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DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1961 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1962

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1961
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1962
  J
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual Report of the Department
of Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1961.
Victoria, B.C.
W. D. BLACK,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
  Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs
Victoria, B.C., January 26, 1962.
The Honourable W. D. Black,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Annual Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1961.
The 1961 municipal assessment rolls of cities, districts, towns, and villages
within the Province contain assessed values of land and improvements totalling
$3,717,472,643. This is an increase of $148,232,508 over 1960 values. While
the rate of increase in assessed values of land and improvements has decreased
during the past year, the municipal tax base continues to grow. The increase in
assessed values for 1961 may be attributed to new incorporations and to new construction rather than to the effect of the assessment equalization programme. The
increase in the municipal tax base over the last few years is indicated by the following table:—
Growth in Combined Assessed Values and Taxes in Municipalities
of British Columbia
Assessed Values
Assessed Values Actually Taxed
Tax
Revenues
Year
All Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
1954    .
1955.         ... _	
1956	
$1,625,968,580
2,108,458,383
2,432,313,912
2,765,873,099
3,047,766,854
3,327,118,937
3,569,240,135
3,717,472,643
$1,321,811,326
1,742,081,045
2,035,542,999
2,315,295,651
2,569,271,281
2,805,547,214
3,015,844,390
3,142,969,534
$842,093,330
1,350,856,875
1,586,627,603
1,854,677,597
2,053,934,444
2,248,145,499
2,417,467,198
2,508,401,082
$842,093,330
1,044,040,275
1,238,390,209
1,415,935,241
1,562,991,738
1,721,746,974
1,843,967,404
1,920,101,216
$53,784,569
59,112,580
66,418,657
1957	
1958   .
1959	
1960.	
196L	
78,811,653
92,429,190
104,819,992
116,857,478
129,000,0001
1 Estimated.
The total assessed values actually taxed for school purposes in 1961 within the
Province amounted to $3,206,795,417. Of this total, $2,508,401,082, or approximately 80 per cent, represented values in municipalities.
During the year, municipal borrowings were approved by the Inspector of
Municipalities in the total amount of $15,030,152. The majority of this borrowing
was supported by debenture issues, with the remainder in a very small amount being
financed through bank loans. This is a decrease in borrowing of $997,636 compared
with borrowing approved during the previous year. Again, as in 1960, the continuing high interest rates on borrowed money were an important factor. However, it is
significant to note that there appears to be a firming trend in the bond market in so
far as municipal borrowings are concerned. Bond sales of the last few months indicated a levelling of the coupon rate on a generally lower plane than that prevailing
at the end of last year. It is noted that the bond market for municipals improved
during the year, but whether this trend will continue is difficult to say. The guarantee
by the Province of principal and interest payments of certain municipal debenture
issues tended to keep coupon rates to a minimum. The amount and purpose for
which new borrowings were approved are set out below. Debentures issued by the
City of Vancouver do not require the approval of the Inspector of Municipalities
and therefore are not included in this table.
 AA 6
british columbia
Distribution of Authorized Debenture Debt by Purposes
for the Year 1961
Purpose
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Local
Districts
Total
$2,108,000
1,769,505
875,071
1,398,219
1,340,000
36,000
110,000
60,000
$1,283,000
1,304,521
1,896,548
1,088,288
465,000
418,251
149,000
$291,000
57,000
$3,682,000
$321,000
3,452,026
2,771,619
33,000
2,519,507
	
1,805,000
27,000
454,000
Protection to persons and property.-	
286,000
60,000
Totals 	
$7,696,795
$6,604,608
$348,000
$381,000
$15,030,152
Total debenture debt as at December 31, 1960, of all of the municipalities of
the Province, including the City of Vancouver, is summarized below.
Total Authorized Debenture Debt as at December 31,
1960
Issued, Sold,
and Outstanding
Unissued
and Unsold
Total
$45,696,525
$6,204,758
5,840,587
20,700
227,000
$51,901,283
48,316,807
2,359,231
6,974,172
58,000
54,157,394
Towns   - -  	
2,379,931
7,201,172
58,000
Totals ..:  	
$103,404,735
151,409,193
$12,293,045
580,000
$115,697,780
151,989,193
$254,813,928
$12,873,045
$267,686,973
The Department of Finance of the Federal Government has advised the Department that as at January 1, 1962, all semi-annual repayments have been made on
loans authorized under the provisions of the Municipalities Improvements Assistance
Act, 1938. The total amount outstanding on these loans is $189,422.31, comprising one city, $13,846.94; two district municipalities, $45,918.94; one village,
$5,192.59; one improvement district incorporated under the Water Act, $13,570.01;
and the Greater Vancouver Water District, $110,893.83. The principal amounts of
all loans authorized under the Municipalities Improvements Assistance Act, 1938,
to British Columbia corporations totalled $2,114,759.70.
