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REPORT of the FOREST SERVICE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1963 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1964

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Hon. R. G. Williston, Minister R. G. McKee, Deputy Minister of Forests
F. S. McKinnon, Chief Forester
REPORT
of the
FOREST SERVICE
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1963
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1964
  Victoria, B.C., February, 1964.
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Forest Service
of the Department of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources for the calendar year
1963.
R. G. WILLISTON,
Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources.
  The Honourable R. G. Williston,
Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—There is submitted herewith the Annual Report on activities of the Forest
Service during the calendar year 1963.
R. G. McKEE,
Deputy Minister of Forests.
  CONTENTS
Page
1. Chief Forester's Report :  11
2. Forest Surveys and Inventory Division  13
Field Programme  13
Forest Classification and Sampling  13
  13
  14
  15
  15
  15
  15
  16
Growth	
Loss-factor Project	
Special Field Projects	
Office Programme	
Forest Mapping	
Area and Volume Summaries
Mensuration Studies	
3. Forest Research Division
Experiment Stations.
Data-processing	
Field Programme	
4. Reforestation Division	
Forest Nurseries	
Forest Tree Seed	
Reconnaissance and Survey Work
Planting	
17
17
17
17
19
19
20
21
21
Permanent Improvements  22
Co-operation    22
Interdepartmental Rehabilitation and Forestry Programme  22
5. Working Plans Division..
Pulpwood Harvesting Areas..
24
24
Other Public Sustained-yield Units  24
Tree-farm Licences  25
Certified Tree-farms  25
Farm Wood-lot Licences  25
 8 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Page
6. Public Information and Education Division  26
Communications Media   26
Press and Periodicals  26
Publications and Printing  26
Radio, Television, and Theatre  27
Signs, Posters, and Exhibits  27
Photography  27
Still and Motion-picture Production  27
Film Library  29
School Lecture Programme  29
Library  29
7. Forest Management Division  30
Peace River Flood Basin  31
Wind-throw  31
Spruce Bark Beetle  31
Administration of Managed Units  32
Market Prices and Stumpage Trends  32
Lumber Prices  32
Log Prices  3 2
Stumpage Prices  33
Sliding-scale Adjustments  33
Siliviculture  34
Scaling  36
8. Grazing Division  37
General Conditions  3 7
Range  37
Hay  37
Markets and Prices  37
Live-stock Losses  3 7
Range Management  37
Range Surveys  3 8
Range Improvements  3 8
Peace River Pastures  39
Co-operation  39
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963 9
Page
8. Grazing Division—Continued
Administration  40
Grazing Permits  40
Hay Permits  40
Special-use Permits  40
Grazing Fees  40
Violations and Prosecutions  41
9. Engineering Services Division  42
Engineering Section  42
Development Engineering  42
Road Location  42
Road Construction and Maintenance  42
General Engineering  43
Mechanical Section  44
Building Construction and Design  44
Marine Design  45
Forest Service Marine Station  45
Marine Work  45
Machine-shop  46
Prefabrication and Carpenter-shop  46
Radio Section  46
10. Forest Protection Division  48
Weather  48
Fires  48
Occurrence and Causes  48
Cost of Fire-fighting  48
Damage  48
Protection Planning and Research  49
Fire Statistics  49
Protection Research  49
Visibility Mapping and Lookout Photography  49
Fuel-moisture Indicator Sticks  49
Fire-weather Records and Investigations  50
Fire-suppression Crews  50
Aircraft  50
Roads and Trails  50
Slash Disposal and Snag-falling  50
Snag-falling Projects  51
Fire-law Enforcement  52
 10 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Page
11. Forest Service Training-school  53
Extra Courses and Functions  54
Acknowledgments  54
12. Accounting Division  55
Fiscal  55
Administration  55
13. Personnel Division  57
Communications and Training  57
Establishment, Recruitment, and Staff Turnover  57
Classifications, Salaries, and Working Conditions  59
14. Personnel Directory, 1964  60
15. Appendix—Tabulated Detailed Statements to Supplement the Report of
the Forest Service '.  65
 REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE, 1963
CHIEF FORESTER'S REPORT
The problem of greatest concern to the British Columbia Forest Service in
1963, and one that received its continual attention, was utilization. The subject is
tremendous in scope and significance. It involves not only the imposition of pulp-
wood harvesting economies on top of existing sawlog economies in many public
sustained-yield units, but also the salvage of small, previously wasted logs in all the
forests—a trend which could ultimately increase the Province's potential yield of
marketable wood to a large extent and give further impetus to the surging forest
industry in the Central Interior of the Province, an area in which a number of pulp-
mills are in the investigative stages.
Already, with new utilization standards still little more than a concept, the
growth of the Interior forest economy is staggering. In 1945, only 19 per cent of the
total Provincial scale came from the Interior. In 1962 it was 41 per cent, and last
year an imposing 44.7 per cent of a total scale of 1,473,423,371 cubic feet.
The scale, due largely to a combination of weather and market conditions, set
a new record for the whole Province, 9.7 per cent above the previous high for 1962.
As a corollary, the value of all forest production reached a new high of $850,000,-
000, some 6 per cent higher than the previous year.
In short, 1963 ended most successfully and prospects for 1964 indicated that
we might anticipate tremendous new developments in the forest-forest industry complex.
The Forest Service, in the last 12 months, continued to make great forward
strides toward the objective of complete sustained-yield management of the forests
entrusted to it and to supply the raw material required to make these developments
possible.
The Surveys and Inventory Division completed unit surveys for seven public
sustained-yield units, bringing to 46 the number on which second, more exact
resource studies have been finished. These unit and maintenance surveys, done with
Federal financial assistance, are really the second step in the Continuous Forest
Inventory and are an indispensable prerequisite to realistic evaluation and disposal
of the forest resource.
Two more new public sustained-yield units were established—the Okanagan
and the Takla—and 13 others were included in the second pulpwood harvesting area,
awarded to Kamloops Pulp and Paper Company Limited. Altogether more than
60,000,000 acres, approximately half the commercial forest land in the Province,
are now committed to working plans. They have a total annual allowable cut of
917,586,000 cubic feet, which is 62 per cent of the total scale for 1963.
As the area of regulated forest increases, the demands on the Service increase
accordingly. During the year the Reforestation Division supplied 14,280,000 seedlings for planting, and with the acquisition of a 52-acre addition to the Duncan
nursery should soon reach a sustained annual production of 25,000,000. But the
new figure is already short of anticipated requirements.
The same continuing pressure, the result of both expansion and intensification,
afflicts other divisions. In 1963 Engineering Services rushed to complete 54 miles
of main haul-road in the Parsnip River drainage and 50 miles in the continuing
programme of forest-development roads.    Since 1950 that programme has made
11
 12 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
some 2,500,000 acres of forest land accessible to industry, but as logging becomes
more concentrated in the central and northern portions of the Province, more and
more development roads are needed. Meanwhile the forest districts' requests for
urgently required protection access is unabated.
The year was a comparatively good one from the protection standpoint.
Although there were 35 per cent more fires than in 1962, nearly half of them were
caused by lightning strikes. Inclement weather, the expanded aerial attack system,
and mobile suppression crews combined to keep most of them to a small size. Some
46,000 acres were burned over, and damage to forest-cover and other property was
$534,000. Both figures are well below average. The cost of fire-fighting was
$440,000, roughly a quarter of the average for the last 10 years. The average
cost per fire was 17.6 per cent less than for 1962.
The pages of this Report devoted to the Forest Management Division add to the
feeling of accomplishment that marked 1963. Although management foresters, like
others, were harassed by the pressure of increased work—more timber sales,
emergency wind-throw and bark beetle stand disposal, more stand treatment—they
were able to report substantially increased revenue from timber sales, a 16-per-cent
increase in water-borne lumber exports, and high prices for dressed lumber and logs
which are expected to continue into 1964. These improved economic conditions
were reflected in an average stumpage price of $3.36 per hundred cubic feet, compared to $3.01 in 1962, and even then the figure was distorted by the unusually large
volume of low stumpage salvage sales.
In a brief summary of highlights, it is impossible to mention in any detail the
work of all divisions. However, such vital parts of the Service as Grazing, which
integrates millions of acres of pasture land with forestry activities in a fine example of
the multiple-use concept, and Research, on whose achievements the ultimate sucess-
ful intensification of forestry practices largely depends, are not forgotten, nor are the
service divisions—Legal, Accounting, Public Information and Education, and Personnel. The work of all is vital and interdependent; to all is due the success, the
cohesiveness, and the morale of the Forest Service.
Perhaps morale is the cause of the awareness and care that resulted in the
Service's 1963 record for safety, a matter on which, for reasons of self-interest as
well as Government policy, a steady pressure is maintained. Last year was the
second in succession which was not marred by a fatal accident, the second to show
a large reduction in Workmen's Compensation Board awards—$132,000 in 1961,
$101,000 in 1962, and only $42,000 in 1963—and the second to show a marked
decrease in man-days lost. All in all, it was a commendable accomplishment in
a commendable year.
F. S. McKinnon,
Chief Forester.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963 13
FOREST SURVEYS AND INVENTORY DIVISION
FIELD PROGRAMME
Forest inventories were completed for seven public sustained-yield units during
1963. These included Chilliwack and Harrison in the Vancouver Forest District,
Shuswap in the Kamloops Forest District, Fernie and Kettle in the Nelson Forest
District, and Terrace and part of the Dean in the Prince Rupert Forest District.
Decay and growth-study programmes were continued in several others. Financial
assistance was again received from the Government of Canada according to the
agreement for forest inventory implemented under the Department of Forestry Act.
Several other forest-inventory projects were completed. A major project in the
Prince George Forest District involved an intensive forest inventory of the Schedule
B lands contained within Pulpwood Harvesting Area No. 1. The Division was also
involved with regeneration surveys and taxation cruises in selected areas in the Vancouver Forest District.
Forest Classification and Sampling
Some 8,700,000 acres were classified and sampled during the 1963 field season.
In addition to the projects outlined above, an area lying to the south of the Kettle
Public Working Circle and the Kiteen River Block were surveyed in conjunction with
the Kettle Public Working Circle and the Terrace Public Sustained-yield Unit respectively. Another 3,600,000 acres were sampled in Block 1 of the Dean Public Sustained-yield Unit in order to bring it up to unit survey standard.
A total of 2,788 multi-plot samples was established by Division personnel
during 1963, and another 120 were received under co-operative agreements with
other agencies.
Experimental sampling with the wedge prism was continued, and over 400
double samples were established in nine separate forest associations.
One Bell 47 G-3B helicopter on a four-month charter was involved in forest
classification and sampling in most of the 1963 project areas. The smaller Hughes
269A was used to complete the forest classification in the Stum Public Sustained-
yield Unit. In general, the performance of these machines was found quite satisfactory for the duties to which they were assigned. Tape recorders were again used to
advantage in this programme of low-level reconnaissance.
During periods of low hazard it was possible to make use of the forest-protection
contract helicopter on several occasions. This was especially helpful on the rugged
Harrison and Terrace projects, where it assisted in providing a more uniform distribution of samples over the more inaccessible areas.
Growth
An expanded growth programme in 1963 resulted in the establishment of 140
permanent growth plots in three Coast public sustained-yield units, distributed as
follows: Yale, 103; Chilliwack, 31; and Harrison, 6. One-third were located in
Douglas fir-hemlock types and the balance in pure Douglas fir. Conditions sampled
were as follows: Ages from 41 to 100 years, sites ranging from good to low with the
majority in the medium and poor class, and elevations from 300 to 3,800 feet. It is
anticipated that this approximate schedule will be maintained for a number of years,
with the first remeasurement due 10 years after initial-plot establishment.
Over the year there was increased co-operation in growth studies between the
Division and private agencies, particularly concerning the pooling and exchange of
basic field data.   One such agency has been the Tree Farm Forestry Committee.
 r
14 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
The following are some of the basic field procedures that are practised by the
Division:—
(1) Single circular plots of one-fifth acre size, with variations of one-quarter
and one-eighth acre are allowed to obtain about 100 living trees.
(2) All living trees 3.6 inches d.b.h. and greater are tagged at breast height
with permanent round plastic numbered tags secured by 2 .-i-inch
aluminum nails.   A 4Vi-foot stick is used to locate tagging height.
(3) Each plot centre is marked by a permanent aluminum stake. Plot circumference is carefully measured and is marked by string, and all line
trees are checked by tape. For tagging and recording, 8 to 12 stringed
segments are established.
(4) Items recorded are tree number, species, d.b.h., tree class, quality class,
pathological remarks, ground cover, stand age, stand height, and small-
tree count of stems 0.6 to 3.5 inches d.b.h.
(5) Ages are based on 10 dominant and (or) codominant trees of the major
species.
(6) Number of tree heights per plot depends on the number of plots per map
type or stratum. Each stratum must have 30 heights for each major
species.
Other field work included the remeasurement of seven experimental plots comprising 45 sub-plots in the Kitimat and Terrace Public Sustained-yield Units. All
existing experimental growth and yield plots in the Province now have at least one
remeasurement. The period of initial-plot establishment was from 1921 to 1949 and
involved 141 experimental plots containing a total of 737 sub-plots.
Net (less decay) mean annual increments were calculated for major growth
types in 14 public sustained-yield units. Similar information is now available on a
total of 46 units. As additional sample information becomes available, many of
these growth-type increments will be modified.
Calculation of gross increments, which were completed for Zone 3, are now
ready for printing and will be issued as a supplement to Forest Survey Note No. 6
in 1964.
During the year 37 requests for growth information were received and
processed.
Loss-factor Project
Decay studies were continued in three public sustained-yield units in 1963.
The number of trees felled and measured included 884 trees on 32 sample plots in
the Soo Public Sustained-yield Unit, 169 trees on 8 sample plots in the Yale Public
Sustained-yield Unit, and 1,257 trees on 44 sample plots in the Hazelton Public
Sustained-yield Unit.
The studies will continue in the Soo and Yale Public Sustained-yield Units in
1964, with helicopters flying field crews into previously inaccessible areas.
Diameter-class loss factors, which were published for mature hemlock and
balsam in the Kitwanga Public Sustained-yield Unit, will be used in the recompila-
tion of the 1961 Kitwanga unit survey report.
The 1963 inventory of the Terrace Public Sustained-yield Unit will be compiled, using local diameter-class loss factors which were based on data collected
within the boundaries of this unit by this Division and the Forest Pathology Branch
of the Canada Department of Forestry.
New zonal loss factors for the Province are being calculated from the 34,250
trees which were felled and measured by the Division since 1953.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963 15
Special Field Projects
An intensive forest inventry of the Schedule B lands of Pulpwood Harvesting
Area No. 1 was completed during the year, and some 1,600,000 acres of Crown
land were classified and sampled. All mature forest types were designated as being
primarily sawlog or primarily pulpwood, based on the definition set forth in the
original contract for Pulpwood Harvesting Area No. 1.
At the request of the Department of Finance, the Division continued the programme of inspection of Crown-granted timber land on Vancouver Island. A total
of 812 .4-acre sample plots was established during the examination of 5,910 acres
for the purpose of real-property assessment and taxation.
In conjunction with the Harrison forest inventory project, a regeneration
survey of the sustained-yield unit's logged and burned areas was completed. Approximately 28,000 acres were examined, and a report has been submitted to the
Reforestation Division.
OFFICE PROGRAMME
Forest Mapping
Increased map production in 1963 resulted in the completion of 462 interim
base maps and 479 final forest-cover maps. The latter covered 13,400,000 acres,
of which 86 per cent were at 20-chains-to-l-inch scale. Mapping of all the 1963
field projects is in progress.
Published maps are now available for 40 public sustained-yield units, including Block 2 of the Dean Public Sustained-yield Unit, as shown on the key map.
In response to requests received from various public and private agencies,
14,300 maps were distributed.
Area and Volume Summaries
Eight unit survey reports were issued for those areas completely surveyed
during the previous year. They included the Arrowhead, Big Bar, Dean (Block 2),
Nechako, Salmo, Salmon Arm, Texada Island, and the Yale Public Sustained-yield
Units. As outlined on the key map, a total of 40 forest survey reports is now available. Furthermore, maps and reports are still obtainable for the previous maintenance survey of the Chilliwack Public Sustained-yield Unit, resurveyed in 1963 to a
unit standard.
Planimetry of unit survey maps exceeded 10,500,000 acres. Further to this,
some 400 map-area and map-volume statements were printed, completing the map
area-volume figures for the above survey reports. Work is now in progress on the
1963 project areas.
Sixty requests were received requiring statistical summaries, to be used mainly
for management planning and access-road development. They involved a total
area of 18,000,000 acres and a net timber volume exceeding 27 billion cubic feet.
All of the 2,908 Provincial samples established during the field season have
been compiled on the basis of the 1962 Standard Cubic Foot Volume Tables. Of
these, 51 were contributed by the Nelson Forest District and 69 by private concerns.
The Provincial total, 1953 to 1963, inclusive, stands at 26,243, exclusive of permanent growth plots, and prints of any compiled sample statement in cubic feet per
acre are available upon request.
The effect on volumes per acre in sample compilation from assigning height
by height-diameter curves rather than by the present Hmax-Dmax system is being
tested.   Several thousand sample-tree measurements in Zone 6 have been trans-
 r
16 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
ferred to punch cards, enabling the construction of both computer and hand-drawn
height-diameter curves, segregated by species composition and age-class. Results
will be compared against various unit survey reports.
In the latter part of 1963 significant changes in I.B.M. equipment were made
in the Data Processing Division, Department of Industrial Development, Trade,
and Commerce, which processes all headquarters divisions' punch-card requirements. The installation included an I.B.M. 1401 data-processing card system with
4,000 positions of core storage and a 1620 electronic computer system with 60,000
positions of core storage, the latter replacing the Government pool 650 computer.
For the above, the complete installation included a 1402 and 1622 card read-punch,
a 1403 printer, and a 1623 storage unit.
Considerable time has been expended by the Division in rewriting programmes
required by the new equipment. To date, the processing of some prepared data
indicates faster results, improved presentation, and more flexibility than obtained
previously.
Mensuration Studies
In 1963 increased scope was provided in the duties of the Division's forest
mensurationist, allowing progressive studies to be made in specific sampling and
classification techniques and requirements. One study was reviewed on the effect
on average-volume-per-acre estimates by combining mature age-classes, and another on the number of samples required to meet the accuracy objective of a unit
survey standard.
At present, work is progressing on the results of over 400 wedge prism double
samples completed in the 1963 project areas. This sampling system has already
proven beneficial in forest classification, but the application to survev volume
requirements for Division use is yet to be determined.
Further studies are anticipated concerning the feasibility of developing the
70-mm. low-elevation photography from helicopters for both forest typing and
sampling purposes.
 122°
120°
118°
114°
112°
110°
60'
58'
56°
'00 <-?
54'
52=
50=
<-   0 Watson
"??e> Lake
BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREST SERVICE
FOREST SURVEYS AND INVENTORY DIVISION
MAINTENANCE SURVEYS (1958-1960)    l-M
1.
Babine
13.
Morice
2.
Barkley
14.
Naver
3.
Big Valley
15.
Niskonlith
4.
Bowron
16.
Purden
5.
Cape Scott
17.
Quesnel Lake
6.
Carp
18.
Redonda
7.
Cottonwood
19.
Robson
8.
Creston
20.
Sayward
9.
Crooked
21.
Sechelt
10.
Kyuquot
22.
Spallumcheen
11.
Lac la Hache
23.
Stuart
12.
Long worth
24.
Williams Lake
25.
Willow River
AVAILABLE
INFORMATION
(a) Maps--majority at 1/4 mile to 1 inch;
balance at 1/2 mile to 1 inch.
(b) Statements--area statement for each map,
(c) Reports--for each P. W. C.--S. Y. U.;
a maintenance survey report.
UNIT SURVEYS (1961+)
mm
o
DundasI
*IN PROGRESS   E_^2
(1963 fieldwork)
13. Westlake
14. Windermere
15. Yale	
16. Chilliwack
17. Dean-Blk 1
18. Fernie
19. Harrison
20. Kettle
**21. P.H.A.   1(B)
22. Shuswap
23. Stum
24. Terrace
DIXON ENTRANCE
CsLangara I.
Charlotte
f*7       n^Port
PRINCJ
RUPERT
£\    Port,
■Pot.ner,/l}\\j
<rf
-.KungMl I.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS
HONOURABLE R. G. WILLISTON, MINISTER
Scale
40    3,0    20    10
8,0
120
160 MILES
PROGRESS OF FOREST-COVER MAPPING
BASED ON MAINTENANCE SURVEYS AND UNIT SURVEYS
OF AREAS UNDER PUBLIC MANAGEMENT
as at 31 DECEMBER 1963
58°
56°
54°
^EdwarcP
*Mapping and compilation in progress.
^Special Sale Area
(oic 2811/62)
QUEEN
CHARLOTTE
Caamano
Sound
Aristtftabalv
SOUND-
Smith Sounds
Cape Caution-'
Allison Harbour i
Cape Scorn
Quatslitoy
Quatsino Sounddtafc^Alic'eX,
Cape Co
Cape Flattery
'°f-rc/CA^s'TRfMr
JPOBT ANGELES,'
136°
134°
132°
130°
128°
126°
124°
122°
120°
116°
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963 17
FOREST RESEARCH DIVISION
Details of the research programme for 1963 will appear in the annual Forest
Research Review.
EXPERIMENT STATIONS
At the Cowichan Lake Experiment Station a small research nursery was
cleared and fenced, office and laboratory accommodation expanded, and construction of a soil-shed started. This development is part of a plan to consolidate all
phases of the tree-breeding programme—seed-processing, raising of seedlings, and
plantations at the experiment station—and provide facilities for other studies that
may be initiated in the future. Soil mixtures for nursery seed-beds are being investigated as part of this development.
Maintenance of the Aleza Lake Experiment Station as a research centre has
become increasingly expensive over the years, and latterly this has tended to restrict
development of the regional research programme. It was decided to close down
the station for the next decade and direct the funds and effort thus saved to the
regional studies. The area will continue to be managed by the district on a
sustained-yield basis, and it is hoped to continue silvicultural investigations, but on
a more restricted scale.
During the year an infestation of spruce bark beetle Dendroctonus obesus
caused serious mortality throughout the Aleza Lake reserve, particularly on the
alluvial flats adjacent to the Bowron River. Efforts are being made to salvage,
through timber sales, the worst areas of infestation.
DATA-PROCESSING
Technical assistance was provided several divisions in solving sampling and
scaling problems. These are usually special or unique problems arising out of a
particular development or associated with a particular industry. For instance,
pulpwood harvesting licences create a new inventory problem associated with the
classification of stands for sawlog and pulpwood use.
The best computer formats for the various scale formula, continues to be an
important investigation carried on in association with the Vancouver Forest District.
In co-operation with the Surveys and Inventory Division, several complex
mensurational problems were, and are being, studied. These involve point sampling, growth estimates, and photogrammetry.
Within the Division, specific programmes were investigated and adapted. In
particular, the tree-breeding project introduced some new problems in statistical
analysis.
FIELD PROGRAMME
Severe deer browsing occurred on a Douglas fir provenance trial at Jennis
Bay. This is worthy of mention because browsing occurred in midsummer when
alternative food supplies are abundant and usually more attractive to deer than
conifer foliage, and also because Jennis Bay is situated far beyond the areas where
severe browsing had previously been noticed in Coastal British Columbia.
Plans are being developed for comprehensive provenance studies of Coastal
Douglas fir and of Interior white spruce. A considerable amount of field data was
obtained during the past summer on Douglas fir sites. In the Interior, white spruce
stands were examined and sampled for detailed study of cone and needle
characteristics.   In co-operation with the University of British Columbia, growth-
 18 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
chamber investigations have been conducted on seedling characteristics of various
provenances.
With respect to the tree-breeding programme, cruising for plus trees was continued in higher-elevation stands on Vancouver Island and the Mainland, and 51
new trees were registered. The fifth Plus Tree Week was held at Pitt River, and 23
members of the Forest Service, the University, and industry took part. Grafting
was started in the Forest Service high-elevation Douglas fir seed orchard at
Campbell River.
A detailed analysis of the breeding programme for Coastal Douglas fir was
completed, with a view to confirming future plans and how they may be implemented. A major decision was to separate tree-breeding research from the more
routine phases of plus-tree cruising and clone-bank and seed-orchard establishment.
A considerable amount of data from the progeny tests is now being processed by computer programming, with the object of establishing estimates of
hereditability.
In 1962 a study was initiated to determine the performance of four types of
Douglas fir planting stock on high-site land prone to rapid brush invasion. If
potential brush sites are planted immediately following logging and burning, and
stock can grow rapidly without a planting check, such lands may be successfully
rehabilitated. While the plots will not be established until 1965, seedlings are now
being grown to provide 1+2, 2+1, 2 + 0 spring-sown and 2 + 0 autumn-sown
seedling and transplant stock for this trial.
In the Prince Rupert Forest District the major activity was again centred on
lodgepole pine, with the establishment of a regeneration study in cut-over stands.
A spacing study with western hemlock was established with wilding stock.
Direct-seeding studies in the Kamloops Forest District were encouraging. The
main limiting factors were rodents and climate. The results suggest that losses due
to rodents, particularly on Douglas fir, may be controlled by a combination of seed
treatment and seeding technique. The study will be repeated in 1963. Planting
studies with Douglas fir and Engelmann spruce aim to determine the effect of season
of planting, and aspect, on the survival of different classes of planting stock. The
field work for a study of the classification of forest land based on landform, soil,
and plant associations, undertaken in co-operation with the Canada Departments
of Agriculture and of Forestry, of an area near Quilchena was completed. A start
was made on a second area, near McGillivray Lake, in which the British Columbia
Department of Agriculture and the Canada Department of Forestry are co-operating
with the Forest Service.
A long-term study of the influence of time on the effectiveness of scarified
seed-beds is nearing completion in the Prince George Forest District.
Results of preliminary direct-seeding studies in the Nelson Forest District were
highly variable. In 1962 a mixture of Engelmann spruce, Douglas fir, western
white pine, and western hemlock was sown near Revelstoke. After one growing
season, average stocking was 69 per cent by milacres with 1,768 seedings per
acre—mostly white pine and Douglas fir. At Cedar Creek, in a similar study based
on spot sowing, germination, regardless of species, was very erratic.
For details of research projects active in 1963, and of publications and unpublished reports, see Table Nos. 11 and 12 in the Appendix.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
19
REFORESTATION DIVISION
FOREST NURSERIES
The year was marked by exceptionally good seedling growth in all nurseries
both Coast and Interior. This was in part a reflection of the weather pattern, which
followed closely that of 1962. Precipitation was light during the first quarter The
