
and I think every ward can truthfully report gains in every facet of pupil education;
no longer do the ward staffs await pupil activities being constructed for them by
other departments; they are all now exploring ways and means of increasing training, social and educational experiences for their pupil population.
The Ward 8 group programme, with an equal division of teaching, self-care,
recreation, and occupational therapy, is truly an outstanding experiment and a
leading programme that brings praise and acknowledgment for this programme from
some of the leading authorities on education, and has been subject to a constant
stream of interested observers.
PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT
The functions of the Department of Psychology are many and complex. It
can be broken down under certain headings, of which " psychodiagnostic " traditionally occupies an important position.
The department members are involved in some group psychotherapy under the
supervision and direction of Dr. Hughes, and are involved in pupil-training and
advising the staff upon the abilities of pupils and their emotional status.
The department has also been involved in some clinical research projects involving correlational studies on tests. The department is interested in comparing
the stages of development of the retardates with those described by Piaget for the
normal child.
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
Work Programme
Treatment in the Occupational Therapy Department on a monthly basis totals
approximately 2,000.
The arts and crafts being taught in this department continue as follows:
Leathercraft, copper tooling, weaving, pottery, cord-knotting, basketry, knitting,
crochet, embroidery, some dressmaking, and soft-toy making. New crafts introduced are lapidary and tincraft.
New Programmes
New programmes include sense training, cooking, good grooming, good posture, and diversional occupational therapy for the cerebral palsy group.
Sense training is being conducted by occupational therapy staff. This programme involves Ward 14, with 144 pupil-hours being given per month. Satisfactory progress has been noticed in the majority of the pupils.
Good-posture classes are provided for Ward 2 and Ward 3.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL D  101
Diversional occupational therapy classes are being conducted on a daily basis
for our cerebral palsy groups on Ward 1. Four periods a week are being devoted
to crafts, and one period to good grooming. This latter activity is carried out by
staff for the purpose of stimulation.
The exhibits from the Occupational Therapy Department in the Pacific
National Exhibition hobby section won a second-place award. This was in competition with non-handicapped people, and the entries came from all over Canada.
Some 250,000 people viewed this display, and the director of the hobby show
informed us by letter that the work was highly commended by judges and visitors
alike.
Sale of items from occupational therapy was held for the first time in conjunction with carnival day in September, 1962; net proceeds were approximately $185.
PHYSIOTHERAPY DEPARTMENT
The following number of treatments were given in this department during the
year ended March 31, 1963:—
Individual treatments—
Male   1,933
Female  1,932
Staff  2
Total   3,867
Group exercises on Wards 3 and 4—
Number of classes  95
Number of patients   90
Number of attendances  958
Assistance with cerebral palsy swimming was given up until October, when
group classes were growing and cerebral palsy swimming was cancelled.
Dr. Outerbridge has seen 33 cases during the year and performed surgery on 5.
The rest have had shoe correction or braces.
Dr. Pinkerton has visited on seven occasions, generally to discuss some cases
with the doctors and on one occasion to visit the cerebral palsy classroom.
Miss Watkins has given illustrated slide lectures on the subject of cerebral
palsy and the work of The Woodlands School on eight separate occasions.
Several parents have been advised regarding treatment on discharge of cerebral palsy children, and blueprints of the relaxing-chair as used on Fraserview have
been supplied.
Ward rounds have been made and advice has been given. Two members of
the nursing and female aide staff have drawn large posters to illustrate the use of
sandbags in treatment, and these are now in a prominent position where staff can
see them.
RADIOLOGY DEPARTMENT
The following is a tabulation of the work performed in this department:—
Chests X-rayed  2,458
Extremities       371
Skulls      227
Spines         60
 D 102 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Pelvis	
    ____       19
Mastoids	
18
Knees	
17
Noses      	
13
Abdomens   ...
13
Intravenous pyelograms	
         9
Hips _
6
Clavicles
5
Shoulders       _          _    	
          5
Nasal sinuses ____    _ _       _     	
          4
Ribs 	
          4
Jaws
          3
Total	
  3,232
RECREATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT
Recreational therapy has introduced certain creative activities during the past
year, such as dancing, painting, rythmn band, and crafts, and feels that the results
have been encouraging.
Mention must be made of the aircraft " Blue Angel," which is placed in the
playground; this was done by the auxiliary. A picnic shelter is also under construction, the material and labour being donated by the community.
Three pupils demonstrated their skill on the trampoline at the District of
Coquitlam May Day festivities. One pupil had a painting shown at the Lower
Fraser Valley Arts Council, and a collection of pupils' paintings was placed in The
Woodlands School display at the Pacific National Exhibition. One of the senior
boys successfully passed and obtained his badge for Red Cross Senior Swimmer,
the examination having taken place at Moody Park swimming-pool in New
Westminster.
Members of the Recreational Therapy Department have participated in the
Northwest Recreation Conference, at which Mrs. E. Thornton participated as a
panel member and the recreation staff from The Woodlands School hosted a workshop session.
Staff from the department also attended leadership training sessions, which are
sponsored by community recreation departments, who, in return, send their playground leaders to The Woodlands School for orientation and programming with
retarded children. We aire pleased to be able to offer the facilities of the swimming-
pool to the Beacon Services and School, which uses them during its lunch period.
SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT
Staffing
As of May, 1962, the appointment of four social workers with Bachelor of
Social Work degrees and the return of Mr. Arthur Chappie, who successfully completed the M.S.W. year at the University of British Columbia, brought the staff,
for the first time, to the full complement of supervisor and seven line workers. In
September, 1962, Miss May Kirkham was granted educational leave to return to
university to obtain her Master of Social Work degree.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL D 103
Preadmission and Admission
The most fruitful development during the year was the extension and strengthening of our working relationship with the metropolitan public health units who are
providing supportive services to families of retarded children and adults. Four
members of our social service staff who are involved in this programme are working closely with the Medical Health Officers and the public health nurses and make
regular visits to the health units. Now many families in the metropolitan health
unit area are benefiting from home visits by public health nurses, who can give them
practical advice concerning the care of their mentally retarded child and in this way
ease some of the strain on the family. Eventually this service will, we hope, do
much to contribute to the mental and physical health of the community, prevent
many family breakdowns, and enable more retardates to remain in their own homes.
The nurses are also assisting the social service staff in assessing the need and priority
for admission to The Woodlands School, attend and contribute to diagnostic clinics,
help interpret clinic findings and recommendations to families, and continue their
supportive service following discharge. We are most pleased with the development
of this programme, and with the wonderful co-operation we have received from the
metropolitan public health staff.
As a result of the services provided to families in the Greater Vancouver area
by the health nurses, the total number of home visits made by our social service
staff has declined from 363 last year to 321 this year, some of which were in the
Fraser Valley area, which is still serviced directly by one of our social workers.
An interesting trend is the increase in office interviews from 146 to 547 in the same
period. The number of orientations of parents to the institutions has also increased,
from 55 to 82. As our staff is relieved of some of the preliminary home-visiting
work, more time becomes available to interview parents at the time of admission and
discharge. During the past year, social workers participated in every admission,
with the exception of some of the summer-holiday admissions. The purpose of
these interviews has been to help relieve the emotional reactions occasioned by the
admission, to clarify what the family expects from the institution, and to interpret
the services of the institution. The social workers, too, usually take the parents on
the ward to which the child is admitted, where they can meet the nursing staff.
Services to Pupils and Families
During the year, 265 pupils were interviewed, an average of four interviews
for each pupil. This is in accordance with our goal to provide more intensive short-
term casework services to more pupils. It will be noted in contrast that a year ago
181pupils had an average of nine interviews each.
During the year we received an increasing number of referrals from medical
and nursing staff to visit or to write to families or patients. This was with a view
to encouraging more contact with the patients, promoting holidays or week-end
visits, or exploring home situations when there was some question about the advisability of home visits. On the whole, the response of parents who have been contacted has been very good.
The social service staff has been active on the Summer Camping Committee
amd the Summer Employment Committee. The latter took almost the full time of
one worker during the summer months. It was an outstanding success. This year
67 boys and 16 girls participated in harvesting strawberries, blueberries, beans, and
potatoes. Gross earnings totalled $2,483.21. One young man earned enough to
pay for a holiday trip to the Peace River country to see his family for the first time
since he had been admitted seven years ago.   They were so pleased with the improve-
 D 104 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
ment in his attitude and behaviour that plans are now being made for his return
home on discharge. Both these programmes have done much to reduce ward management problems, particularly during the summer months.
Orientations to Professional Groups
During the year the Social Service Department arranged and conducted orientation tours for professional groups who requested this service, as follows: Vancouver General Hospital, Children's Aid Society, and Catholic Children's Aid Society,
60 persons (2 tours); B.S.W. year, University of British Columbia, 45 persons;
Pre-medical, University of British Columbia, 12 persons; Department of Social
Welfare (in-service training), 40 person (2 tours); Pre-social work students, University of British Columbia, 60 persons (2 tours); New Westminster Ministerial
Association, 30 persons.
Community Interest
There is a growing awareness in the community of the problems associated
with mental retardation and interest in the services provided. The social service
staff, which, in the course of its duties, has established liaison with all those public
and private agencies who are working with retardates and their families, or who
could be used as a resource for them, is doing all possible to encourage and foster
this interest.
It is interesting to note the very favourable reaction of the White Rock people,
particularly the neighbours, to the Ward 8 White Rock holiday home. A subsequent survey by a member of our staff indicated that the initial acceptance of these
boys was due to the interpretation by the teacher and the social worker before the
camp was set up.
Two community organizations—the Big Sisters and Big Brothers—deserve
special mention here. The sincere interest and friendship they offer those of our
young adults who have been selected for this service is giving these young people a
new hope and new outlook on life. As they identify and share community and
family experiences with their Big Brothers and Sisters, they are becoming better
prepared to live in the community and meanwhile are much happier residents of
our institution.
CO-ORDINATOR OF VOLUNTEER SERVICES
Community interest in and contributions to The Woodlands School treatment
programme during 1962 were most gratifying. The Provincial Auxiliary to The
Woodlands and The Tranquille Schools, under the able direction of President C. R.
Scott, performed the following services for the benefit of all residents at both The
Woodlands School and The Tranquille School:—
Through close liaison with the Association for Retarded Children of British
Columbia, the Auxiliary was granted an annual budget of nearly $6,000 to finance
training equipment and recreational activities for which no Government funds are
available; for example, weekly bowling for 35 male pupils at a community bowla-
drome, providing an instructor-caller for a weekly square dancing class for 40 male
and female pupils, television sets, new records (12-inch long-play) and record-
players, renting summer camping facilities, bus sightseeing trips, colour slides and
prints of the " play to learn " training programme, " child guidance " toys, prizes
amd candy for special events such as carnival day at The Woodlands School and
Tranquille, renting a Shetland pony for a one-day presentation of " Old Macdon-
 —
THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL D  105
aid's Farm " at The Woodlands School, underwriting a pilot project in the summer
employment programme, providing 417 birthday cakes, of which 95 were baked
by an Auxiliary-sponsored project on " The Lodge " female rehabilitation ward.
With the co-operation of Mr. George Williamson, of the B.N.P. Airways, and
some 32 Government and community agencies and business firms, the Association
for Retarded Children presented to The Woodlands School a Beachcraft A.T. 11
transport aeroplane, suitably equipped for play activities and installed firmly in
cement but in flying position.
The West Vancouver Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia
and the North Vancouver Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia,
through close co-operation with the committee at The Woodlands School, completely equipped a " play to learn " classroom for trainable girls in Pine Cottage.
The equipment was chosen by Mr. Julius Erdelyi, based on his wide experience in
this field.
The Auxiliary contributed over 2,000 hours of personal services conducting
90 ward birthday parties, 12 summer picnics, 5 special social events, manned our
Pacific National Exhibition booth, and, despite being unable to operate for three
months of the year, the apparel-shop distributed 6,950 articles of clothing.
The Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia provided transportation to and from ships, aeroplanes, and buses for children on vacation, trips
to Stanley Park for 36 pupils, and, with the co-operation of the New Westminster
Kiwanis, special arrangements have been made for a monthly outing to the Burnaby
Indoor Sports Club social meeting for one adult spastic resident of The Woodlands
School.
THE TRANQUILLE SCHOOL
Population
Population as at March 31, 1962, was 292; as at March 31, 1963, 419.
Staff
Staff increased from 90 to 113 (72 nursing and 41 other).
Public Works
1. New 16- and 14-inch transite water replacement main, C.N.R. tracks to
filter-house, and a start on decentralization of the hot-water system.
2. New distribution tank placed in the basement of the main building.
3. New awnings on the Greaves Building.
4. New floor placed in a portion of the power-house, and major alterations
and renovations carried out involving the heating plant, steam-lines and pumps, etc.
5. New stores area arranged in the basement of the services area of the Central
Building, and the old stores area converted into a new patients' dining-room.
6. Extensive alterations, renovations, and painting to various buildings, including the major renovations to the Handicraft Building, new stairway to the tunnel
from first floor to Main Building, new fire-escapes for Main Building, and new
shower and washroom facilities as well as clothing cupboards, etc., in the Centrail
Building.
Patient Treatment
Medical
For the first six months, medical services were provided primarily by the Irving
Clinic; for the last six months both the Burris and Irving Clinics provided medical
services.
 D 106 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Dental
Dental service was provided by Drs. Nabata, Lavery, and Martin. While the
quality of the dental service provided has been good, the problem of being able to
arrange for service remains. We have been able to provide for the treatment of acute
cases, but no routine examinations have been carried out.
Optical
Dr. Bennett, optometrist, has provided service and optical supplies, and repairs
have been supplied by Imperial Optical Company. Both of these services continue
to be very good.
X-ray
All former tuberculosis patients receive routine X-rays under the direction of
the Division of Tuberculosis Control. The travelling X-ray Clinic, sponsored by the
Division of Tuberculosis Control, visited on October 25, 1962. Other X-ray service
is provided by the Royal Inland Hospital.
South Central Health Unit provided a team for administering oral polio vaccine;
135 male and 125 female patients received this vaccine.
A number of patients received minor surgery either at the Royal Inland Hospital
on an out-patient basis or at one of the clinics.
Patient Movement
Male
One hundred and eleven male patients were transferred from The Woodlands
School to The Tranquille School; 4 male patients were transferred from The Tranquille School to The Woodlands School; 17 male patients were admitted to The
Tranquille School from the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
Female
Seven female patients were transferred from The Woodlands School to The
Tranquille School; 3 female patients were transferred to The Woodlands School
from The Tranquille School.
Pharmacy
Pharmacy stores operated satisfactorily. Supplies were requisitioned from the
Provincial Mental Hospital pharmacy stores via the Medical Superintendent at The
Woodlands School.   Emergency drug purchases were made locally.
Patient Employment
The contribution made by the patients toward the operation of the School has
continued to improve.
General Remarks
One of the boys received official permission to act as assistant scoutmaster for
the Boy Scout troop at The Tranquille School.
A Girl Guide troop has been organized and continues to function very well.
One boy was discharged in full and continues to make his own living in the
Vancouver area. One other boy is on six months' probation, and it is expected that
he will be discharged in care of his mother.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL D 107
Approximately 50 to 60 boys and girls went on summer holidays, and we used
our own bus to transfer those from the Lower Mainland and on the Island to The
Woodlands School for dispersal, and later picked them up there for return. This was
over a two-month period.
At Christmas time over 20 per cent of our total population was out for
Christmas holidays all over the Province. Again, much of this was worked out in
liaison with The Woodlands School, transportation by train being used.
Beaverdell
The opening of Beaverdell for boys appears to have been a successful move.
Continued improvement in the general performance of these boys can be expected.
Fire Protection
Two new pumper-capacity hydrants were installed in connection with redesigning of the water distribution system. Regular fire drills are carried out, and the
volunteer fire-fighters continue to assist the paid personnel. Continued improvement
is under way to fire-fighting equipment and facilities, and this has been a source of
great satisfaction to all concerned.
General Supplies (Stores)
This area, with the continued expansion, has become a very heavy area for
one man, and some help has been sought from the building service workers in receiving and issuing. Generally we have received very good service on our ordering and
receiving of the necessary articles for the operation of the School.
Laundry
Amount of linen and clothing processed was as follows: Tranquille School,
328,970 pounds; Provincial Home, 50,945 pounds at 12 cents per pound,
$6,113.40; Provincial Gaol, 20,085 pounds at 9 cents per pound, $1,807.65; a total
of 400,000 pounds.
One hundred and eighty blankets were washed for the Provincial Forest Service
at 50 cents each, for a total of $90. There were 597 pieces of dry cleaning sent out
by the laundry at a cost of $619.56. The laundry for this year was operated with a
paid staff of 7 (an increase of 1) and a staff of 33 male and female working patients,
an increase of 8 over the previous year.
The central linen and central clothing system seems to be working well.
Dietary
Due to the considerable increase in patient population it has been necessary to
add a new dining area, which has its own dish-washing area. Some improvements
are still needed, and these will be undertaken shortly. The number of staff has continued to increase. The service and the quaility of food continues to be very satisfactory.
Building Service
Building service staff carry out all the routine cleaning and maintenance for the
School except in the patients' wards, and in these areas they are responsible for
instructing nursing staff on cleaning techniques.   They have taken over all cleaning
 D 108 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
supplies from the stores and now do the issuing to all areas weekly on an exchange
basis.   They are assisted by five patient-workers.
Chaplaincy
Protestant
The previous senior Protestant chaplain, Rev. W. G. Crane, left last year, and
his place was taken by the associate chaplain, Dean J. C. Jolley, who is now assisted
by Rev. R. D. Macrae. Sunday services continue the first four Sundays in the month
and counselling is held on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings. Special services are
held at periodic intervals during the year.
Roman Catholic
Under the direction of Bishop Hairrington, assisted by two of the sisters of
St. Ann's Academy, the workshop type of programme continues to expand the knowledge and interest of the patients.
Handicraft
During the year, attention was given to the making of decorations and cards for
special occasions. A large number of articles have been completed and placed on the
wards; that is, runners, tablecloths, pictures, etc.
Recreation
During the first part of the year a programme, which included the majority of
the students, was started under the direction of Mr. Clay. This programme included
evening socials, outside activities, indoor activities, special activities, and choir.
Auxiliary
The Auxiliary to the School was formed during the year and has done an
outstanding job under the direction of Mrs. Friesen, president, and Mrs. Carscadden,
secretary. Mr. Scott and Mr. Hoban, from the Lower Mainland, have been most
helpful and have visited The Tranquille School on a number of occasions.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
STATISTICAL TABLES
D  109
THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
Table 1.—Movement of Population, The Woodlands School, New Westminster, April 1,1962, to March 31,1963
Male
Female
Total
791
12
561
10
1,352
22
Total as at April 1, 1962                                           	
803
571
1,374
Admissions—■
64
3
45
4
3
66
1
31
3
2
130
4
76
7
5
119
103
222
922
674
1,596
Separations—
8
69
9
111
5
14
6
62
4
7
3
10
14
131
Died                                                                                      	
13
118
8
24
216
92
308
-85
706
+21
582
—64
1,288
 D  110
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Table 2.—First Admissions to The Woodlands School by Health Unit and
School District of Residence and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
Srlinnl District No, 3
1
1
2
2
3
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
2
1
2
2
6
1
12
5
3
1
1
3
1
1
___.
1
1
1
1
2
2
4
4
13
4
2
2
2
4
3
2
4
1
2
2
1
3
2
1
2
3
1
2
2
4
10
5
25
9
5
3
Simon   Fraser,   New  Westminster—
School District No. 40
2
2
1
1
1
1
6
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
~1
1
1
2
6
3
1
"~3
„           „        „   5	
4
„   43...	
2
School District No. 7	
 10	
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 11	
North Fraser Valley, Mission—
School District No. 42.. -     -
 75	
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 47.	
 ,   71... 	
 72	
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 52 	
„   53	
2
2
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 14 	
 15
„   23 	
1
1
1
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 20 	
1
2
 22	
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 24 	
 ,   25  .
„   30	
Cariboo, Fort William—
School District No. 28.:,	
Upper   Fraser   Valley,   Chilliwack—
School District No. 32	
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 59	
 ,   60	
Greater  Victoria   Metropolitan
Board of Health—
Greater Victoria—School Dis-
trict No. 61      -
Saanich  and  South  Vancouver Island—School District
No. 64       	
Central Vancouver Island, Nanaimo—
School District No. 68	
„   70
„   79 	
2
1
12
1
 33    ...    .
„   34	
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 35	
 36	
2
4
1
Metropolitan Health Committee,
Vancouver—
School District No. 38   	
School districts not covered by
health units—
School District No. 46	
„   48	
Unorganized _
Totals             	
1
 39  ...
„   41    ....
,,              „           ,,    44	
,,              ,,           „    4D	
3
1
74
68
142
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
D 111
o
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 D 112
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Table 4.—First Admissions and Readmissions to The Woodlands School by
Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Orand
Total
M.    F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M. F.
M.
F.
M. F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M. F.
First Admissions
Mental deficiency—
Idiocy and imbecility.-.
Moron	
Border-line intelligence ...
1
5
2
7
2
1
7
3
2
2
13
6
~~3
5
5
4
3
3
2
2
•1
4
9
1
2
6
2
1
1
1
1
4
3
1
5
2
2
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
27
25
10
12
29
22
6
9
2
56
47
16
21
Other and unspecified types
2
Totalsi	
1
7|  10
14
22
141 11|  16
11
9
7
7|    2|    4|    2
2
3
741 68
142
Readmissions
Mental deficiency—■
Idiocy and imbecility-—
Moron
Border-line intelligence..
Mongolism—	
—
2
3
5
3
1
5
__
9
1
3
3
5
1
3
11
1
1
4
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
—
1
1
19
19
11
6
13
16
6
32
35
1
12
Totals2	
—
2
3
9
6
13
9
15
7
4
3
1
3
1
2
—
2
45
35
80
i Includes 30 cases with epilepsy:  15 imbeciles, 13 morons, and 2 border-line intelligence.
2 Includes 23 cases with epilepsy:  9 imbeciles, 13 morons, and 1 mongol.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
D  113
Table 5.—First Admissions to The Woodlands School by Religion and Sex,
April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Table 6.—First Admissions to The Woodlands School by Previous Occupation and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
Table 7.—Resident Population of The Woodlands School by Mental
Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, December 31, 1962
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
Under 1   . ,
1      |   1_3
4-6
7-9       10-14
I
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Mental deficiency—■
Idiocy and imbecility -	
1
	
