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ANNUAL REPORT of the MOTOR-VEHICLE BRANCH FOR THE YEAR 1961 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1963

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
ANNUAL REPORT
of the
MOTOR-VEHICLE
BRANCH
FOR THE YEAR
1961
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1963
  L
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C, C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Annual Report of the Motor-
vehicle Branch for the year 1961.
R. W. BONNER,
A ttorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., December, 1962.
  REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT
OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1961
The Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C., B.A., LL.B.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Motor-vehicle
Branch for the year 1961.
The Motor-vehicle Branch is charged with the administration of the Motor-
vehicle Act. It encompasses the issuance of licences for motor-vehicles and drivers,
and the control of those licensed to drive. This Report tells of the growth and
activity in both of these spheres of work.
The Superintendent of Motor-vehicles is the licensing authority under the
Department of Commercial Transport Act for the licensing of commercial vehicles,
with the responsibility to see that commercial vehicles are properly licensed in accordance with their gross vehicle weights, and that the vehicles meet the requirements of the Department of Commercial Transport Act. An additional function in
this sphere of work is the responsibility in connection with Uniform Vehicle Registration Proration and Reciprocity Agreement entered into between the Government
of this Province and the States of California, Colorado, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, South Dakota, North
Dakota, and Washington. The purpose of the proration agreement is to provide for
the licensing of commercial vehicles carrying on commerce between two or more
jurisdictions which are members of the agreement by obtaining from each jurisdiction a licence to operate on payment of a percentage of full licence fees in relation
to the percentage of mileage travelled in each jurisdiction. This agreement comes
into effect with the 1962 licence-year.
The Branch is continually faced with expanding demands for service. The
northern areas of our Province are attracting greater numbers of citizens, which has
resulted in the Branch allocating more time to servicing drivers' examinations in
those areas. It is inevitable that further changes will have to be made to again
increase service, but, unless additional staff is provided for this work, it can only be
done at the expense of driver-examination service in other parts of the Province,
notably in the Lower Mainland and the Vancouver Island areas.
The problem of inadequate facilities for this Branch in Victoria, which I mentioned in my 1960 Report, still exists. The time lapse of one year has only increased
the problem. I am particularly concerned about the inadequate storage facilities for
vital records. We are now at the stage where 50 per cent of motor-vehicle and
driver licence records are in office space which would quickly be destroyed should
we be so unfortunate as to have a fire. These records are not duplicated elsewhere,
and establishment of such vital things as vehicle ownership would present a very
great problem. A similar situation continues to exist with documents on deposit in
the Central Registry. There are thousands of chattel mortgages and conditional
sales contracts which are stored on open shelves. Great inconvenience to the public
would be encountered if these documents were destroyed. A microfilming programme is now under way in Central Registry, but this only covers newly filed documents, and it will be ten years at least before this programme is far enough advanced
to provide adequate security.
 D 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
This Report deals with the operation of the Branch under the following headings:—
1. Licences.
2. Accidents and Convictions.
3. Driving Safety.
(a) Safety Responsibility.
(b) Examination of Drivers.
(c) Drivers' Improvement Programme.
4. Encumbrance Registry Division.
5. School Buses.
6. Staff.
1. LICENCES
Licensed motor-vehicles in British Columbia in 1961 totalled 584,041, which
is an increase of 23,770 over the total of 560,271 in 1960, showing an increase of
4.2 per cent. Of this total, passenger motor-vehicles amounted to 467,370, an
increase of 4.8 per cent over the 1960 total of 446,050. Licensed commercial
motor-vehicles increased by 2.2 per cent from the 1960 total of 114,221 to 116,671.
The commercial-vehicle increase reverses a reduction encountered in 1960,
which was the first year of licensing commercial vehicles under the Department of
Commercial Transport Act. The new programme removed station wagons from the
commercial-vehicle category and classified them as passenger-vehicles. It is apparent also that the trucking industry has again commenced a programme of expansion,
which was momentarily stopped by the new licensing structure with higher licence
fees. This caused the curtailing of use of vehicles that were of marginal economic
value.
The number of trailers licensed in this Province continues to increase at a rapid
rate. The 1961 total was 53,109, which is 9 per cent above the 1960 total of 48,658.
It is significant to point out that in 1953 there were 18,205 licensed trailers. The
1961 total is 192 per cent over the 1953 volume. Undoubtedly the expansion in
trailer licensing and use will continue, with most of the impact being felt in the
increase in the house- and boat-trailer categories.
The table which follows is a comparison of licences and permits for motor-
vehicles, trailers, and chauffeurs issued by this Branch during the licence-years 1954
to 1961, inclusive:—
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961
D 7
Comparative Statement of Licences, Permits, etc., Issued during the
Licence-years 1954 to 1961, Inclusive
Licences Issued
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
Motor-vehicles—
34,441
241,720
44,269
259,212
52,950
288,700
50,990
320,737
43,576
349,761
49,268
370,154
45,364
400,686
48,348
419,022
276,161
303,481
341,650
371,727
393,337
419,422
446,050
467,370
11,248
80,558
15,845
86,252
17,827
91,016
15,685
100,432
11,676
106,190
12,985
108,956
9,603
104,618
10,576
Commercial (renewal) 	
106,095
91,806
102,097
108,843
116,117
117,866
121,941
114,221
116,671
367,967
405,578
450,493
487,844
511,203
541,363
560,271
584,041
Non-resident touring motor-vehicle
2,127
213
1,959
232
1,673
219
1,384
245
1,100
149
965
109
1,302
198
1,343
Non-resident  special  motor-vehicle
187
Non-resident commercial motor-vehi-
2,598
3,991
6,519
8,493
10,056
13,197
16,525
344
15,831
	