growing season was generally cloudy and cool, and soil moisture remained above
normal. Heavy rains during the autumn made lifting trees difficult. Although snow
cover was light, the lack of extreme temperatures resulted in only negligible losses
from frost.
Germination in newly sown beds was generally good and subsequent growth
excellent, particularly in the Interior nurseries.    Although diseases seemed more
prevalent, with all nurseries reporting some losses, in no case were these severe
Personnel from the Forest Biology Laboratory, Canada Department of Forestry
investigated all reported cases of disease, and in some cases recommended changes
in nursery technique.
A record total of 3,790 seed-beds was sown. At the end of the year these
contained an estimated 23,354,000 one-year seedlings. An additional 1,360,000
seedlings were transplanted.
The increasing production of transplants was made possible largely by the
development of co-operative nurseries. The first of these, which was developed at
the Brannan Lake Boys' School, now produces approximately half a million transplants annually. Crews from the Attorney-General's Department forestry camps
and Haney Correctional Institution are also producing an increasing number at
transplant sites in the Chilliwack Public Sustained-yield Unit and at Haney
The addition to the Duncan nursery, south of the Silver Bridge over the Cowichan River.
 20 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Transplanted trees are in heavy demand for planting on brushy sites, where
their additional size and vigour provide a better chance of establishment in the face
of heavy competition. The excessive amount of hand labour involved in the production of such trees in a regular nursery nearly doubles the cost in comparison to
normal 2-year-old seedlings.
A total of 14,280,000 trees of all age-classes shipped from all nurseries for
field planting considerably exceeded the record of 11,000,000 established the previous year.    (See Table No. 21 in the Appendix.)
The highlight of the year was the purchase of a 52-acre farm at Duncan. While
this is separate from the old nursery, it is near enough so that the two can be operated
as one with consequent economies in buildings, equipment, and personnel. The soil
in the new fields is the same fertile Chemainus series as in the old one, but appears
to be much better drained. This increase in nursery area should permit a sustained
nursery production of close to 25,000,000 trees annually for the Province.
FOREST TREE SEED
There was no Province-wide seed crop of any forest tree species in 1963.
However, collections for special purposes totalled 655 bushels, of which the majority
was lodgepole pine from the Prince George Forest District. Minor quantities of
spruce were collected in order to carry out tests on extraction equipment. The
extraction of cones collected in 1962 yielded 77 kilograms of seed. Spruce seed
collected in 1962 was of little value owing to the depredations of cone and seed
insects. This appears to confirm the futility of collecting cones during poor or
medium crop years.
At the Duncan seed centre, some 380 germination tests were carried out as part
of the programme to maintain accurate and up-to-date information on seed in
storage. Several tests were carried out to check extraction equipment and improve
germination techniques.
A total of 56 requests involving 357 seed-lots was handled, and a large percentage of these requests was from other countries. In all, 433.5 kilograms of seed
were prepared and shipped to nurseries for routine sowing. Seed-bed counts and
field germination data are now being analysed for possible adjustments of sowing
factors. As nursery practices and irrigation equipment improve germination and
growth, the sowing rates must be adjusted to prevent overstocking in the seed-beds.
Present stock of Forest Service and company seed on hand is 4,883 kilograms
(10,742 pounds), of which about 70 per cent is Coast Douglas fir.
The seed centre staff co-operated actively with the Research Division on two
experiments involving white spruce provenance, and with the Federal Pathological
Laboratory on another experiment in seed-bed density. Twenty-six morphological
analyses were completed.
There are now seven seed production areas (all Douglas fir) in the Vancouver
Forest District. Development of these areas, 37 acres in all, was continued in 1963.
Some areas were thinned to the required density, and all were fertilized at the time
of bud-breaking. Future emphasis will be on the location and development of high-
elevation production areas on the Mainland.
It is now estimated that the seed requirements for planting in the public sustained-yield units alone in the Vancouver Forest District exceed 250 kilograms per
year. This will necessitate periodic cone collections equivalent to over 1,000 bushels
annually.
In the Interior, 10 seed production areas (six of which are spruce) have been
developed, covering 28.6 acres.    Chemical fertilizer was applied to over 20 acres
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963 21
during the year. Three more potential spruce areas have been located for future
development.
At the Campbell River seed orchard, the area developed to date was cultivated
and weeded, and over 2,000 feet of drain tile was laid to improve drainage.
Under the guidance of the Research Division, 417 grafts were made in the
spring from 37 selected clones. Survival was very good at the end of the first
growing season, and what mortality there was, was due mainly to death of rootstocks.
Approximately one-third of the ramets were damaged by unknown causes, but since
healthy buds had already been formed, the damage will probably be outgrown. Five
thousand trees were transplanted at Duncan to provide additional rootstock.
RECONNAISSANCE AND SURVEY WORK
The Reforestation Division again co-operated with the Surveys and Inventory
Division this year on a regeneration survey of the Harrison Public Sustained-yield
Unit. Supplementing and intensifying the regular inventory survey in this area
secured information of value to the Reforestation Division concerning 28,000 acres
of logged-over lands.
A Reforestation Division crew carried out a regeneration survey of the neighbouring Yale Public Sustained-yield Unit. Of 67,000 acres classified as not satisfactorily restocked on inventory maps, 25,000 were examined and 6,400 assessed as
not stocked and plantable. Much of this offers a difficult planting chance due to
slash, brush, topography, etc. It is significant that of this 6,400 acres, 67 per cent
is above 2,500 feet in elevation. The balance of the 67,000 acres which was not
examined is mainly high-elevation low site burns which were considered economically unplantable. An additional 4,650 acres intensively surveyed in the Soo and
Redonda Public Sustained-yield Units revealed 1,560 acres of not satisfactorily
restocked land which could be planted.
PLANTING
Weather during both the spring and fall planting seasons was excellent on the
Coast, and the cool cloudy summer should make for good survival. However, mild
weather lasting well into the fall constituted a problem in that nursery planting stock,
particularly at Green Timbers, was slow to harden off. This caused a necessary
delay in the commencement of fall projects and will likely necessitate scheduling
of more projects in the spring.
Two projects of interest were carried out on the Coast in co-operation with the
Research Division. The first of these involved species trials and a small Douglas fir
provenance trial at Jennis Bay in the Broughton Public Sustained-yield Unit. Its
purposes were: (a) Investigate the economic feasibility of planting on these northern
units, (b) determine the most suitable species for the heavier soil types close to the
coast, and (c) determine which source of Douglas fir is best suited to these units.
The second was a large-scale spacing test for Douglas fir. Since planters' wages
are constantly increasing and spacing has a very large bearing both on the cost of
establishment and final quality of the planted trees, it is most essential to have sound
information on the effect of these factors on plantation economics.
The programme in the Interior districts continues on a modest scale, with the
primary emphasis being on collecting information and securing experience. As
hazard-abatement practices increase on current sales, there is a growing tendency to
concentrate on planting the more productive sites there.
 22 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
The total planting effort for the Province continues to expand. All agencies
together planted 14,218,000 trees on 38,830 acres, which is again a record. Industry
planted more than twice the number of trees the Forest Service was able to with the
funds available.    (See Table No. 22 in the Appendix.)
PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS
The newly cleared field at the Green Timbers nursery was improved by the
installation of a sub-surface drainage system using 18,000 feet of 4-inch drain tile.
The gready improved condition of the field that was retiled last year proves the value
of such an expenditure. Development of the new well was completed by installation
of pumps and mains. This system has proved very efficient, and excellent coverage
is provided by solid-set aluminum pipe and 14V circular sprinklers.
At Telkwa considerable grading has made it possible to utilize almost the entire
site for nursery production. A building providing implement storage, utility room,
washroom, and cold-storage facilities was constructed in co-operation with the
Forest Management Division.
A small pump-house was constructed and a 5-horsepower electric pump installed on the upper field at the Cranbrook nursery. Approximately 3,000 cubic
yards of topsoil were hauled to fill hollows and replace exposed alkaline subsoil
spots. This topsoil was salvaged from a highway right-of-way relocation across a
corner of the nursery property.
CO-OPERATION
As a member of the Tree Farm Forestry Committee, the Reforestation Division
continued to take an active part in co-operative forestry projects. Staff members
served on various panels discussing brush control and site preparation at a reforestation workshop held in May. The Division also supplied five men to take part in
Plus Tree Week. In August two foresters attended the Tree Improvement Board
field trip to examine seed orchards near Campbell River.
Reforestation fallers cleared 3,820 acres of snags during the year, 2,000 acres
of which were a co-operative project with industry.
In the East Kootenay, Grazing Division and Reforestation Division crews
carried out stand-improvement thinning in 80 acres of overstocked immature stands.
Interdepartmental Rehabilitation and Forestry Programme
There are now 500 inmates involved in the forestry programme being conducted co-operatively by the Department of the Attorney-General and the Forest
Service. During 1963 two 60-man camps in the Sayward Forest and one in the
Chilliwack Valley were completed and occupied.
An area of 10,000 acres near Haney was made into a forest reserve and gazetted
as the Blue Mountain Forest. It will provide a work area for the trainees of the
Haney Correctional Institution. A suitable forestry camp-site was located on Hutda
Lake near Prince George, and an access road was constructed to it.
Inmates from the Chilliwack Valley camps constructed 2 miles of graded trail
and assisted in by-passing five condemned bridges. Maintenance work continued
on the access roads. Chilliwack nurseries shipped out a total of 1,036,800 trees,
of which 56,000 were planted by inmates on 118 acres within the Chilliwack Public
Sustained-yield Unit. A further 256,200 trees were transplanted. Over 2,000,000
trees of various age-classes are now on hand in these nurseries, and additional acreage is being developed for transplants.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
23
A 2.^-acre seed production area was established and fertilized, and a previously
established area was rethinned and fertilized. Inmate crews continued rehabilitation of brush areas and cleared another 6 acres preparatory to establishing a mixed-
species planting trial.
The camp sawmill produced 305,000 f.b.m. of lumber during the year, sawed
64,000 survey stakes, and produced 40,000 split cedar stakes. The sign shop prepared 50 signs.
Officer training at Chilliwack was continued by Forest Service officers, who
gave active instruction to correctional officers in fire-suppression, planting, trail construction, and nursery practice. Three officers attended an organizational course
at the Forest Service training-school.
In the Blue Mountain Forest, trainees from the Haney Correctional Institution
converted almost 2 miles of old railway grade to truck-road, cleared brush from 4
miles of road, and cleared 6 miles of right-of-way. A suitable area was located and
cleared for a transplant nursery, and 90,000 seedlings were transplanted in June.
The area was then enlarged to 4 acres. Trainees commenced weeding and pruning
of immature stands along main roads, and a 7-acre logged block was burned in
preparation for planting. A group of 40 officers received instruction in fire suppression, and 25 attended a talk on thinning and pruning given by the Research Division.
The local Ranger organized and trained a fire-suppression crew at the institution.
Snowdon Camp in the Sayward Forest was occupied early in 1960 by 60
inmates, and during the balance of the year they brushed and slashed out over AV2
miles of road, thinned 30 acres of the 1939 plantation, established a 3-acre seed
production area, and planted 6,000 trees. The fire-suppression crew successfully
handled four lightning fires, all in rough country.
Lakeview Camp was occupied in November by 50 trainees, who will be given
training in search and rescue, wilderness survival, and fire-fighting.
Projects carried out by inmates from the Kamloops Gaol were interrupted
during the year by their relocation at Rayleigh. However, during the spring, crews
planted 50,000 trees on 75 acres within the Pin Burn and established a seed production area at White Lake. In the fall, a crew from the Clearwater Camp thinned
another 5-acre seed production area in spruce near Sock Lake.
 24
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
WORKING PLANS DIVISION
During 1963 a second pulpwood harvesting area agreement was formally signed
granting an option to Kamloops Pulp and Paper Company Limited to purchase pulpwood from 13 public sustained-yield units. Two new public sustained-yield units
were established.   There was no change in the number of tree-farm licences.
Two new Taxation Act tree-farms were certified. Six new farm wood-lot
licences were awarded and 10 farm wood-lots were cancelled. The managed units
of the Province now include two pulpwood harvesting areas covering 22 public
sustained-yield units and 60 other public sustained-yield units, altogether 82; 39
tree-farm licences; 25 out of a total of 39 taxation tree-farms which are not managed as an integral part of the tree-farm licences; and 53 farm wood-lot licences,
making a total of 199 managed units.
The total area committed under working plans amounts to 60,288,296 acres
of productive forest, with a total allowable annual cut of 917,586,000 cubic feet,
equivalent to 62 per cent of the total Provincial scale for 1963. The following table
lists the forms of units committed to forest management under working plans for
sustained yield:—
Progress of Sustained-yield Programme up to
1963
Type of Managed Unit
Number
of
Units
Productive
Area
(Acres)
Allowable
Annual Cut
(M CF.)
Public sustained-yield units—
22
60
12,150,125
40,380,561
126,870
406,170
Total public sustained-yield units 	
82
39
25
53
52,530,686
7,070,774
672,712
14,124
533,040
349,915
34,287
344
Totals      -	
199
60,288,296
917,586
PULPWOOD HARVESTING AREAS
The option agreement for Pulpwood Harvesting Area No. 2 was formally ratified by Kamloops Pulp and Paper Company Limited and the Honourable the Minister of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources on November 7, 1963. Public sustained-yield units included are Adams, Barriere, Barton Hill, Botanie, Eagle, Nehal-
liston, Nicola, Niskonlith, North Thompson, Raft, Salmon Arm, Shuswap, and
Spallumcheen.
Other areas in the Province continue to be studied by industry as potential
pulpwood harvesting areas.
OTHER PUBLIC SUSTAINED-YIELD UNITS
Two other public sustained-yield units were established during the year. The
Okanagan was established in the Kamloops Forest District with a productive acreage
of 1,099,135 and the Takla in the Prince George Forest District with a productive
acreage of 2,334,500.
A small isolated portion of the Monkman Sustained-yield Unit in the Upper
Seebach Creek vicinity of the Prince George Forest District was withdrawn and
reserved for the proposed extensions of Tree-farm Licences Nos. 29 and 34.
 138°
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PUBLIC SUSTAINED-YIELD UNITS
PULPWOOD HARVESTING AREA NO.  1
Big Valley
Carp
Crooked River
43. Naver
44, Nechako
51,   Parsnip
70.   Stuart Lake
77.    Westlake
80.    Willow River
PULPWOOD HARVESTING AREA NO.  2
Adams
Barriere
Barton Hill
Botanie
Eagle
45. Nehalliston
46. Nicola
47. Niskonlith
55.   Raft
60.    Salmon Arm
64.   Shuswap
48.   North Thompson    69.   Spallumcheen
BLIC SUSTAINED-YIELD UNITS
2.
Arrowhead
3.
Ashnola
4.
B.abine
5.
Barkley
8.
Big Bar
10.
Blueberry
12.
Bowron
13.
Broughton
14.
Burns Lake
15.
Canoe
16.
Cape Scott
18.
Chilliwack
19.
Cottonwood
20.
Cranbrook
21.
Creston
23.
Dean
25.
Edgewood
26.
Fernie
27.
Granby
28.
Harrison
29. Hazelton
30. Hecate
31. Kettle
32. Kinbasket
33. Kitimat
34. Kitwanga
35. Kyuquot
36. Lac la Hache
37. Longworth
38. Moberly
3 9. Monkman
40. Morice
41. Nakusp
42. Narcosli
49* Okanagan
50. Ootsa
52. Purden
53. Queen Charlotte
54. Quesnel Lake
56. Redonda
57. Rivers Inlet
58. Robson
59. Salmo
61. Sayward
62. Sechelt
63. Seymour
65. Similkameen
66. Slocan
67. Smithers
68. Soo
71. Stum
72. Takla
73. Taseko
74. Tatla
75. Terrace
76. Upper Kootenay
78. Windermere
7 9. Williams Lake
81. Yalakom     fffi^
82. Yale
56°
OTHER PUBLIC UNITS
S.S.A.   Special Sale Area (o i c 2811/62)
K.R.   Kamloops Region      li^^^N
FARM LI(       CES
RESERVED     W////A                  8    Eagle
Lake
Sawmills Limited
2.    Church Sawmill Limited
AWARDED      fl
T.
F.  L.
T.
F.  L.
No.
No.
1.
Celgar Limited
21.
MacMillan,  Bloedel St Powell River
2.
Elk Falls Company Limited
Industries Ltd.
3.
Pacific Logging Company
22.
British Columbia Forest
Limited
Products Limited
4.
I.   W.  McDonagh
23.
Celgar Limited
5.
Western Plywood Company Limited
24.
Rayonier Canada (B.  C.) Limited
6.
Rayonier Canada (B. C.) Limited
25.
Rayonier Canada (B.  C.) Limited
7.
MacMillan,   Bloedel and Powell
26.
The Corporation of the District
River Limited
of Mission
8.
Boundary Sawmills Ltd.
27.
British Columbia Forest
9.
S. M. Simpson Limited
Products Limited
10.
Timberland Development Co.
28.
Shelley Development Limited
Ltd.
29.
Eagle Lake Sawmills Limited
11.
Olinger Lumber Company Ltd.
30.
Sinclair Spruce Lumber
12.
Bendickson Logging Ltd.
Company Ltd.
13.
Galloway Lumber Company Ltd.
31.
Upper Fraser Spruce Mills
14.
Crestbrook Timber Ltd.
Limited
15.
Oliver Sawmills Limited
32.
Vernon Box _t Pine Lumber Co.
16.
Pondosa Pine Lumber Company ,
Ltd.
Ltd.
33.
Shuswap Timbers Ltd.
17.
Evans Products Company Limited
34.
Church Sawmill Limited
18.
Clearwater Timber Products
35.
B. C.  Interior Sawmills Ltd.
Ltd.
36.
F.  it R.  Logging Co.  Ltd.
19.
Tahsis Company,  Ltd.
37.
Canadian Forest Products Ltd.
20.
MacMillan,  Bloedel 8c Powell River
38.
Empire Mills Limited
Industries Ltd.
39.
MacMillan,  Bloedel and Powell
54°
52°
River Limited
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS
HONOURABLE R. G. WILLISTON, MINISTER
Scale
40    30    20     10
40
80
120
160 MILES
STATUS OF SUSTAINED-YIELD FORESTRY PROGRAMME
as at
31 DECEMBER 1963
QuatsinoSound.
Cape Cook
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136°
134°
132°
130°
128°
126°
124°
122°
120°
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
25
TREE-FARM LICENCES
No new tree-farm licences were established in 1963, but new working plans,
including revised inventory figures, resulted in an increased classification of area as
productive forest land of 16,583 acres and plans for improved utilization amounting
to 21,474,000 cubic feet annually. These two figures are not supplementary since
some productive area shown as an increase in 1962 contributes to the revised allowable cut figures which were not effective until 1963.
During the year a portion of the remote undeveloped forests north of the existing managed units was investigated by industry to determine the feasibility of applying for tree-farm licences to support new pulp-oriented integrated forest-products
complexes. Celgar Limited investigated the Upper Skeena area in the Prince Rupert
Forest District and Alexandra Forest Industries Ltd. studied the Finlay, Parsnip,
and Peace Rivers in the Rocky Mountain Trench region of the Prince George Forest
District. MacMillan, Bloedel and Powell River Limited applied for the tree-farm
licence associated with the Kitimat pulp-mill, which had been placed in abeyance
some years ago pending a review of the management potential of the area scheduled
to be held after the end of 1963.   {See Table Nos. 31, 32, and 33 in the Appendix.)
CERTIFIED TREE-FARMS
Two new certified tree-farms were certified in 1963, bringing the total to 39
tree-farms under the Taxation Act. Of these, 14 are managed as portions of tree-
farm licences with a productive acreage of 291,903 acres and a total annual allowable cut of 13,136,000 cubic feet. The tree-farms not included within tree-farm
licences total 25 and have a productive acreage of 672,712 acres with a total annual
allowable cut of 34,287,000 cubic feet plus 386,740 Christmas trees.
FARM WOOD-LOT LICENCES
Routine activity in farm wood-lot administration resulted in six new farm wood-
lots. Ten were cancelled due to change in tenure, failure to adhere to the management plan, death, and, in two cases, change of vocation by the licensee. The 53
farm wood-lots have a productive acreage of 14,124 and an annual allowable cut
of 344,000 cubic feet.
 26 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
PUBLIC INFORMATION AND EDUCATION DIVISION
Nineteen sixty-three was an extremely busy and vital year for the Public
Information and Education Division. As was noted in the 1962 Report, that year
had seen major staff changes affecting the whole structure of the Division. Last
year brought a return to full activity. The Director, himself a new member, was
able to visit all districts to meet Forest Service personnel, renew contacts with
news-distributing media, and observe industrial operations.
In reviewing the activities of the Division as a whole, it appears that the press
and radio fields were particularly active, and the Forest Service is indebted to those
media for their help. The production of a new film advanced rapidly, and stress
was given to the production and showing of Forest Service exhibits. The establishment of a Public Information Officer in the Prince George Forest District again
proved extremely valuable.
For the Divisional staff, what appears as a matter of minor internal importance
loomed as a salient feature of the year. This was the acquisition of a large, dry
storage area in the nearby Forest Service garage. Up to this time, important volumes of printed matter, photographic stores, and bulky exhibits have been stored in
widely separated warehouse areas.
COMMUNICATIONS MEDIA
Press and Periodicals
The 1963 season was particularly successful in the field of news dissemination.
The establishment of a news clipping service late in 1962 gave the Division, for the
first time, a real instrument for making accurate assessments of how releases were
accepted and how widely they were published. The Division learned with some
gratification that many Forest Service releases achieve very full news saturation,
being published by almost every paper in the Province, daily and weekly. It might
be added that although the clipping service cannot substantiate this point, a check
has shown that these same releases appear on most television and radio newscasts.
The most popular and widely accepted news releases are those dealing with
fire protection. These have not departed far from the pattern established many
years ago. The weekly release, issued on Fridays, summarizes the Provincial fire
picture, including numbers of fires and costs to date. There are also daily releases
at special periods and news stories and releases covering particular aspects of the
fire season or fires.
Also released to the press were stories dealing with such subjects as silviculture, reforestation, forest industries, pulpwood harvesting areas, speeches made
by Forest Service personnel, exhibits, and celebrations.
Publications and Printing
The volume of work in this category showed a marked increase in 1963 due
to new and important publications being issued in addition to regular editions and
reprints.
Most important project included the Annual Report of the Forest Service and
the Research Review. In addition, there were large and newly edited reprints of
the Illustrated Forest Activities series, the career pamphlets, and the school scribblers.  The latter appeared with new colour-photo covers and Forest Service crests.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE, 1963 27
In the field of new publications were the Safety Manual and the first two
Management Notes. An old favourite was completely revised, given colour illustrations and a new cover, and brought to the point where final proofs have been
returned to the Queen's Printer. This is the Pocket Guide to the Trees and Shrubs
of British Columbia.
As an indication of the demand for Forest Service publications, 800 requests
were received and filled from school students alone.
Radio, Television, and Theatre
The Division's educational activities in 1963 again included the use of radio,
television, and theatre advertising to emphasize forest-fire protection.
Five sets of 35-mm. protection slides were prepared and used on six television
stations in the Province. These slides were telecast approximately 200 times
between July 1 and September 10, 1963.
The Province's 27 radio stations were supplied with a prepared take which
contained 10 individual 30-second announcements. Copy for special hazard flashes
to be used during periods of high hazard was also prepared and supplied to all
stations. In all, 2,731 announcements were broadcast during the standard schedule,
May 1 to September 10, 1963.
Approximately 250,000 persons viewed a 35-mm. film trailer projected in
33 commercial theatres.
In addition to the scheduled paid and unpaid protection announcements on
radio and television stations, staff officers prepared copy and (or) participated in
numerous special-event programmes. A daily forest-fire report over one Victoria
station was continued.
SIGNS, POSTERS, AND EXHIBITS
With the co-operation of stores, auto courts, private camp-sites, etc., more
than 11,000 protection posters were displayed.
The Service's highway sign crew was active for the 10th consecutive year,
repainting 106 "Keep B.C. Green—Use Your Ashtray" signs. In addition, 181
new standard Forest Service signs were produced, bringing to 789 the number now
on display.
In conjunction with the Reforestation Division, a portable exhibit was constructed and used in numerous fall fairs and exhibitions. The special 50th anniversary exhibit also received wide use, but is now going to be removed from circulation
due to excessive wear. The Service's permanent exhibit in the British Columbia
Building, Pacific National Exhibition, Vancouver, was maintained.
A miniature replica of the special hazard-rating sign was produced in quantity
for use in automobiles during 1964.
PHOTOGRAPHY
Still and Motion-picture Production
During the year, production of black-and-white prints totalled 11,587, a slight
increase over the previous year's record total. The Engineering Services Division
received most of these prints.
Production of negatives, both black and white, and colour, in large format and
roll film, continued to increase. The photographic library had 307 negatives added
to its file, excluding those taken by Engineering Services personnel, which are now
catalogued separately.   The 35-mm.-slide library received 91. additions, and nu-
—
 28
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
merous duplicates of file slides were made for various lecture and display purposes.
Use of the slide collection is increasing, and the use of duplicates for extended loans
allows a master copy to remain on file. A start has been made on forming a collection of 2.4 transparencies, which can be used for display as well as for projection
purposes.
" The Man in the Tower," a 24-minute training film on the lookoutman, was
completed during the year and is now in the film library.
Motion-picture coverage was given to a demonstration of helicopter and
monsoon-bucket use in fire-fighting, 400 feet of film being used. With 600 feet
of film, the procedure used in painting the " Keep B.C. Green—Use Your Ashtray "
highway signs was filmed. This footage will be edited into a silent training sequence
for instruction of future road sign-painting crews.
Slash-burning in the Nimpkish area, part of a 16-mm. film being made.
The major motion-picture undertaking of the year was the production of 4,000
feet of film for an informational and training film on slash-burning. Most of it was
taken in the Nimpkish and Lake Cowichan areas of Vancouver Island. This production had reached the editing stage by the end of the year. At the same time,
extensive 35-mm.-slide coverage was given, and from a total of 130 slides the basic
material for an illustrated lecture will be selected. Sequence colour stills on the
progression of some slash burns were also taken.
Proof copies of photographs added to the photographic library continue to be
sent to the districts at six-month intervals, resulting in increased use of the library
by district personnel.
During the year the District Information Officer in Prince George edited some
1962 footage into an informational silent film on slash-burning and planting, and
nearly completed a second on scarification and silviculture.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
29
FILM LIBRARY
The year 1963 began with 152 films in the library, showing once again an
increase of 12 films over 1962.
A total of 150 of these films was loaned out to the public. The total audience
was down in 1963 from 1962 due to the decrease in school lecturing. (See Table
No. 141 in the Appendix.)
It is planned to repeat the circulation of the film catalogue to the schools at the
beginning of 1964 to stimulate the activity of the library.
All officers of the Division, as well as school lecturers, gave many film and
lecture programmes to schools, service clubs, church groups and Parent-Teacher
Associations.
Once again the films from the library were used to train inmates of British
