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REPORT OF THE Department of Commercial Transport containing the reports on RAILWAYS, AERIAL TRAMWAYS,… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1962

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT
Hon. E. C. Westwood, Minister A. J. Bowering, Deputy Minister
REPORT OF THE
Department of
Commercial Transport
containing the reports on
RAILWAYS, AERIAL TRAMWAYS, PIPE-LINES,
INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORTATION,
and COMMERCIAL VEHICLES
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1961
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1962
  Victoria, B.C., January 22, 1962.
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Annual Report of the Department of
Commercial Transport for the year ended December 31, 1961.
EARLE C. WESTWOOD,
Minister of Commercial Transport.
 Victoria, B.C., January 22, 1962.
The Honourable Earle C. Westwood,
Minister of Commercial Transport.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Commercial Transport for the year ended December 31, 1961.
A. J. BOWERING,
Deputy Minister of Commercial Transport.
 Report of the
Department of Commercial Transport, 1961
A. J. Bowering, Deputy Minister
INTRODUCTION
This is the second Annual Report of the Department of Commercial Transport,
which was formed by combining the Department of Railways with the Commercial
Vehicle Section of the Motor-vehicle Branch, and with the Weigh Scale and Special
Permit Section of the Department of Highways, and includes the administration of
the Pipe-lines Act, the Industrial Transportation Act, and the Mines Rights-of-way
Act. It also provides for certain aspects of the enforcement of the Motor Carrier
Act under the Public Utilities Commission.
The year 1961 has proved to be a turning point in the programme of development with respect to the drilling for and transmission of crude oil and natural-gas
products in British Columbia.
This increased activity in crude-oil production can be attributed directly to the
completion of a major transmission pipe-line from the Peace River area, which provides a direct route through which British Columbia crude-oil products may be
transmitted to marketing facilities in the Lower Mainland area.
There is also an indication of increased activity in the field of aerial-tramway
construction in conjunction with the general development of the park and playground
areas of the Province.
Changes in the administration and policies respecting the movement of commercial vehicles on the public highways of the Province appear to be operating
compatibly with the requirements of industry.
 EE 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1961
EE 7
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE BRANCH AND ACCOUNTS BRANCH
George Lindsay, Superintendent of Motor-vehicles
J. G. M. Lock, Director of Operations
D. I. Ewan, Senior Clerk
The early settlers in Canada depended primarily, and at first exclusively, on
water transport. However, it was not too long before it was realized that roads were
needed to provide means of communication to inland areas from the sea-coast, the
banks of navigable waterways, and the Great Lakes. These roads were built initially,
and maintained by, adjacent land-owners.
Under British rule, colonial governments constructed several roads, mainly for
defence purposes and in the interest of the administration of justice, and the early
nineteenth century witnessed a steady increase in road construction due to the growth
of population and the spread of agricultural settlement. All these roads were
unbelievably bad, impassable in the winters due to snow and rain, and veritable
dusty, rutted bone-shakers in the summer-time. The condition of the roads can be
attributed to ignorance of engineering principles, lack of adequate labour-saving
machinery, inability to finance new construction, and, most of all, the apparent
absence of a strong demand for anything better. Traffic volumes were low and the
amount of revenue was low, and there existed a general resentment among highway-
users to the paying of tolls.
The introduction of the private automobile in 1901 completely changed the
picture. The early automobiles were heavy and undependable, and it was not until
the year 1925 that cars were really reliable and safe to drive. With more cars on the
road, the demand for better highways became stronger, and the provincial governments had to take an active part in highway construction for several reasons. The
cost of building the roads required by fast cars and heavy trucks rose rapidly. Road
surfaces had to be wider and thicker, bridges had to be stronger, curves and gradients
had to be more gentle than for horse-drawn vehicles. Local government units were
unable to finance such heavy capital expenditure, especially when they could see
no way of receiving their costs from the traffic using the roads. Provincial government participation was not limited to the main highways, but included many of the
secondary roads, particularly in the farming areas.
Motor-vehicles and the highways over which they operate have undergone
rapid and continuous technological change, making driving and riding easier, safer,
faster, and more comfortable. Consequently, wear and tear on vehicles and roads
has been greatly reduced. The general advances in the automotive industry have
been quickly absorbed, which is evident when considering the progress made in the
trucking industry.
All the early trucks and many of those currently used in local delivery service
are essentially converted passenger-cars. Trucks of from 1 to 5 tons capacity resemble passenger-automobiles in a general way, but are fitted with more powerful
and more durable engines. Their chassis are more heavily built, and they will stand
more abuse. To an increasing extent, commercial transport vehicles are being
equipped with diesel engines. It is recognized that there are certain disadvantages
to diesel engines in comparison with gasoline engines of equal power, such as weight
and lack of acceleration. However, fuel consumption averages from 20 to 40 per
cent lower, which is a decided advantage.
All the heavier types of trucks are designed with a view to distributing the
weight of the loaded vehicles over as large a number of square inches of road surface
 ;5;5 5555:55 5 55
Early 1920's truck and (wagon) trailer.
An example of early truck logging.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1961
EE 9
as possible, in order to reduce the wear and tear on the road surface. In an honest
effort to reduce the contact weight of trucks on highways, manufacturers have put
on larger pneumatic tires and increased the number of axles per vehicle and the
number of tires per axle.
Advances in metallurgy, such as stainless steel, aluminum, and spot welding,
have permitted either a reduction of gross weight on the surface of the highway or
alternatively an increase in pay load relative to tare. Generally speaking, trucks
are now carefully designed to meet the varying needs of users, and this has resulted
in gains in economy and serviceability.
Future technological changes in trucks will probably be toward more diesel
engines, superchargers for gasoline engines, faster highway operation, and greater
use of light-weight metals and plastics. Any increase in size will be controlled by
current and future restrictions on width, height, length, and axle load, which are
presently determined by clearances in underpasses, by the prevailing concepts of
what the dimensions of trucks should be to make the roads tolerably usable by all
vehicular traffic, and by the maximum weights which highway surfaces and bridges
can reasonably be called upon to withstand.
The fantastic rate of increase in use of trucks is astounding when one considers
that from the initial years of operation in the trucking industry, about the year 1910,
numbers had increased by 1944 to over 300,000 commercial freight-vehicles, and
in 1951 over 720,000 were registered in Canada. It is conservatively estimated that
by 1980 this figure will reach the 2,000,000 mark.
Accurate statistics of ton-mile performance by highway carriers are not wholly
reliable because of the multi-purpose operation and numbers of operations involved;
however, statistics indicate that in 1928 highway vehicles accounted for only 0.1
per cent of the total intercity revenue ton-miles, in 1936 approximately 1 per cent,
and in 1953 an increase to 13 per cent. Current statistics indicate that this increase,
obtained at the expense of the railroads, has been maintained and has reached a
plateau which will not be exceeded to any great extent without major changes to
the general principles of truck transportation being undertaken.
The advantages and disadvantages of truck transportation versus rail transportation are numerous and can be generally summed up by saying that, bearing in mind
that conditions vary widely from one route to another, depending upon the condition of the roads, the circuity of rail routes, and the volume of traffic in so far as it
affects the number of trains run daily, trucks have the advantage over railways for
distances up to at least 50 miles. This is not intended to imply that a distance of 50
miles is a limiting factor in truck haulage operations, for many expert opinions will
favour a much higher figure and, subject to the nature of their operations, could be
quite correct. The results of investigations made into such matters in 1956 concluded that the greatest concentration of intercity motor-truck activity was on routes
between 20 and 600 miles in length, and that a large volume of motor-carrier traffic
also moves on routes up to 1,500 miles in length, but beyond that point there is
considerable doubt whether or not line-haul motor-carrier operations are profitable
or practical.