During the past year the municipalities have continued to exercise their privilege
of applying to the Province for a guarantee of the payments of principal and interest
on debenture issues under the provisions of the Municipalities Assistance Act.
Guaranteed debenture issues in the amount of $8,620,821 were approved last year,
as follows:—
Cities (excluding Vancouver)  $2,002,000
Districts     1,434,821
Towns  57,000
Villages  82,000
Local districts  	
$3,575,821
City of Vancouver     5,045,000
Total
$8,620,821
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1961
AA 7
Debenture issues guaranteed by the Province now represent a large percentage
of the over-all borrowing of the municipalities. A summary of the amount of the
debentures guaranteed by the Province under the Municipalities Assistance Act
and under the Village Municipalities Assistance Act outstanding as at December 31,
1961, is indicated below:—
Outstanding Debentures Guaranteed by the Province Pursuant to Village Municipalities Assistance Act and Municipalities Assistance
Act as at December 31, 1961.
i                    '      ;
Village
Municipalities
Assistance
Act
Municipalities
Assistance
Act
Total
Cities (excluding Vancouver)   _ \,	
$554,000
347,000
2,382,500
3,103,250
$12,913,000
8,170,331
594,000
2,264,000
58,000
$13,467,000
8,517,331
2,976,500
5,367,250
58,000
$6,386,750
$23,999,331
14,373,000
2,182,000
189,000
23,380,000
895,000
$30,386,081
14,373,000
2,182,000
189,000
	
23,380,000
895,000
Totals   |	
$6,386,750
$65,018,331
$71,405,081
The liability represented by guaranteed debenture issues is supported by the
revenues of self-liquidating utilities or enterprises amounting to an appraised value
well in excess of $100,000,000. These debts are also a direct obligation of the
municipality.
A number of municipalities during the year took advantage of the sewer
financing assistance programme of the Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation
made available under the provisions of the National Housing Act. This programme
offered lower interest rates than those currently prevailing and debt cancellation
benefits to those municipalities engaged in extensive sewage-disposal schemes. The
programme is proving to be of financial importance to the municipalities.
Short-term capital borrowings for capital projects amounted to $402,316 during 1961. These borrowings are subject to the approval of the Inspector of
Municipalities and are usually financed through the banking institutions. This
method of borrowing is of considerable importance to the municipalities, and many
have made full use of their borrowing powers in this respect. Short-term capital
loans do not require the assent of the owner-electors.
We have continued to maintain a very close watch over the debenture debt
load of municipalities as well as other aspects of municipal finance. Chart 1
reflects the trend of total debenture debt for all municipalities for British Columbia
during the last decade against the trend of other aspects of municipal financial ability.
It may be noted that all factors have increased faster than the rate of population
growth. However, debenture debt has increased at a slower rate than assessments,
revenues, or total personal income.
As indicated, in 1950 total debenture debt was approximately two and one-half
times total revenue, and in 1960 the ratio had declined to one and one-half times.
As a comparison, the total debenture debt of all municipalities in Canada in 1956
was two times total revenues. This ratio had increased to two and one-half times
by the end of 1960.   The rate of increase of debenture debt in British Columbia
 AA 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
municipalities declined slightly in 1960 over 1959, and, in general, we may conclude
that the debenture debt load of the municipalities has not increased unduly in relation to their ability to carry it.
From information available in the Department, we have prepared the following
summary indicating the investment in capital assets by class of municipality and by
source of funds for the years shown. It is noted that the percentage of new money—
that is, obtained by borrowing—was approximately 66 per cent of the total expended
in 1956, 1957, and 1958, rose to 70 per cent in 1959 and to 73 per cent in 1960.
Investment in Capital Assets by Source of Funds
Revenue
Reserves
Borrowing
Total
1956
Cities (except Vancouver)	
Vancouver  	
Districts	
Villages  	
Totals	
$2,416,035
285,592
2,181,273
682,579
$1,452,073
478,717
712,49,1
15,000
$2,262,189
5,671,430
6,828,601
1,117,000
$6,130,297
6,435,739
9,722,365
1,814,579
$5,565,479    |    $2,658,281    | $15,879,220   <| $24,102,980
1957
Cities (except Vancouver)..
Vancouver	
Districts 	
Towns   —	
Villages	
$2,732,291
391,238
3,019,426
1,085,828
$1,688,799
713,895
271,554
5,000
9,736
$3,783,773
5,987,795
7,195,849
2,984,000
$8,204,863
7,092,928
10,486,829
5,000
4,079,564
Totals..