Columbia correctional institutions in fire-fighting and reforestation, as well as related
forestry subjects. Other prisons as far away as Saskatchewan also used the library
for rehabilitation programmes, and the armed forces used it in their national defence
programme.
For the first time a selection of Forest Service films was shown during the
summer at trailer parks throughout the Province, and this proved most successful.
It was done by the Division's highway sign-painting crew and was therefore carried
out without additional cost.
The Division continued to provide safety shows, and, with the addition of a
new safety film, this was a successful enterprise.
SCHOOL LECTURE PROGRAMME
The school lecture programme has declined from a peak of three full-time
lecturers to two who are only able to devote part of their time to it—one working
out of the Victoria headquarters and one out of the Prince George District office.
Despite this, 151 lectures were given in 74 different schools to a total of 15,240
students.
Both school lecturers on their trips seek opportunities to address service clubs
and other community groups. Including these, and talks by other members of the
Division, some 45 non-school lectures were given. The content of these talks varied
widely of course, but basically they covered the importance of the forests to the
economy and the need for public co-operation in the management and conservation
measures that are being undertaken.
LIBRARY
For the first time in many years the librarian visited the Prince George District
office and the Forest Service training-school at Surrey to reorganize their libraries.
It is hoped that in the future the district and training-school libraries can be visited
at more frequent intervals.
With the use of the Xerox 914 copier, the library staff has been able to give
a much improved service to our borrowers by the copying of a great deal of material.
This enables the original to remain on the shelves and the copy to be retained for
reference by the forester concerned.
Press clippings on forest subjects are now being supplied to all forest districts,
as well as being circulated through the Service at Victoria. This gives an over-all
picture of the industry in British Columbia.
There has been an increase in inter-library loans, up to 174 items, over 152 last
year, borrowed from libraries all across Canada and the United States. This service
is much appreciated by the foresters.
 30 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
FOREST MANAGEMENT DIVISION
Relatively good logging weather, a light fire season, and good markets during
1963 all combined to produce yet another record year for production and revenue
from British Columbia's forests.
The total scale for all products was 1,473,000,000 cubic feet (8,676,000,000
board-feet). This figure surpasses last year's record by over 130,100,000 cubic
feet, or 9.7 per cent. The significant factor of the total increase is that the increase
in the Interior was three times that of the Coast, whereas in 1962 the increase
occurred in almost the reverse manner. This is reflected in the percentage of scale
from the Coast as against that from the Interior. With the exception of 1962, the
Interior has been showing a steady gain on the proportion of the total production,
and in 1963 it rose from 42 to 45.    (See Table No. 53 in the Append'x.)
By species, Douglas fir continued to head the list of wood scaled. Four hundred
and two million cubic feet were scaled during the year, compared to 338,000,000
cubic feet of hemlock, 274,000,000 cubic feet of spruce, and 186,000,000 cubic
feet of cedar. Hemlock showed the greatest volume increase, but spruce showed the
greatest percentage rise.
A breakdown of the scale by species into cut by Coast and Interior brings some
interesting facts to light. The volume of Douglas fir scaled in the Interior just topped
the Coast. The production of spruce in the Interior was over seven times that of
the Coast. Conversely, the scale of hemlock on the Coast was seven times that of
the Interior. The production of fir on the Coast dropped 7,000,000 cubic feet, while
increasing by 13,000,000 in the Interior. Spruce in the Interior showed the greatest
volume increase of all species, Coast and Interior.
While the total scale of all products rose by nearly 10 per cent, the proportion
from timber sales and other temporary alienations remained the same at approximately 81 per cent. Timber sales were the main source of production, contributing
50 per cent of the total scale. The scale from tree-farm licences was approximately
14 per cent.
For a number of years it has been noted that the data contained in Table No. 3
(now Table No. 51) in the Appendix of the Forest Service Annual Report were
duplicated in the table " Net Value of the Forest Industry " in the publication
" British Columbia Forest Industry Statistics," compiled by the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics. As the same sources were being approached for much of the same
information by the two departments and basically the same data were being presented in the two reports, it was decided to use the table compiled by the Bureau
of Economics and Statistics. The figures for 1962 and 1963 are shown as estimates
because data are not complete for approximately two years. Nevertheless the figures
are sufficiently accurate to give a definite trend. During the past few years there
has been a very marked increase in value, rising from $625,000,000 to an estimated
$850,000,000 in the last five years.
The record over-all production for the Province was reflected in the water-borne
lumber shipments, amounting to 2,149,000,000 board-feet, a 16-per-cent increase
over 1962. While the United States and the United Kingdom continued to be the
largest buyers of British Columbia lumber and showed substantial increases over
previous years, the most notable increase in shipments was to Japan. Two hundred
and seventy-eight million board-feet were shipped to Japan, compared to 107,000,-
000 the previous year and a mere 1,500,000 in 1960.
The export of logs also took an upswing in 1963, exceeding the 1962 total by
nearly 20,000,000 board-feet, but failed to reach the 100,000,000 mark of 1961.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963 31
Hemlock increased its lead over other species to 45 per cent with 42,000,000 feet,
while spruce shipments were half this figure and balsam half of that.
The number of timber sales cruised during the year remained about the same
as for the last two years, at 1,862. However, acreage and volume of saw-timber
increased appreciably, and the average size of sales increased from 328 acres to 385.
The number of sales awarded rose from 1,991 in 1962 to 2,183.
While the increase in number of sales awarded was moderate, the increase in
estimated revenue took a very significant jump, from $18,959,259 in 1962 to
$26,194,611, the highest since 1959.
Competition for sales remained much the same, with the percentage of sales
bid in at less than two times the upset price rising two points. Eighty-eight and
seven-tenths per cent of the sales put up for public competition were sold at upset
stumpage. On a few occasions when sales were bid at more than double the upset
stumpage, the Honourable the Minister accepted protests from the recognized applicants and cancelled the sales under authority of section 17 (7) of the Forest Act.
PEACE RIVER FLOOD BASIN
The year saw considerable timber-sale activity in the proposed Peace River
flood basin, with a total of 28 sales being awarded. These sales covered 48,144
acres, for a volume of 68,137,000 cubic feet. At the close of the year a further five
sales were being advertised, and these, together with areas cruised but not yet advertised, covered 65,747 acres and 92,335,000 cubic feet of merchantable timber.
Thus, including seven sales sold prior to 1963, a total area of 116,829 acres has been
cruised, carrying 166,044,000 cubic feet of timber. Some areas still remain to be
cruised, but the bulk of the area has now been covered.
WIND-THROW
In the latter part of 1962 the Lower Mainland experienced heavy gales, including " Frieda," and severe blow-down occurred in some areas. Damage was particularly heavy in the Yale Public Sustained-yield Unit around Hope. Owing to the
severity of the blow-down, the areas most affected were declared salvage areas under
section 27 of the Forest Act, and the timber sold at reduced stumpage rates to encourage early and quick removal of the downed trees to forestall loss by decay and
beetles. Thirty timber sales involving blow-down were sold during the year, for a
total volume of 15,500,000 cubic feet, and more were expected in the early part of
the new year. In the Prince George Forest District, heavy losses from wind-throw
were also experienced, and sales involving 425,000 cubic feet were processed.
SPRUCE BARK BEETLE
In the Prince George Forest District the spruce bark beetle presented the greatest threat to loss of merchantable volumes in standing timber. During the winter
of 1962/63, beetle infestations were reported on by industry, the Canada Department of Forestry, and Forest Service personnel, and joint meetings were held to
discuss the situation. The infestations were mapped from the air by the Federal
Department, and, using these maps, Forest Service personnel carried out ground
checks. As a result, several areas were declared as salvage areas under section 27
of the Forest Act, and a total of 15 timber sales was processed for a volume of
14,500,000 cubic feet. The infestations occurred along a relatively narrow strip
from McLeod Lake in the north to Lightning Creek in the south. The heaviest
attack occurred in the Purden Lake Public Sustained-yield Unit, where 11 sales
were processed.
 32
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Spruce bark beetle attacks of varying intensity have also occurred throughout
the white spruce stands of the Prince Rupert Forest District, with heaviest infestations in the Babine Lake, Ootsa Lake, and Hazelton areas. Where possible, logging
activity is being directed into infested timber, as in the Prince George District.
ADMINISTRATION OF MANAGED UNITS
In 1963 the total cut from the management units listed in the Working Plans
section of this Report was 112 per cent of the sum of their approved allowable cuts,
and this volume represented 70 per cent of the total cut from the whole Province.
From experience the use of timber-sale cruise volumes as a basis for allowable
cut control for sustained-yield units had proved unsatisfactory due to certain inherent
weaknesses. It was therefore decided to use actual scale volumes rather than timber-
sale cruise estimates for budgeting purposes. However, at the request of the logging
industry, implementation of the proposed system was given a six-month moratorium
to allow industry to study the proposals and submit its recommendations.
Two more public sustained-yield units were turned over to management for
administration. The Okanagan was the last unmanaged area in the Kamloops Forest District, and in Prince George Forest District the Takla has pushed management
boundaries still farther north.
The second pulpwood harvesting area was established during the year, centring
on Kamloops, and it contains 13 of the adjacent public sustained-yield units. Also
three of the managed units in Pulpwood Harvesting Area No. 1 were gazetted as
pulpwood harvesting forest reserves. This is the term now given to forest reserves
within pulpwood harvesting areas. The areas gazetted under this new designation
are the Carp, Stuart, and Willow Public Sustained-yield Units.
Another record cut was established on tree-farm licences, amounting to 365,-
000,000 cubic feet, which is 5 per cent over the sum of their approved allowable cuts.
MARKET PRICES AND STUMPAGE TRENDS
Lumber Prices
The selling prices for dressed lumber that were reported to the Forest Service
by the mills in the Interior of the Province were generally higher than those reported
in 1962.
The relatively high prices at year-end reflect a firming-up in the demand for
lumber in the North American market that is expected to continue into 1964. The
market outlook at year-end was reported to be very good.
7965 Uncorrected Quarterly Average Dressed-lumber Prices (Interior)
Jan-Mar.
Apr-
June
July-Sept.
Oct.
-Dec.
Species
Basis,
MB.M.
Average
Price
Basis,
MB.M.
Average
Price
Basis,
M B.M.
Average
Price
Basis.
MB.M.
Average
Price
140,405
185,702
11,501
4,221
640
$58.92
57.00
54.31
96.13
56.86
214,074
308,329
12,902
6,136
6,486
$64.02
60.12
57.98
96.22
59.52
219,272
321,514
11,701
6,282
7,899
$66.04
59.52
63.42
98.20
59.22
173,615
240,002
10,113
4,306
3,446
1
j $60.32
Spruce ._	
Cedar  . ..
White pine _	
Yellow pine	
|    57.86
59.92
|    99.18
j    53.91
1
Log Prices
The log prices reported from transactions in the Vancouver log market started
to rise in the second quarter of 1963 and continued to rise all year.   This increase in
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
33
prices is largely a reflection of the improvement in demand for the sawlog and
peeler-grade material.
Log prices at the year-end had reached their highest level since 1956 and were
still climbing.
1963 Quarterly Average Log Prices per M B.M. (Vancouver Market)
No. 3 GRADE
Species
Jan.-Mar.
Apr.-June
July-Sept.
Oct.-Dec.
Fir	
$59.48
33.96
40.85
32.62
38.45
43.99
$61.11
37.18
44.65
33.61
42.51
44.93
$61.83
39.66
45.65
36.79
43.94
43.47
$61.63
Cedar 	
42.44
46.55
37.51
47.37
43.58
ALL GRADES
Fir -- -	
$73.57
41.69
43.55
40.22
46.96
50.53
$73.85
42.47
46.18
42.69
54.78
50.91
$73.66
46.18
47.14
44.55
56.77
49.54
$78.68
Cedar                          ___
48.55
48.07
45.27
Spruce     - 	
59.87
49.65
Stumpage Prices
Appraised stumpage prices were considerably higher during 1963 following
the improvement in log and lumber prices.
The weighted average stumpage price per hundred cubic feet for all species for
the Coast regions was $5 and for the Interior $2.88. The average of stumpage
prices bid for all species on timber sales in the Province during 1963 was $3.36 per
hundred cubic feet, in comparison with $3.01 for 1962. The comparable figures
for the years 1958, 1959, 1960, and 1961 were $4.03, $3.88, $3.53, and $2.53.
The real increase in the upset rates for conventional sawlog sales is distorted in
a comparison of yearly average prices which reflect the depressed prices for the
volumes that are sold at " salvage value only " rates. The volume sold in this type
of sale is increasing each year, both in the Interior, where the decadent hemlock-cedar
stands are being opened up, and in other areas as the limitations imposed by sustained-yield regulations make this type of material more attractive. The impact of
this type of sale is reflected in the averages that follow and in the " Price Range "
column of Table No. 67 in the Appendix.
The average stumpage price for all species, excluding " salvage value only "
rates, was $5.25 per hundred cubic feet for the Coast and $3.22 for the Interior,
which combines for an average of $3.69 per hundred cubic feet for the Province.
Sliding-scale Adjustments
The stumpage rate payable for each species on a timber sale or cutting permit
is subject to adjustment under a sliding-scale formula each time the average price
of logs or lumber changes by at least 15 per cent from the selling price on which
the current rates were based. There were 4,801 adjustments under this provision
during 1963—2,910 in the Coast zones, where the stumpage is tied to the Vancouver log market, and 1,891 in the Interior zones, where the stumpage is tied to the
average market value of dressed lumber.
2
 34
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
As a result of the general increase in average log and lumber selling prices,
most adjustments served to increase the stumpage rates payable. There were only
240 downward adjustments, all for species in appraisal zones in the Northern
Interior, where prices fell early in the first quarter then recovered.
SILVICULTURE
The programme for 1963 included stand treatment, field studies, and road
location.
Following the trend established in past years, the principal activities were in
the field of stand treatment. All districts were active in this field, and some 629
timber sales, principally in the Interior, received some form of treatment. This
involved the treatment of 179,669 acres.
Stands were generally treated to attain either natural regeneration or increment,
or, in some cases, a combination of both. The cutting methods most frequently
employed were single-tree selection, strips, groups, patches, or single seed-trees.
Of the 179,669 acres receiving some form of treatment, 9,623 acres were
treated under single-tree selection, compared with 72,944 acres in strips or patches
and 90,667 acres in seed blocks or single seed-trees.
Although natural regeneration is dependent on several interrelated factors, a
satisfactory seed-bed and a suitable seed source can be regarded as prime requisites.
The preparation of a satisfactory seed-bed may require either burning or scar'fica-
tion. The past few years have seen an increase in this phase of the programme.
To date some 21,880 acres have been scarified in the Prince George Forest District,
and similar programmes have been developed in the Nelson, Kamloops, and Prince
Rupert Forest Districts.    During 1963 approximately 7,459 acres were scarified.
A D7E with a U-blade scarifying in heavy slash.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
35
Scarification appears to be achieving satisfactory results at a reasonable cost.
Regeneration surveys in the Prince George Forest District over areas scarified in
1960, 1961, and 1962 averaged 58.9 per cent stocked quadrats. The stocking of
spruce resulting from the 1959 scarification programme in the same district was
reported in the 1961 Annual Report as 53 per cent stocked quadrats. The results
of the 1960 and 1961 programmes in the Kamloops Forest District indicate 64.2
per cent stocked quadrats.
The cost of scarifying varies from area to area and from year to year, depending on the physical factors of the area and the prevailing weather conditions. However, experience over the past few years indicates that $10 per acre is the average.
The average cost of scarifying 4,233 acres in the Prince George Forest District
was $10.32 per acre, compared with $7.90 per acre for 483 acres in the Nelson
Forest District.
Prior to 1963 most of the scarification was done following logging. In the
fall of 1962 the incidence of blow-down resulting from hurricane "Frieda" caused
a change in emphasis from post- to pre-scarification.
In 1959 the first of a series of evaluation studies was initiated to determine the
results of the various forms of stand treatment. At least two of these studies have
now been completed, and the findings have been or will be reported in the Forest
Management Note series.
The blister rust control programme, which was initiated in 1961, was expanded,
and 2,100 acres were sprayed by helicopter with Phytoactin. Although no definite
conclusions have been formulated, the results to date are extremely promising.
The Douglas fir bark beetle control programme mentioned in the 1962 Annual
Report is now in force and has been well accepted. Unfortunately the spruce bark
beetle has now replaced the Douglas fir bark beetle as the problem of major concern.
■I
Scaling by weight at 100 Mile House.
 36 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
SCALING
Coast
The scale of Coast timber was made in 1963 by an official scaling staff of 126
scalers and 451 acting official scalers. Approximately 95 per cent of the Coast
volume was scaled by the official staff.
Supervision of the official staff was maintained through regular checking and
training by the official supervisory staff. The Inspectors of Licensed Scalers maintained their supervision of the acting official scalers.
Examination of 71 candidates for scaling licences resulted in the issuance of
27 licences.
Preliminary studies indicated that scaling computing and billing procedures
might be executed more efficiently through electronic computer systems. A forester
has been assigned on a full-time basis to further investigation of this subject.
Interior
Supervision of licensed scalers was maintained by the Inspectors of Licensed
Scalers in co-operation with the Ranger staffs.
Examination of 660 candidates for scaling licences resulted in the issuance of
220 licences. The Inspector staff continued with special lectures for the candidates
after working-hours. Some of these lectures were given in co-operation with local
School Boards in the adult education programme.
Scaling by weight was approved at two stud mills in the Cariboo. Early indications are that this method will prove popular and in certain instances more efficient than normal procedures which require individual measurement of all logs.
 ^—
REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963 37
GRAZING DIVISION
GENERAL CONDITIONS
Conditions were generally favourable for the range live-stock industry in 1963.
With the exception of limited areas only, forage production on both hay land and
range was good. Stock came off the range in excellent condition. Catde prices
declined, but not disastrously. The number of stock using Crown range again set
a record.
Range
Meagre precipitation during the winter of 1962/63 and early in the growing
season resulted in poor range forage production. However, wet weather set in late
in June, and periodic rains throughout the remainder of the growing season resulted
in a remarkable recovery. Many grassland ranges remained green until freeze-up
late in the fall.   Total range production was above average.
The supply of range is now becoming inadequate to meet the needs of the
industry in many areas.
Hay
Hay supplies proved adequate for the relatively short and mild winter of
1962/63. Owing to the frequent rainfall during the harvesting season, haying conditions were difficult in many areas in 1963. However, both the yield and quality
of the crop appears generally adequate for the winter of 1963/64. A notable exception was the Peace River area, where a reduced crop necessitated a cut-back in the
number of stock being wintered on some farms.
Markets and Prices
Cattle prices remained fairly strong during the first half of the year, but weakened later during the period when most of the cattle were marketed. Weighted
average price received by cattlemen through the British Columbia Livestock Producers' Co-operative Association was $20.01 per hundredweight in 1963, compared
to $21.20 per hundredweight in 1962, a drop of $1.19. The prices for sheep and
lambs were up slightly over the previous year.
Live-stock Losses
Losses of stock on the range due to natural causes such as poisonous weeds
and predatory animals appeared to be lighter than in recent years. However, the
unexplained disappearance of stock from Crown range continued to increase. These
losses appeared to be directly related to improved road access to range areas, and
in many cases theft was suspected. Losses from stock becoming trapped in abandoned buildings on the range were also numerous.
RANGE MANAGEMENT
The principal factors affecting the management of Crown range during the year
were the increasing demand for range use, further land alienations, and the mounting
pressure of associated land uses. This situation requires greatiy intensified supervision and management to secure maximum forage benefits, proper integration of
the associated land uses, and maintenance of both the productive and protective
functions of the range. The need is not being met due to both a shortage of staff
and inadequate over-all land-use planning.   The pressures of day-to-day administra-
 38 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
tion necessary to resolve conflicts, both between graziers and with other land users,
did not permit adequate attention to be given to range-management planning needed
to increase forage production.
Range Surveys
Only scant attention could be given to this important activity during 1963.
One small primary survey, covering approximately 46,000 acres, was carried out.
Compilation of maps and reports covering field work completed in previous years
was continued as time permitted. Numerous extensive range inspections were also
carried out.
Range Improvements
During 1963, $52,883.68 was spent from the Range Improvement Fund.
Material to the value of $9,971.12 was on hand at the beginning of the year and
$16,860.92 worth at the end of the year. Net assistance to range-improvement
projects from the Fund was thus $45,993.80.
The following projects, chargeable wholly or in part to the Fund, were constructed or extensively rehab'litated: 22 cattle-guards, 22 drift fences, 1 experimental plot, 3 hazard removals, 4 holding-grounds, 2 meadow improvements, 2
pasture developments, 30 stock-trails, 22 water developments, 1 brush-spraying,
1 yellow pine thinning, range seeding, and abandoned-horse disposal.
Permittees contributed extensively to the projects listed, mainly in the form of
labour. Also, reflecting the growing recognition by the industry of the need for
more intensive management, permittees undertook the construction of a greatiy
increased number of projects entirely at their own expense. During the year the
following projects were authorized for construction: 3 breeding pastures, 4 catde-
guards, 3 corrals, 37 drift fences, 4 pasture enclosures, 2 holding-grounds, 1 stock-
trail, and 3 water developments.
Field,trials to determine the feasibility of improving range forage production
were continued in 1963. One of the pasture-development projects listed above
involved clearing, scarification, and seeding of an area of non-commercial forest
cover. This work is expensive, but where soil quality and forage yields are sufficiently high may prove economically feasible.
The brush-spraying project involved treatment with 2,4-D of sagebrush to
reduce competition with the associated forage plants. The yellow pine thinning was
a continuation of the project commenced in 1962 in an effort to improve forage
cover as well as timber production in an overstocked stand in the Cranbrook area.
Also, a range-land drill, designed by the United States Forest Service and loaned by
that agency, was used in a number of trial seedings on depleted grassland range.
This machine shows considerable promise.
A total of 33,686 pounds of grass and legume seed was distributed for sowing
on Crown ranges during the year, compared to 21,440 pounds distributed in 1962.
Most of the seed was used on logged areas, no extensive burns requiring seeding in
1963. Except for a minor amount sown by Forest Service personnel, seeding was,
as usual, undertaken by co-operating permittees, with seed, equipment, and supervision being supplied by the Service.
Following consultation with the Range Research Station, some adjustment in
seed mixes was made to reduce the possibility of competition with coniferous regeneration. Examination of several of the large areas which were seeded following burns
in 1960 and 1961 showed considerably more promising results than were previously
evident. Several trial slash-disposal burns were carried out in the range area in
1963, both to reduce fire hazard and improve seeding opportunities.
 .
REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE, 1963 39
The maintenance of catde-guards on heavily travelled roads continued to be
a problem. Additional modified designs were installed during the year in an effort
to reduce upkeep.
All of the Kamloops and most of the Nelson Grazing Districts were closed to
horses during the winter of 1962/63 to prevent damaging grazing during this period.
Forty-six horses which remained on Crown range in contravention of the closures
were removed by horse-disposal licensees.
Peace River Pastures
A major feature of Grazing Division activity in 1963 was a gready expanded
pasture-development programme in the Peace River area. This was made possible
through the availability of increased funds as a result of Federal-Provincial cost-
sharing agreements under the Agricultural Rehabilitation and Development Act.
Five pasture projects were approved under this legislation. All of the sites had been
selected and placed under reserve earlier.
In the current phase of development two projects involve only the construction
of fencing, trails, stock-watering dugouts, and other facilities necessary to utilize the
natural-forage values. Two more areas contain virtually no natural forage and
involve the clearing, breaking, and seeding to domestic forage plants of some 4,000
acres currently covered by poplar, willow, and other non-commercial species. The
fifth project is a combination of developed and natural pasture. All of the projects
include additional land which can be developed as required in the future.
Owing to shortage of staff, the amount of planning involved, and time required
for the consummation of project agreements with the Canadian Government, the
bulk of the work was not commenced until October. However, by the end of the
year the following work was completed: 9V-. miles of fencing, 10 stock-watering
dugouts, 8V2 miles of access road, lOVi miles of stock-trails, 2,453 acres cleared,
and 25 acres broken and seeded. The last item represented clean-up of pilot work
undertaken in past years. The present phase of the programme will require two
more years to complete.
CO-OPERATION
There are now 60 local range live-stock associations approved under the
Grazing Act. Three new associations were approved during the year, and one newly
incorporated association was in the process of applying for approval at the end of
the year. Close contact was maintained with these associations, which are an
invaluable aid in resolving the wide variety of problems which arise in the administration of Crown range. Contact was also maintained with the British Columbia
Beef Cattle Growers' Association and the British Columbia Sheep Breeders' Association on matters of industry-wide importance. A total of 166 association meetings
was attended by one or more Forest Service officers during 1963.
The British Columbia Livestock Producers' Co-operative Association, the
producer-owned marketing agency, continued to supply live-stock price figures
necessary for the sliding scale of grazing fees. The co-operation of this agency is
appreciated by the Forest Service.
Close liaison was maintained with other agencies of both the Provincial and
Federal Governments associated with range or live stock. The Canada Research
Stations at both Kamloops and Beaverlodge, Alta., continued to supply valuable
technical information in connection with range management and development. A
number of joint investigational projects were continued or extended.
Grazing officers again assisted with the University of British Columbia Faculty
of Agriculture students' tour in the range area.    Twenty illustrated talks on range
 40 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
mangement were also presented by Grazing Division personnel to rancher groups,
the Forest Service training-school, and Ranger staffs.
ADMINISTRATION