9
2
8
1
34
4
2
6
38
7
3
1
47
18
1
27
44
8
1
16
1
102
27
10
31
3
75
16
7
25
4
78
57
17
29
3
77
28
2
13
4
80
34
17
21
5
60
30
7
8
3
39
17
5
11
31
9
1
9
42
17
3
6
6
3
35
13
4
3
432
176
55
131
6
14
368
112
22
77
13
800
288
Border-line intelli-
77
208
Schizophrenic disorders   	
Other and unspecified
types—	
6
27
Totals	
1
	
11
9
46
49
93
70
173
127 184
124
157
108
72
50
77
55
814
592 1,4061
i Includes 158 males and 155 females with epilepsy.
Table 8.—Resident Population of The Woodlands School by Mental
Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex, December 31, 1962
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 D  114
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Table 9.—Live Discharges and Deaths from The Woodlands School by
Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31,
1963.
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Live Discharges
Mental deficiency—
Idiocy and imbecility 	
Moron	
Border-line intelligence   	
Mongolism	
1
—-
3
1
5
1
10
3
2
1
12
3
2
10
4
3
6
5
3
2
5
15
3
5
5
2
11
11
1
11
3
7
2
1
23
10
4
15
4
1
13
9
1
5
3
i   1
10
5
1
2
3
2
86
57
9
41
34
29
6
9
120
i    86
15
50
Totalsi	
1
4
6
16
17
17|  16
23
12| 34| 13
52
5
28
4
18|    5|193| 78
271
Deaths
Schizophrenia, simple
type 	
—
2
1
1
	
1
	
1
1
	
—
1
1
1
2
1
!	
1
5
2
1
4
1
Mental deficiency—
Idiocy and imbecility
	
	
3
2
9
Moron	
Mongolism.  	
2
1
Totals2	
—
3
2
!
.._..
2
1
1
—
1
	
—■
1
4
-—
9
4
13
1 Includes 42 cases with epilepsy:   19 imbeciles, 19 morons, 3 border-line intelligence, and 1 mongol.
2 Includes 7 cases with epilepsy:   6 imbeciles and 1 mongol.
Table 10.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in The Woodlands
School by Mental Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex, April 1, 1962,
to March 31, 1963.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
D 115
Table 11.—Deaths Occurring in The Woodlands School by Cause of Death,
Age-group, and Sex, April 1,1962, to March 31, 1963
Age-group (Years)
Cause of Death
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Malignant Neoplasm.—.
Cerebral palsy, infantile
Arteriosclerotic heart
disease	
Acute bronchitis	
Bronchopneumonia	
Congenital
—
	
1
1
1
1
3
--
	
■1
1
1
	
1
	
	
	
—
—
	
1
1
1
1
--
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
4
2
Accidental suffocation....
—
—
—
	
2
Totals	
	
3
2
......
	