In addition to the disadvantages referred to herein, which, generally speaking,
are common to the trucking industry throughout Canada, British Columbia trans-
provincial truckers are faced with a higher over-all operational cost due to the nature
of the topography of the Province.
Recognizing the industry's problem and the importance of providing an adequate means of access from the areas of the Province currently engaged in an
upsurge of industrial development, the Government embarked upon an increased
highway-construction programme.
 An early 1900's "fleet."   Note the similarity between the passenger-vehicles
and the trucks.
Standard flat-deck units, 1930 vintage. Similar-type units still in use to-day.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1961
EE 11
As this programme progressed and the highways of the Province were brought
to a higher standard, it was only common sense to assume that a portion of the costs
involved in the provision and maintenance of the public highway system should be
borne by the highway-users. This resulted in the introduction of the Department of
Commercial Transport Act and the formulating of regulations necessary to control
and regulate the size and weight of heavy-truck transportation within the Province.
The wisdom of the Government in taking this course of action is now recognized by
the industry, as a whole, as a step in the right direction if the Province is to maintain
its current high standards and develop its natural resources to the best advantage
and in the best interests of the industry and the people of the Province.
British Columbia is justly proud of the advances made and the high standard
of operation of the trucking industry in the Province, and looks forward to the
continued support and co-operation of the industry in its current and future programme of industrial development. The growth of the trucking industry in British
Columbia and the keen interest of the individual companies concerned—many of
whom can boast of over forty years' service in the Province—is adequately depicted
in the series of photographs reproduced here and kindly supplied by a pioneer firm
in the industry.
OPERATIONS AND ACCOUNTS
During the year 1961, logging operations increased considerably over the
previous year, and restricted-route term permits issued during 1961 far exceeded
the number issued in 1960. Regulations respecting restricted-route term permits
were amended during March to provide additional weight for vehicles transporting
logs and poles, saw-timber cants, or rough green lumber, all of which was to the
benefit of such operators.
The regulations made pursuant to the Motor-vehicle Act respecting commercial
vehicles were amended during the year when extensions of Schedule 1 respecting
the size of vehicles and Schedule 8 respecting weight of vehicles were instituted.
These amendments were of considerable value to the trucking industry.
On January 5, 1961, weighmasters were granted authority to carry out duties
with respect to enforcement required under the Motor Carrier Act. These included
the checking of commercial vehicles for required licences and permits, the checking
of private freight-vehicles regarding ownership of goods being transported and the
possible need for licence or permit, the issuing of violation notices when infractions
were observed and forwarding a copy of each to the Motor Carrier Branch of the
Public Utilities Commission. In addition, specific investigations were made under
the Motor Carrier Act at the request of the Superintendent of Motor Carriers or
the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
Activities of the oil and natural-gas industries increased considerably during the
last year, and our weighmasters were faced with many problems regarding the movement of exceptionally heavy and oversize oil rigs. With the opening of the new
Peace River Bridge, the movement of these heavy units has again become prevalent.
The various forms utilized by the Department for the issuance of permits have
been carefully considered and redesigned to provide the best possible control and
saving in time. Foremost in this line was the issuance of a manual of instructions
for weighmasters and issuing offices. This manual contains a consolidation of all
previous instructions for operating a weigh-station, the issuing of permits, and
Departmental accounting requirements.
Early in the year, in order to make a universal calculation of fees possible, a
set of comprehensive mileage charts was compiled. These charts include the latest
mileage figures supplied by the Department of Highways and cover all the major
 A modern semi-trailer high cube van, 38 feet in length.   This type of unit used
principally for household effects and conventional loads.
Two types of equipment used on the Hope-Princeton Highway.    First a truck and full
trailer followed by a conventional tandem semi-trailer.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1961
EE 13
highways in British Columbia. They have proved invaluable in the determination
of uniform mileages on which overweight fees are calculated. The format and the
information available on these tables has received favourable recognition by the
trucking industry.
As a great many of the permits issued at the various offices consisted of single-
trip oversize permits, the Department introduced a short-term oversize permit which
enables an operator to purchase, for cash, a permit to cover the operation of an
oversize vehicle for a period of one calendar month from the date of issue. This is
intended to provide a greater degree of convenience to the operator and eliminate
time spent in obtaining single-trip permits. This service was previously available
only to those who had established an account with the Department.
Following careful consideration by the Government, whick took place over an
extended period, the Minister of Commercial Transport was authorized, by Order
in Council No. 2465, approved September 26, 1961, to enter into an agreement,
called the " Uniform Vehicle Registration Prorationing and Reciprocity Agreement,"
with the Governments of each of the following States: California, Colorado, Idaho,
Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montant, Nebraska, Nevade, New Mexico, Oregon, South
Dakota, North Dakota, and Washington. This Agreement, which allows for the
pro-rationing of annual commercial-vehicle licence fees, will apply only to the
licence-year beginning March 1, 1962. This course of action has been greatly
appreciated by truck operators who are engaged in international operations in this
Province and in each of the States mentioned as they will benefit considerably from
the Agreement.
Upon approval by the Government of the principles of pro-rationing, the
Accounts Branch, with the co-operation of the Weigh Scale Branch, conducted a
survey at key weigh-stations to ascertain the general volume and flow of international and interprovincial truck traffic. The results of this survey were summarized,
and the information obtained is proving to be very helpful in assessing applications
for pro-rationing.
As evidenced by the following tables, the flow of intraprovincial traffic throughout the Province has remained relatively constant. Normal annual increases in the
number of commercial vehicles registered and in the revenue received were experienced. On the accounting side, the average number of permits audited by this
office per month remains fairly high—approximately 1,800 per month. This involves checking them for accuracy of fee calculation and for correctness of completion. At the same time, a control of term permits is kept to ensure the various
operators' reports are received. Companies availing themselves of the privilege of
charging permits number about 500. These accounts are billed on the fifteenth of
each month  for permits obtained the previous month.
Reports are received weekly from the weigh-stations as to the vehicles proceeding under the authority of overweight term permits. These reports are checked
against the monthly reports of the company to ensure accuracy.
The six portable weigh-scale patrol units operated by this Department have
continued to be of great value. The seventh unit was added during the year 1961 at
Penticton and will be utilized in the South Okanagan region, giving a closer supervision of trucks operating in that vicinity. The mere fact that a portable patrol unit
is stationed in a particular area provides a definite deterrent to operators who might
otherwise take a chance and overload their equipment.
During the twelve-month period January 1 to December 31, 1961, a total of
1,308,352 vehicles was checked by the weighmasters to assure that they were
complying with the size and weight regulations and were properly licensed.
  <
 EE 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Our weighmasters continue to carry out various duties for other departments—
namely, the Department of Agriculture, British Columbia Forest Service, Department of Finance, Department of Highways, and the Motor Carrier Branch of the
Public Utilities Commission.
Due to a relocation of Highway No. 99, it became necessary to move the Douglas weigh-scale station. A new site was finally selected on the Pacific Highway a
short distance from the International Boundary, and construction of the new station
is proceeding. In the near future, all truck transport in this area will enter and leave
the Province by way of the Pacific Highway, while only private passenger-vehicles
will utilize the facilities of the Peace Arch-Douglas port of entry.