	
2,471
2,598
3,991
6,519
8,493
10,056
13,197
16,869
18,302
2,612
3,998
	
	
7,787
11,575
13,333
18,100
	
7,805
16,273
7,719
19,988
	
Tntals
2,612
3,998
7,787
11,575
13,333
18,100
24,078
27,707
Permits for temporary  operation of
810
829
983'
1,070
1,100
1,220
1,425
1,394
Motor-cycles—
470
3,274
532
3,233
536
3,188
602
3,112
577
3,464
678
3,450
603
3,477
652
3,587
3,744
3,765
3,724
3,714
4,041
4,128
4,080
4,239
1S.205
687
873
10
9
875
20,855'
691
883
10
5
843
24,581
722
995
12
7
947
29,663
724
979
11
6
908
34,928
730
925
15
7
919
43,682
755
970
31
19
1,024
48,658
748
989
40
16
1,008
53,109
Motor-dealers—
782
817
Original motor-cycle dealer licences —
Additional motor-cycle dealer licences
28
10
954
Transfers—
172,256
37,540
2,847
466
191,642
41,718
2,846
505
210,463
44,928
2,904
672
215,896
45,671
3,173
830
218,513
46,536
3,190
1,046
229,655
48,061
3,080
1,513
224,037
40,612
2,750
1,318
228,311
41,800
Motor-cycle 	
2,726
1,510
213,109
236,711'
258.967
265,570
269,285
282,309
268,717
274,347
Chauffeurs—
Original Class A	
4,541
4,001
43,486
668,319
4,627
4,011
48,406
939,920
9,690
4,978
4,243
59,443
630,112
13,166
5,251
4,269
65,159
805,528
13,123
5,207
4,112
61,556
639,269
12,785
5,295
4,485
64,359
328,115
13,018
5,368
4,756
65,209
887,170
12,297
5,518
4,925
64,446
1,493,937
Safety   responsibility  insurance   certifi-
12,523
Drivers' Licences
The rate of issuance of licences to new drivers continues at a steady pace.
During 1961 original licences were issued to 43,387 applicants, compared to the
1960 total of 43,878. Adult applicants amounted to 26,608, compared to 27,379
in 1960, and applicants under the age of 21 years totalled 16,779, compared to
16,499 in 1960.
The total number of licensed drivers in 1961 amounted to 689,077. Male
drivers comprised 69.7 per cent of the total in the amount of 480,265, leaving the
remaining 208,812 to be the number of licensed female drivers. The Branch handles the issuance of drivers' licences on a mechanical basis, which allows for the programme of advising licensees of the expiration of their five-year licences.   Another
 D 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
by-product is the ability to determine the number of licensed drivers in the various
age categories. The following table sets out the number of drivers in the several
age-groups and the percentage of drivers in each age-group compared to the total
number of licensed drivers:—
Drivers' Licences—Statistical Information by Age-groups
Age
Year of Birth
Number
Per Cent of
Total
16-20 years..
21-25
26-30
31-35
36-40
41-45
46-50
51-55
56-60
61-65
66-70
71-75
76-80
81-85
Over 85 years..
Totals..
1941-1945
1936-1940
1931-1935
1926-1930
1921-1925
1916-1920
1911-1915
1906-1910
1901-1905
1896-1900
1891-1895
1886-1890
1881-1885
1876-1880
1875 and prior
50,203
73,592
89,171
92,312
88,369
75,798
69,245
52,441
36,048
24,896
17,134
12,245
5,948
1,480
195
689,077
7.29
10.68
12.94
13.40
12.82
11.00
10.05
7.61
5.23
3.61
2.49
1.78
0.86
0.21
0.03
100.00
Chauffeurs' Licences
The comparative statement printed on the previous page shows the number of
licensed chauffeurs. Licensed chauffeurs in 1960 amounted to 74,889, which is a
decrease of 444 from the 1960 total of 75,333. The decrease is entirely due to the
licensing of less chauffeurs in the Class C category. When it is considered that there
were more licensed commercial vehicles in 1961 than in 1960, it seems only reasonable that there should be more licensed drivers in the Class C category, which is the
one assigned to drivers of vehicles which carry goods. It is apparent that the enforcement agencies need to keep a closer surveillance on the matter of chauffeurs being
properly licensed. Obviously there are many persons in this category who are not
complying with the law.
The Class A chauffeur is the operator of a vehicle which carries passengers for
hire with a passenger capacity of over nine passengers. The Class B chauffeur's
licence allows the holder to operate a passenger-carrying vehicle which does not
exceed nine passengers. A very large percentage of Class B licence-holders are
taxi-drivers. The holder of a Class A or a Class B licence can operate without additional licences as an operator of a truck transporting goods.
Distribution of Motor-vehicles
The distribution of motor-vehicles in British Columbia by the areas in which
they were licensed is set out in the following table. It is pointed out that this distribution does not indicate that the figure is an accurate total of the number of vehicles
in any given area because it frequently occurs that a vehicle licensed in one licence
area moves to another during the course of a licence-year. The table does provide
a reasonable guide as to the distribution generally throughout the Province. This
type of information has been sought for a number of years by those charged with
community planning projects.
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961
Distribution of Motor-vehicles
D 9
The following table shows a summary of motor-vehicle licences issued during
the 1961 licence-year by centre:—
Issuing Office
Passenger Motor-vehicles
Commercial Motor-vehicles
Grand
Used
New
Renewals
Total
Used
New
Renewals
Total
Total
Abbotsford.	
102
72
16
2
27
246
17
297
296
445
128
436
62
117
645
9
367
40
250
18
203
38
19
49
42
113
210
1,003
320
52
186
74
30
367
65
21
84
33
26
52
39
23
119
1,937
937
671
22
139
1,161
79
444
413
26
71
520
8
500
396
349
96
412
400
152
298
2
185
94
688
2
591
249
25
37
313
716
425
3,450
1,947
56
621
55
143
793
321'
23
124
56
9
139
143
160
501
8,104
3,528
4,837
42
507
3,420
251
5,454
5,859
819
27
700
9,270
660
13,686
7,228
4,668
1,720
3,459
6,381
1,129
2,812
574
1,716
1,590
7,084
231
7,185
2,083
753
1,161
3,026
9,896
6,693
52,526
15,695
1,837
6,595
514
3,041
6,838
2,639
736
2,242
1,207
850
2,305
1,420
1,510
5,311
64,451
38,018
28,381
849
6,815
67,121
2,257
6,000
6,344
861
29
798
10,036
685
14,483
7,920
5,462
1,944
4,307
6,843
1,398
3,755
585
2,268
1,724
8,022
251
7,979
2,370
797
1,247
3,381
10,725
7,328
56,979
17,962
1,945
7,402
643
3,214
7,998
3,025
780
2,450
1,296
885
2,496
1,602
1,693
5,931
74,492
42,483
33,889
913
7,461
71,702
2,587
34
4
4
7
23
17
8
52
9
129
32
280
6
102
405
159
14
75
4
30
2
2
14
4
10
43
77
5
11
24
160
4
109
5
41
18
4
13
11
8
5
72
65
12
21
25
44
37
225
90
29
7
37
215
24
269
112
131
70
277
no
67
301
4
116
61
311
3
128
32
12
44
84
150
144
379
98
55
168
45
18
342
51
17
82
80
6
64
84
93
91
997
1,003
256
36
220
959
139
2,102
1,212
460
48
587
3,169
544
4,264
1,855
1,950
1,150
2,075
1,833
632
2,172
266
1,151
1,022
3,074
154
2,356
351
447
610
1,059
2,616
2,813
7,753
2,543
887
2,013
721
787
3,319
858
399
1,411
491
184
1,313
1,053
885
1,140
10,871
6,762
2,381
807
3,223
14,627
1,695
2,361
1,306
493
62
647
3,401
576
4,585
1,976
2,210
1,252
2,632
1,949
801
2,878
270
1,426
1,097
3,460
161
2,514
385
461
668
1,147
2,776
3,000
8,209
2,646
953
2,205
926
809
3,770
914
416
1,534
589
194
1,390
1,148
986
1,236
11,940
7,830
2,649
864
3,468
15,630
1,871
8,361
7,650
Ashcroft 	
Atlin       	
1,354
91
1,445
Chilliwack	
13,437
1,261
19,068
9,896
7,672
3,196
Dawson Creek	
6,939
8,792
2,199
Fort St. John...
6,633
Ganges	
855
3,694
2,821
Kamloops	
11,482
412
10,493
Kitimat 	
2,755
1,258
Merritt	
1,915
4,528
Nanaimo 	
Nelson 	
New Westminster i
North Vancouver2
13,501
10,328
65,188
20,608
2,898
9,607
1,569
4,023
11,768
3,939
1,196
3,984
1,885
1,079
Revelstoke     ,	
3,886
Smithers	
2,750
2,679
Trail	
7,167
86,432
50,313
36,538
1,777
10,929
87,332
4,458
Vancouver East4-
Vancouver-Pt. Grey4-
Vanderhoof  .
Totals	
11,706
36,642
419,022
467,370
2,240
8,336
106,095
116,671
584,041
1 New Westminster (includes issuance at Haney, a temporary office at Burnaby during rush period, and mailorder issuance to New Westminster area from Victoria):   Passenger, 57,613;   commercial, 8,366.
2 North Vancouver (does not include 967 commercial plates issued for National Defence vehicles that operate throughout British Columbia):   Passenger, 17,962;   commercial, 1,679.
3Pouce Coupe (does not include 232 commercial plates issued for National Defence vehicles that operate
throughout British Columbia):  Passenger, 643;  commercial, 694.
4 Vancouver, Vancouver East, and Vancouver-Point Grey (includes issuance from Motor Licence Offices at
1730 West Georgia Street, 2410 Nanaimo Street, and 6237 West Boulevard, and mail-order issuance to Vancouver
area from Victoria; does not include issuance at North Vancouver; issuance at Sechelt and Squamish, which
account through Vancouver, has been deducted):   Passenger, 162,719;  commercial, 23,285.
5 Victoria (does not include mail-order issuance to other areas; in addition to these totals, 1,054 passenger
and 3,721 commercial plates were issued for Provincial Government vehicles and 372 commercial plates were
issued for National Defence vehicles which operate throughout British Columbia): Passenger, 50,196; commercial, 7,667.
 D 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Mail-order Issuance
The Motor-vehicle Branch office in Victoria has a section which handles the
mail-order issuance of licences. A considerable number of citizens throughout the
Province use this service in preference to going to the local mo tor-vehicle office.
It is of interest to note that the use of mail-order service has dropped slightly over
the last few years, which is a change the Branch hoped to achieve in the establishment of more licence offices throughout the Province. However, it is inevitable that
there will always be those who will desire to use this form of service. There follows
a synopsis of the mail-order issuance for the 1961 licence-year:—
Mail-order Synopsis, January 1,1961, to February 28,1962
Vancouver
New
Westminster
Vancouver
Island
and
Islands
Balance
of
Province
Out of
Province
Totals
Passenger plates  	
Provincial Government passenger plates „
Commercial plates - __  	
Provincial Government commercial plates
Farm vehicle "A" plates  	
Farm tractor " F " plates 	
Quarterly " T " plates    	
Motor-cycle plates ..      	
National Defence " N " plates  ._
Section 7 " X " plates	
Totals   	
4,603
1,054
298
3,721
6
2
3
26
372
187
10,272
13,865
1,079
29
566
634
33
1
2
123
1,485
396
5
7
6
22
117
807
27
43
1
30
444
793
2,038
5,707
113
205
25,055
1,054
2,818
3,721
39
59
11
109
372
1,439
34,677
Revenue
The Motor-vehicle Branch, through the issuance of licences, permits, and other
services during the 1961 licence-year (March 1, 1961, to February 28, 1962),
collected a total of $20,281,425.05, which is an increase of $1,506,291.77 over
the revenue collected during the 1960 licence-year, which amounted to $18,755,-
133.28 or 8.3 per cent. The actual increase in motor-vehicle revenue was
$766,103.37, which is 4.1 per cent. The remainder of $780,188.40 was the
amount of Social Services Tax Act collections made by this Branch on the sale of
motor-vehicles. This programme of social services tax collection commenced July
1, 1961, and it is now required that this Branch be satisfied the appropriate 5-percent tax is paid prior to the acceptance of a licence transfer. The Branch does not
collect tax on sales made by licensed dealers, who continue to make their remittances
of tax collections directly to the Department of Finance.
Motor-vehicle Branch licence offices collected revenue in the amount of
$13,740,560.58, which amounts to 67.75 per cent of the total revenue collected
from motor-vehicle licences and other services. The remainder of the revenue,
32.25 per cent of total collections, was made by the various government agencies
of the Department of Finance which carry out licensing service in areas of the
Province not served directly by offices of this Branch.
The following are the locations of Motor-vehicle Branch offices, with the 1961
revenue collection for each noted:—
Vancouver (Georgia Street)      $3,119,153.75
Victoria       2,693,041.46
New Westminster       1,995,878.84
Vancouver East       1,800,425.65
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961       D 11
Vancouver-Point Grey  $972,594.21
Cloverdale   657,890.06
North Vancouver   535,768.11
Chilliwack   495,221.18
Kamloops   436,635.95
Dawson Creek  342,500.43
Abbotsford   308,183.16
Trail   220,057.73
Mission   163,210.05
Total    $13,740,560.58
Refunds
The number of licences in various forms which are not further required by the
licensee, and which are surrendered to this Branch, continues to grow. During 1961,
11,096 refunds were made, causing payments of $180,399.44. This compares to
the 1960 figure of 10,084 refunds for a total of $153,240.10.
Refunds are divided into various categories, as follows:—
(1) Drivers' Licences.—It was the policy, when the five-year licence programme was developed in 1951, that licensees could obtain refunds of the
unused portions of their licences if they left the Province or ceased driving.
In the case of the deceased, licence refunds were available to the estates.
(2) General Refunds.—This category concerns cases where licence fees are
collected in error in excess of the proper fee. It also covers instances
where, through some error, two licences are obtained for a vehicle. In
other instances, improper fees are collected on driver's licence issuance,
particularly in the under-21 category where the fee varies according to
the age of the applicant.
(3) Relinquishments.—This category covers motor-vehicle licences which are
surrendered as a result of the vehicles being burned, damaged beyond
repair, or removed from the Province.
(4) Seasonal Refunds.—For many years the Motor-vehicle Act has provided
for the refunding of licence fees for vehicles of owners who lived east of
the Cascades, provided the owners surrendered their licences in October,
November, or December. This policy goes back to the time when winter
conditions restricted the use of vehicles in that part of the Province east
of the Cascades. The provision has not been removed from the Motor-
vehicle Act despite the fact that better vehicle and highway engineering
reduces the validity of it.
(5) Refunds on Transfers.—This is a new provision as a result of the Department of Commercial Transport Act. It provides that when a vehicle with
an annual licence fee in excess of $50 is transferred, the transferor is
entitled, providing the licence-plates are surrendered, to a fee return of
the unexpired quarters of his licence. There is good reason for this type
of a refund in that when the subsequent owner purchases a vehicle in this
category, he may have a different type of use than the original owner,
resulting in a different gross vehicle weight and a different rate for the
licence fee.
 D  12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The following table sets out the number of refunds and the amounts of money
refunded for the 1961/62 fiscal year:—
Type of Refund
Driver's   	
Number
2,053
1,451
6,284
956
344
8
$9,405.41
21,164.84
Amount
$7,149.00
General—
Motor-vehicle Act—passenger	
Department of Commercial  Transport Act—commercial	
1,015
436
Relinquishments—
Motor-vehicle Act—passenger	
Department of Commercial Transport Act—
Regular commercial	
Farm commercial     	
30,570.26
5,194
1,046
44
$30,712.54
38,124.52
528.74
Seasonals—
Motor-vehicle Act—passenger	
Department of Commercial Transport Act—■
Regular commercial      	
69,365.80
414
470
72
$2,373.76
20,567.54
1,182.26
Farm commercial       _    '
Transfers, Department of Commercial
Transport Act—
Regular commercial         -
24,123.56
250
94
$47,497.75
1,653.50
Farm commercial ■•■   •     	
Dealers                    -
49,151.25
39.57
Totals
11,096
$180,399.44
Total under Motor-vehicle Act     _
8,684
2,412
$49,680.28
Total under Department of Commercial Trans-
nort Act                 _.    _                    .
130,719.16
Totals   	
11,096
$180,399.44
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961       D  13
■    '
2. ACCIDENTS AND CONVICTIONS
Motor-vehicle Accidents
The following table gives a summary of the accident frequency during the period
1953 to 1961:—
Motor-
vehicles
Registered
Number
of
Accidents
Accidents
per 1,000
Vehicles
Registered
Injuries
Deaths
Deaths
per
10,000
Vehicles
Registered
Average
Property
Damage
Deaths
per 100
Million
Miles
Fatal
Accidents
Fatal
Accidents
per 100
Million
Miles
1953	
1954     _ .
345,005
367,967
405,578
450,493
487,844
506,398
536,120
566,144
589,917
22,096
22,425
22,030
24,905
25,976
24,583
25,536
26,091
27,203
63.05
61.05
55.10
55.34
53.24
48.54
47.63
46.08
46.11
7,737
7,582
8,263
9,700
9,521
9,814
10,541
11,311
12,101
208
211
225
316
252
282
309
294
320
5.9
5.7
5.6
7.0
5.1
5.5
5.7
5.2
5.4
$322.59
325.67
392.79
437.05
482.76
480.72
478.79
474.78
475.08
8.49
7.38
7.51
9.03
6.70
7.01
7.55
6.73
7.07
183
181
194
272
224
246
268
253
272
7.47
6.33
1955
1956	
1957
1958...	
6.47
7.77
5.96
6.12
1959	
6.55
1960	
5.79
1961	
6.01
The toll of motor-vehicle accidents continues to grow. During 1961 reportable
accidents totalled 27,203, which is a 4-per-cent increase from the 1960 total of
26,091. Increases were also noted in the number of fatal accidents and the number
of persons killed. Fatal accidents totalled 272, which is an 8-per-cent increase from
the 1960 total of 253. The number of persons killed during 1961 reached a higher
total than in any previous year, amounting to 320 deaths, compared to 294 in 1960,
or a rate of increase of 9 per cent.
The preceding table provides figures to show the number of deaths per 100
million miles travelled and the number of fatal accidents per 100 million miles travelled. Both of these rates are righer than the rate in 1960. It altered a trend of
lowering rates noted in 1960, hopefully thought to be the result of better driving,
better vehicles, better highway conditions, and other factors. It is apparent that it
is not the condition of the vehicle or the highway which is at the root of our problem. No one will say that there has not been a considerable improvement in these
factors. It is apparent from the record that the difficulty lies in the driving habits of
the motorist, which showed a deterioration during 1961. It is the group of drivers
who contribute to motor-vehicle accidents that the Motor-vehicle Branch attempts
to deal with in its driver-licence control programme. Information about this programme is contained in a later section of this Report.
Accidents—
1960   26,091
1961   27,203
Injuries—
1960
1961
Deaths—
1960
1961
Increase of 4 per cent.
Increase of 7 per cent.
11,311
12,101
294
320
Property damage
1960 	
1961 	
Increase of 9 per cent.
Increase of 4 per cent.
$12,387,591.72
12,923,663.97
The tables following set out accident statistics for the various cities, municipalities, villages, and districts of British Columbia for 1960 and 1961.
 D  14
CITIES
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in
Place of Occurrence
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
I960
196.1
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1960
1961
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1960
1961
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1
	
