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Mental Health Services Branch PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED MARCH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1963]

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 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES
AND HOSPITAL INSURANCE
Mental Health Services Branch
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED
MARCH 31
1962
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1963
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C, C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor oj the Province oj British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Annual Report of the Mental Health
Services Branch, Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance, for the
year ended March 31, 1962.
ERIC MARTIN,
Minister oj Health Services and Hospital Insurance.
Office oj the Minister oj Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Victoria, B.C., January 24,1963.
 Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Mental Health Services Branch,
Vancouver, B.C., January 23, 1963.
The Honourable Eric Martin,
Minister oj Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Mental Health
Services Branch for the twelve months ended March 31, 1962.
A. E. DAVIDSON, B.A., M.D., F.A.P.A.,
Deputy Minister of Mental Health Services.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
PART I.—HEADQUARTERS
Page
Report—Director of Mental Health Services  7
Report—Business Manager  18
Report—Personnel Officer  30
Report—Supervisor of Psychiatric Social Work  34
Report—Director of Nursing Services  40
Report—Department of Nursing Education  44
PART II.—CREASE CLINIC OF PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE
AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
Report on Crease Clinic—Medical Superintendent  47
Report on Provincial Mental Hospital—Medical Superintendent  51
Report on Treatment Services—Acting Clinical Director  68
Statistical Tables—Crease Clinic  70
Statistical Tables—Provincial Mental Hospital  81
PART III.—THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL AND
THE TRANQUILLE SCHOOL
Report—Medical Superintendent     96
Statistical Tables—The Woodlands School  112
Statistical Tables—The Tranquille School  118
PART IV.—PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME
Report—Medical Superintendent  119
Statistical Tables  121
PART V.—GERIATRIC DIVISION
Report—Medical Superintendent  126
Statistical Tables—Valleyview Hospital, Essondale  139
Statistical Tables—Dellview Hospital, Vernon  146
Statistical Tables—Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace  151
PART VI.—MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
Report—Director of Mental Health Centre  155
Statistical Tables  159
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 Report of Mental Health Services Branch
For the Twelve Months Ended March 31, 1962
PART I.—HEADQUARTERS
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
A. E. Davidson, M.D., Deputy Minister of Mental Health Services
and Director of Mental Health Services
The Mental Health Services Branch is concerned with all activities relating to
mental health and mental illness in the Province of British Columbia. The Branch
has been more specifically involved with the provision of care and treatment for
emotional and mental illnesses. This Report deals primarily with the specific institutions and services which are operated by the Province.
The expansion of the services rendered by the several units comprising this
Branch has been very rapid during the past few years. The total staff employed in
the Mental Health Services Branch as of March 31, 1962, was 3,078. This total
does not include students enrolled at the School of Psychiatric Nursing, Essondale.
The total expenditure for the fiscal year 1961/62 was approximately $16,000,000.
The total number of patients receiving care in the various units of the Branch during
the period under review was 12,714. These few figures give a general indication
of the extent and the scope of the services rendered to the public of this Province
by the Mental Health Services Branch.
STATISTICAL COMMENTS
Study of the accompanying tables will show the steady increase in the number
of patients seeking help from the various divisions of the Mental Health Services.
During the year, 4,193 patients were admitted to the in-patient units of this
service. This figure compares with a total of 3,924 patients admitted during the
previous year. It is interesting to note that 2,023 or some 48 per cent of the patients
sought help on their own volition as voluntary patients. This trend is a most encouraging sign, which indicates an acceptance of mental illness as a treatable condition.
It is also an indication of the public confidence in the treatment facilities that are
provided by the Mental Health Services Branch.
In spite of the fact that the admission rate is rising, it is to be noted that there
was a decrease of 156 patients in residence by the end of this year. There have
been increases in the population of the schools for the mentally retarded and in the
Geriatric Division. Thus the decrease in population is explained by the active treatment programme in the Provincial mental hospitals, where the resident population
was reduced by 247 patients during the year.
Admissions to our Psychiatric Division (Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental
Hospital) increased from 3,375 in 1960/61 to 3,661 admissions in 1961/62. Of
these admissions, 1,894 were first admissions and 1,767 were readmissions. Nevertheless, the population of the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, decreased by
242 during the year.
7
 I 8
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Table 1.—Showing Patients in Residence in the Various Institutions oj the Provincial Mental Health Services, April 1,1961, and March 31, 1962, Together with
Increase or Decrease.
Institution
In Residence, Apr
1, 1961
In Residence, Mar.
31, 1962
Increase (+)
Men
Women
Total
Men
Women
Total
Decrease (—)
108
1,608
288
758
147
246
105
279
136
1,340
640
26
484
124
244
2,948
288
1,398
173
730
229
279
110
1,464
283
791
153
248
106
293
145
1,242
561
139
472
126
255
2,706
283
1,352
292
720
232
293
+ 11
—242
Mental Hospital, Colquitz -	
—5
—46
+ 119
— 10
+3
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale ..	
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace .	
+ 14
Totals  	
3,539
2,750
6,289
3,448
2,685
6,133
— 156
Table 2.—Showing in Summary the Admissions and Population Increase oj the
Provincial Mental Health Services jor the Ten-year Period April 1, 1952, to
March 31, 1962.
Year
Total
Admissions
Admissions
65 Years
and Over
Admissions
15 Years
and Under
Voluntary
Admissions
Population
Increase
Index of
Increase
1952/53 	
1953/54 	
2,518
2,437
2,492
2,855
2,720
2,936
2,993
3,296
3,924
4,193
357
347
348
392
385
442
425
506
580
557
179
169
71
58
57
106
135
182
254
200
768
834
884
1,153
1,083
1,012
1,118
1,316
1,695
2,023
290
215
88
26
—78
38
—90
20
42
-156
11.54
8.82
1954/55	
1955/56	
1956/57	
1957/58	
3.53
0.91
—2.87
1.29
1958/59  	
1959/60 _
1960/61	
-3.00
0.61
1.07
1961/62..... ..„
—3.72
Totals -	
30,364
4,339
1,411
11,886        1           395        1         	
There were 214 patients admitted to The Woodlands School. The programme
in the School has been increased and greatly enriched, and this advance has resulted
in a total of 1,960 patients receiving care in the School during the year. This
compares with a figure of 1,868 patients in 1960/61.
There were 318 patients admitted to the Geriatric Division. This figure compares with 285 admissions during the previous year. Altogether 1,642 patients
received care and treatment in the units of the Geriatric Division this year.
The Mental Health Centres in Burnaby and Victoria have continued to provide
active psychiatric services to patients who can attend these Centres on an ambulatory
basis. These Centres offer both consultative and therapeutic services. A total of
632 new patients were seen in the Adult Clinic of the Mental Health Centre at
Burnaby. Eight hundred and five children attended the Children's Clinics in
Burnaby and Victoria.
MAIOR EVENTS AND TRENDS
In addition to the regular services which have continued during the year,
considerable expansion has occurred in several units. Additional services have also
been provided to certain geographic areas. During the year there has also been
planning for the development of new services in several parts of the Province.
The position of Consultant in Medical Records and Statistics was added to the
Branch establishment this year.    The principal duties of the incumbent in this
 HEADQUARTERS I 9
position are (a) to provide consultative services on medical records and statistics to
the Deputy Minister; (fe) on instruction of the Deputy Minister, to act as consultant
to the heads of the various divisions of the Mental Health Services in reference to
medical records and statistics within their areas and to consult with the supervisors
of medical records offices as requested regarding personnel problems, maintenance
of records, and changes of procedure; (c) to act as liaison officer to the Division of
Vital Statistics, Health Branch, in the planning, collecting, and presentation of
statistics: (d) on instruction of the Deputy Minister, to assist persons from outside
the Mental Health Services Branch in obtaining statistics and material for approved
mental-health research projects. Miss Agnes Dingle was appointed to this position
on lune 1, 1961.
The development of open-ward programmes in the Crease Clinic and the
Provincial Mental Hospital has continued with further expansion during the year.
Over two-thirds of the wards at the Crease Clinic and the Provincial Mental Hospital
are now open. This means patients on these wards have the freedom to come and
go, and in this way they must assume increased responsibilities for their own activities. This year, for the first time, two wards at Valleyview Hospital were converted
to open-ward status.
The boarding-out care programme referred to in last year's Report has been
expanded. The programme is designed to care primarily for patients who have
received maximum benefit from hospital care and who can carry on in the community
in suitable accommodation. This programme is carried on in close collaboration
with the Department of Social Welfare. Boarding homes are selected and supervised
by members of the social service staff of the Mental Health Services Branch. Patients
are selected and placed in various boarding homes, where they are supervised by the
Mental Health Services personnel. Altogether 317 patients have been placed in
boarding homes since this programme began. Many patients have continued their
improvement following transfer from the Mental Hospital, so that in due course it
has been possible to discharge them from boarding homes to independent living in
the community.
A significant expansion during the year has been the development of the
Rehabilitation and After Care Clinic in Vancouver. This Clinic provides psychiatric
follow-up and after-care services for patients discharged from the Crease Clinic and
Provincial Mental Hospital. It was opened in December, 1961. It is located at
" Venture," the half-way house at 445 West Thirteenth Avenue, Vancouver. It
serves principally patients discharged to the metropolitan Vancouver region. It is
hoped that this service can be expanded to include other parts of the Province. Since
the start of this programme in December, 412 patients who have been discharged
have been registered in this Clinic and are there receiving after-care and follow-up
services.
With a view to preparing patients who have been in hospital for a prolonged
period of time for their return to the community, an " activities of daily living " programme has been developed at the Provincial Mental Hospital. It is designed to
retrain and re-educate patients in modern living activities with a view to preparing
them to make their adjustment to community life. Twenty-nine patients have had
the privilege of the training this year.
In lanuary of 1962 a serious fire occurred at the Riverside Annex of the Provincial Mental Hospital. One patient unfortunately lost his life. One hundred and
twenty-three patients were evacuated quickly from the building. Emergency measures were made to accommodate these patients in other areas of the Hospital. The
Public Works Department took quick action in the renovation of the damaged
building.   It is planned to return the patients to this area early in the coming year.
 I 10 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Considerable attention has been given to the development of a plan for the
evacuation of patients from the Provincial Mental Home at Colquitz. This facility
is not regarded as suitable for the provision of modern psychiatric care. It is planned
to transfer patients from Colquitz to our institutions on the Mainland. The provision of certain additional facilities is necessary in order to prevent any overcrowding
in the existing institutions. It is hoped that the movement of patients from Colquitz
will begin during the coming year. Simultaneously with the abandonment of the
Colquitz institution, planning will be continued for the development of modern psychiatric facilities for the Vancouver Island area.
The facilities at The Tranquille School have continued to expand. One hundred and nineteen patients were transferred from The Woodlands School this year,
to bring the resident population up to 292 as of March 31st. Up to the present time,
patients accommodated in this School are all older ambulatory persons requiring
only residential-type care. Planning continues for the provision of care for the more
handicapped mentally retarded in this unit.
The operation of the Valleyview Hospital as a separate mental hospital for
geriatric patients with mental illnesses has continued successfully. This Hospital has
operated very efficiently and provides a worth-while service for this type of patient.
The development of the Social Service Department in this Hospital has been most
welcome. The Social Service Department is able to assist in the screening of the
various patients seeking admission to the Hospital. In addition, it also renders very
valuable assistance in the preparation of patients for discharge to their homes or to
suitable boarding-home accommodation.
A start was made to expand the psychiatric services provided in Victoria and
the Vancouver Island area. For some time past the only Provincial services available in Victoria have been provided by the Child Guidance Clinic. Only one
psychiatrist has been employed in this area. This year an additional psychiatrist,
together with ancillary personnel, has been employed with a view to providing services for both adults and children.
Considerable progress has been made toward developing regional mental-health
services throughout the Province. A psychiatric team from the Mental Health Centre
in Burnaby has been visiting the Upper Fraser Valley health units to provide consultative psychiatric services to this area. The time spent by the visiting team in this
area has been substantially increased this year.
In accordance with the planning reported last year, a regional mental-health
clinic has been developed for the Okanagan region. This clinic will consist of a
psychiatrist, psychologist, psychiatric social worker, and mental-health nurse, together with necessary clerical staff. It will be centred at Kelowna, where suitable
accommodation will be provided in an addition to the Community Health Centre.
This clinic will serve the major centres in the South Okanagan, North Okanagan,
and Central Health Units. There will be regular clinics held in Penticton, Kelowna,
Vernon, Salmon Arm, Revelstoke, and Kamloops. Consultative services will be
available to physicians, health agencies, the Social Welfare Department, and educational services.
There have been a number of major items of capital construction completed or
commenced within the Mental Health Services during the past fiscal year. The
major items in this area include: —
(1) The completion of the central surgical-supply room at the Provincial
Mental Hospital, Essondale.
(2) Continuation of construction of an incinerator at Essondale.
(3) Construction of a central accounting office at Essondale.
 HEADQUARTERS I 11
(4) Commencement of construction of a new Industrial Therapy Building at
Essondale.   This work commenced in February of 1962.
(5) Renovation of the Riverside Annex Building, which was partially destroyed by a fire occurring in January of 1962.
(6) The planning for the reconstruction and conversion of the Nurses' Home 2
Building at The Woodlands School. The purpose of this reconstruction is
to provide modern administrative facilities for the operation of the unit.
(7) Planning for the construction of the building at Essondale to accommodate
the telephone exchange and the Provincial Mental Hospital Employees'
Credit Union,
GENERAL COMMENTS
Our programme in public relations has continued throughout the year. To this
end, each institution made arrangements for interested groups to visit in order to see
their programmes in action and to have the opportunity of imparting instruction
regarding mental illness and its associated problems. Throughout the year there
have been many groups visit the various centres and facilities, such as service clubs,
medical and nursing groups, classes from the University, etc. In this way the public
obtains some impression of the many aspects of mental illness and a knowledge of
the functioning of the various units of the Mental Health Services.
I would again like to commend the Canadian Mental Health Association and
the Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia for the work they have
performed in regard to the mentally ill and the mentally retarded. These organizations have done much to assist the patients. The presence of their volunteers in our
institutions brings the community much closer to the mentally ill person. It also
does much to convey to the community what is taking place in our various centres.
These organizations have done a great deal to further the ends of mental health in
our Province.
The thirty-first graduation exercises were held in the Vincent Massey Junior
High School auditorium in New Westminster on the evening of April 27, 1961.
Ninety-six student-nurses (sixty-four women and thirty-two men) received diplomas
signifying their successful completion of a two-year course in psychiatric nursing.
Mr. Willard Ireland, Provincial Librarian and Archivist, gave a stimulating and
interesting graduation address.
The Council of Psychiatric Nurses held its annual meeting on April 26, 1961.
One thousand two hundred and fifty-one nurses are now licensed under the Psychiatric Nurses Act. This year again two psychiatric nurses were enabled to take
further training with assistance provided from bursary funds. One psychiatric nurse
attended the Eighth Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Group Development at North
Bend, Wash., in June, 1961. A second psychiatric nurse was granted assistance to
attend the Fifteenth Annual Summer Laboratory in Human Relations conducted by
the National Training Laboratory in Bethel, Maine, in July, 1961.
The Narcotic Addiction Foundation continues to receive guidance from the
Mental Health Services Branch through Dr. A. E. Davidson, who serves as a member
of the board of directors. Dr. F. G. Tucker serves in a similar capacity on the board
of directors of the Alcoholism Foundation. The Mental Health Services is thus able
to assist in the planning of the programmes of these two important services.
The Mental Health Services staff members continued to participate in the
in-service training programme for senior school counsellors which is conducted
under the auspices of the Vancouver School Board with financial assistance through
the Mental Health Grant. Seven senior teachers took the course this year. Since
the inception of the programme seven years ago, sixty-three teachers have been given
 I 12 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
training. A summary of the numbers trained for each of the participating School
Boards is as follows: Vancouver, 44; Richmond, 5; Burnaby, 4; Surrey, 4; North
Vancouver, 2; Coquitlam, 2; New Westminster, 1; Langley, 1.
The professional staff throughout the Mental Health Services has shown a
progressive improvement throughout the year. Numerous trained personnel in the
psychiatric, social service, and psychiatric nursing field have been added to our
services. Dr. R. W. Harrington was appointed to the position of Director of the
Rehabilitation and After Care Clinic in December, 1961. Dr. L. Holland was
appointed to the staff of the Mental Health Centre, Victoria, in lanuary, 1962.
It is with regret that I report the death of one of our senior physicians, Dr.
W. P. Fister, a competent and highly respected member of the staff of the Crease
Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital. Dr. Fister was employed as consultant in
neurology and served in the department since 1948. He was especially skilled in
the field of medicine and had taken special training in the field of neurology and
electroencephalography. He developed the neurological department at the Crease
Clinic to a state of high efficiency. Actually, the service which was provided by the
neurological department at the Crease Clinic under Dr. Fister's direction was unique.
His services will be sorely missed.
MENTAL HEALTH GRANT
The Government of Canada, through the Department of National Health and
Welfare, made available to British Columbia a Mental Health Grant " to assist in
an extended programme for the prevention and treatment of mental illness, including
rehabilitation and free treatment." This is the fourteenth year that this Mental
Health Grant has been made available.
The grant provided for 1961/62 was $791,907. Projects to the total value of
$733,483.66 were submitted to and approved by the Department of National Health
and Welfare. Expenditures made and claims submitted to the Federal Treasury by
March 31st totalled $692,502.53. The details of the expenditures are shown in
tabulated form in the Business Manager's section of this Report, which appears
on page 29.
Professional Training
Dr. F. G. Tucker, Clinical Director, Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease
Clinic, was awarded a bursary to permit him to enrol in the administrative psychiatry
course at Columbia University, New York City.
Six physicians were granted bursaries to enable them to enrol for graduate
specialist training in the Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University
of British Columbia. These bursaries, which are tenable for one year, commenced
in July. Special arrangements were made by the Professor of Psychiatry, University
of British Columbia, for two of the trainees to undertake their training at the Allan
Memorial Institute of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal.
Ten social workers were granted bursaries to permit them to enrol at the School
of Social Work, University of British Columbia. One trainee withdrew just before
the course commenced and was not replaced.
Two registered nurses were awarded bursaries to permit them to enrol for
advanced studies in the School of Nursing, University of British Columbia.
One clinical psychologist was given a bursary to permit him to continue with
advanced postgraduate studies in his specialty at the University of British Columbia.
All the persons who were assisted by bursaries were required to sign formal
agreements whereby they obligated themselves to give a stipulated return in service
 HEADQUARTERS I 13
to the Mental Health Services Branch of the Province on the completion of their
training periods.
A number of short courses and institutes for staff personnel were supported by
the Mental Health Grant, as follows:—
Twelve senior nurses attended an institute on nursing administration and supervision for superintendents of nurses and chief male nurses. This institute was given
by the Department of University Extension, University of British Columbia, in
response to a request from the Mental Health Services Branch.
Dr. R. Parkinson, senior psychiatrist with the Adult Clinic of the Mental Health
Centre, Burnaby, attended a five-day institute on group psychotherapy at the
University of Saskatchewan.
Dr. John Walsh, Deputy Medical Superintendent of the Provincial Mental
Hospital, attended the Thirteenth Annual Mental Hospital Institute of the American
Psychiatric Association held in Omaha in October.
Six nurses holding supervisory and head nurse positions attended an institute
entitled " Person to Person " sponsored by the School of Nursing, University of
Washington, Seattle.
Miss A. K. Carroll, Provincial Supervisor of Psychiatric Social Work, and Miss
B. J. Mitchell, Director of Nursing Services, attended the Second Canadian Mental
Health Services Institute held at Ottawa in January.
The Superintendent of Nurses of the Valleyview Hospital attended an institute
on nursing service administration sponsored by the American Psychiatric Association in San Francisco.
Equipment and Supplies
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.—The Surgical Department was supplied with equipment to the value of $12,000, comprising a new anaesthetic machine,
new overhead theatre lamp, mobile X-ray unit with universal seriography complete
with cassettes. The laboratory was supplied with a new autotechnicon to replace
the original instrument received in 1949. To modernize the dental clinic, high-speed
dental equipment to the value of $1,300 was authorized for purchase.
The Woodlands School.—The laboratory was supplied with a new Leitz binocular microscope.
Valleyview Hospital.—Eight walkers, one mobile sitz bath, and one mobile
patient-lifter were supplied to the wards for use in the nursing care of the aged
patients. The Physiotherapy Department was equipped with an ultra-sonic machine,
muscle-stimulator, and associated accessories.
Community Mental-health Programmes
These continue to be supported along the lines described in previous Annual
Reports. The assistance provided to the Vancouver School Board in the course for
senior school counsellors was included with the project to assist the mental-hygiene
programme of the Metropolitan Health Committee of Greater Vancouver to simplify
administration.
A new project this year made available $4,800 as a grant in aid of the stipends
paid to the consultant psychiatrist and senior social worker employed by the Narcotic Addiction Foundation.
Psychiatric Services in General Hospitals
The psychiatric division of the out-patients' department of the Vancouver
General Hospital was assisted by a grant to provide the salaries of two psychiatric
social workers, one psychiatric casework aide, and one medical stenographer.
 I  14
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia
This was the second year in which Mental Health Grant funds were made
available to the Department of Psychiatry of the University of British Columbia to
assist in the establishment of a graduate training programme. The sum of $29,412
was approved for this project. The grant provided the salaries of the clinical psychologist and a medical secretary, as well as for tutorial supervisors and honoraria
for lecturers and visiting specialists. There was also provision to purchase additional
tape recorders.
Personnel for Mental Health Services
As in previous years, a grant provides the stipends for the consultants in neurosurgery, general surgery, orthopaedic surgery, internal medicine, and dermatology.
These consultants supply their services to all of the institutions of this Branch which
are located in the Lower Mainland region of the Province.
Our hospitals and clinics have again received assistance in the provision of
salaries for members of the treatment staff, including such specialists as psychiatrists,
psychiatric nurses, laboratory technicians, clinical psychologists, social workers, and
dieticians.   In total, 108 personnel are involved in these grants.
Director of Mental Health Services
A new project which was approved this year provides salaries for a consultant
in medical records and statistics and a consultant in clinical psychology for the office
of the Director of Mental Health Services. Approval was received for the continuation of the project to study the necessity and feasibility of establishing a combined
course in psychiatric and general nursing.
Research Projects
As in previous years, Mental Health Grant assistance has been given to several
major research projects. The studies are conducted in the Faculty of Medicine,
University of British Columbia, by the Departments of Neurological Research and
of Pharmacology. This year the sum of $76,607.16 was appropriated for these
research studies.
COMPARATIVE SUMMARY OF INCREASES AND DECREASES IN RESIDENT POPULATION BY MAJOR DIVISIONS OF MENTAL HEALTH
SERVICES BRANCH,  1952/53 TO  1961/62.
Fiscal Year
Provincial
Mental
Hospitals
Schools for
Mental
Defectives
Geriatric
Division
Crease
Clinic
Total
1952/53..
1953/54..
1954/55.
1955/56.
1956/57..
1957/58..
1958/59..
1959/60.
1960/61..
1961/62.
-64
+62
+44
+2
—70
-49
— 135
-253
—71
—247
+277
+ 104
+ 19
+ 19
+ 14
+76
+86
+93
+75
+73
+49
+50
"+15
+9
-15
-30
+ 156
+59
+7
+28
— 1
+25
-10
-31
+26
— 11
+24
—21
+ 11
+290
+215
+88
+26
—78
+38
-90
+20
+42
-156
 HEADQUARTERS
I 15
COMPARATIVE SUMMARY OF TOTAL PATIENTS UNDER CARE FOR
MAJOR DIVISIONS OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES BRANCH BY
FISCAL YEARS 1952/53 TO  1961/62.
Fiscal Year
Provincial
Mental
Hospitals
Schools for
Mental
Defectives
Geriatric
Division
Crease
Clinic
Total
1952/53        	
5,227
5,040
5,051
5,247
5,335
5,408
5,377
5,458
5,530
5,803
1,130
1,278
1,263
1,278
1,275
1,373
1,481
1,740
1,868
1,960
1,202
1,255
1,292
1,330
1,287
1,349
1,373
1,459
1,587
1,642
1,436
1,499
1,606
1,894
1,721
1,714
1,744
1,705
1,846
1,876
8,995
1953/54	
9,072
1954/55                            	
9,212
1955/56                            	
9,749
1956/57 --
1957/58    '	
1958/59      	
9,618
9,844
9,975
1959/60       -	
10,362
1960/61	
10,831
1961/62                                               	
11,281
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES,
APRIL 1,  1961, TO MARCH 31,  1962
Psychiatric
Division
Schools for Mental Defectives
Geriatric
Division
Total
M.       F.
1
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
In residence, April 1, 1961 	
On probation, carried forward from
1960/61     	
2,004 1,476
1221    308
51        1
3,480
430
6
905
12
666
11
1,571
23
630
4
608
8
1,238
12
3.539J 2,750
138j    327
5J        1
6,289
465
On  escape,   carried   forward   from
1960/61	
6
Total as at April 1, 1961	
2,131[1,785| 3,916
917|    677| 1,594
634
616| 1,250
3,682! 3,078
6,760
Admissions—
First admissions to Mental Health
988
140
906 1,894
1
1911    331
60
65
1
I
521     112
137
7
160
14
297
21
1.185   1.118
2,303
Readmissions to different institu-
147
777
205
761
352
Readmissions to same institution...
712     724[ 1,436
37
102
1,538
1,840  1,821
571      45
3,661
102
125
24
89|    214
128     152
144
61
174
13
318
74
2,109
142
2,084
186
4,193
Transfers in.  -	
328
Total  admissions   to  indi-
1,897| 1,866| 3,763
149
1
217|    366
205
187
392
I
2.251| 2.270
4,521
Total under care	
4,028j 3,651
7,697
1,056
894j 1,960
839
8031 1,642
5,791 J 5,162
10,9531
Separations—
Discharged in full 	
Died  	
On probation but not discharged
Escaped but not discharged	
1,7431 1,728
113       70
213 j    407
7         1
3,471
183
620
8
76
11
12
58
11
10
134
22
22
11
148
9
9
167
16
20
315
25
1,830]' 1,795
272 j    248
234     433
7|         1
3,625
520
667
8
2.0761 2.206 4.282
99
23
79
115
178
138
168
24
192
13
360
37
2.343  2.477
4,820
95 [       58
153
142
186
328
Total separations from indi-
1            I
2,171|2,264| 4,435
1
122]    194
316
192
205|    397
2,485 (2,663
5,148
-147   -89|-236
+ 39|  +34| +73
+ 17
-10|    +7
-91)  —65
— 156
In residence, March 31, 1962	
1,857| 1,387| 3,244
1          I
944|    7001 1,644
1          1
647
598! 1,245
1
3,448
2,685
6,133
i Total under care for all Mental Health Services includes total as at April 1, 1961, plus the total admissions
to individual institutions minus transfers out.
 I 16
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT.  1961/62
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION IN INDIVIDUAL INSTITUTIONS,
APRIL 1, 1961, TO MARCH 31, 1962
Psychiatric Division
Crease Clinic
Provincial Mental Hospitals
Total
Essondale
Colquitz
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
M.
1    F.
1
1
T.
In residence, April 1, 1961—	
On   probation,   carried   forward
from 1960/61     	
108
136
244
1,608
121
4
1,340
308
1
2,948
429
5
288
1
1
2,004
122
5
1,476
308
1
3,480
430
On escape, carried forward from
1960/61  	
6
Total as at April 1, 1961.
108
136
244
1,733 |  1,649
3,382
290
2,131
1,785
3,916
Admissions—
First   admissions   to   Mental
505
24
203
579
46
275
1,084
70
478
483
116
509
327
145
449
810
261
958
988
140
712
906
191
724
1,894
331
1,436
Readmissions to different institutions   	
Readmissions to same institution —      	
732
900
1,632
1,108
48
921
45
2,029
93
9
1,840
57
1,821
45
3 661
102
Total admissions to individual institution	
732
900
1,632
1,156
966
2,122
9
1,897
1,866
3,763
Total under care 	
840
1,036
1,876
2,889 | 2,615
5,504
299
4,028
3,651
7,679
Separations—■
701
3
855
1
1,556
4
1,040
103
212
6
873
69
407
1
1,913
172
619
7
2
7
1
1
1,743
113
213
7
1,728
70
407
1
3,471
Died               	
183
On   probation   but   not   dis-
620
Escaped but not discharged	
8
704
26
856
35
1,560
61
1,361  1  1,350
64 j       23
2,711
87
11
5
2,076
95
2,206
58
4,282
153
Total   separations  from
individual institution ....
730
891
1,621
1,425
1,373
2,798
16
2,171
2,264
4,435
Net increase or decrease._	
+2
+9
+ 11
— 144 |   —98
-242
—5
— 147
-89
—236
In residence, March 31, 1962 	
110
145
255
1,464 |  1,242
2,706
283
1,857
1,387
3,244
 HEADQUARTERS                                                        I 17
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION IN INDIVIDUAL INSTITUTIONS,
APRIL 1, 1961, TO MARCH 3.1, 1962—Continued
Schools for Mental Defectives
The Woodlands School,
New Westminster
Tranquille School,
Tranquille
Total
M.
F.
T.
M.   |    F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
In residence, April 1, 1961	
On   probation,   carried   forward   from
1960/61	
758
12
640
11
1,398
23
147
26
173
905
12
666
11
1,571
23
Total as at April 1, 1961
770 |     651 | 1,421
147 |       26 |     173
917
677
1,594
Admissions—
First   admissions   to   Mental
Health
60
65
52
37
112
102
	
	
60
65
52
37
112
102
Readmissions to same institution	
125
10
89
11
214
21
14
117
131
125
24
89
128
214
152
Transfers in 	
Total admissions to individual
institution 	
Total under care 	
Separations—
135
100
235
14
117
131
149
217
366
905 |     751 | 1,656
161 | .   143  |      304
1,066
894
1,960
76
11
12
58
11
1     io
134
22
22
     	