The Director of Operations continues to maintain a very close liaison with the
Department of Highways and has an up-to-date record, including a large-scale spot-
map, which quickly and clearly indicates the allowable gross vehicle weight on
various highways and bridges in the Province.
Table No. 1.—Revenue from Gasoline and Motive-fuel Use Taxes for
Passenger-cars and Commercial Vehicles
Fiscal Year Amount
1951/52  $13,079,000
1952/53  14,574,000
1953/54  15,963,000
1954/55  17,455,000
1955/56  19,820,000
Fiscal Year Amount
1956/57  $22,593,000
1957/58     24,500,000
1958/59     26,100,000
1959/60     28,582,000
1960/61     30,093,000
Table No. 2.—-Summary of Commercial Vehicle Licences and
Permits Issued, 1961
Number of
Number of
Number of
Non-resident
Permits
Issued
Number of
Number of
Vehicles
Checked
at Weigh-
Commercial
Commercial
Temporary
Oversize and
Month
Vehicles Reg
Trailers Reg
Operation
Overweight
istered and
istered and
Permits
Permits
Licensed
Licensed
Issued
Issued
January	
13,535
978
1,189
865
1,982
95,790
February 	
61,184
3,469
1,119
808
1,589
101,693
March	
15,245
1,129
2,084
2,187
1,879
124,008
5,360
401
1,241
2,004
1,323
94,642
May   	
4,424
384
1,321
2,179
1,538
106,651
June	
3,832
358
1,850
2,253
1,974
136,389
July	
2,526
222
1,380
1,775
1,634
99,507
2,318
186
1,578
1,712
2,254
91,151
September.	
2,166
176
1,865
1,632
2,067
123,998
1,628
148
1,521
1,506
1,541
105,510
November	
1,355
139
1,356
1,394
2,141
107,099
December	
1,026
98
1,620
1,107
1,380
121,914
Totals. 	
114,599
7,688
18,124
19,422
21,302
1,308,352
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1961
EE 17
Table No. 3.—Comparison of Gross Revenue Collections from Licence
and Permit Fees for Five-year Period 1956/57 to 1960/61, Inclusive
Source
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
Commercial motor-vehicle licences	
Non-resident commercial permits	
$4,314,313.81
91,559.41
169,696.62
$4,359,750.33
106,882.19
185,866.41
$4,470,162.49
133,716.34
201,547.95
$6,804,101.57
189,374.062
128,123.38
5,001.20
276,741.12*
$7,541,536,021
401,976.11
60,325.003
Temporary operation permits .  —
45,765.00
21,176.00
317,568.53
$4,575,569.84
$4,652,498.93
$4,826,602.78
$7,403,341.33
$8,367,170.66
1 Commenced issuing licences on gross vehicle weight January 1, 1960.
2 Department of Commercial Transport commenced issuing permits June 15, 1959.
3 Licence fees now collected on gross-vehicle-weight basis are charged to tractor unit and $10 nominal fee
collected on trailer.   This has reduced trailer fees and transferred it to commercial vehicle licences.
* Department of Commercial Transport commenced issuing permits July 15, 1959.
1961 -v
114.559
112.571
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 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1961 EE 19
ENGINEERING BRANCH
(Railways, Aerial Tramways, Pipe-lines, and Industrial
Transportation )
R. E. Swanson, P.Eng., Chief Inspecting Engineer
RAILWAYS
Contrary to popular opinion, the use of railways has continued to increase
throughout British Columbia on a ton-mile basis. More tons were hauled more
miles on railways in 1961 than in any previous year. The extension of the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway into Northern British Columbia has facilitated the growth
of that country so that it would be difficult to estimate the real value of the service
offered by this line. Pipe and raw materials move from the Coast into the Peace
River area to serve the pipe-line, oil and gas industries, and at the same time manufactured products from that industry move south to the Coast in addition to cattle,
grain, and other commodities. There is no doubt that development in the Peace
River is only in its infancy, and in years to come the foresight of those who planned
and developed the railway and transportation facilities into the north country will
prove to be a turning point in the historic development of this Province, for certainly, with transportation, pipe-lines, and cheap power, the North will develop
beyond all present expectations.
Industrial railways serving mining, logging, and manufacturing plants, and
terminal railways, have continued to develop over a steady pattern. These railways
listed in this report serve pulp-mills, logging operations, lumber-mills, steel-mills,
manufacturing plants, and in many cases are operated jointly with logging-truck
facilities, so that the railway and the industrial roads are a joint effort.
In the inspection of these railways, the inspectors and engineers from the
Department have continued, as in the past, to serve the industry, so that safety is
the cardinal rule. Boilers and pressure vessels, bridges, structures, and facilities
have been inspected, and personnel—especially operating personnel—have been
instructed and trained in the safe use of equipment.
Lectures have been conducted in various parts of the Province to instruct
workmen in the proper use of air-brakes and safe practice in handling trucks and
vehicles on heavy industrial roads. In a number of cases the R.C.M.P. highway
patrol has been instructed in the correct technique to be used in inspecting air-brakes
on commercial vehicles used on highways, and on industrial railways the inspectors
and engineers have instructed personnel as to safe practices involving railway equipment and in the handling of air-brakes.
Railways in general are divided into two categories—(1) common-carrier railways, such as the Pacific Great Eastern Railway and the British Columbia Electric
Railway, and (2) industrial railways, such as Comox Logging & Railway Company,
Canadian Forest Products, and railways serving pulp-mills and industrial plants.
Both categories of railways have been inspected during the year, as outlined in other
parts of this report, and it can be reported the railway facilities have continued to
improve both in efficiency and safety to the workmen employed in that industry.
 EE 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
EQUIPMENT INSPECTIONS DURING 1961 UNDER THE
RAILWAY ACT
Following  is  a list  of individual inspections  carried  out  by  Department
engineers:—
Hydrostatic tests applied to boilers  52
Internal and external inspections of boilers  1
Internal-combustion locomotives and cranes inspected and certified 10
Air-locomotives inspected and certified  10
Electric locomotives inspected and certified  5
Self-powered rail-cars inspected and certified  12
Diesel-electric locomotives inspected  72
Air-reservoirs tested and inspected  8
Railway cars inspected on industrial railways  375
Railway cars inspected on common-carrier railways  175
Miles of railway track inspected  1,900
Aerial tramways inspected and certified  9
Railway conductors examined and certified  1
Power-car operators examined and certified  10
Internal-combustion locomotive engineers examined and certified.., 13
Locomotive-crane engineers examined and certified  4
Diesel-electric locomotive engineers examined and certificates issued, P.G.E. Railway  9
Diesel-electric locomotive engineers examined and certificates issued, B.C. Electric Railway.
Steam-locomotive engineers examined and certified  2
Accidents investigated on logging and industrial railways  3
Fatal accidents on logging and industrial railways  1
Compensable employee accidents, P.G.E. Railway  116
Accidents involving automobiles (crossings, etc.), P.G.E. Railway.. 19
Accidents involving passengers, P.G.E. Railway  7
Fatal accidents to employees, P.G.E. Railway  1
Fatal accidents involving automobiles at crossings, P.G.E. Railway 1
Accidents reported on B.C. Electric Railway    	
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT, 1961                  EE 21
LIST OF RAILWAYS AND SUMMARY OF MILEAGE
Industrial Railways
No. and Owners/Name of Railway
Head Office
Operating
Mileage
Gauge
Main
Track
Sidings,
etc.
