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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Ninetieth Annual Report 1960/61 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1962

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Full Text

 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Ninetieth Annual Report
1960/61
By the Superintendent of Education
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1962
  The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C., LL.B., Minister of Education.
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Ninetieth Annual Report of the Public
Schools of the Province.
LESLIE RAYMOND PETERSON,
Minister of Education.
January, 1962.
  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, 1961
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C, LL.B.
Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education:
J. F. K. English, M.A., Ed.D.
Assistant Superintendent (Administration):
G. W. Graham, B.A.
Assistant Superintendent (Instruction):
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.).
Chief Inspector of Schools:
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.P<ed.
District Superintendents, Superintendents, and Inspectors of Schools:
H. D. Abbott, M.A., Nanaimo.
K. F. Alexander, B.Sc., B.Ed., Prince George
N. A. Allen, B.A., Nelson.
J. E. Beech, B.A., B.Ed., Creston.
G. C. Bissell, B.A., B.Ed., Castlegar.
J. N. Burnett, M.A., B.Ed., Richmond.
D. H. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St. John.
D. G. Chamberlain, B.A., B.Ed., Port Alberni.
J. Chell, M.A., Assistant Superintendent,
Mission.
C E. Clay, B.A., Penticton.
C Cuthbert, B.S.Acc., B.Ed., Nelson.
H. C Ferguson, B.A., West Vancouver.
C J. Frederickson, B.A., Burnaby.
W. B. Fromson, B.A., B.Ed., Revelstoke.
J. Gough, M.A., Victoria.
S. J. Graham, B.A., New Westminster.
J. V. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector, Vancouver.
W. H. Gurney, M.A., Kitimat.
R. M. Hall, B.A., B.Ed.,Williams Lake.
A. E. Henderson, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector,
Vancouver.
F. L. Irwin, B.A., Vernon.
I. H. R. Jeffery, B.A., Haney.
G. E. Johnson, B.A., B.Ed., Powell River.
A. D. Jones, B.A., Duncan.
J. G. Kirk, M.A., Chilliwack.
W. J. Logie, B.A., Campbell River.
R. F. Lucas, B.A., B.Ed., Courtenay.
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.Pa.d., North Vancouver.
J. I. Macdougall, M.A., M.Ed., D.Psd.,
Kamloops.
D. B. Mackenzie, M.A., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
C S. McKenzie, B.A., Trail.
F. A. McLellan, M.A., B. Paed., Victoria.
W. A. Marchbank, A.B., B.Ed.,Dawson
Creek.
E. Marriott, B.A., Assistant Superintendent,
Kamloops.
L. A. Matheson, M.A., B.Ed.,Kimberley.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., Abbotsford.
G. H. Nelson, B.A., B.Ed., Quesnel.
F. J. Orme, B.A., B.Pa.d.,Kelowna.
J. Phellipson, B.A., B.Ed., Prince Rupert.
R. S. Price, B.A., B.Com., Ladysmith.
D. L. Pritchard, M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
P. B. Pullinger, B.A., B.Ed., Fernie.
W. D. Reid, B.A., M.Ed.,Ladner.
C T. Rendle, B.A., Courtenay.
C E. Ritchie, B.A., Oliver.
R. F. Sharp, B.A., D.Paed., Vancouver.
H. B. Smith, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant, Vancouver.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., Langley.
R. B. Stibbs, B.A., New Westminster.
C I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Burnaby.
R. F. Thorstenson, B.A., B.Ed., M.B.A.,
Hope.
F. M. Wallace, M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Cloverdale.
C C Wright, B.A., Smithers.
 Z 8 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1960/61
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Special Services: W. A. Plenderleith,, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment: P. J. Kitley, M.A.
Comptroller of Expenditures: S. E. Espley.
Supervisor of School Construction: H. Dickinson.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education: J. S. White.
Assistant Director of Technical and Vocational Education: T. Quayle.
Inspectors of Technical Classes: C. J. Strong, M.A., and V. E. Rickard.
Registrar: H. M. Evans, B.A.
Assistant Registrars: J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Pad., and P. E. Willkinson, B.A., B.Ed.
Director of Home Economics: Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.S.
Inspectors of Home Economics:
Miss J. R. Irvine, B.Sc.(H.Ec), and Miss J. Campbell, M.A., B.Sc.(H.Ec), Dip.Ed.
Director of Community Programmes: J. H. Panton, B.A., M.Sc.
Director of Visual Education: J. R. Pollock, B.A.Sc.
Director of School Radio Broadcasts: Miss M. Musselman, B.A.
Director of Tests, Standards, and Research: C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed.
Director of High School Correspondence: Miss Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Director of Elementary School Corespondence:  A. H. Plows.
Director of Text-book Branch: Basil R. Wilson.
Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (for the Deaf and the Blind):
C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., LL.D.
Director of Curriculum: J. R. Meredith, B.A., B.Ed.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Report of the Superintendent of Education  11
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Administration and School Board
Relations)  36
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Instructional Services)  38
Report of the Director of Curriculum  41
Report of the Co-ordinator of Special Services  44
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  47
Report of the Director of Home Economics  50
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses  52
Elementary Correspondence School  56
Report of the Director of the Division of School Broadcasts  58
Report of the Director of Visual Education  60
Report of the Director of the Text-book Branch  62
Report of the Chief Inspector of Schools  66
Report of the Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment  70
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education  72
Report of the Director of Community Programmes Branch  82
Report of the Director of Night-schools  89
Report of the Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (Deaf and Blind School)-. 92
Report of the Registrar of Teachers and Examinations  94
Report of the Commission on Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act._ 103
Statistical Returns  105
Information re Examination Papers Inside back cover
 Z 10 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Page
Number of Pupils Enrolled by Type of School  11
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  12
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils According to Different Classes of Schools 13
Teachers' Certificates  13
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  14
Number of School Districts  15
Number of Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  15
Number of Junior-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in
Each District  16
Number of Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  17
Number of Superior Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District. 17
Number of Elementary-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils
in Each District  18
Number of Elementary-Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils
in Each District  18
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  19
District Supervisory and Instructional Personnel  21
Summary of All Schools Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils _ 22
Number of Schools, Teachers, Pupils, and Average Daily Attendance in Each
Type of School  23
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  24
Classification of Teachers' Salaries  25
Expenditure for Education for the Calendar Year 1960  26
Costs per Pupil, Various Bases, Calendar Year 1960  26
Expenditure by School Districts for the Calendar Year 1960  27
Revenue for Education for the Calendar Year 1960 by School District  30
Summary of Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance by Schools in the Various School Districts  107
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades  149
 Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1960/61
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., January, 1962.
To the Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Ninetieth Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30, 1961.
ENROLMENT
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from
305,837 to 321,760, and the average daily attendance increased from 281,513 to
298,175.   The percentage of the regular attendance was 92.07.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Type of School
Number of Pupils Enrolled
Municipal
Rural
Total
29,299
50,716
37,008
2,035
9,080
5,217
178,667
1,157
325
157
2,846
828
4,425
29,299
51,873
37,333
2,192
11,926
6,045
183,092
Totals	
312,022
9.738            1           321.760
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:—
In the High School Correspondence classes, regular students
(exclusive of the 6,512 officially registered in other schools)
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular students 	
Under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, pupils receiving
instruction 	
3,680
1.091
87
4,858
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme  8,5331
Night-schools (high schools)  4,097
Vancouver School of Art  200
Vancouver Vocational Institute  4,8742
High School Correspondence (adults only)  8,777
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only)  318
Carried forward
31,657
1 Day, 4,623; night, 3,910.
2 Day, 2,614; night, 2,260.
11
 Z  12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
Brought forward     31,657
Adult education—Continued
Number of participants in recreational programme  243,012s
33
Vocational teachers-in-training (summer session).
Victoria College, regular credit courses—■
Arts, Science, Commerce  839
College of Education  576
Evening division  299
Summer session  817
University of British Columbia ____
2,531*
6,268*
283,501
3 This figure does not include Vancouver.
* This figure does not include an enrolment of 553 in the non-credit evening classes and ninety-seven in the
non-credit summer session.
5 This figure does not include the following enrolments: 1960 summer session, 4,256; 1960/61 extra sessional
classes, 1,318; correspondence courses, 1,282.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade
for the school-year 1960/61:—
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total
1,967
18,728
17,312
16,398
15,296
14,698
14,612
15,165
14,282
12,302
10,202
8,324
6,617
884
1,883
16,857
15,584
15,075
14,187
13,874
13,774
13,918
13,724
11,901
9,439
7,963
6,295
499
3,850
Grade I                                                                  .
35,585
Grade II                      	
32,896
31,473
Grade III	
Grade IV                                                        	
29,483
Grade V                     	
28,572
Grade VI                     —         	
28,386
Grade VII                                  	
29,083
Grade VIII                                              	
28,006
Grade IX                          	
24,203
Grade X _ .  .
19,641
Grade XI  	
16,287
Grade XII                                     	
12,912
Grade XIII            	
1,383
Totals —	
166,787
154,973
321,760
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
Z 13
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO
THE DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number of pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils
per teacher are shown in the following table:—
Number of Teachers
Total
Enrolment
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment
J  !*IJ«
—■|-|v,i-
Average
Enrolment
per Grade
Teacher
Type of School
Grade
Teacher
Special
Instructor
Total
971
1,693
1,219
95
443
199
5,744
307
534
374
1,278
2,227
1,593
95
499
224
6,018
203
29,299
51,873
37,333
2,192
11,926
6,045
183,092
9.10
16.12
11.60
0.68
3.71
1.88
56.91
30.17
30.64
30.63
Superior schools 	
Elementary-senior high schools..
Elementary-junior high schools
23.07
56
25
274
203
26.92
30.38
31.88
Totals- 	
10,364
1,773
12,137
321,760
100.00
31.05
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
The following table shows the number of teachers employed and also the number with or without university degrees:—
Type of School
Number of Teachers
With
Degrees
Without
Degrees
Total
1,027
1,536
894
15
146
70
662
97
251
691
699
80
353
154
5,356
106
1,278
2,227
1,593
95
499
224
6,018
Unclassified    — .   -	
203
Totals        	
4,447
7,690
12,137
 Z 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE
FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for the various years since
1877/78 and also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
Number
Number
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Percent
Government
Total
School-year
of
of
Daily
age of
Expenditure
Expenditure
Teachers
School
Atten
Atten
for
for Public
Employed
Districts
dance
dance
Education
Schools
1877/78.	
56
45
2,198
1,395
63.49
$48,411.14'
1882/83    	
69
59
2,693
1,383
51.36
60.758.751
1887/88-	
128
104
6.372
3,093
48.54
113.679.361
1892/93  	
267
169
11,496
7,111
61.85
174,775.43
$215,056.22'
1897/98	
429
213
17,648
11,055
62.64
290,255.26
425,555.10
1902/03	
607
268
24,499
16,357
66.76
473,802.29
604,357.86
1907/08         	
816
189
33,314
23,195
69.62
544,671.60
1,220,509.85
1912/13  	
1,597
359
57,608
43,274
75.12
1,663,003.34
4,658,894.97
1913/14—	
1,859
374
62,263
49,377
79.30
1,885,654.11
4,634,877.56
1917/18
2,246
575
67,516
54,746
81.09
1,653,796.60
3,519,014.61
1922/23   .
3,118
744
94,888
77,752
81.94
3,176.686.28s
7,630,009.54s
1927/28— 	
3.668
788
108,179
91,760
84.82
3,532,518.95s
9,261,094.98s
1928/29	
3,784
792
109,588
94,410
86.17
3,765,920.69s
11,149,996.27s
1929/30.    ....	
3,854
803
111,017
96,196
86.65
3,743,317.08s
10,008,255.66s
1930/31 	
3,948
811
113,914
99,375
87.23
3,834,727.19s
10,061,387.99s
1931/32	
3.959
830
115,919
103,510
89.29
4,015,074.37s
9,719,333.81s
1932/33 	
3,912
821
116,816
104,978
89.86
2,849,972.02s
8,941,497.34s
1933/34	
3,873
827
115,792
103,389
89.30
2,611,937.80s
8,213,369.04s
1934/35	
3,942
762
117,233
101,893
86.91
2,835,040.74s
8,458,156.00s
1935/36	
3,956
773
116,722
101,873
87.27
2,972,385.04s
8,775,353.78s
1936/37—	
4,025
763
118,431
104,044
87.85
3,277,660.23s
9,593,562.64s
1937/38. -
4,092
741
120,360
106,515
88.49
3,524,962.69s
10,193,367.08s
1938/39	
4.194
721
120,934
107,660
89.02
3,630,670.78s
10,640,740.47s
1939/40-	
4,220
720
120,459
108,826
90.34
3,585,769.00s
10,521,684.92«
1040/41
4,248
730
119,634
103,192
86.26
3,963,848.24s
10,982,364.49s
1Q41/'1?
4,224
696
118,405
102,085
86.22
4,028,397.88s
11,120,801.94s
1942/43	
4,055
661
115,447
93,473
80.96
3,924,243.53s
11,502,291.35'
1943/44	
4,162
654
119,043
102,999
86.52
4,244,898.82s
12,231,029.35'
1944/45—	
4,354
650
125,135
107,599
85.99
5,022,534.59s
13,683,538.18'
1945/46 —
4,512
86
130,605
114,590
87.74
5,765,205.50s
14,818,625.81'
1946/47 -	
4,833
89
137,827
121,334
88.03
9,398,473.46s
20,176,930.53'
1947/48  -
5,116
93
146,708
129,859
88.51
12,468,653.18s
25,768,392.09'
1948/49          	
5.496
5,873
6,272
97
97
98
155,515
164,212
173,354
138,941
147,583
154,077
89.34
89.87
88.88
17,363,430.94s
22,809,631.23s
25,830,076.88s
35,538,079.88s
1949/50      —    - 	
47,726,750.37'
1950/51. —
54,195,133.95s
1951/52 	
6,598
101
183,112
163,364
89.21
26,885,980.43s
57,881,559.48'
1952/53 - 	
7,105
100
195,290
176,138
90.19
26,555,080.24s
58,401,121.15'
1953/54	
7,574
104
210,174
191,061
90.91
24,060,233.15s
70,791,844.25s
1954/55	
8.185
104
223,840
204,239
91.24
34,279,302.27s
80,823,263.71s
1955/56	
8.690
102
240,674
218,303
90.70
41,067,740.34*
69,314,181.24*
1956/57     	
9,474
10.171
103
102
260,069
277,070
235,396
252,490
90.51
91.13
43,989,524.326
50,861,473.63"
77,653,192.32'
1957/58        	
90,483,765.63«
1958/59. - 	
10,839
101
291,223
267,052
91.70
53,288,028.94'
101,351,107.94'
1959/60 	
11,513
98
305,837
281,513
92.05
59,472,055.06s
115,941,018.06s
1960/61    	
12,137
97
321,760
298,175
92.67
70,174,999.84
133,401,622.849
1 The total expenditure for public schools borne by the Government.
2 This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school
districts.
* This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University.
1 This amount on calendar year 1955, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
6 This amount on calendar year 1956, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
8 This amount on calendar year 1957, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
' This amount on calendar year 1958, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
8 This amount on calendar year 1959, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
9 This amount on calendar year 1960, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
Z 15
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1960/61:—
Municipal school districts  .  73
Rural school districts  25
Total number of districts
98
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in senior high schools during the school-year was 29,299; of
this number, 15,212 were boys and 14,087 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1960/61 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
3. Kimberley       ,	
7. Nelson       	
11. Trail      	
12
18
35
11
23
23
29
32
25
83
25
96
39
114
21
59
38
14
10
15
16
123
10
30
15
21
19
25
46
17
33
29
36
42
34
108
36
137
51
146
28
76
52
20
14
25
22
173
15
44
22
28
370
535
983
294
781
23. Kelowna   —  	
642
857
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford-   ,,.;.. -	
981
813
2,732
S50
3,193
1,168
41. Burnaby  	
42. Maple Ridge _	
3,346
669
1,777
1,196
47.  Powell River
424
321
573
503
61. Greater Victoria. — ■       	
3,894
296
961
490
650
Totals   	
39
937
1,278
29,299
"
 Z  16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior-senior high schools during the school-year was 51,873;
of this number, 26,686 were boys and 25,187 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1960/61 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
12
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
9
24
9
27
10
14
27
9
19
17
23
44
9
6
21
11
8
43
26
24
18
11
14
49
17
37
20
646
89
21
12
19
12
8
10
19
21
12
36
19
30
41
8
25
18
10
24
13
10
32
10
35
13
14
35
10
26
23
30
56
12
7
29
16
12
57
34
33
27
15
20
72
23
52
29
901
125
25
16
25
16
8
13
28
28
17
48
25
41
52
11
33
23
13
31
16
212
771
243
827
7. Nelson  	
300
8. Slocan
330
796
232
11. Trail      .
549
510
665
1,340
263
18. Golden          	
189
672
346
22. Vernon      _ 	
240
1,223
804
769
587
24. Kamloops  „     .
27. Williams Lake — —-	
28. Quesnel                                                     	
31. Merritt    	
347
432
1,641
558
37. Delta.                                         	
1,170
652
21,828
3,000
503
318
53. Terrace  - —
490
331
234
278
660
62. Sooke                   ..	
596
355
1,090
541
830
66. Lake Cowichan     —
70. Alberni          —. ■
1,356
248
806
504
78. Enderby                                       .            	
289
80. Kitimat                                -     -            	
619
329
75
1,639
2,227
51,873
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
Z 17
The enrolment in junior high schools during the school-year was 37,333; of
this number, 19,281 were boys and 18,052 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1960/61 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
6
3
1
1
4
2
4
2
1
1
1
2
1
7
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
23
22
22
31
22
19
49
33
89
66
32
47
122
32
105
50
4
22
19
35
17
165
11
21
7
50
22
23
17
28
30
32
41
34
25
63
46
114
88
45
64
165
44
135
63
4
31
27
49
27
241
13
26
12
67
28
29
22
655
723
11. Trail           - 	
699
994
709
564
33. Chilliwack            _	
1,483
34. Abbotsford 	
1,127
2,722
2,122
1,046
1,605
3,851
1,068
3,093
1,425
104
725
615
1,142
544
5,723
325
63. Saanich   	
65. Cowichan      	
560
251
1,543
70. Alberni                    	
665
709
541
Totals                              —                  	
56
1,177
1,593
37,333
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS
The enrolment in superior schools during the school-year was 2,192; of this
number, 1,163 were boys and 1,029 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1960/61
in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
3
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
2
10
4
6
10
3
5
3
5
6
12
5
8
6
6
2
10
4
6
10
I
3
7
14
5
8
6
6
33
13. Kettle Valley—              ...                 	
243
18. Golden      	
83
27. Williams Lake             	
123
28. Quesnel   •	
220
29. Lillooet    —	
64
112
51. Portland Canal.  	
58
136
171
345
58. McBride  _    	
123
72. Campbell River.. -	
194
73. Alert Bay     _	
130
157
22
91
95
2,192
 Z  18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-senior high schools during the school-year was
11,926; of this number, 6,058 were boys and 5,868 were girls. The number of
schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
year 1960/61 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2
2
1
2
I
32
8
6
14
10
23
15
9
8
8
12
31
34
6
5
32
17
11
9
12
12
17
16
22
14
17
9
10
37
10
6
15
10
28
18
10
10
9
15
36
38
8
8
7
38
18
13
10
14
16
22
19
25
16
22
10
11
935
212
139
408
13. Kettle Valley 	
302
690
408
241
246
222
28. Quesnel.      -    -	
29. Lillooet   -      .              -	
338
740
30. South Cariboo..                 -  	
911
228
181
141
824
427
314
263
58. McBride    	
64. Gulf Islands -    	
323
382
483
486
547
74. Quatsino- -	
376
556
79. Ucluelet Tofino                         	
234
369
Totals     .. - -
42
426
499
11,926
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-junior high schools during the school-year
was 6,045; of this number, 3,127 were boys and 2,918 were girls. The number of
schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
year 1960/61 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
3
38
18
14
10
41
7
9
22
12
21
3
43
20
17
11
53
7
10
23
14
23
77
11. Trail              ...          _ -	
1,123
556
420
33. Chilliwack   - .             	
327
1,351
194
267
59. Peace River South    -    -
621
358
751
Totals  . .            	