	
76
11
12
58
11
10
134
22
22
Died    	
On probation but not discharged	
99
15
79
111
178
126
8
4
12
99
23
79
115
178
138
Total separations from individual institution  	
114
190
304
8
4
12
112
194
316
Net increase or decrease  	
+33 |   -79 |   -46
+6 | +113 | +119
+39
+34
+73
791 1     561 1 1,352
153
139
292
944
700
1,644
Geriatric Division
Valleyview Hospital,
Essondale
Dellview Hospital,
Vernon
Skeena-
view
Hospital,
Terrace
Total
M.   [    F.     1    T.
M.   ■
F.     |    T.
M.
M.
*
x.
In residence, April 1, 1961..—	
On probation,  carried forward
from 1960/61....	
Total as at April 1, 1961
Admissions—
First   admissions   to   Mental
246
3
484
8
730
11
105
1
124        229
.... 1         1
279
630
4
608
8
. 1,238
12
249
492 1     741
106 |     124 |     230 |     279
634
616
1,250
90
5
113
11
203
16
34
2
47
3
81
5
13
137
7
160
14
297
21
Readmissions to different institutions   	
95
15
124
10
219
25
36
4
50
3
86
7
13
42
144
61
174
13
318
74
Total admissions to individual institutions...
Total under care	
Separations—
110
134
244
40
53
93
55
205
187
392
359 |     626 |     985
146 |     177 |     323 |     334
839
803
1,642
8
74
8
9
117
16
17
191
24
1  I     	
36 |       50
1 1     -	
1
86
1
2
38
11
148
9
9
167
16
20
315
25
Died	
On   probation   but   not   discharged 	
90
21
142
12
232
33
38
2
50
1
88
3
40
1
168
24
192
13
360
37
Total separations from
individual institution..
111
154
265
1
40 |       51
91
41
192
205
397
+2 |   —12 |   —10
+ 1   |      +2 |      +3  |    +14
+ "
-10
+7
In residence, March 31, 1962
248
472
720
106
126
232 |     293
647
598
1,245
 I 18 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT
F. A. Matheson, Business Manager
Attached hereto are the financial reports for the British Columbia Mental
Health Services Branch for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1962.
Tables A to J, inclusive, deal with the in-patient care units, while Tables K,
L, M, and N deal with the community services, rehabilitation centres, department
of nursing education, and general administration, respectively.
Table A shows the daily average patient population as 6,207.30, a decrease
of 85.07 from the previous year. This decrease is due mainly to a reduction in the
resident population at the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, of 83.44.
Maintenance expenditures for the in-patient care units increased by $423,-
902.06 to $15,832,999.14, the increase being made up of $406,880.27 in salaries
and the balance of $17,021.79 in supplies and operating expenses.
The gross daily per capita cost rose to $6.99 for the year, an increase of 28
cents over the previous fiscal year. The net per capita cost is $6.04, an increase of
16 cents over 1960/61.
Maintenance revenue continued to rise, the 1961/62 totals showing as $2,150,-
802.56, an increase of $243,954.85 over the 1960/61 total of $1,906,847.71.
The farms at Essondale, Colquitz, and Tranquille were taken over by the Department of Agriculture on April 1, 1961, but continued to supply the Mental Health
Services Branch with dairy produce, meats, vegetables, and canned goods. Transactions involving produce valued in excess of $500,000 were effected between the
two departments during the year.
Assistance from the Federal Government through the medium of health-grant
projects continued to be extremely important to our programme, and the funds provided, totalling $692,502.53, were expended for equipment, personnel, and staff-
training. A detailed statement covering these expenditures is appended to this
report.
I regret to advise that an unfortunate fire occurred in the Riverside Annex
Building at Colony Farm on the evening of January 31, 1962, in which a patient
lost his life. The fire caused such damage that the patients housed in this building had to be provided for elsewhere in the Hospital. Funds were immediately
released to the Department of Public Works for the repair of fire damage, and work
in this connection was completed in April of 1962.
A second shift started operating in the central laundry at Essondale in March,
1962. The start of this shift was necessary in order for the laundry to meet demands.
The second shift is proving to be most satisfactory as, in addition to being better
able to meet the demands for laundry, they are also able to improve the standard of
work and to maintain a higher standard of cleanliness in the laundry.
Radios have been installed in a number of Hospital and Public Works vehicles
at Essondale in order to increase the efficiency of the transportation department.
The volunteer fire department at the Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, has been
reactivated, and it has been supplied with all the necessary equipment, including a
small fire-truck.
The Public Works Department at Essondale and New Westminster was reorganized, and Mr. W. R. Meadows was appointed as General Superintendent with
headquarters in Vancouver. Mr. D. Murray was appointed Superintendent of Public
Works for Essondale and The Woodlands School. The Public Works staff in both
these areas are now considered as one and are interchangeable. These changes have
increased the efficiency and improved the service supplied to us by the Public Works
Department.
 HEADQUARTERS I 19
The year under review has been a particularly active one in so far as planning
and construction are concerned. Some of the main items of interest in this regard
are as follows:—
General Administration.—A contract in the amount of $29,134 was let for the
construction of a new Accounting Building at Essondale. This building was completed in November, 1961. With the completion of this building, we were able to
consolidate our accounting departments, and as a result have a much more efficient
operation.
The butcher-shop section of the central stores at Essondale was completely
renovated.
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.—The brick and ornamental-stone work
on the outside of the Crease Clinic was repaired and cleaned.
Wards North 3 and South 3 of the North Lawn Building were converted into
infirmary wards, and the infirmary patients from Wards D 2 and E 2 in the Centre
Lawn Building were transferred to these new infirmary wards.
The Deputy Minister appointed a committee to plan a new medical clinic for
Essondale. This committee submitted a report regarding our requirements, and the
Public Works Department has appointed an architect, who is now working with the
committee preparing preliminary plans.
Plans for the complete renovation of the West Lawn kitchens and dining-rooms
are presendy being prepared.
A contract in the amount of $103,614 was let for the new Telephone Exchange
and Credit Union Building.
A contract in the amount of $503,462 was let for the new Industrial Therapy
Building.
A contract was let for a new Public Works Shop Building.
Plans are being prepared for new fire-escapes for the Centre Lawn Building.
Work in connection with the building of a new incinerator at Colony Farm is
proceeding.
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz.—The old boiler-house was converted into
a storage-shed.
Valleyview Hospital, Essondale.—Plans are being prepared for the complete
renovation of Buildings VV. 1, 2, and 3.
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace.—-The exteriors of all the Hospital buildings were
painted, and the general offices were renovated.
A chlorinator was installed in the water system.
A survey was made of the fire-alarm and telephone systems, and work on plans
for their replacement started.
The Woodlands School, New Westminster. — A contract in the amount of
$58,054 was let for the conversion of Nurses' Home No. 2 to an Administration
Building.
Toilet facilities were provided for four outside playing areas.
The Tranquille School, Tranquille.—New showers were installed in the Central
Building.
Work was started on the renovation of the Greaves Building to make it suitable
for crib-patient care.
Air-conditioning units were installed in the Main Building and Annex, and in
the patients' dining-room.
The power-house smoke-stack was replaced.
A survey of the water system is being carried out by consulting engineers.
Four houses were received from the Department of Highways for staff residences. Work in connection with the installing of these houses on the grounds and
servicing them is proceeding.
 I 20                           MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
A contract has been let for the installation of a new floor in the pumproom of
the boiler-house.
Work in connection with the installation of new fire-escapes in the Central
Building was started.
Victoria.—The Minister appointed a committee to start planning for a new
mental-health facility in Victoria.   This committee is under the chairmanship of the
Deputy Minister.
Kelowna.—Plans for the establishment of a mental-health centre at Kelowna
to serve the Okanagan area have been completed, and the plans to enlarge the Kel
owna Community Health Centre to provide accommodation for the centre have
been approved.
In addition to the above, I am also pleased to be able to report that the build
ings, grounds, equipment, and furnishings in all the institutions were well main
tained, and that a considerable amount of new equipment and furniture, both replace
ment and additional, was purchased during the year.
FINANCIAL TABLES
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence Each
Year, the Total Amounts Spent for Maintenance, and the Gross
Yearly and Daily per Capita Cost, 1952/53 to 1961/62.
Average
l\/f a i n tpn 3r\ n f*f>
Yearly
Daily
Institution
Number in
Residence
.V1l1J11LLiU11JL.L
Expenditure
per Capita
Cost
per Capita
Cost
1952/53
Provincial Mental Hospital, New West-
949.24
$1,590,703.00
$1,675.76
$4.59
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale...
3,440.34
4,441,278.38
1,290.94
3.54
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz.-	
284.79
433,108.50
1,520.80
4.17
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam	
442.94
617,445.55
1,393.97
3.82
Home for the Aged, Vernon       	
224.18
384,971.73
1,717.24
4.70
Home for the Aged, Terrace    	
292.07
325,842.57
1,115.63
3.06
Crease Clinic                    -	
230.77
759,406.04
3,290.75
9.02
Totals for the year              	
5,864.33         |         $8,552,755.77
$1,458.44                  $4.00
1953/54
The Woodlands School        -	
1,150.76
$1,768,922.31
$1,537.18
$4.21
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale....
3,491.15
4,393,682.65
1,258.52
3.45
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz 	
285.28
421,622.61
1,477.93
4.05
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam..	
469.13
683,511.48
1,456.98
3.99
Home for the Aged, Vernon	
228.26
378,006.20
1,656.03
4.54
Home for the Aged, Terrace	
293.19
330,968.40
1,128.85
3.09
Crease Clinic...             	
235.16
788,302.36
3,352.20
9.18
Totals for the year             	
6,152.93        |        $8,765,016.01
$1,424.53         |        $3.90
1954/55
The Woodlands School        	
1,204.60
$1,811,848.81
$1,504.11
$4.12
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale ...
3,517.75
4,685,444.76
1,331.94
3.65
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
285.74
426,786.04
1,493.62                  4.09
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam	
527.33
739,859.92
1,403.03
3.84
Home for the Aged, Vernon	
230.72
368,726.10
1,598.15
4.38
Home for the Aged, Terrace	
296.42
328,553.97
1,108.41
3.04
Crease Clinic                                       	
238.63        i             860,673.73
3,606.73
9.88
Totals for the year... —	
6,301.19                $9,221,893.33     -
I
$1,463.52
$4.01
1955/56
1
The Woodlands School.	
1,219.45
3,508.79
$2,032,263.32
5,377,708.34
$1,666.54
1,532.64
$4.55
4.19
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale...
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
285.30
428,248.27
1,501.05
4.10
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam
539.27
797,392.10
1,478.65
4.04
Home for the Aged, Vernon 	
229.62
371,438.14
1,617.62
4.42
Home for the Aged, Terrace	
287.30
351,087.68
1,222.02
3.34
Crease Clinic	
257.96
935,501.07
3,626.54
9.91
Totals for the year 	
6,327.69        |      $10,293,638.92
1
$1,626.76                $4.44
1
 headquarters
I 21
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence Each
Year, the Total Amounts Spent for Maintenance, and the Gross
Yearly and Daily per Capita Cost, 1952/53 to 1961/62—Continued.
Institution
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Yearly
per Capita
Cost
Daily
per Capita
Cost
1956/57
1,232.48
3,503.60
284.81
541.83
232.58
288.45
232.85
$2,246,193.06
5,851,370.53
446,497.91
831,370.73
402,867.14
350,880.96
996,288.31
$1,822.50
1,670.10
1,567.70
1,534.38
1,732.17
1,216.43
4,278.67
$4.99
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale —
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz.	
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam	
Home for the Aged, Vernon—	
4.58
4.30
4.20
4.75
3.33
Crease Clinic        —
11.72
6,316.60              $11,125,468.64
$1,761.31                 $4.83
1957/58
The Woodlands School	
1,266.21
3,410.79
285.36
538.56
231.34
288.63
235.31
$2,484,024.86
5,716,745.90
460,863.85
898,225.93
395,584.86
379,826.63
1,077,897.96
$1,961.78
1,676.08
1,615.03
1,667.83
1,709.97
1,315.96
4,580.76
$5.37
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.—
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz—	
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam
4.59
4.42
4.57
4.68
Home for the Aged, Terrace—    .',	
Crease Clinic 	
3.61
12.55
Totals for the year	
6,256.20              $11,413,169.99
$1,824.30                  $5.00
1958/59
1,377.31
3,301.84
282.99
539.13
226.33
282.92
236.88
$2,968,725.50
6,088,091.20
488,028.69
961,921.63
410,529.00
386,804.84
1,149,344.46
$2,155.45
1,843.84
1,724.55
1,784.22
1,813.86
1,367.19
4,852.01
$5.91
5.05
4.72
4.89
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale—
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz ~
4.97
Home for the Aged, Terrace 	
3.75
13.29
Totals for the year  	
6,247.40
$12,453,445.32
$1,993.38                $5.46
1959/60
Crease Clinic   	
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale—
The Woodlands School    _
226.80
3,135.48
1,395.44
53.74
283.50
560.16
230.92
285.18
$1,233,254.59
6,672,849.09
3,443,231.64
400,957.24
523,480.74
1,400,239.30
444,975.54
412,230.25
$5,437.63
2,128.17
2,467.49
7,461.06
1,846.49
2,499.71
1,926.97
1,445.51
$14,86
5.81
6 74
20 39
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
Valleyview Hospital, Port Coquitlam
Dellview Hospital, Vernon	
5.05
6.83
5.26
3 95
Totals for the year  .. .
6,171.22               $14,531,218.39
$2,354.68        |        $6.43
1960/61
237.72
3,008.02
1,415.30
126.01
287.16
695.41
232.05
290.70
$1,313,678.32
6,775,567.11
3,637,555.12
542,556.16
518,591.72
1,754,500.08
448,792.02
417,856.55
$5,526.16
2,252.50
2,570.17
4,305.66
1,805.93
2,522.97
1,934.03
$15.14
6.17
7.04
11.80
4.95
6.91
5.30
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale....
The Woodlands School  	
Tranquille School, Tranquille —	
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
Valleyview Hospital, Port Coquitlam	
Dellview Hospital, Vernon    	
,
Totals for the year 	
6,292.37
$15,409,097.08
$2,448.85                  $6.71
1961/62
241.92
2,824.58
1,351.62
250.33
284.90
736.29
230.38
287.28
$1,344,906.48
6,927,591.07
3,639,782.25
657,736.27
507,315.85
1,848,097.68
464,314.47
443,255.07
$,5559.30
2,452.61
2,692.90
2,627.47
1,780.68
2,510.01
2,015.43
1,542.94
$15.23
6.72
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale...
Tranquille School, Tranquille	
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz
Valleyview Hospital, Port Coquitlam
Dellview Hospital, Vernon  	
7.20
4.88
6.88
5.52
6.7.07.30           1        «1^ SI? QQQ 14
$2,550.71
$6.99
1
 I 22
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Table B.—Summary Statement Showing the Gross and Net per Capita Cost
of Patients in all Mental Health Services Institutions for the Year
Ended March 31, 1962.
Gross operating costs—
Crease Clinic   $1,344,906.48
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale  6,927,591.07
The Wodlands School, New Westminster  3,639,782.25
Tranquille School, Tranquille  657,736.27
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz  507,315.85
Valleyview Hospital, Port Coquitlam  1,848,097.68
Dellview Hospital, Vernon  464,314.47
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace  443,255.07
Gross costs of all institutions.
$15,832,999.14
Less collections remitted to Treasury       2,150,802.56
$13,682,196.58
Daily average population     6,207.30
Gross per capita cost, one year  $2,550.71
Gross per capita cost, one day  6.99
Net per capita cost, one year     2,204.21
Net per capita cost, one day  6.04
Revenue (Patients' Maintenance Collections) oj the Mental Health Services
jor the Past Ten Years
1952/53  $1,147,831.65 1957/58  $1,724,046.70
1953/54  1,300,056.89 1958/59     1,838,158.33
1954/55  1,343,848.02 1959/60     1,821,810.53
1955/56  1,358,708.26 1960/61     1,906,847.71
1956/57  1,546,266.32 1961/62     2,150,802.56
Table C.—Expense Statement of the Crease Clinic of Psychological
Medicine, Essondale, for Twelve Months Ended March 31, 1962
Salaries, Supplies, and Operating
Expense
Net Vouchered
Expenditure as
per Public
Accounts
Services and
Supplies from
Public Works
Department
Actual Cost
of Operation
Yearly per
Capita Cost
$1,001,157.70
2,686.52
2,863.77
1,739.09
23,870.00
87,243.18
120,449.85
9,600.00
26,817.61
4,200.00
10,529.47
1,587.51
$1,001,157.70
2,686.52
2,863.77
1,739.09
23,870.00
87,243.18
120,449.85
9,600.00
26,817.61
4,200.00
10,529.47
1,587.51
52,161.78
$4,138.38
11.11
11.84
7.19
98.67
360.63
497.89
39.68
110.85
17.36
$52,161.78
43.52
6.56
Buildings and grounds, etc 	
215.62
Totals  	
$1,292,744.70
$52,161.78
$1,344,906.48
$5,559.30
 HEADQUARTERS
I 23
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 HEADQUARTERS
I 25
Table H.—Expense Statement of the Valleyview Hospital, Port
Coquitlam, for Twelve Months Ended March 31, 1962
Salaries, Supplies, and
Operating Expenses
Net Vouchered
Expenditure
as per
Public Accounts
Services and
Supplies from
Public Works
Department
Actual Cost of
Operation
Yearly per
Capita Cost
$1,334,650.55
5,346.47
1,312.19
1,292.11
62,300.04
85,866.90
204,422.28
18,000.00
4,800.00
67,576.94
1,921.70
2,216.19
6,135.05
	