2
1
1
	
	
	
	
	
	
4
	
9
4
13
Table 12.—Deaths Occurring in The Woodlands School by Cause of Death,
Length of Stay, and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 D 116 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
THE TRANQUILLE SCHOOL
Table 1.—Movement of Population, The Tranquille School,
April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Male
Female
Total
153
17
111
139
7
292
Admissions—■
17
118
128        |           7                135
Total under care _ 	
281                 146                427
Separations—
1
4
1
3
1
7
1
6
3        1           9
+ 122
275
+4
143
+126
418
Table 2.—Transfers to The Tranquille School by Mental Diagnosis,
Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.    F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Mental deficiency—
8
8
10
1
1
23
10
2
14
1
12
16
5
1
9
8
1
2
2
1
52
42
3
31
3
3
i
55
Moron	
45
3
Mongolism
32
Tntala
26 |    2 | 49
1 | 33
1
20 |    3
128
7
135
Note.—Of the above cases, 5 had epilepsy:   1 imbecile, 3 morons, and 1 border-line intelligence.
Table 3.—Resident Population of The Tranquille School by Mental
Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, December 31, 1962
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Mental deficiency—•
1
1
4
3
4
1
6
25
25
3
15
9
23
u
27
8
4
4
12
15
5
7
16
15
1
2
19
17
1
5
1
69
52
8
25
44
56
6
36
1
113
108
14
Mongolism..	
61
1
Totals    _    	
1
--
8
11
68
50
43 1 39
34 1  43
154
143
2971
i Includes 11 males and 10 females with epilepsy.
Table 4.—Resident Population of The Tranquille School by Mental
Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex, December 31, 1962
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 [
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME D 117
PART IV.—PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME,  COLQUITZ
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
L. G. C. d'Easum, Medical Superintendent
With the impending closure of this institution, several staff changes occurred.
As of April 1, 1962, there were 65 nursing staff, and on March 31, 1963, the nursing
staff numbered 48, a reduction of 17. Of these, 29 are psychiatric nurses and 19
psychiatric aides. Three psychiatric nurses left the institution during the year,
having reached the age of retirement. Of the nurses leaving the institution, only 2
at the end of the year had been placed in other mental health units. The percentage
of psychiatric aides to the total nursing staff is approximately 40 per cent.
The patient population on April 1, 1962, was 283, and on March 31, 1963,
had been reduced to 149, a reduction of 134 patients. Ninety-seven patients were
transferred to the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale; 23 to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace; 8 to Dellview Hospital, Vernon; and there were 6 deaths during
the year.
The use of the centre dormitories was discontinued on February 7, 1963, and
at the end of February the West Ward was closed completely for daytime use.
A few patients from the Lower East Ward sleep on the West Ward at night.
The general health of the patients throughout the year was satisfactory.
Dr. S. S. Avren and Dr. W. Dempsey continued to care for the medical and
dental needs of the patients respectively.
The Vancouver Island Chest Clinic made regular visits to the hospital with a
portable X-ray unit, and X-rayed both patients and staff. For the past several years
they have been most co-operative, and this co-operation has been greatly appreciated.
INDUSTRIAL AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
These two departments remained under the capable supervision of Mr. H.
Helander, and both the indoor and outdoor Occupational Therapy Departments
were utilized to the fullest. Various handicrafts were taught—woodwork, ceramics,
leatherwork, art metalwork, wirework, and rug-hooking. With patient help, considerable maintenance work was done. One hundred and sixty-five feet of buried
steam-line ducts had to be dug up for replacement of steam-pipes. A considerable
amount of surface drain tile had collapsed at the back of the main building and was
replaced with new tile. Due to clogging by tree roots, a portion of the sewer drain
from the staff house had to be replaced and cemented over. A grease trap and rock
pit plus new drain tile was installed at the Chief Nurse's residence. A large number
of chairs were upholstered and repaired, and the new cloth was installed on the
billiard table. The disposal plant was checked and cleaned daily, and the sump
pump overhauled and other improvements made.
The paint gang, which consists of one staff member and three patients, was kept
busy redecorating practically the whole year.
The fire-fighting equipment was checked regularly and hazards removed. The
Saanich Fire Department, on its annual inspection, was well satisfied.
TAILOR AND SHOE SHOP
During the year five patients were kept occupied in the tailor and shoe shop,
and many articles were made and supplied to the stores.   The patient who worked
 D 118
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
in the shoe-repairing shop the previous year died, but we were fortunate in finding
another patient who does excellent repair work.
LAUNDRY
The laundry has continued to work to capacity and satisfactorily. The amount
of work has decreased slowly during the year due to the transfer of patients from
this institution to Mainland units, from 3,500 pounds each week to approximately
half that amount.
RECREATION
During the year three sightseeing bus trips were arranged for the patients, and
as usual proved very enjoyable and much appreciated by the patients.
As in the past several years, various organized groups from the City of Victoria
presented band and variety concerts for the enjoyment of the patients. In addition
to the concerts, television, radio, and picture shows were continued.
Weather permitting, the recreation court was in daily use during the summer
months, and in the winter months the more active patients were allowed outside to
exercise on the sidewalk. The Public Library Commission continued to supply
books for the patients, the books being changed every four months.
The Canadian Legion continued to supply comforts for the ex-servicemen
monthly. Christmas gifts for the patients were contributed by the Canadian Mental
Health Association, Salvation Army, Colwood Women's Institute, Vic-Van Isle
Kinettes, Zone Council of the Canadian Legion, Sons of Norway, Lake Cowichan
Legion Ladies' Auxiliary, and Strawberry Vale Women's Institute.
Except during midsummer months, the spiritual needs of the patients were
cared for by the Salvation Army and the Protestant churches on alternate Sundays.
 PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME
D 119
STATISTICAL TABLES
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz,1
April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
In residence, April 1, 1962	
On probation, carried forward from 1961/62.
On escape, carried forward from 1961/62	
Total as at April 1, 1962
Separations—
Discharged in full.
Died	
Transferred to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale
Transferred to Dellview Hospital, Vernon	
Transferred to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace	
On escape but not discharged	
Total separations	
Net decrease	
In residence, March 31, 1963.
i This institution cares for male patients only.
283
1
1
285
1
6
97
8
23
1
136
-134
149
Table 2.—Resident Population of Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz,
by Mental Diagnosis and Age-group, December 31, 1962
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
Total
20-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-44
45-49
50-54
55-59
60-64
65-69
70 and
Over
Schizophrenic disor-
1
1
3
2
5
|   Z
1
9
z.
13
4
1
14
1
18
1
1
2
27
1
1
1
i
18
3
2
16
1
1
1
23
3
1
1
1
1
147
Manic-depressive reaction 	
Paranoia and paranoid
states
Alcoholic psychosis
Other and unspecified
psychoses	
Syphilis   and   its   se-
4
2
1
1
3
Alcoholism	
Mental deficiency	
Chronic    brain    syndrome, N.O.S.. .
3
14
1
4
Totals 	
2
5
6
9
18    |    15
22
31
23
19
30
180
Table 3.—Resident Population of Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz,
by Mental Diagnosis and Number of Previous Admissions, December
31, 1962.
Table 4.—Resident Population of Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz,
by Mental Diagnosis and Length of Stay, December 31, 1962
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
 D  120
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Table 5.—Live Discharges and Deaths from Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by Mental Diagnosis and Age-group, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
25-29 I 30-34   35-39 | 40-44
I I 1
45-49
50-54
55-59
60-64
65^69
70 and
Over
Total
Live Discharges
Schizophrenic disorders	
Manic-depressive reactions	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis .	
Alcoholic psychosis 	
Psychosis of other demonstrable
etiology.
Psychosis with mental deficiency
Syphilis and its sequela. — 	
Pathological personality	
Immature personality 	
Alcoholism  	
Drug addiction..
Mental deficiency	
Chronic  brain  syndrome with
behavioural reaction	
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S.
Epilepsy  	
Totals.
Deaths
Schizophrenic disorders .
10
10
13
12
12
13     |   16
25
1
30
102
1
1
2
1
3
2
2
2
2
1
6
2
1
1
129
Table 6.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Provincial
Mental Home, Colquitz, by Mental Diagnosis and Length of Stay,
April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
Table 7.—Deaths Occurring in Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by
Cause of Death and Age-group, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Cause of Death
Age-group (Years)
Total
35-39
40-44
45-49
50-54
55-59
60-64
65-69
70 and
Over
Vascular lesion of the central nervous system.. _ ..
Arteriosclerotic heart disease 	
1
-
1
—
—
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
Totals..	
1
—
1
....
—
1
3
6
Table 8.—Deaths Occurring in Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by
Cause of Death and Length of Stay, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION D 121
PART V.—GERIATRIC DIVISION
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
B. F. Bryson, Medical Superintendent
During the fiscal year 1962/63 a total of 1,652 elderly citizens of the Province
received specialized medical and psychiatric care in the three units of the Geriatric
Division of the Mental Health Services, which have operated to capacity throughout
this period.
Requests for the admission of patients 70 years of age or over have been regularly received, but for the first time in several years there has been a slight decrease
in the yearly total. During the past year 433 new applications were received, including 201 for men and 232 for women, representing a decrease of 43 compared to the
previous 12 months. As in past years, the greatest number, totalling 342, was
received from the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island for admission to the
Valleyview Hospital, while 76 requests emanated from the Okanagan and Kootenay
areas for the Dellview Hospital and 15 from the northern portion of the Province
for admission to Skeenaview Hospital. The reduction in the number of applications
has been general throughout the Province and is encouraging as it is felt that it
reflects the greater interest of community agencies in attempting to find alternate
forms of care for the aged and perhaps an increase in preventive measures by physicians, social workers, and others dealing with our elderly citizens.
The Medical Superintendent has continued to follow the policy of accepting
for admission first those applicants who are in the greatest need of the treatment
and special facilities available in the three units or where alternate care in the community is unavailable or has proven inadequate. In addition, every attempt is made
to accept patients into the unit which is closest to the family and friends of each
patient. The assessment of need and urgency for admission is difficult and time-
consuming, and many hours are spent in attempting to gather full information regarding the total problem of each application so that the most urgent cases are
accommodated with the least delay. In this area of responsibility the Medical
Superintendent has been greatly assisted through the preadmission services of the
Valleyview Social Service Department. In many instances the social workers have
been able to assist families and community agencies in locating alternate forms of
care which solved the immediate problem and temporarily or permanently removed
the need for admission to the Geriatric Division.
In the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island area, the number of new applications received totalled 342, and it was possible to accept from the community
256, of which 133 were admitted the same month the application was received.
In addition, all acutely psychotic or otherwise severely disturbed patients were
accommodated immediately. In the areas served by the Dellview and Skeenaview
Hospitals there have been very few delays, and at the end of the year there were
no patients awaiting admission.
Actual admissions to the three units of the Geriatric Division totalled 407,
including 231 men and 176 women. Of these, 321 were direct admissions from
the community, the remaining 86 being transfers from other institutions of the
Mental Health Services. During the year, patients in Valleyview Hospital and
Crease Clinic who required special geriatric care included 30 men and 18 women.
The Dellview unit received 2 men and 1 woman on transfer from the Provincial
Mental Hospital and 8 men from the Colquitz Mental Home, while the Skeenaview
unit was able to accept 23 male transfers from Colquitz.
 D 122 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
There has been no change in the total bed accommodation in the Geriatric
Division, and consequently no significant increases or decreases in the over-all
patient population. As will be noted in the accompanying tables, the resident population in the three units totalled 1,257 as of March 31, 1963, an increase of 12
during the year. To this may be added, however, 44 patients who were on probationary discharge, thus giving a total on unit registers of 1,301 at the end of the
year. Total patient-days of care provided by the Geriatric Division numbered
419,376.
Separations due to death totalled 323, an increase of 8 over the previous year.
Separations on discharge to the community have increased to a total of 66, compared to 46 for the previous year.
VALLEYVIEW HOSPITAL
Valleyview Hospital, the Lower Mainland unit of the Geriatric Division, has
functioned to capacity throughout the year and provided medical and psychiatric
care for 1,030 elderly citizens, including 404 men and 626 women. The vast
majority of patients suffered from varying degrees of senile or arteriosclerotic brain
disease complicated by superimposed psychotic, neurotic, or behavioural reactions
of varying intensity. At the end of the year the resident population at this unit
totalled 729, including 252 men and 477 women, and represents a slight increase
of only 9 over the number in residence one year ago. In addition, 36 patients were
being carried on the unit register but were on probationary discharge to various
homes in the community.
Medical care has continued to be of high standard, and there have been no
major medical problems or serious infective illness of epidemic nature. Regular
daily medical supervision and treatment have been efficiently provided by Dr. Walter
Lazorko, Dr. Lillian Hutton, and Dr. Douglas Turner. The latter two physicians,
however, served only a portion of the year, leaving the service to pursue other forms
of medical practice. On August 1, 1962, Dr. Cameron Hunter replaced Dr. Turner,
while on September 7, 1962, Dr. Hutton was replaced by Dr. Olive Sinclair. The
Valleyview medical staff have been most diligent in their care of their elderly patients
and have maintained the general health of this patient-group at a very satisfactory
level in spite of the advanced ages of their charges and the frequent severity of physical and mental debility seen in many new admissions.
Throughout the year the services provided by the specialist consultant staff,
the surgical resident, and the internist at the Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic
have been regularly available to Valleyview patients, during which time a total of
182 referrals was made. Of this number, 126 required surgical treatment, including 77 general surgical procedures of varying nature and severity, 31 orthopedic
repairs, 27 genito-urinary procedures, and 15 ophthalmologic operations, most of
which were for cataract removal. The remainder were for minor dermatological
and nose and throat operations.
The psychiatric treatment programme has continued to utilize ataractic medication where indicated, especially chlorpromazine, the various anti-depressants, and
occasionally mood-elevating medications, which, when judiciously used in minimal
dosage, have proven to be most helpful in alleviating the anxiety reactions and
depressive states that are so commonly associated with the symptoms of chronic
brain syndrome in elderly patients. The most important approach to the treatment
of emotionally disturbed elderly persons, however, continues to be adequate assessment of the physical, mental, and emotional capabilities of each new patient, followed by the provision of a total environment and daily programme that will answer
 GERIATRIC DIVISION D 123
the needs and promote a sense of security for the elderly patient. Adequate diet,
regularized and supervised living habits, correction of physical defects, manual and
social interests commensurate with physical and mental ability, and particularly the
friendship and patient understanding of all who come in contact with the elderly
person continue to be the primary therapeutic goals guiding the Valleyview staff.
Dr. George Campbell, Valleyview dentist, and his assistant, Mrs. Elizabeth
McFarlane, have continued to provide a comprehensive dental service to patients
at both Valleyview and North Lawn Building, and during this past year provided
dental care for 2,068 patients. Although many newly admitted patients require
emergency care, such as extractions or fillings, the majority of dental work is now
confined to prophylactic and preventive treatment on a regular recall basis, as well
as increased attention to the fitting and repair of dentures.
The Valleyview X-ray Department has also contributed greatly to patient-care
through the diagnostic services provided by Dr. Jackson, Crease Clinic radiologist,
and Miss G. Fuller, Valleyview X-ray technician. During the year a total of 2,454
patients and staff was examined, with the processing of 4,205 films in a wide range
of radiological procedures. This also includes the annual tuberculosis chest survey
of all patients and staff at Valleyview, the films for which were referred to Dr.
Dewick, of the Division of Tuberculosis, North Lawn, for assessment and recording.
The Valleyview laboratory, in like manner, under the operation of Mr. A. Lee,
laboratory technician, has continued to augment general medical care by the provision of a full range of diagnostic services. During the year 9,905 test procedures
were carried out, including 740 urinalyses, 576 blood-chemistry estimations, 6,207
bacteriological procedures, 2,148 blood-cell counts, and 234 miscellaneous procedures. In addition, 625 various procedures were completed through the courtesy
of the Crease Clinic and East Lawn laboratories during periods when medical needs
for diagnostic services became greater than could be coped with by a single technician. A marked reduction in the number of requests for laboratory tests for staphylococcal organisms reflects the continued decrease in the problem of staphylococcal infections amongst this patient-group, and which has been minimal throughout the year. Dr. G. Nicolson, pathologist at the Crease Clinic, has continued to
provide technical supervision of the Valleyview laboratory and has also performed
88 autopsy examinations at the Valleyview Hospital during the year, which represents an autopsy rate of 40 per cent.
Miss Edith Johnstone, Superintendent of Nurses, has continued to give loyal
and devoted leadership to the nursing division, and with the assistance of her efficient supervisory staff has directed this department most ably throughout the year.
All nursing staff have consistently directed their efforts to provide the best possible
care for the elderly residents of this unit, all of whom require constant and patient
understanding and supervision. Of all personnel, the ward nurses and aides, who
are in close daily contact with patients, carry a primary role in the total treatment
programme and, in spite of the constant burden of a difficult and time-consuming
type of nursing care, have maintained a high standard throughout the year.
The protection of patients in the event of fire or other serious emergency has
been of concern to all staff, and many Valleyview personnel, including physicians,
housekeeping staff, nurses, and others, have willingly taken part in the instructional
programmes given by Mr. A. Lowry, Essondale Fire Chief, and his staff in practical
fire-fighting techniques and evacuation procedures. Several fire drills with practice
evacuation of patients were held during the year.
The spiritual needs of our patients have been fully met by the devoted ministry
of Reverend Filer, Valleyview chaplain, who has been unstinting in his efforts to
 D 124 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
bring solace and comfort to all patients at Valleyview and North Lawn Building.
Throughout the year formal Sunday services have been conducted in the Valleyview
chapel for the many patients able to attend, with mid-week chapel and vesper services on all wards for those who are physically or mentally incapable of leaving the
wards. In addition, regular pastoral visits to the bedridden and general visiting on
the wards have brought great comfort to many. In this work Reverend Filer has
been voluntarily assisted by a devoted resident of Riverside Building who has contributed regularly and faithfully by supplying organ music and helpful assistance
wherever required.
Father Lacko, too, has responded readily to the religious needs of all patients
of Roman Catholic faith, and Rev. J. O'Neil, resident chaplain at Essondale, has
also continued his interest in the Valleyview area when relieving Reverend Filer during holiday absence.
The Valleyview Social Service Department has contributed greatly to the general welfare of Valleyview patients and to the welfare of many elderly citizens out