14
195
224
6,045
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
Z 19
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 183,092; of
this number, 95,260 were boys and 87,832 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1960/61 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1. Fernie  - —-
5
6
7
8
7
2
11
11
12
3
10
1
4
2
7
3
3
4
8
14
1
10
22
29
7
7
31
22
3
6
4
6
18
24
21
43
11
24
58
6
30
15
17
18
10
11
12
9
6
2
7
12
5
12
7
42
8
29
29
37
10
12
4
18
8
13
44
43
17
35
2
54
24
41
14
79
18
7
20
52
12
3
16
34
50
12
65
103
118
9
12
68
57
5
12
22
23
98
88
78
305
60
168
1,104
85
346
73
143
245
86
33
60
25
'I
40
18
27
20
126
12
83
60
355
51
51
7
66
31
13
47
44
17
37
2
58
24
42
15
84
18
7
21
56
12
3
17
36
53
13
69
107
123
9
12
70
60
5
12
23
24
101
89
87
315
63
179
1,268
96
370
73
149
263
95
35
63
25
12
2
52
40
19
27
21
134
12
87
63
367
54
53
7
69
1          32
1
383
1,513
1,325
508
1,080
20
1,817
522
9. Castlegar  — .  —
1,213
407
11. Trail      	
2,351
12. Grand Forks   	
645
13. Kettle Valley       .            .   . —      .    _
156
691
1,768
378
49
18. Golden  - -
537
1,026
1,504
486
2,198
23. Kelowna   •	
3,127
3,588
142
244
1,767
1,615
79.  T.illnnef
86
3(1    Snnfh r^ribnn
304
31. Merritt   _     —   _
761
723
33. Chilliwack        _           	
3,519
34. Abbotsford  	
2,816
2,547
36. Surrey      	
37. Delta   ...      .    _._	
10,541
1,956
38. Richmond     .      	
5,892
35,635
3,083
12,136
42. Maple Ridge	
2,532
5,096
8,494
3,114
46. Sechelt                   -               —                              	
922
47. Powell River
1,909
554
49. Ocean Falls          .   '
258
50. Queen Charlotte               	
35
1,673
1,155
532
692
56. Vanrierhnnf
595
3,714
58. McBride .. .	
242
2,433
1,670
13,226
1,568
1,644
122
62. Sooke     	
63. Saanich         _.   -
64. Gulf Islands	
1,980
927
 Z 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
6
22
7
12
12
15
4
4
17
4
2
7
3
3
5
4
14
31
113
12
85
56
51
4
4
49
6
20
16
5
36
8
5
46
34
117
12
87
57
51
4
4
49
6
21
16
5
39
8
5
48
1,047
3,533
284
70. Alberni-   	
3,043
1,767
1,550
73. Alert Bay                     	
85
57
1,546
131
624
78. Enderby—                                   	
419
79. Ucluelet-Toflno                                  	
109
80. Kitimat.    ...
1,158
81. Fort Nelson                    	
217
8-2. Chilcotin _                        _
96
1,280
Totals                         .   - .
992
5,636
6,018
183,092
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT Z 21
DISTRICT SUPERVISORY AND INSTRUCTIONAL PERSONNEL
District Number and Name
2. Cranbrook     	
Number of
Teachers
       2
3.
4.
Kimberley 	
Windermere                  	
       2
       1
8.
Slocan _ _                           	
             1
11.
Trail
       2
18.
Golden __                  ___ _   _
       1
20.
22.
23.
27.
28.
30.
Salmon Arm  	
Vernon   	
Kelowna
       1
       1
             3
Williams Lake
    .        2
Quesnel 	
South Cariboo           _     	
       1
       1
33.
Chilliwack _     _   	
       2
34.
Abbotsford	
Langley
       3
35.
       6
36.
Surrey  	
Delta __                  	
       7
37.
       4
38.
Richmond
       3
39.
Vancouver
     36
40.
New Westminster
       3
41.
Burnaby
 :     16
42.
Maple Ridge 	
Coquidam
       2
43.
     12
44.
North Vancouver
       9
45.
West Vancouver
_                          2
46.
47.
48.
53.
54.
55.
57.
58.
59.
60.
Sechelt
__                          2
Powell River
                       1
Howe Sound            _    	
       2
Terrace	
Smithers     __
Burns Lake
       1
        1
                      2
Prince George	
McBride
       4
        1
Peace River South                -
       4
Peace River North
                        1
61.
Greater Victoria                    _ _
                  39
62.
Sooke 	
Saanich	
Ladysmith                     	
       1
63.
       1
67.
       1
68.
Nanaimo                   _       _
       3
69.
Qualicum	
Alberni _ 	
             1
70.
                      4
71.
72.
Courtenay 	
Campbell River _    	
       3
4
75.
Mission	
                      2
80.
Kitimat    	
                      2
Total 	
  203
 Z 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The following table is a summary of all schools, showing number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54,
55.
56.
57.
58.
59,
60.
61.
62.
63.
64
65
66
67
68
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere-
Creston	
Kootenay Lake-
Nelson	
Slocan 	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan-
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen-
Vernon .„ 	
Kelowna	
Kamloops	
B arriere	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake-
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo-
Merritt	
Fraser Canyon.
Ch illiwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster-
Burnaby 	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam.
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt, 	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
. Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte-
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert	
Terrace	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George	
McBride	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich	
Gulf Islands..
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan-
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo	
7
9
11
9
5
14
14
13
6
15
2
8
4
9
4
4
6
9
17
2
13
28
33
35
26
6
9
5
8
23
27
23
54
13
29
75
8
38
18
20
24
13
14
15
12
8
5
1
9
14
8
14
9
48
10
34
30
49
13
15
5
21
9
8
25
54
68
78
34
68
18
104
38
68
26
193
35
27
61
110
21
26
26
45
86
23
127
191
201
17
20
98
97
39
46
33
44
189
146
127
494
97
279
1,878
171
623
126
232
409
174
58
102
47
44
19
3
76
70
46
40
36
197
29
138
79
643
83
94
19
109
50
61
193
60
81
93
38
78
19
126
39
77
28
233
41
27
71
129
24
31
29
53
101
29
156
230
228
19
21
111
113
44
51
38
52
219
172
165
567
119
335
2,387
214
750
147
286
483
212
66
123
56
50
20
3
93
79
53
42
41
236
32
163
92
820
96
112
23
129
57
76
231
1,530
2,284
2,350
963
2,046
461
3,375
852
2,009
716
5,705
1,155
701
1,912
3,528
641
739
809
1,320
2,584
832
4,213
5,701
6,054
388
466
2,659
2,760
890
1,215
1,108
1,383
6,310
4,756
4,188
16,553
3,126
9,516
61,702
5,856
20,684
4,269
8,096
13,364
5,735
1,529
3,239
1,125
1,082
462
58
2,609
1,959
1,320
1,062
1,044
6,041
688
4,101
2,330
22,843
2,489
2,855
504
3,321
1,468
1,877
6,037
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
Z 23
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
69. Qualicum..
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River-
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz-
77. Summerland-
78. Enderby-
79. Ucluelet-Tofino-
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
82. Chilcotin	
    Unattached districtS-
9
14
17
18
9
7
19
5
3
8
4
4
6
4
17
Totals..
1,240
41
148
118
84
32
24
87
23
38
26
14
60
18
5
80
49
171
141
96
35
26
101
28
44
29
15
72
19
5
87
10,101
12,1371
1,125
5,064
3,700
2,550
762
590
2,737
687
1,128
708
343
1,777
586
96
2,360
321,760
i Includes 203 district supervisory and instructional personnel.
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, PUPILS, AND AVERAGE
DAILY ATTENDANCE IN EACH TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number of
teachers employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance
in each type of school for the school-year 1960/61:—
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Number
of
Teachers
Number of Pupils
Average
Total
Male
Female
Attendance
39
75
56
22
42
14
992
1,278
2,227
1,593
95
499
224
6.018
203
29,299
51,873
37,333
2,192
11,926
6,045
183,092
15,212
26,686
19,281
1,163
6,058
3,127
95,260
14,087
25,187
18,052
1,029
5,868
2,918
87,832
26,639.03
47,751.01
34,835.05
2,017.30
Elementary-senior high schools	
10,904.54
5,669.85
170,358.24
Totals	
1,240
12,137
321,760
166,787
154,973
298,175.02
 Z 24 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1960/61
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars
only) paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals, and special instructors. Teachers earning less than $1,000 are
excluded.
Grade Teachers
Type of School
Number
Employed
Low
Salary
High
Salary
Average
Salary
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools.
Junior high schools	
Superior schools..
Elementary-senior high schools..
Elementary-junior high schools-
Elementary schools	
971
1,693
1,219
95
443
199
5,744
$1,045
1,000
1,202
1,950
1,024
1,380
1,053
$10,920
10,890
10,357
9,814
10,655
10,457
10,357
$6,923
6,371
5,854
4,434
5,111
4,983
4,764
Supervising Principals
39
65
55
27
7
142
$9,516
7,892
8,738
6,565
7,780
6,234
$12,618
13,200
11,750
10,700
11,918
11,170
$11,074
10,740
10,610
8,670
Elementary-junior high schools..  .  	
9,827
9,696
Special Instructors
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools.
Junior high schools.
Elementary-senior high schools..
Elementary-junior high schools..
Elementary schools	
Unclassified  	
$2,060
1,124
1,410
1,200
3,528
1,320
1,064
$9,775
9,613
10,243
9,990
8,360
9,435
12,791
$6,885
6,576
5,959
5,266
6,173
4,906
7,005
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
Z 25
Distribution of
vising principals, and
Salary Range
Under $1,200 _
$1,200-$ 1,299
1,300- 1,399
1,400- 1,499
1,500- 1,599
1,600- 1,699
1,700- 1,799
1,800- 1,899
1,900- 1,999
2,000- 2,099
2,100- 2,199
2,200- 2,299
2,300- 2,399
2,400- 2,499
2,500- 2,599
2,600- 2,699
2,700- 2,799
2,800- 2,899
2,900- 2,999
3,000- 3,099
3,100- 3,199
3,200- 3,299
3,300- 3,399
3,400- 3,499
3,500- 3,599
3,600- 3,699
3,700- 3,799
3,800- 3,899
3,900- 3,999
4,000- 4,099
4,100- 4,199
4,200- 4,299
4,300- 4,399
4,400- 4,499
4,500- 4,599
4,600- 4,699
4,700- 4,799
4,800- 4,899
4,900- 4,999
5,000- 5,099
5,100- 5,199
5,200- 5,299
5,300- 5,399
5,400- 5,499
5,500- 5,599
SALARY CLASSIFICATION
teachers by $100 salary-groups, including principals, super-
part-time teachers:—
Number of
Teachers
120
... 15
_ 17
13
... 14
12
12
16
18
17
17
16
21
27
17
32
31
89
158
87
86
86
200
284
170
248
203
208
192
251
235
303
202
230
283
294
294
235
284
246
303
254
428
520
Salary
$5,600-
5,700-
5,800-
5,900-
6,000-
6,100-
6,200
6,300-
6,400-
6,500-
6,600
6,700
6,800
6,900
7,000
7,100
7,200
7,300
7,400
7,500
7,600
7,700
7,800
7,900
8,000
8,100
8,200
8,300
8,400
8,500
8,600
8,700
8,800
8,900
9,000
9,100
9,200
9,300
9,400
9,500
9,600
9,700
9,800
9,900
10,000
Number of
Teachers
Range
$5,699   _ 220
5,799
5,899
5,999
6,099
6,199
240
363
209
154
147
u 6,299   180
6,399
6,499
6,599
6,699
6,799
6,899
6,999
176
165
156
147
112
103
103
7,099   81
7,199   173
7,299   165
7,399   167
7,499   112
7,599   105
7,699   73
7,799
7,899
7,999
8,099
8,199
8,299
8,399
8,499
8,599
227
172
184
66
132
336
77
50
77
8,699   58
8,799   36
8,899
8,999
9,099
9,199
9,299
9,399
22
27
28
34
29
21
- 9,499   19
9,599
9,699
9,799
23
16
27
- 9,899   16
- 9,999   28
and over  285
 Z 26 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1960
(Exclusive of Capital Expenditures from By-law Funds)
Total expenditure by school districts  $118,269,991.00
Add Department of Education expenditures for—
Administration,   grants  to  University  of
British Columbia, services, etc  $11,097,748.14
Teachers'Pension Fund 6%       3,420,490.31
Free text-books, maps, etc  613,393.39
       15,131,631.84
Grand total expenditure  ,  $133,401,622.84
COST PER PUPIL, CALENDAR YEAR 1960
Grand total cost of education  $133,401,622.84
Deduct—
Capital expenditure from current revenue __ $700,320.00
Debt charges on school district debt  14,294,712.00
Grant to University of British Columbia ____ 7,456,346.00
Grant to Victoria College  514,43 7.00
High Correspondence School  198,473.89
Elementary Correspondence School  76,760.98
Night-schools  66,933.64
Adult education  1,199,990.93
       24,507,974.44
Total operating costs  $108,893,648.40
Operating cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of 298,175 __ $365.20
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
Z 27
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GENERAL REVIEW
The Purpose of Education
There seems to be general agreement in the western world that the broad
purpose of education should aim at the maximum development of the individual
as a person and, as an extension of this, the maximum welfare of society, since
society expects the skills of the individual to be applied for the common good.
The first task of education, then, is to give every individual child the opportunity to develop his abilities and talents. The underlying philosophy of education
in the United Kingdom perhaps states it best, " that every child shall be educated
according to its age, ability and aptitude with equal opportunity for all." In order
to do this a broad but basic programme which takes into account the great variety
of abilities, aptitudes, and interests represented in the population is made available
at both the elementary- and secondary-school levels. Furthermore, instruction
based on individual needs and differences is important in the development of such
an objective.
In the second place, if our society is to flourish, individuals must be willing
to place their skills and talents at the disposal of the public. There must also
be developed a sense of civic responsibility and some skill in human relations
in order to work effectively with other people. The attainment of these objectives
leads to good citizenship.
These two aims of education—the maximum development of the individual
and effective citizenship in a society—are what the schools are attempting to carry
out. The efficiency of our schools, then, should be measured not only in terms
of academic knowledge and skills, but also by their ability to produce competent
citizens for our country.
The Royal Commission on Education
A Royal Commission on Education was set up on January 17, 1958, by Order
in Council to inquire into, assess, and report upon the Provincial education system.
In October, 1960, the report of the Commission was presented to the Provincial
Government and released to the public in the latter part of December. No event
in education in recent times in this Province has caused so much interest as has
this report. Immediately after the report was received by the Department of Education, it was decided to prepare a precis. This was carried out competently by
two members of the Department—Mr. J. R. Meredith, Director of Curriculum,
and Mr. P. J. Kitley, Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment. An excellent summary
was produced for general use. The precis was immediately distributed to District
Superintendents of Schools, School Boards, the press, and other interested groups.
Several weeks later the printed copies of the report became available through the
office of the Queen's Printer. In all, 158 recommendations were made by the Commission. Since January of this year the Department of Education has studied many
of the recommendations, several of which are far reaching. They covered virtually
every aspect of public school education in British Columbia, including its philosophy, the organization of the school system, school buildings and services, qualifications and training of teachers, teachers' salaries, the curriculum, text-books, as well
as school and community relations.
It was considered desirable to implement some of the recommendations immediately, and to this end certain legislation was passed at the 1961 Session of the
Legislature.
3
 Z 34 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
It is not possible in an annual report to describe in detail the work of the
Commission and its recommendations. However, it might be pointed out that the
Commission found many things to admire in the school system of the Province.
Their observations in this regard were summed up by stating " the British Columbia
public school system compares quite favourably with that of any other country."
Legislation
Several important amendments to the Public Schools Act and to the Rules of
the Council of Public Instruction were made during the 1961 Session of the Legislature.   Three broad categories were covered in this legislation.
First, sections required to implement certain recommendations of the Royal
Commission on Education. These involved eight amendments to the Act and three
to the Rules of the Council of Public Instruction. It is estimated that if all the
recommendations of the Royal Commission requiring legislation were to be implemented, twenty-two amendments to the Public Schools Act would be required.
Second, revisions to the educational finance formula. These were designed
to improve the cost-sharing formula for the basic educational programme in such
a way that the local burden of supporting educational services would be distributed
in a more equitable manner.
Third, amendments to clarify existing sections or to facilitate administrative
procedures at present in the Public Schools Act.
A new Manual of the School Law and Rules of the Council of Public Instruction, incorporating all previous revisions and amendments since 1958, became available near the close of the school-year 1960/61.
Technical and Vocational Education
In view of the new agreement between the Canadian Provinces and the Federal
Government, vocational and technical training in British Columbia took on renewed
activity during 1960/61. Plans for additional Provincial vocational schools are well
in hand, but the most important aspect of the new programme involves plans for a
Technological Institute, to be located on grounds of the Burnaby Vocational School.
An Advisory Council was appointed in May, along with a number of technical committees, to commence planning for this new institution. As the school-year draws
to an end, considerable progress has been made toward organizing the various
branches to be taught and a principal for the Institute is about to be selected.
Commonwealth Technical Training Week
Commonwealth Technical Training Week was observed throughout the Province during the last week in May and the first two days in June. This event was
officially opened by the Honourable the Minister of Education at the Burnaby
Vocational School on May 29th. During the week there were a number of press
releases on the subject, and the vocational schools at Nanaimo and Burnaby, the
Vancouver Vocational School, and the F. T. Fairey Vocational School in Victoria
put on displays of work for the public. Pamphlets were also provided to all the
secondary-school children in the Province. Principals and teachers in the secondary
schools drew the attention of parents and pupils to the importance of technical and
vocational education to the future welfare of British Columbia.
 report of superintendent z 35
The Departmental Conference
During the Easter vacation a Departmental conference, including all the
District Superintendents as well as members of the Department of Education staff,
was held in Victoria. The main purpose of this conference was to consider the
Report of the Royal Commission on Education. Early in the year the District
Superintendents were organized into study groups to prepare beforehand basic
material to be used at the conference. All of this was done in a most satisfactory
manner, and the credit for the organization of the conference and the success which
it ultimately attained can be attributed in very large measure to the Chief Inspector
of Schools, Mr. E. E. Hyndman. The Department of Education also acknowledges
the splendid work done by the District Superintendents subsequently in the preparation of reports which contain sufficient material and points of view useful to the
various planning committees which will be set up during the next two or three years.
(A more detailed account of the conference will be given in the Chief Inspector's
report.)
Appointments
The following school principals were appointed in May as District Superintendents of Schools and assumed their new duties on August 1st: Mr. Roland Rankin
Hanna, principal of the Maple Ridge Senior High School; Mr. Gordon Paton,
principal of the North Peace River Junior-Senior High School; Mr. D. P. Todd,
principal of the George Bonner Junior-Senior High School, Cobble Hill.
Acknowledgments
The school-year 1960/61 was one of the most active on record. In addition
to the normal responsibilities of the various officials of the Department, considerable
extra work was entailed as a result of the Report of the Royal Commission on Education. It became necessary for all senior personnel in the Department of Education to play an active part in studying and analysing the report and in planning for
certain sections of the report to be implemented for the beginning of the school-year,
September, 1961. I wish to thank all members of the Department and the District
Superintendents of Schools for their splendid co-operation, particularly this year
when there have been so many additional duties.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. F. K. ENGLISH
Superintendent of Education.
 Z 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
REPORT OF G. W. GRAHAM, B.A., ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF
EDUCATION (ADMINISTRATION)
School Districts
The Province is divided into ninety-eight districts for the purpose of administration of school affairs. These districts are of two classifications—municipal school
districts (seventy-three in number) and rural school districts (twenty-five in
number). Seventy-two of the municipal school districts and ten of the rural school
districts are commonly referred to as large school districts because they range in
area from 50 to 33,000 square miles. The remaining smaller school districts are
often referred to as unattached school districts. School Boards consisting of five,
seven, or nine trustees, elected for a term of two years, are responsible for the operation and administration of the district. There are 560 trustees serving in the Province. Ten school districts are administered by official trustees appointed by the
Council of Public Instruction.
One new school district was created at Fair Harbour, on the west coast of
Vancouver Island, in this school-year.
School Construction
During the 1960/61 school-year, referenda were passed in twenty school
districts authorizing $13,000,000 for school construction. The costs of building
have remained steady at the previous year's level. In 1960 there were 409 classrooms and special rooms and twenty-five gymnasium-auditoriums and activity
rooms completed. This is the smallest number completed in the past seven years.
The average cost of providing elementary buildings is $500 per pupil, and secondary
buildings is $950 per pupil.
The work of the School Planning Branch has greatly increased. Departmental
plans have been provided for fifty-two projects, resulting in a total contract amount
of $1,600,000. The majority of the planning has been for elementary schools of
from two to eight rooms; however, plans for three secondary schools were provided
on an experimental basis.
There is a trend toward increasing expenditures requested for school-site and
playground development.
Transportation
Transportation facilities are provided in seventy-seven of the eighty-two large
school districts and in two of the unattached school districts. Last year there were
402 district-owned buses, with 141 contract buses and nine water taxis operating.
These vehicles travelled approximately 30,000 miles per day and transported 45,250
pupils. School districts organize and operate the school bus systems for their
districts, and the Province shares in the costs as provided by the rules of the Council
of Public Instruction. The Provincial limits for walking distance are 2VS miles
for primary pupils and 3 miles for all other pupils. Approximately 80 per cent of
all pupils transported are within the above classification. The shared operating
costs for transportation for the year were $2,477,202, and the capital expenditure
for the purchase of new buses was $312,675.