Per Cent
— 100.0
— 100.0
— 100.0
—60.0
—100.0
—33.3
—66.7
— 100.0
1
Per Cent
— 100.0
18
29
5
49
16
22
34
12
1
1
3
Per Cent
61.1
36.1
-44.8
4.8
70.0
-53.8
-50.0
59.1
— 100.0
—23.5
—33.3
—21.8
—26.3
16.7
— 14.1
52.6
18.4
47.3
—31.1
44.6
9.1
—86.7
—76.9
50.0
— 33.3
4.9
9.3
1
1
36
29
21
20
26
	
1
2
1
1
1
1
	
-100.0
—100.0
—50.0
— 100.0
—33.3
—66.7
1
6
	
	
1
1
44
2
51
15
78
19
334
156
38
49
55
45
56
44
15
13
2
48
3,467
26
418
24
70
39
10
61
14
388
134
58
58
81
31
81
48
2
3
3
32
3,634
26
457
24
1
1
5
2
1
1
4
2
2
2
3
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
3
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
3
3
3
3
2
2
—50.0
— 100.0
25.8
50.0
1
1
1
1      ..
Trail                           _       -	
32.0
50.0
31
41
31
39
4
6
1
4
6
1
541        711         31.5
531       67
26.4
5.1561  5.4261         34.1
MUNICIPALITIES
14
1
13
12
Per Cent
— 14.3
-100.0
—69.2
100.0
—50.0
100.0
200.0
100.0
150.0
—25.0
150.0
— 100.0
50.0
—100.0
-50.0
61.5
13
12
Per Cent
—7.7
— 100.0
—55.6
iooTo
—50.0
100.0
100.0
150.0
—50.0
300.0
-100.0
— 100.0
—40.0
30.8
677
14
130
6
127
106
36
910
22
104
2
140
96
38
5
33
27
106
131
95
26
2
145
23
2
8
26
301
191
20
78
34
650
6
145
Per Cent
34.4
57.1
—20.0
—66.7
10.2
—9.4
5.6
—37/7
—27.0
— 19.1
-4.4
17.3
— 16.1
4
4
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
4
2
1
3
2
5
3
5
I
2
1
5
2
4
1
53
37
131
137
81
31
154
33
1
1
1
1
1
-5.8
—30.3
100.0
— 13.3
22.9
14.4
-4,8
6.8
100.0
11.9
500.0
16.9
Oak Bay                            - -
1
1
1
9
2
3
1
6
2
3
30
245
167
21
73
17
581
1
124
6
2
1
6
6
2
1
5
13
21
13
17
1
1
Tnfalu
73
79
8.2
661       68
3.0
3.013! 3.366
11.7
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961       D  15
the Province for the Calendar Years 1960 and 1961
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damage
Increase
Increase
Increase
Increase
1960
1961
or(-)
Decrease
1960
1961
or (-)
Decrease
1960
1961
or(-)
Decrease
1960
1961
or (-)
Decrease
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
12
22
83.3
107
126
17.8
67
77
14.9
$32,532.34
$31,522.22
—3.1
2
10
14
40.0
7
9
28.6
2,329.35
4,879.17
109.0
26
34
30.8
195
181
-7.2
105
105
	
41,703.96
42,944.77
2.9
19
13
—31.6
100
96
—4.0
61
54
— 11.5
24,266.29
20,247.08
— 16.6
17
10
-41.2
109
131
33.3
61
69
13.1
24,623.16
30,073.43
22.1
14
22
57.1
171
228
33.3
88
122
38.6
35,931.77
52,653.21
46.5
19
11
—42.1
84
100
19.0
51
53
3.9
16,941.31
19,312.10
13.9
1
2
10
400.0
1
5
400.0
350.00
2,435.00
596.0
1
1
12
41
242.0
6
21
250.0
1,467.00
5,815.00
296.0
5
2
-60.0
32
27
— 15.6
20
15
—25.0
6,503.11
6,005.00
—7.7
7
4
—42.9
4
2
—50.0
1,890.00
400.00
—78.8
33
44
33.3
349
397
13.8
182
216
18.7
85,259.24
109,491.45
28.4
2
— 100.0
8
3
—62.5
6
2
-66.7
1,964.00
580.00
-70.5
37
28
—24.3
240
193
-19.6
135
108
-20.0
48,563.30
39,722.98
— 18.2
10
8
—20.0
82
86
4.9
46
50
8.7
13,858.46
17,982.50
29.8
49
44
— 10.2
360
366
1.7
201
195
—3.0
83,158.36
71,724.80
— 13.7
10
10
82
76
—7.3
44
42
—4.5
19,647.39
18,392.96
—6.4
224
278
24.1
1,840
1,891
2.8
927
962
3.8
407,406.80
417,578.00
2.5
116
99
-14.7
687
647
—5.8
366
334
—8.7
140,639.72
131,230.72
-6.7
31
41
32.3
229
228
—0.4
123
129
4.9
44,125.85
49,877.19
13.0
35
42
20.0
281
297
5.7
153
164
7.2
57,907.61
71,681.65
23.8
39
48
23.1
212
242
14.2
112
134
19.6
57,763.95
57,383.23
-0.7
33
21
— 36.4
157
127
— 19.1
89
72
— 19.1
44,177.45
32,325.42
-26.8
44
56
27.3
400
538
34.5
214
280
30.8
87,807.50
119,741.50
36.4
36
42
16.7
298
304
2.0
175
182
4.0
62,272.67
69,524.58
11.6
12
2
-83.3
52
40
—23.1
29
20
-31.0
11,475.00
7,061.00
—38.5
8
3
—62.5
40
42
5.0
23
25
8.7
10,298.90
8,588.00
-16.6
2
2
20
30
50.0
12
16
33.3
4,000.17
6,561.68
64.0
26
25
—3.8
172
146
— 15.1
97
85
— 12.4
44,059.81
31,685.35
—28.1
2,519
2,654
5.4
15,615
15,927
2.0
8,389
8,689
3.6
3,316,038.80
3,255,391.51
-1.8
17
25
-47.1
159
198
24.5
85
111
30.6
35,859.66
44,773.52
24.9
319
352
10.3
2,026
2,264
11.7
1,070
1,200
12.1
366,634.83
411,534.78
12.2
17
12
—29.4
64
93
45.3
40
52
30.0
14,394.20
21,327.49
48.2
3,732
3,954
5.9
24.202
25,093
3.7
12,989
13,600
4.7
$5,145,851.96
$5,210,447.29
1.3
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
438
568
29.7
3,134
3,498
11.6
1,652
1,825
10.5
$781,836.19
$855,176.76
9.4
11
15
36.4
53
79
49.1
37
49
32.4
17,117.78
17,976.31
5.0
65
56
— 13.8
335
281
— 16.1
215
182
— 15.3
108,415.94
129,263,12
19.2
1
2
100.0
2
7
250.0
1
3
200.0
2,100.00
2,225.00
6.0
94
86
—8.5
490
449
— 8.4
278
251
—9.7
114,559.80
147,159.96
28.5
55
60
9.1
225
270
20.0
158
181
14.6
96,841.58
168,860.44
74.4
28
29
3.6
169
244
44.4
99
135
36.4
46,284.63
50,574.46.
9.3
4
7
16
128.0
4
8
100.0
1,081.00
28,147.22
12,942.00
40,523.56
1,097.0
44.0
20
16
—20.0
72
87
20.8
52
60
15.4
20
21
5.0
116
172
48.3
64
90
40.6
34,570.63
45,996.12
33.1
77
74
—3.9
404
361
— 10.6
230
215
—6.5
108,379.16
112,142.20
3.5
90
74
— 17.8
439
415
-5.5
254
237
—6.7
136,788.09
119,021.97
— 13.0
45
60
33.3
261
307
17.6
147
179
21.8
66,355.55
84,643.48
27.6
15
17
2
13.3
101
63
6
—37.6
67
42
5
—37.3
38,633.92
19,017.73
1,925.00
141,236.29
— 50.8
110
92
— 16.4
621
571
-8.1
338
321
-5.0
138,516.70
2.0
22
22
	
159
146
— 8.2
89
85
-4.5
34,042.83
28,204.87
-17.1
	
2
	
3
7
133.0
2
5
150.0
1,700.00
2,410.00
41.8
5
9
32
255.0
5
18
260.0
1,567.87
36,840.44
8,493.28
35,836.97
442.0
24
18
—25.0
148
132
— 10.8
92
84
—8.7
—2.7
180
188
4.4
982
893
—9.1
538
501
-6.9
236,169.35
234,352.76
-0.8
121
138
14.0
630
738
17.1
377
426
13.0
157,479.73
166,899.21
6.0
13
12
-7.7
76
58
-23.7
48
39
— 18.8
20,858.90
21,095.81
1.1
40
36
— 10.0
189
156
— 17.5
115
102
— 11.3
72,241.31
61,963.77
-14.2
10
21
110.0
53
62
16.9
33
41
24.2
11,958.05
16,682.37
39.5
372
393
5.6
2,184
2,187
0.1
1,172
1,202
2.6
558,960.91
564,896.97
1.1
1
3
200.0
7
21
200.0
6
13
117.0
1,710.00
5,588,69
227.0
83
94
13.3
649
671
3.4
352
354
0.6
170,746.84
164,956.46
-3.4
1,935
2,108
8.9
11,518
11,929
3.6
6,425
6,653
3.5
$3,023,904.42
$3,260,065.56
7.8
 D 16
VILLAGES
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
Place of Occurrence
1960
1961
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1960
1961
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1960
1961
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1
1
Per Cent
—ioo.o
—M».0
— 100.0
—iooo
1
1
Per Cent
-100.6
9
3
1
24
1
2
18
4
Per Cent
167.0
—66.7
— 100.0
9
4
100.0
1
1
1
1
2
1
4
8
2
2
3
6
1
3
6
2
5
1'
5
1
4
2
1
200.0
1
1
1
1
-ioo.o
— 100.0
— 100.0
—25.0
—25.0
150.0
— 100.0
1
1
1
1
8
—37.5
4
10
1
8
— 100.0
1
1
—60.0
100.0
—87.5
1
4
300.0
6
9
5
17
— 16.7
1
1
88.9
1
1
1
1
8
4
2
9
4
1
1
3
12
12
4
3
1
50.0
— IOO.O
	