The number of stock on Crown range increased approximately 8 per cent in
1963. As such additional stock can now be accommodated only through more
intensive management and supervision, the result was a tremendous increase in the
administrative work load—an increase out of all proportion to the larger number
of stock involved. To meet this situation it was necessary to assign a larger amount
of grazing field work to Ranger staffs. Although this greater decentralization is
desirable, its practicability is limited by both the pressure of other Ranger duties and
the need for more training of this staff in grazing work. A light fire season in 1963
helped the situation considerably.
Grazing instruction for the current class at the training-school was increased,
and the possibility of advanced instruction for the existing Ranger staff was given
active consideration. There is a need for a completely rewritten Grazing Manual
to meet current conditions.
Pressure for the commencement of grazing administration on wild lands in the
Peace River area reached the point this year where 72 applications were received for
grazing permits for 6,332 cattle, 714 horses, and 2,286 sheep. It was not possible
to issue these permits, but the appointment of an additional agrologist was approved
late in the year, and plans for the necessary surveys and administration commenced.
Grazing administration was also started on a limited scale in the Pemberton
area of the Vancouver Forest District. There are a few meadows and sub-alpine
areas in this locality which are suitable for grazing small herds of catde for a short
summer season. The potential is limited, but will be a useful adjunct to live-stock
farms in the vicinity.
Grazing Permits
During 1963, 1,951 grazing permits were issued for 158,840 cattle, 5,860
horses, and 25,366 sheep, on Crown range. This is an increase of 27 permits over
1962. Cattle numbers were up 12,010 head or 8.1 per cent, sheep 1,996 head or
8.5 per cent, and horses 853 head or 17 per cent over the previous year. Both the
number of permits issued and the number of cattle are the highest ever recorded.
Increases were shared by all districts.    (See Table No. 81 in the Appendix.)
Hay Permits
A total of 229 hay-cutting permits was issued authorizing the harvesting of
2,842 tons of hay from Crown range. Twenty of these permits, involving 291 tons
of hay, were later cancelled where adverse conditions prevented harvesting. Hay-
cutting fees remained at $ 1 per ton.
Special-use Permits
There are now 96 grazing special-use permits in effect in Provincial forests
under the Forest Reserve Regulations. These are all special-purpose pastures.
Special-use permit fees were revised upward during the year.
Grazing Fees
Grazing fees per head per month for 1963 were 21 cents for catde, 26.25 cents
for horses, and 3 cents for sheep. These fees represent an increase over 1962 of 3
cents for cattle and 3.75 cents for horses.   Fees for sheep dropped Va cent per head
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963 41
per month.   Under the sliding-scale formula, the changes in fees reflect the prices
received by producers the previous year.
Due to higher fees for both cattle and horses and the increased number of stock
on the range, both billings and collections were up considerably over the previous
year and were the highest ever recorded.
Violations and Prosecutions
Most violations of grazing regulations and permit conditions were corrected
prompdy when brought to the attention of the owners of the offending stock. However, it was necessary to authorize seizure on four occasions. One case of trespass
was taken to Court during the year and successfully prosecuted.
 42 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
ENGINEERING SERVICES DIVISION
ENGINEERING SECTION
The design and construction of forest-development roads under terms of a
Federal-Provincial cost-sharing agreement continued during 1963 to form a major
portion of the Engineering Services Division work. The cumulative result of the
programme is that since 1950 nearly 2,500,000 acres of forest lands have been
made accessible to industry.
Last year, in addition, work continued on the construction of a main haul-road
in the Parsnip River valley for the extraction of timber from the pondage area of
the Peace River power development, and field engineering crews carried out road
location, development, and general engineering work in all five forest districts.
Continued emphasis was placed on accident prevention, and during the year
eight British Columbia Safety Council awards of merit, including one bronze-on-
gold, two gold, one silver, and four bronze, were earned by Engineering Section
employee groups.
Development Engineering
Development engineering studies on 16 forest areas encompassing some
6,500,000 acres of forest land with a present recoverable mature timber volume of
approximately 2,000,000,000 cubic feet were undertaken by five field crews.
In the Vancouver Forest District, studies were carried out in the valley of the
Coldwater River and on the Coquihalla River, in the Big Silver Creek-Nahatlatch
area, and along Lillooet Lake. The crew working in the Kamloops Forest District
completed field work in the Barton Hills area and an area centring on the Chilcotin
River. Work undertaken in the Prince Rupert Forest District included development
studies on Insect Creek and on six drainages in the Rivers Inlet area—namely,
Milton River, Sandell River, Johnson Creek, Allard Creek, Lockhart Gordon
Creek, and Nekite River. Development engineering studies in the Prince George
Forest District included work on the Halfway River drainage and on the divide
between the Swift River and Cunningham Creek. Studies were carried out in the
drainages of Bush River and Norns Creek in the Nelson Forest District.
In the Rivers Inlet area the 50-foot Forest Service launch " Poplar III" was
used for crew transportation and accommodation. In the other areas of the Province, pack-horses, jet river craft, fixed- and rotary-winged aircraft, and conventional
vehicles were used to permit crews to carry out field work in the many types of
country encountered.
Road Location
Road location was completed on 181 miles of haul-roads and 116 miles of
protection access road during 1963, and in addition 20 miles of existing low-order
road were surveyed for future reconstruction.  (See Table No. 91 in the Appendix.)
Road Construction and Maintenance
The cost-sharing agreement with the Federal Government continued during
1963, and 50 miles of forest-development road were constructed. In addition, a
heavy concentration of forces worked on the construction of 54 miles of road to
complete a main haul-road for the extraction of merchantable timber from below
flood-line in the Parsnip River drainage.
The construction of these 104 miles of road involved the clearing of 900 acres
of right-of-way, the movement of 2,200,000 cubic yards of common excavation
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
43
and 145,000 cubic yards of solid rock, the installation of some 22,000 lineal feet
of culvert pipe, and the erection of 24 permanent timber bridges and one local-
material timber bridge. Despite an increase of 33 per cent in the amount of
material moved, the actual mileage of roads completed during the year was considerably below the 1962 total of 141 miles. The movement of relatively large
quantities of earth and rock under difficult construction conditions slowed progress
on projects at Port Hardy and Cayoosh Creek. Several jobs in the North Central
Interior of the Province were delayed by wet weather in the early summer months,
but in the Parsnip River area favourable conditions prevailed and work on this
project proceeded well ahead of schedule.
NEW   AREAS   OF  FOREST   WEALTH
MADE   AVAILABLE  BY
FOREST    DEVELOPMENT   ROADS
FOREST
AREA
IN
1250
THOUSANDS
Of 1000
ACRES
750
FOREST
- 2050 ARE4
1640        SQUARE
MILES
1959 I960 I!
TIME IN YEARS
The inventory of bridges was increased by 90 per cent as a result of the year's
construction programme. Of the 25 bridges erected during the year, nine were on
the Parsnip River Road and six on the Kettle River Forest-development road.
Road maintenance was carried out on 670 miles of previously constructed
road. Cost of this work in 1963 far exceeded that of any previous year due to
extensive storm damage suffered in the autumn of 1962 and the need for additional
surfacing on some of the older roads.
General Engineering
Designs, plans, and specifications were completed for 22 pressure-creosoted
timber bridges, six untreated sawn-timber bridges, and substructure repairs to the
Kingcome River Bridge, damaged in the fall of 1962.
A further 27 preliminary sketches and cost estimates were prepared in connection with the 1963 road reconnaissance and location programme.
 44 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Traffic on the Morice Forest-development Road in the Prince Rupert Forest District.
Engineering assistance was provided in the administration of Forest Service
roads, the inspection of work carried out under the terms of timber-sale contracts
and tree-farm licences, supervision of pasture-clearing operations, and the repair
and maintenance of buildings and services.
MECHANICAL SECTION
The amount and variety of mechanical equipment used by the Forest Service
continues to increase, as shown by the following table. Selection of the best equipment for replacement of worn-out units and, in particular, to improve the efficiency
of fire-fighting operations requires a major portion of the time of the Mechanical
Superintendent. The volume of field supervision and inspection necessary to ensure
adequate maintenance of equipment together with instruction of operators is also
growing.
In order to ease the load on the five district mechanical supervisors, each was
given a qualified mechanic to assist in the inspection and training work and also to
provide field assistance in the event of breakdowns, particularly to heavy equipment.
These staff additions have already proved their worth. (See Table No. 92 in the
Appendix.)
During the year, members of the staff gave two short courses of instruction in
mechanics to Assistant Rangers at the Green Timbers training-school. A third
course was given to the personnel of summer survey and reconnaissance parties of
the Engineering Division.
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION AND DESIGN
The construction of standard Ranger station buildings for various functions
throughout the Province again played a prominent part in this year's construction,
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE, 1963
45
with emphasis on renovations and improvements to services for existing buildings.
Increased activity by the Reforestation Division in the use of cold-storage and irrigation facilities accounted for a number of projects both completed and at the
design stage.
Field time was spent in the supervision of division crews, contract inspections,
and district inspections and consultations.
In addition to design work in the office, assessments were made for rental
charges for the residences built and occupied during the year.
Table No. 93 in the Appendix outlines and reports on the progress of projects
undertaken during the year, in addition to which 27 miscellaneous jobs were undertaken and completed. In carrying out this work, 52 contracts were awarded for
various phases of sub-trade and prime work.
Marine Design
The 15-year-old 51-foot motor-vessel "Otter" was purchased early in the
year from the Fish and Game Branch of the Department of Recreation and Conservation and was renamed "Poplar III." Study of this vessel showed it to be
adaptable for service as an exposed-water Ranger launch, and as a result this same
design with modifications is being used for the construction of a new Ranger launch
to be named "Golden Spruce."   It is due to enter service in 1965.
A plan was prepared and materials purchased to equip the former Harrop
ferry scow as a fire-fighting landing-craft (No. 10) for Kootenay Lake.
The following small craft were purchased to replace older boats no longer
considered serviceable:—
Size and Type
Used by
District or Division
8-foot fibreglass	
9-foot inflatable	
11-foot inflatable (two)..
13-foot inflatable	
13-foot inflatable	
12-foot aluminum	
12-foot aluminum __
12-foot aluminum 	
14-foot aluminum 	
14-foot aluminum (two)	
16-foot aluminum (three)	
16-foot aluminum 	
30-foot aluminum river-boat (used)
Ranger staff
Ranger staff
Ranger staff
Ranger staff
Ranger staff
Survey crew.
Survey crew.
Ranger staff
Ranger staff
Ranger staff
Ranger staff
Ranger staff
Ranger staff
Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Kamloops.
Engineering Division.
Surveys Division.
Prince Rupert.
Prince George.
Kamloops.
Prince George.
Nelson.
Prince Rupert.
FOREST SERVICE MARINE STATION
The staff of the Marine Station was largely engaged throughout the year making
repairs and modifications to marine craft, trailers, etc., or producing special equipment required by the Service. Nevertheless, it was possible to make some significant
improvements to the facilities at the plant in the interests of safety and efficiency.
Marine Work
Forty-three annual overhauls and 24 minor jobs on launches of the Forest
Service fleet comprised the major part of the work completed by shipwrights and
marine mechanics. Other jobs handled during the year included alterations to the
" Forest Cruiser " to provide more working space for cruisers and better visibility
from the wheelhouse, rebuilding the hull and engine of the " Forest Pioneer " to
prepare her for operation under rugged conditions on northern lakes, replacement of
 46 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
twin diesels in the " Forest Supervisor " by twin gasoline engines which give her a
cruising speed of better than 20 knots, and re-engining the jet boat " J.C. 2." Minor
alterations were made to the " Hecate Ranger " and to the barge used as a helicopter
landing by the Forest Surveys Division. Thirty small boats, river-boats, and dinghies
were repaired. New construction was limited to six 22- and 30-foot river-boats, two
jet boats, and four 10-foot dinghies.
Machine-shop
Members of the staff of the small-engine repair-shop were kept busy during the
year by a variety of jobs in addition to the regular overhaul work on 405 pumps, outboard motors, power-saws, and portable light plants. One hundred and twenty-five
new units were tested and shipped to the districts, and 32 portable tankers, 30 hand-
winches, 12 sets of lightning-arresters, 15 tree-height calipers, an experimental ben-
tonite mixer, and a trail motor-cycle were built. In addition to the welding, plumbing, and electrical work carried out in conjunction with the repair and rebuilding of
trailers, 1,700 pump and hose fittings plus 100 other miscellaneous pieces were
machined from castings.
Prefabrication and Carpenter-shop
Production of new buildings, furniture, and other specialities required by the
Forest Service was lower than usual. Only four lookout buildings, complete with
furniture, were built. Other items included 59 pieces of office furniture; 110 boxes
for pumps, outboard motors, and chain saws; 100 signs of various types; and 48
scaling-boards. However, it was possible to completely rebuild 9 house trailers and
repair 4 others, as well as do a considerable amount of station improvement and
maintenance work that has been needed for some time.
RADIO SECTION
New radio transmitting equipment acquired in 1963 is as follows:—
A.M.—
Portable   22
Fixed station (20-200 watts)   26
Marine (60-100 watts)     3
General service band portable     9
General service band fixed     1
Total A.M.  ,     61
F.M.—
Portable 1-watt  28
Portable 5-watt     7
Fixed station (60-80 watts)  10
Fixed station (25 watts)     4
Mobile   33
Total F.M.      82
Total purchases, all types  143
Written off during 1963     20
Net increase  123
The above average number of units purchased reflected a programme of improving the supply of forest-protection equipment with portables and mobiles.   The
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE, 1963
47
general trend was toward recouping some of the losses incurred from past writing
off of A.M. equipment by the purchase of a number of higher-powered A.M. units
as Ranger station back-up for the F.M. system.
The planned installation of V.H.F. repeaters from Burns Lake to Terrace was
not implemented pending a possible change of plan, but a repeater for the improvement of forest-protection coverage was installed on Tyce Ridge at Telkwa. In addition, Mount Hays repeater at Prince Rupert was made permanent in its new position
on top of the mountain, thereby consolidating the circuit to Queen Charlotte City.
An extensive survey of forest-protection communications from Chetwynd north
to Fort Nelson resulted in a concrete plan for a trunk system using five lookout locations as repeater-sites. The P.G.E. microwave circuit contracted for in 1962 was
put into operation early in 1963 and has connected Prince George and Victoria
satisfactorily throughout the year.
In the Kamloops Forest District a new repeater on Elephant Mountain near
Ashcroft is the connecting link between the Victoria-Prince George microwave line
and Kamloops. It is controlled by Kamloops headquarters by means of a remote
unit on Dufferin Hill. At the same time another remote unit with forest-protection
frequency was established on Dufferin Hill to increase coverage in the Kamloops
area. During the summer a plan was drawn up for a complete trunk system to
replace the present Kamloops repeater frequencies, with the object of making all
portable and mobile units capable of working through the repeater system.
Fraser Valley communications were greatly improved by a new repeater on
Sumas Mountain, which feeds Chilliwack, Hope, and Harrison Lake with solid
signals. Improved forest-protection communication was reflected in the successful
use of a V.H.F. portable repeater on the " Win " fire near Winslow Lake. The
repeater was placed in position by helicopter and provided uninterrupted contact
between the fire and Mission Ranger Station. An innovation in pre-organization
was the surveying of fire-occurrence areas to determine probable portable-repeater
sites which could be used on fires in 1964.
In the Nelson Forest District, Baker Mountain repeater was placed in service
late in the year and gave excellent results as a replacement for Moyie Mountain.
However, the nearby television pick-up station for the City of Cranbrook was interfered with by our repeater, and the unit was taken off the air pending a solution to
the interference problem.
The Victoria section had a busy year with laboratory projects, including the
design of an improved portable transistorized repeater of extremely low battery drain,
the design of a transistorized A.M. portable to replace the Model B, improvements to
commercial units, and investigation into thermo-power generators. While field work
was reduced to some extent, the Peace River propogation survey and several smaller
projects were completed during the summer.
 48 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
FOREST PROTECTION DIVISION
WEATHER
The 1963 fire season opened with a cool, showery weather pattern throughout
the Province. With the exception of a brief warm, sunny period in May, this
pattern extended into July, though with numerous regional variations, and was
followed by a warming and drying trend which lasted, in the southern third of the
Province, until October.
The fire season was terminated by Order in Council on October 15th for that
portion of the Province lying west of the Rocky Mountains.
The April Snow Bulletin indicated that snow levels ranged from below normal
to well below normal throughout many of the drainages in the Province, with the
greater departures from the normal being located at lower elevations.
April to mid-May weather was generally showery and cool, with precipitation
ranging from 50 per cent of normal in the Queen Charlottes and parts of Vancouver Island to slightly above normal in the Northern Interior and 300 per cent
of normal in the South-west Interior.
The latter part of May provided a marked brief warming period, offsetting the
earlier cool weather and resulting in normal average temperatures for the month.
June and July were generally showery and cooler than average.
The August-September period was marked by a warming trend. Precipitation
varied considerably throughout the Province during this period and some of it was
associated with heavy thunder-storm and lightning activity in the Interior.
Early October ushered in cool showery weather generally, thereby permitting
early termination of the fire season.
FIRES
Occurrence and Causes
Although precipitation during the fire season exceeded the 10-year average,
fire occurrence increased by 35.1 per cent over 1962, which brought the 10-year
average from 1,822 to 1,922 fires per year, an increase of 5.2 per cent. This
increase is attributed mainly to lightning-caused fires, which exceeded the 1962
total for this cause alone by 46 per cent. For example, in the Nelson Forest District, lightning-caused fires represented 72.8 per cent of the total number of fires
for the whole season.   (See Table Nos. 109, 110, and 111 in the Appendix.)
Cost of Fire-fighting
The Forest Service's average fire-suppression cost per fire was approximately
17.6 per cent below that of 1962. Much of this saving can be attributed to our
expanded aerial attack system, particularly the use of helicopters on remote lightning fires, which were so prominent this year. For further information on fire-
fighting costs see Table Nos. 116, 117, and 118 in the Appendix.
Damage
The number of acres burned this year compares closely with 1962. Damage
to forest-cover is also comparable. Damage to forest products cut dropped considerably from the extreme high of last year, which helps to balance out the 10-year
average.    Damage to buildings and railway, logging, and sawmilling equipment
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE, 1963 49
accounted for 88.8 per cent of the total property damage.   For further details see
Table Nos. 114, 115, 116, and 117 in the Appendix.
PROTECTION PLANNING AND RESEARCH
Fire Statistics
Plotting of 1963 forest fires on the Provincial Fire Atlas is complete, and the
summary of key fire information has been entered in the fire statistics, ledgers.
Utilization of the Surveys and Inventory Division 2-mile black-and-white series as
the base maps for the Fire Atlas and overlays has proved to be very practical and
useful. As part of incorporation of the Fire Classification Atlas into the Fire
Atlas, overlays to this 2-mile base were completed for the 1950-59 decade.
Coding of fire report information for mechanical-tabulation card recording
has progressed to the point where primary data have been completed for the years
1950-62 and partial data for lightning fires for the years 1940-49. It is planned
to expand the type of fire information to be recorded on the punched cards in order
to facilitate broader research.
Protection Research
A comprehensive study is being made of the protection standards developed
by other agencies to determine the most practical approach for the British Columbia
Forest Service.   A report is to be made in 1964.
An analysis is currently being made of the cost of precautionary measures with
respect to unburned logging slash, seeking data on which to establish slash-disposal
standards.
Continuing study is being made of the effectiveness of primary lookouts and
the balance between air detection and the fixed-lookout system.
A study of range fires has been undertaken in co-operation with the Kamloops
Forest District.
A basic card index for fire-protection references in forestry literature was completed during the year.
Visibility Mapping and Lookout Photography
One two-man visibility mapping crew was employed during the summer of 1963
examining some 53 pre-selected potential lookout points in the Vancouver, Prince
Rupert, Prince George, and Nelson Forest Districts. On the basis of subsequent
comparative analyses of visible area and other pertinent factors, 11 primary lookouts
were recommended for establishment and 11 secondary lookouts proposed.
Utilization of the district contract helicopter for this work proved invaluable,
both from the aspect of preliminary reconnaissance and in time saved in crew
transport.
Lookout photographs were completed on 25 lookouts for subsequent preparation of the eight-photo panorama booklet made for established lookouts.
FUEL-MOISTURE INDICATOR STICKS
Over 700 sets of the 100-gram fuel-moisture indicator (hazard) sticks were
distributed in 1963, following spring field testing. Industry acquired some 440
sets.
Acknowledgment is made of the use of the kiln and other facilities of the Forest
Products Laboratory at the University of British Columbia in the preparation of these
sticks.
 50 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Fire-weather Records and Investigations
The Fire Danger Index tables developed by the Canada Department of Forestry,
and used to some degree in four of the five forest districts, were also used by the
Vancouver Forecast Office, Department of Transport, in conjunction with calculations for the fire-weather advisory and fire-hazard forecast. A copy of these numerical ratings was forwarded to Victoria, together with ratings from various Forest
Service stations, for production of a Province-wide map showing estimated fire
danger.
A field trip was undertaken through the Prince Rupert and Prince George
Forest Districts to check weather instruments and location-sites, and to discuss
Danger Index calculations with field staffs. Particular attention was paid to standards of maintenance of weather instruments, the results of which suggest that a
district instrument-checker should be assigned and trained for this work.
The meteorologist, currendy on educational leave at the University of Washington, undertook a revision of his 1961 low-level wind study during the summer.
Fire-suppression Crews
Sixteen suppression crews fought 201 fires throughout the three southern forest
districts. Eighty-six per cent of the fires fought by these crews were held to a size
less than 1 acre. Only 1 per cent of the fires fought by the suppression crews
exceeded 50 acres. Some of the suppression crewmen were used at two of the air-
tanker bases, and also several two-man crews were trained and used as " helitac "
crews.
A statistical analysis of suppression-crew fire-fighting activities will be found in
Table No. 113 in the Appendix.
Aircraft
The aircraft programme was kept to 36 aircraft, which were supplied by the
same companies as in 1962. The fire season was again favourable, but the programme is credited with keeping the fires small and the damage figures low. Unfortunately one air tanker crashed and the pilot was killed during a practice drop at
Smithers. See Table Nos. 120 and 121 in the Appendix for statistical information
on the use of contract and non-contract aircraft.
Roads and Trails
The construction and maintenance of forest-protection roads and trails continued much as in previous years. The problem of maintaining the purely protection roads increases each year as additional funds for this purpose are not available.
Ground access is essential for successful and economical attack on most fires. For
further information see Table No. 102 in the Appendix.
Slash Disposal and Snag-falling
In the Vancouver Forest District the generally cool damp weather during 1963
somewhat curtailed fall slash-burning activities. Slash in some areas, particularly on
north exposures, did not dry out sufficiently to permit effective burns. However,
fairly good burning conditions did prevail in late summer, and many excellent broadcast burns were obtained by operators who took advantage of these earlier good
conditions. Some operators on the west coast and Northern Vancouver Island
burned as early as August 5th.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
51
The trend continues to more broadcast burning and less spot burning, on the
basis of effective disposal, cost, and risk. For tabular data on slash disposal in the
Vancouver Forest District see Tables No. 104 to 108 in the Appendix.
Two experimental slash burns were undertaken by Forest Service personnel in
Vancouver Forest District in 1963, one involving a large area of decadent hemlock-
balsam blow-down caused by typhoon " Frieda " in the fall of 1962. Use of a helicopter with a monsoon bucket for distributing diesel oil for lighting up proved very
practical for the rugged conditions prevailing, but extremely high humidities and the
scattered nature of the downed timber prevented successful disposal. A further
attempt will be made in 1964.
On April 1st, the rate of assessment for failure to burn slash was increased by
Order in Council from $7 to $12 per acre.
During the year considerable activity and interest in disposal of slash by burning prevailed in the other four forest districts. Experimental slash burns have been
carried out during the past few years in the Interior, and concern has been mounting
over increasing slash hazards, which have complicated the control of recent costly
and extensive fires. Some 8,700 acres of slash were burned in 1963 in these districts,
with Forest Service crews disposing of 3,200 acres and industry 5,500 acres.
Snag-falling Projects
Five snag-falling contracts—three in the Vancouver Forest District and two
in the Kamloops Forest District—comprising 6,654 acres were awarded in 1963.
The programme of reducing the fire hazard in old burned-over, but good growing
sites will be expanded as funds become available.
Forest-protection snag-falling project on Vancouver Island.
 52 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Fire-law Enforcement
The very light fire season, during which only a few fire-fighters were impressed
and no forest closure imposed under section 122 of the Forest Act, resulted in only
19 prosecutions for fire-law infractions. This is slightly more than one-third of the
average for the past 10 years.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963 53
FOREST SERVICE TRAINING-SCHOOL
The second class of basic trainees (Basic Course No. 2), consisting of 20
men, graduated from the British Columbia Forest Service training-school on March
29, 1963.   Forty men have now completed the three-month basic course.
The 13th class of advanced trainees (Advanced Course No. 13), consisting
of 20 men, commenced September 16th. This course is similar to the Ranger
Course. The name has been changed and the course shortened to six months from
nine months.
Basic elements of the Ranger Course have been transferred to the basic course.
Staff in thus given training in basic subjects earlier in their careers with profit to
all concerned.
The balance of the original Ranger Course is given to those deserving further
training for promotional purposes. It is advanced in nature and provides qualification for many positions besides Ranger. The name " advanced course," therefore,
is more appropriate.
Subjects covered during the year were as follows:—