Total
1. Aluminum  Company   of  Canada
Ltd  	
Montreal	
Revelstoke	
Vancouver    ...
Montreal	
Montreal	
Vancouver   ....
Vancouver ....
Montreal 	
Montreal	
Vancouver	
Trail    	
Trail.....	
Fernie 	
North Vancouver
Mesachie Lake
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver    ...
Vancouver	
Vancouver   ..
Vancouver...
Vancouver
Mesachie Lake
New Westminster
Calgary, Alta.
Vancouver
Vancouver
Honeymoon
Bay
Kitimat	
Revelstoke	
Crofton 	
New Westminster
North Vancouver
2.9
0.92
1.50
3.00
3.19
6.09
0.92
4.00
6.00
0.75
114.09
7.50
7.01
28.45
19.00
42.01
1.53
2.00
7.50
1.00
3.00
5.39
4.10
1.80
1.00
1.50
0.33
5.20
3.68
1.25
2.00
7.60
005
Standard.
30" and
standard
Standard.
2. Arrowhead Wood Preservers Ltd.
3. B.C. Forest Products Ltd 	
2.50
3.00
0.75
4. Canada Creosoting Co. Ltd... 	
5. Canada Creosoting Co. Ltd.	
6. Canadian Collieries Resources Ltd.
7. Canadian Forest Products Ltd.
Nimpkish Valley-
James Island
Watson Island,
Shames and
Kalum
Ladysmith	
Trail...	
Kimberley	
Michel	
North Vancouver
Mesachie Lake	
Port Mellon
Duncan Bay	
Chemainus	
Dunsmuir District
Harmac Pulp
Division
Port Alberni	
Powell River
Crofton	
New Westminster
Taylor. 	
Twigg Island
North Vancouver
Honeymoon Bay
96.25
6.25
17.84
1.25
7.01
5.05
Standard.
30" and
standard
Standard.
18"."
18", 36".
30".
Standard.
Narrow.
Standard.
9. Columbia Cellulose Co. Ltd	
10. Comox Logging & Railway Co.    ~
11. Consolidated Mining & Smelting
of Canada Ltd.
12. Consolidated Mining & Smelting
of Canada Ltd.
13. Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. Ltd	
.
23.40
19.00
9.00
1.53
0.10
6.00
0.50
1.58
1.00
1.80
1.50
0.33
5.20
3.05
1.25
2.00
7.00
0.95
33.01
1.90
1.50
0.50
3.00
3.81
3.10
15. Hillcrest Lumber Co. Ltd	
16. Howe Sound Transportation Co	
17. Elk Falls Co. Ltd.	
18. MacMillan,   Bloedel   and   Powell
River Ltd.
19. MacMillan,   Bloedel   and   Powell
River Ltd.
20. MacMillan,   Bloedel   and   Powell
River Ltd.
21. MacMillan,   Bloedel   and   Powell
River Ltd.
22. MacMillan,   Bloedel   and   Powell
River Ltd.
23. Osborn Bay Wharf Co. Ltd.
24. Pacific Coast Terminals Co. Ltd...
25. Pacific, Jefferson Lake, Westcoast
(Pacific Petroleums Ltd.)
26. Vancouver Steel Co. Ltd	
27. Vancouver Wharves Ltd  	
28. Western Forest Industries Ltd.
29. Western Plywood (Cariboo) Ltd.
1.00
0.63
0.60
Common-carrier Railways
30. B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd.
31. Pacific Great Eastern Railway
Vancouver	
Vancouver
New Westminster-
Huntingdon-
Chilliwack
Vancouver to Fort
St. John and
Dawson Creek
76.58
788.60
25.29
146.10
101.87
934.70
Standard.
PACIFIC GREAT EASTERN RAILW;
Inspecting Engineer's Report
During the year 1961 a number of inspections were mat
of the operation on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway.   The
the track and facilities was carried out in two stages during tl
as follows: On November 2nd, 3rd, and 4th an inspection was
3
KY
ie covt
annu
ie latte
made
5ring all phases
il inspection of
r part of 1961,
by track motor
 EE 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
from Prince George to North Vancouver, at which time officials of the company
accompanied me by track motor on an inspection of the road-bed, the track, bridges,
and structures, dispatch and operation over the southern portion of the line; on
December 14th and 15th an inspection was made by riding a locomotive between
Chetwynd and Prince George, at which time company officials accompanied me
when the same facilities were inspected.
Rail Re-lay
The rail re-lay programme on this railway, which was inaugurated a number
of years ago, has been carried forward so that at the present time there is no light
rail on the main line between Fort St. John and North Vancouver. All 60-pound
rail used during construction between Squamish and Quesnel has been replaced
with new 85-pound rail, and all rail laid during new construction on the railway
extension has been new 85-pound rail, so that the 85-pound rail is continuous
between North Vancouver and Fort St. John. The branch line from Chetwynd to
Dawson Creek was laid with re-lay from the main line, and this consisted of 85-
pound rail, 80-pound rail, 70-pound rail, and 60-pound rail; however, this rail was
all inspected during construction and is of sufficient strength and quality to take care
of the traffic on this branch line.
During 1961 new rail was re-laid between Mileage 344.7 and Mileage 386.9,
a distance of 42.2 miles.   This rail was new 85-pound Algoma steel.
Ballast
The ballast programme on this railway has gone forward over the past several
years and is now up to standard, and with normal annual maintenance, track conditions should continue to improve.
Ties
In 1960 the company inaugurated a programme of replacing ties with creosote
ties wherever possible, and during 1961, 112,622 creosoted ties were installed.
The number of ties required over the next few years will increase as normal
deterioration takes place on the new extensions where new ties were installed in
1958 and 1959. However, it can be reported the ties on the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway are in a better condition generally than they have been at any time.
Bridges
All bridges on the line were visually inspected and matters discussed with
engineers concerned. A few temporary bridges exist which are to be replaced
when the ground consolidates subsequent to construction. Generally, the bridges
are in good condition over the entire line and maintenance is keeping well ahead of
deterioration.
Conditions at the Cottonwood Bridge reported over previous years have
continued to stabilize, so that it can be reported at this time there is no ground
movement adjacent to the north abutment and the tunnels have been successful in
draining off surface water. Several large trestles were renewed in 1960, and these
were inspected in 1961. These trestles have been constructed with creosoted
timbers, so that their expectant life will be well in excess of thirty years.
Shops and Facilities
A programme of inspection has been set up by the company so that locomotives are given their monthly inspections in North Vancouver, where the Department
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1961 EE 23
inspectors can make the necessary inspections, and the annual or heavy inspections
of locomotives are carried out at Squamish, where the proper facilities now exist.
It can therefore be reported that the mechanical facilities for the maintenance of
locomotives on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway are equal to and are functioning
as well as the same type of facilities on any railway in Canada.
Inspection Communications Department
During 1961 the communications department continued to operate the teletype
system between Vancouver and Fort St. John, including points along the way, and
also to operate its telegram service in the dispatch of commercial communications.
In addition, the communication system is tied in with the North-west Telephone
system and the British Columbia Telephone system as a number of channels are
leased to these companies, so that the relay and repeater stations on the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway are used not only for train dispatch, but also for the communication of commercial messages in a north and south direction within the
Province.