of hospital. Mr. Lindsay McCormick, M.S.W., Social Work Supervisor, has been
enthusiastic and efficient in directing the development of this relatively new department, and great progress has been made.
A most important phase of social work has been in the preadmission service,
and during the year the Valleyview workers processed 128 formal applications, of
which they were able to place 63 persons in some appropriate resource other than
Valleyview, most of whom have continued to adjust quite satisfactorily. In addition,
assistance has been given in a less formal manner to many others who telephoned
or inquired regarding the admission of prospective patients.
In addition to the important preadmission and in-hospital services, the Social
Work Department has expanded considerably the difficult and time-consuming programme of discharge planning and probationary follow-up. During the year, 50
residents were separated either on a probationary basis or discharged in full, an
increase of 9 over the previous year. A total of 20 patients was discharged in full
from probation during the year, and as of March 31, 1963, 36 patients were out on
probation. Only 13 patients were returned from probation, their stay in the community ranging from 4 days to IVi years, representing an average length of stay in
the community of 10.3 months.
During the year important liaison has continued with social service departments
in the various communities through the orientation visits to Valleyview of other
social workers and through co-operative planning for the discharge of patients from
hospital, as well as contacts made during preadmission assessment. The ready cooperation and understanding received from the various social welfare agencies and
others concerning applicants for admission and the assistance received in planning
discharge arrangements for Valleyview patients have been sincerely appreciated.
The Valleyview Occupational Therapy Department has continued to provide
a service of major importance in the care of geriatric patients. Miss B. Balverson,
O.T.(Reg.), has directed a comprehensive programme and, with her staff of two
handicraft workers, has provided therapeutic occupations for 728 elderly men and
women, representing 20,114 individual patient-treatment periods during the year.
Special attention has been given to newly admitted patients in order to assess their
needs and abilities for craft work, with a view to assisting toward early rehabilitation
and contented adjustment to hospital, especially where a feeling of loneliness and
uselessness has appeared to be a contributory factor in the emotional disturbances
necessitating hospitalization. In addition to the many and varied handicraft projects
available for patients in the workshop area and on the wards, outdoor gardening has
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
D  125
again been of great interest to many. The Vancouver Dahlia Society has continued
its interest by again devoting a generous supply of tubers for the patients' garden
and by frequent visits of its members to Valleyview to assist the patients in the
cultivation of their plants. In addition, a special class was created in the Dahlia
Society's annual show for the display of blooms in September, with the granting of
prizes to a number of patients. This evidence of community interest has been sincerely appreciated.
The Recreational Therapy Department, in like manner, has continued to provide a very important contribution to the welfare and treatment of patients through
a regular and varied programme of socializing activities in the auditorium, on the
grounds, and on the wards. Special efforts have again been made toward encouraging community interest in the Hospital and its activities and to stimulating patients
toward renewed interest in community life through visits and entertainment provided
by concert groups, dance groups, and community choirs, as well as programmes such
as mystery rides and Stanley Park picnics, which take patients into the community.
In addition to the regular programmes of bingo parties, informal gatherings, concerts, and " Happy Gang " meetings in the auditorium, there has been considerable
expansion in the weekly dayroom programmes on all wards, including sing-songs,
film showings, and birthday socials for the benefit of the many patients unable to
leave the wards.
The British Columbia Division of the Canadian Mental Health Association has
again contributed regularly throughout the year toward the welfare of Valleyview
patients through the visiting volunteer programme and the operation of the tearoom
and tuck shop in Valleyview Lodge under the local direction of Mrs. Mildred
Franklin and Mr. J. Dodsworth. Volunteer ladies have visited the wards regularly
several days a week delivering magazines and books, assisting in the Occupational
Therapy Department and at social activities on the wards and in the auditorium, and
in many other ways have contributed immeasurably to the treatment and care of
our patients. Of special interest has been the weekly Saturday visits to V.V. 3
organized under the volunteer programme by a small group of young ladies from
the Lester Pearson High School in New Westminster. The youthful enthusiasm and
spontaneity of these young people have been most stimulating and much appreciated
by the many patients they have visited.
Pharmaceutical service has been maintained efficiently by Mr. George Kelly,
Valleyview pharmacist, who has been most conscientious in his efforts toward keeping all wards well supplied with pharmaceuticals and other medical or nursing
supplies normally supplied through this department. In addition, the pharmacist
has been most helpful to nursing staff by readily giving advice concerning new
medications and the handling and storing of such supplies on the ward. The Valleyview Pharmacy Committee, under the chairmanship of Dr. Lazorko, has convened
regularly throughout the year to study the pharmaceutical needs of geriatric patients
and to make recommendations to the Branch Pharmacy Council concerning new
medications particularly applicable in the medical treatment of elderly persons.
The medical records of Valleyview patients have been maintained in good
order throughout the year by the stenographic and clerical staff, under the supervision of Mrs. M. Anderson, in this office. In addition, stenographic services have
been supplied to the other departments when required, especially the nursing and
social service departments, each of which has required the full-time service of a
stenographer. Mrs. M. Hardwick has continued to carry out the varied secretarial
duties of the Medical Superintendent's office in an efficient and courteous manner.
 D 126 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1962/63
In like manner, the clerical staff of the business office and information centre
in the Valleyview Building have maintained a comprehensive service to patients,
staff, and public, and have coped efficiently with a large volume of personnel matters and accounting procedures.
The Public Works Department has been most co-operative and understanding
of the needs of this area, and in addition to maintaining utility services and prompt
attention to general maintenance and repairs as required, a number of projects have
been completed in the buildings and on the grounds which have been welcome
improvements. Such projects have included development of additional parking
space at the north end of V.V. 9; new sidewalks extending from V.V. 6 in front of
V.V. 1 to the road, making easier access for patients; and the installation of attractive new chain link fencing around the airing-courts of V.V. 1 and V.V. 8. New
surgery cupboards and work surfaces were completed in the surgeries of V.V. 5 and
V.V. 9, and further floor-tile replacements have been carried out in the Valleyview
Building, for which a special technique was developed for the seating of metal
baseboards to guard against the entrance of moisture, causing rust and objectionable odours.
DELLVIEW HOSPITAL
The Vernon unit of the Geriatric Division has continued to function to capacity
throughout the year under the capable administration of Mr. L. W. Fox, Supervisor,
and his deputy, and Miss H. O. Lipsey, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses. This unit
has provided a high standard of care and treatment for 316 elderly men and women,
representing a total of 84,881 patient-days of care. The resident population as of
March 31, 1963, stands at 233, just 1 more than on the same date a year ago.
Total admissions during the 12 months numbered 84, of which 72 were direct
from the community and 12 transfers from other units of the Mental Health Services,
of which 8 were from the Provincial Mental Home at Colquitz. Separations during
the same period totalled 83, including 67 deaths, 1 by transfer to Valleyview, and
15 on discharge to the community. It is to be noted that deaths decreased by 19
compared to the previous year, while discharges increased significantly by 13, or
87 per cent.
The general health of this patient-group has been maintained at a very satisfactory level, although the great majority are feeble and require constant nursing
care and supervision. Several pre-senile patients in their late fifties were admitted
to Dellview during the year and tend to lower the mean age of its population. At
the end of the fiscal year, however, the average age of male patients was 77.2 years
and that for women 81 years. Of the 233 in residence at this time, 214 were over
age 70, 110 over 80 years, 18 over 90 years, and 2 have exceeded 100 birthdays.
Medical care and supervision have again been provided regularly and efficiently
by Dr. J. R. Smith through frequent ward visits and ready response to emergency
calls whenever requested. There have been no major medical problems during the
year, and general morbidity has been minimal for this patient-group. A slight increase in the incidence of fractures resulting from accidental falls has occurred,
which is not unexpected where so many patients are feeble and unsteady. Seasonal
increases in upper respiratory infections occurred during the winter months, but
there have been no serious epidemic problems. Only one staphylococcal infection
developed, but immediate isolation and treatment prevented spread to others.
Diagnostic and general X-ray and laboratory services have again been provided
through the facilities of the Vernon Jubilee Hospital, whose technical and administrative staffs have continued to be most co-operative.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
D  127
In conjunction with a community-wide programme of oral Sabine vaccination
in the Okanagan area, a clinic was held at Dellview Hospital on June 1, 1962, during
which this preventive protection was accepted by all patients except three women
and four men, and most staff members also participated. During October the
annual chest survey of all patients and staff was conducted by a mobile unit of the
Division of Tuberculosis Control. No active cases of pulmonary infection were
discovered.
Dental care has again been provided by Dr. B. Bishop, who has visited the
Hospital regularly to conduct routine examinations on new patients, perform extractions or fillings, and to prepare dentures as required.
Visual-aid services have been supplied for a number of patients by Mr. W. H.
Franks, a local optometrist who conducted refractions and supplied corrective lenses
as required. Two patients were referred to Dr. L. A. Rook, ophthalmologist, for
special examination and advice.
Nursing services have continued to be maintained at a very desirable standard,
and Miss Lipsey has directed her nursing staff most capably and has motivated a
teamwork spirit amongst them that has contributed immeasurably to the general
happiness and welfare of this patient-group. There have been no major changes in
nursing policy, although nursing procedures have been modified or revised where
indicated. The increasing debility of many patients, especially those who have been
physically and mentally able to assist the nurses on the ward or in other small ways
around the Hospital, is placing additional demands on the present complement of
nursing staff.
Throughout the year every opportunity has been taken to assist and encourage
nursing staff to avail themselves of new knowledge or instruction available in the
field of nursing, especially with reference to the care of emotionally disturbed elderly
patients. To this end a centrally located room in the main building has been suitably
prepared and designated as a library, wherein current periodicals and instructive
literature are placed for the use of all staff. During October one psychiatric nurse
attended an institute in group psychotherapy organized by the British Columbia
Psychiatric Nurses' Association, and on her return reported on her experience and
training to her colleagues. The Vernon chapter of the Psychiatric Nurses' Association has also sponsored the showing of educational films from the Essondale film
library, and in other ways has stimuated nursing staff to keep abreast in their
professions.
The occupational and recreational programmes have continued to play a very
important role in the therapeutic care of Dellview patients and have been efficientiy
carried out by Mrs. J. Sherlock, handicraft instructor. It has also been possible to
expand these activities as a building formerly known as Nurses' Home 2 became
available and now provides much greater space for handicrafts and some social
activities than was previously possible in former quarters. Many more patients are
now able to benefit from these diversional activities, which are so helpful in dispelling
feelings of uselessness and rejection, a common attitude amongst elderly persons,
and in restoring confidence in their own abilities.
The Vernon branch of the Canadian Mental Health Association has contributed
gready to the welfare of the Dellview patients, not only through the generous gifts
for the residents at Christmas, but particularly through the regular and willing
attendance of volunteer ladies who assist with recreational activities in the Hospital
and in the handicraft area.
The religious needs of Dellview residents have again been well attended to by
regular services conducted in the Hospital by Monsignor Miles or Father Kenny and
 D 128 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
by Reverend Reeve.   Ministers of other denominations, too, often visit patients of
their respective faiths.
SKEENAVIEW HOSPITAL
The Terrace unit of the Geriatric Division has continued to maintain a very
satisfactory standard of care and has provided supervision and treatment for 331
elderly men. Direction of this unit has again been capably carried out by Mr. W. E.
Skillicorn, Unit Supervisor, and his deputy, Mr. F. W. Stewart, Chief Psychiatric
Nurse.
The facilities at Skeenaview have been utilized to near capacity throughout the
year, and at March 31, 1963, the resident population totalled 295, an increase of 2
over those in residence on the same date of the previous year. Admission to the
unit totalled 38, a decrease of 17 from the previous year, and included 13 first
admissions from the community, 2 transfers from Valleyview, and 23 transfers from
the Provincial Mental Home at Colquitz. Separations totalled 36, a decrease of 5,
1 being a transfer to Valleyview for specialized care, 1 patient was discharged on
probation, with the remaining 34 being due to death.
The general health and welfare of this patient-group have been maintained at
a very satisfactory level, and no major medical problems were encountered. General
debility and feebleness are evident among a greater number of patients, necessitating
closer personal attention and increased supervision of more patients than formerly.
Seasonal increases in respiratory infection have been experienced, but early and
intensive treatment has kept this problem to a minimum, and only a few of the most
debilitated patients suffered secondary pneumonias.
During the month of May, in conjunction with the community-wide public
health programme of Sabine oral vaccination, all patients and staff at Skeenaview
received this important protection against poliomyelitis. During September the
Division of Tuberculosis Control travelling clinic conducted the annual chest X-ray
of all staff and half the patient-group, with a recheck of doubtful films and the
balance of patients during February. No active cases of infection were found
amongst patients or staff.
Dr. R. E. Lee and Dr. D. Black, who replaced Dr. Christensen, have continued
to provide skilled general medical and surgical care and supervision to Skeenaview
patients, with regular ward visits and ready response to emergency calls whenever
required. Eight patients required major surgery, including five abdonimal operations, one leg amputation for severe circulatory disorder, and two repairs of fractured
hips resulting from accidental falls. As in past years, the surgery has been performed
by Dr. Lee at the Terrace and District General Hospital, now known as the Mills
Memorial Hospital, in memory of the late Dr. and Mrs. Stanley Mills, who gave many
years of devoted service to the people of the Terrace district. Our surgical cases
are returned to Skeenaview immediately following anaesthetic recovery, and receive
post-operative and convalescent care by staff who know them well. The administrative and technical staff have been most co-operative in supplying laboratory and
diagnostic X-ray services to Skeenaview patients whenever required.
Under the direction of Mr. Stewart, Chief Psychiatric Nurse, all members of
the nursing staff have been conscientious in maintaining a high level of nursing
service by the application of the latest techniques together with patient and understanding response to the many problems and needs of their elderly charges. A continued interest has been shown by the nursing staff in lectures and instructive literature made available to them concerning general and psychiatric nursing, especially
as applied to the care of the geriatric patient.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION D 129
The inauguration of a volunteer ladies' group during the year has been of
outstanding importance in the general welfare of Skeenaview patients. This enthusiastic and active group is gradually taking over the task of providing a varied
recreational and occupational programme formerly carried out by the nursing staff
when time became available from their basic nursing duties. This most welcome
assistance from the community has been greatly appreciated by patients and staff
alike, and the appearance of new faces, the kind and friendly approach of the
volunteers as they assist patients with letter-writing, reading, or just visiting, in
addition to conducting various forms of recreation have to a great degree dispelled
the feelings of loneliness and rejection felt by most patients of this type. Through
the interest and activities of the volunteer ladies, the general interest of the community has been more noticeable, as is evident by the increase in visits and entertainment provided by several church organizations, service clubs, as well as students
from various local schools. The advent of television service to the Terrace area has
been an additional source of pleasure for patients through the provision of television
sets for each dayroom. In December the Kitimat Business and Professional Women's
Club generously donated a beautiful television set for patients' use, which has been
installed in " The Den," the small open ward.
Father Mohan and Rev. A. P. Horsefield have attended to the spiritual needs
of the patients by regular services and mid-weekly visits with patients. Groups of
residents continue to attend services at churches in downtown Terrace, and many also
accompany relatives and friends to churches of their own choice. Representatives
from the Salvation Army and ministers of other denominations regularly visit residents who formerly were members of their congregations.
 D  130
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
STATISTICAL TABLES
VALLEYVIEW HOSPITAL
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Valleyview Hospital, Essondale,
April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Male
Female
Total
248
8
472
16
720
24
Total as at April 1, 1962                 	
256
488
744
Admissions—
First admissions - , 	
113
3
1
2
1
28
113
5
1
1
18
226
8
2
2
2
46
148
138
286
Total under care - -
404
626
1,030
Separations—■
Discharged in full 	
Died   .   	
11
117
4
2
18
11
105
15
18
22
222
19
2
36
152
149
301
+4
252
+5
477
+9
729
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
D  131
Table 2.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Health
Unit and School District of Residence and Sex, April 1, 1962, to
March 31, 1963.
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
Simon Fraser, New Westmin
School District No. 1	
1
1
ster—
„   2	
1
1
School District No. 40	
7
9
16
Selkirk, Nelson—
 43-	
6
3
9
School District No. 7	
1
1
North Fraser Valley, Mission—
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 42	
3
3
6
School District No. 17	
1
1
„   75_	
2
2
„   23 	
2
2
„   76  	
1
1
North Okanagan, Vernon—
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 22	
1
1
School District No. 47	
1
1
2
South Central, Kamloops—
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 31 	
1
1
School District No. 50	
1
1
2
Cariboo, Williams Lake—
, 53	
1
2
3
School District No. 28 . 	
1
1
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
Northern Interior, Prince
School District No. 59	
1
1
George—
Greater Victoria Metropolitan
School District No. 55 	
1
1
Board of Health-
 57	
1
1
Greater Victoria—School Dis
Upper Fraser Valley, Chilli
trict No. 61    .        ... 	
15
4
19
wack—
Saanich and South Vancouver
School District No. 33 	
2
2
Island—School District No.
„   34   	
4
3
7
63            	
5
5
Boundary, Cloverdale—
Central Vancouver Island, Na
School District No. 35 	
3
2
5
naimo—
„   36...	
9
9
18
School District No. 65	
1
1
„   37	
1
1
„   67	
2
2
Metropolitan Health Committee,
„   68	
1
...	
1
Vancouver—
School districts not covered by
School District No. 38 ..	
4
4
health units—
„   39	
44
67
111
School District No. 46	
1
2
3
„        „   41	
15
9
24
 49..	
1
1
, 44	
5
7
12
 73.	
1
1
„   45	
2
4
6
Unorganized	
Unknown. —	
Totals  	
1
1
1
2
1
144
135
279
Table 3.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Method
of Admission, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Age-group (Years)
Method of Admission
40-49
50-59
60-69
70-79 1 80-«9
90 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M. F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
First Admissions
1
1
	