$7,228,783    |    $2,688,984    | $19,951,417    | $29,869,184
1958
Cities (except Vancouver)—
Vancouver	
Districts— 	
Towns  	
Villages  	
$3,072,304
339,792
3,461,257
173,047
786,205
$1,565,634
402,865
363,562
10,000
33,100
$4,063,014
8,227,656
6,579,413
413,000
762,000
Totals.
$7,832,605    |    $2,375,161    [ $20,045,083
1959
Cities (except Vancouver)	
Vancouver .	
Districts	
Towns  	
Villages	
$3,069,290
265,126
3,599,951
97,258
906,001
$1,020,512
2,259,622
1,351,124
12,000
50,338
$6,798,394
16,106,007
4,975,525
2,142,000
$8,700,952
8,970,313
10,404,232
596,047
1,581,305
$30,252,849
$10,888,1%
18,630,755
9,926,600
109,258
3,098,339
Totals.
$7,937,626    |    $4,693,596    [ $30,021,926    |  $42,653,148
1960
Cities (except Vancouver)	
Vancouver  —
Districts— 	
Towns   	
Villages  	
$3,283,052
172,971
3,361,857
101,113
1,099,915
Totals..
$8,018,908
$852,714
919,364
800,750
4,000
57,130
$2,633,958
$9,064,263
12,795,993
6,182,525
781,000
$28,823,781
$13,200,029
13,888,328
10,345,132
105,113
1,938,045
$39,476,647
Again, as in 1960, I am pleased to report that there was no necessity to hold
public inquiries into applications for certificates of approval to municipal money
by-laws.
Fourteen municipalities were granted certificates of self-liquidation in respect
of six utility systems and nine sewer systems during the year under review. Some
of these certificates were provisional certificates which will be replaced by subsisting
certificates after proof of actual operation as self-liquidating utilities or enterprises.
To date there have been seventy-nine certificates of self-liquidation issued to fifty-
three municipalities, some having been granted more than one certificate. The
majority of municipalities have now established their utilities and other enterprises
on a self-liquidating basis, which relieves the general mill rate of the provision of
debt charges, operating, maintenance, and replacement costs.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1961 AA 9
Reserve funds for various purposes at the end of 1960 amounted to
$13,853,039, which is an increase over 1959 of $2,452,334, or approximately 18
per cent. These funds are available for capital expenditures subject to Governmental
approval.
As of April 1, 1961, the jurisdiction of the Pollution-control Board was
extended to include the complete drainage basin of the Columbia River located
within Canada. This increased substantially the area for which the Board is responsible. During the year the Board held eight meetings and granted eight permits.
In addition, the Board undertook a familiarization tour of the East and West
Kootenay s.
The Minister of Municipal Affairs' annual shield awards to the municipalities
having the highest percentage turnout of electors were again awarded for 1961.
This is the second year of this award. The municipalities receiving the awards for
the December, 1960, elections in the three categories were: Cities and towns—
Revelstoke, with a turnout of 72.60 per cent; districts—Kitimat, with a turnout of
78.23 per cent; and villages—Stewart, with a turnout of 82.29 per cent. Stewart
also won the village award in 1959. While no mention is made of the municipalities
which placed high on the percentage turnout of electors, it should be noted that,
generally speaking, the percentage of voters exercising their franchise is a considerable figure in most of the municipalities. It is hoped that these annual awards
will continue to encourage interest in civic affairs. The prompt returns of the
percentage vote to the Department indicates a keen competitive interest in the
awards.
The extension course in municipal administration being offered by the Faculty
of Commerce and Business Administration of the University of British Columbia
under the sponsorship of the Department continues to maintain its popularity. The
enrolment for the 1961/62 course-year is made up of forty-nine first-year students,
thirty-two second-year students, twenty-seven third-year students, and twenty-five
fourth-year students. Since the commencement of the municipal administration
course in 1952, 108 students have completed the four-year course in either municipal administration or municipal finance, or both. The annual course institute was
again held at the University at the end of the year. The results of the 1961 examinations were as follows: Twenty-seven students completed first year, twenty-five
students completed second year, twenty-four students completed third year, and
twenty-two students completed fourth year.
During the year the Board of Examiners granted eighteen certificates of proficiency, bringing to 121 the number now issued to municipal officials. Six senior
certificates in administration and eight senior certicates in finance were issued during
1961.    Four junior certificates were also issued.
Accompanied by three senior officials of the Department, I attended the
fifty-fifth Annual Conference on Municipal Finance, held in Seattle, Wash., during
the period of May 21 to 25, 1961. This conference is sponsored by the Municipal
Finance Officers' Association of the United States and Canada, an organization
incorporated for the purpose of improving methods of public finance at the local
level. The quality of material presented was of the highest calibre, and the knowledge and experience gained in this closer contact with the municipal finance officers
from all parts of the continent will, I am sure, prove of great value.