Grade Level Crossings and Crossing Protection
The Pacific Great Eastern Railway's communications department has developed
and perfected a new type of device to operate warnings at level railway crossings.
Four such installations were under way during 1961, and one was completed and
tested at Squamish. The new system utilizes the principle of electronics and
replaces the older system where a low-voltage electrical current was maintained
by the use of batteries over a section of track approximately 1 mile long. The
older system could be tampered with, and when the insulators broke down, the
signal failed to operate. The new system developed by the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway utilizes loops or antennas placed between the rails and beneath the ties
and energized with RF. high-frequency current. The passage of a train over the
loop unbalances a set of sensitive relays so as to initiate the operation of the
standard signal at the highway crossing. The system works exceptionally well and
is in the process of being approved under the Railway Act.
All level crossings were inspected on the railway, and in a number of places
automatic protection is being recommended, and in a number of other cases grade
separation is being recommended.
The over-all condition of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway has continued to
improve during 1961, and the new extensions between North Vancouver and
Squamish and also between Prince George, Fort St. John, and Dawson Creek are
in a good state of repair and being properly maintained.
The microwave communication system is working properly and is being well
maintained, so that it is rendering a good service both to the company and to the
public in general.
BRITISH COLUMBIA ELECTRIC RAILWAY MAIN LINE
Inspecting Engineer's Report
On November 30, 1961, the general annual inspection was made of the above
company's District 3 main line from Mile 0, New Westminster, to Mile 63.92,
Chilliwack. The inspection was made by track motor in company with Mr. A.
Deptford, superintendent, and Mr. W. Alcock, roadmaster.
The main line, passing tracks, and spur lines are all in excellent condition.
Ballast is well placed, and culverts and drainage ditches are well maintained.   The
 EE 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
steel bridge over the Vedder River and all wooden trestles are in good condition.
Locked derails are in place on all side-tracks where required.
It was noted the 85-pound rail completed in 1959 shows little sign of wear,
due in great part to the proper maintenance of track oilers installed on the appropriate sections of track.
A programme in effect to control the growth of weeds and brush has kept the
right-of-way clear and free of such growth.
All locomotives and track vehicles have been equipped with radio communication. At the time of the inspection it was noted that radio contact with the dispatcher in New Westminster was very good at all times.
The diesel-electric locomotives used on District 3 are being very well maintained at the New Westminster maintenance-shop.
At the time of the inspection a survey was made of all highway, farm, and
private crossings over the railway. There are 165 such crossings, and a list of the
data pertaining to each one is on file in the Department.
It would appear there is an excessive number of crossings across Front Street
in New Westminster, some being only a few feet apart. It was noted that this applied
to the C.N.R. and C.P.R. tracks which parallel the B.C. Electric at this location.
All pedestrian crossings should have the standard railway warning-signs
installed.
Several farm crossings as noted on the list have no gates, and this should be
brought to the attention of those concerned and the gates are to be kept closed.
Lefeuver Road crossing, Mileage 28.72, has an obstructed view from the railway in both directions.
Crossings such as at Second Street, Mileage 42.7, being not in use, should be
removed.
Wilson Road crossing, Mileage 55.2, has an obstructed view from the west
approach.
Unsworth crossing, Mileage 59.26, does not have a cross block sign installed.
CANADIAN FOREST PRODUCTS ENGLEWOOD RAILWAY
Inspecting Engineer's Report
On December 20 and 21, 1961, a general inspection was made of the railway
facilities of Canadian Forest Products Limited, Englewood Division. This railway
extends from Beaver Cove past Nimpkish Lake and into the Wasp Lake area, Vancouver Island, a distance of approximately 70 miles. The railway is used for two
purposes—(1) the transportation of logs and (2) the transportation of iron ore.
The main line is laid with 80-pound and 85-pound rail, using creosoted ties and
crushed-rock ballast. Extensive shops and repair depots are in existence at appropriate places on the line, as are loading-works for loading logs and spurs for picking
up iron ore. At the Beaver Cove end of the railway there is a large log-dump and
booming-ground and a railway spur which serves the wharf and storage facilities
for the transportation of iron ore from the railway. This railway utilizes three
1,200-horsepower General Motors diesel-electric locomotives on the main line and
has three smaller diesel hydraulics, approximately 60 tons each, to do switching
and make-up work in the yards. A number of large rail cars are also employed for
the transportation of workmen and passengers from the beach to the various camps
served by the railway. Approximately 400 railroad logging-cars are used and
approximately 100 ore-cars.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1961 EE 25
The inspection was made by track motor from the beach to the top end of the
railway, a distance of 66 miles. The track is generally in very good condition, the
first 33 miles of the main line having recently been ballasted. This ballast is obtained from the iron-ore mine and is stockpiled as waste. However, it is good clean
sharp ballast and ideally suited for railway ballast. From Mileage 33 to the top
end of the railway a number of places have been ballasted with crushed-rock ballast,
but it is intended during 1962 to complete the crushed-rock ballast from Mileage 33
to Mileage 66 and also to apply crushed-rock ballast to various branch lines where
heavy traffice is expected.
Bridges were inspected, and it can be reported the bridges are being properly
maintained by company forces, and they are safe for operation. Guard-rails were
in evidence on all bridges. A new gluelam is being constructed to carry the railway
over a deep canyon, and spans of 110 feet are being used. The designs and plans
for this bridge were approved in the Department, and inspections were made at the
Timber Preservers Limited in New Westminster, where the spans are being constructed from British Columbia fir.
The loading-works used in conjunction with this railway were inspected, and
it can be reported that they are in a safe condition and are being properly maintained and operated. This type of equipment is used to transfer logs or full loads
of logs from logging-trucks and place the full load on railway cars. A load can be
transferred in three to four minutes; consequently, the railway is handling quite
heavy traffic due to the modern methods being used to transport logs to the railway
and to handle them upon arrival.
The log-dump was inspected, and the type of loader used lifts the entire load
from the railway car and places it in the water. This is done to prevent breakage
of logs and destruction of cedar timber.
The shops were inspected and found to be in safe order. The car-shops were
also inspected, and instructions given as to safety and maintenance of air-brakes.
It can be reported that a very well qualified staff is employed in these mechanical
departments of this railway.
Locomotives were inspected, and a check-up made on the working habits of
some of the railway crews. Supervisory personnel were interviewed and dispatching
was checked.
This railway operates in conjunction with a very large system of industrial
roads, and approximately 100 miles of industrial roads were inspected at the time
the railway was inspected. The industrial roads are covered in a separate report,
but it can be reported here that all railway crossings are properly installed and that
all automotive vehicular traffic observe signs, so that proper law and order is the
rule rather than the exception.
In conclusion, it can be reported this operation is well maintained, well handled,
and is in good, safe operating condition.
MacMillan, bloedel and powell river limited
Inspecting Engineer's Report
On December 1, 1961, an inspection was made of the railway and equipment
at the Nanaimo River operation of the above company. The following conditions
were noted.
The new gluelam bridge over the Nanaimo River was inspected, and the footings have been cemented and boxed in as requested. This is in accordance with
good practice and assures safety.   The bridge has been cleaned up and a spray
  DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1961
EE 27
system installed to be used during the summer months. Signs and road planking
were in order on the bridge.
The road into camp is in fair condition, but some slashing requires to be done
where the road crosses the main line of the Comox Logging & Railway Company.