Basic Course No. 2, Spring, 1963
Subject Days Allotted
Protection Policies and Procedures  5
Pre-suppression Studies   5Vz
Fire Suppression  12Vf.
Mathematics and Survey Fundamentals  6
Management Policies and Procedures  5 Vz
Mensuration   6
Mechanics   IVz
Silviculture and Related Fields  5
Air Photos  3
Reports and Maps  2Vz
Examinations, visitors, and field trips  Wz
Total days  60
First aid—two hours per week in evenings for nine weeks.
Typing—two hours per week.
Physical Education—one-half hour per day.
Advanced Course No. 13, First Term, Fall, 1963
Subject Days Allotted
Botany, Dendrology, Wood Technology  6V2
Construction   5Vz
Public Speaking ...  3 Vz
Business English  Wz
Survey and Mathematics  %Vz
Protection Policies and Procedures  8V2
Forest Pathology  3 Vz
Forest Entomology  3
Silviculture   9
Personnel Management and Safety  3
 54 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Subject Days Allotted
Sales and Appraisal  5
Grazing   2
Fire Marshal  2
Visitors, speakers, spares, and trips  2Vz
Total days  63
First Aid—two hours per week in evenings for nine weeks.
Physical Education—one-half hour per day.
EXTRA COURSES AND FUNCTIONS
Training-school facilities were used for two weeks in April by the Department
of Recreation and Conservation for an in-service training course. Average attendance was 35.
The usual course for lookoutmen for the Vancouver Forest District was given
to 13 men from April 30th to May 3rd.
A three-day course was given to 15 correctional officers of the Corrections
Branch, Department of the Attorney-General, at the school. Instruction in fire
control for one day, on two separate occasions, and instruction in Forest Service
organization was conducted in the field by our staff for the Department.
Training-school staff assisted with instruction and aid to the Nelson Forest
District. This was a three-day course for lookoutmen and dispatchers from June
4 to 6, 1963.
The instructional staff participated in courses and lectures to various other
groups, including second-year forestry students at the University of British Columbia, who were lectured on fire control (Forestry 251), on the subject " Organization
for Prevention and Control (B.C. Forest Service)."
Little progress was made in developing reading courses and indoctrination
course outlines. The training-school staff is now in the process of revising subject
material for the major courses—basic and advanced.
The publication " Handbook on Use of Bulldozers for Fighting Forest Fires "
was completed and will be available for distribution in 1964.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Appreciation is expressed to speakers and lecturers and for equipment provided
by the following agencies: Forest Entomology and Pathology Branch, Canada Department of Forestry; Air Division of the Surveys and Mapping Branch, Department
of Lands, Forests, and Water Resources; Director of Safety, Civil Service Commission; Staff Training Officer, Civil Service Commission; Office of the Fire Marshal;
Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Cloverdale Detachment; Magistrate J. Hunter, of
Cloverdale; Municipal Prosecutor, Cloverdale; Forest Products Laboratory, Canada
Department of Forestry; University of British Columbia; Chief Forecaster's Office,
Department of Transport, Vancouver; and lecturers from other divisions and districts of the Forest Service.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
55
ACCOUNTING DIVISION
FISCAL
The total dollar return from Forest Service business in the calendar year 1963
exceeded that of any previous year. The upward trend carried over from 1962 and
continued through the year, which was favoured with a moderate fire season, lack of
serious work stoppages in the industry, and a sustained improvement in the market
prices for forest products. The news at the year's end that the Bill to restrict the
import of Canadian lumber into the United States had been killed by presidential
" pocket veto " seemed to assure continuance of favourable lumber-market conditions well into the new year.
While the total volume of timber scaled again rose to a record high with an
increase of 9.7 per cent over 1962, the total of amounts charged to logging operations registered an even greater rise, increasing 12.9 per cent to $35,957,587 (see
Table No. 142 in the Appendix). All forest districts contributed to the increase,
Kamloops making the biggest gain, 28.9 per cent, with Prince George next at 20.9
per cent. The Prince Rupert, Nelson, and Vancouver Forest Districts followed with
16.4, 5.6, and 5.5 per cent respectively.
Direct forest revenue collected also increased by 12.9 per cent and reached
a new record high total of $34,875,677 (see Table No. 141 in the Appendj.). The
bulk of this total derived from timber-sale stumpage, which, at $30,199,623,
showed a substantial gain of 14.7 per cent. Timber-sale rentals and fees remained
fairly static, rising only 0.4 per cent, but timber-sale cruising and advertising costs
increased by 11.6 per cent.
Timber royalties levelled off somewhat at $2,499,842, a gain of only 2.7
per cent, reflecting a slightly increased cut from both Crown and Crown-granted
royalty-bearing lands. Rentals and fees on timber licences were practically unchanged, but timber-berth and timber-lease rental and fees decreased by 12.3 and
13 per cent respectively. These reductions were probably due in part to the
elimination of some logged-over areas from these old tenures as well as early
payment in December, 1962, of timber-lease annual fees not due until January.
Forest-protection tax declined for the second successive year, being down 4.9 per
cent to $523,598, while miscellaneous collections continued their steady climb,
increasing by 7.2 per cent to $173,192.
Tables showing revenue and expenditure totals for the fiscal year 1962/63
also appear in the Appendix (see Table Nos. 144 and 145), and details of this
expenditure can be found in the statement of Public Accounts published by the
Department of Finance.
Just prior to the close of the year, advice was received from the Minister
of Forestry in Ottawa that Canada was prepared to extend for one year the Federal-
Provincial Forestry Agreement, due to expire March 31, 1964. Canada also offered
to broaden the Agreement, under wh'ch this Province receives $1,804,461 annually,
by extending the classes of projects covered, as well as by removing the percentage
linrtation on distribution of claims between different phases of the Provincial
programme.
ADMINISTRATION
No major changes occurred in Forest Service accounting policy during 1963,
but a change in organization was made in headquarters administration of timber
berths, timber licences, and timber leases.    Administration as affecting forestry
 56 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
aspects was transferred from the Comptroller's Office to the Management Division
to achieve consistency with timber-sale administration. Responsibility for collection
of annual carrying charges on these old tenures was undertaken by the headquarters
accounts office.
In spite of the substantial increase in charges billed against operators as
reported above, the outstanding accounts receivable position continued to improve,
and there were few cases requiring resort to lien action to enforce payment.
The introduction of semi-monthly pay for all Provincial Civil Servants in
October greatly increased the work of the expenditure sections, both district and
headquarters, but the transition was accomplished with remarkably little difficulty.
The expenditure situation generally was eased by the absence of a severe fire season,
but the increasing emphasis on appropriation control resulted in increased demands
on the time of various senior officials.
The series of mill test runs commenced in the Kamloops Forest District in
1962 were concluded, and the results are being assessed as to their value in future
investigation programmes.   Similar tests are planned in other districts during 1964.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963 57
PERSONNEL DIVISION
There were no major personnel changes in the Forest Service during 1963,
and general administration proceeded without disruption. Staff turnover was
reduced slightly, as were the number of applications for employment. The changeover of technical field-staff classifications implemented in 1962 provided a few
problems involving persons in positions for which they had not qualified by
examination, but these were resolved with little difficulty.
In the matter of employee relations, no formal grievances were received. One
complaint from the employees' association was satisfactorily handled by the Personnel Officer.   A general salary increase became effective on April 1st.
COMMUNICATIONS AND TRAINING
No District Foresters' meeting was held in 1963, but each District Forester
with his assistant spent a week at headquarters consulting with various divisions
on problems. Full-scale Ranger meetings were held in Vancouver and Nelson,
and Ranger Zone meetings were held in Kamloops. The Engineering Services
Division held meetings for district mechanical supervisors and for engineers. The
Management Division held the annual meeting on scaling problems and practices.
The Personnel Officer and a number of other Forest Service officers took part in
vocation-day programmes sponsored by various schools, as well as the programme
of instructive interviews jointly sponsored by the Victoria Chamber of Commerce
and the National Employment Service.
Four men were selected for the eighth class of the Executive Development
Training Plan sponsored by the Government through the University of British
Columbia. This class is for employees in the Victoria and Vancouver areas and
includes from the department two foresters, one engineer, and the Assistant Radio
Superintendent. One employee, the Chief Accountant, graduated from the fifth
class of this programme. First-aid courses for field employees continued throughout the year, as did the Civil Defence sponsored St. John Ambulance first-aid
courses in Victoria. Civil defence basic-training courses continued in Victoria,
and several district office employees took courses in communications and other
civil defence subjects. Informal training continued for engineers-in-training and
foresters-in-training.
ESTABLISHMENT, RECRUITMENT, AND STAFF TURNOVER
The permanent Civil Service establishment of the Forest Service was increased
from 859 positions to 860 with the establishment of a Forest Agrologist position in
the Prince George Forest District to assist in the Peace River community pasture
programme and general grazing administration in the Peace River area.
During the year, 98 persons received Civil Service appointments and 72 left
the permanent service. Twelve 25-year service certificates and badges were earned.
There were five retirements and 53 transfers of permanent staff. Twelve graduate
foresters and three engineers left the Service, and nine graduate foresters and two
engineers were hired.
Turnover of Civil Service-appointed staff, including full-time casual staff,
average 9.8 per cent, again down very slightly from 10 per cent last year. Kamloops
Forest District suffered the greatest upheaval with 14.2 per cent, followed by
Vancouver with 11.5 per cent, Prince George with 9.9 per cent, Prince Rupert with
 58
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
9.6 per cent, and Nelson with 8.7 per cent;  Victoria headquarters was 9.6, and
the scaling staff in Vancouver was lowest with 6.8 per cent.
Professional-staff turnover was 6.7 per cent, up again from last year, and
technical-staff turnover went from 3.6 per cent in 1962 to 4.0 per cent in 1963,
the first increase in this group for three years. Total office-staff turnover, while
down to 17.7 per cent from 19.5 per cent in 1962, is still quite high, though it is
perhaps significant that 78.9 per cent of the separations in office staff involved
female employees, most of whom were employed in district offices. This would
indicate a need for review of selection procedures for this group. The present
percentage of female employees in the clerical group remains fairly constant at
59 per cent.
1
The Honourable Ray Williston presenting a safety award to Terry Stringer, assistant
superintendent of the Port Hardy Forest-development Road project.
There were no fatal accidents during the year, and we would like to feel that
this is a direct result of an active safety programme throughout the Service. In the
matter of discipline among permanent staff or during probationary periods, one
person was released by Order in Council and five disciplinary suspensions were
imposed, of which two were for breach of safety regulations.
Over 600 written applications for employment were processed in the Personnel
Office in addition to those handled by divisional and district staffs. Promotional
examinations were held for draughtsmen and mapping assistants. Oral examinations were employed at panel interviews to fill 23 positions. The Personnel Officer
and assistant participated in filling 139 other positions. At the annual spring
examination for Assistant Rangers, 294 candidates sat and 66 qualified. Of this
number, 14 passed for reclassification, leaving 52 available for Assistant Ranger
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963 59
positions. There were only 19 vacant positions for Assistant Ranger, but since
this examination is now a requisite for promotion to any Technical Forest Officer
1 position, a fairly large number of the successful candidates were promoted to
Technical Forest Officer 1 positions other than Assistant Ranger. This action
seriously depleted the eligible list for Assistant Ranger positions on a Province-wide
basis, although it did retain qualified employees in the Service who were available
for transfer to Assistant Ranger positions within their district. Some districts did
suffer by not having a sufficient number of qualified candidates to fill their vacancies.
CLASSIFICATIONS, SALARIES, AND WORKING CONDITIONS
Over 100 positions were reviewed for reclassification, and of these, 64 were
submitted to the Civil Service Commission. Of these 59 were approved, three
were rejected, and five were still under review at the year's end.
Nine employees were registered with the Association of British Columbia
Foresters, three of which were already registered professional engineers. Two
other employees became registered as professional engineers. Working conditions
in general remained unchanged. The Civil Service Commission's review of special
living allowance for northern areas continued without any definite results to date.
The safety and accident-prevention programme was actively continued and
is reflecting improvement in the time-loss accident frequency rate for the Service.
 60 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
PERSONNEL DIRECTORY, 1964
(As of March 31st)
VICTORIA HEADQUARTERS
R. G. McKee --------- Deputy Minister of Forests
F. S. McKinnon     -----------     Chief Forester
L. F. Swannell     ------ Assistant Chief Forester i/c Operations Branch
J. S. Stokes ------   Assistant Chief Forester i/c Planning Branch
Staff Division Heads:
Cooper, C.   ----------- Forest Counsel
Hicks, W. V.        --------       Departmental Comptroller
Park, S. E.   -        -        -        -        -        -        -        -        -   Director, Public Information
McKeever, A. E. Personnel Officer
Operations Branch Division Heads:
Forse, H.B. -       -       -       -       -       -       -       Forester i/c Protection Division
Greggor, R. D.     -       -       -       -       -       - Forester i/c Engineering Services Division
Hughes, W. G. -        -        -        -        -        - Forester i/c Management Division
Pendray, W. C.    -        -        -        -        -        -        -        -      Director, Grazing Division
Robinson, E. W.   -        -        -        -        -      Forester i/c Forest Service Training School
Planning Branch Division Heads:
Pogue, H. M.        -        -        -        -        -        -        Forester i/c Working Plans Division
Young, W. E. L.    •        -        -        -        -    Forester i/c Surveys and Inventory Division
Silburn, G.   ------- Forester i/c Reforestation Division
Spilsbury, R. H. -.-.---. Forester i/c Research Division
FOREST DISTRICTS
Vancouver Forest District
I. T. Cameron        -- District Forester
J. A. K. Reid Assistant District Forester
Forest Rangers:
Carr, W. S. (Chilliwack); McDaniel, R. W. (Hope); Wilson, R. S. (Harrison Lake); Webster,
J. B. (Mission); Mudge, M. H. (Port Moody); Carradice, J. H. (Squamish); Chamberlin,
L. C. (Sechelt); Northrup, K. A. (Pender Harbour); Hollinshead, S. B. (Powell River);
Norbirg, H. (Lund); Doerksen, H. G. (Thurston Bay East); Nelson, J. N. (Thurston Bay
West); Hannah, M. (Chatham Channel); Teindl, A. J. (Echo Bay); Bertram, G. D. (Alert
Bay); Neighbour, M. N. (Port Hardy); McKinnon, C. G. (Campbell River); Antonelli,
M. H. (Courtenay); Moss, R. D. (Parksville); Howard, W. G (Nanaimo); Sykes, S. J.
(Duncan); Lorentsen, L. H. (Ganges); Jones, R. W. (Langford); Thomas, R. W. (Lake
Cowichan); Haley, K. (Alberni); Brash, W. E. (Tofino);  Gill, D. E. (Pemberton).
Prince Rupert Forest District
N. A. McRae ------ District Forester
L. W. W. Lehrle ---------       Assistant District Forester
Forest Rangers:
Simmons, C. F. (Ocean Falls); Brooks, T. (Queen Charlotte City); Hamilton, D. (Prince
Rupert); Lindstrom, W. C. (Terrace); Gorley, O. J. (Kitwanga); Antonenko, J. (Hazelton);
Hawkins, R. M. (Smithers); Clay, W. D. (Telkwa); Berard, R. K. (Houston); Mould, J.
(Pendleton Bay); Mastin, T. (Burns Lake); Harvie, T. (Bella Coola); Pement, A. T.
(Southbank); Wallin, D. (Lower Post); Crosby, D. N. (Topley).
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
61
Prince George Forest District
A. H. Dixon   ------------ District Forester
C. E. Bennett       ---------        Assistant District Forester
Forest Rangers:
Weinard, R. H. (McBride); McRae, M. A. (Penny); Meents, G. E. (Prince George); Flynn,
D. M. (Prince George); Ford, C. (Fort St. James); Keefe, R. R. (Quesnel); Barbour, H. T.
(Dawson Creek); Amonson, D. A. (Aleza Lake); Graham, G. W. (Vanderhoof); Cosens,
A. S. (Fort St. John); Griffiths, P. F. (Fort Fraser); Waller, T. G. (Summit Lake); York,
G. M. (Fort Nelson); Magee, G. E. (Prince George); Hamblin, R. A. (Hixon); Pearce, F.
(Quesnel); Rohn, C. (Quesnel); McQueen, L. (Chetwynd); Magee, K. W. (Hudson Hope).
Kamloops Forest District
W. C. Phillips
L. B. B. Boulton
- District Forester
Assistant District Forester
Forest Rangers:
Hopkins, H. V. (Lumby); Williams, R. V. (Birch Island); Wittner, D. J. (Barriere); Hill,
A. F. (Kamloops South); Paquette, O. (Chase); Gibson, C. L. (Salmon Arm); Jones, G. G.
(Sicamous); Cameron, A. G. (Lillooet); Kuly, A. (Vernon); Scott, E. L. (Penticton);
Baker, F. M. (Princeton); Ashton, L. J. (Clinton); Hamilton, T. J. (Williams Lake);
Donnelly, R. W. (Alexis Creek); Hewlett, H. C. (Kelowna); Noble, J. O. (Ashcroft);
Janning, H. A. W. (Merritt); Huva, G. G. (Blue River); Collins, B. G. (Enderby); Petty,
A. P. (100 Mile North); Weinard, J. P. (Kamloops North); Craig, V. D. (Horsefly);
Monteith, M. E. (100 Mile South).
Nelson Forest District
J. R. Johnston
M. G. Isenor
- District Forester
Assistant District Forester
Forest Rangers:
Taft, L. G. (Invermere); Humphrey, J. L. (Fernie); Anderson, S. E. (Golden); Gierl, J. B.
(Cranbrook East); Ross, A. I. (Creston); Allin, G. G. (Kaslo); Benwell, G. L. (Lardeau);
Robinson, R. E. (Nelson); Jupp, C. C. (New Denver); Raven, J. H. (Nakusp); Wood, H. R.
(Castlegar); Reid, E. W. (Grand Forks); Uphill, W. T. (Kettle Valley); Cartwright, G. M.
(Canal Flats); Russell, F. (Arrowhead); Haggart, W. D. (Edgewood); Benwell, W. G.
(Elko); Bellmond, C. N. (Spillimacheen); Bailey, J. F. (Cranbrook West); Hamann, L. O.
(Beaverdell); Webster, G. R. (Slocan City); Jackson, R. C. (Revelstoke).
  APPENDIX
  REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963 65
TABULATED DETAILED STATEMENTS TO SUPPLEMENT
THE REPORT OF THE FOREST SERVICE*
CONTENTS
Research Division
Table
No. Page
11. Tabulation of Research Projects Active in 1963     68
12. Research Publications, 1963     69
Reforestation Division
21. Nursery Stock Distributed, 1963     69
22. Summary of Planting, 1954-63     70
Working Plans Division
31. Summary of Basic Data for Tree-farm Licences (Private Sustained-yield
Units)     71
32. Summary of Basic Data for Certified Tree-farms (Private Sustained-yield
Units)     73
33. Summary of Basic Data for Farm Wood-lot Licences (Private Sustained-
yield Units)     7 5
Public Information and Education Division
41. Motion-picture Library, 1954-63     76
42. Summary of Coverage by School Lecturers, 1954-63     77
43. Forest Service Library, 1954-63      78
Forest Management Division
51. Value Added by Manufacture, 1963     79
52. Water-borne Lumber Trade (in M B.M.), 1954-63     80
53. Total Amount of Timber Scaled in British Columbia during Years 1962
and 1963:    (A) in F.B.M., (B) in Cubic Feet     81
54. Species Cut, All Products, 1963:    (A) inF.B.M., (B) in Cubic Feet     82
55. Total Scale, All Products, 1963 (Segregated by Land Status and Forest
Districts):    (A) inF.B.M., (B) in Cubic Feet     83
56. Timber Scaled in British Columbia during 1963 (by Months and Forest
Districts)      84
57. Volume of Wood Removed under Relogging at Reduced Royalty and
Stumpage, 1954-63, in Thousands of Cubic Feet     85
58. Number of Acres Operating under Approved Annual Allowable Cuts,
1954-63     86
59. Total Scale of All Products from Areas Operated under Approved Annual
Allowable Cuts, 1954-63     87
* The sequence of tables, and their numbers, have been changed from previous years.
3
 66 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
Table
No. Page
60. Logging Inspections, 1963  88
61. Trespasses, 1963  89
62. Areas Examined by the Forest Service for Miscellaneous Purposes of
the Land Act, 1963  90
63. Areas Cruised for Timber Sales, 1963  90
64. Timber-sale Record, 1963  90
65. Competition for Timber Sales Awarded, 1963  91
66. Timber Sales Awarded by Forest Districts, 1963  92
67. Average Stumpage Prices as Bid, by Species and Forest Districts, on
Timber Sales during 1963, per C CF. Log Scale  93
68. Average Stumpage Prices Received, by Species and Forest Districts, on
Saw-timber on Tree-farm Licence Cutting Permits Issued in 1963  94
69. Timber Cut and Scaled from Timber Sales, 1963  95
70. Saw and Shingle Mills of the Province, 1963  96
71. Export of Logs (inF.B.M.), 1963  96
72. Shipments of Poles and Other Minor Products, 1963     97
73. Summary of Export of Minor Products for Province, 1963   97
74. Timber Marks Issued, 1954-63  98
Grazing Division
81. Grazing Permits Issued  98
Engineering Services Division
91. Forest Road Programme, 1963  99
92. Forest Service Mechanical Equipment, 1963  100
93. Building Construction Undertaken during 1963  101
94. Trailers Designed in 1963  102
Forest Protection Division
101. Forest-protection Expenditure by the Forest Service for the Fiscal Year
1962/63  102
102. Construction of Protection Roads and Trails, 1963  103
103. Reported  Approximate  Expenditure  in  Forest  Protection  by  Other
Agencies, 1963  103
104. Summary of Snag-falling, 1963, Vancouver Forest District  103
105. Summary of Logging Slash Reported in 1963, Vancouver Forest District-. 104
106. Acreage Analysis of Slash Disposal Required, 1963, Vancouver Forest
District  104
107. Analysis of Progress in Slash Disposal, 1963, Vancouver Forest District.. 104
108. Summary of Slash-burn Damage and Costs,  1963, Vancouver Forest
District  105
109. Fire Occurrences by Months, 1963  105
110. Number and Causes of Forest Fires, 1963  106
111. Number and Causes of Forest Fires for the Last Ten Years   106
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
67
Table
No.
Page
107
112. Fires Classified by Size and Damage, 1963	
113. Analysis of Suppression-crew Fire-fighting Activities, 1963  108
114. Damage to Property Other than Forests, 1963  108
115. Damage to Forest-cover Caused by Forest Fires, 1963—Parts I and II  108
116. Fire Causes, Area Burned, Forest Service Cost, and Total Damage, 1963 110
117. Comparison of Damage Caused by Forest Fires in Last Ten Years  111
118. Fires Classified by Forest District and Cost per Fire of Fire-fighting, 1963 112
119. Prosecutions, 1963  113
120. Contract Flying, 1963  114
121. Use of Aircraft in Fire-fighting (Non-contract), 1963  115
Training-school
131. Enrolment at Advanced Course, 1963	
116
Accounting Division
141. Forest Revenue, 1959-63  117
142. Amounts Charged against Logging Operations, 1963  118
143. Amounts Charged against Logging Operations, Fiscal Year 1962/63  119
144. Forest Revenue, Fiscal Year 1962/63  120
145. Forest Service Expenditures, Fiscal Year 1962/63  120
146. Seating Fund  121
147. Grazing Range Improvement Fund  121
Personnel Division
151. Distribution of Personnel, 1963	
122
 68 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(11) TABULATION OF RESEARCH PROJECTS ACTIVE IN  1963
Experimental
Project No.
Title
Region
364
365
368
370
384
428
433
442
468
474
477
479
480
482
483
502
511
513
517
528
530
537
538
541
553
554
555
560
570
571
572
573
581
582
585
586
589
590
591
592
594
595
597
599
■600
602
603
605
606
607
608
609
610
611
612
613
€15
616
617
618
619
620
Thinning experiments in Douglas fir	
Thinning experiments in Douglas fir	
The adaptability of tree species to forest sites
Partial cutting in a mixed wet-belt type	
Experimental thinning in lodgepole pine 	
Plantation trials  	
Growth and inventory plots, Aleza Lake._
Planting trials	
Cone-crop studies-
Inbreeding experiments with Douglas fir..
A study of phenotypes in Douglas fir—
Plus-tree selection for Douglas fir seed orchards	
A co-operative seed provenance study of Douglas fir-
Climate and the altitudinal distribution of conifers	
Record of introduced species in plantations  	
Plantation trials	
Crop tree thinning of western larch..
Intra- and inter-specific crosses within the genus Pseudotsuga..
Thinning studies in ponderosa pine-
Influence of time on the effectiveness of scarified seed-beds	
Morphological characteristics of Douglas fir and their progeny-
White spruce spacing study..
Seed dissemination and the influence of weather conditions-
Natural nurseries     	
Ecological investigations in the Montane forest region	
Thinning experiments in Douglas fir-
Germination and survival of western hemlock, and associated species..
A study of methods of planting ponderosa pine  	
Sitka spruce spacing study  —   - -
Species and spacing trial-
Planting trials with ponderosa pine    -
Planting white spruce throughout the growing season-
Planting study of 2+0 Douglas fir culls .
Cold storage of 2+0 Douglas fir in multi-wall bags..
Plantation studies .  	
Planting-stock comparison trials 	
Comparison of 2+0, 2+1, and 1+2 Douglas fir on high-site lands..
A study of compatability of tree and grass seeding— 	
Regeneration study in cut-over lodgepole pine stands  _ —
Direct-seeding trial, Mars Creek   __ —
Brush control, Coastal British Columbia   	
Outplanting of different fertilized stock-
Planting trials with ponderosa pine, 1962—   - 	
Problem analysis:   Approach to provenance experimentation in Coastal Doug
las fir    —  	
An analysis of the breeding programme for Coastal Douglas fir— —
Lodgepole pine problem analysis-
Study of some hand-planting methods in white spruce.	
Determination of the optimum season for direct seeding-
Direct seeding of Douglas fir and Engelmann spruce.-	
Ponderosa pine spacing trials-
The effect of texture, drainage, and stoniness on growth of Douglas fir seedlings
A study of forest-land classification, Quilchena— —   	
Geographic variation in white and Engelmann spruce    _	
Jennis Bay reforestation trials-
Evaluation of soil texture in seed and transplant beds, Cowichan Experiment
Station nursery -   -     -	
Western hemlock spacing study_.
Cone and seed variation between progenies of single trees  -	
Study of regeneration problems in decadent hemlock-cedar stands  	
The effect of seed-bed density on the survival and initial growth of 2+0 Doug
las fir seedlings    - -    	
Cone production in the Interior of British Columbia—   - —
Douglas fir-Engelmann spruce planting study, 1963     — _ „ 	
A study of forest-land classification, McGillivray Lake.— _ 	
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
Nelson.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince George.
Prince George.
Kamloops.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
British Columbia.
Prince Rupert.
Nelson.
Vancouver Island.
Kamloops.
Prince George.
Vancouver Island.
Prince Rupert.
Vancouver Island.
Prince Rupert.
Kamloops.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
Kamloops.
Prince Rupert.
Vancouver Is'.and.
Nelson.
Prince George.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
Kamloops.
Prince Rupert.
Nelson.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
Nelson.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Nelson.
Vancouver Island.
Kamloops.
Interior.
Vancouver Island.
Vancouver Island.
Prince Rupert.
Vancouver Island.
Kamloops.
Vancouver Island.
Interior.
Kamloops.
Kamloops.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
69
(12) RESEARCH PUBLICATIONS,  1963
Forest Research Review for the Year Ended March, 1963.
van den Driessche, R.:   Nursery Experiments with Douglas Fir.    Commonwealth  Forestry
Review 42 (3), No. 113, 1963.
van den Driessche, R.:  Partial Sterilization of Douglas Fir Seedbeds with Formalin and Chloro-
picrin.   Forest Science 9, No. 3, 1963.
Roche, L.:   The Shore Variety of Pinus contorta.   Baileya 2, No. 1, 1963.
Prochnau, A. E.:   Direct Seeding Experiments with White Spruce, Alpine Fir, Douglas Fir and
Lodgepole Pine in the Central Interior of British Columbia.   B.C. Forest Service Research
Note 37, 1963.
Revel, L:    Improving Reforestation, the Role of Artificial Seeding.    Forestry Chronicle 39,
No. 2, 1963.
Warrack, G. C:    Some Observations on Thinning Forests in the Coastal Region of British
Columbia.   Forestry Chronicle 39, No. 2, 1963.
Unpublished Manuscript Reports
Arlidge, J. W. C:    An Ecological Classification of Stands for Christmas Tree Production.
Clark, M. B.:  Cutting Methods in Overmature Spruce-Alpine Fir.
Hetherington, J. C:   Brush Control in Coastal British Columbia.
Proceedings of the Cowichan Lake Symposium on Forest Meteorology and Microclimate, 1962,
Revel, J.:   Comparison of the Morphology of Autumn Sown and Spring Sown 1+0 Douglas
Fir Seedlings.
Revel, L:   The Effect of Browsing by Columbia Black Tailed Deer and Sooty Blue Grouse on
the Establishment of Conifers on Vancouver Island,
van den Driessche, R.:   Continuous Autumn and Spring Sowing of Douglas Fir.
(21)
NURSERY STOCK DISTRIBUTED, 1963
Age-classes
Total
for Field
Planting
Total
Transplanted
1-1
2-0
2-1 and 2-2
1-0 and 3-0
14,300
4,200
143,600
44,400
4,011,100
4,526,300
3,850,400
74,400
823,700
126,100
76,000
83,900
37,500
11,000
8,100
6,900
187,800
50,000
22,300
4,011,100
4,579,600
3,871,400
148,000
1,036,800
358,300
169,500
11,000
83,900
28,100
1,500
5,800
65,500
500
	