	
100.0
—66.7
—75.0
— 100.0
1
1
3
11
14
200.0
267.0
16.7
Swhf't
1
8
1
3
12
2
1
— 100.0
1
1
50.0
100.0
—66.7
1
1
1
1
11
2
4
15
28
5
6
154.0
150.0
Wnrfisld
— 100.0
—60.0
Totals   .
5
11
120.0
5
11
120.0
184
214
16.3
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961       D 17
Province for the Calendar Years 1960 and 1961—Continued
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damage
1960
1961
Increase
or (-)
Decrease
1960
1961
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1960
1961
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1960
1961
Increase
or (-)
Decrease
7
3
1
17
1
Per Cent
143.0
—66.7
— 100.0
33.3
150.0
97
17
5
19
27
2
24
13
11
92
2
17
21
126
8
5
6
4
32
2
23
26
18
89
15
15
33
12
32
11
6
32
25
11
10
8
50
38
3
61
18
18
7
10
23
19
84
3
4
32
22
17
145
16
4
47
Per Cent
29.9
—52.9
-68.4
18.5
50
10
3
10
42
17
1
14
8
9
46
1
11
12
67
6
3
3
55
18
1
13
13
13
46
9
10
16
8
18
8
4
21
15
7
Per Cent
34.0
—40.0
—70.0
30.9
5.9
—7.1
62.5
44.4
$15,308.47
2,662.00
420.00
5,312.21
$27,048.39
1,235.00
925.00
1,218.77
28,505.08
9,401.31
500.00
9,005.00
4,029.00
4,366.00
70,297.07
2,447.50
4,531.00
5,308.76
3,104.00
7,639.48
1,793.82
1,257.00
12,542.50
5,534.00
3,735.00
Per Cent
76.7
—53.6
120.0
2
11
4
—77.1
3
5,696.18
450.00
3,997.62
2,530.00
3,702.50
17,560.69
1,425.00
2,665.08
5,857.13
65.0
11.1
2
1
2
5
1
2
2
4
—4.2
100.0
63.6
-3.3
650.0
-11.8
57.1
—28.9
—50.0
23.1
19.0
— 8.3
— 100.0
233.0
—20.0
125.0
59.2
17.9
8
—25.0
100.0
100.0
-100.0
300.0
1
2
2
800.0
-9.1
33.3
—30.8
—33.3
71.7
70.0
— 9.4
1
5
1
4
2
1
3
8
—37.5
45
22
6
26
21
12
2
3
10
50
47
1
57
22
8
9
2
8
20
15
67
2
8
25
27
22
2
92
17
10
58
26
12
4
15
13
10
1
2
5
28
27
1
33
13
4
5
2
4
12
9
39
1
5
14
15
13
1
53
9
7
37
17,863.00
3,535.00
1,540.00
9,658.00
6,099.56
2,516.00
200.00
—57.2
—49.3
3
— 100.0
100.0
— 80.0
200.0
37.5
— 18.4
4
1
5
40.0
15.4
-30.0
-100.0
200.0
—20.0
3.6
-7.4
100.0
—9.1
—23.1
175.0
-20.0
350.0
— 100.0
8.3
33.3
23.1
100.0
—40.0
57.1
— 13.3
—23.1
— 100.0
50.9
11.1
—71.4
—29.7
29.9
—9.3
48.4
— 100.0
1
6
4
29
25
2
30
10
11
4
9
13
12
48
2
3
22
13
10
290.00
1,720.48
9,435.00
10,801.41
200.00
14,402.86
4,283.70
1,225.00
4,175.00
1,400.00
959.16
3,030.60
7,195.00
16,282.75
150.00
2,049.00
4,334.50
5,207.87
4,468.00
245.00
1,245.00
1,412.76
10,521.95
11,040.60
607.00
22,692.21
5,755.75
4,460.00
2,240.00
3,022.00
3,945.00
8,300.00
16,130.91
325.00
1,521.00
8,372.68
14,582.50
4,428.00
329.0
— 17.9
5
5
11
11.5
8
— 19.1
200.0
7.0
— 18.2
125.0
—22.2
400.0
— 100.0
15.0
26.7
25.4
50.0
-50.0
28.0
— 18.5
—22.7
— 100.0
57.6
-5.9
—60.0
— 18.9
2.2
203.0
7
7
57.6
3
— 100.0
100.0
—33.3
—50.0
— 100.0
200.0
150.0
20.0
— 100.6
233.0
100.0
—66.7
34.4
2
3
2
1
1
2
10
1
4
2
1
3
5
12
264.0
—46.3
115.0
-100.0
30.2
15.4
—0.9
11.7
—25.8
3
1
3
10
2
1
93.2
180.0
—0.9
— 100.0
8
2
3
11
13
4
4
62.5
100.0
— 100.0
—63.6
80
10
2
26
30,471.45
1,881.11
1,492.50
15,521.85
37,878.47
2,505.00
1,198.54
12,349.97
24.3
33.2
— 19.7
—20.4
139
156
12.2
1,133
1,260
11.2
654
725
10.9
$270,664.66
$378,958.02
40.0
 D 18
UNORGANIZED
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
Detachment
1960
1961
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1960
1961
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1960
1961
Increase
or (-)
Decrease
2
4
Per Cent
100.0
50.0
-50.0
— 100.0
—66.7
— 100.0
-66.7
-60.6
—33.3
300.0
150.0
-66.7
—50.0
—50.0
— 100.0
100.0
2
1
1
3
Per Cent
50.0
64
4
7
9
24
65
1
13
19
46
1
9
26
41
3
12
2
5
46
46
19
15
18
11
22
104
2
63
69
15
79
33
62
72
21
11
27
62
16
64
18
9
9
22
37
8
18
96
73
Per Cent
1.6
—75.0
1
3
85.7
1
2
1
3
200.0
111 0
91.7
— 100.0
-66.7
— 100.0
-66.7
—33.3
-50.0
300.0
400.0
—50.0
—50.0
1
18
27
3
13
800.0
2
1
1
1
1
1
44.4
51.9
2
2
—7.7
26
36
30
21
21
13
26
96
1
67
51
12
56
30
55
85
14
19
28
5
29
11
63
15
15
10
48
30
9
16
92
41
44
105
3
85
26
24
7
29
37
3
3
2
1
3
3
2
~~ 1
76.9
27.8
—36.7
—28.6
3
1
3
1
— 14.3
— 15 4
5
6
2
4
3
4
2
2
1
4
— 15.4
8.3
100 0
1
4
— 6 0
1
1
35.3
25 0
2
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
5
1
1
1
1
1
41.1
10.0
3
2
12.7
— 15.3
50 0
2
7
2
2
—50.0
— 100.0
—42.1
—3.6
100 0
2
4
2
4
100.0
113.0
45 5
4
2
4
2
2
4
100.0
-100.0
—ttXM)
200.0
200.0
1.6
    —100.0
20 0
— 100.0
200.0
200.0
— 100.0
—33.3
— 100.0
33.3
50.6
-ioo.o
-100.0
500.0
— 100.0
—40 0
1
1
2
3
6
1
1
1
2
— 10 0
3
4
1
—54.7
23.3
— 11 1
2
1
4
6
2
6
— 100.0
50.0
-66.7
— 100.0
16.7
— 100.0
12.5
6
6
2
6
6
4
8
6
2
7
4.3
78.0
44
98
15
45
13
24
7
34
9
—6.7
Kasl"
400 0
2
1
2
3
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
—47.1
—50.0
3
3
	
17.2
—75.7
1
1
-100.0
17
8
7
30
11
1
26
7
15
69
26
11
22
11
15
9
2
26
15
16
74
14
—35.3
175.0
4
1
1
1
57.1
—50.0
— 18.2
6
200.0
— 100.0
100.0
Merritt..     	
1
1
1
1
3
114.0
6.7
2
1
2
1
7.2
—46.6
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1961       D 19
Province for the Calendar Years 1960 and 1961—Continued
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damage
Increase
Increase
Increase
Increase
1960
1961
or(-)
Decrease
1960
1961
or(-)
Decrease
1960
1961
or(-)
Decrease
1960
1961
or(-)
Decrease
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
34
37
8.8
149
180
20.8
111
130
17.1
$62,226.45
$109,158.99
75.3
3
1
—66.7
4
7
75.0
4
6
50.0
1,325.00
3,005.00
127.0
4
8
IOO.O
40
28
—30.0
27
21
-22.2
20,505.00
11,534.00
—43.8
9
10
11.1
35
33
—5.7
24
25
4.2
15,031.62
18,703.00
24.4
12
22
83.3
73
94
28.8
60
67
11.7
43,440.00
46,255.68
6.5
1
	
6
6
100.0
3
5
66.7
1,175.00
2,200.00
87.2
1
4
300.0
24
37
54.2
16
26
62.5
7,892.24
20,191.53
156.0
12
14
16.7
89
94
5.6
60
61
1.7
29,512.55
34,705.08
17.6
15
27
80.0
71
90
26.8
52
66
26.9
34,414.10
37,022.75
7.6
2
1
-50.0
6
7
16.7
4
4
	
3,547.50
997.37
-71.9
9
8
2
— 11.1
79
38
4
—51.9
49
24
4
-51.0
23,110.85
16,311.00
1,200.00
—29.4
3
2
13
550.6
1
6
500.0
333.00
3,752.50
1,026.0
15
27
80.0
84
94
11.9
60
66
10.0
43,025.00
59,024.92
37.2
22
31
40.9
104
138
32.7
73
98
34.2
49,251.82
52,190.10
6.0
17
13
-23.5
99
75
—24.2
67
54
-19.4
34,353.50
29,601.18
— 13.8
14
11
—21.4
50
51
2.0
39
40
2.6
19,710.73
19,287.50
-2.1
10
15
50.0
55
79
43.6
35
56
60.0
23,009.83
27,206.40
18.2
7
5
—28.6
31
25
— 19.4
20
16
-20.0
16,676.02
10,434.96
—37.4
13
15
15.4
107
118
10.3
70
84
20.0
48,405.80
46,723.79
—3.5
64
64
288
344
19.4
197
204
3.6
84,255.03
126,797.71
50.5
1
2
100.0
11
3
—72.7
6
2
—66.7
1,327.00
850.00
—35.9
44
42
—4.5
161
178
10.6
111
115
3.6
67,158.55
65,744.13
—2.1
34
37
8.8
146
165
13.0
113
121
7.1
74,872.36
118,388.95
58.1
9
12
33.3
61
61
37
42
13.5
16,964.33
24,825.22
46.3
29
44
51.7
129
149
15.5
95
114
20.0
73,352.57
84,260.00
14.9
22
19
-13.6
74
64
-13.5
52
50
—3.8
28,004.55
30,249.09
8.0
29
32
10.3
146
160
9.6
102
112
9.8
97,167.60
77,124.40
-20.6
50
48
—4.0
178
177
—0.6
129
124
-3.9
68,390.52
56,860.07
— 16.9
8
15
87.5
27
50
85.2
20
37
85.0
12,390.00
17,101.50
38.0
11
8
—27.3
40
34
— 15.0
30
26
-13.3
20,307.86
16,437.00
— 19.1
15
17
13.3
75
67
— 10.7
56
54
—3.6
39,972.00
47,678.00
19.3
3
— 100.0
11
1
—90.9
9
1
—88.9
7,805.00
300.00
—96.2
22
35
59.1
112
141
25.9
86
99
15.1
82,481.90
175,432.97
113.0
10
9
-10.0
31
28
-9.7
22
20
-9.1
11,541.00
10,556.60
— 8.5
33
37
12.1
190
189
—0.5
128
125
-2.3
116,273.57
118,473.84
1.9
6
10
66.7
34
44
29.4
22
31
40.9
29,061.00
14,000.00
—51.8
10
7
—30.0
29
27
—6.9
22
20
-9.1
6,917.53
5,645.00
— 18.4
8
S
	