Locomotive No. 1007 was inspected under steam and was found in very good
mechanical condition, having recently been overhauled with new piston rings, valve
rings, boiler repairs, and general running repairs. The engine is being properly
maintained, but should have the number in at least 6-inch letters on each side of
the cab with the initials of the company on each side of the saddle tank.
It was noted that a fish and game club sign was improperly displayed where
the industrial road enters the camp area. This is not in accordance with the regulations as section 26 of the Industrial Transportation Act requires that signs be displayed declaring the industrial road to be a privately owned industrial road, and if
people are permitted to enter, they must govern themselves in accordance with the
rules and regulations set forth governing such roads. The fish and game club sign
would give the impression that the club was the body governing the road and not
the company. (Recently a letter has been filed in this office stating the sign has been
removed.)
The log-books were checked, and it was found they were not being kept up to
date.   This section of the regulations is to be strictly adhered to in future.
COMOX LOGGING & RAILWAY COMPANY
Inspecting Engineer's Report
On November 15, 1961, the annual track inspection of the above railway
between Ladysmith and Nanaimo Lakes, a distance of 20 miles, was carried out.
Mr. Gordon Naylor, superintendent, accompanied me during the inspection. The
inspection was made via track motor.
This railway is used to transport logs from Nanaimo Lakes to Ladysmith and
is used jointly with MacMillan, Bloedel and Powell River Limited to transport logs
from the Nanaimo River operation to the E. & N. siding at Ladysmith. MacMillan,
Bloedel and Powell River Limited uses two steam-locomotives for motive power,
and the Comox Logging & Railway Company uses a diesel-electric locomotive with
three steam-locomotives as stand-by power. The Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway
operates jointly with Comox Logging & Railway Company over the Ladysmith
yards and the log-dump section of the railway. This is done pursuant to an approved
agreement.
Generally the road-bed and tracks are in very good condition. Ballast has been
maintained and tie-plates are in evidence over most of the railway. A number of
tie-plates are on order, so the entire road will be tie-plated on the main line. Eighty-
pound rail is used on the main line. The rail is in quite good condition, and spare
rail has been procured for replacement on curves.
All bridges were inspected and found to be in good condition, heavy maintenance having been done over the last year.
The steel bridge over Nanaimo River has had new south abutment crib walls
poured in concrete and the south pier has been reinforced with concrete. The
bridge has been completely painted. The ties are in good condition, and generally
the bridge is satisfactory.
Other bridges have had piles and stringers renewed and are in good condition.
The new loading-works was inspected and found to be in good working order,
no repairs being necessary. This loading-works replaces the original steam loading-
works, which is now being dismantled.
 EE 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
A new reload has been installed 1 mile south of the new loading-works. This
replaces the reload which was originally situated at Second Lake. This reload was
inspected and found to be in order.
The following minor repairs are necessary:—
Repair switch-stand at Mileage 6.
Check packing in switch-points and frogs at various locations on the
railway.
Sectionmen normally put up flags to indicate they are working.    In one
instance, flags were not displayed.    This matter should be brought
to the attention of the appropriate section foreman.
The railway crossings were inspected, and repairs are required as set forth in
the list on file in the Department.
AERIAL TRAMWAYS
The activity in aerial tramways during 1961 exceeded anything which has taken
place during past years. Five aerial tramways were constructed or under construction by the end of 1961. These included T-bars and overhead chair-lifts to serve
winter playgrounds in maintain areas. The largest project was the Tod Mountain
aerial tramway near Kamloops. This tramway is reputed to be the longest double-
chair aerial tramway in the world and certainly is the longest aerial tramway in
North America. Its length is 9,403 feet, with a vertical rise of over 3,000 feet.
The lift travels at 500 feet per minute and is powered by a 300-horsepower diesel
engine driving through a torque converter. The lift was officially tested on November 13, 1961, when the Honourable the Minister of Commercial Transport officially
opened the lift for public use.
This lift was engineered in Vancouver by Robert McLellan, P.Eng., and was
constructed by the Murray-Latta Machine Company Limited, the entire project
being designed and built wholly within British Columbia. The area served on Tod
Mountain is an excellent ski resort. The ski-ing terrain, being alpine meadow with
powdered snow, is considered the ultimate in ski-ing circles.
A new aerial tramway was opened in December at Apex Mountain, in the
vicinity of Penticton, to serve ski-ing in that area. The construction was finished
before the snow fell in the area, and it was inspected late in the year.
The Silver King aerial tramway, in the vicinity of Nelson, was inspected, and
the aerial tramway was found to be in excellent condition. This aerial tramway
serves an excellent ski-ing area in that locality. A new aerial tramway is being constructed in Manning Park. This aerial tramway was built in France and was imported and will be in operation early in 1962. AH engineering plans were approved
by the Department.
A new aerial tramway was under construction during late 1961 on Seymour
Mountain. This aerial tramway was designed by Robert McLellan, P.Eng., Vancouver, and is being constructed by the Murray-Latta Machine Company Limited
in Vancouver. Its design is similar to that used on Tod Mountain. A new type of
tower is being used, and special clips which have been approved by the Department
will be used. This aerial tramway will serve a very good ski-ing area, and it will
be operated under the approval of the Department of Recreation and Conservation.
A T-bar aerial tramway is under construction on Grouse Mountain. This
aerial tramway is similar to the one being built at Mount Seymour, and is being
constructed by local firms in Vancouver. This aerial tramway will be a welcome
addition to the ski-ing facilities on Grouse Mountain.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1961 EE 29
Inspections were made of the Hollyburn aerial tramway during the year. No
accidents were reported, other than minor difficulties normally encountered during
such an operation.
In 1955 engineers from the Department recommended that certain changes
be made to the Red Mountain aerial tramway at Rossland. These changes were
necessary in order that the aerial tramway would meet the requirements of the
British Columbia regulations; consequently, an improvement programme initiated
at that time has gone forward, so that in 1961 the programme was completed and
the Red Mountain aerial tramway now meets with the requirements of the British
Columbia regulations as to its construction and operation. Ski tows in the Red
Mountain area were inspected and certified.
At Kamloops the Department of National Defence operates an aerial tramway
for purposes of national defence (details of which we are unable to publish in this
Report). This aerial tramway was constructed under the Department's inspection
a number of years ago, and annual inspections are made and certificates issued.
It can be reported this aerial tramway is in good condition and is giving excellent
service.
The microwave system operated by the British Columbia Telephone Company
utilizes an aerial tramway in the Dog Mountain area near Hope. This aerial tramway is unique. There is one span which is over 2,000 feet in length, and persons
riding the tramway are several hundred feet above the ground. The tramway is not
for public use, but is used solely to serve the microwave station on the top of Dog
Mountain.   This aerial tramway was inspected and certified during the year.
The big aerial tramway at Kemano was inspected and certified. This tramway
was used during construction of the power-tunnel and power-house at Kemano,
where the Aluminum Company of Canada operates its large hydro-electric plant.
The capacity of this aerial tramway is 28 tons, and several years ago engineers from
the Department were instrumental in the design of a safety brake. At times as many
as seventy-five workmen are transported from the bottom up to the 2,600-foot level.
A cursory inspection was made of an aerial tramway at Boston Bar, which is
operated by the Department of Highways of the Province of British Columbia.