The Municipal Officers' Association held its twenty-second annual conference
in Victoria on June 5, 6, and 7, 1961. As in previous years, the conference was
a success and much was gained during the three-day session. Several important
addresses were given and panel discussions on a wide range of subjects were heard.
 AA 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Fifty-eighth Annual Convention of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities was held at Vernon on September 27th to 29th, inclusive. Attendance at
this conference gives Departmental officials an opportunity to better understand the
needs and thinking of the elected representatives of local government.
During the year two new municipalities were incorporated. These were the
Villages of Masset and Aennofield. Masset is the first community in the Queen
Charlotte Islands to be incorporated as a municipality. The incorporation of the
small outlying communities is to be commended and encouraged. The Village of
Aennofield is a residential community adjacent to the Town of Fort St. John.
A number of communities throughout the Province showed interest in incorporation, and the staff made visits to some of these to address public meetings and to
advise incorporation committees on the procedures leading to incorporation.
The Village of North Kamloops changed status to a town during 1961. No
other changes of status took place during the year, although from a study of the
compilation of the 1961 Census figures it appears that there could be further changes
in status in the near future.
The total population of the municipalities of the Province including the City
of Vancouver was 1,284,544 according to the Dominion Census. This is an increase
of 172,732, or 15.5 per cent, over the 1956 population. A part of this increase
may be attributed to new incorporations and extensions of the area of the existing
municipalities. The breakdown of the population between the various classes of
municipalities as a comparison with the 1956 population is as follows:—
Population Percentage Increase, 1956 and 1961
1956 Census
1961 Census
Population
Increase
Percentage
Increase
Cities 	
635,712
406,525
13,700
55,875
680,171
519,990
17,672
66,711
44,459
113,465
3,972
10,836
7.0
27.9
Towns —    	
Villages     —  	
29.0
19.4
Totals  .                              	
1,111,812
1,284,544
172,732
15.5
During the year, extensions of boundaries by way of supplementary Letters
Patent were granted to seven municipalities. The following table shows the increase
in area as well as the increase in population:—
Adjustments in Area and Increases in Population, 1961
Municipality
Area (in Acres)
Before
Extension
of Area
Contained
in Area
Added
After
Extension
of Area
Population
Before
Extension
of Area
Contained
in Area
Added
After
Extension
of Area
Cities
Nelson	
Port Alberni	
Prince George..
Kinnaird	
Ladysmith..
Lillooet	
Lumby	
Villages
1,106.00
2,342.00
5,014.30
1,179.952
2,201.00
280.00
881.00
786.00
480.00
62.75
12.47
824.00
26.00
1.20
1,892.00
2,822.00
5,077.05
1,192.422
2,044.00
306.00
882.20
7,226
10,373
10,563
1,305
2,082
1,083
786
2,774
300
1,236
8
19
10,000
10,673
10,563
1,305
3,318
1,091
805
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1961
AA 11
Extensions of boundaries have been steadily increasing in number during the
past few years. This indicates a growing desire and interest on the part of the residents of fringe areas to participate in and to benefit from the amenities offered
through local government.
In addition to the above, the boundary of the District of Coldstream was
adjusted to conform with surveyed lot lines.
A large number of local areas were established during the year under the provisions of the Local Services Act. All of these areas were for the provision of home
nursing care. The home nursing-care service is provided by the local health units,
and the cost of the service levied by mill rate against properties within the local area.
A number of community planning areas were also established during the course of
the year. Details of these and of other planning activities of the Department follow
in the report of the Director of the Regional Planning Division.
During the year the Department entertained foreign visitors under United
Nations and Commonwealth development programmes. The countries represented
included Ceylon, Sierre Leone, the National Republic of China, Japan, and Israel.
The Department has been actively engaged in co-operation with other departments of Government in seeking a solution to the question of garbage-disposal in
unorganized territory. It is anticipated that a number of local areas under the provisions of the Local Services Act will be set up shortly, which will help to alleviate
this problem.
The offices of the Department were completely renovated during the year,
resulting in more workable office space for the staff and the release of space for the
use of other departments of Government.
Arising out of numerous complaints, a public inquiry was held by the Inspector
of Municipalities into the question of the form or forms of local government required
to provide the diverse groups of citizens of the Municipality of Surrey with adequate
local services. As a result of the inquiry, it was recommended that no basic change
be made to the present municipal organization, but in order to obtain a better distribution of Council representation, it was recommended that the size of the Council
be increased from seven to eleven members.
Following a petition of Council, this was acted on in time for the municipal
elections in December. It was also recommended that Council improve its contact
with the citizens and that a clear policy be established with respect to the provision
of urban amenities. A further recommendation was that the new Municipal Hall
be located well outside existing commercial areas and as close to the geographical
centre of the municipality as possible. This recommendation was imposed by order
of the Inspector of Municipalities and approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council.