$1,334,650.55
5,346.47
1,312.19
1,292.11
62,300.04
85,866.90
204,422.28
18,000.00
4,800.00
67,576.94
1,921.70
2,216.19
6,135.05
52,257.26
$1,812.67
7.26
1.78
1.75
84.62
116.62
277.64
24.45
6.52
91.78
2.61
3.01
8.33
$52,257.26
70.97
Totals        	
$1,795,840.42
$52,257.26
$1,848,097.68
$2,510.01
 1 26
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
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 HEADQUARTERS
I 27
Table K.—Expense Statement of the Community Services for Twelve
Months Ended March 31, 1962
Mental Health Centre, Burnaby
Salaries 	
Office expense	
Travelling expense 	
Office furniture and equipment
Heat, light, water, and power __
Medical care	
Dietary 	
Laundry  	
Motor-vehicles and accessories
Transportation 	
General supplies „.
Occupational and recreational therapy
Incidentals and contingencies	
Buildings, grounds, etc. 	
$376,398.02
2,698.26
10,829.24
17,732.36
12,066.77
7,062.61
1,500.00
1,821.98
1,980.66
2,900.49
2,481.98
2,763.52
37,783.07
Total  $478,018.96
Mental Health Centre, Victoria
Salaries 	
Office expense	
Travelling expense 	
Office furniture and equipment
Incidentals and contingencies __
Total	
$41,090.98
325.04
1,306.79
4.14
350.61
$43,077.56
Grand total, $521,096.52.
 1 28 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Table L.—Expense Statements of the Rehabilitation Centres for
Twelve Months Ended March 31, 1962
Vista Rehabilitation Centre
Salaries   $9,679.32
Office expense  17.05
Heat, light, water, and power  881.64
Medical care     	
Dietary   2,763.30
Laundry    512.48
General supplies   297.60
Incidentals and contingencies  63.07
Buildings, grounds, etc.   1,156.63
Total     $15,371.09
Venture Rehabilitation Centre
Salaries   $7,830.40
Office expense  564.79
Travelling expense  	
Heat, light, water, and power  1,024.95
Dietary   4,184.33
General supplies   104.19
Incidentals and contingencies  49.49
Buildings, grounds, etc.   1,914.74
Total  $15,672.89
Grand total, $31,043.98.
Table M.—Expense Statement of General Administration, Mental
Health Services Branch, for Twelve Months Ended March 31,1962
Salaries   $162,846.03
Office expense  4,763.18
Travelling expense  7,267.62
Office furniture and equipment _•_  7.55
Incidentals and contingencies  2,297.93
Subscription, Social Service Index  245.35
Total  $177,427.66
Table N.—Expense Statement of the Department of Nursing Education,
Essondale, for Twelve Months Ended March 31, 1962
Salaries   $746,746.14
Office expense  3,722.48
TravelUng expense   210.14
Office furniture and equipment  1,714.90
Medical care  17.90
Dietary   8,362.76
Laundry  4,627.47
General supplies  9,452.96
Incidentals and contingencies  1,561.08
Total  $776,415.83
 HEADQUARTERS I 29
Expenditure Made under Federal Health Grants for Province of
British Columbia, Year Ended March 31, 1962
Assistance to Provincial Mental Hospitals—
Equipment      $13,379.95
Staff salaries     291,839.59
  $305,219.54
The Woodlands School, New Westminster—-
Equipment   $ 124,584.56
Staff salaries  474.57
Assistance to  the  Geriatric  Division   (Valleyview,  Dellview,   and
Skeenaview)—
Equipment        $ 1,999.80
Staff salaries         3,060.00
125,059.13
5,059.80
Mental Health Centre, Burnaby—Staff salaries       11,245.00
Division of Nursing Education—
Equipment   $262.97
Staff salaries         5,400.00
         5,662.97
Study of combined course in psychiatric and general nursing—-
Equipment  $ 3.00
Staff salaries         3,424.81
         3,427.81
Consultant staff, Mental Health Services Branch—Staff salaries         3,560.00
Assistant to the Department of Psychiatry       25,051.13
Neurophysiological Research Unit at University of British Columbia—
Identification and quantitation of aromatic compounds in schizophrenic urine     $17,765.85
Central effect of biologically active factors in the
urine extracts of normals and schizophrenics      22,850.52
Disturbed metabolic pathways as casual factors in
schizophrenia        17,656.08
Electroencephalograph^ effects of psychic ener-
gizers and their possible relationships to adrenergic mechanisms in the brain       17,453.53
       75,725.98
Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Psychiatry       11,503.73
Metropolitan Health Committee—Mental-hygiene programme       41,273.00
Assistance to the epileptic programme in British Columbia         6,509.40
Assistance to the Children's Foundation       12,200.00
Assistance to Narcotic Addiction Foundation         4,800.00
Medical film library -         1,187.61
General personnel training—
Short courses in mental health       $4,184.06
Postgraduate training       50,833.37
       55,017.43
Total   $692,502.53
 I 30 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
PERSONNEL REPORT
J. Dowling, Personnel Officer
During the fiscal year the approved establishment of the Mental Health Services increased by 160 positions.
The monthly average of persons on staff, excluding students, rose from 2,974
in the preceding fiscal year to 3,061, an increase of eighty-seven actually on the
payroll.
Details of the above changes are contained in Tables A and D on pages 30
and 32.
Recruitment has kept pace with separations in nearly all classifications, as
shown in Table B.
In the past, short-term relief staff has not been excluded from staff turnover
calculations. The use of temporary staff for vacation and sick relief in increasing
numbers over the past two years has made it necessary to revise methods. This year
Table B provides a more complete picture of the rates of staff turnover.
In addition to the very extensive educational and in-service training programmes outlined elsewhere in this Report, a course in supervisory training was given
by the Personnel Officer. A total of sixty-three supervisors in the Charge Nurse,
Head Nurse, and Charge Cook classifications enrolled for this training.
The Personnel Officer participated in the following matters of some importance:—
(1) The staffing of the Main Building at the Tranquille School.
(2) The planning and staffing of the new Rehabilitation and After Care Services of the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
(3) The provision of staff for the Mental Health Centre, Kelowna, which will
begin service early in the next fiscal year.
(4) A staff reorganization of the Essondale laundry to provide for a night shift.
(5) An analysis of the work being performed by psychiatric aides.
(6) The introduction of the dietary aide classification. This is a step toward
separating the food-service function from nursing services, and organizing
it where it properly belongs, under the dietary administration. Twenty-five
psychiatric aide positions were reclassified to dietary aide during the year.
(7) A review of the staff organization of the Crease Clinic, the Provincial
Mental Hospital, and The Woodlands School.
Table A.—Summary Showing Over-all Staff Totals in Relation
to Separation and Recruitment
Staff recruited, excluding students      770
Staff separated, excluding students       734
Increase         36
Total staff, excluding students, as of March 31, 1962  3,053
iTotal staff, excluding students, as of March 31, 1961  3,017
Increase         36
Monthly staff average, excluding students, 1961/62  3,061
1Monthly staff average, excluding students, 1960/61   2,974
Increase         87
i Items adjusted to reflect the transfer of farms staffs to the Department of Agriculture, effective April 1,
1961.
 HEADQUARTERS
I 31
Table A.—Summary Showing Over-all Staff Totals in Relation
to Separation and Recruitment—Continued
Student enrolment as of March 31, 1962.
Student enrolment as of March 31, 196L
Change 	
Student monthly average, 1961/62	
Student monthly average, 1960/61 	
Change 	
Male
64
Female
181
193
Total
245
82
275
_ —18
-12
— 30
251
267
— 16
Table B.—Breakdown by Classification of Recruitment and Separation
Activity for the Mental Health Services, Excluding Student
Psychiatric Nurses.
Recruited
Physicians   23
Medical interns  13
Registered nurses   28
Female psychiatric nurses  139
Male psychiatric nurses  60
Female psychiatric aides   141
Male psychiatric aides     90
Teachers        1
Occupational therapists       8
Recreational therapists        3
Industrial therapists        5
Psychologists     14
Social workers      16
Dieticians	
Cooks 	
Kitchen helpers 	
Clerks 	
Stenographers 	
Trades	
Laundry-workers 	
Miscellaneous professional
Miscellaneous technical	
Miscellaneous 	
Farm labour	
Separated
23
13
27
144
44
164
91
1
10
5
3
9
12
6
10
43
38
9
9
42
34
34
19
14
14
9
6
70
58
Totals
770
734
 I 32
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Table C.—Summary of Staff Turnover
By Major Classification
Classification
1960/61
1961/62
Change
Student psychiatric nurses..
Male psychiatric nurses	
Female psychiatric nurses...
Registered nurses	
Per Cent
22.1
9.1
26.4
26.1
Per Cent
22.4
9.4
29.8
30.0
Per Cent
+ .3
+ •3
+3.4
+3.9
Note.—Items 1 and 2 have been calculated against the monthly average and other items have been calculated
against the year-end staff totals.
By Pay Division
Pay Division
Temporary Relief
Staff Excluded,
1961/62
Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale..
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz 	
The Woodlands School  	
The Tranquille School  	
Valleyview Hospital    	
Dellview Hospital  _ 	
Skeenaview Hospital	
Mental Health Centres	
Over-all turnover— —   	
Note.—Percentages calculated against year-end staff totals.
Table D.-
-comparison of staff totals by unit with totals for the
Preceding Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year 1960/61
Fiscal Year 1961/62
Positions
in Establishment as of
Mar. 31,
1961
Number on
Staff as of
Mar. 31,
1961
Positions
in Establishment as of
Mar. 31,
1962
Number on
Staff as of
Mar. 31,
1962
37
55
98
36
49
85
37
55
106
37
56
91
190
170
198
184
In-patient care—
282
1,113
80
742
95
409
77
59
285
1,137
81
743
71
391
80
59
285
1,152
80
763
174
413
80
62
273
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale— -	
1,129
81
The Woodlands School                 .                 	
760
90
393
81
62
Total of vote             -	
2,857
2,847
3,009
2,869
Farms—l
52
8
28
52
8
24
Total of vote                .    .            	
88
84
3,135
325
3,101
275
3,207
325
3,053
245
Totals
3,460
3,376
3,532
3,298
1 Transferred to Department of Agriculture, April 1,1961.
 HEADQUARTERS
I 33
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 I 34 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SUPERVISOR OF
PSYCHIATRIC SOCIAL WORK
Miss A. K. Carroll, Provincial Supervisor
Throughout the Mental Health Services the social service departments have
found this year to be one of increasing demands, extension of services, challenge,
stimulation, and serious endeavour. The latter has called for an analysis and re-
focussing of social service organization, administrative procedures, services, and
functions in order to provide a basic minimal coverage of patients' needs arising from
a situation involving increased admissions, accelerated treatment, and discharge.
FUNCTIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF CONSULTATIVE RESPONSIBILITIES
Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic
In the light of the demands in the changing situation noted above, the chief
social worker of this division requested consultative help which involved a study of
the patient-group and the problems presented at the points of admission and discharge from the Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic. The study was
specifically related to ascertaining ways in which social services might be reorganized,
relocated, and refocussed to best meet the demands of the changing situation.
The study, focussed as it was on ascertaining the psycho-sociologic statuses
of patients being admitted for psychiatric treatment, resulted in a recommendation
for the development of centralized sections in the social service departments of the
Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic, the responsibilities of these sections
being to cover the admission and discharge social-service needs of patients entering
hospital for short periods of treatment and care.
This recommendation was accepted, and the sectional organization and services
were developed under the supervision of senior social workers. These positions were
established through job study and reclassification. The responsibilities of this personnel are to over-view discharge plans for short-stay patients generally, further
extend coverage through brief social services, particularly those related to discharge,
and the subsequent provision of social services in those instances where they cannot
be given by social workers assigned to specific services or teams. Additionally, this
development of a brief social service section frees other casework staff to meet the
more complex social needs of acutely ill patients. This development, to date, while
not still possible of total coverage, has nevertheless resulted in more efficient discharge plans.
During this year the social service department has been concerned not only
with consolidating and improving existing services to in-hospital patients and their
families, but with their expansion into the areas of intermediate care (family-care
homes and boarding homes) and after-care services as well. Since the start of the
intermediate-care programme in 1959, some 317 improved mental patients from
long-term treatment units have been placed in boarding homes, and in some instances
with foster-families. Of this group of 317 patients, 134 have been discharged in full
to municipal and Provincial social welfare services. One hundred and fifty patients
in this group remain in intermediate care of the Provincial Mental Hospital, living in
boarding homes and family-care homes. Throughout the fiscal year, social workers
in the Provincial Mental Hospital have assumed the necessary placement and supervisory responsibilities in relation to this group and in relation to the care and social
programmes in operation in the boarding homes. The boarding-home programme
has been co-ordinated by the consultant who works closely with the administration
 HEADQUARTERS I 35
and regional offices of the Department of Social Welfare. However, over the years
of the boarding-home operation 52 per cent of the total monthly in-patient man-
hours of social work has been spent in the preparation of patients for boarding-home
care, their placement and continuing supervision. As a result, less than 50 per cent
of total monthly man-hours was spent in services to patients during their hospitalization. To bring relief to this stressing situation, it was recommended that one
social worker be appointed to administer the boarding-home programme as a beginning to the creation of a specific establishment. This appointment to the Provincial
Mental Hospital was made during the fiscal year. The co-ordination of the programme will continue as before.
This appointment will undoubtedly relieve to a degree the demands made on
the in-hospital social service department in the area of intermediate care of patients.
The duties of the boarding-home social worker involve home-finding, home-studying,
recommending licensing, the supervision of the boarding-home operation, the supervision of the programme for the patients in boarding homes, and the supervision of
the individual patients placed.
In the boarding-home programme, the Provincial Mental Hospital assumes
responsibilities in regard to the motivation of patients toward the acceptance of
boarding-home placement, transportation of patients to boarding-homes, emergency
services, consultative services, and general psychiatric over-view.
Close co-operation with the Department of Social Welfare is maintained both at
administrative and operational levels. At the latter level, co-operation is achieved
by the boarding-home social worker being appointed to the Provincial Mental Hospital staff and in the evaluation, licensing, and supervision of boarding homes
working with the office of the Inspector of Welfare Institutions and, in this specific
area, under the supervision of that office.
The assistance of the Official Committee has been of great value in the boarding-
home programme in the services this office brings in legal protection to the person
of the patient and his estate.
During the year the progress in the on-going development of the boarding-home
programme has been rewarding and reassuring. Administratively, progress has been
made in definitive planning for financing, as well as in the delineation of functions
and servicers between the Department of Social Welfare and the Mental Health
Services in relation to the development of a service adequate in standards of intermediate care and valuable to the patients in the maintenance of easeful social functioning and purposeful social behaviour.
Valleyview Hospital
During the year a social service department has been established at Valleyview
Hospital. This establishment permits three social-work positions. The social workers have been active in the pre-admission phase of the patients' hospitalization,
during which the applicant for admission and his social situation are studied and
assessed. As a result of such studies and assessments and in consultation with the
psychiatrists, private placement in boarding-home or nursing-home care has been
recommended as more suitable and valuable to the applicant. In such instances,
relatives have been helped to understand the benefit of the recommendation to the
applicant and then assisted in the placement of the applicant in suitable care with
the reassurance that the hospital stands by to help the relative and the applicant and
that the social worker will continue to visit if this is desired.
 I 36 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Social workers have also been active in studying and assessing the needs of
selected patients in the Hospital who could be discharged to the care of relatives or
friends, as well as being active with selected patients who could, with the necessary
casework help and support in conjunction with services from psychiatry, nursing,
occupational, and recreational therapy, be motivated toward the use of boarding-
home care.
The social workers have been active in community interpretation and in promoting, with the assistance of community public health and welfare agencies, cooperative policies whereby aged persons may be assisted in a way geared to the
prevention of hospitalization, as well as to the assistance of the aged person leaving
hospital. This work has been directed toward making the Hospital a part of a totally
community-based programme for the aged, in which it functions as a hospital and is
related by co-operative policies to community services for the welfare of the aged.
The Woodlands School
During the year this staff of seven social workers has averaged 124 home visits
per month to parents having mentally subnormal children awaiting admission. Social
services to parents of mentally subnormal children awaiting admission, measured on
the basis of direct interviews and excluding letter and telephone interviews, numbered 217 monthly. Additionally, social services to an average of seventy-four
pupils in residence accounted for 449 interviews per month. Social services were
rendered to an average of fifteen patients per month who were on probation to
parents, relatives, foster homes, or work homes.
Group-work consultation services have been offered to nursing personnel additional to direct activity with groups of pupil-patients resident in areas designated to
enhance the social habits and skills of the pupils.
The need to provide for and develop family-care and boarding-out facilities is
recognized by the administration, and to this end a committee has studied the
problems of mental subnormality confronting the Mental Health Services and the
Department of Social Welfare.
Mental Health Centres
Consultation and services have been given regarding the recruitment and training of social-work personnel specifically in relation to the responsibilities of the
social-work consultant to the travelling clinics and the position of regional supervisor of psychiatric social work in the Okanagan region Mental Health Centre.
In summary, an outstanding feature of social-work practice throughout all the
divisions of the Mental Health Services has been the activity of personnel in work
with groups. In the Provincial Mental Hospital, social workers, with consultation
from the social group worker have been active with patient-groups in hospital, in the
half-way homes, and in the boarding homes. Such groups served a therapeutically
useful purpose in helping prepare patients for their return to community life by
providing them with an opportunity to share their feelings associated with discharge
from hospital and, through the group support thus engendered, to clarify and resolve
many anxieties and concerns which were besetting them.
In The Woodlands School, social workers have also been active as consultants
to nurses in group programmes on the wards and directly with groups geared to
sharing experiences, discussing problems, sharing concerns in a way which brought
ease individually and enhancement of group inter-supports.
In the Mental Health Centres, social workers have been active in group programmes in the Adult Clinic.
 HEADQUARTERS I 37
Rehabilitation and After-care Unit
This year a senior social worker was appointed to the stationary team in this
unit, which is a new service. This social worker has responsibility for co-ordinating
the social service aspects of the after-care programme, as well as supervisory responsibility for meeting social-work requirements in the after-care out-patient department.
Other responsibilities involve social services to in-patients in the half-way homes
and liaison and consultation to co-operating agencies, as well as supervision of the
student training programme.
Social-work Consultant Service
This service to divisions, as noted above, entailed the expenditure of 41 per
cent of the consultant's monthly man-hours of work. Direct consultative services
to all divisions was given in the following areas: Patient selection and motivtaion
in the use of intermediate-care facilities, such as family-care homes and boarding
homes; recruitment, staffing, and staff-patterning; organizational and functional
changes to permit expansion of coverage of patients' needs; development of casework supervisory skills; intake and discharge functions of social workers in geriatric
services; the detailing of adequate social services to patients in boarding homes and
family-care homes; the formulation of interagency co-operative service policies in
the after-care unit.
PERSONNEL AND RECRUITMENT FOR SOCIAL SERVICE
DEPARTMENTS, MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
The recruitment of social workers to the Mental Health Services continues to
be facilitated by the use of Federal Mental Health Grants. These are offered to
graduate university students through the auspices of the National health grant. This
year seven social workers were recruited to the service from the pool of practising
social workers in the community. Nine social workers, recipients of Federal Mental
Health Grant bursaries, returned to staff. Of this nine, six bursary students were
from the social service staff of the Mental Health Services and three were recruited
from outside the service. Early in February some eighteen persons with Bachelor
of Arts degree applied for Federal Mental Health bursaries. Of this number, ten
applicants were selected. Of this number of ten applicants, three applied from the
social service departments of the Mental Health Services and seven were recruited
from outside the service. The values of the Federal Mental Health bursary programme can be clearly realized in that some 80 per cent of social-work staff have
been recruited through this means.
PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES, SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS, MENTAL HEALTH
SERVICES.
Sixteen students from the School of Social Work, University of British Columbia, had field-work placements in the Mental Health Services. The student
training programme, in which casework supervisors and senior social-work practitioners co-operate, offers opportunities for contact with the University and opens up
many opportunities for attendance at educational conferences and seminars focussed
on the enrichment and expansion of teaching and supervisory methods. On the
other hand, University faculty have an opportunity to gain some understanding of
the standards of practice and the programme operating in the agency of field-work
 I 38 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
placement. This co-operation in an education programme has mutual benefits
which are inestimable to agency and school progress.
In the Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic, the staff development
programme during the year was in line with the growing emphasis on the importance
of social-work research to the profession as a whole. A project was commenced
toward the end of the previous fiscal year, but was of necessity continued well into
1961 before tabulation of statistics was completed. The purpose of the study was
to obtain a valid sample of a group of patients from which it was possible to draw
social research information at any time. In order to meet the requirements of individual hospital units, some adaptation was necessary on the basic schedule employed.
The study, which was completed by the Crease Clinic social-work staff and
which was illustrative of the general approach, was concerned with 354 male and
female patients, including those who were resident as of December 31, 1960, and
those who were admitted during the following month. Basic social information on
each patient was obtained primarily from his clinical record, and included such
items as identifying data, length of hospitalization, casework services rendered, etc.
From some twenty-two categories thus covered, it is now possible, through use of
the I.B.M. system (to which this research was geared), to draw out many different
samples of social factors which were common to this patient-group, and to use this
material in predicting special problem areas and casework needs.
In the Mental Health Centres the staff development programme in social work
has continued with a twice-a-month meeting of social workers in the two clinics.
One major focus in this year has been an attempt to study and integrate some of the
recently developed research and methods designed to make better use of appropriate social-science knowledge and strengthen professional contributions to understanding family dynamics and implementing services at the level of family and social
interaction. This has involved review of literature, case discussion, and consideration
of application to the clinical setting. These and other staff meetings in the individual
clinics help considerably to encourage good standards, the flexible use of skills,
stepped-up learning, and integration of new staff to clinical practice. We are pleased
that the general-staff meeting programme has developed so well this year, and I feel
that this has aided in extending knowledge and perspective.
A series of meetings between psychiatry and social-work senior staff in the
Adult Clinic has been most useful in dealing with some aspects of policy and procedure, sharing thinking about complementary professional roles, and working out
problems of communication and interdisciplinary responsibilities. The management
of team programmes, particularly where there is close sharing and interaction, always
presents a challenge to good communication and clarity of function, and I believe a
more regular provision for meetings of this kind will facilitate teamwork. It has
been agreed that a meeting every month of social-work supervisor and team leaders
will be tried as a method of continuing this kind of communication and further
clarifying team interaction.
It was possible during the year to arrange to send ten members of the social
service staff of the Mental Health Services to the following institutes and workshops: National Conference on Social Welfare; Chief Social Workers' Institute,
State Mental Health Programmes; Social Workers' Institute; Canadian Psychiatric
Association; Pacific Northwest Regional Institute of Medical Social Work Section
of the National Association of Social Work; Seminar in Social Work, University of
British Columbia.
Early in July of this year, Professor Eleanor Cockerill of the School of Social
Work, University of Pittsburgh, visited the Mental Health Services for a week.   Miss
 HEADQUARTERS
I 39
Cockerill had just returned from a sabbatical year, during which she had worked as
social-work consultant to Dr. MacMillan and in his programme in community-
centred psychiatry. Miss Cockerill, one of the United States' great scholars in social
work and a leadership person in the community organization of public- and mental-
health services, addressed multi-disciplinary groups throughout the divisions. She
also conducted an inspiring short institute for social workers in the Mental Health
Services. The theme of the institute was " Social Work Trends and Challenges."
It was an inspiring visit from a person of signal ability in her field.
Central Branch Responsibilities
The following reports have been prepared for branch administration: Organizational and Administrative Aspects of Boarding Home and Family Care, special
reports regarding residential treatment needs of mentally and emotionally ill children
as well as mentally subnormal children. A kit has been set up for directing social
workers in basic social services to the aged. A report on procedures in the inter-
provincial transfer of psychiatric patients on discharge was completed, as well as a
report on protection needs of children being discharged from residential units.
An interdepartmental case review committee has been set up through which the treatment and discharge needs of children are reviewed. Membership is drawn from the
Department of Social Welfare and Mental Health Services.
 I 40 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF NURSING SERVICES
Miss B. J. Mitchell, Director of Nursing Services
The provision of nursing care to the large numbers of patients who receive care
and treatment within the Mental Health Services is the prime responsibility of the
nursing administrators responsible for the nursing service departments in the units.
The Director of Nursing Services is responsible for providing assistance on a consultation basis to these nursing administrators and for the administration of the
Department of Nursing Education (through the Associate Director of Nursing Education). This past year has seen the continued struggle of the nursing service
departments to respond to the increasing pressure from within and without the
organization to both improve and increase nursing services and nursing education.
Raising the standards of nursing care inevitably creates problems for the individual
nurse, aide, or student and for the administrative staff. The nurses, aides, and
students are being motivated to gain new knowledge and skills. Fortunately the
Mental Health Services and the community are beginning to be able to provide more
assistance and encouragement to the growing needs of the 2,317 nursing personnel.
Department of Nursing Education
The weekly consultation and supervision sessions with the Associate Director
of Nursing Education and her staff have permitted me to share in the development of
several aspects of the nursing educational programmes. Details of these programmes
are found in Miss Lonergan's report. Other specific activities have included talks to
the psychiatric nursing students, clinical course students and faculty; attendance at
the official functions of the Department; individual interviews with clinical programme students and presentation of diplomas; participation in (but less direct
responsibility for) graduation activities; and planning for an aide-training programme for the men and women psychiatric aides at Essondale and The Woodlands
School. The improved organization of the Department and the individual and group
supervision provided for the instructors have enabled the Department to reach a new
level of functioning. Its growing reputation will serve to improve the nursing care to
patients, bring recognition to the Mental Health Services, and attract nurses who
wish to learn and teach psychiatric nursing in a clinical setting.
CONSULTATION TO UNITS
Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital
Besides the usual consultation services provided, the major task in this unit was
to assist with the extensive study of the reorganization of the nursing service departments. The effort and time the committee members spent in discussion, reading,
and consultation is yielding useful information for immediate use and is providing the
data and direction for the most significant changes in the nursing services. This
unit's nursing services were able to demonstrate the value of team nursing, nursing-
care plans, ward clerks, central supply service, and remotivation groups for the
improvement of patient care.
Valleyview Hospital
Bi-monthly consultation visits to this unit have permitted the observation of the
increasing ability of the nursing personnel to improve their own nursing skills and to
make use of the other therapeutic services for better patient care. Orientation,
supervision, and evaluation of nursing personnel have been a strong feature of this
unit.
 headquarters i 41
The Woodlands School
The opportunity to work with the senior nursing personnel at The Woodlands
School and, through them, to observe the enthusiasm and dedication of members of
the nursing personnel has helped me to appreciate the growing role of the psychiatric
nurse in the training programme for the severely retarded and the need for registered
nurses especially skilled in the nursing of sick children. In February I was asked to
assist with the study of the reorganization of the nursing service departments.
Skeenaview Hospital
In November, Skeenaview Hospital was visited for two days. Discussions with
the Medical Superintendent of the Geriatric Division, Dr. B. F. Bryson; the Supervisor, Mr. W. E. Skillicorn; and the Chief Male Nurse, Mr. F. Stewart, provided a
background of achievements and problems against which to observe the on-going
care of the geriatric patients. The limitations of the physical setting and numbers of
trained nursing staff have not prevented the staff from promoting a nursing-care
programme designed to keep the elderly gentlemen mobile and provide enjoyable
activities.
The Mental Health Centre
Visits to this Centre have permitted the observation of the nurse's role in group
and individual therapy with patients. The opportunity the Superintendent of Nurses,
Miss Arneson, had to receive supervision from a social-work supervisor, Miss Ellen
Bateman, in regard to her individual therapy with selected patients was considered
valuable. The Day Centre programme for emotionally disturbed children was expanded under the skilled management of the senior nurse, Miss Escudero. This is
one of the few areas in the Province where suitable nurses can gain supervised practice in the care and treatment of these children. The Mental Health Centre continues
to be regarded as a training area for selected nurses to gain added skill in psychiatric
nursing, in collaborative teamwork, and in working with community agencies.
Committee and Educational Activities of Nursing Personnel
The nursing administrators continue to meet monthly at the unit nursing conference, chaired by the Director of Nursing Services. Major projects undertaken
during the year were planning for a second nursing institute in co-operation with the
Department of Continuing Medical Education of the University; initiation of a
Nursing Supplies Committee, whose purpose is to assist in the discriminating selection of products used by nursing personnel in the care of patients in the Mental
Health Services; consideration and approval of revised charting procedures prepared
by the Nursing Procedure Committee; and study of a health programme for patients
and staff in the Mental Health Services.
The nursing administrators in all units encouraged their nursing staff to take
advantage of educational opportunities. Most nursing departments continued to
provide an in-service educational programme, the type and length varying with the
availability of nursing and other personned prepared to give lectures. Forty-three
nurses attended institutes, conferences, and lecture programmes, which were held
in Vancouver and Seattle. A few nurses were priviliged to attend outstanding
workshops and institutes held in Ottawa, New York, San Francisco, and Bethel,
Maine. Those who attended reported enthusiastically about their experiences, and
the information and knowledge they gained was shared with other personnel in their
unit.
3
 I 42
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1961/62
Five registered nurses (three from the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental
Hospital, one from Valleyview Hospital, and one from The Woodlands School)
enrolled in the ten months' extension course in nursing administration, sponsored by
the Canadian Nurses' Association and the Canadian Hospital Association. An additional three registered nurses enrolled as part-time students in the University School
of Nursing in order to take a psychiatric nursing course.
Since 1945 the Mental Health Services has used the Federal Mental Health
Grant bursaries in order to increase the educational qualifications of registered nurses
who held supervisory and teaching positions. Seventeen of the twenty-five nurses
who have been given bursaries are still employed in the Mental Health Services.
Two nurses are presently attending the University of British Columbia with the
assistance of mental-health bursaries.
In January I was asked to be chairman of one of the plenary sessions entitled
" Nursing Services Should Be Unified " at the Second Canadian Institute on Mental
Health Services held in Ottawa. The privilege of hearing and sharing ideas and
information with leading members of the psychiatric health team in Canada was one
of the highlights of my professional career.
Community Activities
As in previous years, several faculty members of the School of Nursing of the
University of British Columbia worked closely with nurses in the Mental Health
Services in planning and conducting educational experiences in psychiatric nursing
for the nursing students in the degree and certificate programmes. Two conferences
were arranged to plan and evaluate the twelve-week clinical experience in psychiatric
nursing for twenty-eight students and senior field experience for seven students. An
all-day tour of the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital was co-ordinated
for thirty-one nursing students.
Several orientation programmes for public health and other nursing personnel
were conducted during the year. An all-day tour of the Mental Health Services was
arranged for members of the Union Board of Health in Victoria, and talks were given
to two units of the Metropolitan Health Committee. The opportunity to work on
committees with several lay and professional members of the community has been
an educational and enriching experience. Committee membership has included the
Vancouver Branch of the Canadian Mental Health Association, and the Board of
Examiners and two task committees of the Registered Nurses' Association of British
Columbia.
RECRUITMENT ACTIVITIES
Since 1959 the graduates of the psychiatric nursing programme have been
assigned to one of the three large hospital units in accordance with the psychiatric
nurses' employment preferences and aptitudes, and the relative need for nurses in
the units. The Personnel Officer of the Civil Service Commission uses the assembled
information during the usual employment process.
August, 1961, Class
February, 1962,
Class
Women
Men
Total
Women
Men
Total
Number in class .—  	
Number employed in Mental Health Services—
Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital	
Valleyview Hospital   	
The Woodlands School	
33
9
2
11
15
4
1
6
48
13
3
17
41
15
12
8
14
5
5
4
55
20
17
12
Totals          	
22
11
33
35             14
49
 HEADQUARTERS
I 43
There has been a gradual increase in the number of registered nurses who
indicate an interest in psychiatric nursing and in employment opportunities in the
Mental Health Services. During the fiscal year a total of twenty-three registered
nurses were interviewed, and in so doing an orientation to the Mental Health Services was provided. Seven of these nurses were employed—two as clinical supervisors, one as project co-ordinator, three as clinical instructors, and one as a staff
nurse. The fifteen registered nurses enrolled in the six-month clinical programme
were interviewed. The majority were interested in gaining further experience in
psychiatric nursing, and three sought nursing positions in the Mental Health Services.
MENTAL HEALTH GRANT PROJECT No. 609-5-136
The study of nursing education begun in October, 1960, has continued throughout this fiscal year and is expected to be concluded by June, 1962. The thinking and
conclusions of the various committees were assembled in a comprehensive report,
which was submitted to the Deputy Minister of Mental Health Services in June,
1961. An additional grant for the continuation of the project was received, and in
November a co-ordinator, Miss Alice Wright, and a secretary were appointed. The
Steering and Advisory Committees and three task committees proceeded to develop
a detailed plan for the proposed programme in psychiatric and general nursing. In
February the chairman of the project and Mr. Harold Lacey, psychiatric nurse representative of the Council of Psychiatric Nurses' Association, were invited to attend
a meeting in Ottawa of the Sub-committee on Personnel, Mental Health Division,
Department of National Health and Welfare. On the return trip to Vancouver, consultation with the Senior Nursing Consultant of the Ontario Hospital Services Commission and a visit to the Nightingale School of Nursing in Toronto permitted the
collection of pertinent information for the use of the Steering Committee.
This past year's work with my associates has been reviewed with satisfaction.
I can look forward optimistically to the progress which can be made through the
co-operative efforts of the growing human resources in the Mental Health Services
and in the community.
 1 44 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING EDUCATION
MlSS M. M. LONERGAN, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF NURSING EDUCATION
The purpose of the Department—the preparation of nursing personnel for
Mental Health Services in the Province of British Columbia—is realized through
the nursing programme offered by the Department.
PSYCHIATRIC NURSING PROGRAMME
Student Census
April 1, 1961  271 (191 women and 80 men)
March 31, 1962  245 (181 women and 64 men)
Enrolled  126 (92 women and 34 men)
Completed programme    94 (63 women and 31 men)
Withdrawals, April 1,  1961, to March
31, 1962    55 (36 women and 19 men)
Over one-third of the number of students withdrawing did so due to academic
failure and one-quarter because of personality unsuited to psychiatric nursing.
Therefore, these two factors have become major criteria in the screening of applicants and the selection of students for this programme.
The curriculum offers 560 hours of planned academic instruction in biological
sciences and nursing subjects, the emphasis and focus being psychiatric nursing.
Two principal methods of teaching were employed this past year:—
(a) Group work, which involved dividing each class into small groups, repeating lectures, promoting student preparation for and participation in classes,
and instructor-guided discussion period.
(b) Ward practice, which involved correlating classroom and clinical learning
opportunities, and orientation of instructors and nursing staffs to " what
students are learning and should have opportunities to practise."
Clinical experience is made available, through an increasingly more stable rotation
plan, in the practice of pyschiatric (acute and continued treatment), mental deficiency, geriatric, and medical-surgical nursing.
Clinical teaching is concentrated largely at the preliminary and junior levels of
psychiatric nursing experience, where limited objectives are achievable through
planned orientation, nursing conferences, psychiatric team rounds, weekly classes,
incidental teaching, and evaluation interviews. Mental-deficiency nursing experience has been stabilized through the implementation of a rotation plan for men and
women, and which provides for five weeks' practice in bed care and five weeks in
active self-help wards.
The student organization of the School of Psychiatric Nursing elects an executive representative body—the Student Council. Operating expenses are obtained
from fees payable by the student upon entry into the School. Grants are made to
various activities, and charges are made for social functions sponsored by the Council. Students have been representative members with faculty on committees formed
by the school adminstration. Sports, social activities, and special projects, diverse
in nature, are sponsored by the Council for the student-body.
AFFILIATE PROGRAMME IN PSYCHIATRIC NURSING
The purpose of the programme is to help the student nurse enrolled in a general
hospital school of nursing in British Columbia to increase her understanding of
 HEADQUARTERS
I 45
people and their emotional needs, and to help her devolop some skills in providing
nursing care for psychiatric patients. The programme also serves to help the student
to become better informed about mental health, mental illness, and mental hospitals
so that she becomes a potential resource person in the community.
The programme is divided into two six-week periods, each including formal
lectures, clinical experience, and ward classes. The junior period emphasizes the
need for self-understanding, the study of factors contributing to mental illness, and
the nursing care of acutely ill psychiatric patients. In the senior period, formal lectures are supplemented by student-presented seminars, the topics of which are related
to community aspects of psychiatric care.
Faculty representatives of the home schools have increased the number of their
visits to this Department, and the affiliate instructor has met with faculty members at
their home schools.
Two students withdrew, and 224 students from the six general hospital schools
■completed the three-month programme.
CLINICAL PROGRAMME FOR REGISTERED NURSES
Fourteen out of fifteen registered nurses successfully completed this six-month
programme. Of these, four obtained nursing positions in the Mental Health Services, nine obtained positions in psychiatric units of general hospitals in this and
other Provinces, and one returned to the instructor position she held prior to entering the programme.
The academic content of the programme includes courses in psychiatric
nursing, sociology, psychology, group dynamics, and principles of interviewing.
Teaching methods emphasize group discussion, patient-centred teaching, field-trips,
out-of-class assignments, and seminars.
Clinical experience is correlated with the academic. Guided experience is provided on acute- and continued-treatment wards and progresses from nursing care for
one patient only to participation as a member of the ward staff with some administrative responsibility.
PSYCHIATRIC AIDE PROGRAMME
During the past year much effort and planning were directed toward re-establishment of the orientation course for psychiatric aides. Meetings were held with
representatives of the branch office, Civil Service Commission, and the Departments
of Nursing Service of the Crease Clinic and Mental Hospital, Essondale, and the
Valleyview Hospital. Two course outlines, varying in content and length, were submitted, as well as proposed conditions for the operation of an orientation course.
Problems related to the difficulty of releasing aides from service are presently under
consideration.
POST-BASIC PROGRAMME FOR SENIOR NURSING STAFF
A refresher course was again offered to senior nursing service staff in March,
1962, and is planned to extend for several months, with nurses attending four or five
hours a week on duty time. The purpose of the course is to provide an opportunity
for nurses in responsible positions to review, discuss, and study current trends in administration, medical-surgical nursing, and the field of mental health and psychiatry.
Eighty-five men and women from the Crease Clinic and Mental Hospital, the Valleyview Hospital, and The Woodlands School are presently enrolled in the course.
 I 46 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
FACULTY
In March, 1962, the faculty numbered nineteen. During the year there were
several changes in its personnel. Miss R. Miller was promoted from the position of
clinical instructor to that of senior instructor, affiliate programme. Two nursing
supervisors transferred from the nursing service division of the Crease Clinic and
Mental Hospital, Essondale, to clinical instructor positions—Mrs. K. MacKinnon to
the male side of Crease Clinic and Miss H. Sullivan to The Woodlands School. Miss
L. Gee, Mrs. R. Katzel, Miss M. McFarlane, and Miss G. Patrick joined the faculty
as clinical instructors. The Department regrets the departure of Mrs. E. Gibson,
nursing counsellor; Mrs. F. Sinclair, rotations instructor; and Mr. F. Tudgay,
clinical instructor.
The Associate Director participated in the Unit Nursing Conference Institute on
Nursing Administration at Rockland, University of British Columbia.   The Assistant
Director attended the Civil Defence Course for Nurse Educators at Arnprior, Ont.
A senior instructor attended the World Congress of Psychiatry at Montreal, and a
clinical instructor attended a remotivation course at Weyburn, Sask.
The purpose of the faculty committee on out-of-department examinations is to
prepare and mark (a) licensing examinations for the Council of Psychiatric Nurses
and (b) promotional examinations for the Civil Service Commission. Seven separate test papers were prepared and 192 examinations marked and graded.
Other faculty activities included " open house " for 275 high-school students
and counsellors; introduction of a new student clinical experience evaluation form
and guide; assignment of preliminary men students to female wards, as a first clinical
experience; inclusion of a St. John Ambulance first-aid course in the psychiatric
nursing programme curriculum; supervision of beginning instructors for a four-
month orientation period; recruitment addresses and interviews at various high
schools on the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island; participation in Mental
Health Services projects; and implementation of a clinical experience rotation plan
for the psychiatric nursing programme.
It is noteworthy that faculty activities invariably involved and were dependent
upon the assistance of nursing staff. It is a distinct pleasure to the Department to
acknowledge this support from nursing divisions of the Mental Health Services
Branch, and to express its appreciation for the services provided by many departments of the Crease Clinic and Mental Hospital, Essondale.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
I 47
PART II.—CREASE CLINIC OF PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE
AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
REPORT OF THE CREASE CLINIC OF
PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
T. G. Caunt, Medical Superintendent
The Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine completed its eleventh year of
service to the mentally ill of British Columbia with the fiscal year ended March 31,
1962. During this period the treatment policy has continued as established originally, mainly to provide residential intensive treatment care for those patients who
are believed capable of benefiting from four months or less of psychiatric treatment.
Prospective patient admissions to the Crease Clinic are screened first by the
community doctor, then by the Crease Clinic admitting doctor regarding their
suitability for admission.
The Crease Clinic has operated efficiently and at capacity in all departments.
Again this year more use is being made of the Crease Clinic by more of the mentally
ill of British Columbia. More patients are being admitted each year to the Crease
Clinic voluntarily. More patients retained their civil rights while receiving treatment in the Clinic, and more patients were discharged fit to return to the community
on completion of their treatment.
Examination of the following table, which is a summary of population in the
Crease Clinic for the year, shows that the number of patients admitted was 1,632.
The previous year's total was 1,581 admissions.
Male
Female
Total
In residence, April 1, 1961	
108
136
244
Admissions—
505
24
203
579
46
275
1,084
70
478
Readmissions to a different institution of Mental Health Services
732
900
1,632
840
1,036
1,876
Separations—'
701
24
2
3
855
34
1
1
1,556
58
2
1
Died	
4
730
891
1,621
+2
110
+9
145
+ H
255
The admission rate of voluntary patients continues to increase. There were
1,139 such admissions, which is 69.8 per cent of the total and 4 per cent more than
in the previous year.
A total of 1,621 separations is noted for the year ended March 31, 1962. Of
these, fifty-eight patients, twenty-four men and thirty-four women, were admitted to
 I 48 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1961/62
the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, for continued treatment, or 3.55 per
cent of the discharges. This compares with 3.74 per cent in the previous year. One
thousand five hundred and sixty or 96.45 per cent of the Crease Clinic patients were
discharged directly to the community.
One thousand three hundred and twenty-nine or 81.44 per cent of the 1,632
patients accepted for treatment in the Crease Clinic retained and were capable of
exercising their full civil rights during the course of their treatment. Only 303
patients or 18.56 per cent were, in the opinion of the Clinical Director, too sick
mentally to look after themselves or their own affairs.
Dr. W. J. G. McFarlane, specialist in psychiatry, joined the Crease Clinic staff
and was appointed Admitting Officer, replacing Dr. R. W. Harrington, who was
appointed Director of the Rehabilitation and After Care Programme at 445 West
Thirteenth Avenue, Vancouver.
Operating-room
High standards have been maintained and an excellent service provided to
patients by the specialist consultant staff and surgical residents.
During their six-month rotations, Dr. K. G. Atkinson and Dr. D. A. Brown,
surgical residents, have evaluated 3,546 patients from the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale; Crease Clinic; Valleyview Hospital; The Woodlands School; and
Colquitz Hospital who required surgical investigations or follow-up after surgical
procedures.
The following surgeries and procedures represent the 92.5 per cent bed capacity
of the surgical ward:—
General major surgeries  133
General minor surgeries  165
Neurological surgeries      11
Orthopaedic surgeries     64
Urological surgeries     75
Eye surgeries      30
Ear, nose, and throat     21
Plastic surgeries     24
Chest surgeries       6
Plasters with anaesthetics     22
Dental extractions      45
Blocks     23
Total   619
This year an increase has been shown in the number of new admissions to the
Hospital which have been evaluated and treated by this unit. Several patients with
psychological problems which have been partly due to their complexions have had
plastic surgery, enabling them to be rehabilitated.
Several pieces of new equipment have improved working facilities for the staff.
The installation of an overhead light with reflector in the operating-room has made
a great improvement in the lighting. The mobile X-ray unit has made it possible to
do neurological arteriograms and urological procedures in the operating-room. This
X-ray unit has also proven invaluable in the diagnosis of seriously ill patients on the
surgical ward. The purchase of the new anaesthetic machine has provided for more
versatile anaesthetics. The carbon dioxide absorber has made it possible to do
anaesthetics for surgery on tuberculosis patients.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL I 49
DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY
Since the last report of the Department of Neurology, it has suffered the untimely loss of Dr. W. P. Fister, who had ably directed and guided its work for the
previous eleven years. Changes in the workings of the department instituted by
Dr. Fister shortly before his death have continued, resulting in an increase in the
number of consultations and a closer clinical supervision of the organic-neurological
cases.   These changes have proved of benefit to all.
In addition, the department has been able to spread its work by opening up a
new unit for electroencephalography at The Woodlands School. It has also been
able to make use of the existing unit at the Mental Health Centre for out-patient
follow-up cases and for referrals from the Willingdon Avenue School for Girls.
Already these changes appear to be appreciated.
Neurosurgical consultations and procedures continue to be provided by Dr.
Frank Turnbull. Lectures to University of British Columbia students and nursing
staff here have continued as in previous years.
A detailed account of the laboratory studies for the fiscal year is tabulated
below:—
Electroencephalograms    1,277
Pneumoencephalograms       105
Operations         11
Neurological consultations      121
Neurosurgical consultations        11
Visual perimetry examinations        26
Lectures    7
The 1,277 electroencephalograms were done for the following groups:—
Provincial Mental Hospital      566
Crease Clinic       423
The Woodlands School      114
Out-patients        43
Oakalla Prison Farm        27
Haney Correctional Institution  7
Girls' Industrial School        53
Staff   3
British Columbia Penitentiary  6
New Haven  2
Mental Health Centre and Child Guidance Clinic        33
Total    1,277
Library
The librarian, Mrs. Reeves, reports an active year. The Library Committee
has made efforts to acquire reference works and keep current literature up to date.
More than twice as many books were purchased than in the previous year, and
emphasis was placed on acquiring representative books in the allied fields of psychiatric nursing and general medicine. The circulation of journals has increased fourfold, and the circulation of books has increased considerably.
Advantage was taken of the interlibrary loan privileges to borrow material from
the University of British Columbia and other Canadian universities, as well as the
National Library of Medicine in Washington, D.C. Our library has reciprocated
this privilege.
 I 50 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
In the patients' library, cataloguing the entire book collection has almost been
completed. Generous donations have been received, including a collection of popular fiction titles from a local public library.
Medical Library
Book collection  2,770
Books bought      172
2,942
Losses        3
Donations of old medical books to the University of British
Columbia      3 5
Donations to The Woodlands School     27
        65
Total collection  2,877
Current journal subscriptions  110
Circulation of books  1,441
Circulation of journals  866
Interlibrary loans received  119
Interlibrary loans sent  8
Patients' Library
Books bought                          — - _         - -         -               -
Books donated                          _  _                                           _               	
Discards
     47
Losses
65
To Centre Lawn	
     75
To Skeenaview	
  100
3,675
483
423
4,581
287
Total collection  4,294
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
I 51
REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL,
ESSONDALE
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
T. G. Caunt, Medical Superintendent
The year ended March 31, 1962, saw the completion of the eighty-ninth year
of continuous service provided for the mentally ill of British Columbia by the
Provincial Mental Hospital.
Movement of Population
More patients were admitted, treated, and discharged than in any previous
year. A total of 2,029 patients was admitted from the community. This figure does
not include patients transferred to this Hospital from other units of the Provincial
Mental Health Services or patients who were returned from probation.
The following table gives a summary of the movement of population for the
Provincial Mental Hospital for the year ended March 31, 1962:—
Male
Female
Total
1,608
121
4
1,340
308
1
2,948
429
5
Total as at April 1, 1961    	
1,733
483
116
509
24
5
18
1
1,649
327
145
449
34
11
3,382
Admissions—
810
Readmissions to a different institution of Mental Health Services	
261
958
Admitted direct from Crease Clinic _. 	
58
5
29
1
1,156
966
2,122
2,889
1,040
103
9
53
2
212
6
2,615
873
69
10
13
407
1
5,504
Separations—
1,913
Died                                                ..   .
172
Transferred to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
9
63
15
7
1,425
— 144
1,464
1,373
—98
1,242
2,798
242
In residence, March 31, 1962            	
2,706
Although the number of admissions to the Provincial Mental Hospital was the
highest on record, the treatment programme was such that it has been possible to
further reduce the number of patients in residence. The total in residence at March
31, 1961, was 2,948, and the total in residence on March 31, 1962, was 2,706, a
reduction of 242.
The percentage of patients recovered or improved, as compared to admissions,
was 85.3 per cent. This compares with 75.1 per cent the previous year. The percentage of deaths to the number under treatment was 3.1 per cent. The percentage
of discharges to admission (exclusive of deaths) was 123.8 per cent. The average
daily patient population was 2,824.58. This is a reduction of 183.44 from the
previous year, when the daily average population was 3,008.02.
 I 52 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
This year 100 Order in Council patients were admitted. This is a reduction
over the previous year, when 126 Order in Council patients were admitted.
During the year the admission of Federal cases requiring psychiatric treatment
further declined from the previous year's total of 223. The Department of Veterans'
Affairs and the Department of Indian Health Services most frequently requested our
service.   On March 31, 1962, the following Federal cases were in residence:—
Department of Veterans' Affairs  131
Imperial veterans (D.V.A.)       1
Indian Health Services     35
Yukon Territorial Government       7
British Columbia Penitentiary       2
Total  176
The average monthly admission rate in 1959 was 113.91; in 1960, 133.25; in
1961, 150; and for the year ended March 31, 1962, 169. This gives an indication
of the increasing demands of the people of British Columbia for the services provided by this division of the Provincial Mental Health Services.
The increased rate of patient admissions, treatments, and separations has
increased the work load of every department of the Provincial Mental Hospital.
The patient-treatment team has operated efficiently and at capacity.
All proven and accepted types of therapy are available and continue to be used
for the benefit of the patients in the Provincial Mental Hospital.
General Comments
I appreciate the fullest co-operation and support which has been given me by
all staff members of the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital.
The Honourable Eric Martin, Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance; Dr. A. E. Davidson, Deputy Minister of Mental Health Services; and all
divisions of the Mental Health Services Branch have been co-operative and helpful.