Recently this aerial tramway was redesigned by Robert McLellan, P.Eng., Vancouver, who asked an engineer from this Department to make a cursory inspection with
the idea the aerial tramway should be taken over by the Department of Commercial
Transport in so far as inspection and certification is concerned. This aerial tramway transports automobiles and passengers from one side of the Fraser River to the
other. It is in good condition and could be certified, as it would meet all the requirements of the regulations in its present condition.
An aerial tramway has been constructed near Hudson Hope to facilitate the
construction of the new Peace River dam. This aerial tramway will be operating
in the early part of 1962, but to date inspectors have not been available to make the
necessary inspection.
During the year, engineers from the Department worked and co-operated with
electrical firms in Vancouver on the design and approval of electrical safety devices
for use in the operation of aerial tramways. Some of the devices have met the
Department's approval and are being used.
PIPE-LINES
The year 1961 saw great activity in the pipe-line industry. Not only was the
Trans-Prairie oil-line completed in the Peace River area, but a major big-inch line
was constructed from Taylor to Kamloops—entirely within British Columbia—
 EE 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
NATURAL GAS
TRANSMISSION
PIPELINES
WESTCOAST TRANSMISSION
GAS TRUNK LINE OF B.C.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1961
EE 31
CRUDE OIL
TRANSMISSION
PIPELINES
  BRITISH   COLUMBIA
OIL TRANSMISSION
WESTERN PACIFIC PRODUCTS
AND CRUDE OIL PIPELINE
 EE 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
a distance of 505 miles. The company which owns this pipe-line is known as
" Western Pacific Products and Crude Oil Pipelines Ltd." In addition to this, a
major oil pipe-line from the Blueberry Field was constructed during the year, a distance of 78 miles from the Blueberry Feld, situated north-west of Fort St. John, to
Taylor, where the crude oil is delivered into a tank-farm and injected into the new
Western Pacific line to Kamloops, where it joins the Trans-Mountain line and is
transported to the refineries in the Vancouver area. The new pipe-lines have tank-
farms at each end of the line so as to accumulate oil for batching in transmission,
and include a number of pumping-stations which are used to facilitate the movement
of the oil over the long distances involved.
The construction of the pipe-lines has necessitated a stepped-up programme
in inspection. All the plans and specifications, after being approved, are given to
the inspectors so that they can inspect the line in the field and apply pressure tests
to assure that the line is safe for operation and that the public is being protected.
Both of the above major pipe-lines were rush jobs, as an attempt was made by both
companies to have the lines in the ground before the freeze-up; consequently, the
inspectors were required to work around the clock on the inspections. Generally
speaking, the tests went well, but after the freeze-up it was necessary to test the
Western Pacific line with crude oil and to test the B.C. Oil Transmission line from
Boundary Lake with natural gas obtained from local gas wells. It should be noted
that where crude oil or diesel fuel is used as a test medium, additional difficulties
are involved, so that the inspection work becomes quite complicated. The gas tests
on the B.C. Oil Transmission line were conducted under extremely difficult conditions. During the filling of the line with gas—a distance of 65 miles—the temperature was in the neighbourhood of 30 to 50 degrees below zero, and when the tests
commenced the temperature rose to 40 degrees above zero, which caused expansion
of the gas and a considerable change in test pressures. The line was under test at
pressures in excess of 1,085 p.s.i. for a period of twenty-four hours. The longest
section of pipe under one test in this case was 65 miles, which is an unusually long
section to be tested at one time.
Tank-farms were inspected to make sure that they conformed with the Fire
Marshal's regulations, as all plans for tank-farms, in addition to being approved by
the Department, are also approved by the Fire Marshal. Inspectors of this Department, however, have made all field inspections.
In the operation of the oil-lines, a radio dispatch system is used. One of these
systems has been set up at Taylor so that all stations on the line and all mobile
equipment is in contact with the dispatcher at all times. These installations were
inspected.
During 1961 increased activity was evidenced in the entire Peace River area in
the construction of natural-gas pipe-lines. The B.C. Gas Trunk Line has been considerably extended, as have also the lines of various other companies listed in the
table on page 40. Most of the gas-lines were tested by using compressed air as a
medium; however, in the cold weather gas was used as a test medium in a number
of cases.
The British Columbia regulations under the Pipe-lines Act adopted the A.S.A.
B 31 code for natural-gas pipe-lines. This code is standard in most parts of the world
and provides specifications for tests under all conditions; that is, during cold weather
where water cannot be used as a medium for hydrostatic test, the code stipulates that
compressed air may be used. This necessitates the use of large air-compressors with
inherent danger of explosion. The inspectors in all cases check reservoirs and facilities when air tests are used. Where air tests are not used, natural gas is used from
 ■' .' ■ ■  .-   ,■■'■■   ■'
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1961 EE 33
natural-gas wells so that lines may be pressured up to 1,500 p.s.i., and the lines held
at this pressure for twenty-four hours during the time the tests are being made. The
disadvantage of using air or natural gas as a medium is when a failure occurs the
line explodes and is ripped out of the ground for several hundred feet. When
natural gas is used, the explosion often ignites, with the inherent dangers involved.
Consequently, water is used whereever possible, but it is impossible to use water
when the temperatures are as low as 20 to 50 degrees below zero.
The differential in well pressure in various fields requires that compressor-
stations be installed to boost the pressure up to that carried in the Westcoast
Transmission line. The compressor-station at Kobss is a several-million-dollar
installation. Three 2,000-horsepower internal-combustion engines are installed in
this station, making a total of 6,000 horse-power available for compressing the gas.
These engines drive the compressors to boost the pressure of the gas from the wells
from 150 p.s.i. up to 700 or 1,000 p.s.i., depending upon the requirements of the
load. This station includes very large pressure vessels and treating plants to remove
condensate from the natural gas. In some cases the condensate is pumped back
into the gas-line or pumped into an oil-line to adjust the viscosity of the oil. In
other cases, condensate and unwanted gases are flared in a flare-pit. The inspection
of compressor-stations, therefore, not only involves pressure testing of pipe-lines,
but also the pressure testing of large pressure vessels, gas fuel systems, boilers,
emergency equipment, and large internal-combustion engines. Safety devices, such
as safety-valves and blow-out plates, are inspected and tested, and emergency equipment, safety-gates, and emergency shut-down stations are checked by the inspectors.
The year 1961 has seen increased activity, especially in the Milligan Creek and
Wild Mint areas of the Peace River District. The increased drilling programme can
be attributed to the installation of the Trans-Prairie Pipelines in this area. Ground
transportation has therefore been a problem. In order to provide ground transportation, the Union Oil Company of Canada has constructed an industrial road from
the Beatton River area to the northern end of the Milligan Creek area, a distance of
approximately 64 miles. The road in constructed to secondary-highway standards.
The right-of-way is 100 feet wide with a 24-foot gravel top. Bridges and structures
are built to highway standards, and while this is an industrial road, owned and
operated by the Union Oil Company of Canada, there is little doubt this road will
ultimately become a public highway to serve residents and settlers who will move
into the area.
Considerable gas drilling activity has taken place during the year in the Fort
Nelson area, and it is expected that during 1962 some progress will be made on the
proposed pipe-line from Chetwynd to Fort Nelson.
The B.C. Electric gas transmission-lines in the Lower Mainland area were
inspected during the year, and additions and extensions were tested during construction. The pipe-line to feed the Burrard Thermo Plant was inspected, and considerable extensions and improvements were made at the Huntingdon Metering
Station, where odorant tanks were added.  These were also inspected and certified.