47
59
25.5
38
41
7.9
16,855.91
17,615.67
4.5
23
14
—39.1
108
111
2.8
77
78
1.3
48,673.00
55,743.58
14.5
22
24
9.1
100
92
—8.0
78
68
— 12.8
40,998.94
52,673.60
28.5
5
6
20.0
30
48
60.0
22
36
63.6
21,115.00
20,388.00
-3.4
6
11
83.3
71
53
—25.4
48
44
—8.3
35,410.00
25,954.00
—26.7
52
55
5.8
283
216
—23.7
183
152
-16.9
123,810.85
97,278.07
—21.4
29
43
48.3
154
178
15.6
110
132
20.0
128,087.53
94,170.50
—26.5
22
27
22.7
167
142
— 15.0
116
102
-12.1
66,609.33
70,028.88
5.1
60
53
— 11.7
259
284
9.7
196
208
6.1
146,299.11
127,133.55
— 13.1
3
8
167.0
22
26
18.2
13
20
53.8
6,575.00
18,237.50
177.0
50
28
—44.0
196
174
— 11.2
134
114
— 14.9
68,552.69
54,404.93
—20.6
12
6
—50.0
61
37
—39.3
46
32
—30.4
29,823.00
18,845.00
—36.8
12
16
33.3
92
84
— 8.7
58
58
28,755.06
33,612.42
3,800.00
16.9
5
4
-20.0
19
10
—47.4
13
8
—38.5
8,315.00
—54.3
20
20
.
96
103
7.3
66
69
4.5
36,619.61
47,028.65
28.4
17
9
-47.1
49
62
26.5
37
46
24.3
18,256.79
21,742.73
19.1
2
1
—50.0
1
1
500.00
130.00
25,185.75
—74.0
12.9
10
10
53
37
—30.2
40
30
-25.0
22,316.00
5
14
279.0
19
122
542.0
9
53
489.0
6,820.00
25,919.53
280.0
4
7
75.0
46
34
-26.1
28
26
—7.1
19,952.09
12,834.00
—35.7
13
11
-15.4
48
35
—27.1
39
29
-25.6
20,049.00
16,841.00
— 16.0
8
8
53
26
—50.9
38
20
-47.4
17,135.00
15,214.75
— 11.2
1
2
100.0
13
14
7.7
8
8
2,567.90
42,153.00
4,196.67
63.5
12
20
66.7
72
113
56.9
54
81
50.0
50,707.40
20.3
6
9
50.0
48
32
—33.3
37
24
-35.1
20,433.17
11,865.48
-41.9
11
8
—27.3
54
69
27.8
37
45
21.6
16,913.78
26,415.32
56.2
38
40
5.3
202
203
0.5
130
125
—3.8
76,869.86
68,510.56
— 10.9
14
7
— 50.0
44
37
— 15.9
33
29
— 12.1
126,178.00
16,383.36
— 87.0
 D 20
UNORGANIZED—Continued
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
Detachment
1960
1961
Increase
or (-)
Decrease
1960
1961
Increase
or (-)
Decrease
1960
1961
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1
1
Per Cent
— 100.0
50.0
50.6
— 100.0
—76.9
— 100.0
600.0
—50.0
— 100.0
— 100.0
— 100.0
200.6
— 33.3
— 100.0
— 100.6
1
1
Per Cent
-100.6
44
8
3
35
13
68
34
6
1
20
4
19
117
8
88
54
100
13
40
4
1
21
34
80
31
2
1
24
2
17
140
1
84
66
64
5
Per Cent
—9.1
1
1
—50.0
—66.7
1
2
1
2
—40.0
3
5
3
2
3
1
161.0
17.6
3
1
—8.8
—66.7
2
3
2
3
50.0
-100.0
—75.0
— 100.0
-40.0
400.0
—50.0
— 100.0
— 100.0
— 100.0
200.0
20.0
—50.0
6
13
3
6
1
3
2
12
2
— 10.5
3
3
19.7
— 87.5
6
1
3
4
5
1
3
3
1
3
1
—4.5
22.2
— 36.0
—61.5
1
7
1
5
38
2
21
7
22
11
11
29
31
14
8
38
18
1
33
9
18
23
14
32
29
20
12
29
—52.6
—50.0
3
1
3
1
57.1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
28.6
— 18.2
109.0
 	
27.3
10.3
1
1
3
2
3
1
2
1
1
2
1
3
1
2
—6.5
42.9
50.0
— 100.0
— 100.0
—23.7
1
1
	
16
18
12.5
2
1
3
10
499.0
— IOO.O
— 100.0
1
1
1
5
400.0
— 100.0
— 100.0
100.0
— 100.0
33.3
54
21
18
30
24
58
5
47
43
42
13
47
21
46
5
90
.1
—20.4
Trail                     .         	
100.0
—27.8
56.7
2
3
1
3
2
2
4
2
1
1
3
2
2
-12.5
—33.3
-100.0
33.3
-20.7
Wells
4
91.5
Totals                 	
162
159
—1.9
128
126
— 1.6
2,958
3,095
4.6
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961       D 21
Province for the Calendar Years 1960 and 1961—Continued
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damag
Increase
Increase
Increase
Increase
1960
1961
or(-)
Decrease
1960
1961
or(-)
Decrease
1960
1961
or(-)
Decrease
1960
1961
or(-)
Decrease
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
24
23
-4.2
123
98
—20.3
88
75
— 14.8
$62,613.97
$52,739.05
-15.8
5
4
—20.0
36
30
— 16.7
23
21
— 8.7
22,030.00
9,991.38
-54.6
2
1
—50.0
6
1
—83.3
5
1
—80.0
2,575.00
300.00
— 88.3
16
12
—25.0
56
75
33.9
44
52
18.2
22,494.52
25,119.07
11.7
10
19
90.0
40
66
65.0
32
48
50.0
18,649.00
36,579.22
96.1
45
50
11.1
337
320
—5.0
152
148
-2.6
66,017.81
69,871.30
5.8
25
19
-24.0
82
94
14.6
58
66
13.8
36,309.99
42,005.21
15.7
5
2
—60.0
21
7
-66.7
14
5
—64.3
6,155.00
3,850.00
—37.4
1
1
14
2
	