 ADMINISTRATION BRANCH Z 37
Transportation assistance is paid to parents living in isolated areas who transport their children to school. The cost of this service to 1,500 pupils was $230,000
for this year.
Assistance to Isolated Areas
All pupils living in isolated areas, where neither school nor transportation is
available, may apply for correspondence work from the Correspondence Branch
of the Department of Education.
In conjunction with the Correspondence Branch and under section 20 of the
Public Schools Act, if four or more pupils are assembled for regular school-hours
daily and are tutored by a qualified instructor, then the Province will make a grant
of $15 per month per pupil doing satisfactory work toward the salary of the instructor.   Fifteen of these classes enrolling ninety-one pupils were in operation.
School Boards may pay boarding allowance to pupils who cannot be accommodated in dormitories and have to live away from home to continue their education. Four hundred and twenty-five pupils received such assistance, amounting to
$116,910. Boarding allowance is paid only to pupils attending public schools
within the Province.
 Z 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
Instructional Services
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S. (Ed.), ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION (INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES)
Instructional services include the work of the following divisions, each of which
has its own director who submits his own annual report: Curriculum; Tests,
Standards, and Research; High School Correspondence; Elementary School Correspondence; Visual Education; School Radio Broadcasts; Home Economics;
and the Text-book Branch. There are, in addition, aspects of instructional services
which do not fall readily under any one of the specific divisions.
Staff Meetings
Three regular staff meetings of directors of divisions were held during the year.
The March meeting was cancelled in anticipation of the Departmental conference
held in April. One meeting was held at the Jericho Hill School. Discussion topics,
introduced by appropriate speakers, included school radio broadcasts, vocational
schools, and the education of the deaf and the blind. The last meeting of the year
was devoted to changes in the work of divisions made necessary or desirable by the
recommendations of the Royal Commission on Education.
Accreditation of Schools
The Accrediting Committee considered ninety-six booklets and accepted forty-
eight schools for accreditation, four for the first time. Ten schools were accredited
for four years, eighteen for three years, five for two years, and fifteen for one year.
Two schools were removed from the accredited list. Remaining on the accredited
list from the previous year were fifty-four schools.
Interest elsewhere in Canada in the system of accrediting used in British Columbia is great. In response to requests, two explanatory articles appeared in educational publications during the year.
Organization of Secondary Schools
There was a slight reversal of the tendency noted last year toward separate
junior and senior high schools. The percentage of secondary pupils to be found
in these schools dropped slightly from 54.7 per cent in 1959/60 to 51.9 per cent in
1960/61.
The average size of schools again increased. The percentage of secondary
pupils in schools over 500 enrolment increased from 74.0 to 78.1 per cent. There
was, however, a drop from 11.4 to 9.0 per cent for those in schools over 2,000
enrolment.
With changes in the allotment of grades, the next decade will mark a transition period in secondary-school organization, with new patterns taking the place
of the old. The type of school at the lower secondary level will probably change
radically.
Most secondary schools arrange their time-tables for a five-period seven-day
week. Slightly less than one-third use the seven-period five-day week. Less than
one-tenth use other types of time-tables. Here again it is likely that changes will
take place because of the longer school-day.
As reported by the secondary schools, there are 22.8 pupils to each teacher
(including principals, counsellors, etc.).   Of teachers' time during the school-day,
 CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
Z 39
82.7 per cent is spent in classroom teaching, 3.6 per cent in study supervision, 4.0
per cent in counselling, 4.7 per cent in administration and supervision, and 5.0 per
cent in periods free from these duties. In addition, most teachers carry out supervisory duties after school-hours or sponsor extra-curricular activities.
Advanced Electives Most Frequently Chosen
No major changes took place in the popularity among students of the ten
advanced electives with greatest enrolments. Mathematics 91 displaced Biology 91
for second place; Home Economics 91 took seventh place over from History 91.
Order of most frequent choice in 1960/61 was as follows: Chemistry 91, Mathematics 91, Biology 91, English 91, Physics 91, Geography 91, Home Economics
91, History 91, English 93, and Industrial Arts 91.
Special Classes in Public Schools
These continue to increase in number, especially for the slow-learning or
slightly retarded pupil. This year saw a new category, special classes for the trainable or moderately mentally retarded, as three school districts took advantage of
the 1959 amendments to the Public Schools Act to establish them. Enrolments
shown in the table below are for September.
Number of Teachers
Number of Pupils
1960
1959
1960
1959
161
21
5
17
5
13
2
2
2
4
3
13
1
144
16
4
17
4
13
2
2
2
2
1
2,394
317
C1)
240
56
276
19
29
14
37
62
138
10
2,109
246
C1)
269
66
179
17
35
17
18
23
Speech..          	
	
Totals      -	
249
207
3.592          1          2.979
i Varies.
Schools for Retarded Children
The number of children in schools operated by chapters of the Association
for Retarded Children increased to 491 in September of 1960, in spite of the loss
of 138 children to special classes in public schools. Grants were received for 431
children of school age.
The following table shows the growth of these schools since grants were first
made to them by the Department:—
Number of
Districts
Number of
Schools
Pupils
Year
Eligible for
Grant
Ineligible for
Grant
Total
1960/61 	
38
36
31
33
40
38
36
35
22
431
445
402
309
292
60
39
29
12
25
491
1959/60.-.             -	
484
1958/59              	
431
1957/58  	
321
1956/57          	
317
1955/56 -	
168
 Z 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
Local Supervisory Personnel
The following table shows the number of district teachers employed as supervisors, special counsellors, and in other special capacities:—
I960 1959
Directors of instruction  11 8
Supervisors of instruction  56 53
Teacher consultants   27 28
Special counsellors  31 24
District teachers other than relieving teachers  36 27
Totals  161 132
Retention of Pupils in Schools
The holding power of the schools increases steadily, with each Grade XII in
succession having a higher percentage of the Grade VII enrolment of five years
before.   Recent figures are shown in the following table:—
For each 100 pupils enrolled in Grade VII Grade XII enrolled
in 1954/55 in 1959/60._.._ 58 pupils
in 1953/54 in 1958/59....- 56 pupils
in 1952/53 in 1957/58.____ 53 pupils
in 1951/52 in 1956/57  51 pupils
in 1950/51 in 1955/56- 52 pupils
in 1949/50 in 1954/55 ... 52 pupils
in 1948/49 in 1953/54..... 48 pupils
Interrupted General Programme for Adult Students
A significant forward step in adult education will be taken in September, 1961,
when the new Interrupted General Programme for Adult Students comes into effect.
Adults will be able to take high-school courses through approved public night-
schools or other authorized adult classes. These courses will be credited toward
certificates of Grade X or Grade XI equivalency, as well as high-school graduation
on a General Programme. Regulations have been drawn up in such a way as to
protect the validity and standards of the course offered.
New Legislation and Royal Commission Recommendations
The Report of the Royal Commission on Education was released in the latter
part of December, 1960. In the following spring, legislation to implement certain
of the recommendations was incorporated in amendments to the Public Schools Act.
Changes in the Rules of the Council of Public Instruction were also necessary;
these, in turn, required planning and action within the Department.
1. As a result of the return of Grade VII to the elementary school, administrative circulars concerning accommodation, staffing, time allotments, and curriculum
were prepared and issued.
2. Entitlement of teachers in both elementary schools and in small schools
enrolling both elementary and secondary pupils was increased. This, together
with the change in Grade VII organization, involved changes in the forms and procedure used for determining entitlement.
3. Kindergartens were brought under new regulations. This also involved
a new scale of entitlement.
 CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES Z 41
4. A procedure for ensuring that Grade XIII is taught only in those schools
where staff and facilities are suitable was put into effect.
5. Suggestions as to methods of using the longer instructional day for secondary schools effectively were sent out to all schools.
6. Many formal and informal committee meetings were held to study plans
for both immediate and long-term changes.
7. New report cards, designed to provide further information for parents, were
planned for next school-year at all grade levels except kindergarten.
Summer Schools
An increase in the number of summer schools provided by local School Boards
is noticeable. These summer schools normally are held for pupils who have failed
to complete their whole year of work in the regular school session. Fees charged
must be high enough to make the schools self-supporting. Summer schools have
been approved in the following centres: Victoria, Vancouver, Burnaby, Dawson
Creek, New Westminster, Duncan, Kimberley, Penticton, Nelson, Kamloops, Richmond, and Prince Rupert.
Curriculum Revision
In addition to the routine duties of this office, which included attendance at
various educational conferences or school functions, membership on a variety of
committees and boards, the preparation and distribution of reports, and instructional materials, a large proportion of time was spent in the organization and con-
venorship of curriculum revision committees. Two of these were in the sciences
at the secondary-school level, physics and biology; the other, in the preparation
of adapted programmes for slow learners in the elementary schools. Details are
covered in the report of the Division of Curriculum.
Division of Curriculum
REPORT OF J. R. MEREDITH, B.A., B.Ed., DIRECTOR
The work of this Division during the past year has been extended as a result
of the inquiry made by the Royal Commission on Education. In addition to carrying on regular curriculum development work, the Division was involved in the
preparation of a precis of the 445-page report of the Commission and in the analysis
of the 158 recommendations made by the Commissioners. Some sixty of these
recommendations have direct reference to curriculum. Since they have been offered
with the expressed intent of improving the curriculum, they deserve the most careful study, not merely to determine ways and means of implementing them, but also
to ensure that they would be effectual in producing desirable improvements.
It has been possible to make some changes almost immediately. Others are in
the process of being made. Still others will require much more time and study than
has presently been given.
Curriculum Changes Completed
Among the curriculum changes which were completed during the past year are
the following: The time allotments and subject-matter content for the basic subjects
prescribed for Grade VII were adjusted to allow for increased emphasis on the
 Z 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
fundamentals. A new Canadian text-book for elementary-school social studies was
prescribed. The physical and health education course revisions begun two years
ago were completed for Grades VII to XII, and a set of teacher reference texts was
selected and distributed to all secondary schools. Two new guidance courses were
developed, and new text-books were prescribed and issued for Grades IX and X.
The revisions in guidance and physical and health education courses included the
development of a series of first-aid lessons and the provision of a St. John Ambulance text-book as a part of the course prescription for all Grade X classes. A
revised course in Latin was developed, and a suitable Canadian text-book was
selected for Grade IX. A revised course and new text-books were selected for
Grade XIII physics, to bring this course into line with the course offered in the first
year of university.
New and Continuing Course Revision and Text-book Selection Studies
Several revision studies begun last year were continued. These included the
revision of the elementary-school arithmetic programme, the revision of the guidance
course for Grade XI, the bookkeeping course for Grades XI and XII, and the
chemistry course for Grade XIII. Certain experimental work in course development begun last year was also continued in the fields of Russian language courses,
senior high-school mathematics, and elementary-school French. In connection with
the last of these, the experimental work has reached a point where it was possible
to give permissive authorization to all Boards of School Trustees to permit the
teaching of French to selected elementary-school classes at the Grades VI and VII
level, provided a qualified teacher is available on the staff.
Revision work and text-book selection studies were begun in certain additional
subjects, particularly as a result of the recommendations of the Royal Commission
on Education. A study of dictionaries appropriate for elementary schools was
begun. Course revision and text-book selection work was begun for English, French,
and mathematics at the Grade VIII level. These are directly related to proposals
regarding reorganization of the secondary-school curriculum.
Information Service to Schools
In conjunction with the office of the Assistant Superintendent (Instruction),
the Division of Curriculum is responsible for the preparation and distribution of
directives concerning Department policy, procedures, and other information pertinent to education. The orderly development of an expanding school system makes
this service essential. The information is provided by means of specially designed
Department circulars—administrative, curriculum, announcement, and teaching
aids. Five sets of these circulars were issued, with a mailing list of over 1,950
during the past school-year. In addition, the Department, with the assistance of
two special committees of teachers and librarians, provides information to all schools
concerning library books selected as being suitable for school libraries. Lists of
these books are prepared three times a year from the committees' reviews of several
hundred books submitted by publishers. Over 1,750 schools and local libraries
receive this service.
Acknowledgment
As noted in previous reports, curriculum development work is undertaken with
the assistance of special committees. During the year under review, a total of fourteen course revision and text-book selection committees were at work; two standing
committees reviewed library books; three special committees assisted with experimental course work; and three standing committees in special fields assisted on
specific curriculum problems.
 curriculum and general educational SERVICES Z 43
In addition, it was considered desirable to reorganize the former standing professional committee into two committees to advise on general curriculum planning
at the elementary- and secondary-school levels. These committees are representative of the professional groups engaged in public education. Their work is largely
that of advising on the more technical aspects of curriculum planning and development.
Mention should also be made of the Provincial Curriculum Advisory Board,
which consists of some twenty-five professional and lay representatives. The Board
met three times during the last school-year to advise on general matters relating to
curriculum development. The agenda for each meeting included curriculum work
presently being undertaken, as well as a study of special subjects, including music,
kindergartens, and the recommendations arising from the inquiry made by the Royal
Commission on Education.
It is impossible, in the space of this report, to acknowledge in full the work of
the more than 200 persons acting on the twenty-two Department advisory committees. It can only be said that the assistance given by these people is very sincerely
appreciated. Their willingness, their scholarship, and their devotion to the cause
of public education is a source of continual inspiration and a tribute to their profession.
 Z 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
SPECIAL SERVICES
REPORT OF WILLIAM A. PLENDERLEITH, M.A., D.P/ed., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.,
CO-ORDINATOR OF SPECIAL SERVICES
The Conveyance of School-children
This year the Report of the Royal Commission on Education recommended
" that primary consideration be given to the establishment of small local elementary
schools wherever added facilities in the form of classrooms or transportation are
necessary." Fifteen years earlier, Dr. Maxwell Cameron stressed the fact that his
proposal to enlarge school districts did not imply the elimination of small elementary
schools and the transportation of young pupils to distant centres. Notwithstanding
Dr. Cameron's clearly stated recommendation, many small elementary schools
were closed when the larger units were formed, and the pupils from these closed
schools were transported from their local areas to consolidated schools. The
Department issued circulars indicating that it preferred to pay capital grants for
permanent assets, such as new local schools, rather than for impermanent assets,
such as school buses. The Department also stated that it preferred to pay operating
grants toward instruction services in the form of teachers' salaries, rather than to
pay grants for non-instructional services, such as the wages of bus-drivers and the
operation of buses.
By the year 1952 the practice of transporting elementary pupils away from
their home centres to attend consolidated schools had become so prevalent in the
Province that hundreds of thousands of dollars were being spent unnecessarily for
non-instructional services in the form of transportation, and in spite of repeated
suggestions from the Department advocating the building of local elementary
schools, there was no significant evidence to indicate that the policy was being
generally implemented at the district level.
The proof that these suggestions had little effect is attested by the fact that
transportation costs increased from $417,651 (or less than 1 per cent of the total
district operating costs) in 1945/46 to $1,702,229 (or more than 4 per cent of
the total district operating costs) in 1952/53. The following year new regulations
governing the approval of grants for the conveyance of school-children were introduced. Departmental walk-limits were defined, and the cost of transporting pupils
within these walk-limits became a local responsibility. To encourage the construction of small local elementary schools, standard plans were supplied free to School
Boards who wished to utilize them. Provision was made for increased supervision
in the small schools by giving grants for teacher-consultants and supervisors. The
teacher entitlement for the small schools was readjusted so that a second teacher
could be employed when the school population reached twenty-six and a third
teacher when the school population reached seventy-one.
These incentives to encourage the building of small local elementary schools
have had a marked effect in reducing the percentage of the educational budget
spent on transportation. Because of the co-operation of the trustees in implementing these policies during the past six years, hundreds of elementary classrooms have
been built in the local districts where the pupils reside, and the percentage of the
budget required for transportation has been brought back to a more reasonable level.
The following figures, taken from the Annual Reports of the Public Schools for the
years 1955 to 1960, indicate the change in trend:—
 SPECIAL SERVICES Z 45
Cost of Pupil Conveyance Compared with Total District Expenditures
Calendar
Year
Total District
Expenditures
Conveyance
Costs
Conveyance
Costs as a
Percentage
of District
Expenditures
1955 —  	
$62,238,464
$69,234,423
$80,966,873
$91,279,662
$105,044,901
$118,269,991
$1,812,353
$1,918,902
$2,104,443
$2,236,918
$2,340,813
$2,477,202
2.9
1956  	
2.8
1957  -
1958                                            	
2.5
2.4
1959	
2.2
1960.	
2.1
Transportation Assistance
In addition to the grants paid to School Boards for the operation of school
buses, provision is made for assistance to the parents where there are insufficient
children to justify the establishment of a regular school bus route. If such parents
provide for the transportation of their children, the Department shares up to $ 1 per
day per child on a mileage basis. During the past school-year 1,490 pupils from
fifty-nine districts utilized this means of conveyance at a total cost of $229,382.
School Dormitories
In many of the isolated rural sections of large school districts it is impossible
to provide school bus services for pupils of school age. In order to enable these
students to attend a high school offering a full programme, authority is given to
Boards in the Public Schools Act to operate school dormitories.
Although there are now nine school districts providing dormitization, these
institutions for public school students are of comparatively recent origin in British
Columbia, the first being established at Prince George in 1947.
Typical accommodation in school district dormitories consists of sleeping-
rooms or cubicles with cots or bunks, two or four students to a room, boys in one
wing of the building, girls in the other, and washrooms in each wing. Most of the
dormitories have a common dining-room, a recreation and study room, staff quarters,
kitchen, storerooms, laundry-room, and heating plant.
The fees charged in 1960/61 ranged from $20 to $30 per month for children
resident within the school district. The fees for the dormitization of pupils coming
from outside the school district ranged from $27 to $35.
The fees charged cover, generally, no more than half the actual cost of operation. The cost of operation not covered by fees is an expense of the Board which
is accepted as shareable by the Department provided it does not exceed one-half the
cost of operation.
Boarding Allowances
Boarding allowances of up to $30 per month may be provided to both elementary and secondary students who have to come from remote areas to attend
public school and who are unable to obtain accommodation in a school dormitory.
During the past school-year, 481 students from twenty-seven school districts
received a total of $131,570 in such boarding allowances.
Jericho Hill Advisory Board
This Board met once each school-month during the year. Monthly reports
were made to the Department respecting the operation and requirements of the
school.
 Z 46 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
The accompanying report from Dr. C. E. MacDonald, the Superintendent of
the Jericho Hill School, contains pertinent information respecting the operation of
this institution.
 DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH Z 47
DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.P/ED., DIRECTOR
Terminal Course Testing
Tests that were administered during 1960/61 included two English 40 tests,
Language and Literature, and three Mathematics 30 tests, one in ability and two
in achievement. Both were based on the prescribed courses. They provided seven
sub-test scores in English and four in mathematics for which norms have been
obtained that can be used semi-diagnostically by teachers. Two forms of the Ma
30 achievement test were administered to alternate pupils to maintain accurate
equivalence of norms. Separate norms also have been obtained for University
and General Programme students and for both sexes. The typical superiority of
boys in mathematics and of girls in English is evident in the following data.
Mean Scores, Terminal Course Tests, May, 1961
ENGLISH 40
Language
Male
Female
University
Programme
General
Programme
Total
Words	
Grammar  —	
24.6
29.4
11.5
25.8
32.0
14.4
25.4
30.9
13.2
21.8
26.7
9.3
25.2
30.7
12.9
65.5
72.2
69.5
57.7
68.8
Literature
Prose.  	
Poetry    -	
Drama	
Sight work  -	
16.9
19.5
17.7
35.0
18.3
22.0
19.2
38.7
17.8
21.0
18.7
37.3
13.7
16.4
15.0
29.5
17.6
20.7
18.5
36.8
89.1
98.3
94.8
74.6
93.6
MATHEMATICS 30
Mathematical Ability Test
Male
Female
University
Programme
General
Programme
Total
Part I                   	
19.1
9.0
12.9
18.4
7.7
11.8
18.9
8.4
12.5
17.1          i          18.7
Part II                   -
7.9                        8.4
Part III  	
11.6                      12.4
Total score	
40.9
37.9
39.7
36.5                      39.5
1
Mathematics
30 Achievement Tests
24.1
25.9
22.2
23.9
23.3
25.2
22.0
22.7
23.2
FormB	
25.0
The five tests are to be reprinted and released to teachers. The English 40
tests should be of particular value to teachers of high-school English in reducing
the burden of marking which includes large numbers of subjective tests and essays.
 z 48 public schools report, 1960/61
French Language Test
The B.C. High School French Test, Form S, had been administered to students
enrolled in the former French II and French III courses in May, 1950. The same
test has now been readministered to the three new course levels—French 20 in
May, 1958, French 91 in March, 1961, and French 92 in June, 1959—thus making
comparisons possible over an eight- to eleven-year period.