43,500
105,000
Duncan —	
398,200
400,000
256,200
Brannan Lake	
51,600
121,000
	
Total seedlings...
206,500
13,571,900
385,700
116,800
14,280,900
1,360,100
 70
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
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HO
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
73
SUMMARY OF BASIC DATA FOR CERTIFIED TREE-FARMS (PRIVATE
(32) SUSTAINED-YIELD UNITS)
Within Tree-farm Licences
Productive Area (Acres)
Total
Area
(Acres)
Mature
Volume
(MCu.
Ft.)
Present
Allowable Cut
(MCu.
Ft.)
Estimated
Productive
Capacity
(MCu.
Ft.)
Tree-farm Licence Number
and Name
Mature
Immature
N.S.R.
and
N.C.C.
Total
Vancouver Forest District
8. T.F.L. No. 2
204
51
26,792
10,695
6,519
2,691
23,969
2,964
2,286
3,270
10,095
51,112
169
45,081
17,343
11,849
1,542
10,673
5,755
1,961
8,143
10,567
2,456
269
13,507
2,348
4,446
501
2,216
1,208
425
2,493
2,217
53,772
489
85,380
30,386
22,814
4,734
36,858
9,927
4,672
13,906
22,879
61,959
1,230
93,615
32,627
24,719
5,683
38,213
11,331
4,964
15,694
26,715
145
135
104,715
37,694
49,622
7,806
92,623
20,187
10,680
10,124
42,837
3,089
12. T.F.L. No. 17.	
13. T.F.L. No. 20	
14. T.F.L. No. 21 	
16. T.F.L. No. 22 -	
20. T.F.L. No. 19	
21. T.F.L. No. 39      -
25. T.F.L. No. 37     .
29. T.F.L. No. 6	
21
4,242
1,405
1,285
277
1,663
749
282
1,177
2,008
22
4,732
1,742
1,285
336
2,202
836
530
30. T.F.L. No. 25	
31. T.F.L. No. 25	
2,931
2,700
Totals 	
89,536
164,195
32,086
285,817
316,750
376,568
13,109
20,405
Prince George Forest District
41. T.F.L. No. 29 	
Nelson Forest District
35. T.F.L. No. 23   .    ..
350
989
668
3,249
504
236
90
1,254
4,328
504
1,280
5,157
504
860
441
27
37
130
37. T.F.L. No. 13	
20
Totals	
989
3,753
90
4,832
5,661
441
150
_
Grand    totals    within
tree-farm licences __
90,875
168,616
32,412
291,903
323,691
377,869
13,136
20,592
Not Included within Tree-farm Licences
Vancouver Forest District
1. Thomas G. Wright	
244
140
8,448
20,109
1,923
4,176
6,300
2,037
157
4,002
138,735
2,277
779
1,888
749
106
1,282
27,433
4,735
3
25
1,253
3,967
346
1,603
247
165
9,744
24,978
2,652
9,468
6,535
2,150
157
4,679
295,766
2,299
1,010
1,898
749
106
1,437
32,411
4,980
305
180
10,347
27,388
3,568
10,303
7,566
2,561
163
4,945
312,887
2,458
1,010
1,947
788
106
1,698
34,295
5,533
31
9
358
44
2. H. R. Nickson	
4. MacMillan, Bloedel and
Powell River Ltd.    	
(!)
43
902
383
3,689
235
113
68
1,269
1,506
2,091
12,616
935
298
10
430
5. Western   Forest   Indus-
1,749
135
6. British Columbia Forest
125
282
100
30
7. Victoria Plywood Ltd.—
9. Robert J. Filberg	
606
492
10. Canadian   Forest   Prod-
141
15. W. J. Robertson	
17
17. British Columbia Forest
80
129,396
597
27,635
22
231
10
248
1,203,723
22
29,500
266
19. MacMillan, Bloedel and
Powell River Ltd..
21,456
197
22. Merrill & Ring ...-	
23. W. & W. Holdings Ltd....
111
24. Merrill & Ring-Canadian
Properties Inc.— —
28. Merrill & Ring-Canadian
59
175
67
32. Savary Island Hotels Ltd.
and A. B. Christopher
34. Robert J. Filberg 	
(!)
155
4,765
47
151
5
5
90
39. Canadian Collieries Re-
213
198
347
687
1,447
250
Totals    . .   .
135,252
225,520
40,659
401,431
428,048
1,223,998
30,462
27,688
1 Scattered.
 74
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
SUMMARY OF BASIC DATA FOR CERTIFIED TREE-FARMS (PRIVATE
(32) SUSTAINED-YIELD UNITS)—Continued
Not Included within Tree-farm Licences—Continued
Productive Area (Acres)
Total
Area
(Acres)
Mature
Volume
(MCu.
Ft.)
Present
Allowable Cut
(MCu.
Ft.)
Estimated
Productive
Capacity
(MCu.
Ft.)
Tree-farm Licence Number
and Name
Mature
Immature
N.S.R.
and
N.C.C.
Total
Nelson Forest District
26. Kirk Ltd	
96
25,457
16,999
77,301
2,931
24,060
848
52,808
17,095
106,107
2,931
26,042
32,494
86,612
22,362
236,807
3,230
28,847
33,632
144,341
(488,762)
39,482
(79,066)
(1,072,896)
85,572
67,319
(194,235)
1,510
(18,496)
(174,009)
945
1,370
(427,375)
27. The  Crow's  Nest  Pass
Coal Co. Ltd 	
33. Elkhorn Ranch and Em-
3,349
1,543
(73,275)
36. J. HofertLtd	
31,646
33,804
1,982
(601,500)
38. William T. Joyce Co	
1,029
40. Kootenay Lake Logging
Co.	
1,260
91,003
174,947
5,331
271,281
469,219
192,373
(1,640,724)
3,825
(386,740)
3,832
(1,102,150)
Grand totals not within
tree-farm licences	
226,255
400,467
45,990
672,712
897,267
1,416,371
(1,640,724)
34,287
(386,740)
31,520
(1,102,150)
1 Scattered.
Numbers in parentheses are Christmas trees.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
75
SUMMARY OF BASIC DATA FOR FARM WOOD-LOT LICENCES (PRIVATE
(33) SUSTAINED-YIELD UNITS)
Farm Wood-lot Number
and Licensee
Productive Area (Acres)
Crown      Private
Total
Total
Area
(Acres)
Total Mature Volume
(M Cu. Ft.)
Crown     Private
Total
Allowable
Annual
Cut(M
Cu. Ft.)
Vancouver Forest District
1. Copley, G.R. 	
5. Thompson, A. R	
8. Heiltkla, E _ 	
17. Wells, G.E	
22. Kirkelund, P  	
26. Dawson, C 	
34. Morris, F 	
40. Courchens, R. O 	
41. Jones, T. E. D.	
43. Evans, L.W.. 	
44. Wilson, M. R 	
46. Williams, G. C	
49. Fall, J. S. T. -
51. Owens, S. 	
52. Dawson, H 	
57. Mellor, J. G. 	
58. Kokaska, A —
Totals	
Prince Rupert Forest District
28. Priest, C. V. -~~
42. Nysven, K.  	
66. Grainger, B. H	
70. Burt, A. H _ -
73. Sprigler, L. F 	
Totals	
Prince George Forest District
11. Shovar, J.C	
14. Macallister, J. M	
31. Myers, A. P	
36. Hiller, W.	
38. Miller, A. B... --
45. Lynum, M —
47. Sanford, J 	
53. Hiller, B 	
54. Teichman, O	
55. Kienzle, C.W	
59. McCauley, H. K. _
61. Kaska, M. G	
63. Walsh, G. D	
67. Higdon, J. and K..
68. Aiken, E. F _
74. Caron, L. A. -
75. Lavally,E.L	
Totals.
Kamloops Forest District
3. Myers, J. A	
9. Black, W  	
29. Hankey, A.  	
30. Kershaw, R. T  	
48. Durrell, J. M	
72. Law, D. A.	
Totals..
Nelson Forest District
7. Bombini, S  	
18. Siska, C.  	
21. Sahlstrom 	
60. Stevenson, J.,  and Boyd
R.A	
62. Braisher, O _	
65. Johnson, B. P. 	
69. Davidson, D. G -	
71. Carey, F	
Totals	
107
70
135
101
70
190
174
122
29
235
152
75
253
142
198
186
122
143
353
321
343
296
90
258
400
292
222
283
154
240
240
240
200
245
218
289
225
202
243
4,041
236
142
154
320
499
417
1,768
2,032
23
75
38
7
62
8
14
38
16
130
145
143
139
70
197
236
130
29
249
152
113
253
142
198
202
122
110
240
37
1,456 [  475
95
28
3
50
29
253
593
358
343
384
90
353
400
292
250
283
157
240
240
240
250
274
218
289
225
202
243
205
4,246
110
48
36
236
252
202
320
499
453
194 | 1,962
98
147
176
13
125
90
162
147
154
382
238
379
564
27
515
118
1,303
245
189
215
309
536
617
591
633
150
232
159
199
92
274
494
223
69
304
282
189
321
241
202
202
136
2,361 |  289 | 2,650 | 3,769
640
927
824
480
825
1,931 [ 3,696
106
428
404
299
251
302
166
240
240
240
250
274
226
290
256
202
249
4,423
260
276
326
160
540
724
2,286
254
195
269
333
567
617
601
633
3,335 | 3,469
Grand totals.
11,658 | 2,466 | 14,124 | 17,643
74
31
35
86
66
640
419
72
143
374
195
316
343
251
550
362
576
4,533
354
178
616
372
388
165
550
321
785
170
186
263
648
645
642
261
332
427
381
429
540
370
7,115
286
27
127
112
865
235
29
32
40
33
74
60
35
118
66
640
430
80
143
414
195
349
343
251
550
362
576
11
365 |
35
213 |
82
698 |
372 |
4
392 |
1,908 |  132 | 2,040
91
165
641
321
785
173
186
269
648
645
642
261
332
427
381
429
540
370
18
I
286
45
127
112
865
235
1,652 |   18 | 1,670
98
144
155
123
193
151
443
243
24
11
117
46
109
249
19
8
1,550
583
16,758
986
122
155
272
169
302
400
462
251
2,133
3.0
6.0
1.0
6.0
2.6
9.0
6.5
2.5
2.0
5.0
4.0
8.0
4.5
5.0
10.0
7.0
10.0
153 | 4,686 |  92.1
10.0
8.0
6.2
4.0
8.3
36.5
4.2
10.0
8.0
10.0
9.5
6.0
5.5
10.0
10.0
10.0
5.0
5.0
7.0
4.5
7.0
9.0
5.9
7,215 | 126.6
8.0
4.5
4.0
6.0
10.0
7.5
40.0
4.9
6.2
6.0
6.2
5.5
6.7
9.4
4.2
49.1
17,744
344.3
 76
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
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(43) FOREST SERVICE LIBRARY, 1954-63
Classification
Items Catalogued and Indexed
10-year
Average,
1954-63
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
62
246
92
124
127
932
55
190
94
136
141
1,090
37
179
170
151
177
1,321
45
266
109
155
214
1,417
48
177
159
133
230
43
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130
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39
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200
115
274
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31
92
135
134
375
878
29
113
140
151
378
911
23
191
110
151
370
41
Government reports and bulle-
172
Other bulletins and reports	
138
138
259
1.139 11.502
1.165 1   1.135
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REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
81
(53A)
TOTAL AMOUNT OF TIMBER SCALED IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
DURING YEARS 1962 AND 1963 IN F.B.M.
(All products converted to f.b.m.)
Forest District
10-year Average,
1954-63
1962
1963
Increase
Vancouver	
Prince Rupert (C.)	
Totals, Coast.
Prince Rupert (I.)	
Prince George 	
Kamloops  	
Nelson	
Totals, Interior .
Grand totals	
3,538
419
.892,563
612,916
4,093,000,614
607,098,846
3,958,505,479
4,700,099,460
248.
759
1,050
555
047,846
425,666
.784,010
.064,650
287,584,416
932,304,270
1,270,125,786
727,607,714
2,613,322,172    j    3,217,622,186
6,571,827,651
7,917,721,646
4,246,691,460
640,847,064
394,162,098
1,079,231,863
1,466,537,891
848,361,446
3,788,293,298
8,675,831,822
153,690,846
33,748,218
4,887,538,524    |       187,439,064
106,577,682
146,927,593
196,412,105
120,753,732
570,671,112
758,110,176
(53B)
TOTAL AMOUNT OF TIMBER SCALED IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
DURING YEARS 1962 AND 1963 IN CUBIC FEET
(Conversion factors:   Coast—6 f.b.m. = 1 cu. ft.;  Interior—5.75 f.b.m.=1 cu. ft.)
(All products converted to cubic feet.)
Forest District
10-year Average,
1954-63
1962
1963
Increase
589,815,427
69,935,486
682,166,769
101,183,141
707,781,910
106,807,844
25,615,141
5,624,703
Totals, Coast	
659,750,913    |       783,349,910
814,589,754    |         31,239,844
43,138,756
132,074,029
182,745,045
96,532,983
50,014,681
162,139,873
220,891,441
126,540,472
68,549,930    1         18,535,249
187,692,498             25,552,625
255,050,068             34,158,627
Nelson —	
147,541,121    1         21,000,649
Totals, Interior 	
454,490,813    |       559,586,467
1.114.241.77.6     1     1.342.936.377
658,833,617    |         99,247,150
1,473,423,371
130,486,994
 82
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
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 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
83
TOTAL SCALE OF ALL PRODUCTS,  1963, IN F.B.M.  (SEGREGATED BY
(55A) LAND STATUS AND FOREST DISTRICTS)
Land Status
Vancouver
Prince
Rupert
(Coast)
Prince
Rupert
(Interior)
Prince
George
Kamloops
Nelson
Totals
Timber licences	
Timber berths	
Timber leases	
Pulp leases	
Pulp licences —
Farm wood-lots	
Timber sales 	
No mark visible	
Tree-farm licences	
Miscellaneous	
Sub-totals, Crown
lands 	
Federal lands	
Crown grants—
To 1887 	
1887-1906	
1906-1914  	
1914 to date 	
Totals 	
924,076,548   14,147,982
105,871,554
90,170,532
55,712,058
20,495,058
487,866
1,234,957,9981244,745,406
104,101,098
581,529,948)219,434,880   96,334,965
2,520,006     6,044,886     1,939,556
15,739,757
8,705,724
19,493,432
35,561,214;
53,352,870
43,904,160
55,706,910
110,745
274,865,674
340,883
926,008,733
335,823
1,103,065,533
12,138
479,616,758
3,119,922,666 583,984,224
17,411,622     8,806,548
958,732,452]
64,541,616'
14,689,896:
71,393,208:
13,241,814
3,599,196
12,972,168
18,243,114
63,162,301
15,423,696
66,141,451
21,898,702
174,238,030
6,263,544
998,231,225
178,717,856
90,170,532
99,616,218
76,201,968
1,287,455
4,263,260,102
104,101,098
1,200,841,575
54,090,390
4,246,691,4601640,847,064
373,250,940
1,718,140
352,538
298,276
5,097,640
13,444,564
1,020,675,370|1,219,640,665
259,756|     46,576,897
573,5911 43,862,006
272,907| 29,105,902
7,990,056| 31,738,304
49,460,183j 95,614,117
749,044,554
3,805,551
5,669,845
58,504,732
10,084,235
21,252,529
394,162,098
1,079,231,863|1,466,537,8911848,361,446
7,066,518,419
78,578,514
1,022,432,246
156,322,629
82,572,299
269,407,715
I
8,675,831,822
TOTAL SCALE OF ALL PRODUCTS,  1963, IN CUBIC FEET (SEGREGATED
BY LAND STATUS AND FOREST DISTRICTS)
(55B) (Conversion factors:  Coast—6 f.b.m. = 1 cu. ft.; Interior—5.75 f.b.m. = 1 cu. ft.)
Land Status
Vancouver
Prince
Rupert
(Coast)
Prince
Rupert
(Interior)
Prince
George
Kamloops
Nelson
Totals
Timber licences-
Timber berths—
Timber leases	
Pulp leases	
Pulp licences	
Farm wood-lots..
Timber sales	
No mark visible..
Tree-farm licences-
Miscellaneous	
Sub-totals, Crown
lands	
Federal lands	
Crown grants—
To 1887	
1887-1906
1906-1914
1914 to date-
Totals	
154,012,758     2,357,997
17,645,259
15,028,422
9,285,343
3,415,8431
81,3111
205,826,3331
17,350,183|
96,921,6581 36,572,480
420,0011    1,007,481
7,317,360
9,284,485
40,790,901
19,260
47,802,726
16,753,907
337,314
519,987,111
2,901,937
159,788,742
10,756,936
2,448,316
97,330,704
1,467,758
2,206,969
599,866
2,162,028
11,898,8681 3,040,519
64,913,207
298,807
61,311
51,874
886,546
2,338,185
707,781,910 106,807,844
68,549,930
2,737,349
1,514,039
3,390,162
6,184,559
9,278,760
59,284
161,044,997
58,404
191,837,484
2,111
83,411,610
10,984,748
2,682,382
11,502,861
3,808,470
30,302,266
1,089,312
166,806,702
30,314,181
15,028,422
16,602,703
12,700,328
220,370
730,714,051
17,350,183
203,037,920
9,344,960
177,508,760    212,111,420
45,175|       8,100,330
130,268,618
661,835
99,755|       7,628,175 986,060
47,462|       5,061,896| 10,174,736
1,389,575)       5,519,705 1,753,780
8,601,771 j 16,628,542 3,696,092
1,202,119,820
13,475,842
170,771,012
26,692,770
14,159,950
46,203,977
187,692,498!   255,050,068|147,541,121|1,473,423,371
 84
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
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85
VOLUME  OF WOOD  REMOVED  UNDER  RELOGGING  AT  REDUCED  ROYALTY
(57) AND STUMPAGE,  1954-63, IN THOUSANDS OF CUBIC FEET
Salvage Wood Salvage Wood
Year (M Cu. Ft.) Year (M Cu. Ft.)
1954  1,888      1959   1,257
1955   1,209      1960   1,976
1956   1,795      1961   1,813
1957   3,663      1962   2,580
1958   1,427      1963   3,217
Ten-year average, 1954-63, 2,083 M cu. ft.
 86
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 88 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(60) LOGGING INSPECTIONS,  1963
Typ
e of Tenure Operated
Number of Inspections Made
Forest District
Timber
Sales
Leases, Licences, Crown
Grants,
and Other
Tenures
Total
Timber
Sales
Other
Tenures
Total
1,257
818
1,628
2,000
1,223
1,306
383
1,749
1,922
1,808
2,563
1,201
3,377
3,922
3,031
4,410
2,559
4,601
3,957
2,494
2,909
674
1,060
945
1,601
7,319
Prince Rupert. 	
3,233
5,661
Kamloops  	
4,902
4,095
Totals, 1963	
6,926
7,168
14,094
18,021
7,189
25,210
Totals, 1962 	
7,079
6,645
13,724
18,602
6,353
24,955
Totals, 1961	
7,088
6,463
13,551
18,330
6,242
24.572
Totals, 1960	
7,249
5,120
12,369
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26,151
Totals, 1959
6,273
4,898
11,171
C1)
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26,912
Totals, 1958.     -
5,936
4,341
10,277
C1)
(1)
23.802
Totals, 1957   	
7,503
5,940
13,443
(!)
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25,253
Totals, 1956   	
7,492
5,841
13,333
(!)
(1)
22,038
Totals, 1955  	
6,818
4,676
11,494
(!)
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22,355
Totals, 1954	
5,855
4,877
10,732
t1)
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21,011
6,822
5,597
12,419
24,226
i No breakdown made prior to 1961.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
89
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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
AREAS EXAMINED BY THE FOREST SERVICE FOR MISCELLANEOUS
(62) PURPOSES OF THE LAND ACT,  1963
Forest District
Applications for
Foreshore Leases
Applications to
Purchase
Miscellaneous
Total
Number
Acres
Number
Acres
Number
Acres
Number
Acres
Vancouver	
19
33
279
793
1
6
69
277
4
15
45
2,439
24
54
393
3.509
Totals	
52
1,072
7
346
19
2,484
78
3,902
(63)
AREAS CRUISED FOR TIMBER SALES,  1963
Forest District
Number
Cruised
Acreage
Saw-
timber
(MC.F.)
Pit-props,
Poles, and
Piles
(Lin. Ft.)
Shingle-
bolts and
Cord-
wood
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Railway-
ties
(No.)
Car-stakes,
Posts,
Shakes,
etc.
(No.)
603
290
364
463
142
99,588
112,096
159,230
254,370
91,415
223,318
224,002
248,512
385,511
84,633
58,500
1,258,000
382,700
978,277
1,210,048
3,078
9,906
11,200
5,575
2,760
18,000
1,800
177,950
31,930
427,000
Totals, 1963	
1,862
716,699
1.165.976
3,887,525
32,519
656,680
	