The major changes in legislation enacted by the 1961 session of the Legislature
which particularly affected municipalities are outlined briefly as follows:—
The Municipal Act was amended to include new provisions for the extension of
the area of a municipality. Under these new provisions a vote may be caused to be
taken or the Minister of Municipal Affairs may appoint a Commission to inquire into
and report to him on the propriety of the extension of the area of the municipality.
This latter provision was used during the year in connection with the extension of
the area of the Village of Ladysmith. The Ladysmith Boundary Commission was
made up of members of the staff of the Department.
An important amendment was made respecting civil defence to provide for the
continuity of Council in the event of a disaster. This new provision also provides
for the re-establishment of properly elected Councils after the emergency is over.
Amendments were made to provide for the reversion to the principle of assessed
 AA 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
values to be based on current values rather than on base-year values. Land classified as farm land was given a further exemption of $1,000 in the taxable assessed
values for school purposes.
Miscellaneous amendments to the Municipal Act included the classification of
residents of owner-occupied apartments as owner-electors. A new provision was
made whereby the Returning Officer is authorized to destroy all documents and
ballots relative to an election. A vacancy on Council may now be held open from
July 1st until the next annual election. Previously this date had been November 1st.
Changes were made in the community planning provision of the Municipal Act to
provide more specific information in respect of public hearings and to allow some
zoning appeals to be dealt with by a Judge of the County Court.
An innovation was introduced whereby off-street parking facilities in the
larger city municipalities may be provided for and at the expense of a specified area.
Two cities took advantage of this legislation during the year.
The Local Services Act was amended to revise the powers of the Minister of
Municipal Affairs in respect of the regulation of land use and to provide machinery
for the extension and merging of existing local areas. Other amendments affecting
municipalities were made to the Municipal Superannuation Act, the Land Registry
Act, the Forest Act, the Public Schools Act, the Health Act, the Assessment Equalization Act, the Provincial Infirmaries Act, and the Real Estate Act. The Public
Bodies Financial Information Act, passed at the last session of the Legislature, has
the effect of requiring municipalities to expand the financial information now given
to include a report of wages and expenses as well as payments to suppliers. This
additional information will be submitted to this Department.
Certain specific municipalities were affected by amendments to the Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act. These municipalities were Cache Creek, Cumberland, Surrey, Kamloops, and Sahno.
It is with regret that I have to report the death of two valued staff members—
Edward C. Young, of the Finance and Statistics Division, and R. Millar, of the
Regional Planning Division. These men had each been in the Provincial Government Service for eleven to twelve years and were highly regarded by those with
whom they came into contact, either socially or in the course of their duties.
The continued expansion of the Municipal Winter Works Incentive Programme
has again increased the volume of work dealt with by the Department. In addition
to this, the changes in the style of financial reporting along with the many changes
to the municipal finance reporting forms, together with complications in the borrowing procedures of municipalities through recent amendments to the National Housing
Act, added materially to the work of the Department. We have endeavoured to
ensure that the extra demands on the staff have not delayed the business of the
municipalities.
I would again like to express my thanks to all municipal officials of this Province, both elected and appointed, for their continued courtesies and assistance, and
to the executive and staff of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities, and to
the executive of the Municipal Officers' Association, and to all other Government
officials, and to you, Sir, for your continued support and encouragement.
J. E. BROWN, F.C.I.S.,
Deputy Minister.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1961 AA 13
Trends in Financial Aspects of Municipal Government
Compared to Population and Income
LEGEND
— POPULATION "In   millions
-OT0TAL  REVENUE       N
-ODEBENTURE    DEBT   > In millions of  dollars
 BUILDING   PERMITS /
O O OMAXIMUM   VALUES  TAXABLE \ In hundreds   of
 PERSONAL   INCOME J millions of   dollars
 AA 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF MUNICIPALITIES
Victoria, B.C., January 24, 1962.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,-—Commensurate with the development of the Province as a whole, the
municipal field of administration has continued to expand in British Columbia,
adding extra duties to the members of the staff in maintaining supervision of
administration in municipalities as required by the various Statutes. The expansion
of municipal government in the Province continues to demand more services from
the Department from year to year, and I am happy to report that the staff have
continued to co-operate with extra time and effort required to provide assistance
to municipalities and municipal groups.
The following is a compilation of some of the major activities of the Department
during 1961:— j
(1) One hundred and ninety-seven visits were made to municipalities. The
number of municipalities actually visited was 121, some receiving more
than one visit.
(2) Two hundred and seventy-one Minutes of Council were prepared and
subsequently approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
(3) Eighty-seven certificates of approval for municipal loan by-laws were
issued. A few of these were cancelled during the year due to the subsequent amendment of the by-law concerned. A new certificate to the
by-law as amended was issued if required.