Comparison of Mean French Language Scores 1950 vs. 1958-61
(Equated to June 1st)
French 20,
1958
French II,
1950
French 91,
1961
French III,
1950
French 92,
1959
9.8
15.2
8.2
8.4
9.8
12.0
9.8
6.9
16.2
20.9
15.5
10.4
15.2
15.2
14.2
7.9
21.1
23.4
20.2
12.1
The average student who completes the present four-year French programme
is between the 82nd and 92nd percentiles on the former French III norms. Even
those who complete only three years are above the former norms, particularly in
Grammar and Civilization. This means that there has been a tremendous improvement in terms of students obtaining University Entrance standing in French. It
must be noted, however, that those who complete a major in French now have one
additional year of instruction and are members of a much more highly selected
group. Concern is felt regarding the small proportion of the original population
continuing the study of languages beyond the Grade X level.
Scores reported during the year, including 1,676 I.Q.s for Grade XIII, totalled
118,849.
Retention and Scholastic Aptitude in High-school French Courses
Course
Enrolment
1949/50
Mean
I.Q.,
1950
Reten-
tion1
Course and Year
Enrolment
Mean
I.Q.,
1958
Retention 3-
French II 	
French III              	
3,824
3,084
113.8
113.2
Per Cent
34
27
French 20, 1958/59
French 91, 1959/60
French 92, 1960/61
8,458
2,502
1,469
116.1
119.3
Per Cent
42
12
7
i Retention as per cent o£ average enrolment in the corresponding Grades II to VI.
Additional Work
Studies of enrolment and retention were continued. As may be seen elsewhere,
high-school enrolments are rising more rapidly than at any time in the past, even
though net interprovincial immigration of children was only 750 in 1959 and 1,137
in 1960. (In comparison, the fifteen-year average is 3,756 children.) Over 60
per cent of the students enrolled in Grades II to VI now reach Grade XII, and two-
thirds of the latter—that is, 40 per cent—are attempting to complete the University
Programme.
During the year many of the man-hours of the Division were devoted to
problems related to University Entrance and Senior Matriculation examinations.
 DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
Z 49
(a) A survey of Grade XIII students was made to compare their ability with
that of the Grade XII U.E. students and their achievement with that of students
going directly to first-year university.
(b) University Entrance candidates completing the Ma 91 experimental course
that has been given in six schools for the past two years were compared with students
of equivalent ability in the regular Ma 91 course. No significant differences were
found. Because of different treatment at the University of British Columbia, comparisons at higher levels have not been possible.
(c) A large number of scales were revised and recalculated, particularly those
used for the August supplemental examinations. The scores of public school
scholarship candidates are now incorporated in all scales. Studies of the effects of
changes in failure rates are being carried out annually.
(d) An experiment in computer programming was conducted to parallel the
graphical methods of scaling. Scores were successfully transmuted mechanically
and collated to the mark-entry level. This method requires punched-card input and
therefore will require complete revision of exam-handling procedures, but it is
believed that it will be essential by 1964, when the first post-war wave of matriculants reaches Grade XII.
Grade XII enrolments—
June, 1954 __.
June, 1961
June, 1964 (estimate) __.
June, 1974 (estimate) _
6,663
12,700*
15,000
24,000
1 Actual enrolment from final recap when available.
(e) An investigation of the relation of High School and University Entrance
graduation ratios to scholastic aptitude test results and Grade VII and XII enrolments showed that:—
There is a direct relationship between the proportion of elementary-school
students graduating from high school (U.P.-f-G.P.) and the population of the school
district. The proportion graduating is three to four times as large in the largest
school district as in a group of the smallest districts. This is partly due to the fact
that retention to Grade XII is twice as high and indicates the effect of the provision
of non-academic types of courses in addition to other facilities.
The proportion of U.E. graduates is largest in districts with the highest proportion of students of high academic potential (I.Q.s, 110-f-). Such districts are
small cities and suburban areas with Grade XII enrolments of 200 to 400. The
probability of a Grade VII student with an I.Q. of 110+ completing University
Entrance successfully is twice as great in such districts as in those with the lowest
density of population. It also is slightly greater than in the largest districts. This
seems to indicate that an academic or a non-academic environment can be developed in a school district that is not entirely dependent on size.
 Z 50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
HOME ECONOMICS
REPORT OF MISS MILDRED C. ORR, B.A., B.S., DIRECTOR
Total number of students taking Home Economics:—
Elementary schools      1,425
Junior high schools  24,462
  25,887
In Grade VII  12,077
In Grade VIII  12,746
In Grade IX     1,058
Special classes  6
25,887
Senior high schools   18,880
High-school boys  95
Technical students  78
Special classes   228
Jericho Hill School  42
45,115
The above figures cover statistics for public schools only and show an increase
of 3,024 in enrolment over 1959/60.
In addition to the above, there were a number of students in public schools
taking home economics courses through High School Correspondence instruction
under the supervision of home economics teachers who were not qualified to teach
senior home economics courses.
There were also a number of home economics classes conducted in private
schools and some in Indian schools.
During the 1960/61 session there were 194 home economics centres in the
public schools of the Province, showing an increase of ten over the total in public
schools for last year.
Centres Rooms
One-room centre  74 74
Two-room centre  74 148
Three-room centre   31 93
Four-room centre  8 32
Five-room centre  3 15
Six-room centre  3 18
Eight-room centre  1 8
Totals  194 388
New home economics centres were included in the following new public schools
which were opened during the 1960/61 session: Rosedale Junior High School,
Chilliwack; Mount Prevost Junior High School, Duncan; Dr. Knox Junior High
School, Kelowna; Argyle Junior High School, North Vancouver; Hugh Boyd Junior
High School, Richmond; Eagle River Elementary-Senior High School, Sicamous;
Gordon Head Junior High School, Victoria; Mount Douglas Senior High School,
Victoria; and Prince of Wales Senior High School, Vancouver.
 HOME ECONOMICS Z 51
Additional home economics rooms were added to the Smithers Junior-Senior
High School, Smithers; Queen Elizabeth Senior High School, Surrey; and Williams
Lake Junior-Senior High School, Williams Lake.
There were 379 teachers of home economics in the public schools of this Province, showing an increase of nineteen over the previous year. Of the total number,
16 per cent of the home economics teachers were new to teaching home economics
in British Columbia. As in 1958/59 and 1959/60, the percentage of home economics teachers in public schools who held home economics degrees remained at
54 per cent. A large number of home economics teachers hold Elementary Certificates, or Academic Certificates with Bachelor of Arts, or Professional C or
Professional Basic Certificates on the Bachelor of Education programme. The
teachers in the latter four groups have varying amounts of training in home
economics.
The number of Grade XII students electing Home Economics 91, which is
the final course for the major in home economics, has increased during the past
five years from 1,476 in 1955/56 to 2,752 in 1960/61.
Conference-workshops, which varied in length from two hours to a day, were
held early in the fall term for groups of home economics teachers in six districts.
An extra-sessional course in home economics was offered by the University
of British Columbia for the fourth consecutive year. This year the course was conducted by Miss Maud F. Bailey, B.H.E., M.A., and was held at New Westminster.
Fifteen teachers were in attendance.
 Z 52
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
High School Correspondence Branch
REPORT OF D. KERSHAW, B.A., ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
Dr. Edith E. Lucas, the Director of High School Correspondence, was honoured this year by being chosen to set up a correspondence school in the new British
West Indies Federation. Dr. Lucas was granted a year's leave of absence by the
Department, and will remain in Jamaica until the end of 1961.
Enrolment
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the
year 1960/61 was 18,969. This shows an increase of 1,665 students, or 9.6 per
cent over 1959/60, when the enrolment was 17,304.
1. Number of Students.—The enrolment by age over the last five years, and the
per cent increase in the total enrolment, is shown in the following table:—
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
4,382
7,579
5,460
8,967
9,8341
6,5552
10,1201
7,1842
10,1921
8,7772
11,961
14,427
2,466
20.3
16,389
1,962
13.6
17,304
915
5.6
18,969
1,665
9.6
1 Under 19 years.
2 Nineteen years and over.
2. School Students by Grade.—Students who could properly be called school
students (those registered in a school or taking a full grade by correspondence)
were classified by grade as follows:—
Number Per Cent
Grade IX   1,028 15.7
Grade X    1,612 24.7
Grade XI   1,862 28.6
Grade XII   2,010 31.0
Totals...
6,512
100.0
These figures do not include students who merely continue a course from one
year to the next, since we have no way of determining whether or not they returned
to school in the fall.
3. School Students Registered in a School.—A large number of school students
were registered in a school and took one or more courses by correspondence. These
figures do not include those students who merely continue a course from one year
to the next, since we have no way of knowing whether or not they returned to
school.
Number
Per Cent
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment
225
1,745
3,444
362
3.9
30.2
59.6
6.3
1.2
Small high schools (fewer than 140 students in Grades IX to XII)	
9.2
18.2
1.9
Totals.	
5,776
100.0
30.5
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
Z 53
Students registered in a school enrolled in correspondence courses for the
following reasons:—
Number Per Cent
Course not offered at school  3,641 59.6
Time-table difficulties   1,272 20.8
Failure in the course  1,187 19.5
Other reasons          6 0.1
4. Students Taking a Full Grade by Correspondence.—A total of 564 students enrolled in a full grade by correspondence for the following reasons:—
Living too far from a school __
Too ill to attend school	
In receipt of social assistance
Needed at home	
Other	
Number
... 205
_.._    98
1
Not free or continuing from a previous year  244
Totals
564
Per Cent
36.3
17.4
0.2
1.4
1.4
43.3
100.0
Classification of Students by Fees
Students may be classified according to the fee they paid for each course.
1. School-age Students Charged No Fees:
• t   .  .        ..       ,                        ,       . Percentage of Total
Not in attendance at School                                          Number Enrolment
Because of illness       201 1.1
Because of need at home        21 0.1
Because of distance factor      259 1.4
In receipt of social assistance        55 0.3
In correctional institutions      171 0.9
In attendance at a superior school      225 1.2
Totals      932 5.0
2. School-age Students Charged Fees:
Number
In high schools with fewer than 140 students
in Grades IX to XII ($5 per course)   1,745
In high schools with more than 140 students in
Grades IX to XII ($8 per course)  3,444
In private schools ($8 per course)      362
Summer students enrolled in courses in which
they failed ($8 per course)       193
Gainfully employed ($5 per course)       841
Totals   6,585
Percentage of Total
Enrolment
9.2
18.2
1.9
1.0
4.4
34.7
 Z 54 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1960/61
3. Adult Students Charged No Fees:
Number
Because of illness  153
Because in receipt of social assistance  107
Because in a correctional institution  460
Enrolled in preparation for Canadian citizenship   267
Totals       987
4. Adult Students Charged Fees:
Taking academic courses— Number
Resident in British Columbia   ($8  per
course)   3,160
Non-resident in British Columbia  ($16
per course)       177
Taking technical courses ($12 per course)—
Resident in British Columbia       679
Non-resident in British Columbia      286
Totals   4,302
Percentage of Total
Enrolment
0.8
0.5
2.4
1.4
5.1
Percentage of Total
Enrolment
16.7
0.9
3.6
1.5
22.7
5. Senior Matriculation Students Charged Fees:
Number
Resident in British Columbia ($20 per course)   1,230
Non-resident in British  Columbia  ($25  per
course)         23
Totals     1,253
Percentage of Total
Enrolment
6.5
0.1
6.6
6. Students Abroad.—British Columbia taxpayers living abroad and in other
Provinces of Canada were charged rates applicable to British Columbia residents
($8 per course).   Number, 141; percentage of total enrolment, 0.7.
Completion of Papers
The number of papers marked over the last five years and the per cent increase
per year is shown in the following table:—
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60     1960/61
I
Number of papers marked.—
Per cent increase (per year).
130,941
158,236
20.8
178,246
12.7
196,618      I        205,435
10.6 4.5
I
Instructional Staff
An inside staff of four course-writers and an outside staff of eighty-four instructors were employed during the year. The outside instructors were paid on a piecework basis.
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
Z 55
New and Revised Courses
New and revised courses offered during the year were as follows: English
Language 10, English Literature 10, Homemaking 10a and 30a, Auto Mechanics
30, Forestry 30.
Courses
The number of students who enrolled in each of the high-school subjects during
the year was as follows:—
Subject
School
Age
Adult
Total
English Literature 10, 20, 30, 40, 100	
1,289
1,387
1,262
646
2,361
718
684
511
598
252
248
376
865
466
1,104
247
48
7
23
241
128
53
17
3
652
217
232
65
248
162
204
114
6
231
192
130
141
63
18
22
120
3
1
2
1
3
1,471
1,781
526
46
2,820
167
503
229
142
155
38
167
53
107
240
81
32
16
666
64
119
24
45
6
115
106
495
19
418
101
213
140
4
54
93
168
184
21
3
47
37
19
1
23
99
2
11
174
1
9
387
69
267
2,760
English Language 10, 20, 30, 31, 40, 101-               	
Social Studies 10, 20, 30, 32, 33 —	
3,168
1,788
Health and Personal Development 10, 20, 30 ■	
692
Mathematics 10, 20, 30, 12, 91, 100, 101 	
5,181
Science 10, 20—   	
885
French 10, 20, 91, 92, 110, 120	
1,187
German 10, 20, 91, 92, 110, 90, 120                                      .	
Latin 10, 20, 91, 92, 110, 120—                                   ..	
740
740
Spanish 10, 20, 91, 92, 110                                    	
407
Agriculture 10, 20, 38, 39  _	
286
Art 10, 20, 39                                            	
543
Homemaking 10, 20, 30, 91    .
918
573
Typewriting 10, 20	
1,344
Mechanical Drawing 10, 20	
328
Bible Literature 10, 20, 30, 40	
80
23
English and Citizenship 19, 29 ,;, 	
689
305
Electricity 20                                               	
247
77
62
Sheet-metal Work 20.	
9
Auto Mechanics 20, 30	
Shorthand 21, 31-	
767
323
Bookkeeping 34, 91	
727
84
History 91, 101, 102. 	
Geography 91                                   	
666
263
English 32, 91, 93, 99   	
417
Radio and Wireless 30 _	
Metal-mining 30                .                  	
Forestry 30  	
254
10
285
Biology 91     .
285
Chemistry 91, 101 	
Physics 91, 101                             .     .
298
325
Home Furnishing 23— _ _	
84
21
69
Law 93                                 	
157
Vocational Courses
Air Navigation I, II  	
19
1
Dressmaking ..                   .    . .
Electricity for the Building Trades 	
26
99
2
12
176
Mathematics for Steam Engineering Second Class   	
1
10
390
69
267
English for New Canadians
During the year this division supplied 1,964 students with new material from
our course in English and Citizenship I; 830 students were supplied with material
from English and Citizenship II; 74 with English and Citizenship III; 306 students
 Z 56 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1960/61
took the course in English 19 and 383 students took the course in English 29 by
correspondence. In addition, 267 students were enrolled in the Preparation for
Citizenship Course. Classes in English were held in fifty-two night-school centres,
and material was supplied for other classes and individuals in eighty-nine small,
isolated places throughout the Province. Since volunteer instructors no longer
make yearly reports, it is impossible to estimate how many students have been using
books already supplied.
Adult Education
Enrolment—                                                          1959/60 i960/6i
Total enrolment  17,304 18,969
Adult enrolment (19 years and over)      7,184 8,777
Per cent adults       41.5 46.3
Employment—
Adults employed      6,698
Adults unemployed      2,079
8,777
Unemployed Students Exempt from Fees
A number of unemployed students were exempt from fees for the following
reasons:—
Illness and hospital      153
Correctional institution      460
Social assistance      107
Other      347
Total   1,067
Adult Students Completing on the Interrupted Programme
A total of 1,058 students was completing the University Entrance requirements
under the Interrupted Programme.
Enrolment in Courses
The number of adult students enrolled in each course will be found under my
report of High School and Vocational Courses.
Elementary Correspondence School
REPORT OF ARTHUR H. PLOWS, B.Ed., DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1960/61 there were 1,091 pupils enrolled in Elementary Correspondence School. Of these, 999 were enrolled at Victoria and the
remaining ninety-two at Pouce Coupe in the Peace River District.
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
enrolled in victoria
Z 57
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Total
1
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
September	
112
103
107
70
70
80
64
68
674
October	
120
109
115
71
75
84
80
83
737
November	
125
118
117
78
78
90
84
92
782
December	
124
128
120
81
83
91
91
108
826
January	
134
129
125
88
86
95
91
125
873
February— 	
140
132
132
92
85
99
95
131
906
144
144
141
146
128
125
98
105
86
86
96
102
95
101
145
147
933
956
May 	
141
147
133
111
87
101
108
154
982
June 	
141
148
135
114
90
102
no
159
999
ENROLLED AT POUCE COUPE (PEACE RIVER BRANCH)
September.
October	
November.
December-
January.—
February-
March	
April	
May. _
June	
9
7
6
7
4
4
3
5
14
8
12
10
6
5
6
6
14
10
13
11
6
5
7
6
14
10
13
11
6
5
7
6
13
13
14
12
8
5
11
6
14
14
16
12
8
5
10
8
14
14
16
13
8
5
10
9
15
14
16
14
8
5
11
9
15
14
16
14
8
5
11
9
15
14
15
15
8
5
11
9
45
67
72
72
82
87
89
92
92
92
The number of papers marked in the two centres were as follows: Victoria,
137,959; Pouce Coupe, 11,190; total, 149,149.
In addition to the number of pupils and papers shown above, 318 students
were enrolled in the Adult Section and 7,172 papers marked.
Thus the services of the school were used by 1,409 persons and 156,321
papers were marked. The average enrolment per instructor was 100 pupils, and
each instructor marked an average of 11,165 papers. The average number of
papers submitted per pupil was 137, as compared with an average of 119 in
1959/60.
As an additional service, kindergarten kits were sent to eighty-seven preschool-age children.
Authorized under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, correspondence instruction classes were established at fourteen centres with a total enrolment of
eighty-seven pupils.
The Victoria staff consisted of a Director, thirteen instructors, and a clerical
staff of five; at Pouce Coupe, one instructor and one clerk.
 Z 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
REPORT OF MARGARET A. MUSSELMAN, B.A.,
DIRECTOR OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS
The following is a review of the work and services of the Broadcasts Branch
of the Department of Education for the school-year 1960/61.
Radio
Ranging from primary-grade science, character education, music, through
wide intermediate subject-matter, up to senior secondary French and vocational
guidance, 146 programmes were planned and prepared by this department. (This
is a reduction of twelve in number from 1959/60, but with no reduction in time.
More half-hour rather than fifteen- or twenty-minute broadcasts were scheduled.
This was an economy measure, coupled with a successful experiment—the use of
more definite classroom participation quiz sessions as part of the half-hour.) Production supervision of each of the 146 programmes was undertaken by either the
Director or the Assistant Director.
Script analyses were made of thirty-seven additional western regional shared
programmes. For fifty-two national Canadian Broadcasting Corporation programmes, this department had a voice in advice and assessment. A resultant total
of 235 programmes was available for classroom participation.
Making the broadcasts of value to schools requires:—
(1) Study of teacher comments regarding previous series; discussions with
teachers, teacher groups, and specialists to determine the content and
manner of presentation of each year's programmes.
(2) (a) Preparation of the Teachers' Bulletin outlining the schedule for the
year, together with background information and suggestions for the use
of each broadcast. Preparation of music, French, and art booklets to
supplement broadcasts.
(b) Packaging and mailing of the above—each year trying to adjust
to increasing school demand. Quantities in 1960/61 were: Teachers'
Bulletins, 10,000; Pictures in the Air, 4,000; Junior Music, 20,000;
Ecoutez, 10,000; Intermediate Music (Manitoba), 41,000; Young
Canada Listens (C.B.C.), 7,000. The number of music and French
booklets was not adequate for the demand.
(3) Preparation of each script, including several discussions on content and
format, with selected free-lance script-writers. Editing, revision, and
rewriting in various amounts is necessary for each script before it is
mimeographed and ready for dead-line production.
(4) Auditioning and rehearsing of student actors and choirs, as well as selection of professional performers, with due knowledge of, and regard for,
union regulations.
(5) Maintaining contact with schools through a carefully planned evalution
system and through promotional reminders of series. We always regret
the inability to do extensive school-visiting throughout the Province. Any
that is done is of great mutual benefit. Student work in creative writing
and art is sent to us in tremendous quantities as a result of special series.
Acknowledgment and constructive criticism is made of the work, resulting in appreciative comments and letters from schools.
 DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
Z 59
Demonstrating and discussing the use of school broadcasts was undertaken
with classes of the College of Education in Victoria during the summer session, and
in Vancouver during the winter and summer sessions.
Response to British Columbia School Broadcasts
for
for
1. The British Columbia Department of Education won a first award
" Listening Is Fun" (intermediate music appreciation) from the Institute
Education by Radio-Television, The Ohio State University.
2. Annual reports on the use of school broadcasts 1960/61 indicate:—
(a) Reports to date submitted from approximately 79.12 per cent of British
Columbia schools.
(b) 668 schools or 67.27 per cent of reporting schools participated in school
radio broadcasts (3,286 classes, 100,530 students).
Television
Two four-programme series were presented for western regional in-school use.