4
4
1
66
1
53
8
~~8
5
~i5
1
1
14->
Wt
1
1
721 63
777
1|    1|..._.
4
4
671 72| 641 53
144|135|   279
Readmissions
1       1
1       1
1       1
3
1
1
11    1
2
4
31        7
■
 D  132
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Table 4.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Mental
Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Age-group (Years)
Total
Mental Diagnosis
40-49
50-59
60-69
70-79    80-89
90 and
Over
Grand
Total
J
1
M.| F.
1      1
1
M.IF.
1
M.|F.
I
1      1       1
M.|F. I M.IF.
1      1      1
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
1
1
1
2
5|    6| -  | ....
11     1 j ...  | __
—      1|     H  -
11    8'    81    5
.
6
1
8
1
14
—
	
1
1
1
1
7
1
2
2
2
1
7
3
13|  13
16| 12
1
1     3
 1    2
1
-1     1
.....|    1
1|	
2|.—
 f    1
74| 54
6|    4
221 33
26
101    7|    3
1|   	
.....     3 	
4
7
28
7
4
1
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology. 	
4
2
Anxiety reaction without mention of somatic symp-
: z.
...
i
1     1      -
1
!   i|
ll - I -
2|      |__
!   ii
27| 28| 42
2|    1|    3
15| 14|    7
24
1
17
1
Chron:c brain sydrome with neurotic reaction	
1
2
1
Chronic brain sydrome with behavioural reaction ....
— —
—
128
10
i
55
11       1       1     11    4
4
671' 77.1  641  531     8
5
1441135
279
Table 5.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Mental
Diagnosis, Marital Status, and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Table 6.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by
■•■■    i   Religion and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Table 7.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by
Previous Occupation and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
 geriatric division
D 133
Table 8.—Resident Population of Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by
Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, Decemer 31, 1962
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
20-39
40-49
50-59
60-64
65-69
70-74
75-79
80 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M. 1 F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
Schizophrenic disorders	
4
4
2
5
1
4
1
~~2
2
1
1
5
1
1
1
8
2
1
6
1
1
1
13
4
12
1
~2
13
15
2
1
2
10
1
5
1
1
8
15
1
1
18
1
21
1
1
1
24
25
3
1
1
2
29
7
1
1
1
3
33
25
1
1
1
44
4
17
2
1
84
54
44
5
1
49
32
5
2
3
42
46
2
1
1
1
3
5
75
9
3
37
60
4
1
4
121
95
3
3
2
1
2
12
84
14
1
78
92
9
	
—
—
3
Paranoia and paranoid states
7
163
Psychosis with cerebral arterio-
141
—
—
	
	
5
Psychosis of other demonstrable
1
1
_■
2
3
Anxiety reaction  without mention of somatic symptoms	
2
Obsessive-compulsive reaction
1
Neurotic-depressive reaction	
Chronic   brain   syndrome   with
	
	
	
1
2
5
2
6
2
2
—
1
17
Chronic   brain   syndrome   with
behavioural reaction	
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S.
159
23
1
1
—
....
6
10
16
19
13
3
Other   diseases   of   the   central
nervous system not associated
with psychosis ~	
115
Totals
6
6
71     4
5
2
71     4
4
8
43
69
67
135
128
257 267
485
752
 D  134
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Table 9.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Valleyview
Hospital, Essondale, by Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April
1, 1962, to March 31, 1963.
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
40-49    50-59     60-69    70-79     80-89    90-99
F.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.  M.
F.  M.
Total
F.  M.lF.
I      I
Grand
Total
Live Discharges
Schizophrenic disorders	
Manic-depressive reaction	
Paranoia and paranoid states	
Senile psychosis-
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis..
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology-
Other and unspecified psychoses	
Anxiety reaction	
Mental deficiency..
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural reaction	
Senility, N.O.S...
Totals-
Deaths
Schizophrenic disorders..
Senile psychosis-
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis...
Other and unspecified psychoses..
Chronic brain syndrome with neurotic reaction-
Mental deficiency-
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural reaction	
Chronic brain syndrome not otherwise stated-
Other diseases of the central nervous system-
Totals	
3     2
1
1     1
1     2
H    11
48| 36
1
30 12
3 3
8   10
57   53
12
10J13J    6|    8| .—I    2
14
4     4
1     4
17|~26
117
105
43
8
42
43
1
1
1
75
9
42
222
Table 10.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Valleyview
Hospital, Essondale, by Mental Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex,
April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 geriatric division
D  135
Table 11.—Deaths Occurring in Valleyview Hospital,  Essondale,  by
Cause of Death, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Age-group (Years)
Total
Cause of Death
60-69    70-79 [ 80-89
90-99
ca
O
H
1      1      I      1      1
M.| F. I M.I F. | M.| F.
M.|F.
M.
F.
3
a
0
--
1
1
2
3
1
28
2
1
3
3
'1
1
2
1
3
1
3
18
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
44
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
31
3
2
6
3
1
1
1
1
1
9
1
1
11
1
2
3
4
1
2
81
1
5
I
4
5
1
3
3
3
4
1
1
5
61
4
3
1
8
6
2
1
2
1
5
7
4
1
Disease of the blood and blood-forming
2
7
142
4
1
8
2
12
11
3
4
5
1
8
Totals
2
48
36
57
53
12
14
117
105
222
Table 12.—Deaths Occurring in Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Cause
of Death, Length of Stay, and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 D 136
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
DELLVIEW HOSPITAL
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Dellview Hospital, Vernon,
April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Male
Female
Total
106
1
126
232
1
Total as at April 1, 1967.
107
126
233
Admissions—
33
2
2
8
37
1
70
2
3
8
45
38
83
152
4
39
3
164
4
28
1
4
316
Separations—
Discharged in full                  .....
Died
8
67
1
7
46
37
83
Net increase or decrease                	
In residence, March 31,1963  , 	
106
+ 1
127
+ 1
233
Table 2.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Health
Unit and School District of Residence and Sex, April 1, 1962, to
March 31, 1963.
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
School District No. 1	
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 11      	
-         "         "   12    . .   .
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
3
2
3
1
12
1
3
1
1
3
3
4
3
1
4
1
11
3
1
1
1
5
1
5
6
1
1
6
1
2
7
2
23
1
6
1
1
2
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 35	
"   36	
—
1
1
Metropolitan Health Committee,
Vancouver—
School District No. 39   	
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School Distn'ft No 14
1
Simon  Fraser,  New  Westminster—
School District No. 40	
"   15	
"         "          "   16
2
1
1
 17	
"   23	
"   77	
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 19	
 '   20-	
"   21—	
"   22...	
 78	
South Central, Kamloops—
Skeena, Prince Rupert-
School District No. 52—   .—
Peace River, Dawson Creek—■
School District No. 60	
Greater  Victoria  Metropolitan
Board of Health-
Greater Victoria—School District No. 61	
1
3
2
Central Vancouver Island, Nanaimo—School DistrictNo. 68
Totals   	
1
"         "         "   26
45
38
83
Northern  Interior,  Prince
George—
School District No. 55 	
 57	
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
D 137
Table 3.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Method of
Admission, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Age-group (Years)
Method of Admission
50-59
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Certification 	
1
3
3
25
17
14
16
2
2
45
38
83
Table 4.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental
Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Age-group (Years)
Total
Mental Diagnosis
50-59
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
First Admissions
1
....
2
1
3
4
1
70
1
16
1
13
16
2
2
7
1
1
1
35
1
37
8
1
1
Chronic brain syndrome with neurotic reac-
1
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural
72
Totals         	
1  I
3
3
25
17
14
16
2
2
45
38
83
Table 5.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental
Diagnosis, Marital Status, and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Table 6.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Religion
and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Table 7.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Previous
Occupation and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
 D 138
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1962/63
Table 8.—Resident Population of Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental
Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, December 31, 1962
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
50-59
60-64
65-69
70-74
75-79
80 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.IF.
1
M.IF.
'     1
M.
F.
M.
F.
—-
—
1
	