1
86
11
1
95
9
1
64
7
1
66
6
3.1
-14.3
30.00
43,483.41
2,405.00
1,000.00
46,034.01
1,875.00
233.0
14
10.5
— 18.2
5.9
3
—33.3
—22.0
10
12
20.0
34
57
67.6
25
42
68.0
13,680.00
17,180.00
25.6
60
86
43.3
380
478
25.8
255
303
18.8
133,600.16
177,564.17
32.9
2
1
—50,0
21
4
—81.0
16
3
— 81.3
10,320.00
520.00
—95.0
48
44
-8.3
180
180
124
133
7.3
95,763.19
126,583.15
32.2
31
33
47
6.5
— 19.0
134
230
147
235
9.7
2.2
103
174
103
160
55,249.16
105,947.00
48,809.76
101,302.57
— 11.7
58
—8.0
—4.4
8
1
—87.5
19
21
10.5
14
15
7.1
7,160.00
7,760.00
8.4
—36.8
4
82
— 100.0
11.0
3
62
65
— 100.0
4.8
3,400.00
— 100.0
19
12
91
43,096.75
42,738.44
—0.8
2
1
—50.0
6
5
-16.7
5
3
—40.0
3,495.00
560.00
-84.0
10
15
50.0
61
54
— 11.5
42
42
28,393.50
22,328.00
—21.4
4
8
100.0
41
26
—36.6
30
19
-36.7
20,691.23
12,311.65
—40.5
14
8
-42.9
42
56
33.3
33
42
27.3
18,584.76
21,517.65
15.8
8
9
12.5
32
37
15.6
20
27
35.0
14,726.00
17,992,12
22.2
7
9
28.6
29
35
20.7
23
27
17.4
15,440.00
23,666.27
53.3
17
17
74
98
32.4
45
61
35.6
22,475.33
30,759.03
36.9
19
18
-5.3
99
127
28.3
67
85
26.9
36,833.35
44,020.13
19.5
8
12
50.0
60
64
6.7
44
49
11.4
19,046.29
23,962.42
25.8
6
10
66.7
28
48
71.4
21
37
76.2
11,132.00
20,458.95
83.8
18
20
11.1
91
76
— 16.5
60
60
34,019.88
34,150.12
0.4
57.1
5
57
2
48
—60.0
-15.8
3
37
2
31
—33.3
— 16.2
1,900.00
42,780.73
875.00
15,268.26
— 53.9
7
11
—64.3
2
— 100.0
1
— 100.0
174.00
— 100.0
35
23
—34.3
172
137
—20.3
119
98
— 17.6
84,647.83
76,032.72
— 10.2
16
23
43.8
115
108
—6.1
73
72
-1.4
35,956.87
46,348.10
28.9
8
11
37.5
27
35
29.6
19
27
42.1
13,590.00
13,640.00
0.4
21
33
57.1
138
162
17.4
80
91
13.8
27,791.23
39,903.40
43.6
14
12
—14.3
66
54
— 18.2
48
37
-22.9
34,270.99
53,261.00
55.4
37
25
—32.4
161
120
—25.5
113
80
-29.2
82,957.15
45,386.38
—45.3
5
2
—60.0
29
31
6.9
21
19
—9.5
12,304.24
7,402.03
—39.8
29
46
1
58.6
225
245
2
8.9
154
167
1
8.4
123,147.34
138,836.41
600.00
12.7
1,738
1,858
6.9
8,702
9,074
4.3
6,023
6,225
3.4
$3,947,170.68
$4,074,193.10
3.2
 D 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961       D 23
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1961—Continued
HOUR OF OCCURRENCE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
12 to   1a.m..
1 to   2 a.m..
2 to   3 a.m..
3 to
4 to
5 to
6 to
7 to
8 to
4 a.m...
5 a.m...
6 a.m...
7 a.m..
8 a.m. .
9 a.m...
9 to 10 a.m. .
10 to 11 a.m...
11 to 12    m...
12 to   1 p.m.-
1 to   2 p.m...
2 to   3 p.m.-
3 to   4 p.m.-
4 to   5 p.m..
5 to   6 p.m.~
6 to   7 p.m...
7 to   8 p.m...
8 to   9 p.m...
9 to 10 p.m.-
10 to 11p.m...
11 to 12 p.m.-
Not stated	
1,020
750
604
335
274
176
247
862
1,290
841
1,020
1,160
1,067
1,241
1,431
1,810
2,497
2,544
1,516
1,805
1,341
1,066
1,018
1,273
15
14
19
15
3
5
5
3
1
11
8
16
6
5
6
3
15
13
22
21
21
20
19
13
302
245
202
91
92
38
69
227
364
216
266
291
321
318
423
542
782
762
489
587
407
321
333
385
3
704
486
387
241
177
133
175
634
915
617
738
863
741
917
1,005
1,253
1,702
1,760
1,006
1,197
914
726
672
880
12
Totals -
27,203
272
8,076 18,855
DAY OF OCCURRENCE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Sunday	
2. Monday	
3. Tuesday- _
4. Wednesday....
5. Thursday	
6. Friday	
7. Saturday-	
8. Not stated	
Totals
3,680
3,077
3,247
3,368
3,696
4,691
5,442
2
58
23
28
36
28
42
57
1,160
857
930
982
1,081
1,389
1,677
2,462
2,197
2,289
2,350
2.587
3,260
3,708
2
27,203
272
8,076
18,855
4.            TYPE OF VEHICLES INVOLVED
Number of Vehicles Involved
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
40,760
5,674
298
324
73
185
28
10
4
271
78
2
1
3
2
2
11,652
1,500
139
111
20
149
6
1
28,837
2. Truck      	
4,096
3. Bus                                     . .    ~
157
4. Taxi                                           	
212
50
34
22
9
9. Not stated                           	
2
Totals                 	
47,356
359
13.578         I       33.419
5.                     RAILROAD CROSSINGS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
52
3
6
1
5
3
18
1
1
2
31
3
5
3
7. Not stated 	
Totals                               	
67
3
22
42
 D 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1961—Continued
MANNER OF COLLISION
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Angle collision   	
2. Head-on collision or head-on side-swipe..
3. "
4.
Rear-end collision-
Backed into other vehicle-
5. Side-swiped other vehicle going same direction .
6. Not stated  	
9,836
4,188
7,276
404
1,161
4,338
66
76
8
1
5
116
2,513
1,425
2,163
23
152
1,800
7,257
2,687
5,105
380
1,004
2,422
Totals.
27,203
272
8,076
18,855
DRIVERS INVOLVED, DESCRIPTION OF
Number of Drivers
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Male 	
2. Female	
3. Not stated -
Totals.
40,523
6,590
243
326
30
3
11,454
2,096
28
28,743
4,464
212
47,356
359
13,578
33,419
Age of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. 16 to 20 years	
2. 21 to 24 years	
3. 25 to 30 years	
4. 31 to 40 years	
5. 41 to 50 years	
6. 51 to 60 years	
7. 61 to 64 years	
8. 65 to 69 years	
9. 70 years and over .
5,436
5,497
7,495
11,130
9,023
5,319
1,504
728
934
58
47
58
67
64
39
11
4
1,633
1,626
2,074
3,235
2,567
1,464
431
235
279
3,745
3,824
5,363
7,828
6,392
3,816
1,062
489
647
Driving Experince
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
Less than 3 months .
3 to 6 months	
6 to 12 months	
1 to 4 years	
5 years and over	
Not stated	
874
582
396
8,929
36,290
285
9
4
1
64
275
6
296
178
124
2,578
10,368
34
569
400
271
6,287
25,647
245
Condition of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Normal	
2. Extreme fatigue .
3. Physical defect —
Confused by traffic -
Ability impaired	
Not known	
Not stated	
44,924
463
156
398
1,094
151
170
292
10
2
1
30
24
12,882
139
56
93
336
27
45
31,750
314
98
304
728
100
125
Licence of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
45,607
410
1,088
251
325
9
22
3
13,068
137
344
29
32,214
264
722
219
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961       D 25
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1961—Continued
ACTION OF DRIVER CONTRIBUTING
TO ACCIDENT
Number of Drivers
Total
,
Personal
Property
Injury
Damage Only
163
7,460
17,172
33
567
1,159
5
737
2,427
6
695
1,254
715
1,615
19
253
773
164
563
6
281
703
1
69
221
45
222
473
62
1,671
3,435
64
318
3
82
313
26
75
1
13
72
4
69
474
2
13
18
53
230
6
341
2,001
2
15
15
1
6
13
No improper driving. —
Driving off roadway . 	
Did not have right-of-way ..
Car standing in roadway (not parked)..
Following too close 	
On wrong side of road 	
Failing to signal
Through street—did not stop .
Passing at intersection - 	
Exceeding speed-limit —	
Careless driving 	
Cutting in _	
Car ran away..
Passing on curve or hill
Passing on wrong side —
Hit and run 	
Railroad—did not stop-
Cutting left corner	
Parked legally..
Driving through school zone.
Driving through safety zone -
Totals 	
24,795
1,759
3,169
1,955
2,330
1,045
727
990
291
740
5,168
382
398
101
86
547
33
283
2,348
32
20
47,199
359
13,516 33,324
TRAFFIC CONTROL
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. No control present-
2. Police officer	
3.
4.
5.
Automatic traffic signal.
Stop-signs
Warning-signs, slow-signs, etc. _
Totals	
19,857
286
3,713
2,432
760
227
1
16
11
17
5,750
78
1,226
704
252
13,880
207
2,471
1,717
491
27,048
272
8,010
18,766
10.
PEDESTRIANS INVOLVED, ACTIONS OF
Number of Pedestrians
Total
Personal
aa
Injury
1
89
13
171
11
163
10
191
5
90
5
93
17
83
5
88
41
2
22
7
2
6
4
10
12
3
81
10
Not known     -
Crossing at intersection—no signal -
In street, not at intersection   	
Coming from behind parked or moving vehicle .
Crossing at intersection with signal - 	
Crossing street diagonally, not at intersection	
Walking on or along highway 	
Playing in street
Crossing at intersection against signal -
Not on roadway  	
Getting on or off another vehicle	
Riding or hitching on vehicle	
Working on car or roadway	
Crossing intersection diagonally	
In pedestrian crosswalk -	
Standing on safety isle -
Totals         	
90
184
174
201
95
98
100
93
41
24
7
8
14
12
84
10
1,235
78
1,157
Condition of Pedestrian
Number of Pedestrians
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1. Apparently normal—
2. Extreme fatigue 	
3. Had physical defect .
4. Confused by traffic.—
5. Ability impaired	
6. Not known 	
7. Not stated 	
Totals
879
4
18
100
60
30
144
1,235
51
2
1
11
9
2
2
78
828
2
17
89
51
28
142
1,157
 D 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1961—Continued
11.
CLASSIFICATION OF
VICTIMS
Number of Victims
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1. Passengers -  	
6,093
4,587
1,235
331
131
11
33
125
108
78
6
3
5,968
4 479
1 157
4. Bicyclists
5. Motor-cycle
6. Others (pers
7. Motor-cycle
8. Not stated
325
128
ons in horse-drawn vehicles
etc.)  	
11
33
Totals
12,421
320
12,101
12.
NATURE OF INJURIES
Number of Victims
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1. Slight shock and shake-up-
2. Fractured skull	
3. Fractured spine 	
4. Other fractures 	
Other injuries (sprains, dislocations, etc.)..
Internal injuries   	
Concussion of brain.    	
5.
6.
7.
8. Severe general shock with bruises and cuts .
9. Cuts by glass (only)  	
10. Drowned -	
11. Burned—   - 	
12. Asphyxiated-
13. Not stated	
Totals ...
3,636
207
56
1,277
6,617
298
187
68
42
22
7
4
1
89
19
68
111
1
3
22
2
4
3,635
118
37
1,209
6,617
187
186
65
42
12,421
320 12,101
13.                       LIGHT CONDITIONS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
15,761
8,224
1,493
1,337
331
57
111
127
13
12
9
4,562
2,496
476
392
130
20
11,088
5,601
3. Artificial light—good  	
4. Dusk or semi-darkness — 	
1,004
933
192
37
27,203
272         1         8.076
18,855
14.
PROPERTY DAMAGE.—Amount of property damage for period covered by this report,  $12,923,663.97;
amount for same period last year, $12,387,591.72.
15.
CONDITION OF VEHICLES
INVOLVED
Number of Vehicles
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Apparently good 	
2. No chains (slippery road).
3. Brakes defective —
4. Steering mechanism defective..
5. Head-lights dim .  	
6. Puncture or blow-out	
7. Head-lights out (both) —
8. Tail-light out or obscured	
9. Glaring head-lights.
10. Head-light out (one light)..
11. Other defects. —
12. Not stated  	
Totals
44,731
808
636
197
86
260
120
172
39
50
203
54
47,356
329
6
8
2
4
1
2
2
1
2
2
359
12,860
154
163
80
32
83
39
59
16
11
61
20
13,578
31,542
648
465
115
50
176
79
111
23
38
140
32
33,419
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961       D 27
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1961—Continued
DIRECTION OF TRAVEL
Number of Vehicles
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Going straight  -
2. Turning left  	
3. Turning right  	
4. Slowing down or stopping .
Backing (not to or from curb)..