(4) Sixty-four debenture issues were examined and subsequently certified by
the Inspector of Municipalities, consisting of 8,426 debentures of a total
par value of $7,790,983.93.
(5) Six hundred and forty-six by-laws were examined and registered. Of this
amount, eighty-six were town by-laws, 555 were village by-laws, and five
were local district by-laws. Many of the by-laws required advice and
correspondence, resulting in resubmission in revised form.
(6) Several hundred draft by-laws and similar documents were submitted for
review and comment, involving a considerable amount of correspondence.
(7) Publication of the Annual Report of Municipal Statistics.
(8) Editing the financial and statistical returns of the municipalities to ensure
conformity with statutory and other requirements. This phase of administration involves considerable correspondence with municipal officials
and auditors.
(9) By correspondence and by personal visits to the various municipalities,
I  encouraging the adoption of good financial, accounting, and administrative
procedures.
In connection with the annual edition of Municipal Statistics, a good deal of
additional thought and effort were required this year in effecting many changes in
procedure brought about by the introduction of the new Municipal Finance Reporting Manual, published recently by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. In the case
of most municipalities, these changes were made without any appreciable delay in
the submission of the financial returns. The principle of reporting the various
municipal funds on a revenue and expenditure basis has been maintained in the
requirements of the new manual, the major change being to broaden the reporting
base to make additional information available to those concerned with the study of
the financial aspect of municipal administration.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1961
AA 15
The Government of Canada has, for the fourth consecutive winter, provided
an incentive for municipalities to provide winter work for the relief of unemployment. The incentive is the offer to pay one-half of the direct labour cost of approved
projects. The programme period is initially the same as the 1960/61 season—
that is, October 15th to April 30th. There were no important changes in the regulations or in the type of project which may be undertaken on a shareable basis under
the current programme.
In addition to the incentive offered by the Federal Government, the Government of this Province has agreed to pay to municipalities 25 per cent of the approved
direct labour costs relating to accepted projects. The Province, in addition, has
agreed to pay a further 25 per cent of the wages of any person employed on an
accepted project who has been continuously in receipt of welfare assistance from,
on, or before June 15, 1961, to the date of being engaged on the project.
Some idea of the growth of the programme may be gained from the following:—
Cost of Projects Man-days Work
Payroll
1959/60 as at January 15, 1960 	
S7.000.000      1        183.000
$3,000,000
1960/61 as at January 15, 1961 	
1961/62 as at January 15, 1962  _	
20,000,000
26,500,000
392,000
426,000
7,000,000
8,333,333
These are estimated figures of the municipalities for the programme period.
As of January 15, 1962, approvals had been given to 537 projects, whereas the
total for last year's programme at the same date was 556 projects. The total number
of projects approved under last year's programme was 796 projects. It is anticipated that additional applications will be received this year following the consideration of municipal budgets by the Councils in 1962.
The programme, which includes the processing of application and claim forms
along with relative correspondence, has added considerably to the administrative
load in the Department, and I wish to record my appreciation to the members of
the staff who have cheerfully and efficiently adjusted to the extra work load.
The following tabulation gives a summary of the British Columbia municipalities' participation in the Winter Works Programme as at January 15, 1962,
according to the records in this office:—
Number of men
Man-days work
  6,000
  426,000
Total cost of projects  $26,809,000
Federal share, payroll cost  $4,180,000
Provincial share, payroll cost  $2,144,000
Municipal share, payroll cost  $2,050,000
Total payroll under offer  $8,374,000
Nature and Total Cost of Projects
Waterworks
Sewers	
Drainage _
Roads 	
Sidewalks	
Buildings „
Parks 	
Other 	
$5,622,000
5,847,000
884,000
2,396,000
985,000
2,905,000
1,075.000
2,639,000
 AA 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Municipalities Participating Number of Accepted Projects
Cities  29 Cities  225
Districts  27 Districts  177
Towns   2 Towns  15
Villages  34 Villages  83
Other ___.  16 Other  37
Total  108 Total  537
Table 1 shows the final summary of the Municipal Winter Works Incentive
Programme for the year 1960/61 as issued by the Department of Labour, Ottawa,
and Table 2 indicates the same information for the current programme as at
January 19, 1962.
The year 1961 witnessed a further increase in authorized debenture debt of
municipalities, although the total amount of debentures authorized to be issued
decreased from $16,000,000 in 1960 to $15,000,000 in 1961. It is felt that this
decrease in 1961 over 1960 borrowings may be partly attributed to the fact that
the majority of municipalities in the Province have now completed construction or
major reconstruction of their utility systems. Continued borrowings for sewer and
other public works may be expected for some time to come.