7
1
1
7
1
1
8
1
2
1
8
1
1
3
10
4
1
17
1
8
2
1
16
4
14
33
19
24
2
9
1
5
1
2
1
41
24
17
18
1
1
65
26
2
27
1
6
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
5
1
Chronic brain sydrome with behavioural re-
1
8| 14
— |    7
106
7| 14
50
Totals
1
2
1
14
6
18
11
34
39
42
70
110|128
1
238
Table 9.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Dellview
Hospital, Vernon, by Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1,
1962, to March 31, 1963.
Age-group (Years)
Total
Mental Diagnosis
60-69
70-79
80-89
90-99
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Live Discharges
Chronic brain syndrome with be-
2
1
1
3
3    |      1
15     I     14
4
4
4
39
5
28
9
Deaths
Chronic brain syndrome with be-
I
I
18     I     10
67
Table 10.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Dellview
Hospital, Vernon, by Mental Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex,
April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 geriatric division
D  139
Table 11.—Deaths Occurring in Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Cause
of Death, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Age-group (Years)
Cause of Death
60-69 I 70-79
1
80-89
90 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
2
	
3
15
1
9
1
13
1
14
4
4
4
34
1
1
27
5
61
Total*.
2I_
18
10
15
14
4
4
39
28
67
Table 12.—Deaths Occurring in Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Cause
of Death, Length of Stay, and Sex, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 D 140
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
SKEENAVIEW HOSPITAL1
Table  1.—Movement of Population, Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace,
April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
In residence, April 1, 1962
293
Admissions—
First admissions
Transfers from other geriatric units     	
Transfers from Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz
Total admissions	
Total under care	
13
2
23
38
331
Separations—
Died 	
Transferred to other geriatric units
On probation and still out	
34
1
1
Total separations.
36
Net increase 	
In residence, March 31, 1963
1 This institution cares for male patients only.
+2
295
Table 2.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Health
Unit and School District of Residence, April 1, 1962, to March 31,
1963.
Health Unit
Selkirk, Nelson—
School District No. 7 	
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 20 	
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 24 	
Number
Northern Interior, Prince George
School District No. 55 	
 58 	
Metropolitan Health Committee, Vancouver-
School District No. 39 _	
Simon Fraser, New Westminster—
School District No. 40   -
Health Unit
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 71  	
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 52  	
 53 	
"   54 	
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 59 	
Number
Greater Victoria Metropolitan Board of Health-
Greater Victoria—School District No. 61	
Saanich and South Vancouver Island—■
School District No. 63   _ _
" 64    rr
Total
38
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
D  141
Table 3.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Method
of Admission and Age-group, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Method of Admission
Age-group (Years)
Total
40-49
50-59
60-69
70-79
80-89
Warrant — —	
i
3
3
—
3
8
1
1
12
6
7
30
1
Totals
l
6
12
13
6
38
Table 4.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Mental
Diagnosis and Age-group, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
Total
40-49
50-59
60-69
70-79
80-89
Schizophrenic disorders  _	
1
5
1
9
1
2
5
2
2
1
3
3
1
2
20
5
1
1
3
1
7
Totals.	
1
6
12
13
6
38
Table 5.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Mental
Diagnosis and Marital Status, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Table 6.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Religion,
April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Table 7.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Previous
Occupation, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
 D  142
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1962/63
Table 8.—Resident Population of Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by
Mental Diagnosis and Age-group, December 31, 1962
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
40-49     50-59
60-64
65-69     70-74    75-79
80 and
Over
Total
Schizophrenic disorders	
Manic-depressive reaction	
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states-
Senile psychosis-
Presenile psychosis	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis-
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology-
Other and unspecified psychoses	
Alcoholism 	
Mental deficiency-
Chronic   brain  syndrome   with  behavioural
reaction	
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S—
Syphilis and its sequelas..
Other diseases of the central nervous system
not associated with psychosis	
Totals..
19
1
30
26
39
36    |      70
48
1
1
1
19
91
17
29
61
157
2
1
1
59
1
28
3
6
1
5
4
5
3
12
10
298
Table 9.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Skeenaview
Hospital, Terrace, by Mental Diagnosis and Age-group, April 1,
1962, to March 31, 1963.
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
60-69      70-79      80-89      90-99
Total
Live Discharges
Schizophrenic disorders .
Deaths
Schizophrenic disorders	
Manic depressive reaction .
Senile psychosis ..
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis...
Syphilis and its sequela .	
Mental deficiency..
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural reaction-
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S   	
Senility, N.O.S  	
Totals  	
21
12
1
7
5
1
1
2
2
3
34
Table 10.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Skeenaview
Hospital, Terrace, by Mental Diagnosis and Length of Stay, April 1,
1962, to March 31, 1963.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
D 143
Table 11.—Deaths Occurring in Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Cause
of Death and Age-group, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Cause of Death
Age-group (Years)
Total
60-69
70-79
80-89
90-99
1
5
1
2
5
1
4
1
2
7
2
2
1
5
1
2
15
1
7
1
2
Totals 	
1
21
9
3
34
Table 12.—Deaths Occurring in Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Cause
of Death and Length of Stay, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 D 144 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
PART VI.—COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE, BURNABY
K. J. Davies, Director
This has been a year of many changes. During the summer of 1962 the Mental
Health Centre strength was depleted by the loss of key personnel who had been
stalwarts in its five years of operation (Director, Business Manager, Supervisor of
Nursing, and Supervisor of Occupational Therapy), as well as other psychiatrists,
psychologists, social workers, nurses, and occupational therapists. The excellent
effort of the remaining staff maintained the quality and nearly the quantity of work
as new staff were gradually recruited and trained. The remainder of 1962 was a
period of adaptation, with the emergence of some changes in orientation in 1963.
Better community service became the major project of all departments, with a
more defined orientation of the Mental Health Centre as a psychiatric treatment and
consultation clinic. This necessitated all referrals coming from the community
medical doctors and included all other agencies involved with the patients' health and
welfare. Immediate access to the Mental Health Centre was facilitated by the establishment of intake teams (psychiatrist, psychologist, social worker, and nurse) in
both the Adult and Children's Clinics to process all referrals and provide, as indicated, screening, emergency and brief service, consultation, or transfer to a treatment
team. Each of the four multi-discipline treatment teams functioned under the
medical responsibility of certified psychiatrists to give a more complete assessment
and consultation, as well as individual and group psychotherapy. For the first time
experienced psychiatrists and psychologists were recruited from the community on
a part-time basis by means of sessional payment. Private psychiatrists were also
invited to treat their patients in the day-hospital setting in teamwork with the Mental
Health Centre staff. Numerous meetings with several agencies also established
policy wherein various aspects of treatment could be integrated. A strong trend
of comprehensive family therapy and family-group interviewing developed in both
the Adult and Children's Clinics, with more advances in sharing duties and services
between the two clinics.
To keep in contact with community needs and other resources, staff of all
disciplines became more involved in liaison committee meetings as well as lectures
delivered to outside groups and received at the Mental Health Centre staff development programme. Great demand for public education continued to be requested
from Mental Health Centre staff. Professional education (students of medicine,
psychology, social work, nursing, occupational therapy, plus special school counsellors, probation officers, medical health officers, and clergymen) was expanded and
will continue to demand more staff time in this extremely vital area in the move to
community psychiatry.
ADULT CLINIC
A total of 486 patients (plus family members) was treated, with 583 patients
being seen in assessment during the year. Throughout the six years of Mental Health
Centre operation, only about one-quarter of the referrals and one-third of the assessments (ratio of 5:8, male-female) are actually taken into treatment (ratio male-
female, 5:9. Readmissions (15 per cent) and diagnostic categories (psychotic-
psychoneurotic-personality disturbance in ratio of 1:2:1) remain about the same.
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES D  145
Out-patient Department
The need for comprehensive treatment has increased the number of family
members being seen separately or in a joint interview with the patient. One of the
difficulties in providing therapy for male family members or patients has been the
problem of getting time off work, which has necessitated most of the staff working
every Tuesday evening when the Clinic is open.
Also on Tuesday evenings, the Social Club, with various group and recreational
activities, provides meaningful contacts for many patients and ex-patients, and this
has now been opened to family members as well. The programme is prepared by an
executive of patients assisted by nursing and occupational-therapy staff with much
more patient effort as they have assumed more responsibility.
Day Hospital
One hundred and forty-six patients (3,716 total patient-days) have been
treated in the Day Hospital, with an average stay of 30 days during this year. The
increasing use of this facility had only started toward the end of the year, and the
anticipation is for an average occupancy of 40, compared with the previous level
of approximately 20. This increased number of patients with the same number of
staff has been possible by staff assignment to groups rather than individuals. Besides
the usual somatic therapies (E.C.T., insulin, amytal interviews, medications), four
levels of group activity have been set up:—
(1) Activity programme, stressing reality tasks in group efforts with repressive-
supportive orientation.
(2) Rehabilitation programme, with similar activities but also educational and
expressive approach only in realistic vocational aptitudes, goals, and
efforts.
(3) Motivation programme, with more overt emotional interaction encouraged
and attempts to resolve the emotional conflicts through group relationships.
(4) Group psychotherapy for young adults, with emotional interaction plus
insight goals to ease personality conflicts.
These groups are structured and directed by the staff each morning, and the
patients are brought together for the afternoon activities, which are organized by
themselves and include group planning, group discussion, psychodrama, group education, plus recreation. Every other week, family members are encouraged to also
attend for an afternoon to help their participation in treatment.
A reorganization of the physical plant has converted the old treatment room
into an area for sewing, stenographic, beauty-parlour, and kitchen sections. The
woodworking section must also be developed into a more practical and useful training unit.
CHILDREN'S CLINIC
There has already been a substantial increase under the new community
orientation to a total of 260 patients (plus an average of two family members) treated,
while 276 patients were seen in assessment. The requests for service are enormous,
and treatment only possible for a minority. For example, the intake team handled
126 calls in one month; interpreting services and referral procedures involved 35,
liaison and consultation with social agencies involved another 35, obtaining and
co-ordinating assessment information involved 40, six were emergency first-aid
interviews, and 20 entailed processing information on behalf of the patient and
family.
 D 146 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Out-patient Department
The new intake procedure has enabled most of the therapists to spread their
time equally between brief and intensive therapy. This Clinic is the only one in the
area offering this specialty of intensive child psychotherapy, and caution must be
exercised not to withdraw staff from this important community contribution. An
important addition to each treatment team has been a public health nurse (also
assigned one-half time to the Day Centre), who helps co-ordinate team function as
well as contacts the community public health nurses and school nurses.
Day Centre
This operation has been limited to 10 pre-school children with communication
problems. Activities are varied, with emphasis on creative, expressive endeavours to
arouse the curiosity of the children, stimulate spontaneous verbal expression, increase
vocabulary, and improve speech. It has proven successful as far as treatment, training, and research are concerned. The patients in the Adult Day Hospital and
" Venture " half-way house built several pieces of play-therapy equipment, which
enhanced the programme. The Children's Day Centre has great application to preschool, elementary school, as well as adolescents.
Agency Consultation Service
A weekly service has been provided by Mental Health Centre child psychiatrists
on afternoon visits to the Health Centre for Children, Children's Hospital, Children's
Aid, Catholic Children's Aid, Juvenile Court, and Willingdon School. There have
been requests to increase the service to these agencies as well as extend it to others.
We are gathering statistics at present to evaluate a special problem, with numerous
requests for residential treatment of adolescents whose behaviour is the result of
emotional disturbance (as distinct from sociopathic personality) who are destructive
to foster homes and disruptive in group-living homes.
Group-living Homes
A screening, consultation, and therapeutic service is being provided to social
welfare group-living homes in Burnaby (adolescent boys) and Prince George
(adolescent girls). These homes and this service are proposed to increase greatly
in the next few years.
TRAVELLING CLINICS