All departments of Government and community services associated with the welfare
of our patients have been most helpful.
Ward doors are kept open and grounds privileges are extended wherever this
is indicated and is possible in keeping with the physical and mental condition of the
patients. Sixteen of the twenty-one men's wards are open, as are eighteen of the
twenty-three women's wards. This policy is helpful to the patient therapeutically,
as well as being considered an aid to patient and staff morale. The number varies,
but at present over 2,000 or over two-thirds of the Crease Clinic and Provincial
Mental Hospital patients have free access to the Hospital grounds.
Each year there is a noticeable increase in the community interest in the Crease
Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital. Each year more visitors come singly, in
groups, or as organizations to see friends or relatives, participate in patient therapeutic programmes, or assist with the Canadian Mental Health Association hospital
volunteer organization's activities. This increased community interest in mental
health has made it possible for more patients to spend day, night, week-end, or
longer visits in the community with relatives or friends, to their mutual advantage.
Many changes and improvements have been made for the benefit of patients
in many areas of the Hospital. There is a continuing improvement in nursing techniques. In-service staff lectures and community study are further improving nursing
standards. Each year more University of British Columbia and general affiliate
nurses from the six British Columbia general hospitals' schools of nursing come to
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
I 53
the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital. Interns in occupational therapy,
psychology, medicine, and dietetics also attend during the summer months.
On December 19, 1961, a Rehabilitation and After-care Centre at 445 West
Thirteenth Avenue, Vancouver, was opened. Dr. R. W. Harrington, specialist in
psychiatry, was appointed Director. This unit, with its staff and treatment teams
from the Provincial Mental Hospital, provides an after-care service for discharged
patients. It is proving to be successful, and the demand for service is increasing
rapidly. The Director of the Rehabilitation and After-care centre also supervises
the operation of the two half-way houses in Vancouver—-the " Vista " for female
patients, which was opened in 1948, and the " Venture " for male patients, which
has been in operation since 1957.
The moving of D 2 and E 2 infirmary wards to the North Lawn Building is
especially noteworthy and is a tremendous improvement in the care and treatment
of infirmary patients. The vacated wards, D 2 and E 2, in the Centre Lawn Building
were renovated and converted to male and female admitting wards. This change has
greatly improved the efficiency of patients' admission and care.
The problem for caring of the mentally ill of this Province is a constantly
increasing one. It is therefore a pleasure to report that considerable improvement
has been made in patient treatment. The discharge rate has increased, and boarding-
home and after care services have been expanded. In addition to improvements
in patient housing and building maintenance, much further beautification of the
Hospital grounds has been accomplished.
There are many acts of courage and heroism performed in the course of duty
by staff members in an institution of this size during the period of a year, many of
which are not reported. I wish to commend Colony Farm staff members Mr. Harry
Currie and Mr. John Attridge, who were instrumental in saving a patient's life from
drowning in the Coquitlam River on August 4, 1961. I also wish to commend the
action of Mr. E. Fisher, assistant charge nurse of Riverside Annex Building, who, at
considerable risk to his life, was instrumental, with his staff, in evacuating the
patients in four minutes from the Riverside Annex Building and personally saving
two patients in the fire which claimed one life on January 31, 1962.
Women's Nursing Division
The Women's Nursing Division has completed a very rewarding year under the
able direction of Mrs. M. L. McKay, Superintendent of Nurses.
During this past year the Women's Division of Nursing has continued to expand
its services and has been involved in considerable reorganization, which has resulted
in further improving the quality of nursing care.
One of the milestones of the year occurred in September of 1961 when the
Central Supply Department was opened. The purpose of this department is to provide a service of properly autoclaved equipment and supplies which are normally
used in the care of patients. It also serves as an organized control of the care and
management of hospital equipment, thereby increasing the general economy of its
usage.
In July of 1961 the two infirmary wards were moved from the Central Supply
Buildings to the North Lawn Building. This move paved the way for the renovation
of Ward E 2 in the Centre Lawn Building, which is now functioning as the women's
admitting ward of the Provincial Mental Hospital. One feature which is notable is
the fact that this ward now contains an admitting suite, which is a great improvement
over the past procedures.
 I 54 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
In order to accommodate the two new wards in the North Lawn Building, a
reassessment of patients was necessary, which resulted in many transfers to other
wards or out of the buliding. In the Centre Lawn Building this change has resulted
in newly admitted patients receiving more individualized and improved nursing care.
With the exception of E 3, all female wards in this building are now declared open.
During the year there has been a continued trend to encourage the socialization
of patients. This has obtained in work as well as recreational situations. The usual
parties continue to be arranged, which makes provision for the joint participation of
patients from the men's and women's wards. One such example is the Christmas
party, which was held for the first time for all patients within the building on
Ward E 3.
Continued efforts have been made to improve patient-care through more efficient assignment of nursing staff. To this end, all wards in the Crease Clinic adopted
team nursing and are finding it improves nurse-patient relationships.
In the East Lawn Building the staff from Ward H 4 has initiated group nursing,
which has proved an improvement over previous assignments. As a result of this
system, some of the regressed patients have demonstrated progress, and this encourages its continuance.
Male student psychiatric nurses were assigned for the first time to the women's
wards.   This proved to be successful from both the view-point of patients and staff.
In an effort to simplify nursing administration, daily staff attendance sheets have
been instituted. A new policy has also been drawn up in conjunction with the pay
office which has greatly improved the procedure of issuing monthly pay-cheques.
Plans are continuing as scheduled to separate the nursing and dietary departments. Such a procedure is the initial step toward a clearer delineation of nursing
functions and should prove most valuable in the future.
Supervisors in each area now have a manual on policies and procedures to
which they can refer. This is proving to be particularly useful to new members of
the nursing staff.
The in-service Educational Programme has continued into the third consecutive
year under the leadership of Mrs. B. Lowry. A total of fifty-two hours of lectures
was given to the following three levels of male and female staff: (a) Psychiatric
aides, (b) general-duty nurses, and (c) charge and assistant charge nurses. Included
in this programme were lectures in oxygen therapy, which 191 staff members
attended, and lectures on mouth-to-mouth breathing and resuscitation, which were
attended by 247 individuals.
The trend toward additional preparation continues among the senior nursing
staff. Three members have been carrying night-school courses for some years and
hope eventually to go to university.
In the past year two head nurses, Mrs. J. Unger and Mrs. L. Thompson,
enrolled in a correspondence course in nursing unit administration, which was sponsored by the Canadian Nurses' Association and financed by Federal Health Grant.
One supervisor, Mrs. E. Wilton, enrolled in this course at her own expense. The
senior clinic supervisor, Mrs. A. Axtell, attended lectures in psychiatric nursing
throughout the year at the University of British Columbia.
In May, 1961, Mrs. M. Mounce, Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, attended
the Nurse Educator Course in Civil Defence at Arnprior, Ont. In July Mrs. C. Ross,
charge nurse, attended the Laboratory of Human Relations held in Bethel, Maine.
An institute on remotivation was held in September and was attended by Mrs.
M. Simpson, senior supervisor in East Lawn, and by Mrs. M. Elias, a psychiatric
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
I 55
nurse from that building.   Mrs. M. Bidwell, head nurse from North Lawn Building,
also attended one week of lectures at Willow Chest Centre.
It should be noted that these various institutes and courses have provided stimulation as well as contributing to the general interest in modern concepts of patient-
care.
Men's Nursing Division
Mr. R. H. Strong, Chief Psychiatric Male Nurse, reports that steady advances
have been made in the nursing care of the mentally ill and that staff education has
increased considerably. The results have been an increasing interest and participation in various team activities. It has been noted in the past year that many of our
nursing staff are contributing much of their free time by returning to the Hospital in
off-duty hours to assist with social and recreational functions for the patients.
The establishment of unit medical directors and unit nursing supervisors in
1960 made possible a more cohesive and organized unit than previously. It has been
possible to obtain a closer and better co-ordinated psychiatric team in each unit,
which involves all related disciplines. In the past year these units have certainly
proven their value both to patients as well as all other staff.
A number of remotivation programmes at the Hospital continue to function
quite effectively. The Farm View project, under the supervision of psychiatric nurse
Mr. A. Finnie, is gradually being extended farther up the hill behind West Lawn.
The landscaping being undertaken by groups of male and female patients on this
project is beautifying the area considerably.
The remotivation programmes in West Lawn have taken the form of picking
the better of the regressed patients from C 4 in groups of ten and moving them to a
small ward, B 4, and giving them concentrated therapies. Most of them improved
so as to be able to be placed on open wards. Some of them later were discharged
completely.
Riverside area has worked diligently on the Riverside Park project, and, as
well as landscaping and beautifying the allotted park-site, they built a picnic shelter,
barbecue, erected a flagpole, and started working on a fish-pond which they hope
to complete this year. Patients in this area also made a small nine-hole golf-course
in the airing-court and made a bowling-green at the east end of the building with the
help of the gardeners.
This past year three separate therapeutic groups were formed in the Riverside
area—(1) ward discussion groups, (2) resocialization groups, and (3) remotivation
groups. The three groups work in co-ordination. The results have been gratifying.
A number of the participating patients have been discharged, and a fair number
have been transferred to boarding homes.
Credit for assisting in the resocialization of many of the patients in Riverside
area must be given to a group of student nurses from the School of Nursing of the
University of British Columbia. Patients were taken on picnics, fishing trips, sightseeing tours, in addition to the regular-scheduled recreational programmes. Other
student nurses from the University were assigned to Crease Clinic Building, Centre
Lawn Building, and West Lawn Building.
The successful experiment of allowing patients to go into the community on
berry-picking expeditions was repeated this year and was even more successful.
Twenty patients made a total of $1,435 during the blueberry season. One patient
in particular made the highest amount of any picker according to the berry-farmer.
He made $169 in the season, and several others made well over $100. The money
went into the patients' respective accounts.   The aforementioned patient, as well as
 I 56 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
several others, used his money to help rehabilitate himself when he was discharged
from Hospital.
In July thirty-seven patients were transferred to West Lawn Building from
North Lawn Building. All infirmary patients from D 2 were transferred to the
North Lawn Building. The ward was then renovated and redecorated, and on February 12, 1962, was reopened as the male admitting ward for the Provincial Mental
Hospital, with 33 beds maximum. Patients are now taken directly to the admitting
section of the ward from the rear of the building, instead of the front of the building
as formerly.   Ward D 4 has now become a continued-treatment ward.
At 5.34 p.m. on January 31, 1962, fire broke out in the Riverside Annex, and
all patients except one were immediately evacuated. This patient was overcome by
smoke fumes before he could be reached. Response to the fire call by the Fire
Department was rapid. A great deal of credit is due the nursing staff for getting
their patients out in four minutes. The senior nurse, Mr. E. Fisher, entered the
building through the bathroom window to rescue two crippled patients. The patients
evacuated had to be temporarily relocated on different wards in the Hospital.
The Riverside Annex is now completely renovated and the patients returned.
The fire-walls and fire-doors in the Riverside Annex undoubtedly saved the building
and prevented a major catastrophe.
The Public Works Department has completed many important projects in the
male service areas this past year. The bootroom was renovated to a very modern
and attractive barber-shop. The opening of the new shop is another step toward
natural community life. We consider this an important project to have been completed because of the therapeutic value in having a central barber-shop where all
male patients in West Lawn Building, Centre Lawn Building, and Crease Clinic
Building may go at will, on the days scheduled for their wards, rather than the barber
having to go to each ward.
Formal in-service lectures commenced again in September, and our staff have
been very keen to attend in their turn. Four 64-hour post basic courses were also
re-established by the Department of Nursing Education for the benefit of charge and
assistant charge nurses and will continue until December, 1962. In the early part
of 1962 a short course of administration was conducted by the Personnel Officer,
Mr. Dowling, for the benefit of charge psychiatric nurses. Other disciplines and
medical staff have devoted much of their time toward staff in-service education.
On April 24 and 25, 1961, Mr. R. H. Strong, Chief Psychiatric Male Nurse,
Essondale, was privileged to attend a nursing institute for senior nursing supervisory
personnel at Rockwood Centre. This was an all-B.C. institute, with guidance and
direction from Mr. A. Thomas and Mrs. B. Smith, of the Adult Education Department of the University of British Columbia.
In September Mr. M. Savoie, psychiatric nurse, was enrolled in a special one-
week course at Weyburn on remotivation. Mr. Clare, Riverside Unit Supervisor,
attended for one day as an observer, as did the Acting Clinic Director. In September
Mr. Knight, Chief Psychiatric Nurse, Crease Clinic, attended a one-week course on
human relations and later a further week on communications in Vancouver under
the Canadian Department of Labour Training Programme. Mr. E. Gustafson, assistant charge psychiatric nurse, attended a two-part institute at the University of
Washington on a course entitled " Person to Person " in November, 1961, and February, 1962.   Each part took five days.
The ground supervisors interviewed a total of 3,098 patients for grounds privileges during the year (1,656 males and 1,442 females).
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL I 57
Department of Psychology
The Department of Psychology, under Mr. J. W. Borthwick's direction, reports
a successful year.
An increased availability of psychologists plus more active use of Federal training grants and better liaison with the University of British Columbia have made it
possible to recruit and keep a larger staff than we have had for several years. As a
result, the activities of the Department of Psychology have expanded, and it has
been able to provide a more comprehensive service in the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital.
During the year, 3,710 psychological tests were administered and 780 reports
about patients were submitted. Group tests (to be used for counselling and guidance) were administered to new students in the School of Psychiatric Nursing.
Many lectures and talks of a psychological nature were delivered. Increasing
activity in training programmes resulted in more requests for the department's contributions. Topics ranging from communication to psychological development were
covered in 111 hours of lectures.
The greatest expansion in the activities of the department was related to group
therapy. Most of the staff were involved with a therapeutic group during the year.
A total of 545 group sessions was conducted. One member co-ordinated the intensive group programme for young acutely ill schizophrenics in the Crease Clinic. The
psychologist attached to the East Lawn Building helped to develop ward programmes
for more disturbed patients. A group discussion programme was begun for closed-
ward patients in the West Lawn Building. A number of nurses participated with
the psychology staff in group programmes and are now leading their own groups.
In conjunction with an occupational therapist, one of our staff prepared a manual,
" Working with Intensive Therapeutic Groups," which summarizes their philosophy
and methods. Specific techniques they have found most useful are included. Copies
have been distributed primarily to interested nurses.
There has been more opportunity for research by members of the department.
A number of small projects have been undertaken, and the department has been
able to make use of the four students employed during the summer to gather and
process data. In one project, regression equations have been worked out to predict
intelligence test scores from a new test which requires less than ten minutes to
administer.
The department repeated the summer programme for graduating students from
the University of British Columbia. The most immediate reward from this programme has been the recruitment into the Mental Health Services as permanent staff
of three of these students following their graduate training.
Social Services
During the year the staff of the Social Service Department was concerned, not
only with consolidating existing services to patients and their families, but with then-
expansion into the areas of boarding-home and after-care services as well. Also,
as a result of the growing emphasis on group treatment of patients in psychiatric
settings, the social caseworkers, and more specifically those assigned to the Crease
Clinic, found themselves engaged increasingly in services to groups of patients in
addition to those regularly provided on an individual basis. The appointment of a
qualified social group worker to the staff of this department was of immeasurable
assistance.
An example of this latter service is the group for adolescent patients which for
several months was in operation in the Crease Clinic under the leadership of a social
 I 58 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
caseworker, who did, however, make extensive use of the consultation available from
the social group worker. Similar help was also provided in relation to those group
services offered to family members of Crease Clinic patients as an aid to their better
understanding of emotional and mental disorders.
Of particular interest are the patient-groups which, under the direct guidance
of the social group worker, were commenced at the " Vista " and " Venture"
rehabilitation units. Such groups served a therapeutically useful purpose in helping
to prepare patients for their return to community life by providing them with an
opportunity to share their feelings associated with discharge from Hospital.
In addition to the above, the social group worker has been responsible for
direct services to two groups of patients in the Provincial Mental Hospital.
The work of the department, particularly in the long-term units, has expanded
considerably in the area of boarding-home care. The statistical summary of placements effected shows that 104 patients, whose needs were primarily for domiciliary
care, were placed in licensed boarding and family-care homes, offering smaller group
liivng experiences and more individualized attention than is possible in the hospital
setting.   At the same time, beds were freed for more acutely ill patients.
For some patients, particularly younger ones who are recovering from serious
acute mental illnesses., there is a therapeutic benefit to be derived from placement in
family-care homes which accommodate not more than two or three patients and
provide a supportive milieu for testing out treatment gains in a setting nearer to that
of normal family life. Although the availability of this type of facility has been
limited, it represents an area which undoubtedly will be developed in the future.
The aforementioned statistics refer only to patients placed in domiciliary boarding care and who were expected to remain under the supervision of Hospital services
for an indefinite period. Of this group, twenty-one or 13 per cent were returned to
Hospital for further treatment. As of March 31st, however, a significant number
of this returned group were again being considered for boarding-home care and
should be placed within the next few months.
During the year it was possible to assign one social worker from the West Lawn
service on a full-time basis in the Riverside Building, with the result that Social
Service participated actively in planning for 79 of the 101 patients who were either
discharged from this building or placed in domiciliary boarding-home care. The
latter programme accounted for eleven patients of the total group of seventy-nine
who were referred for social service help in planning and carrying out physical separation from the Hospital. Of the remaining sixty-eight who were discharged, thirty-
eight were carried in after-care by the Riverside social worker. The above figures
indicate an increase in discharge rates over the previous year and point to the value
of carefully planned and executed discharges in that it has been necessary to return
very few of this group to the Hospital.
Social-work activities in the Centre Lawn Building continued to be concerned
primarily with the provision of brief social and casework services on an accelerated
basis. The results of a study undertaken by members of the social service staff in
this unit toward the end of the previous year confirm this fact in that it revealed that
a notable percentage of the unattached male patients admitted during a specified
period were subsequently diagnosed as suffering from non-psychotic illnesses and,
for this reason, were not eligible for continuing treatment in the Mental Hospital.
However, because of the indigent state of such patients generally, the social workers
were, of necessity, engaged in processing referrals for financial assistance and accommodation. This situation has continued to exist throughout this year and has
absorbed a significant proportion of social-work time.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL I 59
With a view to increasing the over-all coverage of brief services, particularly
those related to discharge, and also to free caseworkers to meet the more complex
social needs of acutely ill patients, the admissions and brief services sections, both
in this unit and the Crease Clinic, were reorganized under senior social workers
whose responsibilities included an over-view of discharge plans for patients generally.
The arrangement, while not possible of 100 per cent coverage, has nevertheless
resulted in more efficient discharge plans.
As in the previous year, the staff of the East Lawn Social Service Department
was actively engaged in preparing patients for domiciliary boarding-home care and
in the ongoing supervision which this programme entailed. More than 60 per cent
of such placements made within the year emanated from this unit.
Furthermore, as a result of efforts on the part of Hospital personnel to sustain
the interest of relatives in the treatment and well-being of the long-term patients, an
increasing number of patients from the East Lawn Building were successfully rehabilitated to the care and supervision of family members. Such arrangements have
involved the social-work staff in supportive services during the probationary period
and in some cases beyond it.
The social and casework services rendered by the department are reflected in
the statistical summaries for the year. In the Provincial Mental Hospital 2,880
patients were in receipt of either brief or continuing services, as compared with 1,981
patients during the previous year. This is an increase of 899 or approximately 45
per cent. This increase derives largely from the Centre Lawn Building, where intake
to the department more than doubled that of the preceding year.
In contrast, the statistics for the Crease Clinic have remained consistent with
those of 1960/61 and show only a slight rise in intake of cases to the department
(1,491 as compared with 1,409, or an increase of 5.8 per cent).
These services have involved the social workers of the Mental Hospital in
19,935 interviews.
Similarly, the social workers in the Crease Clinic were engaged in 6,347 interviews with or on behalf of patients.
The number of patients placed in domiciliary boarding care during the year has
increased considerably. As of March 31, 1962, 113 patients were accommodated,
in comparison with forty-nine patients as of March 31, 1961.
As in former years, the staff accepted responsibility for contributing to the
education of the community, the profession itself, and allied disciplines through
speaking engagements, lectures, and orientations. As a means of meeting educational responsibilities toward the profession, twelve students from the School of
Social Work, consisting of nine first-year students (B.S.W.) and three second-year
students (M.S.W.), were accepted for field-work practice under the instruction of
nine senior and supervisory caseworkers. The programme has been mutually beneficial to students and instructors in that it stimulated professional growth and improved standards of practice. In addition, the services of the social group worker
were requested by the School of Social Work for lecture purposes in the area of
craft work.
Two members of the social-work staff were granted educational leave in order
to complete the requirements for the master's degree in social work under Federal
Mental Health bursary and will be returning to duty in May, 1962. The staff was
also represented at two conferences and institutes geared to recent developments in
social-work method and professional practice.
A research project begun in the previous year was completed. Basic social
information was obtained on 354 male and female patients resident in the Hospital
on December 31, 1960, and patients admitted during January of 1961.   From the
 I 60 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
some twenty-two categories uncovered, it was possible, through the use of the I.B.M.
system, to draw out many different samples of social factors which were common to
this patient-group and to use this material in predicting special problem areas and
casework needs. While it was not a specific focus of the research project, there was
a strong indication that a large majority of the patients comprising the sample had
not had contact with community social agencies. It is expected that further research
on this particular aspect will be undertaken.
Occupational Therapy
The Occupational Therapy Department, under the leadership of Miss June
Archer, Supervisor, has gradually expanded its services to meet the growing need to
involve all grades of patients in meaningful activity programmes. Increased involvement with other services has shown a considerable expansion from individual treatments carried out in the department to group work involving greater numbers of
patients on the wards. This reflects mainly the enthusiasm and co-operation of the
nursing staff who have organized and maintained such groups in conjunction with
the occupational therapy-recreational therapy programmes. The recently established Unit Activities Co-ordinating Committees, which are comprised of representatives from each discipline directly involved with any activity programme planned for
patients within a unit, have enabled increased communication and understanding of
the differing needs of the patients in acute and long-term areas.
At these meetings an effort has been made to prevent overlapping of activities
and to evaluate the most therapeutic use of each discipline's contribution for the
welfare of the patient.
The Activities of Daily Living Programme commenced in April, 1961, and is
gradually beginning to show good results. In January the Hospital provided a house
for use of the patients involved in this intensive domestic rehabilitation programme.
With increased facilities, eight patients can now be accommodated. The close cooperation and interest of medical, nursing, social service, and volunteer staff has
helped to develop the potentialities of the unit and the placement of patients on
discharge.   Twenty-nine patients attended this unit.
It is hoped that in the future selected patients taking part in the programme
will be able to live and sleep in the home with the minimum of supervision. This
would provide a reality testing situation to establish the amount of independence patients can achieve within the Hospital setting prior to discharge into the community.
In relation to the expansion of the Activities for Daily Living Programme and
the establishment of the unit in Home 110, many groups of patients have been
involved in providing furnishings for this area. Patients in West Lawn and Centre
Lawn woodwork departments have assisted in framing pictures and reconditioning
furniture for the home, while the ladies have been concerned with the soft furnishings.
The need to provide meaningful work projects has been met in a variety of
ways, such as the construction of the Riverside Park area and the picnic-site above
West Lawn, where patients and staff have participated in their construction.
Several departments have started framing suitable calendars, posters, and prints
in an attempt to supply the wards with pictures. These are being catalogued, and
eventually it is hoped that a picture library will be established.
The experience gained in the observation and participation in an intensive group
situation, such as the somnolent insulin, has been reflected in an increasing use of
such techniques. Much of this is the result of the interest and co-operation shown
by the Psychology Department.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL I 61
In North Lawn the recent assessment and regrouping of patients according to
their mental status and potential chances of rehabilitation has led to a more integrated treatment programme using small intensive groups on a multi-discipline basis.
The range of activities and media used with these groups has widened to include all
types of experience from simple cookery classes to visiting places of interest outside
the Hospital.
Educational responsibilities in orientating other disciplines and outside groups
to occupational therapy have been carried out. Methods included lectures, demonstrations, seminars, and the production of a manual, " Working with Small Intensive
Groups," by Mr. Geddes, Psychology Department, in collaboration with Miss Ogden,
of the Occupational Therapy Department. All these have been geared to help
nursing students in their increasing role in activity settings both on the ward and in
the Occupational Therapy Departments.
Five graduate students from the University of Toronto and three first-year
students from the Universite de Montreal each spent nine weeks interning in the
department during the summer months. These students contributed greatly to the
department and showed much appreciation of the interest shown by other staff.
The annual occupational-therapy sale was held on December 6th and realized
$2,785.25. This year Valleyview work was sold earlier at a sale in its own building.
Recreational Therapy
The Recreational Therapy Department, under Mr. G. Maxwell, has had an
active programme throughout the year. There has been a considerable growth of
socio-recreational techniques as part of the Hospital's treatment programme.
Revision of staff working-hours and increased co-operation with volunteer
groups have resulted in maximum use of recreational facilities.
Pennington Hall continues to prove an active magnet, attracting the time and
attention of many hundreds of patients during those grounds-privileged hours when
they are free to select activities of their own choosing.
A new billiard table has been installed in the West Lawn Building.
A regular afternoon swimming programme at Hillside Pool is conducted during
the summer months for grounds-privileged patients.
A varied programme of outdoor activities is available during the summer
months.
The music therapist reports a busy year, during which, in addition to regular
weekly music programmes on the wards, he conducted activities in the Music Centre
in the East Lawn Building, provided individual instrument instruction for eighteen
patients, gave weekly music appreciation sessions averaging twenty patients, and
formed a patient orchestra of seven to nine members. Choir practice was held every
Tuesday afternoon, and choral and organ performances contributed much to the
regular religious services each Sunday.
The statistical report shows increased activity in all areas. The sessions and
attendance were made up as follows:-—•
Sessions Attendance
Crease Clinic      976 34,058
Provincial Mental Hospital  1,828 154,881
Music therapy      453 13,294
Staff recreation      235 8,235
Totals  3,492 210,468
 1 62 mental health services report, 1961/62
Patients' School
The school is open for classes from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. At the end of the year
there were forty-three patients—twenty-six adults and seventeen adolescents—in the
teaching programme. Thirty-seven of these attended the regular daily classes, and
six who were unable to do so received instruction on the wards.
To suit the needs of a hospital, the programme is necessarily varied. The main
aim is to assist the individual to resume or complete his interrupted schooling
whenever possible. Correspondence courses available from the Department of Education have proved of great value. Nearly half the enrolment availed themselves
of one or more of these courses. In addition to the above, classes in elementary
education for those who desire it and classes for New Canadians to improve their
English have been carried.
Rehabilitation and After-care
The After-care Unit of the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital was
opened on December 19, 1961, under the direction of Dr. R. W. Harrington, with
the object of giving follow-up services to patients in the community. The headquarters is a psychiatric community clinic located at 445 West Thirteenth Avenue,
Vancouver.  The clinic is open daily from Monday to Friday.
The general goal of the unit is to maintain patients out of hospital and in the
community functioning up to their capabilities.
During the sixteen weeks of its operation, 457 patients were under follow-up
care, and of this number fifty-one had been discharged from care.
There are two treatment divisions in the After-care Unit. One is the resident
team, made up of the directing psychiatrist, a social worker, and a mental health
nurse; the other is made up of six visiting teams from units of the Crease Clinic and
Provincial Mental Hospital, each consisting of two doctors, one social worker, and
a psychiatric nurse. Each of these teams is responsible for the follow-up of patients
discharged from their unit areas and devotes one-half day per week to the clinic.
Physiotherapy
The Physiotherapy Department, under Mr. Borge Dahl, has had an active
treatment programme. A clinic has been opened in the East Lawn Building. One
thousand seven hundred and thirty-three patients received a total of 16,257
treatments.
A wide range of physiotherapeutic procedures are available—hydrotherapy,
infra-red, short-wave diathermy, massage, exercises, ultraviolet light, wax baths, and
faradic-galvanic electrotherapy.
In addition to these, chiropody treatments were given to 742 patients.
A nurse's aide assists with the work in this Department.
Department of Radiology
This department, under the direction of Dr. J. M. Jackson, reports an improved
diagnostic service due to the acquisition of a modern mobile X-ray unit with special
power outlets in both the operating-room and the surgical ward. A modern machine
for making rapid serial radiographs of the vascular system in the brain has improved
the service to the Neurosurgical Department.
A tota of 10,847 patients was X-rayed, and 17,402 films were taken.
Many specialized X-ray examinations have been completed for the Surgical
and Neurosurgical Departments, and the demands for X-ray investigations in cases
of internal medicine have increased considerably.
 crease clinic and provincial mental hospital i 63
Department of Laboratories
This department, under the direction of Dr. G. A. Nicolson, reports increased
activity over the past year.
The total number of procedures performed is 58,328, an increase of 687 over
the previous year. This increase was fairly evenly distributed throughout the departments of chemistry, bacteriology, haematology, and histology. In chemistry there was
a significant increase in the number of kidney-function tests and urinary chromato-
grams performed. In bacteriology there was a sharp increase in the number of
coagulase tests performed, indicating an increasing incidence of haemolytic staphylococcus aureus infections. In haematology there was an increase in the number of
blood sedimentation-rate tests due to the establishment of this procedure as a
routine admission test for all patients. There was also a marked increase in prothrombin time determinations, reflecting a widening interest in arteriosclerosis and
its related complications. This was further demonstrated by a marked increase in
the number of electrocardiograms carried out. The histology department showed
increased activity resulting from an increase in the number of autopsies performed,
which totalled 234, more than in any previous year for the Provincial Mental Health
Services.  This produced an autopsy rate of 81 per cent, which is exceptionally high.
The technician training programme has produced three more successful candidates for certification by examination by the Canadian Society of Laboratory Technologists, and one other student has just completed a year of training and has thereby
become eligible to take the examinations.
Pharmacy Department
The pharmacy, under the direction of Mr. K. Woolcock, continues to supply
the needs of the Mental Health Services. Services to out-patients have shown considerable expansion during the year. There is a general trend toward individual
prescriptions for patients whether in or out of hospital.
New regulations to control certain drugs—namely, barbiturates and amphetamines—have been put into operation to meet the requirements of Federal legislation
concerning these drugs.
The Unit Pharmacy Committee meets regularly 'and continues to make recommendations for the improvement of the Pharmacy service.
Optical Department
Mr. H. H. Woodbridge, optometrist in charge of the Optical Department, reports on the completion of another year of active service to our patients.
During the year a total of 1,027 procedures was carried out, consisting of 529
examinations, 278 major repairs, and 220 minor repairs.
Dental Department
The Dental Department, under the direction of Dr. W. C. Cusack, has maintained its activities during the year.
Dr. Smithurst resigned on December 31, 1961, and was replaced by Dr. Hil-
born. Mr. Discher, dental technician, resigned in November, 1961, and was replaced by Mr. Watson.
The programme of services includes examination and treatment of patients in
the Dental Department, visits to wards for this purpose, and special extractions in
the operating-room as required.   There is a great demand for dentures, and a priority
 I 64 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
arrangement ensures that those in need receive them before discharge to a boarding
home or other community facility.
During the year 4,548 patients were seen, and 1,188 examinations and 9,259
operations were completed.
Some modern equipment to supplement that in the operating-room has been
installed.   A new high-speed drill has been accepted very favourably by the patients.
Chaplain
Rev. John F. O'Neil, E.D., B.A., L.T.A., the resident chaplain, has continued
to provide valuable opportunities for worship for Protestant patients, and weekly
services are held in Pennington Hall. Additional services are held in the wards for
those unable to attend at Pennington Hall. Rev. F. Filer, Valleyview Hospital chaplain, provides a service for North Lawn patients.
The Roman Catholic chaplain, Rev. Father Freschette, O.F.M., resigned. Rev.
William S. Lacko, S.J., was appointed in his place and took up duty on May 1, 1961.
Since that time a greatly expanded service has been provided. Mass is said weekly.
Visits to the sick and dying are made at all times on request, and services at Hospital
burials are provided. In addition, two afternoons each week are devoted to visiting
the various areas of the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital so that patients
may talk with their chaplain.
Business Administration
Quite a large number of projects of varying scope were begun or completed
during the year.   The more noteworthy included the following:—
(1) A more systematic procedure for obtaining accurate daily census figures.
(2) The commencement of operation of the central supply room.
(3) The consolidation of the Dietary Department, such that dietary functions
would be performed by members of that department.
(4) The introduction of orientation lectures for all new members joining the
staff.
(5) The completion of a properly equipped barber-shop for the patients.
The year saw the commencement of construction on the new Industrial Therapy
Building and the Telephone and Credit Union Building.
Close co-operation has been maintained with the Public Works Department,
from whom we have had every assistance.
Success is being met in brightening the patients' areas, and to this end new
furniture, drapes, and brighter paint colours are being used whenever possible.
The general office took delivery of a posting-machine and transferred all patients' trust records from ledgers to machine cards.
The sum of $1,036,309.29 was collected in maintenance fees on behalf of our
patients, and $172,671.08 was received for individual patients' comfort expenditures.
The amount expended by these patients was $162,233.27.
Pension applications submitted on behalf of patients totalled 227, of which
150 were approved by March 31, 1962. Five hundred and twenty-eight staff requisitions were issued to cover hirings, promotions, and transfers.
Audio-Visual Department
During the year an extensive survey at the ward level was made of movies
shown by this department. The object of this procedure was to show movies that
were more suitable and more likely to meet the tastes of the patients than had pre-
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL I 65
viously been the case.   The broad plan is to use a children and adult programme and
then divide the patients into these two broad categories.
The educational library of 16-mm. films is still very popular, and new films
have been added in order to keep up with demands. Physicians and supervisors
have been given instruction in the operation of the 16-mm. projector for the running
of instructional films for staff members.
Black-and-white photography has been used extensively by the Public Works
Department to illustrate different phases of their work. Clinical motion-picture
films have been made in conjunction with research, and the Mental Health Centre
has borrowed a 16-mm. motion-picture camera in order to aid it in the production
of a child-series movie.
During the year the 35-mm. films at Pennington Hall were shown on 145 occasions to a total of 38,767 patients; in The Woodlands School they were shown 101
times to 17,207 patients. The 16-mm. ward shows were presented at Essondale,
Riverside, and Valleyview 323 times to 19,032 patients. Weekly 16-mm. shows
were presented at The Woodlands School, Allco Infirmary, Haney, Kamloops, and
Tranquille.
Industrial Therapy Department
The staff of this department has maintained a closer tie than previously with
clinical groups and other patient therapy activities. This liaison has been stimulated
in view of the construction of the new Industrial Therapy Building, which will place
the staff in a closer proximity to the treatment groups. This will make it possible
to stress the therapeutic advantages to be derived from the work carried out in this
department.
The following are the significant statistics for the year:—
Total patients employed in trade-shops during the year  2,510
Patients progressed to hospital work level      110
Patients discharged to community      182
The following figures indicate the productivity of this department:—
Manufactured Repaired
Items Items
Dry-goods Section  74,955                 	
Mending Section            98,961
Tailoring Section  6,292 13,345
Mattress and Canvas Section  8,025 1,271
Printing Section  3,678,718                  	
Machine and Metalsmithing Section  1,877 868
Cabinet-shop   429 2,013
Upholstery Section  1,066 943
Uniform Section  9,679 11,303
Shoe section  435 8,610
Laundry
During the year the volume of linen going through our department amounted to
9,352,754 pounds and that of dry cleaning to 116,840 pounds. This increase represents approximately 1 pound of linen per patient-day, giving an average consumption
for Essondale, The Woodlands School, Valleyview, and Mental Health Centrfe of
5.3 pounds per patient-day.
During the year, on account of the increased volume of linen, a reorganization
was made of the shifts in the laundry such that there were introduced two shifts on a
six-day week basis rather than one shift on a seven-day week basis.   This reorganiza-
 I 66 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
tion has enabled the department to increase its capacity and to maintain an improved
service to the Hospital.
Medical Records
During the year Miss A. Dingle was transferred to the Deputy Minister's office
as Consultant in Medical Records and Statistics. Mrs. P. A. West was appointed in
her place.
As the result of a study undertaken in the previous year, a more efficient method
of collecting and distributing the daily census figures on patient movement was put
into operation. It is now possible to supply accurate census figures to the various
departments on a daily basis and in a standardized form.
The work load in the admitting unit of the Provincial Mental Hospital has increased such that there has been an increase in admissions of 11.06 per cent and an
increase in discharge of 22.86 per cent in comparison with those of the previous year.
Dietary Department
The provision of meals to our large organization has been well carried out by
members of the Dietary Department under Mrs. M. E. Marr, dietetics administrator.
During the year the following volume of meals was served:—
Total general-menu meals served to Crease Clinic and Essondale patients   3,311,398
Total special-diet meals served to Crease Clinic and Essondale
patients       406,245
Total general-menu meals served to Crease Clinic and Essondale staff      125,458
Total special-diet meals served to Crease Clinic and Essondale
staff    6,345
Total of all meals served  3,849,446
Total raw-food cost per meal      $0.2716
During the year there was a consolidation of this department whereby the
nursing staff attached to the Dietary Department was replaced by dietary aides.
This has formed part of a programme whereby dietary staff become responsible for
esentially dietary functions formerly done either by nursing staff or by nursing staff
seconded to the Dietary Department. With the introduction of electric food-carts in
several areas, and with the change-over of certain procedures, success is being met
in providing an improved quality and variety of food for patients unable to go to
dining-room areas.
Plans are virtually completed for the renovation of the West Lawn kitchen and
dining-room areas. This is a part of the continuing programme to modernize dietary
facilities in this hospital.
Volunteer Service
The volunteer service, through its co-ordinator, Mr. G. Dodsworth, has been
very active and has done much excellent work for our patients. An average of 175
volunteers visited the Hospital at least once a week, and another fifty visited every
two weeks or oftener. The total group has volunteered approximately 53,400 man-
hours of work to patients.
A new and welcome addition was a group of high-school students from New
Westminster whose social club chose to volunteer for this work.
An important extension of the programme was the establishment of a regular
visting schedule for a volunteer from Nanaimo.    This volunteer visits most new
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL I 67
admissions from the Nanaimo area and follows up when they return home by
interesting them in the special group operated by the local mental health association.
The apparel-shops have shown greatly increased activity; 3,761 patients visited
these shops and received 16,794 articles of clothing. In addition, a very large
number of prizes were given out during the year, including Carnival Day. Two
fashion shows were put on for the patients.
The Christmas gift programme was again successful, with every patient in the
Hospital receiving a gift.
Several organizations have adopted wards and provide gifts. The most recent
are the Lutheran Churches of Vancouver, the Vancouver Association of Insurance
Women, and the Alpha Beta Phi Sorority of Nelson, B.C. These organizations make
monthly contributions.
Two volunteers have assisted the Psychology Department with an experimental
project with long-term patients.
Civil Defence
The Essondale Civil Defence Planning Committee remained active during the
year, and regular monthly meetings have been held.
New identification cards were issued to registered Civil Defence personnel in
accordance with a block of numbers allotted to this Civil Defence unit.
At the request of the American Psychiatric Association, a report on Essondale
civil defence and hospital disaster planning was submitted. This was related to an
increasing interest in this subject on the part of mental hospitals in the United States.
A survey of Hospital buildings has been carried out with a view to providing
information on their relative value as a protection against blast and fallout. As a
result of the information obtained, a plan to move patients from upper floors to basements and other areas giving a high degree of protection which could be attained at
short notice has been evolved.
As in previous years, the incoming classes of psychiatric nursing students were
given a four-hour orientation to civil defence and hospital disaster. Radio communication instruction courses have been given, and as a result 150 members of the staff
have obtained the restricted radio operator's licence of the department of Transport.
The unit has taken part in two National Civil Defence exercises, mainly communications.
Two senior nursing-staff members have attended courses of instruction at the
Civil Defence College at Arnprior, Ont., and three other members have attended
Civil Defence courses of instruction at Victoria.
 I 68 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
TREATMENT SERVICES
M. O. Calverley, Acting Clinical Director
This report will be more meaningful if it is read in sequence with Dr. Tucker's
in the 1960/61 Annual Report.
The need and demand for psychiatric services in the Province continues to
expand. Though there is general agreement that these should be provided at the
community level, it appears likely that several years will pass before this is accomplished in any adequate measure. Meanwhile the pressure for diagnostic and
treatment services in the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital mounts, as
reflected by a 3.5-per-cent and 12.7-per-cent increase in admissions in these units
respectively in the past year. Though modern treatment techniques and enlightened
attitudes toward early discharge have made it possible to cope with larger numbers
of patients, and even reduce the resident population of chronically ill, these in themselves are only a part solution to the growing demands for psychiatric services in a
rapidly expanding population. As it is also generally agreed that there should be
no expansion of the physical facilities for general psychiatry in the Essondale area,
the alternative is to accelerate diagnosis and treatment by necessary increases in
professional staff, who can later be shifted to community-based services, on a full-
or part-time basis, as provision for such is made.
In keeping with this philosophy, an important development in the clinical services in the past year has been the launching of our after-care programme. After
several years in the planning stages, this project became functional December 19,
1961, at 445 West Thirteenth Avenue, Vancouver, and by March 31, 1962, had
registered 432 people for after-care. Dr. Robert W. Harrington, as Director of
Rehabilitation and After-care is in charge of this unit and has a resident staff consisting of a social worker, a mental health nurse, and a stenographer-receptionist.
They are assisted by treatment teams from each of the units at Essondale, who go
in to conduct clinics each week, offering after-care to patients discharged from their
unit who require such care, and are within commuting distance and cannot obtain it
from other sources in the community. Such a treatment team consists of a senior
and junior psychiatrist, a social worker, and a psychiatric nurse. This plan has the
advantage of providing a considerable degree of continuity of care in terms of personnel. It permits earlier discharge in some instances, and by sustaining that group
of patients who previously had little or no follow-up care after leaving hospital, it
is anticipated that the readmission rate will be lowered. Such after-care clinics are
good examples of the feasibility and advantages of staff dividing their time between
the institution and the community. If adequate provision is made for the expected
rate of growth of the after-care programme, it will constitute a significant shift in
mental-health care from Essondale to the community from which the patient comes
and to which he returns after hospitalization, which usually will be a relatively brief
episode in the total course of his illness.
Our half-way houses, "Vista" and "Venture," also in Vancouver, are now
under the direction and guidance of the resident staff of the after-care unit. As was
expected, this closer identification with a treatment team is creating a more therapeutic atmosphere in these units. The number of beds in " Vista" was increased by
four to ten in November, 1961. A total of 113 patients used these rehabilitation
facilities during the year. The persisting difficulties in finding employment slows the
movement of patients into the community from half-way houses as it does from the
hospital as well.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
I 69
Our consultant staff in all branches of medicine and surgery have rendered
valuable service to our patients throughout the year. They supervise and work
closely with our medical and surgical residents. Two infirmary wards previously
located in the Centre Lawn Building have been moved to more suitable locations in
the North Lawn Building. In addition to improving infirmary ward care, this has
permitted the renovation of D 2 and E 2, the wards vacated, which have since been
reopened as the male and female admitting wards for the Provincial Mental Hospital.
These bright, relatively pleasant surroundings constitute a therapeutic atmosphere
for newly admitted patients.
The medical clinic planned for Essondale should do much to facilitate and
further general medical and surgical care of our patients. The rising average age
of those in the continued-treatment areas is resulting in a growing need for such
services. The increased amount of general nursing care that such cases require is
making heavy demands upon our nursing services.
As anticipated, there has been an expansion of the special boarding-home care
plan for partially disabled patients who are able to get along outside of hospital.
A total of 104 were so placed last year, for a grand total of 184 since this plan went
into effect. Much of the work that has ensured the success of this project has been
done by our Social Service Department. Again it demonstrates the bridging of the
gap between hospital and community in the provision of care.
New treatments have been limited to the selection and judicious use of the most
promising of the psychotropic drugs, from the large numbers of such compounds
reaching the market. Milieu and group activity therapies provide the common
treatment background upon which specific therapies, tailored to the individual
requirements of each patient and his illness, are superimposed. The therapeutic
influence of trained staff continues to be the major tool for the treatment of psychiatric illness, and unfortunately the most difficult to provide in adequate quality and
quantity. In this respect the contribution of community volunteer workers has
come to play a prominent part in treatment services, complementing the progressive
efforts of the intramural therapeutic disciplines.
There is now a sufficient body of knowledge and treatment techniques available
to make vast strides in coping with the problem of psychiatric illness, providing
the facilities and trained staff can be obtained to adequately apply these advances in
psychiatric theory and practice.
 I 70
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
STATISTICAL TABLES
CREASE CLINIC
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Crease Clinic, April 1, 1961,
to March 31, 1962
Male
Female
Total
108
505
24
203
136
579
46
275
244
Admissions—
1,084
Readmissions to a different institution of Mental Health Services ....
70
478
732                     900                  1,632
Total under care    	
840        |         1,036        |         1,876
Separations—
701
24
2
3
855
34
1
1
1,556
Discharged direct to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale	
58
2
1
Died                	
4
730                     891
1,621
+2        |            +9
110         I             145
+ 11
255
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
I 71
Table 2.—First Admissions to Crease Clinic, by Health Unit and School
District of Residence and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
School District No. 1    	
2
4
3
2
1
8
3
7
2
1
10
2
1
7
2
4
1
3
11
1
2
1
2
4
1
2
4
9
3
1
12
4
31
3
14
179
34
3
2
5
3
11
2
1
10
4
1
7
1
6
1
14
1
1
4
5
1
7
3
4
6
12
37
3
12
206
41
3
1
6
4
3
4
9
1
3
5
12
2
4
21
4
2
17
6
1
11
2
9
1
23
1
1
3
1
6
4
6
2
5
16
6
5
18
16
68
6
26
385
75
Metropolitan Health Committee,
Vancouver—Continued
School District No. 44 	
„   45	
21
7
24
17
13
2
1
5
2
1
1
1
4
3
2
2
2
2
5
3
2
2
9
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
3
34
7
27
25
9
3
7
8
4
2
2
1
1
2
1
2
17
5
4
2
3
3
7
1
6
3
2
1
1
4
3
1
2
„   2...	
 ,   3
55
14
„   4
Simon  Fraser,  New  Westminster—
.School District No, 40
, 5
„          „         „   18
51
,,   43
42
School District No. 7	
North Fraser Valley, Mission—
School District No. 47.
..   8
22
 10	
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 9     _
,,   11    -
"            'a   7fi
5
1
Upper Island, Courtenay—■
School District No. 47
„   71 ...
12
„          „         „   12
10
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 14
, 15	
„         „         „   72...	
5
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 50.   .
»   51
„          ,          „   57
3
„         „         „   16 .
1
„          „          „   17
6
 ,   23   .
 ,   53	
4
u          ,.   77
 54	
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 59
„   60...
 81	
Greater  Victoria  Metropolitan
Board of Health-
Greater Victoria—School District No. 61 (parti)	
3
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 19    ..
4
 20	
„   21     	
3
4
22
„   78	
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 24
22
.,   75
Saanich and South Vancouver
Island—
School District No. 61
(parf2)
 ,   26	
„   29 -
, 30
8
„   31	
School District No. 62
 63	
Central Vancouver Island, Nanaimo—■
School District No. 65
4
Cariboo, Prince George-
School District No. 27	
2
.,   55
3
„   56	
 57	
Upper   Fraser   Valley,   Chilli
 66	
 67	
,,   68
2
5
16
wack—■
 69..	
2
School District No. 32 _
 70
8
>   33
School districts not covered by
health units—
School District No. 46   . .
, 48	
„   49
„   73	
 74	
 80
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 35
„   36
4
2
3
„   37	
Metropolitan Health Committee,
Vancouver—
2
5
2
School District No. 38	
5
 ,   39 	
3
 ,   41... .     .
5
Totals	
529
625
1,154
1 Includes Victoria, Esquimalt, and Oak Bay.
2 Saanich only.
 I 72
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT.  1961/62
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MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
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 1 76
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Table 6.—First Admissions to Crease Clinic by Marital Status, Mental
Diagnosis, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 7.—Readmissions to Crease Clinic by Marital Status, Mental
Diagnosis, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 8.—First Admissions to Crease Clinic by Mental Diagnosis, Years
of Schooling, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 9.—Readmissions to Crease Clinic by Mental Diagnosis, Years of
Schooling, and Sex, April 1,1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 10.—First Admissions to Crease Clinic by Citizenship, Age-group,
and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31,1962
Table 11.—First Admissions to Crease Clinic by Religion and Sex,
April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 12.—First Admissions to Crease Clinic by Previous Occupation and
Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
Table 13.—Live Discharges from Crease Clinic by Condition on Discharge,
Disposition to, and Sex, April 1,1961, to March 31, 1962
Disposition to-
Condition
Home
Clinic
Agency
General
Hospital
Welfare
Institution
Other
Mental
Hospital
Other
Total
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
7
11
556
118
12
33
754
51
	