Skidding-
Leaving curb (including backing).
Making U-turn	
Overtaking .
10. Stopping (not at curb or off paved strip)-
11. Overtaking on right side   	
12. Overtaking on left side 	
13. Avoiding object or pedestrian	
14. Not stated  	
Totals.
31,124
5,843
2,661
2,099
565
1,565
464
107
347
1,527
108
367
420
159
237
49
26
6
5
17
1
1
6
2
1
1
6
47,356
359
9,269
1,572
663
653
67
379
56
28
112
518
18
84
118
41
21,618
4,222
1,972
1,440
493
1,169
407
78
229
1,007
89
282
296
117
13,578
33,419
17.                           ROAD SURFACE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
13,337
9,752
2,402
625
845
77
165
157
76
22
9
5
3
4,222
2,899
499
188
178
17
73
8,958
6,777
1,881
4. Loose sand or gravel 	
428
662
60
7. Not stated                    	
89
Totals   	
27,203
272
8,076
18,855
18.                        ROAD CONDITION
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
24,265
360
234
219
120
1,890
115
234
6
1
6
1
23
1
7,276
101
59
69
44
488
39
16,755
253
174
4. Road under repair   - -
5. Obstruction not marked or lighted 	
6. Other	
144
75
1,379
75
Totals       	
27,203
272
8,076
18,855
19.                           TYPE OF ROAD
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
23,717
2,140
829
273
28
176
40
1
230         1         7.161
16,326
2. Gravel      	
26
8
5
2
1
539
255
55
4
46
16
1,575
566
4. Earth —	
213
5. Brick or cobble     —
6. Other     	
7. Not stated -	
24
128
23
Totals       	
27,203
272
8,076
18,855
 D 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1961—Continued
20.                   WEATHER CONDITIONS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Clear  	
2. Rain                                       	
15,539
6,513
2,725
880
1,116
88
342
171
47
29
9
10
2
4
4,697
1,925
827
255
231
36
105
10,671
4,541
3. Cloudy 	
4. Fog or mist    	
1,869
616
875
50
7. Not stated... .
233
Totals	
27,203
272
8,076
18,855
Motor-vehicle and motor-cycle licences issued to December 31,1960—557,262;
to December 31, 1961—577,844.
Convictions
An integral part of driving records in British Columbia is information about
convictions for driving offences, which convictions are recorded against the records
of the drivers involved. The Motor-vehicle Act requires that the Courts submit to
the Superintendent appropriate notices of all convictions of driving infractions under
the Criminal Code of Canada, the Motor-vehicle Act, and the Motor-vehicle Act
Regulations. The Courts are very conscientious in seeing that this information is
forthcoming, and I want to express my appreciation for this high degree of cooperation. This information plays a large part in the dealing with driving records
and assists in arriving at reasonable courses of action to take in controlling our problem drivers.
Convictions for driving offences in 1961 totalled 85,159, which is a 10-per-
cent decrease from the 1960 total of 94,978. My last Report spoke of an increase
in convictions noted in 1960 as compared to 1959, and caused the comment the
increase was in direct relation to the stepped-up enforcement programmes of the
various police departments. Similarly, I cannot help but feel the decrease in convictions in 1961 is a direct result of a lessening rate of enforcement. It may be that
here lies the reason for the increase in rates of accidents with subsequently more
fatalities and injuries. It does seem significant that when enforcement decreases,
the rate of offences increases.
The table which follows summarizes conviction reports received by the Motor-
vehicle Branch from 1958 to 1961.
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961       D 29
Convictions under Motor-vehicle Act and Criminal Code of Canada, 1958—61
Offences
1958
1959
1960
1961
Under Criminal Code of Canada—
Causing death by criminal negligence, sec. 192 -
Causing bodily harm by criminal negligence, sec. 193 _ -
Criminal negligence in operation of motor-vehicle, sec. 221 (1)..
Failing to stop after accident, sec. 221 (2) 	
Dangerous driving, sec. 221 (4)..
Driving motor-vehicle while intoxicated, sec. 222..
Driving motor-vehicle while ability impaired by alcohol or drugs,
sec. 223 	
Driving motor-vehicle while driver's licence under suspension, sec.
225 (3)
Unlawfully taking a motor-vehicle without consent of owner, sec. 281
Under Motor-vehicle Act—
Failing to obtain or display motor-vehicle licence or permit as required, sees. 3-10, 57.
Failing to notify re change of address, sees. 11, 18 (11)-
Failing to report change in motor-vehicle, sec. 12	
Failing to transfer motor-vehicle, etc., sec. 14..
Failing to notify of removal or destruction of motor-vehicle, sec.
16 (1)
Failing to register as a tourist, sec. 17 - 	
Driving   motor-vehicle   otherwise   than   as   restricted   on   driver's
licence, sec. 18 (8), (7)
Driving without obtaining driver's licence, sec. 18 (1), (2)	
Driving without having driver's licence in possession at time, sec. 19
Driving while right to obtain licence is under suspension, sec. 20	
Driving as a chauffeur without chauffeur's licence or permit, sees.
21, 23, 27, 28
Operating as dealer without licence, misuse of dealer's plates, etc.,
sees. 29, 33, 34 	
Operating with " D " plates without salesman's licence or permit,
etc., sees. 36-39    —
Operating vehicle not properly equipped, sec. 40	
Failing to obtain replacement of licence or  chauffeur's badge if
mutilated, sees. 41, 42
Carrying too many passengers on motor-cycle, sec. 43 	
Improper disposition of licence-plate, dismantled vehicle, sec. 45-
Failing to report accident, etc., sec. 54-
Making  false  statement,  permitting   another  to  use licence,   etc..
sec. 55     	
Using licence belonging to another, refusing to show licence, etc..
sec. 56     	
Failing to stop on request of police or state proper name, sec. 58-
Altering number-plates and using fictitious plates, sec. 59-
Permitting person not properly licensed to drive motor-vehicle, etc.,
sec. 69   	
Failing to surrender licence on suspension, sec. 99
Removing or releasing impounded vehicle  without authority,  sec.
100      	
Producing invalid financial liability card, etc., sec. 102  	
Failing to obey emergency instructions of a peace officer, sees. 122,
124  	
Failing to obey traffic-control signal legend, sees. 127, 128, 152	
Defacing traffic-control devices by advertising or removal, etc., sees.
129, 131, 136.
Failing to obey special signal signs re highway construction, sees.
133, 135, 137.
Careless driving, sees. 138, 139   	
Exceeding maximum speed-limit, sec. 140  	
Exceeding speed-limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec. 141	
Exceeding speed-limit overtaking stopped school bus, sec. 142	
Failure to drive on the right, sec. 143  	
Infractions of " lane " driving, sees. 144-146  	
Infractions of "passing," sees. 148-151, 153, 154- 	
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees.  155-
159, 160-162     	
Failure to yield right-of-way, sees. 163-167—
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 168-172..
Failure by bicycle operators to obey rules, sec. 173-	
Failure to stop at railroad crossing, sees. 174-176	
Failure to stop at intersections, sec. 177 —-	
Illegal stopping or parking, sees. 178-181 	
7
1
98
404
117
3,622
816
26
1,433
167
2
17
2,008
3,952
1,613
71
487
43
29
4
3
1
157
118
30
9
292
2
9,392
144
4,675
16,415
3,408
10
67
3,186
748
1,737
1,168
272
12
222
5,021
1,325
99
424
98
3,059
792
16
71
513
98
2,936
920
20
1,554
1,604
245
272
3
2
19
26
1
5
8
2,380
3,044
2,959
2.884
1,570
1,305
40
46
457
398
14
19
25
20
8
6
2
1
1
145
195
80
79
180
177
41
26
2
9
296
250
2
4
8
7
11
26
17,214
21,130
1
2
61
31
3,839
3,661
22,349
23,686
3,867
2,503
8
32
134
113
2,288
3,154
1,289
1,300
2,304
2,369
1,382
1,461
1,074
1,142
2
210
234
6,149
6,158
803
1,014
1
7
2
72
610
32
79
2,840
862
14
5,091    |    4,496    |    4,558    |    4,518
1,475
108
2
29
1
2,991
4,807
1,259
93
359
54
24
158
55
132
29
9
262
3
3
6
22
15,192
55
3,287
23,522
1,710
72
145
3,023
1,157
2,359
1,556
1,320
5
198
4,821
959
 D 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Convictions under Motor-vehicle Act and Criminal Code of Canada, 1958-61—
Continued
Offences
1958
1959
1960
1961
Under Motor-vehicle Act—Continued
Leaving vehicle improperly parked, sec. 182 -
Backing vehicle illegally, sec. 184 .
Operating motor-cycle with more than one person, sec. 185-
Requirements of safe driving on highway, sees. 186, 187	
Fire-vehicle safety, sees. 189, 190  	
Driving on sidewalk, sec. 191.
Horse-racing on highway prohibited, sec. 193-
Opening door requirements, sec. 194	
Transporting explosives, sec. 196.
Failing to carry adequate safety equipment, sees. 197, 198-
Illegal use or defacement of signs, sec. 201  	
Motor-vehicle Act miscellaneous   	
Under Motor-vehicle Act Regulations—
Operating defective vehicle after ordered off road, sees. 2.02, 7.09	
Number-plates, sec. 3   - 	
Driving without proper head-lamps, sees. 4.01-4.06  	
Driving without clearance-lamps, lamps on projections, etc., sees.
4.11-4.13     	
Driving without tail-lamps, reflectors, other required lamps,  sees.
4.07-4.10    -   	
Driving without adequate brakes, sees. 5, 6 	
Driving  vehicle with defective horn or  miscellaneous  equipment,
sees. 7.01, 7.02     —
Driving vehicle without muffler, sec. 7.03 —  	
Driving vehicle without rear-view mirror or unobstructed rear view,
sec. 7.04       	
Inadequate windshield-wiper, etc., sec. 7.05	
Driving vehicle without mud-guards, sec. 7.06 	
Failing to have proper connection between motor-vehicle and trailer,
sec. 7.07  	
Sale of unapproved equipment, sec. 8 	
Failing to  obtain temporary permit for moving motor-vehicle or
trailer from place to place, sec. 14 	
Faiilng to sign driver's licence, sec. 15	
Oversize loads, sees. 19.01-19.03 	
Inadequate  tires,   insecure  loads,   excessive   speed   with  unloaded
trailer, sec. 19.04   _ 	
Excessive weight, sec. 19.05   	
Failure to report for weight inspection, sec. 19.06	
Failure to obtain overweight or oversize permits, sec. 19.07 	
Failure of a dealer to maintain security while carrying on a business, sec. 20.14   	
Miscellaneous infractions	
Vancouver City by-laws	
Juvenile Delinquents Act.
293
204
7
10
23
11
22
1
153
3
3
77
339
53
222
96
40
1,033
14
35
60
16
2
1
3
184
195
234
6
14
39
473
321
1
20
21
16
868
415
29
25
10
29
1
138
55
184
7
136
482
368
12
32
20
16
31
3
172
90
58,921    | 75,599
79,993    | 72,498
4
260
1,775
134
709
285
76
1,097
25
114
204
52
1
249
73
230
14
19
68
14
203
954
206
1,072
565
84
1,400
38
278
204
79
1
5
233
120
99
34
41
57
18
Ul
793
128
605
751
87
1,144
45
238
193
110
2
4
337
Ul
270
24
139
2
42
2,396
5,389
5,687
5,153
2,236
943
	