This Department planned and prepared the " Western Landscape " (geography)
series, while Saskatchewan was responsible for the series " Need for Numbers "
(mathematics).
A November series already completed, called " Patterns of Living," by Dr.
Ian McTaggart Cowan, has direct application to a wide range of courses from intermediate level to senior secondary biology.
The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, on advice from the National Advisory Council, made available during the school-year five series (twenty-six telecasts) for school use.
Use
There has been some increase in the use of television in British Columbia
schools:   forty-four schools and 102 classes reported using it in 1960/61.
Nevertheless, television offerings have been few and somewhat haphazard in
course application because of their national and western regional coverage. For
instructional purposes they would need to be provincial and to have more telecasts
in each series. Furthermore, schools are faced with the major problem of providing receivers and of adjusting time-tables.
 Z 60
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sc, DIRECTOR
Submitted herewith is the circulation report of the Division of Visual Education covering the period September 1, 1960, to August 31, 1961.
Motion Pictures
Filmstrips
District Number and Name
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
1. Ferni                     ■	
439
129
481
195
47
1
680
364
119
161
272
205
237
369
275
210
40
253
532
549
194
391
1,202
1,319
200
316
793
476
138
243
242
700
1,707
1,224
1.198
608
406
797
2,264
784
2,373
1,388
935
801
577
584
1,112
216
433
344
127
507
165
390
319
243
566
92
716
172
6,947
513
343
235
74
332
117
27
1
422
225
83
89
181
113
102
228
194
124
24
188
285
337
107
216
595
795
106
162
374
259
63
176
115
332
1,114
765
747
330
235
441
1,574
541
1,342
759
504
492
377
291
640
137
279
263
71
243
104
177
179
108
407
41
384
93
3,193
319
215
143
16
866
243
27
38
1,429
206
403
12
128
22
391
485
279
79
764
558
1,616
205
1,050
1,628
975
483
86
978
512
58
336
189
944
698
1,331
489
1,835
460
1,111
725
748
674
1,392
1,946
307
122
1,265
1,460
14
384
246
203
153
395
163
413
682
33
1,061
46
870
288
117
14
3. Kimberley*   	
729
154
5. Creston.—	
26
19
1,173
167
9. Castlegar*- 	
385
10
11. Trail*— — 	
108
19
13. Kettle Valley	
282
14. Southern Okanagan 	
381
248
66
18. Golden _.	
637
19. Revelstoke  	
20. Salmon Arm-  — .
447
1,239
161
22. Vernon	
23. Kelowna*   .                -     	
833
1,152
739
314
60
24. Kamloops*   -  —	
25. Barriere  	
640
28. Quesnel*                    	
393
46
278
31. Merritt ...            .  	
145
634
33. Chilliwack*       	
34. Abbotsford*
579
1,074
391
1,395
35. Langley*	
37. Delta                             	
341
825
39. Vancouver.  - 	
614
621
41. Burnaby   	
42. Maple Ridge	
538
1,032
1,437
44. North Vancouver* 	
249
100
46. Sechelt                  . -  _  	
934
47. Powell River*             ■
1,085
13
49. Ocean Falls                              	
310
50. Queen Charlotte 	
51. Portland Canal  	
211
152
53. Terrace*- — „
138
273
113
253
57. Prince George*  	
58. McBride                 -
537
28
756
23
61. Victoria*   	
677
227
1
 DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
Z 61
Motion Pictures
Filmstrips
District Number and Name
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
64. Saltspring   „	
65. Cowichan	
92
1,034
"524
766
514
685
460
1,316
197
430
965
241
198
63
27
325
1,961
787
57
510
293
563
299
442
263
713
95
234
698
117
131
50
14
214
1,257
574
102
1,680
40
74
1,226
21
106                     85
257                   220
354                   292
70. Alberni* 	
499                   396
71. Courtenay	
306                   198
654                   495
73. Alert Bay	
234                     170
524                     323
75. Mission* -     	
862                     774
353                   267
117                     98
78. Enderby *       _
79. Ucluelet-Tofino	
157                    124
38                     28
80. Kitimat*.	
97                     89
81. Fort Nelson	
                   	
82. Chilcotin	
|         	
1,270                1,015
  Miscellaneous _	
363                   326
Totals	
51.208                29.633
42.676              32.753
In the districts marked with an asterisk (*) a system has been organized to distribute films and filmstrips
locally among the public schools. Blocks of films are shipped from the Division to a central place in the
district and redistributed to the schools from there. Entries in these instances refer to block bookings. They
do not indicate the extent to which material may be used within the district.
Demand for audio-visual teaching material continues high. Nine hundred and
eighty-seven or 78 per cent of the public schools registered with the Division for
service. Close co-operation was maintained with the College of Education and its
teacher-training programme.
In addition to motion pictures and filmstrips, 1,190 pictures and other aids
were supplied to borrowers.
 Z 62
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
TEXTBOOK BRANCH
REPORT OF BASIL R. WILSON, DIRECTOR
During the year the Text-book Branch has again completed all orders and
requisitions for school text-books and other supplies as and when requested.
For the school-year 1960/61 an expenditure of some $608,615.78 was made to
complete 4,563 requisitions relating to the purchase and distribution of free books
and supplies. This is an increase of $89,065.69 or 17 per cent over the previous
year.
A total of 22,873 purchase orders valued at $1,009,374.67 was received
during the school-year 1960/61, an increase of 1,392 orders, and an increase in
value of $120,114.89 or 13x/2 per cent for the year.
A total of 2,694 Rental Plan requisitions was completed during the school-
year 1959/60 and 2,771 during the school-year 1960/61, an increase of seventy-
seven requisitions or 2.86 per cent.
During the school-year 1959/60, $646,351.30 was collected in rental fees,
for lost and damaged books paid for by students, and for remittances covering
fire losses. During the school-year 1960/61, $695,726.05 was collected for the
same purpose, this being an increase of $49,374.75 or 7.63 per cent. For the
school-year, refunds totalling $7,534.97 were made to students who left the school
system prior to March 31, 1960, and refunds totalling $7,663.35 were made to
students who left the British Columbia school system prior to March 31, 1961.
This is an increase of $128.38 or 1.7 per cent over the previous year.
Our library service department employs four people on a permanent full-
time basis. These people are assisted by other members of the staff from time to
time, as conditions demand. During the year 1959/60, 602 purchase orders were
received and serviced, which required the placement of 1,951 requisitions with
various suppliers. In the school year 1960/61, 615 orders were received (an
increase of 2.15 per cent). To complete these orders it was necessary to place
2,022 requisitions with our suppliers. This was an increase of 3.64 per cent over
the previous year.
The shipping department employs three men on a permanent basis, who are
assisted by as many as twenty-three men employed on a part-time basis during the
peak periods.
The total weights and quantities shipped via various general shipping agencies
are shown in the following comparative tabulation:—
1959/60
1960/61
Percentage
Increase ( + )
or
Decrease (—)
Freight (including rail, truck, and boat)-
Number of pieces shipped—	
Weight _ 	
Express-
Number of pieces shipped.
Weight. _ _	
Mail-
Number of pieces shipped.
Weight... —	
Total shipments for year—
Number of pieces shipped..
Total weight	
_lb.
29,024
1,285,285
384
10,605
27,578
58,669
56,986
1,354,559
26,819
1,347,660
438
11,793
30,426
69,246
57,683
1,428,699
-7.6
+4.8
+ 14.13
+ 11.2
+ 10.32
+ 18.03
+ 1.22
+3.47
 TEXT-BOOK BRANCH Z 63
Once again I wish to take this opportunity to thank each member of the staff
of the Text-book Branch for the help and co-operation given during the past year,
without which the results shown in the above report could not have been attained,
and to express my appreciation to those responsible officials in each school district
for the patience and consideration shown during the year.
Balance-sheet, March 31, 1961
Assets
Imprest Account—Cash on hand ;  $100.00
Inventory—
Stock on hand        693,677.55
Consigned text-books  $1,465,081.53
Less depreciation1         725,325.83
        739,755.70
Accounts receivable   10,315.78
Outstanding publisher's credit notes  24.43
$1,443,873.46
i Third year depreciation on 1958/59 inventory _  $231,666.16
Second year depreciation on 1959/60 inventory   _.   247,563.65
First year depreciation on 1960/61 inventory —   246,096.02
Liabilities
Customers' credit balances carried as back orders  $262.22
Outstanding publishers' invoices  1,819.71
Treasury advances for petty cash, Imprest Account  100.00
Advances from Consolidated Revenue Fund  1,441,691.53
$1,443,873.46
 Z 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 31, 1961
Sales
Revenue—Sales   $1,214,369.12
Less discount        234,580.93
Net sales      $979,788.19
Deduct cost of sales—
Inventory, March 31, 1960 $654,603.93
Purchases  for  year   (cost,
freight, duty)      876,515.58
  $1,531,119.51
Inventory, March 31, 1961         693,677.55
Cost of sales         837,441.96
Gross profit      $142,346.23
Expenditure—■
Salaries and wages        $43,272.58
Packing and general expenses  3,005.61
Freight and delivery  11,777.40
Sundry expenses   60.89
  58,116.48
Excess of revenue over expenditure for the fiscal year
ended March 31, 1961         $84,229.75
 TEXT-BOOK BRANCH Z 65
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 31, 1961—Continued
Text-book Rental Plan Operations
Rental fees collected      $692,160.15
Opening rental inventory at March 31, 1960      $726,793.47
Plus purchases for year (cost, freight, duty, and S.S.
tax)         738,288.06
$1,465,081.53
1960/61
Depreciationi
Inventory,   March   31,
1959   $694,998.48
Less three years' depreciation at 33!/3 per
cent per annum...    694,998.48 $231,666.16
Inventory,   March   31,
1960   $742,690,96
Less two years' depreciation at 33% per
cent per annum-.    495,127.30    247,563.65
$247,563.66
Inventory,   March   31,
1961   $738,288.06
Less one year's depreciation at 33% per
cent per annum....    246,096.02    246,096.02
$492,192.04
Closing rental inventory at March 31,
1961   739,755.70
Total depreciation for year
1960/61     $725,325.83     $725,325.83
Add expenses—
Salaries and wages     $35,404.85
Packing and general expenses         2,459.14
Freight and delivery         9,636.06
Sundry expenses  49.83
  47,549.88
1 See footnote to balance-sheet.
5
772,875.71
Excess of expenditure over revenue for the fiscal year
ended March 31, 1961           $80,715.56
 Z 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
REPORT BY E. E. HYNDMAN, B.A., B.P/ED., CHIEF INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
Supervision of Instruction
The supervision of instruction by the forty-seven District Superintendents and
the Superintendent of Schools (Vancouver) included more than 12,300 teachers
during the school-year 1960/61. This number includes 132 teachers of Indian
day-schools whose classrooms were visited on request of the Indian Affairs Branch,
Department of Citizenship and Immigration, Ottawa. In addition to the teachers
in public schools, supervision was provided for those employed in Provincial institutions, and, on request by the Registrar, some teachers in private schools were
examined for purposes of certification. An incomplete list reveals more than 11,300
supervisory visits to schools and classrooms by District Superintendents, and the
number of visits per teacher varied from nil to many. The number of formal written
reports on teachers was 3,760.
Some modifications in the district personnel for supervision under the direction
of the District Superintendents occurred during the past year. The assignment of
an unattached District Superintendent as a relieving agent was temporarily abandoned because of the greater need of an assistant in the Surrey District. There was
no increase in the number of District Superintendents on the staff, but, nevertheless,
there were five new appointments to replace two who retired, two who resigned,
and one who died. Mr. Claude Bissell, supervising principal, Kelowna Elementary
Schools, was appointed District Superintendent for the Castlegar and Arrow Lakes
School Districts; Mr. Charles Cuthbert, principal, Dawson Creek Elementary
School, was appointed to the Nelson superintendency, with School Districts No. 7
(Nelson) and No. 8 (Slocan). Mr. William Fromson, director of instruction for
West Vancouver, undertook the duties of District Superintendent for Salmon Arm,
Revelstoke, and Enderby School Districts. The Campbell River and Qualicum
School Districts were new areas of endeavour for Mr. W. J. Logie, principal of the
Kelowna High School. Mr. Ronald F. Lucas, principal, Prince Rupert Senior High
School, Prince Rupert, was appointed as District Superintendent for Ocean Falls,
Alert Bay, and Quatsino School Districts with headquarters in Courtenay. Directors
of Elementary Instruction were appointed in the Nanaimo and Trail Districts,
increasing to nine the number of districts with these supervisory assistants.
The District Superintendents and headquarters officials of the Department of
Education shared in a number of projects aimed to improve the quality of instruction throughout British Columbia. Underlying each of these was an attempt to
involve the many agencies and groups associated with education both in the
planning as well as in their actual functions.
1. The biennial conference for principals, held on the University Campus
from August 5 to 13, 1960, was very successful. The conference, directed by Professor McGechean, of the College of Education, and assisted by District Superintendent C. I. Taylor, was sponsored by the British Columbia Trustees Association,
the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, the College of Education, the University
of British Columbia, as well as the Department of Education. The programme
included major addresses by the Deputy Minister of Education, the Dean of the
Faculty of Arts, the Dean of the Faculty of Commerce, the Dean of the College
of Education, and representatives of the Teachers' Federation and the Trustees
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES Z 67
Association. Resource persons included District Superintendents and Victoria
College and College of Education personnel. The aim to increase the effectiveness
of principals in the discharge of their supervisory responsibilities brought a unity
to the conference and gave insight to the participants. All the sponsoring groups
as well as the principals and District Superintendents who took part earned the
feeling of satisfaction and accomplishment from this successful project.
2. In an ingenious effort to spark enthusiasms in physical fitness by teachers
of physical education, the District Superintendents organized four workshops in
different regions of the Province. Several hundred teachers, principals, and District Superintendents took part in these projects—observed demonstrations, examined equipment, and shared discussions and problems. Outstanding teachers of
physical education, instructors from the School of Physical Education, the College
of Education, and Victoria College, all gave valuable assistance to the projects.
These workshops, which were developed because of the shortage of qualified specialists at a time when a revised programme of studies was released, were extremely
worth while. The Directors of Curriculum and Community Programmes, as well as
the District Superintendents and their supervisory staffs, are to be highly commended
for their leadership in this problem area. It brought emphasis to the physical fitness
aim of instruction, and it pointed to the need for revised procedures at the level of
teacher-training.
3. A Provincial conference of District Superintendents with headquarters staff
culminated several months of intensive study on the Royal Commission Report on
Education. In the knowledge that their experience and ideas would influence the
development of education in this Province for many years to come, this phase of
district activity was given priority. On occasion, district supervisory and teaching
staffs were used to develop aspects of their studies for presentation at the conference. As would be expected, the conference received a cross-section of opinion
that was not always unanimous. The recommendations were, however, always
constructive, always positive, and consensus was reached on many concepts which
recognized the variations in conditions existing in this Province. As a result of the
conference, changes were made in the goals which had previously been considered
desirable, and modifications in procedures were found necessary. Without any
doubt, the crucible of many minds with rich backgrounds of training and experience
produced clearer goals and more acceptable procedures.
4. The District Superintendents joined with their teachers of experimental
Mathematics 7 and 8 in a unique day of sharing experiences at the University of
British Columbia on December 27, 1960. The University Department of Mathematics, in co-operation with the Curriculum Division of the Department of Education, utilized this opportunity to evaluate progress in these experimental courses
and encourage the exchange of concepts and experiences among University mathematicians, teacher mathematicians, and their supervisors. The thirty-five or more
who attended from the Lower Mainland, Vancouver Island, and Interior points
gained clarity in the aims and objectives and renewed enthusiasm for the experiment.
Activities of the District Superintendents
Reports of the forty-seven District Superintendents and the Superintendent of
Schools (Vancouver) reveal trends and aspects of education of special interest in
the public schools of British Columbia.
1. The release of the Royal Commission Report on Education led to unprecedented demands on the time of the District Superintendents to make public speeches,
statements, and explanations.   The reports revealed a very large number of public
 Z 68 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
addresses to groups of teachers, Parent-Teacher Associations, service clubs, and
the like. The efforts of the District Superintendents in their areas did much to
reduce the misconceptions that developed from publicity given the report and gave
reassurance to some specialist groups who felt their security threatened.
2. Reports indicated that school districts are making progress in the withdrawal of Grade VII pupils to elementary-school buildings, although it may be some
years before this will be completed over the Province. It is also indicated that many
school districts are instituting an occupational programme for low-achieving Grade
VII and VIII pupils. Few school districts are initiating kindergarten classes in
their school organizations, but School District No. 39 (Vancouver) has completed
arrangements for an additional thirty-five classes.
3. Several reports reflect School Board interest in the classes for trainable
children operated by chapters of the Retarded Children's Association. A year of
successful operation by school districts of Nanaimo, Vancouver, and Victoria is
noted for their classes of retarded children. The newly constructed Oakridge School
in Vancouver, with nine teachers, may well provide a demonstration unit for educators who will be responsible for expansion of this special education elsewhere.
Several districts are negotiating with a view to School Board operation of retarded
classes in the coming school-year.
4. The vitality of the Provincial system of education is manifest by the variety
and amount of experimentation in schools of British Columbia. A few of these
are:—
(i) A demonstration of teaching by closed-circuit television was reported by
the District Superintendent for Greater Victoria.
(ii) A successful " week of music " with participation by 2,600 pupils was
reported by the Burnaby District Superintendent.
(iii) The District Superintendent for Prince George noted that a resident professor from the University of British Columbia gave three courses for
teachers in 1960/61—English 200, English 300, English 439.
(iv) The North Vancouver major work project initiated at Grade IV for exceptional children proved effective and of interest to educators both within
and outside the district.
(v) The Superintendent of Schools (Vancouver) reports that after five years
of careful experimentation and evaluation with the modern arithmetic
method it has been decided to replace the traditional method for all
Grade I pupils in the coming year.
Liaison Activities
The semi-annual zone meetings of District Superintendents held in seven areas
of the Province continued to be an effective means of co-ordinating the supervisory
function of the field officers. These conferences also provided for communication
with headquarters on local affairs. On occasion, representatives of the School
Boards joined in these zone discussions.
Sixteen regular School Board meetings were attended, and, in addition, a large
number of informal discussions were held with Board members and secretary-
treasurers. Altogether twenty-seven secondary schools were visited during the
year; three of these were team inspections which thoroughly examined the organization, administration, and supervisory practices.
Included in the field activities was participation in administration conferences
in the East Kootenay and Northern British Columbia. These meetings, which are
jointly organized by principals and District Superintendents, were extremely valu-
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES Z 69
able in the explanation of new legislation implementing the Royal Commission
Report on Education.
From observation of relationships existing over the Province between school
trustees and their District Superintendents, it can be reported that they are very
favourable. All the District Superintendents have been appointed executive officers by their School Boards. Four School Boards have included in the defined
duties of their District Superintendents the responsibility of Chief Administrative
Officer; other School Boards have depended upon the close co-operation of their
senior administrative officers to maintain unity and efficiency in district affairs.
It should not be concluded that School Boards are in any way giving up their
authority in local administration of Education. They determine policy and ensure
that it is effected locally by their district staff. The existing favourable relationship
could not continue under any other circumstances.
Conclusion
This has been an extremely demanding year on all persons active in educational affairs. Study and discussion groups on the Royal Commission Report on
Education added greatly to the assignments of trustees, teachers, and supervisors.
Nevertheless, they have given time and effort freely. The effectiveness of the
organization and curriculum of the future will owe much to the endeavours of this
year by interested and dedicated workers in education from all parts of the
Province.
In addition, they found time to give many courtesies and assistance to this
peripatetic representative of the headquarters staff, for which I am truly grateful.
 Z 70 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1960/61
TEACHER RECRUITMENT
REPORT OF PHILIP J. KITLEY, M.A., CO-ORDINATOR
This covers the second full year of operation of this Branch. Its most important function is in liaison with and service to organizations active in the recruitment
of teachers.
College of Education
Addresses on teaching as a vocation were given to the majority of the arts
undergraduates at the University of British Columbia. Three days were spent interviewing students attending the summer schools, with regard to teacher certification
problems. Future Teachers Day at the University was planned in consultation with
this office, and the final report of the conference was edited and distributed to high
schools by this office.
British Columbia Teachers' Federation
Addresses were given to teacher groups on a number of occasions, including
the British Columbia Teachers' Federation summer workshop at Nelson. Contacts
were maintained regarding teacher placement.
British Columbia School Trustees Association
Several individual School Board meetings were attended and a meeting of the
Metropolitan School Board.
Advisory Committee on Teacher Recruitment
This Committee brings together representatives of the above groups as well
as a representative of the District Superintendents of Schools. Its purpose is to
consider suggestions for improving teacher recruitment and to assist in co-ordinating the recruitment activities of the represented groups. Three meetings were held
during the year, the main topics of discussion including supply and training of specialist teachers, recruitment publicity, survey of Commonwealth programmes of
financial assistance for teacher-training (undertaken by the British Columbia School
Trustees Association), contacts with Personnel Managers' Association and National
Employment Service, problems of credit for teaching experience outside the
Province.