Totals, 1962 	
1,871
615,500
921,710
18,508,084
7,687,920
19,340
14,798
564,865
	
24,000
Totals, 1961	
1,892
720,144
1,027,243
1,395,285
Totals, 1960     	
2,122
767,351
1,142,479
8,807,614
29,050
13,809
1.405,370
Totals, 1959 	
2,317
681,550
877,370
7,387,960
27,753
26,875
1,124,400
Totals, 1958 	
1,922
609,563
890,285
8,772,888
24,316
34,430
1,146,719
Totals, 1957     -.
2,582
781,748
1,171,283
16,099,489
39.254
95.209
1,149,133
Totals, 1956...-. - 	
3,089
1,095,150
1,273,970
13,981,856
44,287
128,432
1,916,510
Totals, 1955	
3,354
1,077,986
1,131,521
9,885,451
16,819
145,525
501,820
Totals, 1954	
3,085
781,665
697,421
10,532,164
76,859
76,310
1,127,346
Ten-year average, 1954-63
2,410
784,736
1,029,926
10,555,095
32,499
54,459
1,098,813
(64)
TIMBER-SALE RECORD,  1963
Forest District
Sales
Made
Sales
Closed
Total
Sales
Existing
Total Area
(Acres)
Area Paying
Forest-protection Tax
(Acres)
Total
10-per-cent
Deposit
Vancouver	
609
231
350
365
157
567
230
323
503
218
1,681
1,007
1,198
1,608
639
586,189
393,851
700,097
1,072,521
600,432
543,546
364,404
613,382
1,034,468
564,143
$5,893,811.12
1,520,380.08
Prince George 	
Kamloops      — - 	
Nelson. -.       -   _    .
2,314,751.66
3,382,074.49
1,912,806.49
Totals 	
1,712
471
1,841
6,133
	
3,353,090
3,119,943
$15,023,823.84
2,183
       |       	
1
       |       	
1
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2
 96 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
CO) SAW AND SHINGLE MILLS OF THE PROVINCE,  1963
Operating
Shut Down
Sawmills
Shingle-mills
Sawmills
Shingle-mills
Forest District
Number
Estimated
Eight-hour
Daily
Capacity,
MB.F.
Numbe.
Estimated
Eight-hour
Daily
Capacity,
MB.F.
Number
Estimated
Eight-hour
Daily
Capacity,
MB.F.
Number
Estimated
Eight-hour
Daily
Capacity,
MB.F.
Vancouver 	
156
190
493
474
228
8,355
2,251
7,045
7,732
3,956
51
3
12
3
852
90
47
14
52
61
231
71
87
399
389
1,767
466
469
2
2
2
3
50
1
11
Nelson   	
Totals, 1963	
1,541
29,339
69
1,003
502
3,490
9
65
Totals, 1962	
1,627
28,234
33
591
512
3,217
14
92
Totals, 1961..
1,778
29,025
60
917
559
3,613
9
49
Totals, 1960	
1,938
29,432
44
950
558
3,381
17
93
Totals, 1959	
2,005
28,280
65
1,138
587
3,975
6
23
Totals, 1958	
2,010
27,694
56
1,141
585
4,007
9
37
Totals, 1957	
2,255
26,752
58
1,390
514
3,124
10
121
Totals, 1956	
2,435
29,080
66    |        1,381
390
2,013
8
15
Totals, 1955	
2,489
28,016
72    [        1,804
404
2,285
3
19
Totals, 1954.._	
2,346
25,602
57    |        1,108
367
2,281
13
22
Ten-year average,
1954-63	
2,042
28,145
58    1        1.142
498
3,139
10
54
(71)
EXPORT OF LOGS (IN F.B.M.),  1963
Species
Grade No. 1
Grade No. 2
Grade No. 3
Ungraded
Fuel-logs
Total
Fir                 	
107,612
406,411
1,877,378
762,510
1,047,617
1,913,276
7,223,827
4,278,085
3,285,147
3,468,921
12,543,218
37,011,935
33,676
1,102
4,555,989
13,517
	
4,453,893
5,788,608
78,215
15,797
21,644,423
42,130,745
10,253,906
10,269,703
	
5,797
39,473
1,102
313,502
1,051,663
5,921,154
21,085
	
21,085
1,573
     -,
629,546
1,890,222
2,521,341
Totals, 1963	
3,468,986
16,149,811
62,790,210
10,274,991
107,529
92,791,5271
Totals, 1962	
3,773,734
11,215,447
46,151,663
13,143,092
696,436
74,980,372
Totals, 1961 	
9,216,534
28,611,982
48,009,763
12,202,800
3,311,119
101,352,198
Totals, 1960	
1,391,803
5,351,398
20,872,330
11,805,419
890,260
40,311,210
Totals, 1959	
486,685
2,601,653
19,608,208
3,999,901
1,839,030
28,535,477
Totals, 1958  .
734,991
3,727,452
16,164,689
3,715,124
3,762,411
28,104,667
Totals, 1957	
524,180
3,987,443
22,016,291
5,625,910
3,421,354
35,575,178
Totals, 1956	
183,859
2,933,129
27,433,037
12,929,722
3,530,479
47,010,226
Totals, 1955	
906,141
7,468,949
58,863,477
16,974,165
4,754,796
88,967,528
Totals, 1954	
3,948,345
19,595,544
90,691,771
17,465,267
9,274,995
140,975,922
Ten-year average, 1954-63
2,463,526
10,164,281
41,260,144
10,813,639
3,158,841
67,860,431
1 Of this total, 51,109,835 f.b.m. were exported from Crown-granted lands carrying the export privilege;
41,681,692 f.b.m. were exported under permit from other areas.
 	
REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE, 1963
(72) SHIPMENTS OF POLES AND OTHER MINOR PRODUCTS,  1963
97
Forest District and Product
Quantity
Exported
Approximate
Value,
F.O.B.
Where Marketed
United
States
Canada
Other
Countries
Vancouver—
Poles   lin. ft.
Piling         „
Stakes and sticks      „
Fence-posts  pieces
Cedar shakes      „
Christmas trees     „
Prince Rupert—
Poles   lin. ft.
Fender logs  f.b.m.
Boom-sticks       ,,
Prince George—
Poles _ lin. ft.
Piling        „
Fence-posts       ,,
Hewn ties   -.pieces
Christmas trees        „
Kamloops—
Poles lin. ft.
Piling        „
Fence-posts   cords
Christmas trees   pieces
Nelson—■
Poles and piling lin. ft.
Corral-rails      „
Orchard-props __    ,,
Mine timbers      ,,
Mine-props cords
Fence-posts       „
Palings and pickets pieces
Cedar shakes     ,,
Christmas trees      „
Total value, 1963	
Total value, 1962	
5,424,467
2,207,618
5,800
2,495
33,611,523
65,650
3,285,344
19,380
66,065
50,230
11,510
44,185
1,913
1,350
1,845,560
137,550
3,320
574,923
2,194,178
41,024
54,000
42,726
116
5,600
479,467
752,840
1,257,000
$2,856,782.45
742,487.45
174.00
748.50
2,492,806.61
131,300.00
1,453,324.72
775.20
2,642.60
20,128.00
3,222.80
11,046.25
1,052.15
1,080.00
590,579.20
34,387.50
132,800.00
344,953.80
1,004,568.00
410.00
1,890.00
5,127.00
893.00
341,600.00
57,536.00
120,454.00
842,190.00
| $11,194,959.23
3,999,777
1,760
5,800
2,495
35,611,523
157,288
2,295,208
50,230
676,000
558,433
1,091,495
54,000
966
434,374
616,510
1,131,300
410,366
239,848
1,530,136
19,380
66,065
11,510
44,185
1,913
1,350
1,169,560
137,550
3,320
16,490
1,102,683
41,204
42,726
116
4,634
45,093
136,330
125,700
1,014,324
1,966,010
| $11,030,814.62
(73)
SUMMARY OF EXPORT OF MINOR PRODUCTS FOR
PROVINCE,  1963
Product
Quantity
Value
Per Cent of
Total Value
 ... lin. ft
10,605,601
2,356,678
2,194,178
42,726
44,185
54,000
41,024
5,800
34,364,363
1,898,923
479,467
1,913
2,495
8,920
116
66,065
19,380
$4,920,814.37
780,097.75
1,004,568.00
5,127.00
11,046.25
1,890.00
410.00
174.00
2,613,260.61
1,319,523.80
57,536.00
1,052.15
748.50
474,400.00
893.00
2,642.60
775.20
43.2476
Pilinp                                                                                        ....           "
6.8560
Other poles and piling .—	
       ;;
8.8289
.0451
Fence-posts - 	
Orchard-props	
"
.0971
.0166
.0036
.0015
22.9672
13.2077
.5057
.0092
Fence-posts 	
.0065
4.1694
Mine-props
... f.h m
.0078
.0232
.0068
$11,194,959.23
100.0000
 98 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(74) TIMBER MARKS ISSUED,  1954-63
Ten year
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
Average,
1954-63
Old Crown grants 	
528
609
480
320
215
299
315
268
300
313
365
Crown grants, 1887-
1906	
175
218
207
108
93
103
115
121
150
125
141
Crown grants, 1906-
1914     _-	
160
171
172
97
93
125
123
121
164
161
139
Section 58, Forest Act
485
653
655
460
362
524
517
470
589
608
532
Stumpage reservations
69
95
82
59
89
108
116
117
109
141
98
Pre-emptions  	
1
2
6
1
	
1
3
9
13
4
Timber berths —
1
10
10
7
7
9
4
4
12
12
8
Indian reserves	
30
31
46
23
9
21
15
8
20
18
22
2,786
3,130
2,859
2,239
1,900
1,926
2,136
2,141
1,991
2,183
2,329
Hand-loggers 	
Special marks and
rights-of-way.	
44
43
71
74
80
85
113
91
90
97
79
1
6
1
1
7
1
1
5
5
3
2
Totals..	
4,280
4,968
4,589
3,389
2,855
3,201
3.456
3,349
3,441
3,671
3,720
Transfers and changes
780
867
873
615
598
669
794
691
809
725
742
(81)
GRAZING PERMITS ISSUED
District
Number of
Permits
Issued
Number of Stock under Permit
Cattle
Horses
Sheep
Kamloops    	
1,285
439
221
6
129,832
22,230
6,684
94
3,921
1,411
528
23,991
Nelson 	
1,375
Vancouver
1963 	
Totals,
1,951
158,840
5,860
25,366
Totals,
1962  	
1,924
146,830
5,007
23,370
Totals,
1961 	
1960	
1959- -
1958   - 	
1957 	
1,825
132,749
4,985
21,309
Totals,
1,726
127,148
4,504
19,460
Totals,
1,683
124,425
4,377
20,604
Totals,
1,571
122,489
4,169
20,927
Totals,
1,640
128,978
3,886
20,693
Totals,
1956	
1955	
1954 	
1,776
127,182
3,667
22,310
Totals,
1,705
121,284
3,575
22,560
Totals,
1,750
111,767
3,738
24,909
 (91)
REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
FOREST ROAD PROGRAMME,  1963
99
Project
Regulation Unit
Reconnaissance
Miles
Location
Miles
Construction
Miles
Vancouver Forest District
Blue Mountain -	
Yale S.Y.TJ 	
1
5
15
4
7
3
6
6
4
7
20
2
7
3
2
4
30
32
6
7.5
3.5
3.1
2.1
1.6
3.9
3.5
2.2
0.6
13.6
12.8
3.4
9.3
17.6
	