1,396
1,615
2,368
2,047
Total of all convictions..
67,804
87,099
94,842
85,159
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961       D 31
3. DRIVING SAFETY
(a) Safety Responsibility
The Motor-vehicle Act provides for the Superintendent to suspend the licences
of drivers who are involved in certain serious driving infractions and those who fail
to satisfy Court judgments arising from actions involving motor-vehicle accidents.
Drivers suspended under these provisions cannot regain their driver's licence until
they file proof of financial responsibility. During 1961, drivers suspended under
these provisions totalled 11,286, which is 5 per cent less than the 1960 total of
11,871. It will be noted that the decrease in this requirement is again in reverse
to the increased accident trend, but this is felt to be a direct result of a lower level
of highway traffic enforcement. Proof of financial responsibility was given by 9,377
drivers suspended in this manner, which is an increase of 13 per cent over the 8,288
drivers who filed proof in 1960.
The Motor-vehicle Act provides that drivers who come within the financial
responsibility section have a continuing obligation to file suitable proof of financial
responsibility with the Superintendent. The policy is that if a person has maintained
a clear driving record for a period of at least three years from the date of the last
conviction which would require the invoking of financial responsibility provisions,
the Superintendent may release him of the filing requirement. The following table
gives full information with regard to the filing and cancellation of British Columbia
financial responsibility insurance certificates:—
Comparison of Financial Responsibility Certificates Received,
Filed, and Cancelled in 1960 and 1961
1960
1961
Increase
Decrease
Per Cent
13,849
12,213
1,636
10,207
1,162
844
12,835
$24,426
13,477
12,544
933
10,379
1,261
904
12,914
$25,088
331
172
99
60
79
662
372
703
2.69
2.71
42 97
Owner's policy certificates and garage and sales agency cer-
1.68
8.52
7.11
.61
2 71
It is the responsibility of the Safety Responsibility Division to ensure that all
drivers who come within the provisions of the safety responsibility sections of the
Motor-vehicle Act continue to meet those requirements for all licences issued to
them. This requires a continual check of new vehicle registrations, transfers of
motor-vehicle licences, and all original driver's licence applications. There are
60,000 drivers who come within these provisions, and in the continuing programme
of watching for the evaders, a total of 500,000 item checks were made in 1961 with
the card-index wheel which records the names of all drivers required to show
financial responsibility.
This branch produces a monthly suspension list giving the names of all persons
whose licences are under suspension at the date of publication. This list goes to all
licence issuing offices to assist issuing clerks in determining what licence applications should be rejected. The list goes to the various police departments for their
use in dealing with the difficult problem of drivers who will continue to operate a
motor-vehicle while under suspension. The Branch also co-operates with other
motor-vehicle administrators in Canada in an endeavour to cope with the driver
 D 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
who, even though suspended in one Province, which suspension prohibits him under
the Criminal Code of Canada from driving anywhere in Canada, tries to obtain a
licence in another Province. There have been numerous instances where drivers
have done just this, and then they have come back into British Columbia with an
out-of-Province driver's licence, very often operating a motor-vehicle registered
elsewhere.
The following table indicates the various causes for this type of suspension and
reinstatement action:—
Drivers' Licences
Offence
Accident—careless driving	
Accident—dangerous driving	
No accident—dangerous driving ..
Accident—criminal negligence	
No accident—criminal negligence
Accident—drunken driving	
No accident—drunken driving	
Accident—impaired driving
Suspended
2,055
11
No accident—impaired driving     1,796
Accident—failing to remain at scene of accident..
Accident—driving under suspension	
No accident—driving under suspension	
Accident—suspension due to accident	
Accident—speeding	
Accident—unsatisfied judgment
Conviction and judgment outside Province
Unsatisfactory driving record	
Suspension by Superintendent
Proof of financial responsibility requested by Superintendent 	
Death by criminal negligence	
Bodily harm by criminal negligence	
Further or additional proof of financial responsibility
Totals
21
3
3,994
11,286
Reinstated
1,762
25
130
33
34
25
9
38
26
579
449
1,796
1,527
458
224
15
12
95
47
1,528
1,187
22
152
103
15
197
65
102
137
177
74
2
10
3,515
9,377
Suspension of Drivers' Licences by Court Order and Recommendations, 1961
Months
Years
Under
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
1
2
I
Death by criminal negligence	
Bodily harm by criminal negligence	
1
5
2
33
1
1
48
39
1
28
1
30
1
4
198
1
28
198
109
1
57
3
29
5
128
2
5
79
30
3
16
5
45
3
9
295
11
3
78
39
24
32
3
2
2
97
1
9
4
3
1
5
3
40
1
3
3
43
1
16
316
16
22
55
15
24
15
3
8
18
2
1
5
2
1
1
1
8
12
2
6
91
11
11
30
7
5
9
1
4
5
1
4
18
10
1
5
1
4
2
8
3
24
8
2
10
4
5
3
39
Failing to remain at scene of accident-
187
10
Driving while intoxicated	
49
1,258
Driving while under suspension._  _
Conviction and judgment outside the
64
74
Driving without due care and attention
Exceeding speed-limit—  	
517
246
69
Miscellaneous  	
159
Totals             	
159
628
300
544
122
52
526
41
193
50
65
2,680
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961       D 33
(b) Examination of Drivers
The Drivers' Examination Division conducted examinations of 113,808 persons during 1961, compared to the 1960 total of 104,613. Drivers' examinations
are required of all original applicants for drivers' licences in British Columbia. The
examination consists of a test of knowledge of the rules of the road, a vision and
reaction test, the report of a medical practitioner when deemed advisable, and a
demonstration of on-the-road driving. Due to the geographic location of some
communities, it has at times been difficult to insist upon a full examination for some
applicants for original drivers' licences, which has necessitated the issuance of
licences restricted to limited areas of driving. The 1961 drivers' examination programme practically eliminated the situation of the issuing of licences without a complete examination. Examiners go into most communities on a regular schedule to
provide a complete examination service and to minimize the delay in applicants
obtaining drivers' licences.
The Motor-vehicle Branch has an objective of re-examining every driver on a
five-year basis. In some communities the Branch is fairly close to that objective,
but in the larger centres the spread between examinations is at least seven years.
It is simply a matter of work requirements and staff available. If the Branch is
going to improve this situation, it will be necessary that additional examiners be
provided. The number of drivers increases annually, with its inevitable increase in
work load in drivers' examinations. The re-examination programme for the over-70
drivers is in a satisfactory condition, and most drivers in this category were either
re-examined in 1961 or had received attention during 1960. The Motor-vehicle
Branch receives criticism from some drivers in the over-70 group because of the
requirement for medical examination at the time of each driver's re-examination.
They feel that if the physical examination is necessary for them, then certainly at
least a good percentage of drivers of younger age should be faced with the same
requirement. It is proper to point out that the Branch does require periodic medical
examination of a considerably greater number of drivers under the age of 70 than
of the number of drivers over that age. Examiners are trained to observe any physical difficulties. They ask certain questions of the driver, and there are numerous
other ways by which this Branch learns of persons with physical problems.
The following table is a summary of the examinations given to 55,645 applicants for original drivers' licences. The table shows that 12,153 applicants failed
some part of the driver's examination, but a large percentage of these did subsequently qualify by taking additional examinations. The failure rate is not high in
comparison of other years, which indicates that drivers are more adequately preparing themselves for the examinations:—
 D 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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  REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961       D 39
Re-examination of Drivers
The following tables summarize the re-examinations conducted for 58,163
drivers in 1961. Examination failures totalled 1,793, or 3.1 per cent. Licences
restricted as a result of re-examinations were 29.8 per cent of those examined. It is
this aspect of the re-examination programme which is so important. Drivers, unless
required to appear for re-examination, may go on for years with undetected physical
deficiencies which affect driving ability and health generally. As an example, the
obtaining of suitable corrective lenses for vision not only improves the person's
ability to cope with the hazards of driving, but also provides a better physical condition for the driver in all his other activities. Drivers need to be continually concerned of maintaining good physical standards, and the drivers' examination programme has an important part to play in achieving this condition of awareness.
 D 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961       D 43
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 D 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(c) Drivers' Improvement Programme
An important step in the British Columbia system of driver's licence control is
the Drivers' Improvement Programme. This programme was started in 1953 and
was developed as a means of dealing with drivers who had the unfortunate habit of
being continually involved in motor-vehicle accidents, or traffic offences which result
in Court convictions. The Branch follows these basic steps in dealing with drivers
in this category:—
(1) The record of each driver is reviewed when a report of an accident or
conviction is added to the file of the driver. This involved reviewing
132,515 files during 1961. In this process a reviewing clerk notes when
a record shows an accumulation of accidents or convictions, and when a
certain level has been reached the clerk refers the file for adjudication.
The referral to adjudication follows the first conviction in many instances
if the conviction is one of a serious nature.
(2) The adjudication step is to determine what appropriate action should be
taken with the erring motorist. At this step a committee of several senior
employees goes over the driving records. The action decided upon
may be:—
(a) To send a warning letter to the driver, in which he is reminded
of his driving record and is informed that unless his driving habits improve
he faces prospects of a driving suspension.
(b) The driver may be required to report for a personal interview
with a member of this Branch for the purpose of a frank discussion of his
driving record. The interview in many instances involves a complete reexamination of the driver.
(c) As a result of the adjudication, suspension notices are sent to
many drivers when it is felt that this course of action is essential. It is the
policy of the Branch not to suspend a licence until the licensee has had
an opportunity to show cause why this should not be done. The driver
may endeavour to show cause by a personal appearance, or by making a
written submission, or, as frequently happens, by being represented by
legal counsel.
During 1961, 2,123 interviews were conducted in our Drivers' Improvement
Programme. This is a time-consuming effort, but I am satisfied it is an essential step
in any programme to successfully deal with the hard core of the problem drivers.
All too often these persons come for the interview with the attitude that their driving
problems are not really of their own making, but rather that they are the victims of
unfortunate circumstances. In most instances the complete opposite is the case, and
I am satisfied our staff is making some progress in pointing it out to this group of
drivers. The following table provides a brief summary of the work handled by the
Drivers' Improvement Programme during 1961:—
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961       D 45
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 D 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
4. CENTRAL REGISTRY
On January 1, 1961, amendments to the Bills of Sale Act, Conditional Sales
Act, and Assignment of Book Accounts Act became effective so as to provide for
fifing with the Registrar-General all documents created under those Acts which were
given by individuals or partnerships, and all documents which concerned motor-
vehicles regardless of who gave the document. This caused a change from the previous requirement of filing with the various County Court Registrars throughout the
Province those documents which concerned any type of personal chattel other than
motor-vehicles. The change centralized the filing of documents and eliminated the
problem which previously existed of determining what registry or registries needed
to be searched to learn if documents had been filed against certain chattels.
The office of the Registrar-General is called the Central Registry. An Order
in Council named the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles to be the Registrar-General.
The task of placing existing documents located in the various registries into the
Central Registry was handled during 1961, and by November all documents filed
within the preceding three years in the various registries were taken over by the
Registrar-General. This involved developing a suitable registration index to replace
the handwritten ledger-type indexes used by the County Court Registrars. The
punch-card equipment of the Motor-vehicle Branch was used, with the result that
there is now a punch-card index record for every bill of sale, conditional sale, and
assignment of book account. This method allows for speedy reference and has permitted the development of an effective programme for handling the work.
Bills of sale, conditional sales, and assignments of book accounts which are
given by limited companies incorporated under the Companies Act are filed with
the Registrar of Companies.
The Central Registry programme is the first of its type developed in Canada.
It is a departure from the previous system of County Court Registries, which seemed
to be very much in keeping with the methods of transportation and communications
of years gone by. The fact that it is so easy now to move a chattel from one county
to another complicated the problem of the determination of the legal ownership of
chattels in County Court system. This was a principal reason for the establishing of
a Central Registry.
The programme has attracted a great deal of interest from the registration
authorities of other Provinces. It is regarded as a pilot plan and may well set the
pattern for the development of more adequate registry systems for other forms of
legal documents. The motor-vehicle aspect of the programme offers an effective
alternate to the title-deed system used in a number of American jurisdictions. Our
method offers a simple registry system with the advantage of one location to check
for records of filed liens.
The following table shows the volume of business transacted in the Central
Registry during 1960 and 1961. It will be noted that there has been a substantial
increase. It will be also noted that the statement speaks of documents filed under
the Mechanics' Lien Act, the Companies Act, and the Co-operative Associations
Act, which for years have used the central registry principle.
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961       D 47
Statement of Comparison of Transactions under Provisions of Bills of Sale Act,
Conditional Sales Act, Mechanics' Lien Act, Assignment of Book Accounts
Act, Companies Act, and Co-operative Associations Act, 1960 and 1961.
1960
1961
Increase
Decrease
Per Cent
Increase
Per Cent
Decrease
Item
Registrations under Conditional Sales Act..
Registrations under Bills of Sale Act	
Registrations under Mechanics' Lien Act....
Registrations under Assignment of Book
54,035
39,815
4,936
59,690
63,483
4,399
414
77
1
584
1,701
537
5,655
23,668
10.46
59.44
537
1.60
414
100.00
Registrations under Companies Act.—	
Registrations under Co-operative Associ-
135
2
554
1,551
323
58
1
42.96
50.00
30
150
214
5.41
9.67
66.25
Releases under Bills of Sale Act. 	
Documents copied, certified, etc 	
Total number of items	
101,351
130,886
29,535
     |      29.14    |     ....
Revenue
$188,438.00
104,363.00
46,856.00
$281,798.00
120,847.00
62,481.00
151.00
$93,360.00
16,484.00
15,625.00
151.00
49.54
15.79
33.34
100.00
Value of law stamps attached to docu-
Value of conditional sales  and bills of
Value  of  assignment  of  book  account
Miscellaneous   copying   and   certification
646.00
1,074.00
428.00
66.25
$340,303.00
$466,351.00
$162,048.00
53.25
5. SCHOOL BUSES
The Motor-vehicle Branch continued to exercise control over the use and
operation of school buses engaged in the transportation of students to and from the
public schools in the Province. The mechanical inspectors of the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police and of the Motor Carrier Branch of the Public Utilities Commission
continued their programme of inspection of school buses to ensure that the buses
are maintained to the level of standards set by the Superintendent. Buses which do
not meet the minimum standards are ruled off the road until such time as satisfactory
reconditioning can be carried out. The School Boards rely upon this inspection
programme to guide them in the matter of the replacement of school buses and to
assist them in maintaining their fleets in good condition. The Department of Education also relies upon the inspection programme in determining that replacements
are justified.
British Columbia continues to maintain a programme of strict control over
school-bus drivers by insisting that they be holders of Class A chauffeurs' licences.
A requisite to holding this form of licence is that the licensee must submit to frequent
medical re-examinations. From time to time, holders of these licences are denied
the privilege of further carrying out this type of work because of medical reasons.
This is unfortunate for the driver in that it often disrupts his method of earning his
livelihood, but there is no alternative when consideration is given to the responsibility which rests with these drivers in transporting our youth to and from school.
The number of school buses for which permits were issued during 1961 totalled 660,
compared to the 1960 total of 586.
Accident statistics for 1961 showed that there were twenty-eight accidents
which involved school buses.   None of these accidents resulted in loss of life.    Six
 D 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
of the accidents involved personal injury. It is interesting to note that the last fatal
accident which involved a school bus in British Columbia was in 1959, resulting in
death to one student who was crossing the highway after leaving the bus. It is very
commendable and a credit to the School Boards which operate this form of transportation, and especially to the school-bus drivers, that British Columbia can speak
of such a good record of school-bus transportation.
6. STAFF
The total staff of the Motor-vehicle Branch as of December 31, 1961, totalled
294 employees, as compared to a total staff of 293 at the same date in 1960. The
permanent staff establishment was increased during 1961 from 253 to 260. The
additions were approved to provide two additional employees in Central Registry
and five additional employees to take care of increased work in several of the licence
issuing offices and Victoria headquarters as a result of assuming functions in the
collection of social services tax revenue on motor-vehicle transactions. The number
of temporary employees during 1961 was reduced from forty to thirty-four.
The staff is to be highly commended in that they have been able to handle the
increased volume of work without commensurate increases in staff. Again, it shows
signs of initiative on their part in developing better work methods, with the resulting
higher level of efficiency.
My sincere appreciation is expressed to all the staff members for their continuing loyalty to their work.
CONCLUSION
Each year tells a story of greater use of our highways by ever-increasing numbers of drivers and motor-vehicles. The tremendous development in the highway
system of our Province, which has opened up vast new areas to business and recreation, has caused a large increase in total vehicle miles travelled. All of these factors
result in a greater degree of exposure to accidents for all highway-users. A major
problem of the future is to provide measures which will counteract the increased
exposure factor, or the alternative is to expect a rapidly increasing accident rate
with its untold human suffering and enormous financial loss to our society.
The Motor-vehicle Branch will have an increasingly important part to play in
developing progressive measures of driver's licence control. If we are to maintain
our favoured position in the field of drivers' examinations, additional staff must be
assigned to this work. The only alternative is a reduction of existing services, which
are even now spread rather thinly in some areas of the Province.
The level of law enforcement on our highways must be stepped up. The conspicuous appearance of the enforcement officer is an essential deterrent to the
would-be traffic violator. There is no substitute.
The many other aspects of the work of the Branch will continue to expand.
I assure you every effort will be exerted to developing efficient procedures. However, our success in coping with future growth will be dependent to a very large
degree on the development of new office accommodation for the Branch headquarters in Victoria. I strongly urge that an early start be made in providing a new
building designed so as to enable an integrated operation of all aspects of administration of highway transportation.
My gratitude is expressed to the many persons who have assisted this Branch
in its efforts. I am grateful for the assistance and advice given so readily by members
of your Department. The Branch continues to enjoy a high level of liaison with the
judicial and magisterial benches of the Province, and with the Crown prosecutors
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1961       D 49
and the members of the law society. The splendid co-operation of the Officer Commanding and other officers and members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
and the chiefs, officers, and constables of the municipal police departments continues to be an important factor, without which we would have great difficulty in
meeting our obligation. A special thanks to them. My sincere appreciation goes to
the many organizations, at the community level and in the business field, which
have continued their support of programmes dedicated to highway safety.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE LINDSAY,
Superintendent of Motor-vehicles.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1963
410-962-2506
   

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