Future Teachers Clubs
During the year 110 Future Teachers Clubs were registered with this office,
having a total membership of over 2,000. There were twenty-three new clubs this
year. Club members were supplied with a variety of materials, including a completely new revision of the club manual, " Teaching in British Columbia." An
innovation was the regular provision of a news-letter, which appeared four times
during the year, with the aim of exchanging club news and ideas and providing
other programme suggestions and materials. Club reports indicate that well over
50 per cent of the membership have already made definite plans to enter the
teaching profession.
Visits were made to a number of clubs and club conferences during the year,
and an informal conference was held with club sponsors during Future Teachers
Day at the University.
 teacher recruitment z 71
Other Recruitment Activities
Written and personal requests for teacher-training information were dealt with
throughout the year.
The teacher recruitment programme in the United Kingdom was revised, in
conjunction with the office of the Registrar. For the first time in a number of years
it was considered advisable to supply explanatory materials in greater detail rather
than send a personal recruitment officer to the United Kingdom.
A study of requirements for specialist physical education teachers was carried
out, and through the joint board of the College of Education a recommendation
was made which resulted in a modification of the training procedures, which allows
a student-teacher to complete the physical education requirements for a major by
the end of the third year of the training programme.
Educational and Vocational Guidance
Sample occupational information material was supplied to secondary schools
as heretofore, a total of thirty-three separate items being sent out during the year.
The Vancouver Board of Trade and Pacific National Exhibition job study competition was conducted, with some major revisions which resulted in giving wider
recognition to students, both on a geographical basis and on the basis of the type
of occupation investigated.
Over 200 individual occupation inquiries were also dealt with during the year.
Visits were made to a number of larger schools, as the initiation of a programme of studying at first hand problems and methods connected with school
guidance work.
Preparations were made for a short workshop summer course for untrained
counsellors, at Victoria College.
Royal Commission Report
In co-operation with the Director of Curriculum, a precis of the Royal Commission Report on Education was undertaken. This required extensive study and
careful editing, but with the assistance of other Departmental officials was brought
to a satisfactory conclusion.
 Z 72 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. S. WHITE, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL
EDUCATION AND REGIONAL DIRECTOR FOR CANADIAN VOCATIONAL TRAINING.
This particular field of education has been the subject of much increased
attention across Canada, and indeed throughout the Commonwealth. The continued aim in British Columbia is to provide the facilities necessary to give adequate
training required to meet the challenge provided by industry in order to establish
and expand the economy of Canada.
As always, this rapid growth maintains a constant pressure within this branch,
and indications are that the present rate of expansion will continue for some time
to come.
Almost all of the training carried out is provided under the Federal-Provincial
Training Agreement, and in April, 1961, a new six-year agreement came into force,
which provides for additional assistance from the Federal Government.
The Provincial vocational schools at Burnaby and Nanaimo are operating to
full capacity in many types of courses, as is the Vancouver Vocational Institute,
which is administered by the Vancouver School Board and largely financed by the
Provincial and Federal Governments. During the year a training unit was established in Victoria and additions made at the British Columbia Vocational School
in Nanaimo and the Vancouver Vocational Institute, to give training in practical
nursing, commercial subjects, and vocational preparatory courses, the primary and
immediate objective being to provide the unemployed with a more acceptable standard of proficiency and so enhance their prospects of employment.
Additional details on the Victoria programme are contained later in this report,
and the remarks contained therein refer also to similar programmes at Nanaimo
and Vancouver.
A much-needed unit in the form of a stores building was constructed at the
Nanaimo school by students from the Burnaby school.
Progress continued in the construction of the new vocational school in Prince
George.
The Nelson School of Art was taken over by the Department of Education in
June, 1961, and the new term to commence in September will provide two-year
courses in commercial art, ceramics, sculpture, block printing on textiles, and murals.
The school is now called the " Kootenay School of Art."
Two new training projects were carried out. The first was a construction
equipment operators' elementary course at the vocational schools in Burnaby and
Nanaimo, this being instituted at the request of the Heavy Construction Association
of British Columbia as a means of assisting unemployed men in this field. The
second programme was held in co-operation with the Province of Alberta education
authorities and the Federal Government. This consisted of a regional pipe-welding
school at Calgary, to which trainees from the Western Provinces undertook pipeline welding in 36-inch pipe. It is interesting to note that of twenty-three trainees
from British Columbia, twenty-two were successful, and that whereas in 1950 when
85 to 90 per cent of big-inch pipe-line welders in Canada came from the United
States, the position is now completely reversed, with less than 2 per cent of such
skilled men coming in from the States. (Survey made by Pipeline Association of
Canada.)
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION Z 73
Considerable interest was sparked by a Commonwealth Technical Training
Week, and British Columbia played its part with open houses at all vocational
schools, lectures to service clubs and other selected groups, and films in high schools.
Trade-unions and employers played their parts, and full publicity was given through
press, radio, television, and the high schools.
Reports on certain sections of this branch and details of enrolment follow.
Accommodation Industries Staff Training
This division lost the services of Mr. George Seldon, who resigned his position
of consultant in April, 1961.
Up-grading waitress-training clinics were held in Trail, Vancouver, Victoria,
Kamloops, Kelowna, and Langley, together with motel and resorts management
courses at Kamloops, Penticton, Nelson, Campbell River, Courtenay, Port Alberni,
Parksville, Qualicum, Victoria, Powell River, Gibsons, and Pender Harbour.
The continued co-operation of the various groups within the accommodation
industry is very much appreciated and contributed to the very fine job performed
by Mr. Seldon in the difficult initial stage of organization.
Supervisory Training
This programme covers the fundamentals of management as they apply to the
middle management group—engineers, office managers, superintendents, and foremen. The programme includes all the material from the original " J " series programmes as well as modifications to fit current industrial needs. The conferences
covered three main areas—communications, human relations, and job cost control.
Each conference covered a period of one week, and conferences were held at Burnaby, Kamloops, Nanaimo, Abbotsford, and Kemano.
In many cases, conference leaders were developed during the conferences, and
these men returned to their own companies and carried out in-plant training of other
supervisors. This is particularly true of several of the larger lumber and logging
firms, as well as the Department of Highways, which is involved in extensive programmes covering all of their supervision.
The in-plant course requires ten hours to complete, generally five two-hour
sessions. These courses are shown in the statistics below along with the regular
forty-hour conferences.
Ten-hour
In-plant Forty-hour
Programme Conference
Communications (job instruction training)   236 95
Human Relations (job relations training)      85 	
Human Relations and Job Cost Control (job relations
and job methods)    93
Combination Programme (job instruction, job relations, and job methods)   104
Totals  321 292
Appreciation and follow-up sessions, 18.
Other sessions were also held with industry for the purpose of developing
future training plans in British Columbia. Response from industry for this type
of training has been excellent. There was full participation by industry and government during the entire term, and in most cases industry is asking for further
training in the management field.
6
 Z 74 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1960/61
Court Reporting Course
The British Columbia Civil Service Commission, in co-operation with Canadian Vocational Training and the British Columbia Department of Education,
offered an evening course to train court reporters.
Classes were held two evenings each week for two and one-half hours. The
instructor, Mr. Dennis Pearce, is the senior court reporter in the Supreme Court
and County Courts, Victoria Court-house. The progress made by the students has
been most gratifying. The instructor reports that he feels that several of the students will be sufficiently trained to commence a career in court reporting or in conference and (or) public hearings reporting next year.
Appraisal Course—Final Report
Since this is the final report in respect of this programme, a comprehensive
outline covering the period 1958 to 1961 follows.
A total of 122 candidates attended the course; eighty-six attended both
courses, thirty-six attended one course only. These candidates wrote a total of
208 examinations set by the headquarters of the Appraisal Institute of Canada.
To date, seventeen candidates have completed the requirements of the Appraisal
Institute of Canada and have been awarded the A.A.C.I. designation.
A breakdown of the attendance is as follows:—
Municipal assessors—
Appraisal 1  30
Appraisal 2  20
British Columbia Department of Finance—
Appraisal 1  39
Appraisal 2  39
British Columbia Department of Lands—
Appraisal 1   18
Appraisal 2  16
Parks Branch—
Appraisal 1     3
Appraisal 2     2
50
78
34
— 5
Department of Highways right-of-way agents—
Appraisal 1     6
Appraisal 2     3
— 9
Federal Government—
Appraisal 1     6
Appraisal 2     5
— 11
British Columbia Power Commission—Appraisal 2       1
Private industry—
Appraisal 1  10
Appraisal 2  10
— 20
Total  208
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION Z 75
Fully Accredited Appraisers (as of April 30, 1961)
Municipal assessors  4
Department of Finance  5
Department of Lands  5
Private industry   3
Total  17
The Committee wishes to express sincere appreciation to the Appraisal Institute of Canada; to the executive director, Mr. W. N. Mulock; to the executive and
members of the British Columbia chapters of the Appraisal Institute for their wholehearted support; and to Mesdames Allwood and Sutherland of Island Hall for their
wonderful service.
British Columbia Vocational School, Victoria
A total of four teaching areas was set up to accommodate the following programmes:  General vocational (two), commercial, and practical nursing.
1. General Vocational Training
This programme was instituted as a pilot programme to provide academic
upgrading for those individuals requiring such upgrading to achieve a specific vocational objective. By working in close co-operation with the local National Employment Service office, a total of sixty-six persons was interviewed, and of these, thirty
were chosen initially for two programmes—(a) to upgrade from a Grade VIII level
to a Grade X equivalent level, and (b) to upgrade from a Grade X level to an
equivalent Grade XII level. Instruction was given by two fully certified and experienced teachers in English, mathematics, science, and social studies.
Total number interviewed  66
Total number achieving an equivalent Grade IX standing     3
Total number achieving an equivalent Grade X standing  15
Total number achieving an equivalent Grade XII standing     8
Total completing training  26
Total withdrawing from training for various reasons     7
Total accepted into training  33
Total rejected from initial interview  33
In general terms it would seem this programme was a success. The students
completing this training were appreciative of the opportunity to improve their academic standing, and there seemed to be definite improvement in the morale of the
whole group. Several were directed immediately into a vocational commercial
course; others were making application for other vocational programmes. The
instructors concerned were impressed with the sincerity of the students and the will
with which they worked to achieve their objective. Tests applied by the instructors
to determine the equivalent grade standing were those in use in the local high schools.
Standards of instruction and testing could be regarded as equivalent to those of the
local high schools.
The continuance of this programme will be contingent upon the approval of
the Federal Government to regard this upgrading in academic subjects as a vocational programme.
 Z 76 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
2. Commercial Training
A meeting with the National Employment Service officers indicated a need in
the Victoria area to offer training to unemployed persons who had previously been
trained in typing and shorthand to upgrading their speeds to acceptable commercial
standards. The Technical Branch, working in close co-operation with the National
Employment Service office, interviewed a large number of applicants, and of these
a total of nineteen was accepted for the course, which commenced on January 9,
1961.   Statistics to June 30, 1961, are as follows:—
Terminated course to enter employment directly  10
Terminated course to find employment     8
Total number in training as of June 30, 1961  12
Total number receiving training  30
This programme has also been well received, and the students have met with
some measure of success. It is anticipated this programme will be continued to
assist unemployed persons to upgrade themselves to standards of typing and shorthand acceptable to employers of this type of worker.
3. Practical Nursing
To meet an apparent need for trained practical nurses and to provide training
for unemployed females, the practical nurses' programme was commenced on January 9, 1961. The programme was patterned on that instituted (with success) by the
Vancouver Vocational Institute several years ago and which has proven to be most
successful. It is planned to continue this programme with a new class of sixteen
commencing every four months—that is, January, May, and September. The total
number entering school is as follows:—
Total number in January, 1961, class  14
Withdrawn     3
Total number entering hospital, May, 1961  11
Total number entering May, 1961, class  15
Withdrawn to date     3
Total number presently in class  12
It is anticipated a minimum of thirty practical nurses will be trained each year
with the present accommodation and facilities. Indications are that these will all
be placed with very little difficulty.
Vocational-instructor Training
The context of the vocational-instructor training programme was revised during
the school-year. This revision requires a vocational instructor in training to complete a total of 15 units of professional work equivalent to that covered by the
secondary-school teachers in the College of Education.
In view of the difficulties in offering the revised programme on an in-service
basis, it was decided that henceforth the training would be carried out at summer
sessions of five weeks' duration. This would allow instructors from any vocational
school in the Province to participate in the programme.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION Z 77
Vancouver Vocational Institute
As indicated earlier in this report, emergency courses to assist the unemployed
were held at the Vancouver Vocational Institute. The following is an assessment on
the vocational preparatory programme (general vocational education).
The experimental programme in general vocational education included some
new concepts in vocational training programmes, and because of its new approach
to some basic employment problems, it commanded a good deal of interest and
attention across Canada. This programme developed from the study of unemployment by a committee including representatives of the Department of Education, the
Vancouver School Board, the National Employment Service, the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, and the Vancouver and District Labour Council. It was
observed that many unemployed persons could not qualify for certain types of
employment because they lacked Grade X or Grade XII standings in general education, which were required by employers for many job opportunities in the Vancouver area. It was considered, therefore, that a complete vocational training service
in this area should include programmes which would enable adults to achieve
equivalent Grade X or Grade XII standings during periods of unemployment. These
programmes serve the additional purpose of qualifying unemployed people for entry
into other vocational training programmes which require Grade X or Grade XII
for entrance.
The experimental group of 109 pupils was sufficiently large to provide reasonably reliable conclusions. Some of the results of the experiment to date include
the following:—
(1) That unemployed people will come forward for such classes in substantial
numbers.
(2) That the unemployed selected worked very hard at their studies and a
very high proportion were successful as measured by the examinations.
(3) That the Grade X equivalency group achieved this standing in less than
four months of full-time study.
(4) That, to date, one-third of the first Grade X group to complete were
placed in employment because the lack of Grade X standing, which was
an employment impediment to them, had been corrected.
Report of C. J. Strong and V. E. Rickard, Inspectors of Technical Classes
New facilities for teaching industrial arts have been provided in Chilliwack,
Cowichan, Ladysmith, Surrey, Vancouver, Victoria, Williams Lake, Burnaby, West
Vancouver, North Vancouver, Kelowna, and Sicamous.
Thirty-six qualified and eight untrained teachers were employed to staff the
new industrial arts shops and to replace those leaving the profession. The recommendation of the Chant Report that Grade VII pupils be returned to the elementary
school in September, 1961, should enable us to staff all centres this fall with qualified
teachers.
The total number of industrial arts teachers employed in the past year stands
at 482, an increase of thirty-nine over last year.
Participating in industrial arts courses were 35,490 junior high-school students
and 15,217 senior high-school students, a total of 50,707 students.
 Z 78
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1960/61
Student Enrolments
British Columbia Vocational School (Nanaimo)
day courses
Enrolment
Course
Apprentice
Pre-apprentice
Pre-employment
Upgrading
Total
Enrolled
Completed
Course
Enrolled
Completed
Course
Enrolled
Completed
Course
Enrolled
Completed
Course
Enrolled
Completed
Course
Auto Mechanics	
Heavy-duty Mechanics—
Diesel	
Heavy-equipment Operators-
Welding—
123
31
123
31
24
53
121
261
1
8
40
15
17
32
19
5
271
12
12
14
26
43
25
37
148
92
40
15
26
43
17
32
19
135
62
27
12
Up-grading	
25
37
Commercial 	
12
Timekeeping and Industrial
First Aid 	
14
Totals	
154    !     154
77
38
132
70
69
62
432     1      324
i Students not yet completed training—still on course.
British Columbia Vocational School (Burnaby)
DAY COURSES
Course
Enrolment
Apprentice
Enrolled
Completed
Course
Pre-apprentice
Enrolled
Completed
Course
Pre-employment
Enrolled
Completed
Course
Upgrading
Enrolled
Completed
Course
Total
Enrolled
Completed
Course
Aeronautics 	
Auto Mechanics	
Boat-building	
Bricklaying	
Carpentry	
Electrical  	
Electronics  	
Heavy-duty Mechanics-
Ironworkers	
Lathing— 	
Millwork and Joinery	
Painting and Decorating
Plastering   	
Plumbing _ 	
Steam-fitting. -	
Sheet Metal	
Sign Painting 	
Welding 	
Welding tests	
Totals	
3
24
73
66
6
35
27
21
27
29
34
1
25
17
388
23
71
65
34
27
21
25
29
33
22
361
25
25
20
34
27
23
24
36
24
12
28
43
38
34
15
12
13
7
24
21
18
12
26
15
11
15
21
17
18
29
1
6
1
1
1
3
4
1
1
43
408
|. 230 |
I
93
20
12
382
351
29
26
34
45
108
94
32
28
72
51
35
27
57
77
39
60
15
442
1,376
382 | 351 | 2,647
I     I	
20
12
14
30
95
87
20
15
61
42
33
25
44
54
17
40
374
1,376
2,359
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
Z 79
British Columbia Vocational School (Burnaby)—Continued
NIGHT COURSES
Course
Aeronautics 	
Automotive  	
Boat-building 	
Blue-print Reading
Carpentry
Calibration of Industrial Instruments
Domestic Gas Controls 	
Floorlayers 	
Gas-fitting
Heavy-duty Mechanics
Advanced Gas 	
Low-pressure Steam 	
Plumbing 	
Plumbing Code	
Rigging  _
Sheet Metal 	
Sheet-metal Layout
Sprinkler
Telecommunications
Transit and Level _
Welding 	
Steam-fitting
Industrial Gas .
Totals
Enrolled
Completed Course
102
102
29
26
21
21
13
13
154
121
56
52
14
14
13
10
124
122
99
82
63
62
23
23
120
107
72
72
17
17
164
143
42
42
29
27
95
68
77
22
242
209
69
57
12
12
1,650
1,352
Vancouver Vocational Institute
DAY COURSES
Course
Enrolment
Number
Enrolled
Number
Completed
Course
Number
Completed
Upgrade
Number in
Training
Advanced Technical	
Auto Collision Repairs.
Auto Mechanics	
Barbering..
Beauty Culture-
Carpentry  	
Chef Training-
Commercial—
General-
Secretarial	
Diesel Operations-
Draughting 	
Electrical	
Electronics	
Engineering	
Machine Shop	
Navigation-
Power Sewing	
Practical Nursing-
Shoe Repairing	
Welding	
Diesel i	
Ship's Cooki—..
Eiectronicsi-
General Vocational Programme2..
Totals..
26
36
64
37
213
65
69
286
168
49
92
69
57
612
53
181
45
218
28
117
5
6
9
109
7
18
36
24
113
21
33
100
47
22
48
35
24
2,614
24
72
12
30
27
704
13
15
5
15
22
26
12:
492
14
10
25
13
64
18
28
100
100
22
24
29
28
307
10
27
13
103
11
20
57
1,023
1 Special upgrading classes for fishermen held in the Vancouver Vocational Institute.
2 Special academic upgrading classes for unemployed held in the Vancouver Vocational Institute.
NIGHT COURSES
Numbers of courses  .	
Number of students enrolled
101
2,260
 Z 80 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
Schedule M—Training for the Unemployed
New enrolment by class during the period July 1, 1960, to June 30, 1961,
was as follows:—
Men Women
Advanced Technical       1 	
Art       2 1
Auto Mechanics       3 	
Barbering        3 	
Beauty Culture       4 19
Boat-building        1 	
Carpentry     16 	
Chef Training     14 7
Commercial     64 252
Diesel      11 	
Draughting       8 	
Electricity       7 	
Electronics      11 	
Engineering     12 	
General Vocational  101 35
Hairdressing     12 105
Heavy-duty Mechanics       2 	
Heavy-equipment Operators       8 	
Machine Shop       6 	
Medical Technology  1
Power Sewing    11
Practical Nursing    125
Radio and Electronics     10 	
Shoe Repairing       7 	
Timekeeping and First Aid     16 	
Upgrade Commercial       4 14
Welding—
General     26 	
Upgrade      32 	
Pipe-fine        5 	
Totals  385 570
Grand total, 955.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
Schedule R—Rehabilitation
Z 81
New enrolment by class during the period July 1, 1960, to June 30, 1961,
was as follows:—
Men Women
Auto Body     1
Commercial     6 8
Electronics      2
Industrial First Aid     1
Machine Shop     2
Power Sewing  1
Shoe Repairing     1
Teacher Training  2
Upgrade Welding     1
Beauty Culture    1
Carpentry      1
Engineer (fourth class)      1
General Vocational  1
Welding       1
Totals  17
Grand total, 30.
13
Commercial-
Industrial .....
Agriculture...
Totals.