	
1
1
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20
~~9
26
7
~~2
7
11
563
146
12
33
766
79
19
Much improved-
44
1,329
Unimproved	
225
Totals-
692
850
—
	
2
2
	
1
26
35
7
2
727
890
1,617
 crease clinic and provincial mental hospital
I 77
Table 14.—Live Discharges from Crease Clinic by Mental Diagnosis, Condition on Discharge, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31,1962
Mental Diagnosis
Condition on Discharge
Recovered
M.
F.
Much
Improved
M.
Improved
M.
Unimproved
M.
Total
M.
Grand
Total
Schizophrenic disorders	
Manic-depressive reaction..
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states..
Senile psychosis-
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis
Alcoholic psychosis ..
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology-
Other and unspecified psychoses..
Anxiety reaction without mention of somatic symptoms.
Hysterical reaction without mention of somatic symptoms	
Phobic reaction.
Obsessive-compulsive reaction	
Neurotic-depressive reaction	
Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms
(somatization reaction) affecting digestive system.
Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms
(somatization reaction) affecting other
systems.
Psychoneurotic disorders, other mixed and
unspecified types                 	
Chronic brain syndrome with neurotic reaction	
Pathological personality-
Immature personality	
Alcoholism 	
Other drug addiction-
Primary childhood behaviour disorders-
Mental deficiency-
Other and unspecified character behaviour
and intelligence disorders
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural
reaction-
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S..
Epilepsy-
Other diseases of central nervous system
not associated with psychosis-
Observation without need for further medical (psychiatric) care	
Other, unknown, and unspecified conditions	
Totals-
12
11
33
212
17
24
4
4
3
13
72
2
96
563
212
41
32
11
1
2
4
4
21
108
15
2
7
231
3
13
21
14
766
22
2
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
3
3
3
1
4
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20
241
20
25
8
1
6
6
8
16
74
5
101
11
4
86
18
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1
12
5
12
6
7
12
1
1
727
249
46
36
11
2
2
6
6
24
125
18
3
7
248
2
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890
490
66
61
19
3
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12
14
40
199
26
3
12
349
16
8
106
49
25
3
28
5
14
14
9
21
1
3
 8^
1,617
 I 78
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
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I 81
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Male
Female
Total
1,608
121
4
1,340
308
1
2,948
429
5
Total as at April 1, 1961                    _ 	
1,733
1,649
3,382
Admissions—
483
116
509
24
24
327
145
449
34
11
810
Readmissions to a different institution of Mental Health Services.	
261
958
58
35
1,156
966
2,122
2,889
2,615
5,504
Separations—
1,040
103
64
212
6
873
69
23
407
1
1,913
riled
172
87
619
7
1,425
1,373
2,798
— 144
1,464
-98
1,242
—242
In residence, March 31, 1962                      	
2,706
 I 82
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Table 2.—First Admissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by
Health Unit and School District of Residence and Sex, April 1, 1961,
to March 31, 1962.
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
Metropolitan Health Committee,
School District No. 2	
3
2
5
Vancouver—Continued
„   3..	
2
1
3
School District No. 44	
6
18
24
„   4 	
1
1
 45	
1
7
8
„   5 	
2
2
Simon  Fraser,   New Westmin
„   18	
2
2
ster—
Selkirk, Nelson—
School District No. 40	
21
9
30
3
2
5
„   43	
15
13
28
„   8 	
1
1
„   10	
1
1
2
School District No. 42	
8
11
19
West Kootenay, Trail—
„   75	
6
7
13
School District No. 9 .—	
6
7
13
„   76	
2
2
„   11 	
5
2
7
Upper Island, Courtenay—
 ,   12 	
2
1
3
School District No. 47	
2
5
7
„   13	
2
2
„   71	
5
2
7
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
 72	
2
1
3
School District No. 14 	
2
2
4
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
 15. 	
3
2
5
School District No. 51	
2
2
„   16 	
1
1
 52.   	
8
6
14
 17-	
1
1
2
 53	
2
3
5
„   23	
8
5
13
„   54	
2
1
3
„   77   	
1
1
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 59	
7
5
North Okanagan, Vernon—
12
School District No. 19 —
1
2
3
„   60	
1
1
2
„   20	
6
5
11
„   81	
1
1
„   ?! 	
1
1
Greater   Victoria   Metropolitan
„   22 	
4
3
7
Board of Health-
„   78	
1
1
2
Greater Victoria—School Dis
South Central, Kamloops—
trict No. 61 (parti)	
21
21
42
School District No. 24	
8
7
15
Saanich and South Vancouver
„   29..	
6
1
7
Island—
„   30	
2
1
3
School District No. 61
„   31	
1
2
3
(part2)   	
3
4
7
Cariboo, Prince George—
School District No. 63	
3
3
School District No. 27.	
5
1
6
„   64.	
1
1
„   28	
2
2
4
Central Vancouver Island, Na
„   55	
2
	
2
naimo—
„   56	
11
1
5
1
16
Scohol District No. 65 	
„   66....	
2
1
2
2
4
„   57	
3
 58. 	
1
2
3
 67-...	
3
3
6
Upper   Fraser   Valley,    Chilli
„   68	
5
4
9
wack—
„   69	
1
2
3
School District No. 32	
7
7
„   70	
4
9
13
33
5
8
13
School districts not covered by
„   34	
8
9
17
health units—
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 46	
4
3
7
School District No. 35	
5
6
11
 49  ...
2
1
3
„   36	
21
21
42
„   73 	
1
1
2
„   37	
1
1
2
„   74	
6
4
10
Metropolitan Health Committee,
„   80 	
3
3
Vancouver—
Unorganized	
6
6
School District No. 38	
8
6
14
12
5
17
„   39	
 41	
278
31
215
27
493
58
Totals  	
624
508
1,132
i Includes Victoria, Esquimalt, and Oak Bay.
2 Saanich only.
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 i 88 mental health services report, 1961/62
Table 6.—First Admissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by
Mental Diagnosis, Marital Status, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March
31, 1962.
Table 7.—Readmissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by
Mental Diagnosis, Marital Status, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March
31, 1962.
Table 8.—First Admissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by
Mental Diagnosis, Years of Schooling, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to
March 31, 1962.
Table 9.—Readmissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by
Mental Diagnosis, Years of Schooling, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to
March 31, 1962.
Table 10.—First Admissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by
Citizenship, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 11.—First Admissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by
Religion and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 12.—First Admissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by
Previous Occupation and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
I 89
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UUWO
 I 90                           MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Table 14.—Resident Population of Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by Mental Diagnosis, Number of Previous Admissions, and Sex,
December 31, 1961.
Table 15.—Resident Population of Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, 25 Years of Age and under, by Mental Diagnosis, Length of Stay,
and Sex, December 31, 1961.
Table 16.—Resident Population of Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, 26 to 49 Years of Age, by Mental Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and
Sex, December 31, 1961.
Table 17.—Resident Population of Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, 50 Years of Age and over, by Mental Diagnosis, Length of Stay,
and Sex, December 31, 1961.
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
Table 18.—Live Discharges from Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale,
by Condition on Discharge, Disposition to, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to
March 31, 1962.
Condition
Disposition to—
Total
Grand
Total
Home
Clinic
Agency
General
Hospital
Welfare
Institution
Other
Mental
Hospital
Other
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.          F.
Recovered.. 	
Much improved
Improved-
Unimproved—
Totals	
7
16
836
71
6
9
777
42
1
1
1
1
~~6
~~i
—
~1
1
27
45
17
17
2
4
651
213
222
3
10 |         7
21 |         9
935 j     818
138 j       62
17
30
1,753
200
930
834
2
1
7
i
—
1
73
34
92
25
1,104 |     896
2,000
1 Includes 6 escapees.
2 Includes 2 escapees.
3 Includes 4 escapees.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
I 91
Table 19.—Live Discharges from Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale,
by Mental Diagnosis, Condition on Discharge, and Sex, April 1, 1961,
to March 31, 1962.
Condition on Discharge
Total
Mental Diagnosis
Recovered
Much
Improved
Improved
Unimproved
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
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1
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2
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1
1
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2
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1
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1
360
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5
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15
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11
2
2
30
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14
254
2
3
10
2
11
6
25
1
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36
33
3
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13
18
17
11
3
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11
2
34
32
52
5
4
18
1
2
2
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2
1
44
1
1
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3
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4
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6
1
2
17
1
2
2
2
	
2
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11
9
1
5
6
1
1
1
417
15
12
7
1
19
71
18
10
12
2
2
34
1
2
5
102
18
277
4
5
13
2
17
8
26
2
2
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37
35
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2
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23
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20
19
12
4
64
1
1
4
11
2
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42
53
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4
24
2
2
3
13
3
1
842
Manic-depressive reaction	
Involutional melancholia 	
52
47
10
3
1
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis.	
Alcoholic psychosis.	
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology-
35
94
32
30
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31
Hysterical reaction without mention of
14
6
Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms
(somatization reaction)   affecting di-
98
2
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(somatization reaction) affecting other
5
2
1
1
1
Psychoneurotic   disorders,   other   mixed
and unspecified types     -	
Chronic brain  syndrome with neurotic
4
13
Syphilis and its sequelae	
7
147
60
330
14
Primary childhood behaviour disorders	
9
37
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and intelligence disorders.—	
Chronic   brain   syndrome   with   beha-
4
19
11
39
Observation  without  need  for  further
medical (psychiatric) care _
Other, unknown, and unspecified condi-
5
3
Totals	
10
7
21
9  1  935
818
138
62
1,104
896
2,000
 I 92
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
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 I 96 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
PART HI.—THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL, NEW WESTMINSTER,
AND THE TRANQUILLE SCHOOL, TRANQUILLE
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
L. A. Kerwood, Medical Superintendent
PATIENT POPULATION
The Woodlands School.—On March 31, 1962, the total cases on register, including cases on probation, was 1,398. There were 1,352 cases in residence at The
Woodlands School.
The Tranquille School.—On March 31, 1962, there were 292 in residence at
The Tranquille School.
ADMISSIONS
There were 177 temporary admissions during the year; of these, fifty-two
remained as permanent cases by certification. There were forty-four permanent
admissions by certification, making a total of 221 patients admitted during the year.
Temporary admissions were extended beyond thirty days in 261 cases. Two hundred and twenty-five patients were transferred to The Tranquille School.
SUMMER THIRTY-DAY ADMISSION PROGRAMME
During June, July, and August, 1961, this programme, which utilizes beds
vacated by children who go to their own homes for summer vacation, was again put
into operation.
It will be noted that the numbers are somewhat reduced from the previous year,
but this enabled admissions to be placed on appropriate wards, and thus avoided
dislocation of ward organization, which had occurred to some extent previously.
A total of ninety-three patients was given temporary admission, the majority
for one month, but several for one and a half or two months. The monthly rates
were: June, 43; July, 43; and August, 39; that is a total of 125 pupil-months for
93 patients.
It should be recognized that this programme takes place at a time when there
is normally some decrease in staff owing to holidays and when the academic school
is closed. Thus it represents a considerable effort of organization on the part of all
staff, particularly on the bed bureau, nursing divisions, and recreational department.
I am pleased to report that all staff have co-operated fully in making this added programme function, and that the Chief Personnel Officer and the Civil Service Commission have been most helpful in facilitating staff replacement and summer relief,
without which the programme would have been very difficult to stage.
As I mentioned in my last year's report, there are many types of care which
can be made available for the retardate or may support his family and thus lessen
the demands for permanent residential care, and these alternates should be actively
promulgated when possible. The modern residential hospital school should be
utilized for a more selected case load with definite neuropsychiatric complications
and in conjunction with adequate foster-home, hostel, boarding-home, and nursing-
home satellites. It is neither necessary nor desirable that patients who merely need
a protective environment with some supervision be placed in the relatively more
expensive and highly staffed residential hospital school.
The tendency today is rightly away from the concept of utilizing hospital-type
settings for residential and non-treatment types of care, and the developments out-
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL I 97
lined above and in last year's report are vitally important if a larger number of
retardates and their parents are to receive adequate and appropriate service.
There is a great deal of personal tragedy and unhappiness that will only be
ameliorated when comprehensive programmes for the care, training, and rehabilitation of all retardates and adequate service to their parents are provided. This can
never be given entirely from a centralized residential facility, but needs the widest
co-operation from all agencies and services which exist, along with some development of specialized services for this large section of our growing population.
In this regard we are most happy to report a major development in policy with
the agreement between the Metropolitan Health Committee and The Woodlands
School to work in close liaison in the Greater Vancouver area. The wealth of medical resources of this great organization is now available to us, and it is to be hoped
that progressive decentralization of The Woodlands School responsibility will take
place with the growing participation of local agencies and authorities.
In this context one must mention the very valuable work of the Registry of
Handicapped Persons undertaken and kept up to date by the Division of Vital Statistics. It would appear to be most useful if registration of the mentally handicapped
were ultimately to become a statutory responsibility, as thus the extent of the problem
in each community would be known and long-term and effective planning would be
more easily accomplished.
It frequently happens at the moment that cases spring to attention only when
some crisis (death of a parent, serious illness, etc.) occurs, and also that demands
for admission are made when all that is needed may be the development of a special
school class, a day-nursery, occupation centre, etc. It would appear to be most
useful for a survey of all known cases to be made with an indication of the special
services needed in order that they be effectively dealt with, where possible, in their
own homes or nearby.
The developments currently being undertaken by the education authorities and
by the Association for Retarded Children with governmental co-operation would
appear to be very promising in this regard. In the meantime, The Woodlands School
has to try to utilize available beds as far as possible.
Many cases have now been processed through the Thirty-day Admission Programme. This has meant in many instances that an extension has been necessary
in order that complete clinical and other investigations can be carried out. At this
date the majority of applicants for admission have been evaluated and the need for
admission can be better appraised at the same time the criteria for eventual admission are becoming better clarified.
In general, it can be said that the severely retarded child will be admitted at
about the age of 7 to 9 years. There will, of course, be great individual variation,
depending upon various weighting factors on our rating scale (hyperactivity, blindness, parental health, etc.). The moderately retarded may be given permanent
admission at about 15 to 18 years of age, depending upon the social adjustment.
In the case of the mildly retarded, admissions may not be possible whilst the parents
are alive unless the individual's lack of adequate training and supervision result in
quite unacceptable social behaviour.
HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT
The Hospital Administrator reports the following highlights of the year:—
(1) The approval by the Civil Service Commission of our line organizational
chart and the reorganization of the business and medical administrative
areas of the School.
 I 98 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
(2) The approval of the positions of Executive Housekeeper and Instructor
of Trades and Maintenance.
(3) The letting of the contract and the commencement of the conversion of
Nurses' Home 2 into administration and clinical offices and the placement
therein of the two new laboratories and the beautician's department.
(4) The reclassification of his position from Unit Business Manager to Hospital Administrator 1.
(5) The appointment of the Co-ordinator of Volunteer Services.
(6) The establishment of an E.E.G. machine in the Fraser View Building,
which has meant a great reduction of transportation difficulties.
(7) The establishment of an additional night shift in the central laundry location at Essondale, which has provided much-needed additional services
to the wards and reduced problems at the ward level.
(8) The general improvement noted in the operation of the Public Works
Department.
Dietary
The night-school class in quantity cookery completed its two-year course in
March, 1962. Four members of the Dietary Department were successful in the
course. One cook completed a course in diet therapy. Three cooks from The
Woodlands School enrolled in the University of British Columbia Extension Department course in kitchen management. This brings to eight the number of our cooks
who have taken this course.
Pharmacy
The operations of the pharmacy during the year have been efficiently carried
out under the direction of the pharmacist, Mr. C. Wells. A Stockman 3, Mr. E.
Roach, was appointed to the pharmacy staff on April 15, 1961. This appointment
has lessened the burden on the pharmacist and allowed an increase in the standards
of service from this area.
The Pharmacy Committee, comprising Dr. Tischler, Clinical Director, as Chairman, Mr. Booth, Mr. Wells, Miss Curie, and Mr. Milne, has met monthly to discuss
pharmaceutical items, pharmacy problems and requirements.
Central Supply
The Central Supply Department has continued to facilitate the controls that
have been established over supplies and equipment. All equipment to the institution
is routed through this area and requisitions checked and cleared.
Housekeeping
The Housekeeping Department has continued to maintain reasonable care of
the public areas of the School. We are very pleased at the approval of the Civil
Service Commission of our proposed housekeeping organization and of the approval
of the Executive Housekeeper position. We expect to see this department expanded
and the services greatly improved during the next year.
Transportation
The transport needs of the School have been met efficiently by our Transport
Division under the head of Mr. W. Wilson. The demands on the Transport Division
have been great, especially with the introduction of scheduled runs to and from
Essondale for working patients.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL I 99
Industrial Therapy
The Industrial Therapy Division consists of mending and sewing departments,
metal repair section, shoe-shop, and upholstery-shop. Each of these divisions has
been active during the year. The orthopaedic-shoe maker has taken on the responsibility of repairing and fabricating all orthopaedic shoes and appliances for Essondale
as well as his own duties at the School.
Security
The security staff comprises two full-time and one part-time commissionaires.
The security officers have assisted management of the School in reducing petty thefts,
assisted with parking on special occasions, checking lights, fire-watches, securing
doors, etc.
Medical Records
During the year Miss E. Henshaw, supervisor of this department, has been
involved in improving methods related to diagnostic clinics and discharge procedures.
Control systems have been set up for (1) standard procedure for routine notes,
(2) diagnostic clinic reports to outside physicians and health units, and (3) transfer
of patients to Crease Clinic operating-room.
A policy manual has been compiled.
A medical information letter is prepared on all patients who have been seen
at diagnostic clinic and those discharged on probation, and sent to the medical
practitioner in charge of the case, the Medical Health Officer, and the Registry for
Handicapped Children.
Department of Public Works
Major projects completed by the Public Works Department during the 1961/62
fiscal year are as follows:—
(1) Sidewalks and curbing from the two main entrances.
(2) Two playing-field toilets completed.
(3) Ramps   installed  for  additional  toilet  facilities  from  airing-court  to
buildings.
(4) Additional toilet facilities installed in Fraser Glen and Fraser View wards.
(5) Repairs to drainage-tiles and waterproofing of complete north wall of
auditorium building.
(6) Installed ramps and double doors off the back wall of Fraser View as
requested by the Fire Marshal.
(7) New drain-pipe installed on the Fraser View Building.
(8) Rebuilt kettle yard in the old cafeteria building.
(9) Additional parking at the Administration Building provided.
(10) Painted and provided additional lighting in tunnel.
DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY
During the year, as well as carrying out routine dental care, the department
surveyed 1,158 patients for periodontal conditions. Two hundred and eighty-eight
tubes of tooth-paste in lieu of the usual tooth-powder were prepared in an effort to
simplify and improve dental care on the wards.   Summary of work is as follows:—
Number of patients  1,476
Examinations      346
Prophylaxis and scaling      351
 I 100 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Fillings  1,506
Dentures   36
Dentures repaired and relined  35
Extractions   669
X-rays   73
Periodontal treatments   165
Miscellaneous treatments  371
Patients treated on wards  38
EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT
Class changes included time in occupational therapy and in the recreation
department for a fairly large group of pupils. This allowed teaching time for
twenty-three imbeciles on Ward 7 on a half-day basis, remedial reading, speech
correction, lipreading, and Braille tuition during these hours.
In co-operation with the male nursing office and the industrial-therapy staff,
all the boys in the opportunity classes on a half-day basis were placed in the shops
during the remainder of the day. The teacher maintained contact and attempted to
work out in the classroom some of the problems that arose in shop work.
Other inaugurations included a fashion show in which the domestic science
classes modelled the clothing they had made during the year and prepared and served
refreshments to the invited guests. Entertainment was provided by the various
school clubs. The domestic science classes, in co-operation with Riverdale, undertook shirt mending and ironing. The biggest change of the year was the complete
renovation of the domestic science room undertaken by Mr. Mercer, the industrial
arts instructor, and the senior boys during July. An attempt was made on the part
of the instructor to make the work as similar to a day's work in ordinary life as
possible. Boys were encouraged to use power-tools and modern methods. Fitting,
measuring, squaring, and cutting exceeded expectations for accuracy. Cutting sink
openings, gluing and fitting of the Arborite was very good, as was hardware installation and finishing. A teacher's desk, 6 by 3 feet, with twenty-seven sliding trays
and five drawers, was also constructed. A demonstration table, with drop-leaves,
was also built, and fitted cupboards for sewing equipment. The purchase of three
new stoves and a refrigerator gives us now a modern kitchen in which the girls and
boys can receive a better training in a shorter time. For the first time in the history
of the School, domestic science is being taught for a full day, seventy-two pupils,
both boys and girls, participating in nine classes.
The boy's choir and band remained popular and sang and played in the community on fifteen different occasions. After-school clubs continued to be a source
of pleasure to the pupils and profitable to us. The Woodwork Club built cupboards
for the school classrooms and a storage unit for the school gymnasium for projection
equipment.
Cartoon showings were inaugurated for those unable to benefit from longer
and more advanced film runs. These are currently running to an audience of nearly
300 and are shown in nine different locations.
Staff spoke at the usual number of P.-T.A. and other meetings.
Miss Ellison, children's librarian at the New Westminster Public Library, sorted
our books and has offered to come in one day a week for cataloguing.
For the first time, youngsters were taken into the community to participate in
Hallowe'en " handouts."
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL I 101
Over 1,200 visitors were escorted through the school last year. Two hundred
and fifty-nine pupils attended classes during the year; five of these were day pupils
and a number of T.D.As.
" Playing to Learn " Classes
The number of pupils in regular attendance is seventy-two, all from Ward 8.
These pupils attend in groups of twelve for one-hour periods of tuition on regular
schedule, and when other activities have been cancelled, many periods have been
filled in with two groups which can be managed with the visual aid of slides or
educational moving film. This has now become a regular feature on Friday, giving
the pupils longer periods off the ward.
The pupils have been taken out on many field-trips to the Queen's Park
children's zoo, to Stanley Park, fishing trips, visits to the fire-hall, to birthday parties
at parents' homes, and on week-end camping trips to Crescent Beach last summer.
With these living experiences, the children have learned much and are developing
lines of communication as their vocabulary develops.
The additional programmes of the self-care recreational activities and ocupa-
tional-therapy classes conducted in this area now with resulting adjustments give
four hours of various tuition to the groups, and better behaviour has made it possible
to also include these pupils in much of the entertainment supplied by other areas.
LABORATORY
The laboratory has had a capacity year, under the capable management of Miss
Bunting and the supervision of Dr. Nicholson.
A start has been made in the taking, staining, and examination of Buccal smears
for sex chromatin. The acquisition of the new Zeiss microscope under Federal
Health Grant has helped the work of this department. It will be a great step forward
when the laboratory moves from its present quarters to the new site in the Administration Building.
Total number of tests carried out during the year was 19,472.
MEDICAL STAFF
I wish to report that a very high level of medical skill is exhibited by the physicians at The Woodlands School in both diagnosis of the disorders associated with
mental retardation and with the diagnosis of intercurrent diseases to which these
patients are subject. I feel that we have an admirable medical team, and I would like
to take this opportunity of thanking them.
We are also much indebted to our many medical colleagues who have given us
admirable consultative service, and to those physicians in the Public Health Services
and private practice who have advised us in matters relating to admission and have
been of such help to parents in many ways. We were very pleased to see various
medical practitioners attend intake conferences and give us their reports on their
patients.
We feel that the full reports that we sent to the family physicians on all new
cases are appreciated and are useful to them. The family physician is in a crucial
position to help parents in understanding their retarded children in his management.
NURSING SERVICES
I am pleased to report that the two nursing divisions have developed an increasing concept of programming for the patients under their care and show an enthusi-
 I 102 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
astic willingness to contribute a great deal more than custodial care. My thanks go
to all their members, who have made life on the wards of the School a much more
stimulating and happy experience for all our patients. Kind, intelligent, and active
ward staff are the basic essential of any residential programme, and I am most happy
that at Woodlands there is general acceptance of this view-point. Our next major
challenge lies in the activation of the severely retarded population, and in the development of techniques for their training in this programme I feel that I can count
upon the whole-hearted support of the nursing division.
Female Nursing Division
Education Programmes
1. Psychiatric Students.—One hundred and forty-five student psychiatric nurses
received training at The Woodlands School (30 male and 115 female).
2. Post-basic Clinical Programme for Registered Nurses in Psychiatric Nursing.
—The post-basic clinical teaching programme in psychiatric nursing for the registered nurses has been established at the Education Centre, Essondale, since 1960.
In July, 1961, five registered nurses affiliated for one week of their six-month
course at The Woodlands School. One of these nurses has been employed at The
Woodlands School since completion of her course. In January, 1962, ten registered
nurses affiliated at The Woodlands School for one week.
3. In-service Education Programme for Psychiatric Graduate Nurses.—An in-
service programme was started at The Woodlands School on January 24, 1962, for
psychiatric nurses. This is our first effort and began in a small way. The course of
lectures, discussions, and films was held every Wednesday from January 24, 1962,
to April 11, 1962, inclusive.
Mrs. K. Fritz, psychiatric aide instructor, has organized an additional in-service
programme for psychiatric aides. This consists of review of nursing procedures,
films, discussions on new areas that have developed within the institution, etc.
4. Visiting Nurses.—Student nurses from the various general hospitals in
British Columbia spend a three-month affiliation period in psychiatric nursing at
Essondale. During this period they spend two afternoons at The Woodlands School.
There is an average of twenty-five nurses visiting every six weeks.
Approximately six student nurses continue to visit The Woodlands School each
month from the Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster. This is part of a
two-week leadership programme.
Groups of public health nurses from the University of British Columbia and
psychiatric and registered nurses from Essondale tour The Woodlands School on
various occasions.
Reorganization of Wards
Ward 2, a 78-bed ward, was exchanged with men's division for A Ward, 36
beds.   A Ward was opened July 21, 1961, for idiot-level pupils.
G Ward was changed from young adult group (female) to younger schoolgirls.
Ward 9 was changed from active schoolgirls' ward to cerebral palsied pupils,
both sexes. This took place on November 29, 1961, thus making Fraser View
Building a hospital unit.
Ward 14 was changed from a partial bed-care area to a completely active
kindergarten group, with seventy-three children. This is the only non-hospital ward
in the Fraser View Building.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL I 103
Transfer of Pupils to Tranquille from The Woodlands School
We have transferred 117 pupils (female) from The Woodlands School to
Tranquille, but four were later returned.
Addition to Fourth Shift in Nursing Division
In July, 1961, a portion of the staff on 3 to 11 p.m. shift were moved ahead
to facilitate the very heavy period from 12 noon to 3.10 p.m. on small children's
wards. This shift was added to four wards in the Fraser View Building—namely,
Wards 11, 12, 13, and 14—by September, 1961. Improved patient care and
supervision has resulted.
Escort and Errand Service
This service was instituted in October, 1961. Two psychiatric aides were
chosen to carry out this service. This has been very beneficial to ward staff. Previously, wards were constantly being disrupted by staff being sent to various areas
either with patients or on errands. This service has decreased the necessity of the
staff leaving wards.
Recreation
We have had many excellent recreational activities for the pupils during the
past year. A committee is presently organizing groups of pupils for camping periods
during the summer months. These pupils will be accompanied by members of the
nursing staff.
Summary
We feel that the nursing division has improved considerably in both quantity
and quality of service to patients during the past year. This could not have been
accomplished without the co-operation of the entire nursing division and allied departments.
Men's Nursing Division
Staff movements in this year have shown twenty-eight resignations, four transfers to other departments, and two retirements.
Ward 6 pupils were transferred to Ward 2, which we received from the department of female nursing. Ward A and B pupils were then transferred to Ward 6,
Ward A was given over to the department of female nursing, and Ward B was reopened as a new ward for severely retarded junior boys. Since the final change as
of last November, the wards have all become well established and have developed
programmes in diversified or recreational activities.
Ward 8, for the junior moderately retarded pupils, has now been developed
into a good group system of pupil supervision and activities. The activities and
pupil development have been increased, with the additional areas in tuition covering
self-care, recreation, and occupational-therapy activities.
At this time we have no pupils confined entirely to the ward, with the exception
of the bed cases on Ward C. A large group of these Ward C spastic pupils are up
and dressed for regular exercise periods within the ward, and a number more are
moved outside for airings when the weather is nice. The other more active groups
of severely retarded are now attending picture shows, concerts, parties, and daily
activities in the auditorium, which includes swimming for several groups.
The Cubs and Scouts have had an active year up to the last few months. We
are at present experiencing some difficulty in adjusting times favourable to the
leaders, but hope to effect adjustments so these activities will be back on weekly
 I  104 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
schedules again. We also require a much more active committee who will lend
their support to the leaders and clear the way to further community participation
by those two groups.
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
Handicraft Section
Treatment in the Occupational Therapy Department on a monthly basis now
totals 2,119. This is more than double the monthly treatments carried out last year.
Number of patients attending occupational therapy daily, 135; number of patients
treated on the ward weekly, 85.
A great deal of reorganizing was done in July in order to keep up with the ward
changes which were taking place at this time. A group of our boys took on the project of modernizing the department. Cupboards, tables, and chairs were painted;
furniture was remodelled; and the results were a much more attractive occupational-therapy room.
CEREBRAL PALSY OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT
The therapist for this department was absent on four months' special educational leave until early June, 1961, when she returned with the degree of Bachelor
of Science in Occupational Therapy. After three weeks' annual vacation, during
which she visited several occupational-therapy departments in cerebral palsy centres
in California and the physical-therapy unit at Stanford University in order to gain
first-hand information on current trends in treatment, the therapist returned, and
a fresh programme for the department was planned with the help of Dr. Tischler,
Director of the Cerebral Palsy Unit, and Dr. Pinkerton, consultant in cerebral palsy.
In the following eight months, 729 treatments were given, of which 576 were
group craft activities given in the wards (430 female, 146 male) and 153 were
specific individual treatments based on promoting neurological development and
encouraging self-help skills (61 female, 182 male). The reason for the greater
number of boys' individual treatments is because the male handicapped ward is
nearer the department, and there are consequently fewer transportation difficulties.
More girls have been given group craft activity because larger classes could be carried owing to the familiarity of patients to this type of programme.
Throughout the year we have had monthly cerebral palsy clinics with Dr.
Pinkerton as consulting specialist, and much help has been offered by Dr. Tischler
as the Director of the Cerebral Palsy Unit.
PHYSIOTHERAPY DEPARTMENT
The following treatments were given in this department during the year:
Male   3,138
Female   2,383
Total  5,521
These treatments include massage, electrotherapy, hydrotherapy, and exercises.
Unfortunately both physiotherapists were off during the year with major surgery,
leaving only eight months in which two physiotherapists were operating at one time.
Dr. Pinkerton has visited regularly each month since January, 1961, in an
advisory capacity, and his suggestions regarding patient treatment have helped
greatly. During the last year Dr. Outerbridge has seen forty-seven patients and
performed surgery on ten of these.   The rest have had shoe corrections or braces.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL I 105
PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT
The function of a psychologist in a mental-deficiency unit is unique. The
usual areas of interest to a psychologist are available, but the application of known
psychological principles and techniques varies somewhat and must be adapted to
this selected population. As such, on-the-job training becomes extremely important,
particularly as the psychological aspects of retardation are not included in the ordinary postgraduate psychology curriculum.
At intervals of approximately three months, three different people have been
started in the department. In May Miss Haltalin, student, joined the staff; in
August, Mr. Coles; and finally in December, Mrs. Flackett on a part-time basis.
Over a period of time the services of these people have been valuable, but it must
be recognized that much time has been spent on orientation and training of new staff.
Unfortunately this was also rendered more difficult by the resignation of Mr.
John Nuttall, head of the department. Mr. Nuttall left behind a most impressive
record of work and initiated the expansion of the department in lines other than
routine testing.
The statistical breakdown of work for the year compares favourably with last
year's output. A slight decrease in number of reports occurs because verbal report-
ings for the year were not recorded. Under miscellaneous duties it can be seen that,
as in previous years, the Psychology Department has been involved in areas other
than straight psychological assessments. Considerable time has been spent in rehabilitative programming, assisting on tours, and lectures to the student nurses.
RADIOLOGY DEPARTMENT
The following is a tabulation of the work performed in this department in the
twelve-month period ended March 31, 1962:—
Chests X-rayed  2,205
Skulls   255
Extremities   336
Abdomens   19
Shoulders   11
Pelvis   16
Spines X-rayed   3 7
Mastoids   9
Noses   11
I.V.P.s   9
Gall-bladders   5
Ribs   9
Nasal sinuses   8
Total  2,930
RECREATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT
The Recreation Department has tried to provide a variety of recreational
experiences which offer diversion, training, and education within the limitations
of the pupils. Although all objectives were not reached, the support and co-operation given by the staff members, who are becoming increasingly aware of the immediate values of recreation for the retarded child, were most welcome.
5
 I  106 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Noteworthy in this regard was the pilot project on camping. Fifty-two children
attended ten days' sessions at Crescent Beach and Gibsons Landing with recreation
staff, who assisted camp directors as leaders and advisers.
The introduction of a carnival theme to the annual sports day allowed children
and visitors to enjoy a full day of parades, outdoor stage entertainment, merry-go-
rounds, plus all the elements that contribute to the fanciful atmosphere of a fair.
Classes in craft work and painting for fun, as well as roller-skating, were all
new aspects of the programme.
The following were some highlights of the year's activities which were additional
to the regular activation classes: Music groups (singing, chime band, rhythm band),
socials and dances, mass entertainments (variety concerts, band concerts, talent
shows), and swimming.
SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT
Pre-admission and Admission
During the year the pressures for admission have required that an increasing
proportion of our service be allotted to families of children on the waiting-list and
to concerned public and private agencies. By the end of the year, at least 80 per
cent of our services were directed to this area.
A real effort has been made to encourage community public and private welfare agencies to extend more of their services to families, but these groups in turn,
have requested more service from this department to better enable them to work in
a field which they consider a highly specialized one. As community services to
retardates and their families develop, it is hoped that we can withdraw to some
extent from pre-admission work.
The following are pre-admission and admission statistics for the fiscal year:—
Cases active during fiscal year      471
Orientations         55
Home visits      363
Office interviews       146
Collateral interviews      500
Consultations with institutional staff  1,517
Diagnostic clinics        189
There were many hours spent on correspondence and telephone calls.
Institutional Service and Rehabilitation
During the year there was a revision of service within the institution so that
more pupils would benefit from the time available. Casework service to pupils
with a view to preparing them for community placement was discontinued in November. The unhappy experiences of the few young adults who were placed in the community (most of whom returned to our institution or others) indicated the need for
supervised group-living accommodation, which is not available.
So that individual pupils with special needs are not neglected, an interdisciplinary review board chaired by the supervisor of the Social Service Department meets
weekly to review the situation of pupils on the " educable wards " and to recommend
on transfers, probations, and discharges. Short-term casework service is provided
to pupils referred by the review board when staff time has been available. Statistics
for the fiscal year are as follows:—
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL I 107
Number of pupils interviewed      191
Number of interviews with pupils  1,717
Number of interviews with family and friends  1,113
In January a group discussion programme commenced on two male wards.
The nursing staff who lead the groups meet regularly with medical and social staff
to evaluate the progress. The skill and interest of the group leaders have contributed
greatly to the success of this programme.
The summer employment programme received the whole-hearted support of
the administration, medical, nursing, and school staff. Seventy-four boys and girls
were employed in the strawberry and bean fields, and their net earnings amounted
to $1,372.20. The therapeutic value of this satisfactory work experience cannot
be overestimated.
The Social Service Department was also actively engaged in planning the first
summer camping experience for the pupils. Several pupils attended various church
camps, and in September twenty-four young adults spent ten days at Camp Alexandra.   The camping proved a most happy experience.
The committee on religion was reactivated in January under the chairmanship
of the supervisor of the Social Service Department to assist the part-time chaplains
in the extension of religious education and services.
CO-ORDINATOR OF VOLUNTEER SERVICES
On October 20, 1961, the position of Co-ordinator of Volunteer Services was
filled by Mr. Des Hoban. Since his appointment the services of the Provincial
Auxiliary and other citizens and groups have been much more effectively utilized.
The five most important areas of service are as follows:—
The Apparel-shop.—An average of 700 articles of clothing is distributed each
month of the year.
Transportation.—Pupils have been driven to and picked up from aeroplanes,
buses, and trains, also special-treatment clinics. Special bus tours have been
arranged, taking pupils to Stanley Park, to beaches for picnics, and to the Pacific
National Exhibition. At Christmas, through the good offices of the Street Railway-
men's Union and Dr. Gordon Shrum, eight B.C. Hydro buses took over 300 pupils
for a two-hour tour of the Christmas decoration lights.
Parties.—Nine parties are held on wards at The Woodlands School every
month. In addition, volunteers have prepared refreshments and helped conduct
many parties organized by the Recreation Department throughout the year.
Supplying Materials and Equipment.—Through the volunteers' working committee, the Provincial Auxiliary to The Woodlands School and The Tranquille
School, certain funds are made available for the purchase of colouring-books,
crayons, playballs, painting by numbers kits, Christmas decorations, gramophone
records, and other expendable items. Special donations at Christmas-time made
it possible for every pupil to receive at least one present.
Auxiliary Canteen and Sheltered Workshop.—The Provincial Auxiliary is
supplying funds for the operation of a canteen in the recreation centre. This canteen takes care of all orders sent from the wards and, in addition, is open for general
trade three days per week. This gives the pupils an opportunity to make small
purchases and to learn something about the value of money.
 I 108 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
The Auxiliary is also supplying funds to purchase materials for a variety of
sheltered workshop projects—(a) birthday-cake making at the lodge; {b) rug-
weaving and basketry at Riverdale; (c) five-piece plywood rocking-horse, key-chain,
copperwork and leather manufactures on Fraser Glen; (d) hooking rugs on Ward 6.
The Auxiliary has accepted responsibility for marketing these products, either directly or through community contacts. Proceeds are distributed fairly between the
purchase of additional materials and the payment of wages to the pupils doing
the work.
Provincial Auxiliary to The Woodlands School and
The Tranquille School
This working committee performed an excellent service for the benefit of all
residents at The Woodlands School and The Tranquille School in the following
ways:—
(1) Provided liaison between The Woodlands School and the Association for
Retarded Children of British Columbia.
(2) Provided funds for special projects; e.g., " Home for Christmas Train
Lift" between The Woodlands School and The Tranquille School involving the transportation of forty-four pupils.
(3) Provided funds for canteen and sheltered workshop.
(4) Wrote letters of thanks to donors for unsolicited gifts.
(5) Financed the upkeep of clubroom facilities in New Westminster for pupils
with down-town parole.
(6) Provided funds for party supplies, colouring-books, crayons, and all the
other expendable items always needed on wards.
(7) Financed the whole year's birthday-cake programme.
(8) Kept the Medical Superintendent informed of their activities.
THE TRANQUILLE SCHOOL
Population
Male Female
April 1,1961  147 April 1, 1961     26
March 31, 1962  153 March 31, 1962  139
Patient Movement
Male
Six patients were returned to The Woodlands School, four of these for medical
reasons and two were The Woodlands School's patients who had been sent here for
summer months (guests). Twelve patients were received from The Woodlands
School at various times.
Female
Four patients were returned to The Woodlands School for medical attention or
behaviour problems. One hundred and seventeen patients were received from The
Woodlands School at various times. Large transfers of patients were moved by bus
in the usual manner.
 the woodlands school
Patient Statistics
I 109
Male and female population by age-groups, intellectual status, and physical
handicap are as follows:—
Age-group (Years)
Physically
Handicapped
I.Q. Grade
14-21
22-31
32-41
42 and
Over
Male
Dull normal (80-89)	
4
10
2
5
4
16
42
6
2
5
21
6
1
1
7
16
4
1
1
Border-line (70-79).-	
Moron (50-69)	
Imbecile (25-49)	
7
Idiot (0-25 )   	
1
Totals by age-group	
21
68
34
30
9
Female
Border-line (70-79).—	
2
11
2
4
12
19
3
10
17
23
1
2
2
7
23
1
Moron (50-69)	
7
Imbecile (25-49)	
8
Idiot (0-25) ..._	
1
Totals by age-group      	
19
44
43
33
16
None handicapped to a degree which necessitates being confined to a bed or wheelchair.
Medical Attention
Medical services were supplied by the two local clinics, and service and cooperation are very good. However, the need for our own physician is very evident
as much staff time and a vehicle are used to transport patients to and from clinics,
dentist, opticians, etc.
Dental Attention
Most of our dental service was supplied by Dr. Nabata. In all, twenty-three
male and sixteen female patients visited the dentist for extractions, fillings, examinations, service to dentures, etc. The co-operation of the local dentist has been very
good, but the demands for dental service are such that the local dentists have advised
that they feel they will not be able to continue to provide us with services, other than
emergency services, and that we might be well advised to make other arrangements.
Optical Service
This service continues to be supplied by Dr. Bennett, and the arrangements are
quite satisfactory. In all, four male and nine female patients were referred to the
optometrist. Imperial Optical Company Limited in Kamloops continue to give
excellent service.
X-ray Services
All patients were X-rayed by the travelling X-ray clinic on July 3rd. Arrangements should be made to have this done this year. Four male and six female patients
received large chest X-rays, as per Tuberculosis Control.
Pharmacy
Pharmacy supplies are requisitioned from the Provincial Mental Hospital
pharmacy stores through The Woodlands School. The service has been good. During the year we received further advice and guidance as to the requisitioning of sup-
 I  110 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1961/62
plies from the medical staff at The Woodlands School, and this has proved to be
most helpful.   Controls as necessary are in effect for drugs containing narcotics.
Patient Employment
At the time of writing, sixty-six male and forty-two female patients are employed on a continuous basis in various areas, including the farm and public works,
off the wards under the supervision of staff other than nursing. Seven female patients are employed on a part-time basis off the ward. Twenty-four male and ten
female patients are employed on various tasks off the ward under the supervision of
three psychiatric aides (two male and one female). Fifteen male and eight female
patients are employed as ward-workers. All patients take part in recreational-
therapy and occupational-therapy programmes on and off the ward in keeping with
their abilities and need for a diversionary programme.
Laundry
The Tranquille laundry processed 342,595 pounds of linen and clothing made
up as follows: Tranquille School, 276,680 pounds; Provincial Home, 50,160
pounds; Provincial Gaol, 15,755 pounds; and Forest Service, 3,940 blankets.
This year the laundry was operated with a paid staff of six, an increase of one
over the previous year, and a staff of twenty-five male and female working patients,
an increase of thirteen over the previous year. The boy and girl patients are adapting themselves very well to this type of work.
Chaplaincy
Protestant
The past year has been a pleasant and developing experience for both men
involved in the Protestant chaplaincy for the patients at The Tranquille School.
Both the excellent co-operation of the staff and the response of the patients have
made this possible.
Roman Catholic
On Sunday afternoons for approximately 1 to 1 Vk hours a workshop-type service is held at Tranquille for the boys and girls by Bishop Harrington, assisted by
one or two of the sisters from St. Ann's Academy. On special occasions they are
taken to the North Kamloops church for services. The bishop also arranges for
special outings, picnics, etc., on occasion. The regular attention is paid to the matter
of baptisms, confirmations, and confessions.
Handicraft
Female
With the arrival of girls in April, classes were divided between boys and girls
until the arrival of the male handicraft instructor in September. In October all the
boys were turned over to the male instructor and classes in this area set up for female
patients only. The entire female population is accommodated into classes. Each
girl attends two classes per week, with Wednesday afternoon set aside for special
projects.   Monday morning is left open for staff meetings.
Male
This area did not come into operation until late October and was not fully
operative until January, when the equipment and supplies of material arrived.   Prior
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
I 111
to December the main project was the construction of Christmas displays for the
School grounds. These were a complete success and won for the School the award
for the best-decorated institution.
Recreation
Patient participation was active in floor hockey, softball, beach clean-up, camping, swimming, skating, gymnastics, corn and wiener roasts, basketball, square
dances, etc. Many forms of entertainment were attended as off the grounds as on;
e.g., Gayland shows, wrestling, ice carnivals, hockey games, basketball games, etc.
 I  112
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1961/62
STATISTICAL TABLES
THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
Table 1.—Movement of Population, The Woodlands School, New Westminster, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Male
Female
Total
758
12
640
11
1,398
23
Total as at April 1,1961 ,	
770
651
1,421
Admissions—
60
65
8
2
52
37
4
7
112
Readmissions to the same institution	
Transfers from Tranquille School —	
102
12
9
135
100
235
905
751
1,656
Separations—
15
61
11
14
1
12
8
50
11
111
10
23
Discharged in full from temporary care—  	
Died           -                               -              -           	
111
22
125
Transferred to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale 	
1
22
114
190
304
Net increase or decrease.  -   	
+33
791
-79
561
-46
1,352
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
I 113
Table 2.—First Admissions to The Woodlands School by Health Unit and
School District of Residence and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
School District No. 2	
, 3	
Selkirk, Nelson-
School District No. 6	
„   7	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
4
2
9
2
4
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
11
3
3
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
6
3
20
5
7
1
4
Simon Fraser,  New Westminster—Continued
School District No. 43	
North Fraser Valley, Mission—
School District No. 75	
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 47	
, 71	
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 51	
 52	
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 59	
„   60	
„   81	
Greater Victoria  Metropolitan
Board of Health—
Greater Victoria—School District No. 61 (parti)
2
1
2
2
1
1
2
3
1
4
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
7
2
1
2
2
3
1
4
2
 10	
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 11	
3
2
South Okanagan, Kelowna—-
School District No. 15	
1
2
„   23	
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 25	
2
1
 30	
 31	
Cariboo, Prince George—
School District No. 27	
2
„   56.	
10
 57	
Upper   Fraser   Valley,   Chilli-
Saanich and South Vancouver
Island—School District No.
62
1
School District No. 32	
Central Vancouver Island, Nanaimo—
School District No. 65 _
 66	
„   67.-	
„   68 _
33
„   34	
6
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 36	
1
Metropolitan   Health   Commit
2
tee, Vancouver—
School District No. 38	
„   70 	
School districts not covered by
health units—
School District No. 48	
 80	
Unorganized	
Totals 	
4
„   39	
, 41..	
„   44	
3
1
3
„   45  - .
ster—
School District No. 40   	
62
57
119
i Includes Victoria, Esquimalt, and Oak Bay.
 I 114
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Table 3.—First Admissions and Readmissions to The Woodlands School
by Method of Admission, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March
31,1962.
Age-group (Years)
Method of Admission
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.|F. |M..F. |M.[F.
M.   F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
First Admissions
Certification 	
7
20
11
1ft
R
2i
10
4
2
5
1
7
2
7
1
5
1
1
1
7
55
9
m
16
■>
s
9
103
Totals 	
	