In view of the importance placed on this aspect of municipal administration,
we have continued to keep a very close watch on the tax-collection picture in the
municipalities. A review of the figures which are published in Table 3 indicates
that collections over the previous year have shown some slight improvement. We
will, of course, continue to maintain our watch for any sign which might indicate
the inability of a municipality to effect a high rate of collection of the tax levy and
will lend what assistance we can in aiding them to establish good collection procedures. Table 4 shows in 1960 an improvement in all classes except districts and
towns from the 0-9.99 per cent. We have had to report previously that tax-collection procedures in villages were not as good as in other classes of municipalities.
However, I am pleased to now report that considerable improvement is noted in
the procedures being adopted in villages, and we are hopeful that the trend will
continue.
Table 5 shows the percentages of municipal revenues according to major
sources for the years shown. It is interesting to note the marked difference as
between the various classes of municipalities.
J. D. Baird, F.C.I.S.,
Supervisor of Municipalities.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1961
AA 17
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 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1961
Table 3.—Percentage Tax Collections
aa 19
Percentage of
Current Levy
Collected
Total Collections
as a Percentage of
Current Levy
Outstanding Taxes
as a Percentage of
Current Levy
Cities (Except Vancouver)
1939       	
1946                                 	
81.10
94.13
95.02
95.24
94.67
94.97
91.00
95.74
95.41
95.20
95.08
95.43
77.60
92.32
95.67
95.83
95.43
95.40
89.55
88.69
90.41
76.50
92.45
91.58
91.70
91.69
93.83
99.10
100.46
100.38
100.02
99.28
99.92
103.10
100.57
100.74
99.36
99.35
99.47
95.80
99.28
100.93
100.00
99.46
99.68
97.06
98.00
101.53
98.30
99.90
99.94
99.26
99.60
101.96
40.16
7.85
1957                	
6.87
1958          - .     ..	
f<>59
6.53
6.92
1960. .          ............   .   	
6.84
Vancouver
1939
30.06
1946 	
1957              _-...                             	
5.90
6.82
1958 	
1959	
1960                	
6.62
6.88
6.98
Districts
1939    	
1946
1957                                    .   ..             	
34.81
9.45
5.74
1958               .   ..    -
5.36
1959 -~-      	
1960            „,	
Towns
1958    	
5.73
6.10
13.62
1959          ;      ....:..
15.18
1960	
13.28
Villages
1939	
38.71
1946 :....	
11.90
1957.	
1958      .	
1959.      	
11.23
11.19'
10 99
1960  	
8.78
 AA 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS,  1961
AA 21
Table 5.—Percentage of Municipal Revenues by Major Sources
for the Years 1931, 1941, 1951, 1956, and 1960
Year
Municipal Taxation
Provincial
Grants
Utilities
Licences,
Fines, and
Other
Revenue
Total
For Schools
Total
Revenue
Cities (Except Vancouver)
1931	
1941 	
1951  	
1956	
29.10
21.80
22.50
19.20
23.89
24.62
24.60
24.70
22.09
24.82
30.30
29.20
31.85
27.56
33.04
25.45
22.01
29.16
69.25
65.60
49.00
54.69
58.70
85.45
79.10
63.20
70.76
69.02
68.60
82.20
60.00
66.53
73.90
57.20
41.65
64.24
34.90
51.57
63.43
7.16
7.10
23.25
15.96
17.60
5.32
8.95
22.95
11.61
14.08
9.82
11.32
27.20
17.57
15.35
23.19
28.20
10.93
34.90
25.45
20.57
3.20
8.55
9.77
8.73
4.90
0.64
1.09
1.01
.09
1.33
2.39
.61
1.67
1.88
3.76
3.19
1.16
20.39
18.75
17.98
20.62
18.80
9.23
11.31
12.76
16.62
16.81
21.58
6.48
11.47
13.51
10.14
17.94
30.15
22.94
26.44
19.79
14.84
100
100
100
100
1960  	
100
Vancouver
1931                  ...
100
1941	
1951	
1956 -
100
100
100
1960	
100
Districts
1931	
100
1941	
1951	
100
100
1956	
1960	
Towns
I960..  	
100
100
Villages
1931	
1941.	
1951
100
100
1956       	
1960	
100
100
Note.—Subsequent to 1951, grants to municipalities were reduced in exchange for greater participation in
direct school costs by the Province.
 AA 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR, REGIONAL
PLANNING DIVISION
Victoria, B.C., January 23, 1962.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—The Division continued through the year to expand its community planning services throughout the Province. We gave planning advice to fourteen municipalities beyond the boundaries of the Lower Mainland Regional Planning Board and
the Capital Region Planning Board. This advice has changed from one where a
planning report was presented to Council and the job was finished to where a continuing service is maintained. Now a planning report is prepared, presented to
Council, and a follow-up is maintained through visits and correspondence. In this
way the report can become a dynamic thing, guiding the orderly growth of the
community if the Council chooses to follow the recommendations.