High Schools—Day Courses
1959/60
6,020
1,254
110
7,384
1960/61
6,433
1,180
150
7,763
Vocational Night-schools Excluding Classes in Provincial Vocational
Schools and Vancouver Vocational Institute
1959/60
Commercial     4,662
Industrial     8,837
Agriculture  40
Totals   13,539
1960/61
4,326
8,191
13
12,530
 Z 82 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1960/61
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
REPORT OF J. H. PANTON, B.A., M.Sc, DIRECTOR
The revised grant-in-aid structure, effective April 1, 1960, which provided
increased financial aid to British Columbia communities for recreation programming
and leadership, had a very significant impact on Community Programmes Branch
work throughout the year and confronted the Branch with problems of considerable
magnitude.
Recreation in British Columbia on the community administration level is
slowly emerging from a period of indifferent organization to one of sound concepts
of the importance of intelligent recreation planning and organization in the community. Recreation Commissions are becoming more accepted as community
recreation authorities, and this responsibility is manifesting itself in much better
organization both on the administrative and programme level.
The number of Recreation Commissions continued to increase, but after eight
years of steady growth the rate of increase has become less due to the diminishing
number of communities without Recreation Commissions. The annual increase is
indicated as follows: 1954, 86; 1955, 140; 1956, 183; 1957, 216; 1958, 250;
1959,266;  1960,281;  1961,307.
Services extended by the Community Programmes Branch to British Columbia
communities are:-—
(1) Advice to public agencies and individuals on recreational matters by a
staff of regional Recreation Consultants.
(2) Aid in recreation to the blind through White Cane Clubs organized by
staff member Mr. Joseph Lewis.
(3) Large and comprehensive library of books, booklets, films, and filmstrips
.   on innumerable recreation topics.
(4) Drama library, materials, and advisory services.
(5) Leadership training through workshops, conferences, clinics, and regional
schools.
(6) Night-school grants for regularly organized night-school classes.
(7) Regular grants to Recreation Commissions to assist communities with paid
recreation help and expenses.
(8) Special grants to those Recreation Commissions who conducted summer
swimming and playground programmes.
(9) Responsible for educational sessions and resource personnel at Annual
British Columbia Recreation Conference.
Recreation Commissions
The following is a list of Recreation Commissions in British Columbia and the
annual Provincial Government grant allocated for the year:—
* Commissions receiving grants for directors' salaries.
t Inactive Commissions during year with actual amount received shown in parentheses.
Annual Annual
Recreation Commission Grant Recreation Commission Grant
Abbotsford    $480.00           Arrowhead-Sidmouth    $180.00
Ainsworth      300.00            Arow Park       240.00
*Alert Bay   900.00            Ashcroft       300.00
Alexandria    300.00           Balfour    240.00
Argenta-Iohnsons Landing   300.00          tBarnston Island  No grant
Armstrong    300.00            Bear Creek       240.00
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
Z 83
Recreation Commission
Beaver Creek	
Beaverdell   	
Birch Island 	
Black Creek	
Blue River
Annual
Grant
  $480.00
  240.00
  240.00
  240.00
  144.00
Bonnington-Corra Linn  240.00
Boston Bar  300.00
Boswell   420.00
Bouchie Lake   180.00
Bowen Island   240.00
*Bralorne   900.00
Bridesville   240.00
Brisco   180.00
Britannia Beach   480.00
Brocklehurst   300.00
Brookmere   240.00
*Burnaby Parks   3,600.00
Burton   240.00
*Campbell River  1,200.00
Canal Flats   300.00
Canoe   240.00
Canyon  300.00
Cawston  240.00
Cedar  420.00
Celista   240.00
Central Saanich  480.00
Chase ,  300.00
Chehalis Crossing   360.00
Chehalis Reserve  240.00
Cherry Creek  540.00
Cheryville   240.00
Chetwynd   300.00
Christian Valley  240.00
Christina Lake  300.00
Comox Community (R.C.A.F.).... 420.00
Connaught Heights   240.00
Coombs   240.00
*Courtenay   1,800.00
*Cranbrook    900.00
Crawford Bay   300.00
Crescent Valley  240.00
*Creston    900.00
Cumberland    600.00
Decker Lake   180.00
Deep Cove   300.00
Delta Parks   600.00
tDeroche 240.00 (none)
Dewdney   300.00
*District of Coquitlam   2,100.00
District of Matsqui   300.00
District of Mission    300.00
Doe River  240.00
Dragon Lake   200.00
Eagle Valley   240.00
East Kelowna   360.00
Edgewater   420.00
Elko  180.00
Emerald  Mines    180.00
Enderby  300.00
Erickson    420.00
Errington   300.00
Falkland    300.00
Ferndale    300.00
Field    300.00
Forest Grove  300.00
Fort Fraser  300.00
tFort St. John  No grant
Francois Lake  300.00
Franklin River   300.00
Recreation Commission
tFraser Lake	
Fruitvale 	
Gabriola Island
Galloway	
Genelle  	
Gibsons 	
tGiscome	
Glenmore  	
Glenora	
Golden 	
Annual
Grant
. $240.00 (none)
  240.00
  240.00
  300.00
  540.00
  300.00
.. 300.00 (none)
  240.00
  420.00
  480.00
Grand Forks  480.00
Gray Creek   240.00
Great Central   300.00
Greenwood     420.00
Grindrod     300.00
Groundbirch   240.00
Haida Masset   240.00
Halfmoon Bay   300.00
Happy Valley-Glen Lake   300.00
Harrison Hot Springs  420.00
tHarrop and District  240.00 (none)
Hatzic Prairie  180.00
Hazelton  300.00
Hedley  240.00
Hixon   420.00
Hope   600.00
Horsefly    300.00
Houston    300.00
Inonoaklin   300.00
Invermere    300.00
loco   300.00
lordan River   480.00
Kaleden   300.00
Kaslo   420.00
Kelowna    600.00
Kent  600.00
Keremeos   240.00
Kersley     300.00
Kettle Valley   —.. 240.00
Kilkerran  240.00
*Kimberley   1,200.00
Kingfisher   300.00
Kitwanga Valley  240.00
Kootenay Bay  240.00
Kyuquot   240.00
Lac la Hache  300.00
Ladysmith   300.00
La France   240.00
tLaidlaw  No grant
Lakeview Heights   240.00
Langford   480.00
tLangley 300.00 (75.00)
Lantzville   420.00
Lardeau District  300.00
Lavington   300.00
Lillooet   240.00
Lister   240.00
Little Fort  240.00
tLone Butte 180.00 (none)
Lumby   300.00
Lund    240.00
Lytton   420.00
Mahatta River   300.00
Mahood Falls  180.00
Malaspina  .  300.00
tMaple Ridge  No grant
Mara    240.00
Marysville     300.00
Merritt   300.00
 Z 84
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
Recreation Commission
Metchosin _
Midway
Minstrel Island
Minto 	
Montney
Moose Heights
Mud River 	
McConnell Creek
McLeese Lake 	
Nakusp
*Nanaimo Civic Properties
Nanoose   	
Naramata 	
tNarcosli Creek	
Natal 	
*Nelson 	
Annual
Grant
  $480.00
  300.00
  240.00
  240.00
  180.00
  180.00
  180.00
  240.00
  240.00
  600.00
  1,800.00
  420.00
  300.00
180.00 (none)
  300.00
  1,800.00
tNew Denver	
New Hazelton _....
New Masset	
*New Westminster
Nicomen Island _
._ 240.00 (120.00)
  360.00
  180.00
  2,700.00
  300.00
Noralee-Clemretta-Colleymount .. 300.00
North Bend  480.00
North Cowichan   600.00
Northfield    420.00
North Kamloops   600.00
North Shore (Nelson)   480.00
*North Vancouver   600.00
Oak Bay   600.00
Okanagan Centre   120.00
Okanagan Falls   240.00
Okanagan Mission   240.00
Oliver   300.00
tlOO Mile House  180.00 (none)
150 Mile House   240.00
Osoyoos  .       360.00
Oyama   240.00
Palling   300.00
Parksville   480.00
Peachland   300.00
Pemberton and District  300.00
Pendelton Bay   180.00
Pender Harbour   300.00
Penticton   600.00
tPitt Meadows   No grant
Popkum   360.00
Port Alberni   360.00
Port Clements  216.00
Port Coquitlam  300.00
Port Mellon  600.00
Port Moody  300.00
Port McNeill   480.00
Port Renfrew   480.00
Pouce Coupe  300.00
f Powell River  No grant
♦Prince George  1,500.00
♦Prince Rupert  2,700.00
Princeton  420.00
Procter   420.00
Progress         240.00
Quadra  480.00
Qualicum Beach   300.00
Queen Charlotte  180.00
Quesnel   300.00
Radium Junction   360.00
Red Bluff  300.00
Redwell   240.00
Revelstoke   300.00
*Richmond   2,700.00
Recreation Commission
Riondel 	
Riske Creek	
Riverside 	
Roberts Creek
Robson 	
Rock Creek 	
Roe Lake 	
Rose Lake	
Round Lake _
Rutland	
Annual
Grant
  $300.00
  300.00
  240.00
  300.00
  600.00
  240.00
  300.00
  300.00
  240.00
  300.00
tSalmo  300.00 (225.00)
Salmon Arm   600.00
Saltspring Island  300.00
Sandspit  180.00
Savona District   300.00
Sayward  480.00
Sechelt   300.00
70 Mile and Watch Lake  180.00
Shalalth   180.00
Shawnigan Lake   420.00
Shirley   240.00
Sidney   540.00
Silver Creek  300.00
Silverton    240.00
Skidegate Mission  240.00
Slocan    300.00
Smithers   300.00
Soda Creek   240.00
Sooke   540.00
Southbank   360.00
Southern Cortez   300.00
South Hazelton  360.00
South Kelowna  180.00
South Slocan  180.00
South Taylor  240.00
Spences Bridge  180.00
Sproat Lake    420.00
Squamish  480.00
tSquamish Indian Band  No grant
Stikine   240.00
Straiton   360.00
Sumas Municipality   480.00
Summerland  480.00
Sunnybrae   180.00
Sunrise-Two Rivers  180.00
Sunset Prairie  240.00
tTahsis  300.00 (none)
tTappen  180.00 (none)
Tarrys and District  300.00
Tatla Lake  420.00
Tatlayoko Lake   120.00
Tchesinkut Lake  300.00
Telkwa   240.00
Terrace   600.00
Tofino  420.00
Topley   240.00
*Trail-Tadanac   1,800.00
Tulameen   240.00
*Ucluelet  1,500.00
Union Bay  420.00
tUniversity Area   No grant
Valemount   360.00
Valleyview-Dallas   240.00
♦Vancouver Board of Parks  and
Public   7,800.00
Vavenby   240.00
Vernon   300.00
Village of Mission  240.00
Wardner District  300.00
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
Z 85
Annual Annual
Recreation Commission Grant Recreation Commission Grant
Warfield   $480.00 Willow River  $240.00
Westbank  300.00 Wilson Creek  300.00
West Bench  300.00 Windermere   300.00
Westbridge   300.00 Winfield  216.00
West Creston  180.00 Winlaw   240.00
♦West Vancouver  2,400.00 Wistaria   180.00
Whaletown Community  360.00 Wynndel  300.00
White Lake   300.00 Yale   180.00
Williams Lake   420.00 Ymir  300.00
Willow Point District  480.00 Zeballos   300.00
During the year a total of sixteen Commissions was on the inactive list at one
time or another. In most cases this is temporary, and in all cases is due to lack
of competent leadership at the local level.
The increased grants provided in the 1960/61 budget resulted in an increase
of $31,877 in grants-in-aid over the past year. Twenty-eight communities with
professional leadership had their grants increased from a maximum of $600 annually to $1,500 annually. One hundred and three Commissions received an increase
during the year, and twenty-two new Commissions applied for and received grants.
Increases are not approved unless regulations governing grants are rigidly adhered to.
Staff
The work of the staff increases each year. The growth of Commissions and
a better understanding of recreation resources by communities make more demands
on the field staff and Branch resources. The consultative staff of the Community
Programmes Branch are to be commended for the effective way eight men are covering 307 communities all over the Province.
The consultative staff and their regions are as follows:—
Consultant
Headquarters
Region
ft T. Pyrin
(Vacant, March 15th)..__ ,      	
Vancouver                  ...
Greater Vancouver and District.
K. K". MalfmATi
T. TCnhe.n
T   T?   MrK>pn
Instructor of Handicapped.
Leadership
The increased grant from $10,000 to $15,000 for leadership training has
enabled the Community Programmes Branch to greatly expand in this area.
Although expansion was possible because of the availability of more funds, it must
be noted that interest and desire for opportunity to participate in leadership activities are continually increasing throughout the Province.
Five regional leadership workshops were held throughout the year; these were
designed for volunteer leaders and afforded them opportunity to improve their skills
and teaching methods. This type of activity is still in the experimental stage but
was received enthusiastically.
 Z 86
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1960/61
Workshops
Number
Attending
Number of
Commissions
Represented
Number of
Courses
Given
Cost
48
153
75
65
61
16
25
34
15
18
8
11
9
4
6
$463 45
Cranhrnnk
Kelowna
1,042.71
363.60
298.99
374.00
Totals      .                    	
402
108
38
$2,542.75
Statistical Analysis, 1960/61
Clinics
Conferences
Leadership
Workshops
Regional
118
7,076
223
4
271
22
898
185
1
146
60
5
402
108
Provincial
Numhfir
In addition to the above, ninety-eight communities received aid totalling
$9,305 for aquatic and playground programmes. This was a 22-per-cent increase
over the year before. Seventy-seven aquatic and twenty-three playground programmes were assisted. These special project grants are designed to encourage
swimming and water safety and to promote the development of good playground
organization during the summer when many youngsters have so much free time.
The Nelson and Okanagan Schools of Fine Arts each received a $250 grant
from the Community Programmes Branch. This was done to promote the development of leadership in this area of recreation. People taking courses at these schools
are excellent sources of leadership for clinics and workshops as well as other community activities in the arts.
In co-operation with the office of the Chief Inspector, the Community Programmes Branch paid the expenses of resource personnel and worked with four
regional committees to organize physical education workshops. The workshops
were conducted at Coquitlam, Kelowna, Nanaimo, and Nelson and resulted in an
increased interest and enthusiasm for modern trends in physical education for
school programmes.
On the Provincial level the Community Programmes Branch is responsible
for the educational sessions and resource personnel for the Annual Provincial Recreation Conference. This conference, held in conjunction with the British Columbia Recreation Association annual meeting, is designed for professional people,
Recreation Commission personnel, and municipal personnel with recreation responsibilities. The 1960 conference was held in Trail, and 146 delegates representing sixty Recreation Commissions attended.
The following sessions were held: Recreation in Small Communities, Recreation Commission Chairmen, Private Agencies in Recreation, Professional Personnel,
The Problem of Volunteer Leaders, Arts in Recreation, Adult Education, School
Community Student Recreation, Municipal Recreation, Senior Citizens' Recreation,
Public Relations, Physical Fitness, and Commercial Recreation.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH Z 87
Library Services
A new resource catalogue was completed and forwarded to every Recreation
Commission.
Library Statistics
Number of new books purchased  145
Number of new films     13
Number of books circulated  592
Number of films circulated  788
Number of drama books, plays, etc., circulated In excess of 8,000
The new catalogue acted as a stimulus to library activity. Requests for films
were almost doubled over the preceding year. The Community Programmes Branch
book service could be used much more than it is. There are more than 3,000
excellent publications pertaining to nearly every aspect of recreation; most of these
are the latest prints available.
Publications
In September of 1960 a new quarterly bulletin service was instituted by the
Community Programmes Branch. Each quarter every Recreation Commission receives the bulletin, which contains articles of interest to people in the recreation field.
During the year the following were also printed: (1) Catalogue of Resource
Material, (2) New Guide to Recreation Commissions, (3) Community Programmes
Branch Information Brochure, (4) Leadership Training Brochure.
Drama
The drama services of the Community Programmes Branch continued to be
taxed to the limit. Between eight and nine thousand books, including plays, pamphlets, magazines, etc., were sent out to interested groups, schools, teachers, etc.
Equipment, including curtains, lights, and rheostats, was in constand demand for
productions, concerts, special events, and festivals of all kinds.
Over 200 active drama groups with a minimum of fifteen members produced
from three to five full-length plays during the season, with one-act and workshop
plays completing the programme.
Drama festivals play a major role in the cultural life of British Columbia. Last
spring thirty festivals were held throughout the Province; of these, ten were for
schools only, ten adults only, three included both school and community groups, and
seven combined drama and speech arts with music and dancing.
Vancouver played host to the British Columbia region of the Dominion Drama
Festival. Entries came from Lake Cowichan, Vancouver, Kamloops, and Prince
George, with three groups not meeting the required standards and one being withdrawn. Miss Gay Scrivener, of Vancouver, acted as preliminary judge. Adjudicator Miss Norma Springford, of Montreal, chose Lake Cowichan to represent
British Columbia at the Dominion Drama Festival in Montreal. Their comedia del
arte play, " The Three Cuckolds," was directed by Mrs. Yvonne Green. Mr. Adrian
Pecknold, who played the lead, received a Canada Council scholarship to attend the
National Theatre School in Montreal.
The One-act Final Festival took place in Victoria, with Mrs. Florence James,
of Regina, adjudicating. Nine regional festival winners competed, and first-place
honours went to the Haney Correctional Institution Players for their presentation of
"Lady Audley's Secret" (Act I), directed by Mr. Antony Holland. The Community Programmes Branch appointed adjudicators for these festivals and provided
 Z 88
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1960/61
assistance to the committees in charge. Workshops continued to be important to
the groups, and the Branch provided financial and other assistance in this regard.
The British Columbia Drama Association, with Mr. Franklin Johnson, of White
Rock, as its president, continued to function as the parent body of drama groups in
the Province. Our Drama Adviser, Miss Anne Adamson, in her capacity of corresponding secretary, gave invaluable assistance to drama groups throughout the
Province.
The association has set up a British Columbia Guild of Adjudicators to train
and raise the standard of adjudication in this Province. It is hoped to set up examinations for those already acting as judges in the dramatic field and to provide
workshops for those desirous of being appointed to this position. Mr. Antony
Holland, of Haney, heads the committee.
A committee has also been appointed to assist students to attend the National
Theatre School at Montreal, University of British Columbia Summer School of the
Theatre, and other established schools in British Columbia.
Conclusion
Although the year 1960/61 was successful with regard to increased activity and
interest in recreation on the community level throughout British Columbia, a job of
considerable magnitude will always face us. Communities must learn the value
of good communications, we badly need more qualified leaders at the top level,
leadership training procedure requires constant study and development, municipal
governments must become more cognizant of recreation problems, and the job of
Recreation Commission chairmen needs a more thorough understanding by Commission personnel.
The Community Programmes Branch is endeavouring to promote better recreation procedure in British Columbia. Progress was registered in 1960/61, as the
preceding statistics clearly indicate.
 NIGHT-SCHOOLS
NIGHT-SCHOOLS
Z 89
REPORT OF J. H. PANTON, B.A., M.Sc, DIRECTOR
All indications in the field of adult education point to a future growth that will
tax all our resources in this area of education. The increase in enrolment, innumerable requests for information governing courses, and the new awareness of the growing need for continuing education has confronted British Columbia educators with
an ever-growing and increasingly important challenge.
Adult education is no longer a matter of night-schools. It is demanding an
extension of time to every hour of the day and each month of the year. It is requiring more and well-qualified instructional staff and maximum use of facilities.
Education is the key to the future. Only countries with adequately educated citizens
will be able to meet the demands of the highly technical and complex society in
which we live.
The programme in British Columbia offers courses of two types, as follows:—
(1) Vocational, technical, or industrial courses operating under Dominion-
Provincial agreements. These courses include such subjects as typing,
book-keeping, engineering, mechanics, commercial art, carpentry, or any
subject an individual takes to increase his ability in his vocation.
(2) Cultural, recreational, or academic courses which fall into the general field
of adult education. Courses in this category include almost all academic
subjects, and all sports, hobbies, crafts, arts, and other leisure-time
pursuits.
Grants on behalf of instructors' and directors' salaries are paid to School Boards
for classes which are approved by the Department of Education. Under a Dominion-
Provincial agreement, additional grants are provided for instructors' salaries and
equipment for vocational courses only.
The following School Boards conducted night-school programmes during the
academic year 1960/61:—
Abbotsford.
Alberni.
Alert Bay.
Armstrong-Spall umcheen.
Arrow Lakes.
Burnaby.
Campbell River.
Castlegar.
Coquitlam.
Courtenay.
Cowichan.
Cranbrook.
Creston.
Delta.
Fernie.
Fraser Canyon.
Golden.
Grand Forks.
Howe Sound.
Kamloops.
Kelowna.
Keremeos.
Kettle Valley.
Kimberley.
Kitimat.
Lake Cowichan.
Langley.
Maple Ridge.
Merritt.
Mission.
Nanaimo.
Nelson.
New Westminster.
North Vancouver.
Ocean Falls.
Peace River North.
Peace River South.
Penticton.
Powell River.
Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Princeton.
Quesnel.
Richmond.
Saanich.
Salmon Arm.
Sechelt.
Slocan.