Multi-discipline teams (psychiatrist, psychologist, social worker) are providing
a community psychiatric service (to local physicians, medical health officers, and
public health nurses in the school programme, social welfare, probation officers) by
assessing psychiatric referrals and giving consultation regarding treatment recommendations. They are also seeing limited numbers of patients in psychotherapy plus
continued supervision of local personnel. Other personnel (school counsellors and
clergymen) are also being given guidance and instruction in their counselling duties.
On most community visits there are requests for lectures to professional and lay
personnel. The psychiatric services are centred in the local public health unit, and
there have been requests from every unit for increased number of visits. Policy
meetings with public health and social welfare senior staff are continuing to establish
the best co-operative use of available psychiatric resources now in future planning,
with the inevitable need for expanded community psychiatric services and the estab-
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
D  147
lishment of regional mental health clinics in the areas now served by the travelling
teams, as follows:-—■
(a) Boundary Health Unit—one day per week.
(b) Chilliwack, Abbotsford, Mission—two and one-half days per month.
(c) Trail, Nelson, Cranbrook—one week bi-monthly.
(d) Prince George—four days every four months.
(e) Gibson-Powell River, Kitimat-Terrace, Prince Rupert, Williams Lake-
Quesnel, Dawson Creek-Fort St. John—one week bi-annually.
The number of patients seen at these units is recorded in the statistical tables;
however, this does not record the other consultative and educational involvement.
The need in these communities indicates increasing services, and the possibility of
grouping Prince George, Williams Lake, Quesnel, and Dawson Creek into a bimonthly trip is being considered for the fall of 1963.
DEPARTMENT REPORTS
Chief Psychologist (Dr. D. Shalman)
1. Staff Qualifications.—A great advance was made in the revision of classification of clinical psychologists which established a doctoral category, with an initial
attempt made to provide pay commensurate with the advanced training ability. The
establishment of two Ph.D.s on part-time sessional payment is a direct response to
the challenge of providing a better service to the public and other professional
disciplines.
2. In-service Training.—Senior psychologists are now actively involved in
upgrading the abilities of other psychology staff by weekly seminars and case presentations on diagnostic techniques and reporting. Lectures and liaison with visits by
other community psychologists have also continued weekly throughout the year.
3. Research Projects.—(a) Sociometric assessment of changes in attitude and
behaviour of Day Hospital adult patients.
(fo) Reading disability in children investigated from three aspects—visual perception, auditory perception, learning.
(c) Proposed project on autistic syndrome—diagnostic evaluation, parental
attitude ratings, intrapersonal assessment of family, parental group psychotherapy.
4. Group Psychotherapy.—Three psychologists are doing group psychotherapy
with two " open ended " groups of young adults. One group meets twice weekly
during the daytime with six to eight Day Hospital patients selected for this type of
psychotherapy. The other group meets once weekly on Tuesday evenings with six
to eight selected out-patients.
Social Work Supervisor (Mr. D. Ricketts)
1. Staff attention turning more to briefer and community-oriented services and
family group contact and interviewing.
2. Case loads and direct-service involvment have gone up significantly with
the above orientation and new intake team approach. Referrals have doubled within
a few months of 1963, and social-work case loads are averaging around 30.
3. Social-work student training will necessitate increased staff time and effort,
with requests for more placements at the Mental Health Centre in the coming year.
Supervisor of Nursing (Miss S. MacDonald)
1. The Day Hospital nursing staff are more involved with groups and becoming more proficient with the group approach.
 D 148 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1962/63
2. The Day Centre nursing staff have operated an active programme with the
children, as well as being involved as co-ordinators and liaison personnel with the
treatment teams' out-patient activities.
3. Training of students, lecturing, and liaison work have involved considerable
nursing time.
Supervisor of Occupational Therapy (Mr. A. Dyce)
1. The Day Hospital structured morning activities are the special responsibility
of the Occupational Therapy Department. Assessment of the patient's individual
work attitude, habits, and ability, combined with group function and behaviour, is
reported to the psychiatric team. Specific use of reality-oriented (meaningful activities, both to the individual patient and group) occupational therapy within the Day
Hospital milieu programme leads to community rehabilitation.
2. Social Club participation has increased, with more patient responsibility
here as well as in the Day Hospital.
3. Training of two postgraduate students from the University of Toronto with
nine-week internships, as well as the involvement in the University of British Columbia programme, has been an integral part of the Occupational Therapy Department
activities.
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
D  149
STATISTICAL TABLES
Table 1.—Summary of Operations, Mental Health Centre, Burnaby,
Adult Clinic, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Male
Female
Total
Total number pending at April 1, 1962	
Plus assessments—■
Previous Mental Health Services hospital services-
Community health services	
Other institutions	
From in-town general practitioners and other specialists..
From out-of-town general practitioners 	
From in-town psychiatrists 	
From out-of-town psychiatrists  .	
Intake service without interview  	
Totals.
Disposition of assessments—
Hospitalization recommended..
Social agency recommended.
Other medical care recommended..
Adyice and assessment only	
Patient withdrew 	
Cases opened for treatment-
Total pending at March 31, 1963-
Patient load—
Brought forward at April 1, 1962 _
Total out-patient department cases opened .
Less out-patient department cases closed	
Total under treatment at March 31,1963..
19
12
49
11
94
15
37
2
1
15
52
12
175
22
55
3
2
221
336
228
9
7
14
94
9
83
355
18
20
28
97
14
155
216
332
12
23
76
82
158
83
75
172
154
326
162
164        |
26
27
101
23
269
37
92
5
3
557
583
27
27
42
191
23
_238_
~1W
35
248
236
484
245
239
Family members under treatment at March 31, 1963:  Parents, 3;  spouses, 13; other, 1;  total, 17.
Table 2.—Movement of Population, Out-patient Department, Mental
Health Centre, Adult Clinic, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Female
Total
Case load as at April 1, 1962 .
Total admissions 	
First admissions	
Readmissions  	
Cases closed	
Case load as at March 31, 1963..
76
82
64
18
83
75
172
154
127
27
162
164
248
236
191
45
245
239
Table 3.—First Admissions to Mental Health Centre, Adult Clinic, by
Health Unit and School District of Residence, April 1, 1962, to
March 31, 1963.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 D  150
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
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MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1962/63
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 D  154
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Table 8.—Movement of Population, Day Hospital, Mental Health
Centre, Adult Clinic, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Male
Female
Total
In day hospital, April 1, 1962
5
38
11
7
73
12
12
111
23
Totals
54
44
92
79
146
Less discharges
123
In day hospital, March 31,1963
10
13
23
Total patient-days of those discharged-
Total discharges..
Average stay in day hospital.
 3,716
      123
_30.2 days
Table 9.—Movement of Population, Children's Clinic, Burnaby,
April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
New
Male    Female
Repeat
Male    Female
Grand
Total
Intake Section
Cases carried over from previous year.	
Cases opened—
Self-referral, friends, relatives	
Private physicians	
Schools	
Social agencies-
Other.	
9
42
2
64
4
Total cases carried in intake during year_
Cases closed from intake section—
Intake service only	
Withdrew	
Referred outside source-
Transferred to treatment-
53
Total cases closed from intake-
Cases carried in intake at the end of year	
Treatment Section
Cases carried over from previous year	
Cases transferred from intake	
Cases closed  ,	
2 I
53
50
Cases carried in treatment at the end of year..
91
7
25
32
3
52
17
124 |  64
31
34
11
1
1
2
3
29
27
12
122 |  63 |  65 |
22
25
4
29
27
12
18
20
7
33
32
9
26
74
2
165
4
65 |  23 | 276
128
10
14
121
273
139
121
95
165
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
D 155
Table 10.—Summary of Diagnostic Service Given to Agencies by Mental
Health Centre, Burnaby, Travelling (Children's) Clinics, April 1,
1962, to March 31, 1963.
Place of Examination
New
Repeat
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
Local agencies and medical units—
2
3
7
13
7
30
52
22
2
4
21
2
7
11
5
10
20
6
19
10
2
7
3
3
16
16
15
3
13
5
4
1
7
3
12
1
7
9
3
25
5
1
3
18
1
1
6
3
7
4
3
1
2
1
1
5
2
3
4
6
2
2
9
4
3
2
1
1
4
4
Children's Hospital _  	
5
17
34
12
39
20
Public health units—
99
44
South Central Health Unit
6
North Fraser Health Unit                    _
9
61
3
17
24
5
16
35
Selkirk Health Unit                               	
14
38
11
Totals          .  —	
253
110
98
52
513
 D 156
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Table 11.—Summary of Mental Health Centre, Burnaby, Travelling
(Children's) Clinics Service, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Vancouver 	
Abbotsford	
Chilliwack	
Total Number of
Children Seen on
Travelling Clinic
  131
     14
               47
Other Agency
Consultative
Cases
32
8
21
Cranbrook 	
                   15
13
Creston	
Dawson Creek	
       2
                           23
2
Fort St. John	
        12
Gibsons	
                   3
2
Kamloops	
                     6
4
Kelowna     	
                    10
16
Kitimat	
                  15
2
Mission    	
               9
4
Nelson     .
14
4
Penticton    	
6
8
Powell River	
                        11
2
Prince George   __.
                      33
2
Prince Rupert  	
15
13
Quesnel	
Salmon Arm .__.__	
       5
           4
2
2
Surrey .     	
     99
45
Terrace               ..       .   	
8
7
Trail	
       24
8
Vernon     -	
2
2
Williams Lake	
       5
Totals	
  513
199
Table 12.—Summary of Services Given by Mental Health Centre,
Burnaby, Children's Clinics, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Stationary
Clinic
Mainland
Travelling
Clinic
Total
Number of children referred-
Total number of children given full examination _
Other agency consultative cases..
Clinic direct-service cases referred (private)—
New	
Repeat.
271
202
32
67
7
513
513
167
784
715
199
67
7
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
D  157
Table 13.—Sources of All Cases Referred to Children's Clinics and
Service Given, April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Number
of
Cases
Type of Service Given
Agency or Source
Agency
Diagnostic
Study
Clinic
Direct
Service
1. Social agencies—
34
42
20
1
2
1
1
25
1
113
44
6
15
62
4
17
24
5
16
36
14
39
12
9
5
30
1
1
4
8
26
6
1
1
1
1
2
42
3
3
74
26
6
34
12
20
99
44
6
9
61
3
17
24
5
16
35
14
38
11
4
5
17
*39
34
8
8
1
2
1
1
2. Institutions—
5
1
3. Medical and health agencies—
14
South Central Health Unit	
North Fraser Health Unit....  	
6
1
1
West Kootenay Health Unit  	
1
Selkirk Hi-altli TTnit
1
1
9
5
30
1
1
3
9
6
1
St. Paul's Hospital
1
1
1
2
3
3
3
74
26
8,  Othp.r
6
Totals
784
513
271
 D 158
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
Table 14.—Diagnoses of All Cases Assessed by the Children's Clinic,
April 1, 1962, to March 31, 1963
Male
Female
Total
Psychotic disorders—
Schizophrenic reaction—
Simple type..
Hebephrenic type..
Catatonic type	
Childhood type„
Psychotic reaction without clearly defined structural change.
Chronic brain syndrome with psychotic reaction	
Autism   	
Psychoneurotic disorders-
Anxiety reaction	
Dissociative reaction-
Phobic reaction	
Obsessive-compulsive reaction-
Depressive reaction-
Psychophysiological skin reaction..
Psychophysiological musculoskeletal reaction..
Psychoneurotic reaction—
Mixed	
Other	
Psychoneurotic behaviour disorder..
Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms affecting digestive system
Disorder of character, behaviour, and intelligence—
Schizoid personality.
Paranoid personality	
Inadequate personality..
Anti-social personality ...
Asocial personality.	
Sexual deviation	
Other and unspecified-
Emotionally unstable personality-
Passive-dependent personality	
Aggressiveness  	
Enuresis	
Other symptomatic habits..
Other and unspecified-
Adjustment reaction of infancy	
Adjustment reaction of childhood-
Adjustment reaction of adolescence	
Adjustment reaction no specified period-
Mental deficiency—
Severe	
Moderate .
Mild	
Mongolism .
Other and unspecified type-
Learning disturbance	
Speech disturbance-
Acute situational maladjustment-
Other and unspecified-
Chronic brain syndrome associated with birth trauma-
Chronic brain syndrome associated with other trauma-
Chronic brain syndrome due to prenatal influence...
Chronic brain syndrome associated with drug or poison..
Chronic brain syndrome of unknown cause	
Observation only	
No disease	
Incomplete-
Diagnosis deferred-
Totals	
31
1
1
1
1
2
16
3
3
1
3
1
2
23
20
3
2
2
5
9
75
56
1
5
12
21
2
1
22
13
1
3
2
2
1
3
153
1
7
1
3
1
3
1
11
16
3
3
1
2
28
28
3
12
10
2
10
5
2
57
5
2
2
3
2
3
3
2
1
3
42
4
2
1
4
2
2
13
6
1
1
17
3
6
2
6
1
3
34
36
6
5
3
7
9
103
84
1
8
24
31
2
3
32
18
1
3
2
1
4
1
5
210
6
9
3
535
249
784
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES D 159
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE, VICTORIA
C. Gregory, Director
Psychiatric facilities on Vancouver Island were, until 1962, confined to a Child
Guidance Clinic, operating from a location immediately behind the Parliament
Buildings, and providing facilities for child guidance for Victoria and, by means
of travelling clinics, for the rest of the Island. Provision for adults by the
Provincial Government services was limited, and since the plan for Victoria
called for a community-type mental health service, in accordance with the latest
psychiatric linking, the formation of a Mental Health Centre, comprising both
Child and Adult Clinics, with their separate staffs but with joint administration, was
the logical development.
Thus in February, 1962, Dr. Lieselotte Holland was appointed as psychiatrist
in charge of the Adult Clinic, and Mr. R. N. Crawford, working at that time with
the Child Guidance Clinic, joined with Dr. Holland as the first social worker, to
form the nucleus of what will develop into a clinic able to cope with all the psychiatric requirements of adults in Victoria. Dr. W. Valens, then Director of the
Child Guidance Clinic, retired from the Government service, and in July, 1962,
Dr. C. Gregory was appointed as Director of the Mental Health Centre and to be
responsible for the Children's Clinic until such time as a further appointment of a
child psychiatrist might be made.