2
10
9
201  HI
10
8|  IB
41   7
8
9
1
5'
2
1
62
57
1119
Readmissions
Certification 	
Temporary	
l1
	
3
9
i    3
2
12
3
5
5
10
3     5
6|   9
2
10
2
7
2
3
4
1
3
2
V
H
2
25
48
16
27
41
75
Totals	
1.
	
12
3
14
8
15
91  14
12
9
5
5
3
2
1
1
2
73
43'
116
Table 4.—First Admissions and Readmissions to The Woodlands School by
Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
First Admissions^
Mental deficiency—
Idiocy and imbecility-
Moron	
Border-line intelligence  	
Mongolism	
._..
2
7
2
1'
6
1
■   2
10
5
5
1
1
1
5'
4
1
3
1
2
2
3
5
4
3
__
2
2
3
2
6
	
2
S
2
1
1'
~4
2
1
27
21
7
7
25
17'
5
10
52
38
12
17
Totals -
__|   2
10
9| 20
111
10
8|  12|    4
7
8
	
9
1|    5
2
1
62[ 57
1119
Readmissions^
Mental deficiency—■
Idiocy and imbecility-
Moron 	
Border-line intelli-
1
—
111
1
3
10
4
6
1
9
5
6
3
4
7
2
1
6
3
1
2
1
4
1
3
~3
I
1
1
2
V
li
1
2
2
l
1
2
38
25
4
6
24
13
2
4
62
38
6
Mongolism	
	
	
	
 ■
	
1
10
Totals	
11
	
12
3
14
8
15]    9
14
12
9
5
5
3,
2
1
1
2
73
43'
116
i Of the first admissions, 35 had epilepsy:  22 idiots and imbeciles, 10 morons, and 3 border-line intelligence.
2 Of the readmissions, 50 had epilepsy:   31 idiots and imbeciles, 16 morons, 2 border-line intelligence, and
1 mongol.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
I 115
Table 5.—First Admissions to The Woodlands School by Mental Diagnosis,
Years of Schooling, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 6.—First Admissions to The Woodlands School by Citizenship, Age-
group, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 7.—First Admissions to The Woodlands School by Religion and Sex,
April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 8.—First Admissions to The Woodlands School by Previous Occupation and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
Table 9.—Resident Population of The Woodlands School by Mental
Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, December 31, 1961
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Mental deficiency—i
Idiocy and imbecility	
13
1
13
1
40
10
1
9
 1
40
6
1
2
V
511
17
1
33
1
39
4
2
IS
1
91
30
14
22
3
83
20
5
26
4
78
47
,13
29
3
65
27
5
10
3
73
39
14
18
4
58
27
3
7
3
34
12
5
10
27
10
1
9
42'
19
?
37
11
4
422
176
SO
362
106
21
784
1
282
Border-line  intelligence _	
71
1
i   1
71    3
10|... .
129   76
21.   12
205
Other and unspecified
types.-  	
33
Totals	
1
	
15
15
60
50
103
64
160
138
170
1:10
148,
98
61
47
801  55
798
577
1,375
i Of the above, 151 males and 153 females had epilepsy.
Table 10.—Resident Population of The Woodlands School by Mental
Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex, December 31, 1961
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 I  116
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1961/62
Table 11.—Live Discharges from The Woodlands School by Mental Diagnosis, Condition on Discharge, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31,
1962.
Condition on Discharge
Mental Diagnosis
Recovered
Much
Improved
Improved
Unimproved
Total
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Mental deficiency—
1
1
28
35
11
10
58
56
9
41
28
37
16
10
59
59
10
41
87
2
5
2
1
96
26
Mongolism
51
Totals
2
7
3
84
164
91
169
260
Note.—Of the above cases, 56 had epilepsy:   26 idiots and imbeciles, 24 morons, 5 border-line intelligence,
and 1 mongol.
Table 12.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in The Woodlands
School by Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to
March 31, 1962.
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Live Discharges^
Mental deficiency—
Idiocy and imbecility   ..
	
—
7
1
~~1
5
1
~~1
10
6
~~4
8
2
1
3
5
6
5
2
2
2
2
10
2
2
3
4
1
3
5
6
2
3
10
1
10
2
7
5
1
7
24
2
13
2
1
2
11
8
3
6
1
1
15
8
3
28
37
16
10
59
59
10
41
87
96
Border-line   intelli-
26
51
Totals	
 1	
9
7
20| 14
11
11
16
11| 13] 26
15
46
5
28
2
26
91|169
260
Deaths^
Mental deficiency—
Idiocy and imbecility
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
	
	
1
	
1
1
1
8
1
2
9
1
1
17
2
Mongolism
3
Totals	
	
1
2
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
	
	
1
	
2
1
11
11
22
i Of the live discharges, 56 had epilepsy:   26 idiots and imbeciles, 24 morons, 5 border-line intelligence, and
1 mongol.
2 Of the cases who died, 10 imbeciles and idiots had epilepsy.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
I 117
Table 13.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in The Woodlands
School by Mental Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex, April 1, 1961,
to March 31, 1962.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
Table 14.—Deaths Occurring in The Woodlands School by Cause of Death,
Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Age-group (Years)
Cause of Death
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Measles.-   -  -	
Diseases  of the  central  nervous
1
1
1
1
~~2
1
1
~~i
i
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
	
1
s
1
1
1
1
1
4
3
2
1
2
2
1
5
1
2
Arteriosclerotic heart disease	
1
1
6
Diseases of the digestive system	
Infections of the kidney 	
Congenital malformations—	
3
1
7
Totals 	
1
2
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
	