COMMUNITY PLANNING AREAS
There are now twenty-one community planning areas in operation in unorganized territory throughout the Province.   The new areas established in 1961 are:—
Chetwynd, formerly Little Prairie, a frontier settlement of eighty people in
1951, has now grown to an active community of about 1,000 people.
Chase is a growing community of about 1,000 on the Trans-Canada Highway
between Kamloops and Salmon Arm.
In addition, the following community planning areas' boundaries were extended:—
Community Planning Area Number 2:   The boundaries were extended to
include the settled unorganized territory in the North Okanagan and
including the community of Oyama, of about 500 people.   The area now
has a joint boundary with Community Planning Area Number 1, so continuous land-use regulations are in effect in a settled valley area over 40
miles long on both sides of Okanagan Lake.
Community Planning Area Number 4 embraces the communities of Albert
Head, Colwood, Colwood Corner, Glen Lake, Happy Valley, Langford,
and Metchosin, with a total population of over 11,000 people.  The former
Community Planning Areas 4 and 16 are now incorporated into this
larger area.
Community Planning Area Number 14 now is an area embracing the settled
part of the east coastal plain of Vancouver Island from north of Campbell
River to south of Courtenay.
In all, the service given to people in unorganized territory has increased by
more than 40 per cent in the past year.
The demand for community planning areas remains high, and we feel the best
way to handle the greatest number of requests quickly is to create large areas under
the supervision of a full-time inspector rather than create a proliferation of small
areas with part-time inspectors.
Highway Planning Area Number 1 was established in co-operation with the
Department of Highways, with the purpose of protecting the capacity of the Trans-
Canada Highway around the Village of Golden.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS, 1961
AA 23
We are receiving requests from communities in unorganized territory to develop
house number systems, and we are developing a simple system which can give
necessary locational information.
Advisory Planning Commissions for Community Planning Areas 3, 8, and 17
were appointed, making a total of six areas with these groups. They continue to give
good service to their communities. It is interesting to note that there have been
requests from some of the commissions for long-range land-use plans for their areas.
The staff planners in the Division will start on these plans soon so that rezoning
applications can be referred to an agreed pattern of future land use rather than
examining each application as an isolated case.
The total value of construction for the year was $12,192,000, the highest
reported by the Division. This follows the trend of increased construction in the
Province and the increased coverage of our services in unorganized territory. The
breakdown by areas is shown in the following table:—
Place
Dwelling
Units
Built, 1961
Dwelling Units
Built since
Areas
Established
Total Value of
Construction,
1961
Community Planning Area Number 1 (around Kelowna)	
Community Planning Area Number 2 (around Vernon)—	
Community Planning Area Number 3 (View Royal)	
Community Planning Area Number 4 (Thetis, near Victoria)..
Community Planning Area Number 5 (North Saanich)..
Community Planning Area Number 6 (around Nanaimo)	
Community Planning Area Number 7 (around Prince George) _
Community Planning Area Number 8 (around Kamloops)	
Community Planning Area Number 9 (around Quesnel)..
Community Planning Area Number 10 (Connaught Heights, D.L.
172, next to New Westminster)     	
Community Planning Area Number 11 (around Alberni)
Community Planning Area Number 12 (around Dawson Creek)	
Community Planning Area Number 13 (Woodhaven, near loco)	
Community Planning Area Number 14 (North of Campbell River
to South of Courtenay)
Community Planning Area Number 15 (around Fort St. John)	
Community Planning  Area  Number   16   (industrial  reserve  near
Victoria)    	
117
53
20
8
35
143
91
65
11
2
2
1
6
35
Community Planning Area Number 17 (Fort Nelson)  	
Community Planning Area Number 18 (West Bench, near Penticton)
Community Planning Area Number 19 (Hudson Hope)
13
1,167
415
320
19
486
1,622
722
744
178
70
6
218
19
106
32
Community Planning Area Number 20 (Crooked River, 60 miles
north of Prince George)
Community Planning Area Number 21 (Chetwynd)..
Community Planning Area Number 22 (Chase)	
Others      _ 	
3
62
$1,839,548
665,305
273,801
88,518
565,444
4,415,920
1,252,002
1,088,372
195,080
12,133
25,000
25,960
7,590
96,470
393,516
5,000
878,184
6,000
61,986
296,492
Totals..
605
6,197
$12,192,321
Total value of construction to date, $77,072,230.
The ratio of owner-built construction to contractor-built construction continues
to be about 4:1, and the most common size of houses continues to be around 1,000
square feet.
Don South, M.T.P.I.C,
Director, Regional Planning Division.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1962
1,060-262-7795
 

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