In view of the fact that the nature of the entire service in Victoria was to change,
from a relatively isolated kind of operation to a completely community-orientated
service, the basic task for the first year was necessarily that of making close contact
with the various Government services and other agencies in the community concerned with the handling of mentally ill patients and of laying the groundwork for
an integrated approach by all such interested bodies. These organizations include
Denartment of Social Welfare, particularly the Child Welfare Division; the Medical
Health Services for Victoria; the Probation Service; the Family and Children's
Service; the Society for Emotionally Disturbed Children; the Association for
Retarded Children; the Canadian Mental Health Association, etc. And since the
operation of a health service of any kind is dependent in the final analysis on the
full co-ooeration of the physicians practising in the area, it has been most essential
for us to lay the foundation for a closer working relationship with them, both through
individual contacts with doctors and through the Victoria Medical Association.
One of the most important tasks in the realization of such an undertaking as
this is that of educating the public in basic mental health considerations, of informing them of the nature of the service which we are trying to build for them, and of
the necessity for an increasing awareness of both the problems confronting the
mental health services and of the indispensable role which the public must play if
these plans are to be fully implemented. This has been done by the professional
staff in a variety of ways: by addressing meetings of, for example, Parent-Teacher
Associations; by serving on committees of the agencies involved in the mental health
field; talking to professional groups, such as teachers and public health nurses, who
have a direct interest in psychiatric matters, etc.
ADMINISTRATION
Administration has previously been carried out by the Mental Health Centre
in Burnaby. In line with the process of decentralization of services, the Victoria
Mental Health Centre became autonomous as from January 1, 1963, and is therefore now responsible for its own administration.
 D  160 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
CHILDREN'S CLINIC
After the first few months of settling in, it was decided that the major part of
the energies of the Clinic should be directed along three main channels—work with
the Child Welfare Division of the Department of Social Welfare, with the Medical
Health Services for Victoria, and with referrals from the local practitioners. The
rationale behind this was the following: the Child Welfare Division is responsible
for the bulk of children who have been deprived of their home life, either because
the home is in some way inadequate or harmful to the child or because the child is
constitutionally too difficult to be managed in the home. A further important consideration as far as the Child Welfare Division is concerned is that it is building up
one of the most important resources for the treatment of emotionally disturbed children—the group-living homes, which will be scattered at strategic points throughout the Province. These enterprises require all the support and advice the Mental
Health Services can supply, and, accordingly, readily available consultative services
have been an important part of our contribution to the success of these group homes,
and in particular to that at Smithers.
School health services, and this includes consultative mental health services,
are supplied by the Metropolitan Board of Health, and it was felt that by spending
a certain amount of time each week on consulting services for the schools, we would
thereby be able to cover the psychiatric requirements of a large proportion of the
child and adolescent population.
Referrals from local practitioners are part of the service which, it is hoped, we
shall be able to supply to them, and which is indispensable in the process of increasing integration of the large amount of psychiatric work done by the practitioners
into the more widespread efforts of the community, including agencies and Governmental services.
The following figures give some indication of the day-to-day work in seeing
patients: A total of 135 psychiatric assessments was made during the year in the
Victoria Clinic, and a further 60, including a number of adults, on the travelling
clinic to Comox; the social-work interviews during this time totalled 1,479, and
the average case load per social worker was 30 per month.
ADULT CLINIC
The Adult Clinic opened in February, 1962, staffed by one psychiatrist.
Before the 1962 working-year began, contact was established with individuals and
organizations in the community who deal with adult problems with the objective of
encouraging free communication and co-operation.
In August of 1962 the staff of the Adult Clinic was enlarged by the addition
of Mr. R. N. Crawford, who is the Adult Social Service Department. He acts as
social worker and psychotherapist.
Use has been made throughout of the Children's Clinic psychologist, but the
service requirements of the Children's Clinic limits our use of testing.
In Victoria the Adult Clinic now offers after-care services to patients discharged
from the mental hospitals and consultation and out-patient treatment to cases referred from the community. We indicate a preference for having the family doctor
make referrals.
In summation, it is felt that the Adult Clinic has been providing good service.
The after-care programme has been working out especially well, with few returns to
the mental hospital. The Clinic itself has been well received in the community, as
demonstrated by the number of casual contacts with people who telephone or drop
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
D  161
in for some general advice about mental health matters, never mind the formal
consultations.
The number of patients assessed during the year was 142, of whom 25 were
seen only for assessment. At the end of the year 81 patients were receiving ongoing
after-care and a further 28 were undergoing treatment, resulting in a total of 111
interviews during the last month of the year.
TRAVELLING CLINICS
In addition to fulfilling the requirements of the Victoria area as far as circumstances permit, we have had the responsibility for supplying the rest of Vancouver
Island with a consultative psychiatric service, which has necessarily taken the form
of travelling clinics. We have therefore been engaged in monthly visits to Nanaimo
and to Courtenay-Comox-Campbell River, the former having been the responsibility
of Dr. L. Holland and the latter of Dr. C. Gregory.
In June, 1962, a travelling clinic service to Nanaimo was begun. This occurs
one day a month and is carried by the psychiatrist alone. The emphasis has been
on discussion of the assessments with the people who will be managing the case in
the community. Everyone has been very willing and helpful, but desperately in
need of some basic instruction in normal personality function and the natural history
of the various mental disorders. The future staff of the Mental Health Centre at
Nanaimo will be very fortunate in having a well-motivated community behind them.
The Courtenay-Comox-Campbell River area has been visited since November
last on a monthly basis, and a total of 60 patients has been seen. The duration of
each visit was one day in Courtenay and Comox and half a day in Campbell River.
The organization of these clinics has been good, and there has been a most desirable
state reached in our working relationships with the Public Health Branch.
However, there are some modifications in organization of these clinics which
ought to bring about an increased efficiency in the day-to-day management of cases
by the local professional personnel in between visits of the psychiatric team. These
changes will largely by directed toward an increase in conferences, which will be
attended by the nurses, social workers, and physicians who are concerned with the
case to be discussed, as a means of providing an ongoing education in the functions
of a community mental health service and the roles which each professional group
might be expected to play in it. This will benefit everyone concerned, providing a
better service for the patients, and the basis for increasing competence by the various
workers in dealing with psychiatric patients.
 D 162 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1962/63
MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE, KELOWNA
F. E. McNair, Director
This service was opened August 1, 1962, with Dr. McNair, psychiatrist, and
Mrs. Irene Quinn, secretary-receptionist on duty, with the office nominally at the
Community Health Centre in Kelowna. The Health Centre underwent extensive
building alterations during the summer to accommodate the Regional Mental Health
Centre, with the premises finally being put into use in mid-November. An official
opening was held on December 28, 1962, at which Premier W. A. C. Bennett
officiated. The Honourable Eric Martin, Minister of Health Services and Hospital
Insurance, was present to give encouragement both on the opening day of the clinical
service, August 1st, and at the official opening.
The Kelowna Hospital Board established a psychiatric unit in the General
Hospital to accommodate seven patients for the whole area being served by the
Regional Mental Health Centre, and this service went into operation in November,
though admission of psychiatric patients to general medical wards had been permitted
from July on.
In mid-August, staff was augmented by the addition of Mr. Keith Barnes,
clinical psychologist, and in November by Mr. Ishmael Holmes, psychiatric social
worker.
The area served consists of three health units—South Okanagan with headquarters at Kelowna, North Okanagan with headquarters at Vernon, and South
Central with headquarters at Kamloops. The total population of this area is
approximately 100,000 people.
The headquarters of the service is on the second floor of the Community Health
Building in Kelowna, where there is a suite of six offices which includes an observation room with a one-way window. In addition, there is a large group therapy room.
The cost of the building has been borne by the combined efforts of the local community, the Provincial Government, and the Federal Government.
The service is a comprehensive one. Community consultations to Public
Health, Department of Social Welfare, and probation services are carried out at the
Mental Health Centre, as is out-patient treatment, both interview psychotherapy and
sustaining service.
Seven working-days a month are spent out of town—two at Penticton, two at
Kamloops, two at Vernon, and one alternating between Salmon Arm and Revelstoke.
Appointments are arranged for the out-of-town trips at the health unit, but some
cases are also seen in the general hospitals. The out-of-town work is divided
between consultations and sustaining-service treatment. Some cases initially seen
are brought to Kelowna for hospital care; others travel into Kelowna for out-patient
treatment.
In conjunction with the clinical service, a professional advisory committee has
been developed and also a citizens' advisory committee, under the chairmanship of
Mr. Ivor Jackson, which functions under the Union Board of Health, South Okanagan Health Unit.
There has been very good community acceptance of the service, and a great
deal of public relations work has been undertaken, including not only talks to various
community groups by the various staff members, but also a number of additional
forms of service, such as home visits and taking calls at any time of the day, which
makes for goodwill.
The division of time is between consultative service and treatment service, with
each day at Kelowna being divided into half for this purpose.   There are usually
 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
D 163
11 half-days for referral in each month. Medical referral is asked for, but it is not
obligatory, and 50 per cent of our referrals are not initiated by doctors, though
doctors are always a part of the referral pattern. Accordingly, 4 of the 11 days are
set aside for cases coming directly from doctors; another 4 for cases coming from
the school system via the medical health officer, the public health nurse, and the
doctor; 2 for cases initiated by Social Welfare; and 1 for Probation Service.
The professional members of the staff have taken an active part in professional
meetings and have assisted in the organization of volunteer workers under the
sponsorship of the Canadian Mental Health Association.
The volume of work that has been undertaken in the eight months reported is
considerable and is shown in the accompanying tables. Three hundred and fifty-nine
patients have been seen in consultation, of whom 204 were adults and 155 were
children; 93 of the adults and 26 of the children have received a treatment service.
On discharge from the General Hospital, follow-up service has been given at the
Mental Health Centre. Only one patient treated in the psychiatric unit at the
Kelowna General Hospital has had to be certified to the Crease Clinic. Some
patients have been seen in the region where co-operation could not be gained for
community management, and these have been appropriately certified. They have
totalled eight in all, as shown in the table. Of course, it is to be expected that a
number of patients in the district have been sent directly to the Crease Clinic,
Provincial Mental Hospital, or The Woodlands School without reference to the
Okanagan Mental Health Centre.
We have been pleased to have consultative service offered by the Director of
Mental Health Services, Dr. A. E. Davidson; the Headquarters Business Manager,
Mr. F. A. Matheson; the Personnel Officer, Mr. J. Dowling; the Supervisor of
Psychiatric Social Work, Miss A. K. Carroll; the Director of Nursing Services, Miss
B. J. Mitchell; the Consultant in Medical Records and Statistics, Miss A. D. Dingle;
and the Chief Psychologist, Mental Health Centre, Burnaby, Dr. D. Shalman.
It is apparent that the reports of the American Psychiatric Association and of
the Canadian Mental Health Association vigorously support community-centred
psychiatric services that are comprehensive in nature. It is evident that if these
services are to meet the health needs of the population served, they must be comprehensive, be a part of the medical and social welfare structure of the community, and
give additional service for co-ordinating existing services in the interest of better
mental health.
 D 164 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1962/63
STATISTICS FOR PERIOD AUGUST 1,  1962, TO MARCH 31, 1963
Consultations by Areas
Adults
Children
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
Kelowna	
30
25
12
15
4
1
46
25
16
18
9
3
76
50
28
33
13
4
22
36
12
16
6
2
16
18
9
H2
6
38
54
21
28
12
Revelstoke 	
2
Totals
87
<m
204
94
61
155
Patients Receiving Regular Treatment
11(2
14
6
1
2
29
15
3
6
3
2
41
29
9
7
5
2
5
2
i
2
8
3
1
2
2
13
5
1
3
4
Revelstoke	
Totals
35
58
93
10
16
26
Patients Certified to Crease Clinic, Provincial Mental Hospital,
and The Woodlands School
South Okanagan—
2
1
_
1
2
1
	
4
1
1
1
1
—
1
Tntals
4
3
7
1
—
1
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1964
660-164-2955

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