1
2
1
11
11
22
Table 15.—Deaths Occurring in The Woodlands School by Cause of Death,
Length of Stay, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 1  118
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
THE TRANQUILLE SCHOOL
Table 1.—Movement of Population, The Tranquille School,
April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Male
Female
Total
147
26
173
Admissions—
14
111
6
125
6
14
117
131
161
143
304
8
4
12
+ 6
153
4-113
139
+ 119
292
In residence, March 31, 1962— ,	
Table 2.—Transfers to The Tranquille School by Mental Diagnosis,
Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.     F.
1
Mental deficiency—
3
1
5
5
9
2
4
1
1
7
19
13
1
10
10
5
6
1
....
15
8
1
3
1
3
8
1
2
37
42
6
31
1
40
50
7
33
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S	
1
Totals
4
19
8
39
1
31
1
28
14
117
131
Note.—Of the above cases, 12 had epilepsy:  1 imbecile, 9 morons, 1 border-line intelligence, and 1 mongol.
Table 3.—Resident Population of The Tranquille School by Mental
Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, December 31, 1961
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Mental deficiency—1
1
....
4
3
5
5
5
9
23
23
3
14
9
20
14
26
6
3
3
10
13
5
9
15
15
1
2
17
14
1
2
1
68
47
7
25
41
52
6
34
1
109
99
13
59
1
Totals...  	
1
12
19
63
43
38
37
33
35
147
134
281
i Of the above, 10 males and 10 females had epilepsy.
Table 4.—Resident Population of The Tranquille School by Mental
Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex, December 31, 1961
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME I 119
PART IV.—PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME, COLQUITZ
REPORT OF MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
L. G. C. d'Easum, Medical Superintendent
The patient population on April 1, 1961, was 288, and on March 31, 1962,
was 283. During the year thirteen patients were transferred to this institution from
the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, and five patients were transferred from
this institution to Essondale.
One patient was discharged in full on transfer back to Oakalla Gaol. Two
patients were discharged on probation and two returned from probation.
There were seven patient deaths during the year. Practically all of these were
in the old-age group.
Ten patients were seen by the Appeal Board.
As in previous years, a number of patients were allowed to go home on leave
for various periods of time, and throughout the year none of these privileges was
abused.
The Vancouver Island Chest Clinic has been most co-operative, and each year
has made regular visits to the hospital with a portable X-ray unit to X-ray both
patients and staff. Throughout the year the general health of the patients was good,
and there were no epidemics of any kind to report. Dr. S. S. Avren and Dr. W.
Dempsey continued to care for the physical and dental needs of the patients
respectively.
INDUSTRIAL AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT
These two departments remained under the very capable supervision of Mr.
H. Helander. Both the indoor and outdoor Occupational Therapy Departments
were utilized to the fullest, with the patients being occupied with the various crafts,
ceramics, art metalwork, all phases of woodwork, leather-craft, and upholstery.
Much of the maintenance of the institution is looked after by this department with
the aid of patient help.
The paint crew, which consists of one assistant instructor of trades and maintenance and five or six patients, does all the decorating for the institution and had
a busy year.
A fixture with three shelves for the Lower East and Top East Wards and a
storage cupboard for the ice-cream room were built, installed, and painted. Part
of the concrete floor in the scullery was repaired. The tile floor in the kitchen was in
bad shape, requiring maintenance. Double stainless-steel sinks and drain-counter
to the dish-washing machine and a stainless-steel vegetable-washing sink with drain-
board were installed in the kitchen.   This has made a big improvement there.
Thirty-three feet of counter and room dividers were made, installed, and
finished for the Canadian Mental Health Association in its headquarters. All
materials for this were supplied by the association.
Three oak plant-stands were made and sent to the Department of Social Welfare.
The old boiler-house, which had the roof torn off when the boiler was removed,
was remodelled, a new roof put on, floor repaired, and now serves as a storage-
house for the laundry.
The cement sidewalk in the recreation court had settled badly in places and
was either lifted or new concrete poured to make it right again. Considerable work
was done to the farm buildings, and troughs and feeders were built as required.
 I 120 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Approximately 260 articles of toys were made, repaired, refinished, and sent
to the Cosmopolitan Club for distribution to needy children at Christmas.
The fire-fighting equipment was checked regularly and hazards removed. The
Saanich Fire Department, on its annual inspection in October, was well satisfied.
TAILOR AND SHOE SHOP
During the year five patients were kept occupied in the tailor and shoe shop,
and many articles were made and supplied to the stores. The sole-sewing machine
was repaired and is being run by one of the patients, who does excellent repair work.
LAUNDRY
The laundry has continued to work very satisfactorily and to capacity. The
amount of work done does not vary much throughout the years. Again this department was called upon to launder the linen used in the legislative dining-room during
the sitting of the Provincial Legislature. Machinery in the laundry continued to give
good service, with two or three minor repairs.
RECREATION
During the year three sightseeing bus tours were arranged for the patients and
proved very enjoyable. A total of sixteen band and variety concerts was presented
to the patients during the year. These entertainments were put on by various groups
of interested Victoria citizens, and all were much appreciated and well attended.
In addition to the concerts, the regular programmes of television, radio, picture
shows, etc., were continued.
Weather permitting, the recreation court was in daily use during the summer
months, and in the winter months the more active patients were allowed outside to
exercise on the cement sidewalk.
The Public Library Commission continued to supply books for the patients,
books being changed every four months.
The Canadian Legion and the Red Cross continued to supply comforts for the
ex-servicemen monthly. These comforts consist mostly of confections and smoking
material.
Christmas gifts for the patients were contributed by the Canadian Mental Health
Association, Salvation Army, Colwood Women's Institute, Vic-Van Isle Kinettes,
Zone Council of the Canadian Legion, Sons of Norway, and the Lake Cowichan
Legion Ladies' Auxiliary.
The spiritual needs of the patients were cared for by the Salvation Army and
Protestant churches on alternate Sundays.
 PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME
STATISTICAL TABLES
I 121
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz,1
April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Number
  288
       1
       1
In residence, April 1, 1961.
On probation, carried forward from 1960/6L
On escape, carried forward from 1960/61—
Total as at April 1, 196L
290
Admissions—Transfers from Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale      9
Total under care  299
Separations—
Discharged in full.
Died	
  2
  7
Transferred to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale  5
On probation and still out  1
On escape but not discharged  1
Total separations
Net increase or decrease	
In residence, March 31, 1962.
16
-5
283
l This institution cares for male patients only.
Table 2.—Transfers to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by Health
Unit and School District of Residence, April 1,1961, to March 31,1962
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
Table 3.—Transfers to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by Method of
Admission and Age-group, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Age-group (Years)
Method of Admission
20-
24
25-
29
30-
34
35-
39
40-
44
1
45- I 50-
49   I   54
1
55-
59
60-
64
65-
69
70
and
Over
Total
1
1
1
2
1
1    1    2
1
8
Totals
1
2
2
1
'I2
9
 I 122
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Table 4.—Transfers to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by Mental
Diagnosis and Age-group, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
20-
24
25-
29
30-
34
1
35- I 40- 1 45-
39   I   44   I   49
1          1
50-
54
55-
59
1
60- ! 65-
64   |   69
1
70
and
Over
Total
Schizophrenic disorders. 	
1
1
1
1         1
1
1
—
2
7
1
Drug addiction (other than alcohol)-
1
Totals-   	
1
2
2    I    1
1
2
9
1
Table 5.—Transfers to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by Mental
Diagnosis and Marital Status, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 6.—Transfers to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by Mental
Diagnosis and Years of Schooling, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 7.—Transfers to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by Citizenship
and Age-group, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 8.—Transfers to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by Religion,
April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 9.—Transfers to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by Previous
Occupation, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
 provincial mental home
I 123
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 I 124
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Table 11.—Resident Population of Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz,
by Mental Diagnosis and Number of Previous Admissions, December
31,1961.
Table 12.—Resident Population of Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz,
by Mental Diagnosis and Length of Stay, December 31, 1961
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
Table 13.—Live Discharges from Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by
Mental Diagnosis and Condition on Discharge, April 1, 1961, to
March 31, 1962.
Mental Diagnosis
Condition on Discharge
Total
Improved
Unimproved
1
1
5
6
1
Totals
2
5
7
Table 14.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Provincial
Mental Home, Colquitz, by Mental Diagnosis and Age-group, April 1,
1961, to March 31, 1962.
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
Total
15-19
20-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-44
45-49
50-54
55-59
60-64
65-69
70 and
Over
Live Discharges
Schizophrenic disorders 	
Pathological   personality	
1
1
1
--
....
1
....
1
2
6
1
Totals	
1    1      1
1
—
_.
__   \    ....
1
1
—
2
7
Deaths
Schizophrenic disorders  -
Psychosis
with cerebral
arteriosclerosis
....
....
1
1
1
4
6
1
Totals	
....
—
—
1
—
1
1
4
7
Table 15.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Provincial
Mental Home, Colquitz, by Mental Diagnosis and Length of Stay,
April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 provincial mental home
I 125
Table 16.—Deaths Occurring in Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by
Cause of Death and Age-group, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Cause of Death
Age-group (Years)
Total
45-49
50-54
55-59
60-64
65-69
70 and
Over
Malignant neoplasm  	
1
1
1
3
1
1
3
2
1
Totals         	
1
~
1
1
4
7
Table 17.—Deaths Occurring in Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by
Cause of Death and Length of Stay, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 I  126 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
PART V.—GERIATRIC DIVISION
REPORT OF MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
B. F. Bryson, Medical Superintendent
The three units of the Geriatric Division of the Mental Health Services have
continued to function to capacity throughout the fiscal year 1961/62 and have provided special medical and psychiatric care for over 1,600 elderly citizens of the
Province.
The continuing and increasing demand for this service is again reflected in the
number of requests for the admission of patients 70 years of age or over. During
the year a total of 474 new applications was received, including 204 for men and 270
for women. This represents an increase of sixty-eight over the previous year, and
averages thirty-nine requests each month. As may be expected, the greatest number,
totalling 357, emanated from all areas of the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island
for admission to the Valleyview unit and represents a significant increase of fifty-
three, or over 17 per cent, of the number received the previous year. Smaller increases were experienced in the number of new applications from the other areas of
the Province. From the Okanagan and Kootenay areas a total of 101 requests was
received for admission to the Dellview Hospital, an increase of ten over the previous
year, while from the northern parts of the Province sixteen new applications were
received, compared to eleven last year.
As in past years, the Medical Superintendent has attempted to allot vacancies
to those most in need of the special environment and services provided by the Geriatric Division, and wherever possible to arrange for admission to the unit which is
closest to the family and friends of each patient. In addition, every effort has
been made through correspondence, telephone, or office interviews with physicians,
families, or community agencies to obtain as much information as possible concerning applicants in order to utilize limited vacancies as efficiently as possible. The
Valleyview social service staff has been most helpful in this respect, particularly for
applicants from the Lower Mainland area. In a significant number of cases, advice
has been given or assistance provided to relatives whereby satisfactory alternate
sources of care were found and admission to Valleyview was no longer necessary.
During the year it was possible to accept 356 applicants from the community,
of which 216 were required to wait less than a month after receipt of their application. All urgent cases were accepted immediately. In addition, sixty-six elderly
patients originally admitted to the Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic for
observation and treatment were accepted to the Geriatric Division for continued care.
At the Terrace and Vernon units all requests for admission of men could be accommodated without delay, and only occasionally was it necessary to delay the admission
of women to the Dellview Hospital until vacancies occurred.
As direct admissions to the Skeenaview unit did not utilize all vacancies created
there by deaths and discharges, it was possible to arrange transfers of suitable male
patients from the Provincial Mental Hospital to this unit on two occasions. On
May 16, 1961, eighteen men from West Lawn Building and four men from Valleyview were transported via Canadian Pacific Airlines to Skeenaview, while on March
1, 1962, it was possible to transfer a further twenty men from the Provincial Mental
Hospital. On each occasion special attention was given to the selection of patients
for transfer, and it was pleasing to note that all patients accepted the change of
 GERIATRIC DIVISION I 127
environment very readily. No difficulties were encountered, and the ready cooperation and courteous attention of all C.P.A. personnel involved in making the
arrangements and during the flights made these transfers a pleasant experience for
both patients and escorting staff.
During the past fiscal year there has been no change in the total bed accommodation in the Geriatric Division, and consequently no significant increases or
decreases in the over-all movement of patients in the three units. As will be noted
in the accompanying tables, the resident population in the Geriatric Division totalled
1,245 as of March 31, 1962, representing an increase of only seven. However, to
this may be added twenty-five patients who are on probationary discharge, bringing
the total on unit register to 1,270 at the end of the year.
Total actual admissions to the Division numbered 392, including 205 men and
187 women. Of this number, 297 were first admissions from the community, and
included 203 to Valleyview, eighty-one to Dellview, and thirteen to Skeenaview.
A total of sixty-six was transferred from the Provincial Mental Hospital to the
three units.
Separations due to death totalled 315, an increase of twelve over the previous
year, of which 148 were men and 167 women. Separations on discharge to the
community have increased significantly to a total for the year of forty-six, compared
to twenty for the previous year. Of this number, forty-one were discharges from the
Valleyview unit, including sixteen men and twenty-five women, and reflects the very
commendable efforts of the Valleyview social workers who were instrumental in
working out the many details involved in locating and arranging for suitable and
very scarce sources of care in the community, and in assisting their elderly patients
to accept and adjust to new environments away from the security of the Hospital.
Experience during the past year has continued to show that many patients handicapped by senile brain changes and emotionally disturbed by their attempts to cope
with their problems in an environment too complex for their diminished capabilities,
do improve in hospital and can readjust happily in suitable boarding homes, rest
homes, or nursing homes in the community. Unfortunately there are still many
improved patients in hospital who could benefit by returning to community life and
nearness to family and friends but are denied this privilege due to the scarcity of
suitable homes or the fact that the financial differential would place an undue strain
on their limited assets or those of their family. The social welfare agencies in the
various communities of the Province have been most co-operative and have taken
a sincere interest in assisting in the placement of our geriatric patients whenever
approached.
VALLEYVIEW HOSPITAL
The Valleyview unit of the Geriatric Division has continued to maintain a high
standard of care throughout the year, during which time a total of 985 elderly
citizens received special geriatric treatment and supervision. This number included
359 men and 626 women, the vast majority suffering from varying degrees of senile
or arteriosclerotic brain disease associated with psychotic or behavioural reactions
of varying intensity. As of March 31, 1962, the resident population at this unit
totalled 720, including 248 men and 472 women. An additional eight men and
sixteen women were on the unit register but on probationary discharge to various
homes in the nearby community.
The general health of this patient-group has remained very satisfactory throughout the year, and there have been no major medical problems or epidemics. Regular
medical supervision and treatment have been provided during the year by Dr. Walter
Lazorko and Dr. Kenneth Greer, who were joined on May 9th by Dr. George
 I 128 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Kovacs. Due to illness, however, it was necessary for Dr. Greer to leave the service
on September 22nd, his place being taken by Dr. Lillian Hutton. On March 30,
1962, Dr. Kovacs resigned to undertake further medical training in the East, and
arrangements were completed for Dr. Douglas Turner to replace him on April 1,
1962. The Valleyview medical staff have been diligent in their care of their elderly
patients and have constantly exhibited the patient understanding that is so important
in dealing with the varied medical and psychiatric problems of elderly men and
women handicapped by senile changes and emotionally disturbed by the frustrations
and insecurities of later life.
The services of the specialist consultant staff at the Mental Hospital and Crease
CUnic have continued to augment the day-to-day medical care of the Valleyview
staff. During the year a total of 204 men and women was referred for a wide range
of conditions requiring the attention of a specialist. Most of this number required
surgical treatment of varying types and severity, many being major procedures.
A total of 150 surgical procedures was required, all of which were successfully carried out in the Crease Clinic Surgery Department, again demonstrating that advanced
age in itself is no longer a reason for denying elderly citizens the benefit of modern
surgical skill and knowledge.
Seasonal increases in morbidity have occurred as expected during the unsettled weather of the fall and spring months, with pneumonia and upper respiratory
illnesses being most prominent. In most cases antibiotic therapy and special nursing
care prevented serious complications, except in the very debilitated patients when
pneumonia became the terminal illness. During the month of March an especially
virulent strain of viral infection, which was also prevalent in the community, attacked
many patients and was unusually resistive to treatment. Staphylococcal skin infections have continued as a minor problem, but with prophylactic measures and early
isolation of new cases the incidence of this form of infection has been held to a
minimum.
Ataractic therapy, especially chlorpromazine, along with the anti-depressants
and occasionally mood-elevating medications have continued to be most helpful in
alleviating the anxiety states and depressive reactions that are frequently associated
with chronic brain syndrome symptoms. However, adequate assessment of the
needs and capabilities of each patient and the production of a total environment and
daily programme that will answer the needs and promote a sense of security for the
elderly person remains the primary approach to proper care and treatment of the
geriatric patient. Adequate diet, regularized living habits, correction of physical
defects, manual and social interests commensurate with physical and mental ability,
and particularly the friendship and patient understanding of all who come in contact
with the elderly person, continue to be the primary therapeutic goals in the care of
our patients.
It is with regret that we report the resignation of Miss West, Valleyview physiotherapist, in April, 1961. There is a great need for this type of therapy for geriatric
patients, but it is recognized that the number of physiotherapists available are few
and in great demand. Minimal therapy, such as heat lamp and massage, has been
carried out by nursing staff as much as possible, and in special instances Valleyview
patients have been accepted for treatment in the Physiotherapy Department at the
Provincial Mental Hospital.
The Valleyview Dental Department, which began operation late in the previous
fiscal year, has played an important part in the total health programme. Dr. G.
Campbell and his assistant, Mrs. Jane Pettifer, during the year have carried out a
comprehensive survey of the dental needs of 640 patients at Valleyview, as well as
 GERIATRIC DIVISION I 129
1,254 additional treatment appointments. At the North Lawn Building, a total of
791 examinations and treatments was given. Experience during the year has shown
that the vast majority of newly admitted patients have a very low level of dental
hygiene and evidence of having had no dental care of any consequence long before
admission. Adequate dental treatment has been an important factor in the improvement of general health in many patients, with freedom from distress of ill-fitting
dentures, eradication of chronic mouth infection, and improvement of feeding habits
and general well-being.
The diagnostic services provided by the Valleyview X-ray Department and
Laboratory have also played a vital part in promoting adequate medical care and
treatment for Valleyview patients. Dr. Jackson, Crease Clinic radiologist, and Miss
G. Fuller, X-ray technician, have provided constant radiological services throughout
the year, during which time a total of 2,577 patients and staff received X-ray
examinations, requiring the processing and reporting of 4,375 films, covering a wide
range of radiological procedures. This also includes the annual tuberculosis chest
survey of all patients and staff at Valleyview, the films for which were referred to
Dr. Dewick, of the Division of Tuberculosis, North Lawn, for assessment and
recording. Although several patients required further examination for suspicious
chest films, no positive cases of tuberculosis infection were found.
Mr. A. Lee, Valleyview laboratory technician, has provided a comprehensive
diagnostic service, covering a full range of tests. During the year 10,357 test procedures were carried out, including 861 urinalyses, 347 blood chemistry estimations,
6,799 bacteriological procedures, and 2,218 blood-cell counts and allied tests. On
a number of occasions the volume of laboratory work requisitioned was greater than
could be accomplished by our technician, so that assistance was required from the
laboratories in the Crease Clinic and Mental Hospital. Dr. G. Nicholson, consultant
pathologist at the Crease Clinic, has continued to provide technical supervision of
the Valleyview Laboratory, and has performed seventy-six post-mortem examinations during the year.   This represents an autopsy rate of 40 per cent.
The Valleyview Nursing Department, under the able direction of Miss E. Johnstone, Superintendent of Nurses, has continued to provide devoted service to this
group of patients, and all nursing staff have consistently directed their efforts to
providing the best care possible for the elderly residents of this unit. Wherever
indicated, routine nursing procedures and techniques have been revised or new ones
instituted in order to provide as high a standard of geriatric nursing care as possible.
To this end, an in-service educational course was held for various levels of nursing
personnel through the months of October to the end of March, the Valleyview nursing supervisors being the instructing staff. In addition, twenty-five charge and
assistant charge nurses have been attending the post-basic course in nursing conducted by the Mental Health Services School of Nursing. Several nursing supervisors have also been able to attend special institutes at the University of Washington,
and in February Miss Johnstone, Superintendent of Nurses, was assisted through
Federal Health Grants to attend an institute in San Francisco on nursing service
administration. These opportunities are not only stimulating and educational for
nursing personnel, but also are reflected in improved nursing care for patients.
Every effort is made to place newly admitted patients on wards where they will
benefit most from the ward facilities, and where they will adjust most happily, depending on their mental and physical handicaps. During the year several ward
exchanges were made, which resulted in one group of feeble elderly women being
moved from one of the older buildings, where they had to contend with steep stairs
and other building aspects unsuited to feeble patients, to a newer, more convenient
ward, all on one level.   At the same time, by gradual interward transfers, it was
 I 130 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
possible to organize the two older buildings, Wards V.V. 2 and V.V. 3, as open
wards for men and women respectively. These buildings now house the more
physically active and mentally capable men and women who can benefit from the
freedom and independence of an open ward, and can most easily cope with the
physical characteristics of these older-type structures. In addition, supervision in
the wards of the new Valleyview Building has been reorganized so that the main
doors to these six wards can be open or unlocked most of the time. The remaining
wards of the unit must of necessity be closed wards, not for security measures, but
rather to protect confused patients from wandering and becoming lost or endangering
themselves.
In addition to their prime responsibilities of patient and ward-centred care,
nursing staff have willingly devoted time and effort in important aspects of patient-
care, such as escorting patients and assisting in off-the-ward programmes during
Christmas festivities, summer picnics, Carnival Day, gardening projects, or functions
in the Valleyview auditorium and chapel. The escorting of patients to the dentist,
to the X-ray Department, to the Crease Clinic surgery, and to the Occupational
Therapy Department are also time-consuming but necessary duties that take nursing
personnel away from wards. Fortunately there have been very few occasions when
activities have been cancelled due to lack of available nursing staff.
The protection of patients in the event of fire or other serious emergency has
also been of concern to nursing staff, who have willingly taken part in the instructional programmes given by Mr. A. Lowry, Essondale Fire Chief, and his staff in
practical fire-fighting techniques and evacuation procedures. Several fire drills with
evacuation of patients were held during the year. In addition, Civil Defence plans
for the safety and protection of Valleyview patients and staff in the event of nuclear
disaster are being formulated in conjunction with the over-all Civil Defence plans
for the Essondale area.
Reverend Filer, Valleyview chaplain, has provided a devoted and comprehensive ministry to all patients at this unit and the North Lawn Building of the Provincial
Mental Hospital during the past year, and his services have been of great comfort
and support to all. Regular Sunday services in the Valleyview chapel and at North
Lawn totalled ninety-nine for the year, with four additional special services of Holy
Communion in April and December. In addition, 423 mid-week chapel services
were held on the various wards for those patients unable to leave the wards. In
October an additional ward programme of short vesper services featuring hymns and
other religious music was instituted and readily received by the elderly men and
women. A total of 125 such programmes was held. In this work Reverend Filer
has again been assisted voluntarily by Mrs. Filer, whose interest and devotion to the
welfare of Valleyview patients has been deeply appreciated. All patients and staff
sincerely regret that illness has reduced Mrs. Filer's active participation in this programme during the latter part of the year. However, her assistance as organist has
been replaced by a talented patient from Riverside Building at the Provincial Mental
Hospital, who has willingly devoted many hours in assisting Reverend Filer as organist and in many other ways. In addition to this regular programme, the Valleyview
chaplain has also carried out regular pastoral visits to all wards each month, with
special attention to the seriously ill and the bed-ridden.
Throughout the year Father Frechette has responded readily to the religious
needs of all patients of Roman Catholic faith and has brought spiritual comfort to
many patients at Valleyview. Rev. J. O'Neil, resident chaplain at Essondale, has
also continued his interest in this area when relieving Reverend Filer during holiday
absence.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION I  131
The Valleyview Social Service Department became a long-awaited reality on
May 15, 1961, when Miss Jean MacLean, B.S.W., and Miss Marjorie Martin,
B.S.W., joined the Valleyview staff on a permanent basis, having completed postgraduate courses in social work at the University of British Columbia. On January 8,
1962, the staff complement of this new department was completed with the appointment of Mr. Lindsay McCormick, M.S.W., as Valleyview social-work supervisor.
These workers have been most diligent in their efforts in the development of
this new service and have been of great assistance to the Medical Superintendent in
his efforts to assign limited vacancies in the unit to those applicants in the community most in need of hospital care. Social service work is required and has been
developed in three main areas. Firstly, in the field of pre-admission service the
Valleyview staff have visited seventy-six applicants and their families, and of these
were actively able to assist in the placement of forty-three men and women in suitable accommodation, thus preventing the need for admission to Valleyview. In
addition, information was obtained regarding forty-three licensed rest homes in
the Lower Mainland which are considered suitable for the placement of geriatric
patients. Secondly, the area of in-hospital services has been most helpful to medical
staff with the documenting of background information and social history of in-
resident patients, and to patients' relatives who are so frequently burdened by guilt
and misunderstanding of the purpose and function of a modern mental hospital. The
reassurance and support provided by the social service staff have been of sincere help
to many families. Finally, the time-consuming work done in the area of pre-
discharge planning and probationary follow-up has been evident by the fact that the
number of patients discharged on probation has risen to a total of forty-one, including sixteen men and twenty-five women, compared to a total of eleven during the
previous year. In addition, very important liaison has developed with social service
departments in the various communities, by orientation visits of other social workers
to Valleyview, and through co-operative planning for discharge of patients and
contacts made during pre-admission assessment. The ready co-operation and understanding received from the various social welfare departments concerning applicants
for admission and the assistance received in planning discharge arrangements for
Valleyview patients have been sincerely appreciated throughout the year.
Occupational therapy continues to be of major importance in the total care and
treatment of geriatric patients, and this department at Valleyview has provided a
comprehensive and expanded programme during the year under the able direction
of Miss B. Halverson, O.T.(Reg.), who took charge of this area in April, 1961. In
June Mr. R. Rettschlag, handicraft instructor, joined the staff, while later, in October, Mrs. N. Fitchett was appointed as a handicraft instructor to replace Miss S.
Groenewood, who resigned to return to her home in Holland. Special attention has
been given to newly admitted patients in order to assess their needs and abilities for
craft work with a view to providing an early and contented adjustment to hospital,
and to remove the feeling of loneliness and uselessness that so frequently pervades
the life of elderly people and so often is a major factor contributing to the emotional
disturbances necessitating hospitalization. During the year a total of 533 men and
women participated in occupational-therapy activities, representing 12,859 individual patient-treatment periods, both on the wards and in the workshop in the
Valleyview Building. The development of a patients' gardening project has been a
new feature this year, which has appealed to a large number of men and women, as
well as expansion in woodworking activities, especially for the male residents. Of
particular interest has been the generous and much-appreciated contribution of
members of the Vancouver Dahlia Society, who donated a variety of dahlia plants
 I 132 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
for the gardening project, then visited the Hospital regularly to instruct the men and
women in planting and caring for their dahlias, as well as arranging for a special
exhibit of the patients' blooms at the annual flower show in Vancouver. C.M.H.A.
volunteers have also assisted regularly in this department throughout the year.
The Valleyview recreational-therapy programme, in like manner, has continued
to provide a very important contribution to the welfare and treatment of patients
under the very capable direction of Mrs. Mildred Franklin and Mr. A. Massey,
Valleyview recreational instructors. During the year a total of 639 regularly scheduled events was conducted, which were enjoyed by a total attendance of 25,446
patients, a marked increase over the number of events and patient attendance provided in past years. In developing programmes, special attention has been directed
toward encouraging community interest in the Hospital and to stimulating patients'
interest in community life, through visits and entertainment provided by concert
groups, dance groups, and community choirs, as well as programmes such as mystery
bus trips and Stanley Park picnics, which take patients into the community. This
contribution to patient welfare provided by many community organizations has been
most appreciated and encouraging. In addition to the regular programmes, such as
bingo parties, "open house," and Happy Gang activities in the Valleyview auditorium, it has been possible to increase markedly the number of ward activities, such
as sing-songs, film showings, and birthday socials, for the benefit of many men and
women who are unable to leave the wards. Special efforts were put forth to highlight
festive occasions such as Easter, Hallowe'en, Carnival Day, and Christmas, when the
Occupational and Recreational Departments combined activities to provide appropriate decorations and entertainment for patients' enjoyment and participation. Of
particular note were the special Christmas concerts and pantomime shows in which
many Valleyview patients were participants, and which were repeated on several
occasions so that all residents were able to enjoy the spirit and meaning of the
Yuletide season. Staff members of all other departments also gave willingly of their
time and talents toward making these festive occasions a meaningful experience to
all patients.
The British Columbia Division of the Canadian Mental Health Association
again contributed regularly throughout the year toward the welfare of Valleyview
patients through the volunteer programme and the tearoom and tuck-shop in the
Valleyview lodge. An increased number of volunteers have visited the wards regularly several days a week, delivering magazines and books, assisting in the Occupational Therapy Department and at recreational-therapy activities, and by friendly
visiting and in many other ways have contributed immeasurably to the contentment
and security of our men and women. The teashop, too, has continued to be a valuable asset to Valleyview patients and their visitors, who are most appreciative of
the cheerful and efficient service provided by Mrs. T. Barony and the volunteer ladies
who assist her.
Business management of Valleyview Hospital has been of high standard
throughout the year, under the conscientious and able direction of Mr. A. I. Smith,
and the various departments directly responsible to his office have functioned efficiently, with no major changes or additions.
Dietary service to patients and staff has continued at a high level of efficiency
under the skilled guidance of Mrs. A. Frith, Valleyview dietician, and improvements
In food preparation and service have been instituted wherever possible. In addition
to the daily average of 310 patients who receive the high-protein geriatric diet and
307 who require specially prepared minced foods, the special-diet section in the main
kitchen has prepared a daily average of 163 diets for diabetic patients, cardiac cases,
 GERIATRIC DIVISION I 133
ulcer regimes, and other special medical dietary needs. Staff menus, too, have been
varied and nutritious and prepared appetizingly by Mr. McCook, Chief Cook, and
his energetic kitchen staff during the year.
Mr. G. Kelly, Valleyview pharmacist, has maintained a full and regular pharmaceutical and nursing and medical supply service to all wards throughout the year.
In addition to a busy daily schedule fulfilling the regular and special pharmacy ward
orders, the pharmacist has spent many hours assisting nursing staff regarding the
maintenance and storage of ward medications, the preparation of stock solutions,
and general supervision of the Valleyview pharmaceutical needs as a member and
secretary of the unit Pharmacy Committee, which was formed during the year with
Dr. Lazorko as chairman and Valleyview representative on the Branch Pharmacy
Council.
The housekeeping staff, directed by Mrs. A. Warren, have also continued to
maintain a high level of efficiency in ward cleanliness and linen-supply in the Valleyview Building. In-service training of housekeeping employees has continued, including the presentation of films on hospital sepsis and sanitation to the staff- of this
department, as well as nursing and medical staff in March, 1962. By reclassification
of established housekeeping positions, a full-time seamstress was employed to
maintain clothing repair in the main building and a working male supervisor was
appointed as an assistant to the Valleyview housekeeper.
Throughout the year Valleyview patients have benefited greatly from the regular and important services provided by Mrs. M. Lutner in the Valleyview beauty-
parlour and Mr. Drinkwater, our male barber. Proper grooming has stimulated
many elderly men and women to renew interest in their general appearance and
habits, which so readily are forgotten and neglected by geriatric patients.
The medical records of Valleyview patients have been maintained in good
order throughout the year by the stenographic and clerical staff under the general
supervision of Miss M. Jorgenson, senior clerk-stenographer, who has also carried
out the secretarial duties of the Medical Superintendent's office in an efficient and
courteous manner. The addition of a Social Service Department during the year has
increased considerably the volume of stenographic work, for which additional clerical
assistance is urgently needed. The appointment of a clinical supervisor for the
medical records office early in the new fiscal year will alleviate this situation.
The business office and information centre in the Valleyview Building has
maintained a comprehensive service to patients, staff, and public throughout the
year. General work volume has continued to increase, with heavy activity in personnel matters and all accounting of patients' trust and maintenance accounts. The
vouchering of all invoices and accounts for payment was undertaken as a Valleyview
responsibility during the year and is proceeding satisfactorily. Tribute is due Mrs.
N. Timtiman, accountant, and her staff for a high level of efficiency involving, large
volume and multiplicity of clerical accounting routines. An audit of Valleyview
business records was completed in October and November, 1961, without adverse
comments.
The Public Works Department has attended to the maintenance needs of
Valleyview Hospital promptly and efficiently during the year. Utility services
continued at a satisfactory level, with no major interruptions except in water-supply
in January. On this occasion a high-pressure supply-line was accidentally fractured
by a power-shovel, and a shut-down of the system was required for several hours.
Temporary flooding of the basement of Ward V.V. 6 occurred, but no damage
resulted.
 1  134 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
In addition to the completion of routine maintenance and repair items, Public
Works staff completed the modification of stair treads and the screening of the new
fire-escapes for Wards 1, 2, and 3. Root clogging of surface drains around the
Valleyview auditorium necessitated deep excavation, removal of a large willow-tree,
and lawn replacement, which was completed in November. Preparatory landscaping
work was also commenced on the slope below the main building.
During the year several items of major equipment were received, including a
standard passenger automobile for the Social Service Department; physiotherapy
and medical equipment through Federal Health Grants; fifty dining-room chairs and
twelve dining-room tables; two Soundscriber dictating-machines, one transcriber,
and one typewriter. In addition, two Hobart single-compartment dish-washers, one
industrial sewing-machine, six floor-polishing machines, and fifty park benches have
been welcome additions to Valleyview equipment.
DELLVIEW HOSPITAL
The Vernon unit of the Geriatric Division has functioned to capacity throughout
the year, under the capable administration of Mr. L. W. Fox, Supervisor, and his
deputy and Superintendent of Nurses, Miss H. O. Lipsey, R.N. A total of 323
elderly men and women received care and treatment during the fiscal year 1961/62.
The resident population as of March 31, 1962, stands at 232, including 106
men and 126 women, a slight increase of three over the resident population of a
year ago. Total admissions numbered ninety-three, of which eighty-six were direct
from the community and seven transfers from other units of the Mental Health
Services. This total includes forty men and fifty-three women, and represents an
increase over the previous year of fifteen patients. Separations numbered ninety-
one, a slight increase of eight. Of these, eighty-six were due to death, two transfers
to the Essondale area for special treatment, and two discharges to the community,
one of which was discharged in full and the other remaining on probationary status
at the year's end.
The general health and welfare of this patient-group have been maintained at
a satisfactory level, although it is evident that the average patient at Dellview is more
feeble and helpless than in previous years, is less able to care for himself or to assist
others, and requires more supervision and personal attention from nursing staff.
As of March 31, 1962, the average age of male patients was 77.3, and for women,
80.1 years.
General medical care and supervision has again been given by Dr. J. Smith,
who has visited the Hospital regularly and has responded to calls promptly whenever
required. There have been no major medical problems during the year, and no
major surgery has been required. Ten patients suffered fractures due to accidental
falls, but most were of a minor nature and all could be treated conservatively on the
ward.
During January and February there was a general increase in the number of
upper respiratory infections, and in some of the most debilitated residents secondary
pneumonias developed and became the terminal illness.
The Vernon Jubilee Hospital has supplied all X-ray and laboratory service for
Dellview patients as required, and the administrative and technical staff of this Hospital have been most co-operative whenever their advice or assistance has been
needed.
In October, 1961, a mobile unit of the Division of Tuberculosis Control carried
out the annual chest survey of all patients and staff.   Although one lady was trans-
 GERIATRIC DIVISION I 135
ferred to the North Lawn Building at Essondale for further observation, no infectious
cases of pulmonary tuberculosis were found amongst this patient-group.
Auxiliary medical services included dental care, given by Dr. Bishop, who has
visited the Hospital regularly to perform examinations, extractions, and to fit dentures when justified. Visual aid has been provided by Mr. W. H. Franks, optometrist, who has carried out refractions and provided corrective lenses whenever
required.
Nursing services have been maintained at a very satisfactory standard, under
the capable direction of Miss H. O. Lipsey, R.N., with no major changes in nursing
policy, although nursing procedures have been modified or revised as indicated to
improve the quality of nursing care for the many feeble and helpless residents.
Every effort has been made to provide reading material and instruction to nursing
staff concerning current techniques in the field of geriatric nursing. To this end,
Miss Lipsey has attended two Mental Health Services unit nursing conferences in
Vancouver during the year, as well as participating in a two-day seminar held in
Kelowna under the auspices of the Okanagan Registered Nurses' Association. New
knowledge obtained through these sources has formed the basis for instructional
programmes for the Dellview nursing staff.
During the year the nursing complement was increased by three, two positions
being assigned to the male wards and one to the female section. This additional
assistance has been most welcome as the increasing debility of this patient-group
has required a great deal of time-consuming nursing care.
The important diversional activities, including handicrafts and recreational
programmes, have been enthusiastically and capably directed by Mrs. J. Sherlock,
handicraft instructor. A wide range of projects, such as rug-making, leather and
copper work, crocheting, knitting, and embroidery, have contributed to the well-
being of many patients by providing productive activity and a feeling of accomplishment. Loneliness and feelings of rejection, so commonly the complaints of elderly
persons, have been combated at Dellview by the daily ward activities, the understanding attention of the nursing staff, the regular monthly parties on the lawns or
in the wards, and by the friendship and entertainment provided by the volunteer
ladies and visiting groups. Always ready and willing to help are various groups of
church, fraternal, and service organizations. The Canadian Mental Health Association volunteers, whose services to Dellview patients have been co-ordinated by
Mrs. Sherlock and Mrs. L. Fox, have been most helpful at scheduled social activities
and in their generous donations and help at Christmas. Radio and television also
continue to be a daily source of interest for many patients. Interest in community
activities has been enjoyed by many patients through car rides provided by members
of the local I.O.O.F. lodge, bus rides sponsored by the St. John Ambulance Society,
and by the showing of travel films from the Vernon Film Council.
The spiritual needs of our patients have been well supplied by the regular services held by Reverend Reeve and by Monsignor Miles or Father Kenny. Ministers
of other denominations often visit patients who formerly belonged to their organizations.
Dietary services have continued to be most satisfactory throughout the year.
Mr. Owens, Chief Cook, and his staff have constantly demonstrated their interest in
the welfare of the residents at Dellview by their capable production of appetizing
and nutritious menus each day, by their extra efforts to provide special diets when
required, and by their ready co-operation in providing special treats for birthday
parties and special occasions such as Christmas.
The many and varied duties of the general office have shown a general increase
in volume during the year, and all administration and medical records have been
 I  136 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
maintained efficiently. An audit of the unit records was carried out in July by
Departmental auditors without adverse reports.
Laundry service to all wards, so important in the nursing care of elderly patients, has been maintained efficiently by Mr. Todd and his conscientious staff. During
the year a total of 575,296 pounds of soiled linen was processed, representing a daily
average of 7 pounds for each patient.
All departments have benefited from the regular and efficient service provided
by Mr. Baron, stockman, who has maintained a ready supply at all times of the many
and varied items required for the operation of this unit.
The Public Works staff, too, have continued to play an important role in the
maintenance of good health and welfare for Dellview residents by their prompt and
skilled attention to the many details connected with the efficient operation of the
physical plant and its utilities. Reorganization of this department occurred in June,
1961, when Mr. T. Baker was placed in charge of all maintenance and engineering
staff at Dellview, with general supervision being provided by Mr. W. Smith, at Tranquille. Two major projects in 1961 were the reshingling of the second half of the
main building, plus Nurses' Homes 1 and 2, and partial structural reconstruction
and exterior shingling of Nurses' Home 3. New water-lines were also required to
the main building to provide a more adequate supply, and to the annex to replace a
broken line which was embedded in concrete and could not be repaired. In addition, considerable interior redecorating was accomplished during the fall and winter
months in the wards and corridors, improving appreciably their general appearance.
Some structural changes were also made to the fire-escapes from two male wards,
which made possible the elimination of several hazardous ramps.
Mr. Legg, Dellview gardener, and his helper have contributed greatly to the
pleasure of the patients and the general appearance of the Hospital by their expert
attention to the lawns and gardens, and by the constant supply of beautiful plants
and flowers for the wards throughout the year.
SKEENAVIEW HOSPITAL
The Skeenaview Hospital, too, has continued to maintain a very satisfactory
standard of care for many elderly residents, under the capable direction of Mr. W. E.
Skillicorn, Supervisor, and his deputy, Mr. F. Stewart, Chief Psychiatric Nurse.
During the past year a total of 334 patients received care and treatment at this unit.
Resident population as of March 31, 1962, numbered 293, an increase of fourteen compared to the same date a year ago. Admissions during the year increased
by twenty-three, to a total of fifty-five, including thirteen first admissions from the
community, four transfers from Valleyview, and thirty-eight transfers from the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale. Separations totalled forty-one, including two
patients discharged in full to the community, one transfer to Essondale, and thirty-
eight deaths.
The general health of this patient-group has been maintained at a satisfactory
level throughout the year, with no major medical problems encountered. An increased number of patients have required bed care or close personal attention due
to general debility and feebleness compared to previous years as most of the patients
now being transferred from the Essondale area are older and less capable of caring
for themselves than those transferred in earlier years. Seasonal increases in respiratory and intestinal infections during the spring and fall months were noticeable, but
early and intensive treatment kept this problem from reaching epidemic proportions.
The Division of Tuberculosis Control travelling clinic conducted the annual chest
X-ray survey of the staff and half of the patients during September, with a recheck
 GERIATRIC DIVISION I 137
of doubtful cases and the balance of the patients during February. One positive case
was transferred to North Lawn Building, Essondale, for observation and treatment.
Dr. R. E. Lee and Dr. K. Christensen, who replaced Dr. Nicholson in July,
have conscientiously provided full medical care and supervision of the general health
of the Dellview patients. Major surgical procedures were carried out on seven patients, including three repairs of fractured hips resulting from accidental falls, four
abdominal operations, and one leg amputation for severe circulatory disturbance.
In all instances the surgery was performed at the Terrace and District Hospital, and
the patients were immediately returned to Skeenaview for post-operative and convalescent care. The administrative and technical staffs of the Terrace and District
General Hospital have been most co-operative during the year, and the improved
facilities in this new hospital have been fully available to our patients.
Nursing services have been maintained at a high level under the direction of
Mr. F. W. Stewart, Chief Psychiatric Nurse, and all members of the nursing staff
have been most conscientious in providing patient, understanding care to their
elderly charges. A programme of lectures and study of the latest nursing techniques
in geriatric nursing and in post-operative care has been well received by all staff.
During February it was possible to renovate a vacated area of the main building
as a 10-bed open ward. This area provides a living-room and other home-like
facilities for patients who are capable of enjoying full ground privileges and of caring
for themselves, and has been most stimulating for both patients and staff.
In addition to their specific duties of providing time-consuming nursing care
to patients, the staff have also provided a varied occupational and recreation programme as time permitted, and in many instances they have readily devoted their
own free time to providing diversional activities for the residents. A regular programme of organized indoor activities, such as bingo, shuffleboard, cribbage tournaments, and twice-weekly movies, has been available. In addition a special effort
was made to provide an outdoor programme for the summer months, which has
resulted in the installation of two concrete checkerboards in the lawn area, which
are used regularly. Out-of-doors picnics, bingo games, and impromptu softball
games, as well as scenic drives and walking parties, have been enjoyed by many
patients. It has also been pleasing to note the growing interest of the Terrace community in the welfare of our patients, who have benefited and sincerely enjoyed the
visits of many interested organizations. Visits and entertainment provided by the
local Square Dance Club, the Teenettes Club, and choirs from various churches have
been well received.
Religious services for patients have been regularly conducted by Father Mohan
and Rev. A. P. Horsfield, who replaced Archdeacon Hinchcliffe in October. In addition to the regular services at the Hospital, a sizeable group of patients also attend
evening services in the St. Mathew's Anglican Church on at least one Sunday of each
month. Ministers from several denominations have also visited patients who were
former members of their congregation.
Under the direction of Mr. H. F. Piffer, Chief Cook, the kitchen staff have
provided regular dietary service of high quality with varied appetizing and nutritious
menus, as well as special diets for medical purposes as required. Special occasions
such as Christmas and the New Year have been marked by extra delicacies, much to
the delight and enjoyment of all the men. At the end of February, 1962, Mr. Val
Feeney, a senior cook, became subject to automatic retirement after many years of
faithful service.
The Laundry Department, under the supervision of Mr. Norton, has also provided conscientious service to the patients with a regular supply of clean linen and
clothing for the wards.   The efficiency of this service was heightened by the addition
 I 138 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
of two staff laundresses to replace the dwindling efforts of several patients who have
assisted faithfully in the laundry for several years.
Stores and supplies have been regularly available and of good quality through
the conscientious efforts of Mr. Olson, stockman, who has maintained the many
items required by the unit in adequate supply at all times. Due to careful scrutiny
and anticipation of the needs of the Hospital and the potential hazards of transportation in this northern area, no problems of service or delivery occurred.
The staff in the general office completed the decentralization of business procedures during the early months of the year and have carried out the many and varied
duties of this service, including the maintenance of medical records, very efficiently.
The addition of a part-time clerk-stenographer who had previous experience in medical records at Essondale has improved the efficiency of this office appreciably.
The Public Works staff, under the direction of the Chief Engineer, Mr. F. T.
McLachlan, have carried out all maintenance and repairs as required, and there
have been no interferences in utility services of a major nature or hazardous to the
general welfare of the patients. On several occasions, problems arose which were
potentially hazardous, including the contamination of water from the secondary
well, but prompt action by the Public Works Department and the Skeenaview engineering staff prevented serious consequences. Projects completed included the repair
of a 6-inch water-main in the boiler-house, the installation of a water-chlorinating
system, the replacement of a collapsed floor in the boiler-room by a concrete floor,
and final repairs to the boiler-house stacks and incinerator.
An event of major importance to the Skeenaview Hospital occurred on November 27, 1961, when Mr. A. Lowry, Fire Chief, Essondale, delivered to the unit a
half-ton pick-up truck which had been specially converted and equipped by the
Public Works Department for use as a fire-truck. The arrival of this equipment
and the generous efforts of Mr. Lowry in assisting in the reorganization and training
of the Skeenaview volunteer fire group have been most appreciated. The Skeenaview patients now have the protection of a well-trained group of nine staff members
under the leadership of Mr. Hans Morlok, of the engineering staff. Continued training in fire-fighting procedures has been in co-operation with the local Terrace Fire
Department and its chief, Mr. A. Owens, whose leadership and assistance to the
Skeenaview volunteers have been most appreciated.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
I  139
STATISTICAL TABLES
VALLEYVIEW HOSPITAL
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Valleyview Hospital, Essondale,
April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Male
Female
Total
In residence, April 1,1961      _
246
3
484
8
730
11
Total as at April 1, 1961	
249
492
741
Admissions—
90
5
2
1
12
113
11
10
203
16
2
1
22
110
134
244
359
626
985
Separations—
8
74
16
5
8
9
117
10
2
16
17
Died  	
191
26
7
24
111
154
265
Net increase or decrease  ■  	
+2
248
-12
472
-10
720
 I 140
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Table 2.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Health
Unit and School District of Residence and Sex, April 1, 1961, to
March 31, 1962.
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
West Kootenay, Trail—
School PistriVf No. o
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
40
15
7
2
6
2
5
2
1
1
1
1
2
9
69
8
10
2
12
1
3
2
2
3
15
109
23
17
4
18
3
8
2
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 47
,i         jj  71
1
1
9
2
1
2
1
1
1
no
1
1
4
1
1
1
2
1
~"I
134
2
 12    ~~   ..
1
South Central, Kamloops—
,Srh""l TMstrtet N<\ '4
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School nietrirt No. 5?
1
„         „         „  29
Greater  Victoria  Metropolitan
Board of Health-
Greater Victoria—School District No. 61 (parti)	
Saanich and South Vancouver
Island—
School District No. 61
(parts) 	
School District No. 62	
Central Vancouver Island, Nanaimo—
school restrict Nn. M
Cariboo, Prince George—
School District No. 28	
■           u           jj   ,fi
13
Upper   Fraser   Valley,   Chilliwack—
School District No. 32	
 34     .
3
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 35	
„         .,         .,   ?<?
1
Metropohtan Health Committee,
Vancouver—
1
1
4
JJ fi7
»   68
„          „   41
.,   70
School districts not covered by
health units—
School District No. 46	
2
„          „   44
,.         u         j,   M
Simon  Fraser,  New  Westminster—
1
1
1
Unknown
jj  49
Totals
North Fraser Valley, Mission—
244
„         „  75
1 Includes Victoria, Esquimalt, and Oak Bay.
2 Saanich only.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
I 141
Table 3.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Method
of Admission, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Age-group (Years)
Method of Admission
45-49
50-54
55-59
60-69
70-79
80 and
Over
loiai
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
.....
1
~~1
	