On the Magna Pipeline project, where gas is to be transmitted from the Mainland to Vancouver Island via flexible undersea piping, meetings have been held with
respect to engineering problems involved, but progress reports have not been submitted.   It is expected this project should get under way in late 1962 or early 1963.
  Western Pacific Products & Crude Oil Pipelines Ltd. line near Quesnel.
 Blueberry to Taylor crude-oil pipe-line welding operation.
 5555 55   555
«
 Six-inch crossing of the Beatton River east of Fort St. lohn boundary to Taylor.
 Western Pacific Products & Crude Oil Pipelines Ltd. pipe-line being laid across
the Fraser River at Shelley.
 EE 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Annual Inspections under the Pipe-lines Act
Miles of new pipe-line inspected and tested  734
Number of pipe-line inspections  360
Compressor-stations inspected  3
Pumping-stations inspected  6
Accidents investigated on pipe-lines  	
Number of gas distribution and metering stations inspected  7
Number of tank-farms inspected  3
Number of new pipe-line projects approved  48
Number of pipe-line crossings of railways approved  25
Number of pipe-line crossings of highways approved  139
Number of pipe-line crossings of other pipe-lines approved  6
Power-line crossings over pipe-line right-of-way-approved  10
Pipe-line hearings attended  3
Survey as to relocation of pipe-lines under the Act  2
River crossings of pipe-lines approved and inspected  12
Approval of sets of plans and specifications for pipe-line projects  48
Approval of company pipe-line testing procedures  12
Investigation of pipe-line problems involving subdivisions  4
Certificates issued under the Pipe-lines Act authorizing the construction of new pipe-lines  20
Certificates of inspection issued under the Pipe-lines Act authorizing
the operation of new pipe-line projects  31.
Following is a list of pipe-lines approved, installed, and tested during 1961
Name of Company
Oil or
Gas
Project
No.
Pipe-line Location
Amerada Petroleum Corporation 	
Gas
1090
Boundary Lake Field.
British Columbia Electric Co. Ltd—	
,,
1100
Burrard Regulator Station.
,,
1097
Ferguson Road Regulator Station.
1098
Second Avenue and Boundary Road  Regulator Station.
„
1092
Dow Chemical lateral, Tilbury.
British Columbia Oil Transmission Co. Ltd..
Oil
1103
Blueberry-Taylor.
Gas
1113
1115
Dome-Bubbles extension.
„
1093
Dome-Laprise Creek extension
„
1117
Dome-Laprise Creek No. 1 extension.
Gas Trunk Line of British Columbia Ltd	
,,
1099
North Jedney-Beg gathering system.
,,
1075
Boundary Lake retest.
,,
1101
Buick Creek Compressor Station No. 4.
„
1102
Kobes Compressor Station No. 3.
Oil
Cert. 62
Boundary Lake flow-lines.
Cert. 62
Gas
llll
1091
Jedney gathering system.
„
1089
East Laprise extension.
,,
1087
Boundary Lake extension.
1114
Sun Oil Co.                 -	
Oil
1112
1109
Blueberry gathering system.
Gas
1106
1110
Nig Creek extension.
,,
1096
Boundary Lake to Amerada tie-in.
,,
1094
Nig Creek extension.
»>
1095
Buick Creek extension.
„
1080
Buick Creek gathering system.
,,
1081
Nig Creek gathering system.
Oil
1116
Taylor tank-farm to Western Pacific pipe-line.
,,
1108
Boundary Lake gathering system.
,,
1071
Taylor to Beatton River (retest)
Triad Oil Co -	
Cert. 62
Boundary Lake flow-lines.
Gas
1082
Synder Creek gathering system.
Western Pacific Products & Crude Oil Pipe
Oil
1104
Taylor-Kamloops, four pumping-stations.
line Ltd.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT,  1961 EE 41
INDUSTRIAL ROADS
Industrial roads continued to expand throughout British Columbia during the
year 1961. Not only were logging-roads and mining-roads extended, but new
industrial roads have been built to serve the oil-drilling and pipe-line industries in
the northern part of British Columbia. In some cases, quite large and involved
bridges have been constructed on industrial roads, and these bridges have been
approved in design by Departmental engineers and inspectors in the field.
The use of gluelam girders in both industrial roads and logging-bridges has
been initiated during 1960 and 1961. At Squamish a gluelam girder bridge was
installed to serve the industrial road of Empire Mills Limited. The plans for this
bridge were approved in the Department after calculations and design were carefully checked.
In a number of cases at Nanaimo Lakes and in the Englewood area, railway
logging-bridges also accommodate the passage of heavy-duty logging-trucks so that
a bridge is used jointly by the railway and the industrial road. Gluelam spans which
have been used in this type of construction have proven very successful.
The industrial roads in the Englewood area were inspected during the latter
part of 1961. One hundred miles of industrial road are used jointly with a railway
which extends for a distance of 63 miles from the beach to the logging area in the
Woss Lake and Nimpkish Lake districts. Approximately forty level crossings of the
railway are involved, and these were all inspected.
It was found that employees in the area own and operate their own automobiles
over the industrial roads with the consent of the company, and each automobile
carries a licence-plate which is issued by the company free of charge. These are not
British Columbia licence-plates, but are used to identify the vehicles in accordance
with the regulations pursuant to the Industrial Transportation Act. All drivers are
required to have drivers' licences and also air tickets where necessary. The company
keeps a very close check on traffic as the road is used by employees of other companies. The same arrangement is in force in the Port Hardy area, where industrial
roads owned by companies are used by the general public.
The public is not allowed on certain roads when heavy trucks are hauling, but
in most areas no restrictions are imposed after the hours of hauling.
Inspectors from the Department continued to conduct examinations and certify
operators on all mining and logging roads which could be reached during the year.
In a number of cases vehicles were taken off the road until necessary repairs were
made to the safety appliances, and in other cases wharves and loading-works were
required to be repaired.
Air-brake Lectures and Examinations Held in the Field
Number Number
Attending Examined
Kamloops  110 45
Victoria (R.C.M.P. highway patrol)    16
Franklin River (safety talk)  100
Terrace    50 25
Nelson (R.C.M.P. patrol)    18 3
Kelowna    61 8
Vernon    62 42
Nanaimo (B.C. Vocational School)  59 54
Vancouver (Burnaby Vocational School)  26 26
  department of commercial transport, 1961 ee 43
Annual Inspections under the Industrial Transportation Act
Logging-trucks inspected  382
Gravel-trucks inspected  35
Crummies inspected  93
Miscellaneous vehicles inspected   19
Highway vehicles inspected with Royal Canadian Mounted Police.... 65
Number of new logging-trucks put into service  94
Air-brake lectures  212
Logging-truck operators certified  325
Lectures to Royal Canadian Mounted Police  3
Royal Canadian Mounted Police examined and certified in air-brake
operation  26
Air-brake lecture classes held in Vancouver for students of Vocational Curriculum Development Division, Burnaby  2
Students examined  26
Air-brake lecture classes held for students of the B.C. Vocational
School, Nanaimo    3
Students examined  62
Lecture classes held for mechanics for Department of Education  6
Mechanics examined and certified for Department of Education  14
Accidents investigated on logging-truck roads  4
Fatal accidents on logging-truck roads    1
Accidents investigated on highways for Royal Canadian Mounted
Police  3
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1962
360-462-9217
 

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