1...
2.7
12.1
26.4
3.0
18.9
58.4
14.2
8.7
13.4
"5.7
16.1
7.1
18.9
7
Harrison S.Y.U -	
Bond Sound F.R.               	
Broughton S.Y.U	
Garibaldi Park and Soo S.Y.U	
Soo S.Y.U.                       	
Soo S.Y.U.                          	
Redonda S.Y.U	
Sayward S.Y.U.                        	
Sayward S.Y.U	
Sayward S.Y.U.
McNab Howe Sound F.R	
Sechelt S.Y.U.                     	
Cape Scott P W.C.
94
Stella Lake F.R.                	
Sayward S.Y.U.             	
Sechelt S.Y.U.           	
Redonda S.Y.U.           	
Prince Rupert Forest District
Allard Creek
Rivers Inlet P.W.C.
Blunt Creek F.D.R 	
Smithers P.W.C	
7.2
Kitwanga S.Y.U -	
Rivers Inlet P.W.C—    ■
Rivers Inlet P.W.C...	
Rive.™ Inlet P.W.C 	
Morice River F.D.R	
Ootsa S.Y.U.. 	
Rivers Inlet S.Y.U	
5.4
Rivers Inlet S.Y.U     	
Smithers P.W.C.                   	
Suskwa River F.R	
Hazelton S.Y.U -	
Prince George Forest District
Aleza Lake F.D.R.           	
Aleza Lake Forest  	
Bowron S.Y.U	
V.C.L.--  _
1.8
Moberly S.Y.U	
V.C.L                	
V.C.L                         --
53.8
Bowron S.Y.U	
Kamloops Forest District
Adams S.Y.U.    -	
Shuswap S.Y.U	
Ashnola River F.D.R	
Barton Hills S.Y.U.
6.0
Barton Hills
Nicola S.Y.U	
Cariboo River F.R - 	
Quesnel Lake P.W.C	
Cayoosh Creek F.D.R	
Yalakom S.Y.U	
5.1
Taseko S.Y.U.    .
Hendrix Creek F.D.R _
Stum S.Y.U	
Lac la Hache S.Y.U.._   _
Quesnel Lake P.W.C.
9.0
Horsefly River F.D.R.
34
Nelson Forest District
Akolkolex River F.D.R 	
Arrowhead S.Y.U _. ._ 	
Edgewood S.Y.U	
Bench Creek F.R	
Kinbasket S.Y.U	
V.C.L....          .                	
Fernie S.Y.U.
2.6
Salmo S.Y.U -	
Windermere S.Y.U 	
164
3,916
297.3
1,612.4
103.7
670.5
Totals, forest road programme 1950-63	
4,080
1,909.7
774.2
F.D.R._=Forest-deveIopment road. F.R.=:Forest road. P.W.C.=Public working circle.
S.Y.U.=Sustained-yield unit. V.C.L.=Vacant Crown land.
 100 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(92) FOREST SERVICE MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT,  1963
Type
Total
Units,
Jan. 1,
1963
Removed
from
Service
New
Purchases
Total
Units,
Jan. 1,
1964
Sedans.
Suburbans, station wagons, sedan deliveries -
Panel deliveries 	
Four-wheel-drive passenger types -
Four-wheel-drive pick-ups, power wagons, panel deliveries.-
5,000-10,000 G.V.W. pick-ups, Vi and 1 ton  	
14,000-24,000 G.V.W. trucks, 2, 3, and 4 tons	
24,000^10,000 G.V.W. heavy-duty trucks 	
Fire-fighting tank-trucks  	
Total vehicles   	
Trail motor-cycles 	
Tractors   	
Graders  	
Scrapers—self-propelled	
Scrapers—not self-propelled.
Shovels—power_
Loaders—self-propelled .
Outboard motors 	
Fire-pumps—various ._
Fire-pumps—portable tanker	
Bean fire-fighting units—-high-pressure .
Borate mixer pumps  	
Chain saws 	
Lighting plants 	
Snow sedan—propellor-driven .
Speeders—railway ...
Trailers—low and high bed . 	
Trailers—dwelling, bunk-house, etc. _
Trailers—miscellaneous	
Air-compressors _ _	
Rock drills—gas-powered  	
Muskeg and snow tractors (personnel carriers)..
Yarders   —
Crushing plants 	
Mechanical wheelbarrows .
Welders	
Cement-mixers	
Augers—power, planting -
Fork lift trucks - -	
47
121
69
104
288
172
54
3
4
862
26
44
15
4
2
2
1
387
851
100
34
10
365
98
1
14
7
157
213
5
8
10
1
1
22
9
6
4
1
11
22
17
20
46
28
3
1
148
17
37
16
4
10
17
18
34
46
30
4
2
161
16
2
1
23
12
35
7
2
15
32
4
46
116
70
118
288
174
55
4
4
|      875
42
44
15
4
2
2
2
393
826
108
34
10
384
101
1
14
9
166
245
9
8
10
1
22
12
7
3
2
 (93)
REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE, 1963
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION UNDERTAKEN DURING 1963
101
Location
Project
Construction
Agency
Progress
Carry-over of 1961/62 Programme
Adams Lake  _  	
Alexis Creek- 	
Barriere     _	
Beaverdell   	
Chilliwack 	
Chilliwack —	
Cranbrook    	
Cranbrook _ 	
Fort Fraser _ -	
Fort McLeod   —	
Fort Nelson 	
Gold Bridge  	
Golden    -	
Green Timbers 	
Green Timbers  	
Green Timbers   -	
Hudson Hope   -
Kitwanga —	
Kitwanga...   -	
Likely  _	
Lund    _	
Merritt   _ —
Merritt _	
McBride   	
Pemberton	
Prince Rupert	
Queen Charlotte City..
Quinsam 	
Sayward Forest	
Smithers	
Spillimacheen	
Spillimacheen 	
Telkwa.  _	
Topley _
Vancouver	
Victoria  	
Wells  _ -..
Williams Lake.
1962/63 Programme
Aleza Lake	
Aleza Lake 	
Beaverdell	
Burns Lake	
Chase .._.
Chatham Channel.
Crescent Spur	
Dawson Creek	
Duncan	
Duncan 	
Duncan   	
Fort St. John	
Ganges    	
Green Timbers	
Green Timbers	
Green Timbers	
Green Timbers	
Harrison Lake	
Hazelton 	
Hazelton  	
Hudson Hope	
Invermere 	
Kettle Valley	
Kettle Valley	
Kitwanga 	
Likely   _.
Lower Post 	
Lund   	
Mesachie Lake	
Mesachie Lake	
Mooring facilities ..
Bunk-house	
Addition to residence _
Residence 	
Bunk-houses — _...
Cold-storage building	
Pumping and irrigation..
Cold-storage extension ..
Residence	
Residence 	
Warehouse   	
Office and cache	
Bunk-house 	
Office renovations 	
Repair-shed, electrical-
Pumping and irrigation-
Residence  - __
Electrical distribution	
Water supply	
Marine ways	
Residence  	
Addition to office 	
Addition to residence	
Addition to office	
Vehicle-shed  _. 	
Mooring facilities _	
Residence	
Addition to residence.
Water supply 	
Alterations to hangar-
Addition to residence .
Water treatment	
Cold-storage and warehouse building-
Water-supply system 	
Warehouse  	
Warehouse renovations.
Residence _ _
Residence  	
Vehicle-repair building	
Water-system renovations .
Residence	
Heating renovations 	
Offico extension 	
Wharf—cathodic treatment-
Residence  — -	
Paving 	
Warehouse conversion	
Utility building-
Pumping and irrigation .
Paving _ 	
Garage	
Roof repairs-
Irrigation extension	
Cold-storage extension ..
Domestic water system..
Construction camp	
Warehouse	
Residence	
Residence   	
Office extension 	
Heating 	
Office extension 	
Residence   	
Boat-house extension .
Office conversion	
Float addition    	
Office extension	
Soil-shed	
Own forces..
Own forces.
Own forces.
Own forces.
Own forces..
Own forces.
Own forces.
Own forces.
Own forces.
Own forces.
Own forces.
Own forces.
Own forces.
Own forces.
Own forces.
Own forces.
Own forces
Contract ...
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces.
Own forces
Contract	
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Contract .
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Contract ..
Own forces
Contract—
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces.
Own forces
Own forces.
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Contract .
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Own forces
Contract .
Own forces
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Design completed.
Completed.
Design completed.
Completed,
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Design completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Work proceeding.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Design completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Design completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Work proceeding.
Work proceeding.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Design proceeding.
Design proceeding.
Design proceeding.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Work proceeding.
Design completed.
Design proceeding.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Work proceeding.
Work proceeding.
 102 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(93)   BUILDING CONSTRUCTION UNDERTAKEN DURING 1963—Continued
Location
Project
Construction
Agency
Progress
Mesachie Lake-
Parsnip River	
Prince Rupert...
Quesnel	
Salmo _
Smithers	
Summit Lake	
Summit Lake	
Topley  . - _
Vancouver	
Vancouver _
Irrigation system	
Construction camp —
Carport  —
Air-conditioning	
Warehouse —
Roof repairs -	
Residence 	
Electrical distribution
Building conversion—
Offico extension 	
Oil-storage building _
Own forces _
Own forces.
Own forces .
Own forces
Own forces
Contract	
Own forces
Own forces -.
Own forces ..
Own forces.
Own forces.
Design proceeding.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
Completed.
(94)
TRAILERS DESIGNED IN  1963
Type and Size
Used by—
District or Division
Camper unit (truck-borne), 7' x 8'	
Bunk-house, 8' x 30' 	
Office and bunk-house (two), 10' x 36'
Office and bunk-house (one), 10' x 36'.
Office and bunk-house (one), 10' x 36'.
Residence, 8' x 36'	
Workshop (truck-borne), 8' x 13'	
Dwelling, 8' x 16'    _
Camper unit (truck-borne), 7' x 8'	
Dwelling, 8' x 18'	
Dwelling, 8' x 28'  -	
Dwelling, 8' x 28'   	
Dwelling, 8' x 18'  	
Dwelling, 8' x 28'	
Dwelling, 8' x 18'... 	
Dwelling, 8' x 14' 	
Reconnaissance crew 	
Survey crew	
Water-bombing crew 	
Water-bombing crew	
Water-bombing crew..	
Survey supervisor — _	
Mechanical Superintendent.
Fire-suppression crew.	
Patrolman  	
Project crew 	
Project crew 	
Silviculture crew -	
Silviculture crew	
Silviculture crew 	
Silviculture crew 	
Cruising crew	
Engineering Division.
Surveys Division.
Kamloops.
Prince George.
Nelson.
Surveys Division.
Surveys Division.
Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Nelson.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince George.
Nelson.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
(101)        FOREST-PROTECTION EXPENDITURE BY THE FOREST SERVICE
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1962/63
Travelling expense
  $22,035.26
 : 6,001.60
  618,587.61
  260,414.66
  273,202.62
Maintenance and operation of equipment  295,660.72
Clothing and uniforms	
Equipment rental (aircraft)_
Equipment and machinery..
Maintenance of buildings and grounds.
Acquisition or construction of buildings and works..
Motor-vehicles and accessories .
Incidentals and contingencies.__.
Slash and snag disposal-
Wages and expenses, seasonal staff-
Increased protection, Peace River.—
Total
185,799.29
118,376.18
23,091.87
74,945.76
1,432,880.21
231,366.22
$3,542,362.00
Fire-suppression expenditure by the Forest Service for the fiscal
year 1962/63 -	
$444,057.16
 (102)
REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
CONSTRUCTION OF PROTECTION ROADS AND TRAILS,  1963
103
Light
Medium
Heavy
Total
Miles
41
987
Miles
56
638
Miles
104
407
Miles
201
2,032
1,028
694
511
2,233
46
122
44
185
32
56
122
363
168
229
88
485
REPORTED APPROXIMATE EXPENDITURE IN FOREST PROTECTION
(103) BY OTHER AGENCIES,1 1963
Forest District
Expenditures
Patrols and
Fire
Prevention
Tools and
Equipment
Fires
Improvements
Total
Vancouver	
Prince Rupert	
Prince George  	
Kamloops	
Nelson - 	
Totals	
Ten-year average, 1954-63
$122,866
147,450
6,800
7,310
13,984
$318,435
30,750
71,070
6,428
46,085
$202,476
13,800
18,510
42,520
32,562
$62,275
32,300
33,350
17,000
34,720
$706,052
224,300
129,730
73,258
127,351
$298,410
$472,768
$309,868
$179,645
$1,260,691
$322,730
$429,924
$338,748
$305,951
$1,397,353
1 Principally forest industry.
(104)    SUMMARY OF SNAG-FALLING,  1963, VANCOUVER FOREST DISTRICT
Acres
Total area logged, Vancouver Forest District, 1963  90,548
Logged in small exempted operations1      280
Assessed for non-compliance, less 561 acres subsequently felled  1,359
 ■    1,639
Balance logged acres snagged, 1963-
88,909
Snags felled, 1963, by Forest Service Protection Division	
Snags felled, 1963, by Forest Service Reforestation Division..
3,377
3,660
Total area snagged, 1963, Vancouver Forest District-
Total area snagged, 1963, Interior districts	
7,037
1,800
Total area snagged, 1963, all districts     8,837
i Exemption granted under subsection (3) of section 116 of the Forest Act.
 104 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
SUMMARY OF LOGGING SLASH REPORTED IN  1963,
(105) VANCOUVER FOREST DISTRICT
Acres
Total area logged, 1963  90,548
Area covered by full hazard reports  52,649
Covered by snag reports but exempted from slash disposal  25,432
Covered by acreage reports only (exempted from slash and snag disposal) i        280
  78,361
Slash created and not reported in 1963  12,187
i Exemption granted under subsection (3) of section 116 of the Forest Act.
ACREAGE ANALYSIS OF SLASH DISPOSAL REQUIRED, 1963,
(106) VANCOUVER FOREST DISTRICT
Acres of Slash
Prior to 1963           19631 Total Acres
Broadcast burning  20,943            22,035 42,978
Spot burning      4,470              5,201 9,671
Totals  25,413 27,236 52,649
1963 reports not recommending slash disposal  25,432
1963 slash on very small operations exempted without special examination        280
  25,712
Total area of slash dealt with, 1963  78,361
i Does not include the estimated 12,187 acres (see Table No. 40) created too late to be dealt with in 1963.
ANALYSIS OF PROGRESS IN SLASH DISPOSAL,  1963,
(107) VANCOUVER FOREST DISTRICT
Acres
Total disposal required (see Table No. 39)  52,649
Acres of Slash
Type of Disposal Prior to 1963 1963 Total Acres
Spring broadcast burning         75 161 236
Spring spot burning        108            108
Fall broadcast burning  26,573 19,825 46,398
Fall spot burning     6,168 3,023 9,191
Total burning completed  32,924 23,009 55,933
Burning by accidental fires     1,143
Lopping, scattering, land-clearing, etc         60
Total  57,136
Balance reported slash not yet abated1        Nil
Slash created, 1963, acres assessed       284
Plus slash created too late to be dealt with, 1963  12,187
Total area of slash carried over to 1964 for disposition2  12,471
i Caused by voluntary burning and abatement of assessed and extended areas.
2 Does not show the acreage instructed in 1963 to be extended or assessed in 1964.
Actual area burned in spring spot burning, 18 acres.
Actual area burned in fall spot burning, 1,176 acres.
The above figures do not include 1962 slash-burn reports received too late for inclusion in 1963 Annual
Report, 1,676 acres.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
105
(108)
SUMMARY OF SLASH-BURN DAMAGE AND COSTS,  1963,
VANCOUVER FOREST DISTRICT
Total acres of forest-cover burned in slash fires, 1963-
Net damage to forest-cover..
Net damage to cut products..
Net damage to equipment and property..
Total damage 	
487
$14,779.50
242.50
1,100.00
$16,122.00
Cost of Slash Burning as Reported by Operators
Total Cost Acres
        $400.00 236
          560.00 108
  185,164.23 46,398
(d) Fall spot burning     14,186.23 9,191
(a) Spring broadcast burning
(_>) Spring spot burning	
(c) Fall broadcast burning
Cost per
MB.F.
$0,042
.172
.099
.051
Cost per
Acre
$1.69
5.18
3.99
1.54
(109)
FIRE OCCURRENCES BY MONTHS,  1963
Forest District
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
Total
Per
Cent
Vancouver!	
4
23
9
5
27
3
16
6
66
54
79
190
29
67
17
63
134
24
44
65
59
173
123
185
18
81
312
200
51
7
11
51
119
6
1
8
9
6
424
189
308
908
516
18.1
8.1
13.1
Kamloops2	
38.7
22.0
Totals  _
36
57
418
305
464
796
239
30
2,345
100.0
Per cent.	
1.5
2.4
17.8
13.0
19.8
34.0
10.2
1.3
100.0
Ten-year average,
1954-63	
32
86
298
267
583
478
151
27
1,922
Per cent 	
1.7
4.5
15.5
13.9
30.3
24.9
7.8
1.4
100.0
     1        |     349
1               1
69
34
36
38
2
528
,.
i Excludes 438 railroad-tie fires.
2 Excludes 90 railroad-tie fires.
 106 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(110) NUMBER AND CAUSES OF FOREST FIRES,  1963
Forest District
8
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Vancouver! _	
Prince Rupert 	
Prince George :__
Kamloops2	
Nelson 	
Totals	
Percent	
Ten-year average.
1954-63	
Per cent 	
Railroad-tie fires	
140
73
139
416
376
49
26
36
67
43
12
3
13
34
3
72
11
16
93
28
17
16
23
22
4
16
24
52
3
1,144 | 221 ]  65 | 220
82
95
24 | 141
5
3
12
39
3
~6T
74
23
20
109
24
424
189
308
908
516
18.1
8.1
13.1
38.7
22.0
250
41  |2,345 1100.0
48.8 |    9.4 |    2.8 |    9.4 |    3.5
4.1  |    1.0 [    6.0 |    2.6
10.7 |    1.7 |100.0 |	
702
212
112
245
79
85
33
148
35
215
56
1,922
36.5  |  11.0 |    5.8 |  12.8  |    4.1
4.5 ]    1.7 |    7.7
1.8
11.2 |    2.9 1100.0
528
I-
528
1 Excludes 438 railroad-tie fires.
2 Excludes 90 railroad-tie fires.
(HI)   NUMBER AND CAUSES OF FOREST FIRES FOR THE LAST TEN YEARS
Causes
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
Total
116
157
69
120
63
3
11
64
12
79
21
418
195
74
206
47
2
24
89
15
132
50
497
214
135
281
112
47
73
183
27
213
73
307
170
85
182
65
48
46
107
22
172
45
1,150
296
162
478
120
131
18
246
53
310
94
184
172
88
211
75
190
30
204
34
253
33
1,166
241
245
257
82
87
36
137
54
271
59
1,426
269
154
336
86
179
36
194
49
290
83
615
182
41
162
60
62
35
109
25
183
62
1,144
221
65
220
82
95
24
141
62
250
41
7,023
2,117
1,118
Smokers   -
Brush-burning (not railway or right-
2,453
792
Range-burning -	
Road and Power-,  telephone-,  and
pipe-line construction
Industrial operations (logging, etc.).  .
Incendiary _   —
844
333
1,474
353
2,153
Unknown causes  	
561
Totals     	
715
1,252
1,855
1,249
3,058
1,474
2,635
3,102
1,536
2,345 119,221
Railroad-tie fires 	
49
132
955
370
1,062
536
1,478
1,489
2,479
528 I 9,078
1
i Excludes 9,078 railroad-tie fires.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
107
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 108
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(113)
ANALYSIS OF SUPPRESSION-CREW FIRE-FIGHTING
ACTIVITIES, 1963
Size of Fire When Attacked
Number
of Fires
Subsequent Spread (by Number of Fires)
V<\ Acre
or Less
Over V*
Acre to
1 Acre
Over 1
Acre to
5 Acres
Over 5
Acres to
50 Acres
Over 50
Acres
Spot (up to V4 acre)	
Over lA acre and up to 1 acre-
Over 1 acre and up to 5 acres	
Over 5 acres and up to 50 acres..
Over 50 acres  	
132
46
14
7
2
Totals.
201
129
6
3
35
135
38
(114)
DAMAGE TO PROPERTY OTHER THAN FORESTS,  19631
Forest District
Forest
Products
Cut, Logs,
Lumber, etc.
Buildings
Railway,
Logging,
and
Sawmill
Equipment
Miscellaneous
Total
Per Cent
of Total
Vancouver -	
Prince Rupert	
$19,585.00
210.00
70.00
525.00
51.00
$3,100.00
56,500.00
4,000.00
250.00
3,000.00
$128,763.00
$2,165.00
137.00
124.00
407.00
2,010.00
$153,613.00
56,847.00
4,194.00
1,182.00
9,961.00
68.0
25.2
1.9
0.5
4,900.00
4.4
Totals	
$20,441.00 |    $66,850.00 | $133,663.00
$4,843.00 | $225,797.00 |      100.0
Per cent 	
9.0    |             29.6    |             59.2
2.2    |           100.0    |     	
Ten-year average, 1954-63
$81,582.00 |    $31,848.00 | $177,997.00
$23,683.00 | $315,110.00 [     .   .
25.9
10.1    1            56.5
7.5    1           100 0
i Does not include intentional slash burns.   (For this item see Table No. 108.)
DAMAGE TO FOREST-COVER CAUSED BY FOREST FIRES,  1963-
(115, Parti) PART II
Merchantable Timber
Immature Timber
Forest District
Net Area
Killed
Total
Volume
Killed
Salvable
Volume
of Timber
Killed
Net Stumpage
Loss
Net Area
Killed
Present
Value
Vancouver -
Prince Rupert _
Acres
404
1.332
522
590
273
M Cu. Ft.
1,966
1,961
2,047
1,351
628
M Cu. Ft.
1,127
24
1,705
486
15
$
53,168
43,544
12,199
12,407
11,326
Acres
245
1,035
2,590
1,648
447
$
12,429
35,627
28,888
24,435
Nelson —
9,144
Totals -	
3,121
7,953
3,357
132,644 2
5,965
110,5232
6.7
100.0 .
42.2
43.0
12.9
35.8
Ten-year average, 1954-63
59,023
82,926
26,992
1,271,183
57,522
1,173,019
13.0
100.0
32.5
45.8
12.6
42.3
i Does not include intentional slash burns.   (For this item see Table No. 107.)
2 The dollar value of losses in merchantable and immature timber represents only stumpage loss to the
Crown. Actual payroll loss to the Province is 10 times these figures.
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE, 1963
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 114
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(120)
CONTRACT FLYING, 1963
Fixed-wing Aircraft
Forest District
Base
Type of Aeroplane
Hours Flown
Vancouver 	
386
Beaver 	
Beaver, Otter, and Super Cub
397
1,117
589
Kamloops	
Nelson
Nelson.   _.. . _.
Beaver     -	
500
Total
2,989
Helicopters
Forest District
Base
Type of Helicopter
Hours Flown
Vancouver	
Prince Rupert
Vancouver and Campbell River	
Bell -  	
Bell and Hiller
465
522
Prince George and Fort St. John	
Kamloops ~    	
Nelson, Cranbrook, and Revelstoke	
Bell and Hiller....-	
990
Kamloops
Bell...  	
Bell and Hiller
538
500
Total    .
3,015
Air Tankers
Forest District
Base
Type of Aeroplane
Hours Flown
Prince Rupert-
Prince George..
Kamloops	
Nelson	
Total..
Smithers- 	
Prince George..
Kamloops..
Castlegar, Midway, and Cranbrook-
Avenger 	
Avenger and Otter.-
Avenger and Otter-
Avenger _	
68
36
175
149
428
 REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
115
(121)      USE OF AIRCRAFT IN FIRE-FIGHTING (NON-CONTRACT), 1963
Fixed-wing Aircraft
Reconnaissance
Transportation of
Men and Supplies
Water Bombing
Total
Hours
Cost
Hours
Cost
Hours
Cost
Hours
Cost
58
125
123
6
28
$3,595
6,930
4,848
175
889
24
58
140
273
6
28
$3,595
15    |       $970
126    j      8,935
7,900
$3,263
17,046
Kamloops	
Nelson	
175
889
Totals	
340
$16,437
141    1    $9,905
1
24
$3,263
505
$29,605
Helicopters
4
84
18
91
18
145
$8,440
1,958
9,910
1,980
16,633
28
$3,014
112
18
91
22
145
$11,454
	
1,958
9,910
$440
2,420
Nelson -	
16,633
Totals —-	
4
$440
356    | $38,921
1
28
$3,014
388
$42,375
 116           DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
ENROLMENT AT ADVANCED COURSE, FOREST SERVICE
(13D                                          TRAINING-SCHOOL, 1963
Forest District
Forest
Assistants,
Cruisers,
Etc.
Rangers
Acting
Rangers
Assistant
Rangers
Clerks
Total
Graduations
Class 13
2
1
—
—
3
2
3
3
4
—
5
3
3
5
4
—
Prince Rupert  	
Kamloops...
Nelson
2
Attendance, 1963  .
5
—
15
—
20       I        _
Attendance, 1962	
3
....
—-
17
_..
20
20
Attendance, 1961	
3
—
—
17
—
20
—
Attendance, 1960	
4
—
—
17
—
21
21
Attendance, 1959	
4
—
—
17
—
21
—
Attendance, 1959	
—.
—
—
21
—
21
21
Attendance, 1958
—
—
—
21
—
21
	
Attendance, 1957
4
—
—
26
—
30
30
Attendance, 1956	
4
—
—
26
—-
30
—
Attendance, 1956	
3
—
—
18
—
21
21
Attendance, 1955	
3
—
--
18
.._
21
—
Attendance, 1954 	
—
—.
20
--
20
20
Attendance, 1953	
—
—
—
21
—
21
—
Attendance, 1953	
—.
...
....
20
....
20
20
Attendance, 1952 	
—.
—
—
20
....
20
—
Attendance, 1951	
—.
3
3
15
—
21
21
Attendance, 1950	
3
3
15
—
21
21
Attendance, 1949	
3
2
16
—-
21
—
Attendance, 1948	
—
4
2
12
2
20
20
Attendance, 1947	
_..
8
_..
12
—
20
20
Attendance, 1946	
—
2
9
9
—
20
20
Total graduates to December
31, 1963
"                  -
_..
—
—
--
255
Note.—Since 1949/50 until 1962 the course was of nine months' duration, spread over Wi years.   From 1946
to 1949, and commencing with Class 13, 1962, a six-month course is involved, spread over one year.
Enrolment at Basic Course, 1963
Forest District
Forest
Assistants,
Cruisers,
Etc.
Rangers
Acting
Rangers
Assistant
Rangers
Clerks
Total
Graduations
Class 2
Vancouver	
1
1
2
3
;:;
-
3
3
2
1
4
-
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Prince George—	
Kamloops
Attendance, 1963	
7
—        1        —        1        13
—
20
20
Attendance, 1962	
3
-       |       .-       |       17
|       20
20
Total graduates to  December
31,1963	
40
Grand total of graduates, both courses, 295.
 (141)
REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963
FOREST REVENUE, 1959-63
117
12 Months
to Dec. 31,
1959
12 Months
to Dec. 31,
1960
12 Months
to Dec. 31,
1961
12 Months
to Dec. 31,
1962
12 Months
to Dec. 31,
1963
Five-year
Average,
1959-63
Timber-licence   rentals
$362,825.25
19,910.61
70,094.39
435,589.31
23,092,737.28
252,985.19
1,890,590.96
86,506.29
510,661.47
121,287.96
$363,597.80
18,712.81
76,493.46
452,788.69
26,374,420.04
277,345.73
2,281,028.09
101,240.36
456,491.27
121,461.72
$366,600.53
21,929.03
59,071.23
480,803.23
24,554,147.30
377,755.89
2,245,313.71
119,876.87
569,749.95
134,824.47
$352,418.29
19,795.95
73,139.35
500,208.12
26,315,940.41
346,627.67
2,433,175.10
137,118.26
550,949.16
161,447.52
$357,175.79       S366.616.54
Timber-berth rentals and
fees	
Timber-lease rentals and
fees  _     	
Timber-sale rentals and
fees - -  —	
Timber-sale stumpage	
Timber-sale cruising and
advertising 	
Timber royalties	
Grazing permits and fees
17,361.70
63,629.77
502,317.68
30,199,623.94
386,735.44
2,499,842.31
152,200.70
523,598.00
173,192.07
19,643.18
70,554.25
405,528.30
23,533,014.63
279,280.07
2,090,339.34
97,784.06
Miscellaneous	
133,249.23
Totals	
$26,843,188.71
$30,523,579.97
$28,930,072.21
$30,890,819.83|$34,875,677.40
1
$26,996,009.60
 118
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
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 120
DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(144)
FOREST REVENUE, FISCAL YEAR 1962/63
Timber-licence rentals and fees-
Timber-berth rentals and fees-	
Timber-lease rentals and fees.	
Timber-sale rentals and fees	
  $358,052.11
  19,656.30
  69,823.37
  507,398.62
Timber-sale stumpage  27,363,989.10
Timber-sale cruising and advertising-
Timber royalties	
Grazing permits and fees-
Forest-protection tax	
Miscellaneous  _
337,354.74
2,436,224.52
135,743.18
553,267.85
175,974.84
$31,957,484.63
Ten-year
Average
$372,334.20
18,171.58
68,451.65
373,103.14
21,314,559.23
251,415.95
2,129,285.47
82,511.08
C1)
122,797.12
$24,732,629.42
i Formerly credited to Forest Protection Fund.
(145)
FOREST SERVICE EXPENDITURES, FISCAL YEAR 1962/63 1
Forest District
Salaries
Expenses
Total
$615,444.56
460,051.23
531,135.85
653,463.08
524,984.07
606,385.50
$204,412.31
140,978.67
126,968.28
175,501.57
109,915.69
357,717.00
$819,856.87
601,029.90
658,104.13
Kamloops
828,964.65
634,899.76
964,102.50
Totals 	
$3,391,464.29
$1,115,493.52
$4,506,957.81
575.104.50
617,337.69
210,108.82
101,372.18
106,173.28
12,500.00
28,355.79
967,787.05
2,654,684.86
3,542,362.00
390,028.05
1,077,291.61
1,373,206.44
56,545.23
19,510.36
Peace River power timber salvage	
622,385.89
$16,861,711.56
2,552.33
Special Warrant No. 12            _    .
5,582.00
$16,869,845.89
1 These are all true gross expenditures.
2 Statement provided elsewhere.
 I
REPORT OF FOREST SERVICE,  1963 121
(146) SCALING FUND
Surplus, April 1, 1962      $146,543.88
Collections, fiscal year 1962/63     1,289,501.80
$1,436,045.68
Expenditures, fiscal year 1962/63     1,287,323.99
Surplus, March 31, 1963      $148,721.69
Collections, nine months, April to December, 1963       919,863.61
$1,068,585.30
Expenditures, nine months, April to December, 1963        981,887.36
Surplus, December 31, 1963        $86,697.94
(147) GRAZING RANGE IMPROVEMENT FUND
Deficit, April 1, 1962    $18,930.61
Government contribution (section 13, Grazing Act)     58,188.69
$39,258.08
Expenditures, fiscal year 1962/63     56,545.23
Deficit, March 31, 1963  $17,287.15
Government contribution (section 13, Grazing Act)     67,871.59
$50,584.44
Expenditures, nine months, April to December, 1963    29,634.31
Surplus, December 31, 1963  $20,950.13
 122 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, FORESTS, AND WATER RESOURCES
(151) DISTRIBUTION OF PERSONNEL, 1963
Personnel
Vancouver
Prince
Rupert
Prince
George
Kamloops
Nelson
Victoria
4
8
2
3
2
	
12
90
2
37
2
4
3
29
2
1
7
5
83
13
37
1
53
4
3
36
22
118
6
22
2
47
13
28
2
14
34
Total
Continuously Employed
Deputy Minister, Chief Forester, and Assistant Chief
Foresters _
Division Foresters-
Directors of Grazing and Public Information..
Forest Counsel and Personnel Officers	
District Foresters and Assistant District Foresters-
Foresters and Foresters-in-training _ _ —
Agrologists and Agrologists-in-training	
Engineers and Enginers-in-training.  	
Forest Protection Officers -   —
Supervisors of Rangers-
Rangers—Grades 1 and 2 — _
Superintendent of Scaling and Assistants.
Scalers, Official	
Scalers, Official, temporary _ _	
Comptroller, Accountant, and Audit Assistants..
Engineering, Mechanical and Radio.
Technical Forest and Public Information Assistants.
Reforestation, Research, and Survey Assistants	
Nursery Superintendents  _ 	
Draughtsmen and Mapping Assistants _	
Clerks, Stenographers, and Messengers._
Superintendent and Foremen, Forest Service Marine
Station  _   	
Mechanics, Carpenters, and Technicians .
Launch Crewmen    .'_	
Assistant and Acting Rangers .
Dispatchers..
Cruisers, Compassmen, and Silviculture Crewmen .
Truck, Tractor, and Equipment Operators 	
Foremen    	
Miscellaneous  _ _ 	
Totals, continuous personnel 	
Seasonally Employed
Assistant and Acting Rangers —   _
Patrolmen    — _ _
Lookoutmen    _	
Dispatchers, Radio Operators, and Clerks -
Fire-suppression Crewmen .
Reforestation—Snag-falters, Planters, etc.
Cruisers and Compassmen..
Iruck, Tractor, and Equipment Operators. —	
Student and Survey Assistants and Engineering Aides
Silvicultural Crewmen  	
Foremen    	
Miscellaneous  _
Totals, seasonal personnel 	
Totals, all personnel   	
2
13
3
3
34
11
78
58
~4
6
5
99
4
18
42
16
29
6
1
1
38
11
52
12
19
2
11
2
2
20
2
3
4
26
3
7
33
12
41
1
433    |    175
1
20
3
1
11
2
13
2
2
3
29
3
5
11
1
5
31
37
12
64
1
3
2
228
9
2
28
4
25
4
5
1
2
3
35
2
14
5
1
3
29
4
6
15
1
5
29
52
19
58
249
1
4
33
1
60
10
2
12
141    |     41    |    118    |    129
574    I    216    I    346    |    378
2    I
40
111
300
52
189    |      616
190
_____
184
3
15
84
497
4
8
2
3
10
153
9
37
14
14
141
22
82
63
7
106
82
57
4
58
325
6
32
27
211
72
220
24
38
59
1,890
20
14
160
27
152
225
10
42
185
5
33
164
1,037
1,113    I  2,927
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1964
1,560-164-3439
  

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