1
2
3
60
67
48
1
60
110
11         1
1331     243
Totals 	
1
—
1
—
1
2
3
60
67
48
61
110
134
244
Table 4.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Mental
Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
45-49
50-54
55-59
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
—
1
	
1
—
1
2
1
1
1
2
3
4
12
28
11
3
1
11
8
1
1
1
1
18
21
1
1
1
1
4
4
23
9
i
~7
4
2
1
21
21
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
1
1
8
17
54
23
6
1
1
19
13
1
3
1
1
2
1
40
43
2
9
4
1
Paranoia and paranoid states 	
2
27
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis	
30
1
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology ...
3
1
1
2
Other and unspecified  character,  behaviour, and intelligence disorders	
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural
1
Chronic brain syndrome associated with
66
2
Other, unknown, and unspecified condi-
Totals	
—
1
—
1
—
1
2
3
60
67
43
57
5
4
110
134
244
 I  142
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Table 5.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Mental
Diagnosis, Marital Status, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 6.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Mental
Diagnosis, Years of Schooling, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 7.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Citizenship, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 8.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by
Religion and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31,1962
Table 9.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Previous Occupation and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31,1962
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
Table 10.—Resident Population of Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by
Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, December 31, 1961
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
20-29
M.
F.
30-39
M.
40-49
M.
F.
50-59
M.
F.
60-69
M.  F.
70-79
M.
80 and
Over
M.  F.
Total
M.
Grand
Total
Schizophrenic disorders 	
Manic-depressive reaction	
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states .
Senile psychosis..
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis
Alcoholic psychosis.
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology
Other and unspecified psychoses	
Anxiety reaction without mention of somatic symptoms
Obsessive-compulsive reaction .
Neurotic-depressive reaction.
Chronic brain syndrome with neurotic
reaction   	
Syphilis and its sequelae 	
Pathological personality— 	
Alcoholism  	
Mental deficiency..
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural reaction   	
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S...
Epilepsy...
Other diseases of central nervous system
not associated with psychosis 	
Other, unknown, and unspecified conditions 	
Totals.
1
1
24
5
_|_
18   29
ll    .
26
12!  14
107 213
258|259
I
498
91
10
3
6
192
174
4
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
1
3
18
113
24
1
103
757
 geriatric division
I 143
Table 11.—Live Discharges from Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Mental Diagnosis, Condition on Discharge, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to
March 31, 1962.
Mental Diagnosis
Condition on Discharge
Much
Improved
M.
Improved
M.
F.
Unimproved
M.
Total
M.
Grand
Total
Schizophrenic disorders—
Manic-depressive reaction..
Involutional melancholia-
Paranoia and paranoid states..
Senile pyschosis	
Presenile psychosis-
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis..
Other and unspecified psychoses 	
Pathological personality.	
Mental deficiency-
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and
intelligence disorders  ...	
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural reaction  	
Senility    	
Totals  	
2
1
IF
18
1
1
liT
7
1
2
2
~21~
13
1
1
2
5
1
9
1
1
3
9
3
~s<r
 I   144
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Table 12.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Valleyview
Hospital, Essondale, by Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April
1, 1961, to March 31, 1962.
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
30-39
40-49
50-59
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
iotai
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.lF.
1
M.
F.
Live Discharges
1
	
	
2
2
1
2
	
2
1
2
1
1
3
4
8
1
1
3
5
1
2
5
~2
2
1
4
1
~T
l
2
2
13
i
l
l
l
	
	
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
5
1
1
1
~1
9
1
—
1
1
1
	
	
1
1
	
3
Other and unspecified character, beha-
1
Chronic   brain   syndrome   with   beha-
1
3
i
4
1
	
	
7
1
9
Senility 	
3
Totals  .    -
1
-I i
2
2
3
3|    2
8
10
14
4
	
29
21
~50~
Deaths
1
l
	
1
25
11
2
1
2
5
4
1
14
I
1
1
39
23
3
1
1
21
1
26
2
1
—
	
	
..__
—
	
—
2
8
9
8
1
1
7
4
49
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis —
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology
37
3
1
1
1
1
1
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural
13
8
15
1
"1
12
4
...„.
1
32
1
15
53
1
Other  diseases  of the  central nervous
1
12
~41
1
Senility                                  ..    	
	
	
6
41
1
	
—
—
	
31
35
65
8
10
74
117
191
Table 13.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Valleyview
Hospital, Essondale, by Mental Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex,
April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
I  145
Table 14.—Live Discharges from Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Condition on Discharge, Disposition to, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March
31, 1962.
Disposition to—
Condition on Discharge
Other
Home          Mental
Hospital
Other
Total
Grand
Total
M.
F.      M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
6
1
1
7
1
1
4
16
2
10
1 J 	
1
10
18
1
9
11
2
Improved    — 	
19
29
Totals            	
7
9
21
12
1   I .	
29  1     21
50
I
Table 15.—Deaths Occurring in Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Cause
of Death, Age-group, and Sex, April 1,1961, to March 31 1962
Ag
e-group (Years)
Total
Cause of Death
4CM9
70
-79
80-89
90-99
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
4
2
15
1
3
1
4
1
1
1
1
3
25
1
1
4
1
1
2
1
1
2
18
1
4
5
2
1
2
4
37
2
7
5
4
3
1
7
1
2
6
2
5
1
4
40
2
7
1
9
2
1
2
5
1
1
7
1
68
3
8
9
4
3
1
1
5
10
11
108
2
10
9
18
Other diseases of respiratory system..—	
Diseases of the digestive system  	
Infections of the kidney _ „.
4
5
2
1
Accidents    	
7
Totals 	
1   1     31
41
35
65
8
10
74
117
191
Table 16.—Deaths Occurring in Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Cause
of Death, Length of Stay, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 I  146
Table 1.
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
DELLVIEW HOSPITAL
-Movement of Population, Dellview Hospital, Vernon,
April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Male
Female
Total
105
1
124
229
1
Total as at April 1, 1961      .                 	
106
124
230
Admissions—
34
2
1
3
47
3
1
2
81
5
1
3
3
40
53
93
146
177
323
Separations—
1
36
1
1
1
50
1
1
Died    -	
86
Transferred to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale  	
2
1
1
40
51
91
+ 1
106
+2
126
+3
In residence, March 31, 1962 -	
232
Table 2.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Health Unit
and School District of Residence and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31,
1962.
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 1 	
2
2
School District No. 24	
2
4
6
, 2	
2
2
Cariboo, Prince George—
Selkirk, Nelson—
School District No. 28	
1
1
School District No. 7	
1
3
4
Metropolitan Health Committee,
 10	
3
3
Vancouver—
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 38 ..
1
1
School District No. 9 _	
1
1
2
„   39	
2
2
4
„   11	
2
2
Simon Fraser, New Westmin
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
ster—
School District No. 14	
1
1
School District No. 40	
1
1
 15.._	
5
6
11
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
„   17	
1
1
2
School District No. 53	
1
1
„   23...	
7
6
13
 ,   54  —
1
1
 77 	
3
5
8
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 60	
2
2
School District No. 19	
2
2
School districts not covered by
„   20 	
3
1
4
health units—
■■        ,.   21	
„   22	
1
8
7
1
15
School District No. 80..-	
1
1
 78...	
2
1
3
Totals... 	
40
53
93
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
I 147
Table 3.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Method of
Admission, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Age-group (Years)
Method of Admission
50-59
60-69
70-79
80_g9           90and
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
2
6
21
21
14
22
3
3
40
53
93
Table 4.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental
Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Age-group (Years)
Total
Mental Diagnosis
50-59
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.    F.
M.
F.
1
2
1
5
1
19
1
21
1
13
22
1
1
37
1
1
52
2
3
3
1
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural
89
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S „.
1
Totals 	
1
2
6
21
21
14
22
3
3
40
53
93
No readmissions.
Table 5.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental
Diagnosis, Marital Status, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 6.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental
Diagnosis, Years of Schooling, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 7.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Citizenship,
Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 8.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Religion
and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 9.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Previous
Occupation and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
 I  148
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Table 10.—Resident Population of Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, December 31, 1961
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
60-69
M.
70-79
M.
80 and Over
M.
Total
M.
Grand
Total
Schizophrenic disorders
Manic-depressive reaction .
Senile psychosis-
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis .....
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology..
Other and unspecified psychoses  -
Neurotic-depressive reaction 	
Syphilis and its sequels 	
Mental deficiency_
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural reaction 	
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S —	
Totals    	
10
1
19
13
13
9
45
12
5
1
1
24
9
IS
,16
4
118
22
26
23
1
10
7
1
2
1
1
32
27
52
41
70
105
17
23
1
50
39
127
40
1
33
8
1
1
2
1
1
82
62
232
Table 11.—Live Discharges from Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental
Diagnosis, Condition on Discharge, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March
31, 1962.
Condition on
Discharge
Mental Diagnosis
Improved
Unimproved
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Schizophrenic disorders — —   ..      .   .
Chronic brain syndrome with beha-
•
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
3
Totals                 	
3
1
3
1
4
 geriatric division
I 149
Table 12.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1961,
to March 31, 1962.
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
60-69
70-79
80-89
90-99
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Live Discharges
1
1
1
	
—
1
1
2
1
1
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural
3
Totals	
2 | —
1 | —
—
1
j
3
1 1       4
Deaths
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural
2
15
7
15
32
6
9
36
50
86
Table 13.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex, April 1,
1961, to March 31, 1962.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
Table 14.—Live Discharges from Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Condition
on Discharge, Disposition to, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Disposition to—
Condition on Discharge
Other Mental
Hospital
Escapee
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
2
1
1
3
1
4
 I 150
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1961/62
Table 15.—Deaths Occurring in Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Cause of
Death, Age-group, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31,1962
Age-group (Years)
Cause of Death
60-69
70-79
80-89
90-99
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
■
2
1
13
1
7
1
1
13
~15"
lo
1
1
~32~
1
4
1
1
1
7
1
3
1
1
1
1
4
30
46
76
1 1    1
1 1    1
2
2
—
2
15
7
6
9
36
50
86
Table 16.—Deaths Occurring in Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Cause of
Death, Length of Stay, and Sex, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION I 151
SKEENAVIEW HOSPITAL1
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace,
April 1,1961, to March 31, 1962
Number
     279
In residence, April 1, 1961
Admissions—
First admissions 	
Transfers from other geriatric units
13
4
Transfers from Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale       38
Total admissions _.
Total under care-
Separations—
Discharged in full	
Died 	
Transferred to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale
Total separations 	
Net increase or decrease	
In residence, March 31, 1962_
55
334
2
38
1
41
+ 14
293
i This institution cares for male patients only.
Table 2.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Health
Unit and School District of Residence, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Health Unit                                                  Number
Health Unit                                               Number
Selkirk, Nelson—
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 7    —    1
School District No. 47       1
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
 ,    71     1
School District No. 23 .    -      1
„    72 , -     1
South Central, Kamloops—
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 30     3
School District No. 50                                            1
„    31 -    1
„    52       6
Cariboo, Prince George—
„    53    2
School District No. 28    2
, 54    2
„    55      1
„    57—     3
School District No. 59      2
„    60      2
School District No. 34     1
Metropolitan Health Committee, Vancouver—
Greater Victoria — School District No.  61
School District No. 39  - 18
(parti)     3
„        „   41    .                                       1
Simon Fraser, New Westminster—
School District No. 40                                            1
Totals                      55
i Includes Victoria, Esquimalt, and Oak Bay.
 I  152
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1961/62
Table 3.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Method
of Admission and Age-group, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Method of Admission
Age-group (Years)
Total
55-59
60-69
70-79
80-89
2
1
27
1
16
8
53
2
Totals
3
28
16
8
55
Table 4.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Mental
Diagnosis and Age-group, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
55-59
60-69
70-79
80-89
Total
Schizophrenic disorders	
Senile psychosis  	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis .
Alcoholic psychosis 	
Syphilis and its sequela?	
AJcoholism—     _ 	
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural reaction .
Chronic brain syndrome with senile brain disease _.
Totals   	
19
5
1
1
1
1
28
16
28
4
12
1
3
1
4
2
55
Table 5.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Mental
Diagnosis and Marital Status, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 6.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Mental
Diagnosis and Years of Schooling, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 7.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Citizenship and Age-group, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 8.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Religion,
April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Table 9.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Previous
Occupation, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
 geriatric division
I 153
Table 10. — Resident Population of Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace,
Mental Diagnosis and Age-group, December 31, 1961
by
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
50-59
60-69
70-79
80 and
Over
Total
Schizophrenic disorders	
Manic-depressive reaction	
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states-
Senile psychosis...
Presenile psychosis  	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis-
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology..
Other and unspecified psychoses	
Syphilis and its sequelae 	
Alcoholism 	
Mental deficiency-
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural reaction-
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S—
Other diseases of central nervous system not associated
with psychosis	
Other, unknown, and unspecified conditions-
Totals..   	
36
1
54
87
1
t
1
32
ill
14
1
6
$
8
1
2
2
5
3
2
168
ia
l
32
6
57
137
3
1
1
66
,1
27
3
6
1
ill
3
5
3
5
6
3
282
Table 11.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Skeenaview
Hospital, Terrace, by Mental Diagnosis and Age-group, April 1, 1961,
to March 31, 1962.
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
60-69
70-79
80-89
90-99
Total
Live Discharges
Schizophrenic disorders	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis..
Alcoholic psychosis —	
Totals... _	
Deaths
Schizophrenic disorders..
Senile psychosis-
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis-
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology„
Syphilis and its sequelae	
Alcoholism  	
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural reaction „
Senility _ 	
Totals  	
19
14
8
5
1
2
1
1
3
3
38
Table 12.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Skeenaview
Hospital, Terrace, by Mental Diagnosis and Length of Stay, April 1,
1961, to March 31, 1962.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 I  154
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Table 13.—Deaths Occurring in Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Cause
of Death and Age-group, April 1, 1961, to March 31,1962
Cause of Death
Age-group (Years)
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Total
Malignant neoplasm-
Cerebral haemorrhage..
Epilepsy-
Arteriosclerotic and degenerative heart disease-
Influenza with pneumonia	
Bronchopneumonia	
Ulcer of stomach	
Osteomyelitis   __..
Accidents _
Totals..
1
	
2
1
	
7
15
1
1
1
—
i
2
13
19
1
2
1
27
2
1
1
1
2
"38~
Table 14.—Deaths Occurring in Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Cause
of Death and Length of Stay, April 1,1961, to March 31, 1962
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE I 155
PART VI.—MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
DIRECTOR'S REPORT
F. E. McNair, Director
ADULT OUT-PATIENT SERVICE
The number of persons receiving both diagnostic and treatment service during
the year is surprisingly comparable to the number treated last year in Adult Clinic
despite the dispersal of staff to cover regional development. Six hundred and twenty-
eight persons were seen in diagnostic assessment, compared with 632 the previous
year, of whom 275 were taken on for treatment, compared with 282 last year. Two
hundred and forty-four were continued in treatment from the previous year, for a
total of 519 persons who received treatment during the year.
The number of male patients referred compared to female has increased so that
the ratio is now 5:7 instead of 5:8. There has been a corresponding shift in the
ratio of male to female patients under treatment from 1:2.1 to 1:1.9. Of the 275
persons on whom treatment was commenced, the major occupations represented
were housewife, then clerical and sales. There were more unskilled workmen than
there were semi-skilled and skilled combined. More than half were full-time employed or working as housewives, but nearly one-third were unemployed, retired, or
had unsettled employment. Educational opportunity for the group was good, with
more than half having Grade VII to XI education, and another one-third having
more than that. Two-thirds had average income, one-quarter had low income, and
one-twelfth had a subsistence level.
During the five years that the Adult Clinic has been in operation, 1,402 persons
have been admitted for treatment, nearly half of whom have been in the 25-39 age
range. About 5 per cent have been under 20 years, and another 5 per cent over 60
years. The average age is 36 years. The admissions for treatment by residence
reveal that utilization of service varies according to accessibility. During the five-
year period, 75 per cent of the patients under treatment have come from the metropolitan area of Vancouver, Burnaby, and New Westminster. An additional 15 per
cent have come from the periphery, including North and West Vancouver, Richmond, and the area of the Boundary Health Unit. Three per cent have come from
the Upper Fraser Valley, 3Vi per cent from the Okanagan, South Central, and
Kootenay districts combined. That leaves only 3J/i per cent for the balance of the
Province. Fifteen per cent of the total patients seen for treatment are readmissions,
but, if we pick out the last year, nearly 25 per cent of that group have been treated
at the Adult Clinic before. The diagnostic categories represented show psychotic
reactions, psychoneurotic reactions, and character disorders in the proportion of
1:2:1. More than half of the persons with neurotic disorders suffer from depression, and more than one-quarter from anxiety reaction. One may certainly offer
four conclusions from these figures:—
(1) That women come more readily for treatment than men, although the gap
is narrowing.
(2) Persons with more education come more readily for treatment than those
who have not completed grade school.
(3) Treatment availability and utilization vary directly according to proximity
to the Centre.
(4) In the treatment of mental disorder, one must be prepared to meet the
problems of chronicity and relapse.
 I 156 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
CHILDREN'S CLINICS OUT-PATIENT SERVICE
Eight hundred and five children have been seen during the year by the Children's Clinics for diagnostic assessment. Four hundred and fifty-nine children have
been receiving a treatment service in the Children's Clinics during the year, 216 of
which were on treatment at the end of last year and 243 new cases were taken on;
278 cases were closed, leaving 139 cases currently in treatment in the Children's
Clinic at the Mental Health Centre in Burnaby and forty-two in the Children's Clinic
at the Mental Health Centre in Victoria.
TREATMENT OF EMOTIONAL DISORDERS IN CHILDREN
The emerging personality of the child depends for its nourishment on his own
home and regular school setting. Optimally, the child has two parents who want
him and can show their affection and provide a balance between encouragement and
discipline which enables him to develop up to capacity in the work he undertakes to
do, the interests he develops, and his ability to enjoy life in relation to other people.
Help is sought outside the home when difficulties within the child, difficulties within
one of the parents or in the parent-child relationship are creating tensions. The first
line of specialized help may come from the school, where a teacher-nurse conference
identifies that a child is having particular difficulties and the school personnel take
steps to do something about it. Alternatively, the parents may recognize that they
require help and go to their family counsellor for advice. This family counsellor
might be a relative, the family doctor, their clergyman, nurse, social worker, or other
person who undertakes to fulfil this role.
When it comes to treatment, however, a more specialized resource is required.
The principal mode of treatment is by interview, with the child and parents seeing
the therapist separately or together. The number of interviews varies a good deal,
both according to the severity of the problem and the availability of resources. If
the problem presented cannot be dealt with within the home setting, a special school
setting for the child may be necessary or even a different home setting either with
relatives or by foster-home placement. When such a move is undertaken, continued
work must be done with the child and parents if the home is to be reconstituted later.
For example, the Children's Clinic gave ninety-two assessments and consultatives to
the Children's Aid Society and the Catholic Children's Aid Society last year. In
more severe instances, when it is felt that the child would be unable to benefit from
any community setting, temporary placement in a residential treatment centre is
desirable, though facilities of this kind are very limited. However, cases referred
into the " Esther Irwin " and " Seven Oaks " homes from the Children's Aid Society
and the Catholic Children's Aid Society and the social welfare branches in many
instances are given a diagnostic assessment at the Children's Clinic. Again it is
essential that continued work be done, not only with the child, but with the parents,
in order to assure that rehabilitation can be carried out after the residential part of
the treatment has been concluded.
The basic treatment services a community requires are foster-home and family-
counselling services provided by opportunity for consultation with a psychiatrist or
psychiatric out-patient clinic which will undertake responsibility for some of the
treatment directly. It is only a small percentage of children who present problems
of emotional disturbance who require 24-hour residential care. The impact of the
out-patient and in-patient psychiatric resources together will be greatest when they
are well integrated with other resources in the community and support their efforts.
Last year 202 children were reported by the Children's Clinic to the Children's
 MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE I 157
Registry as requiring special education and (or) treatment opportunity.   The vast
majority of emotionally troubled children can be helped in their own homes.
AUTISTIC CHILDREN
One group of disturbed children who are posing special problems of treatment
and disposal for the Children's Clinic are those suffering from serious mental illness
to a degree that is considered psychotic. These children are variously labelled as
"infantile autism" or "childhood schizophrenia," but all of them are so disabled
that their adjustment to normal family life is chaotic, and in most cases their admission to schools, including day schools for retarded children, is impossible. During
the past two to three years about forty children in whom the diagnosis of psychosis
is certain have become known to the Children's Clinic either by direct referral or
via the Communicative Disorder Programme of the Health Centre for Children, and
another thirty to forty have been seen in whom the diagnosis is probable but not yet
confirmed. Some of these children are treatable, either on an out-patient basis or
in a day or residential treatment programme, and all of these facilities will have to
be developed if we are to deal with the serious problems which the psychotic children
are presenting to their families and the community. The therapeutic approach can
be a costly one, especially if it includes intensive psychotherapy for both child and
parents. A residential programme with a bias toward custodial care rather than
intensive psychiatric treatment may be justified in some cases. For those children
who can remain at home, an extension of the current Day Centre programme would
seem ideal, provided transportation difficulties can be overcome and staffing maintained at a desirable level.
DAY HOSPITAL
The place of a day hospital amongst the continuum of psychiatric services
continues to be debated across the continent. In reviewing our experience the
following observations can be made:—
(1) The neurotic patient who requires hospitalization of any kind can, for
the most part, be managed in a day hospital, provided that facility is
reasonably close to his place of residence. The patient is removed from
his ordinary day-to-day responsibilities without being removed from his
family life. A woman so treated may need the assistance of a visiting
homemaker service.
(2) The person with some residual symptoms of chronic mental illness who is
residing in the community may require from time to time the additional
care that day hospital provides in order to prevent his readmission to
hospital. About 10 per cent of patients receiving long-term rehabilitative
care in the Adult Clinic require such an intensification of service at any
one time.
(3) Patients who suffer a disturbance in personality development characterized
by difficulty and oversensitivity in social relationships are helped to be-
• come more proficient in their social relationships by a long-range (three
or four months) day-hospital programme.
(4) With the advent of renewed interest in the chronic patient and his rehabilitation by the medical staff of general hospitals, one may expect to see
the development of facilities which will include occupational shops and
opportunity for social activity. To my mind, this is a step toward the
development of the day-hospital idea for non-psychiatric patients. It may
be that in the future such a day-hospital facility for general hospitals
will provide accommodation for all patients who require rehabilitative
'-, care.
 I 158 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
REGIONAL SERVICES
Provision has been made for the development of a regional mental-health centre
for the Okanagan Valley with headquarters at Kelowna. The policy has been declared that a series of such centres will be developed throughout the Province at
population centres. This regional service is an outgrowth of the previous travelling
clinic and will have its headquarters in the Community Health Centre at Kelowna.
A staff of a psychiatrist, a social worker, a psychologist, a public health nurse, and
a clerk-stenographer has been provided.
There has been a redeployment of the previous travelling clinic service. Commencing the end of January, 1962, the travelling consultant team has gone one week
in two months to Nelson, Trail, and Cranbrook or Kimberley in the Kootenays.
Another team has spent a corresponding period of time giving service to Abbotsford,
Chilliwack, and Mission in the Upper Fraser Valley. All the previous points which
received service once or twice a year are now receiving twice-a-year service, and
one new point—namely, Ocean Falls—has been picked up for an annual visit.
VICTORIA MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
Plans to augment the Child Guidance Clinic, Victoria, to provide both adult
and children's service were implemented with the appointment of a psychiatrist and
the establishment of a position for a social worker. This unit will henceforth be
called the " Victoria Mental Health Centre." The Adult and Children's Clinics will
share space in the building on Superior Street until new accommodation is built.
Close co-operation will be sought between the doctors in private practice of psychiatry, the social welfare agencies, and the public health department to co-ordinate effort
and offer consultative assistance. Also in this matter, additional facilities are available to those patients who are under community management and those who require
short-term hospitalization. The new adult psychiatric team will travel one day per
month to Nanaimo to work with the Medical Health Officer there, to offer consultant
service and to help co-ordinate existing professional resources in mental health
according to the pattern which has already been followed in the Upper Fraser Valley
at Chilliwack. The latter development has been reported in the British Columbia
Medical Journal, November, 1961, and again in Canada's Mental Health, May,
1962.
STAFF DEVELOPMENT
A weekly staff-development programme has been conducted over the noon
hour weekly. In addition, specific projects have been undertaken to improve the
standards of service rendered by each professional discipline. The Psychology
Department has been involved in a combined treatment and research programme
with a group of non-communicative, emotionally disturbed, pre-school-age children.
This department has also undergone reorganization under Dr. D. C. Shalman, the
new Chief Psychologist, and a workshop project has been undertaken to enable psychologists to familiarize themselves more thoroughly with different aspects of psychological tests, including both a critical evaluation of tests in current use and an
evaluation and understanding of new tests as they become available. A short battery
of psychological tests has been given every patient attending Adult Clinic, for a six-
month period, as a research project to determine the possibility of developing an
instrument for predicting the outcome of treatment.
The Mental Health Centre staff and community workers for child betterment
were saddened this year by the premature death of Miss Marjorie Munro, former
Chief Psychologist. She was a dedicated person, and a memorial tribute is being
established in her name by her friends.
 MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
I  159
STATISTICAL TABLES
Table 1.—Summary of Operations, Mental Health Centre, Adult Clinic,
April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Male
Female
Total
Total number pending at April 1, 1961	
Plus assessments—
Previous Mental Health Services hospital services .
Community health services —	
Other institutions   —	
From in-town general practitioners and other specialists .
From out-of-town general practitioners  	
From in-town psychiatrists __  	
From out-of-town psychiatrists  _. —.
Totals	
Disposition of assessments—
Hospitalization recommended —
Social agency recommended  	
Other medical care recommended .
Advice and assessment only	
Patient withdrew 	
Cases opened for treatment —	
Total pending at March 31, 1962
Patient load-
Brought forward at April 1, 1961 -	
Total out-patient department cases opened .
Less out-patient department cases closed -
Total under treatment, March 31, 1962 .
10
32
24
13
134
29
23
255
265
20
2
18
102
9
107
76
25
19
1
240
38
30
1
354
363
28
12
13
110
13
168
172
19
57
43
14
374
67
53
1
609
628
48
14
21
212
22
275
258
344
602
7
19
26
69
107
175
168
244
275
176
100
343
171
519
271
248
Family members under treatment at March 31, 1962:   Parents, 3;  spouses, 10;  other, 1;  total, 14.
Table 2.—Movement of Population, Out-patient Department, Mental
Health Centre, Adult Clinic, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Male
Female
1
Total
Case load as at March 31, 1961 — 	
69
107
77
30
100
76
175
168
131
37
171
172
244
275
208
67
271
248
Table 3.—First Admissions to Mental Health Centre, Adult Clinic, by
Health Unit and School District of Residence, April 1, 1961, to
March 31, 1962.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 I  160
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
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MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
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 MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
I 163
Table 8.—Movement of Population, Day-hospital Unit, Mental Health
Centre, Adult Clinic, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Male
Female
Total
In day-hospital, April 1,1961..
Admissions  	
Readmissions _	
6
22
10
Totals	
Less discharges 	
In day-hospital, March 31,1962.
38
33
11
69
31
111
104
17
91
41
149
137
12
Total patient-days of those discharged
Total discharges
Average stay in day-hospital
3,551
137
25.9
Table 9.—Movement of Population, Children's Clinics, Burnaby
and Victoria, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Burnaby
Victoria
New
Repeat
*rt
O
H
New
Repeat
o
H
es
O
H
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
1        1
F. | M. 1 F.
1        1
§
Ih
O
Intake Section
3
22
30
2
13
2
1
10
13
1
6
6
6
1
11
2
1
4
40
49
4
31
2
31
27
25
5
3
11
2
87
4
Cases opened—
28
8
6
1
17
1
1
1
127
36
33
7
4
85
37
38
6
Schools   	
Social agencies  	
Other                            	
Total cases carried in intake during year 	
72
31
24
3
130
91
43|    20|    13| 167| 297
Cases closed from intake section—
Intake service only.  ■ 	
3
3
16
12
35
3
1
9
7
11
1
2
5
14
1
2
8
4
27
26
60
6
4
2
11
10
15
142
18
4
27
Referred outside resource  	
Transferred to treatment for—
11
74
1
38
1
19
41
202
69
31
22
3
125
911    43
20
13
167| 292
3
 1      2
5
_._|__
 1  1
5
Treatment Section
79
47
38
31
18
27
24
19
18
13
2
11
147
86
94
44
85
116
10
39
45
6
20
18
9
13
5
69
157
216
243
88
22
25
4
139
13
4
8
17
 I  164
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Table 10.—Summary of Diagnostic Service Given to Agencies by Burnaby,
Victoria, and Travelling Clinics, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Place of Examination
New
Repeat
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
5(2
28
3
10
6
13
7
31
36
216'
23
12
1
4
4
8
14
17
3
105
14
2
3
9
5
15
4
7
15
58
8
1
2
7
4
4
4
35
97
412
Burnaby travelling clinics—
8
29
13
39
23
56
21
54
414
402
191
132
65
790
 MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
I  165
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C
 I 166
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1961/62
Table 12.—Summary of Services Given by the Children's Clinics,
April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Stationary Clinics
Mainland
Travelling
Clinics
Vancouver
Island
Travelling
Clinics
Totals
Burnaby
Victoria
223
183
97
86
99
27
209
199
42
157
74
134
33
597
597
597
269
54
54
54
10
1,083
1,033
790
243
Total number of children given full examination..
Other agency diagnostic given full examination   ..
Other agency consultative cases -	
Clinic direct-service cases referred (private)—
New  	
353
233
60
Table 13.—Sources of All Cases Referred to Children's Clinics and
Service Given, April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Number
of Cases
Type of Service Given
Agency or Source
Agency
Diagnostic
Study
Clinic
Direct
Service
1. Social Agencies—■
126
47
28
3
1
2
10
1
23
18
2
40
3
44
7
32
9
22
13
14
9
9
21
41
62
50
1
4
31
13
10
2
2
3
1
4
77
2
59
13
87
127
10
123
46
27
3
1
1
7
1
22
18
1
34
44
7
32
9
22
13
14
9
9
21
41
62
49
1
4
23
13
8
3
4
43
59
13
2
1
3
1
1
1
3
2. Institutions—
1
1
3. Medical and health agencies—
6
3
Selkirk Health Unit                     	
1
8
Children's Hospital	
2
2
2
1
4. Schools—
Public                                    	
34
Other
2
6. Adult Court 	
85
127
9. Other —	
9
Totals                   .         	
1,083
790
293
 MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
I 167
Table 14.—Diagnoses of All Cases Assessed by the Children's Clinic,
April 1, 1961, to March 31, 1962
Male
Female
Psychotic disorders—■
Schizophrenic reaction-
Simple type-
Paranoid type .
Residual type..
Schizo-affective type-
Childhood type.
Manic depressive reaction, depressed.
Psychotic reaction without clearly defined structural change..
Psychoneurotic disorders—■
Anxiety reaction  „  - 	
Dissociative reaction  _	
Obsessive-compulsive reaction..
Depressive reaction....	
Neurocirculatory asthenia —	
Psychophysiological respiratory reaction..
Psychophysiological skin reaction_.
Psychophysiological musculoskeletal reaction.
Hypochondriacal reaction —  ..	
Mixed psychoneurosis  	
Psychoneurotic reaction, other-
Disorders of character, behaviour, and intelligence-
Schizoid personality  	
Paranoid personality.  	
Inadequate personality   _
Anti-social reaction    	
Dyssocial reaction 	
Sexual deviation   	
Sociopathic personality disturbance..
Emotionally unstable personality	
Passive-aggressive personality	
Enuresis.   _	
Other symptomatic habits..
Other unspecified _ 	
Alcoholism, chronic...	
Adjustment reaction of infancy	
Adjustment reaction of childhood	
Adjustment reaction of adolescence	
Mental deficiency—■
Mild  _	
Moderate-
Severe	
Unspecified ..
Special learning defects..
Speech disturbance-
Acute situational maladjustment _  	
Other and unspecified behaviour disorder  _	
Chronic brain syndrome due to prenatal influence  	
Chronic brain syndrome associated with drug or poison 	
Chronic brain syndrome associated with circulatory disturbance..
Chronic brain syndrome, other disease-
Chronic brain syndrome associated with intracranial infection .
Chronic brain syndrome associated with birth trauma-
Chronic brain syndrome associated with other unspecified disease-
Chronic brain syndrome associated with convulsive disorder .	
Not yet diagnosed  _ 	
Observation only _   	
Incomplete         	
Totals	
29
1
2
3
4
2
2
6
2
7
4
7
2
2
29
38
2
5
19
il
1'46
50
21
36
32
17
2
18
7
4
lil
3
1
2
120
1
81
738
19
IS
3
2
5
1
52
17
1®
16
23
8
3
1
1
3
1
1
5
69
2
39
345
1
1
1
1
9
2
4
37
2
2
6
2
1
2
1
4
2
3
12
3
9
2
2
48
56
5
7
24
2
198
67
39
52
55
25
2
21
8
5
14
4
1
1
1
2
1
1
7
189
3
120
1,083
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1963
735^1062^2980
   

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