Smithers.
Southern Okanagan.
Summerland.
Surrey.
Trail.
Vancouver.
Victoria.
West Vancouver.
Windermere.
 Z 90
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
Growth in Night-school Programme
Year
Number
of School
Districts
Number of
Enrolees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
1953/54..
1954/55 .
1955/56.
1956/57..
1957/58.
1958/59.
1959/60.
1960/61-
49
55
57
60
62
64
58
64
19,969
22,280
29.335
33,565
36,611
39,108
40,867
40,917
842
948
1,186
3,328
1,401
1,578
1,796
1,945
1,578
2,220
Vocational
Year
Number of
Enrolees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
1955/56          	
9,040
11,582
11,118
10,761
13,539
12,530
357
440
477
454
540
552
1956/57 —  	
1957/58         	
1958/59       ..  — —   	
1959/60 —   —              „                	
322
1960/61	
552
Non-vocational
1955/56
1956/57.
1957/58 .
1958/59 .
1959/60 .
1960/61
20,251
21,983
25,453
28,427
27.328
28.387
1,256
1,648
One hundred and eleven different non-vocational courses were offered in the
total programme during the year. Some of these courses could be broken down into
separate courses, making a much higher total. When vocational courses are added,
the number of different courses is in the vicinity of 150. The six largest enrolment
activities in the non-vocational programme were: (1) Sewing, 2,858; (2) dancing,
2,660; (3) English, 1,553; (4) art, 1,293; (5) English for new Canadians, 1,287;
(6) bridge, 1,240.
The regional conferences which were instituted in 1959 continued at Nanaimo
and Kelowna during 1960/61. Others were not organized because of the Provincial
conference which was held in Vancouver on April 3 and 4, 1961. The regional
conferences again discussed problems and procedure relative to the conduct of adult
education work in the public schools of British Columbia. These conferences also
provided an opportunity for adult educators to get together to exchange ideas and
develop better concepts of adult education.
Some of British Columbia's leading adult educators provided invaluable assistance and made important contributions to the adult education activities sponsored
by the Community Programmes Branch. Dr. B. E. Wales, Dr. W. C. Hallenbeck,
Dr. J. K. Friesen, Dr. C. C. Watson, Mr. A. M. Thomas, Mr. J. H. Dalgleish,
Mr. J. W. Morrow, Mr. A. L. Cartier, Mr. W. L. Day, Mr. B. Curtis, and Mr.
W. G. Tippett acted as resource personnel at conferences and assisted immeasurably
throughout the year.
The committee which was formed to study the Interrupted General Programme
for Adults submitted a brief and met with the Department to plan procedure for
 NIGHT-SCHOOLS Z 91
courses. The work of this committee resulted in a new academic programme in
the Interrupted General Programme for Adults which permits high-school graduation. The committee terminated work on this project in early 1961, and the new
programme became effective on September 1, 1961. The committee consisted of
Dr. B. E. Wales, Director of Vancouver Night-schools; Mr. C. Watson, Director of
Burnaby Night-schools; Mr. J. Morrow, Director of New Westminster Night-
schools; and Mr. N. L. Day, Director of Maple Ridge Night-schools.
After two years of regional conferences it was decided to hold a Provincial
conference for the first time since 1955. A committee was established, and the
initial meeting was held on November 16, 1960. Committee members were
Mr. James Panton, Department of Education, Victoria; Dr. Bert Wales, Director
of Adult Education, Vancouver School Board; Mr. Frank Reder, Executive Secretary, British Columbia School Trustees Association; Dr. C. Watson, Director of
Adult Education for Burnaby; Mr. William Allister, British Columbia Teachers'
Federation; Mr. Alan Thomas, University of British Columbia; Dr. Wilbur C.
Hallenbeck, University of British Columbia; Mr. Bert Curtis, University of British
Columbia; Mr. Bill Tippett, Director of Adult Education, Nanaimo; and Mr. Wes
Janzen, British Columbia Teachers Federation.
Mr. J. H. Dalgleish, of Victoria, and Mr. H. N. Cairns were added in the capacities of first and second day conference programme chairmen.
Prior to the conference, the committee held regular meetings for four months,
and the final programme was the result of a searching look into the problems of
adult education in the public schools of British Columbia. The conference itself
will be reported in the 1961/62 Annual Report, as it was held in April of 1961.
Adult education in British Columbia has developed from a slightly regarded
adjunct to the school programme to a growing giant which seems destined to exert
a great amount of influence on our society. It has reached the stage where serious
thought and study must be given if future procedure is to be successful. With this
in mind, many aspects of adult education services and organization are the subjects
of discussion at all conferences sponsored by the Community Programmes Branch.
Much thought and study are being given to this challenging and important field of
education; this indicates future development commensurate with the importance
of continuing education.
At the conclusion of the 1960/61 fiscal year the Provincial conference scheduled for April 3rd and 4th was expected to provide many suggestions for future
procedure and study concerning adult education in the public schools of British
Columbia.
A very significant development during the 1960/61 year was the increased
interest in adult education in evidence among the men responsible for the direction
of programmes throughout the Province. Adult education leaders are meeting
frequently for discussions and planning; at each meeting there has been great interest
generated concerning the future and there is a probing search for better approaches
to programmes and development.
 Z 92 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
JERICHO HILL SCHOOL
(A Special School for Aurally or Visually Handicapped Children)
REPORT OF C. E. MacDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D.,
SUPERINTENDENT
The enrolment for the 1960/61 school-year was divided as follows:
Day
Resident
Total
36                  53
91                 102
89
193
Totals...      -
127
155
282
Of the total number, eight blind pupils were enrolled from the Province of
Alberta. There were also three children from the Northwest Territory and one
from the Yukon Territory. Magna-type readers were loaned to thirty-six partial-
sighted children in primary grades of regular public schools throughout the Province.
As heretofore, the Canadian National Institute for the Blind co-operated with the
school in providing home training and counselling for pre-school blind children and
parents. A small group of pre-school deaf children were given part-time training
at the school.
General Remarks
The Children's Health Centre and the Metropolitan Health Services provided
invaluable assistance throughout the year in the screening and care of our resident
and day pupils.
Dr. MacDonald's twenty-five years of service to the Government as superintendent of Jericho Hill School were recognized, along with other long-service Civil
Servants, at a luncheon given by the Premier at the Vancouver Hotel.
A Handbook of Information for Parents was prepared and distributed on the
reopening of school. A manual designed to assist teachers with partial-sighted
pupils in regular schools was prepared by Miss Eileen Scott and Mr. Gordon Carson.
These were distributed through the District Superintendents of Schools during
the fall.
The senior deaf class, accompanied by a teacher, visited the Legislature and
other points of interest in Victoria. This was a new and very stimulating experience
for our young people. The association with thirty selected hearing high-school pupils
on this tour was very worth while from many points of view.
On the afternoon of March 25th a delegation of Russian educators, accompanied by National and Provincial Teacher Federation officials, visited both departments of our school. From comments made, it was believed they liked what they
saw and learned. We enjoyed the exchange of ideas and the informal tea with them
which followed.
On May 2nd we were hosts for a day to eight deaf Koreans returning home
from a tour of the United States and Canada. The girls were part of a percussion
orchestra brought over for money-raising purposes. Our girls and boys found them
and their school director to be very interesting people, and we are sure that they
enjoyed the stop-over.
 IERICHO HILL SCHOOL
Z 93
During the year the language outline for the first six school-years was revised
by the vice-principal and teachers of the deaf department.
At the end of the school-year Mr. Peter Freemantle resigned as vice-principal
to take a similar position in the new interprovincial school for the deaf in Amherst,
N.S.   Mr. Maurice White was appointed as successor.
A recommendation by the Advisory Committee that University Programme
blind pupils of Grades XI and XII be required to enrol in local sighted classes for
completion of matriculation requirements and that this school concentrate on the
General Programme for senior blind pupils was approved by the Department of
Education before the end of the school-year.
A decision was reached by the Public Works Department with regard to cottage
rentals, which was acceptable to senior resident staff. It was agreed that the rentals
then in effect be increased by $10 a month, and that the tenants' bills for services be
forwarded to the Public Works Department for payment.
Special examinations were authorized for blind students of Grades XI and XII
on the University Programme. Two senior deaf pupils wrote the regular Social
Studies 30 examination.   It is worthy of note that all candidates passed.
On June 16th diplomas and certificates of achievement were awarded to ten
blind and fifteen deaf senior pupils. This was the largest graduation night in the
history of the school.
I wish to gratefully acknowledge the co-operation received throughout the year
from the Department of Education, the Advisory Committee, the two P.-T.A. organizations, and staff.
 Z 94
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
REPORT OF HARRY M. EVANS, B.A., REGISTRAR
For reference convenience this report includes data covering a number of
years.
Teacher Registration and Certification
I. Each teacher employed in the public schools must hold a valid certificate,
and this office must establish certification and classification, maintaining an individual record for each person, including teaching service. The following chart
shows developments in the past ten years, and indicates that the number of individual service records to be maintained has increased by approximately 85 per cent
in this period.
1	
1
1950/511 1951/52
1
1952/53
I
1953/54! 1954/55
1
1
1955/561 1956/57
1
1
1957/581 1958/59
1
1
1959/601 1960/61
1
2a 	
6,250
6,622
7,116
7,560
8,223
8,757
9,482
1
10.119  10.856
11,547
12,148
2b  .
(?)
126
158
154
229
176
221
297
332
369
327
2c —  	
377
372
494
444
663
534
725
637
737
691
601
2d  ...
6.4
6.0
7.5
6.2
8.8
6.5
8.3
6.7
7.3
6.4
5.2
3a 	
835
895
829
965
974
(?)
1,135
1,165
1,270
1,357
1,356
3b —	
14.2
14.3
12.5
13.6
12.9
(?)
13.0
12.3
12.6
12.5
11.7
4 	
287
310
313
348
388
317
5a -	
1,212
1,267
1,323
1,409
1,637
(?)
1,860
1,802
2,007
2,048
1,957
5b	
20.6
20.3
20.0
19.8
21.7
(?)
21.2
19.0 |  19.8
!
19.0
16.9
1. School-year.
2a. Teachers emp|oyed, as at October, from district nominal rolls. Includes regular staff of Vancouver
Vocational Institute, Vancouver School of Art, and, up to 1955/56, a portion of Victoria College. Includes
supervisors, consultants, relieving teachers, etc.
2b. Numbers with temporary certificates for lack of qualifications, or qualified but overage, included in 2a.
A change in age regulations occurred for 1955/56 and continued thereafter.
2c. Increase in teachers employed.
2d. Percentage increase in teachers employed.
3a. Numbers who were teaching as at June 30th in previous school-year, not teaching in November of year
shown;   that is, drop-outs.
3b. Drop-outs as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
4. Numbers who left positions during the school-year shown.
5a. Numbers of teachers needed in September of year shown to staff new positions and replace drop-outs
from June previous; that is, teacher demand. This does not include replacements for staff changes during the
school-year.
5b. Teacher demand for September as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
In 1960/61 there was the smallest annual increase in teachers employed (item
2) in the past five years, and the smallest percentage increase of the past ten years.
The drop-outs (item 3) were approximately the same as the previous years but
represented the lowest percentage of the last ten years. The teacher demand (item
5) was the lowest of the past three years and represented significantly the lowest
percentage of the past ten years.
II. During the period up to the end of 1955/56, teacher-training was carried
out in normal schools or in the one-year course for graduates at the University.
Enrolments, therefore, in such one-year courses were easy to determine. Since
1956/57 such training has been in the College of Education, and enrolment figures
are more difficult to relate to completion of a basic teacher-training programme as
enrolments cover all years of training. The following charts, however, covering
some eleven years, permit of useful comparisons.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
Z 95
1949/50
1950/51
1951/52
1952/53
1953/54
1954/55
1955/56
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
1
M.JF.
T.
|
M.jF.
T.
M.|F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M. F.
T.
la  	
175
36
211
170
35
205
102
39
141
77 35
112
86
22
108
91
22
113
72
50
122
lb	
109
259
368
124
251
375
108
228
336
1161284
400
114
219
333
204
342|546
196
393
589
lc	
541128
182
79
162
241
33
136
169
48
156 204
40
125
165
90
155
245
99
228
327
Id	
338
152
423
32
761
184
473
137
448
30
821
167
243
88
403
35
646\241
1231 67
475
35
716
102
240
71
366
20
606
91
385
74
519
17
904
91
367
55
671
44
1,038
2a	
99
2b .       	
96
44
249
117
345
161
110
66
239
149
349
215
96
24
214
124
310
148
102
44
771
373
100
37
?0fi
306
185
83
322
150
507
233
177
93
369
222
546
2c  —	
149(193
1191156
315
2d	
292
398
690
313
418
731
208
373
581
213
455 '668
208
345
553
342
489
___;325
635
960
3a	
9
2
11
13
2
15
5
1  6
8
8
2
2
3
2
5
3b  	
2
2
4
10| 12
22
3
6| 9
5
13
18
2
8
10
12
11
23
3c 	
2
6
8
 1 1
1
1
3] 4
1
4
5
3
3
6
6
12
3d—	
13
300
10
4 OS
23
708
23| 15| 38
9
204
10| 19
14
194
17
328
Ml 4
11
478
If
21
19
40
4.	
185j358|54_
1  1
445\649
1
522|338
1
S/6|304|616
1  1
920
References:   M.=male;   F.--.female;  T.=total;   a=University of British Columbia;   b=Vancouver Normal;
c=Victoria Normal.
1. Enrolments in teacher-training as at October.
2. Number graduating as at June of the school-year, available for September following.
3. Number graduating as at June of the school-year who were not teaching in November following.    Some
entered teaching in later years.
4. Number graduating as at June of the school-year who were teaching in November following;   that is,
supply from training institutions.
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
la  	
766
378
1,144
548
131
679
487
120
607
?
?
525
7
?
?
159
7
166
12
23
35
377
9
386
34
102
136
985
410
1,395
635
135
770
657
119
776
589
16
605
46
125
171
279
18
297
39
19
58
508
28
536
60
95
155
1,353
523
1,876
827
177
1,004
835
199
1,034
787
46
833
99
114
213
338
12
350
46
51
97
555
35
590
99
135
234
1,635
666
2,301
981
200
1,181
1,026
216
1,242
893
47
940
145
186
331
2,006
lb -
798
lc        	
2,804
1,224
2a	
2b         	
257
2c	
3a	
3b .
1,481
1,158
266
3c.        	
1,424
4a	
4b 	
4c (approximately)—	
5a       	
5b 	
5c     	
References:   M.=_male; F.=female;  T.__total.
1. Teacher-training enrolments, in all years;   (a) elementary training, (b) secondary training, (c) total.
2. Enrolled in training programmes leading to a certificate at end of year, and therefore considered likely
to teach.
3. Listed by training-college at close of year, and teaching considered likely (includes those who may be
considered for temporary cetrificates, but not those who failed the year or failed practice teaching and a limited
number of special cases).
4. Number of those listed in 3 who were teaching as at November in school-year following training;
(a) numbers with regular certificates, (b) numbers with temporary certificates, (c) total.
5. Numbers of those listed in 3; (a) not teaching as at November but certificates issued, (b) not teaching
and no certificate issued or requested, (c) total not teaching.
Note.—The above do not include those taking emergency Industrial Arts and summer session Home Economics training programme.
 Z 96
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
The certification of those listed in the preceding table as undertaking teacher-
training in 1958/59, who were teaching as at November, 1959, was as follows,
and includes adjustments through supplemental or summer session courses taken in
1959:—
Certificate
E-T
EC
E-B
E-A
S_T
PC
P-B
PA
Total
Male	
Female	
17
28
61
150
54
238
32
36
1
20
38
110
45
2
1
297
536
Totals	
45
211
292
68
1
58
155
3
833
Similar information for 1960/61 follows and indicates a drop in the E-C category and increases in the E-B and E-A categories, reflecting improvement at the
elementary certification level.   The secondary levels remained relatively the same.
Certificate
Total
E-T
E-C
E-B
E-A
S-T
P-C
P-B
P-A
10
34
58
128
92
295
56
45
2
1
15
40
109
46
8
1
350
590
Totals
44
186
387
101
3
55
155
9
940
III. From the preceding tables can be calculated supply from the training-
colleges as a percentage of demand:—
1951/52
1952/53
1953/54
1954/55
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
la   	
731
708
1,267
57.7
55.9
581
543
1,323
43.9
41.0
668
649
1,409
47.4
46.1
553
522
1,637
33.8
31.9
831
816
(?)
(?)
(?)
960
920
1,860
51.6
49.5
607
525
1,802
33.7
29.1
776
605
2,007
38.7
29.9
1,034
833
2,048
50.5
40.7
1,242
lb	
2        	
940
1,957
3a      — 	
63.5
3b	
48.0
la. Numbers in training-college listed in June previous as likely available to teach in September of school-
year shown.
lb. Numbers in training-college in June previous actually teaching in October of school-year shown.
2. Numbers needed in September to staff new positions and replace drop-outs from June previous; that is,
teacher demand.  This does not include further replacements required during the school-year.
3a. Numbers listed in training-college in June as a percentage of demand;  that is, la as a percentage of 2.
3b. Numbers from training-college who taught, as a percentage of demand; that is, lb as a percentage of
2—actual training-college supply as a percentage of demand.
IV. The employment of teachers with temporary certificates in 1959/60, as
at October 31st, was as follows:—
Temporary Elementary
Temporary Secondary
E-T
EC
Total
S-T
S-C
S-B
v-c
Total
127
82
13
1
140
83
9
83
2
8
11
Secondary schools	
8
2
101
Totals —
209
8
14
223
8
92
10    1        2
3
8
23
112
3
23
217    |.     14    |    231
92
13    |        2
31
138
All schools	
	
	
	
369
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
Z 97
Of the 369 persons with temporary certificates in 1959/60, 335 were in
regular public schools.   In 1960/61 the total was 327, with 285 in public schools.
V. Since 1955 the Department of Education has co-operated with School
Boards to obtain teachers from the United Kingdom, and in 1955 to 1960, inclusive,
has sent an interviewing officer in the early spring to select and recommend individuals for appointments. Applications are recorded, certificate and experience
classifications are made in this office before or after interview, and exceed by far
the number of interviews and numbers appointed. Replies to advertisements have
in some years exceeded a thousand. A number of individuals annually proceed
independently to this Province. The numbers who have arrived under the immigration plan have been as follows:—
School-year
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
21
41
30
35
48
33
61
30
33
35
35
Secondary „ .
27
Totals
62
65
81
91
68
62
VI. Teacher-exchange applications proceed through this office. The numbers
of applications from British Columbia teachers annually exceed the exchange positions available.   Exchanges in recent years were as shown:—
School-year
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
United Kingdom 	
22
4
3
22
4
5
23
1
1
26
2
1
26
2
28
1
Elsewhere   	
1
Totals	
29
31
25
29
28
30
VII. Annually several thousand teachers' certificates have been issued, to new
teachers and to those who have qualified for permanent certificates or for higher
certification. Evaluations are completed for many teachers from other Provinces or
countries who have submitted credentials for this purpose; a goodly number do not
arrive. General inquiries are considered from outside teachers, numbering in the
thousands. In addition, there are many inquiries from British Columbia teachers
for evaluations, certification or experience changes, and assistance in learning of
specific requirements or suitable training programmes.
Since 1958 an individual teacher-docket system has been possible, leading to
significant improvement in correspondence handling. There is difficulty in keeping
up with significant annual correspondence volume increase.
Division of Examinations
I. There has been a significant increase in examinations over the years. This
Division has arranged for the preparation, printing, and distribution of the June
and August University Entrance (Grade XI-XII) and for Grade Xin examinations.
Considerable administrative time is involved. It is also responsible for arrangements for marking, tabulating, and releasing results, appeals, and maintenance of
records.   The following tables give significant data:—
 Z 98
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
Number of Markers
1951/52
1952/53| 1953/54
I
1954/55
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58  1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
June. 	
August 	
181
29
193
34
210
33
220
42
234]         243
39|           41
|
246          290
44|           48
301
50
343
61
Totals	
210[         2271         243
262|         2731         284
290|         338j         3511         404
Approximate costs
$74,300j $81,700| $88,400
1               1
$9O,0O0| $96,000 $113,000
1
$123,000 $153,000|$168,000 $179,000
Number of Candidates (June)
University Entrance....
Grade XIII    	
7,503
1,712
9,048
1,336
7,985
1,375
9,159
1.653
9,418
1.765
10,924
1,565
1
13,014]     14,933
1,797 j      2,204
16,786
2,673
19,113
3,253
Totals	
9,215
10,384
9,360
10,814
11,183
12,489
14,811|    17,137
1
19,459
22,366
Number Completed in June
University Entrance ...
Grade XIII	
1
2,704[
284]
2,3281
269
2,594
304
1
3,139|
399|
1
3,160|
410|
3,433
383
4,025
341
4,2151
464]
4,720
587
5,651
620
Totals.—	
2,9881
1
2,597|
1
2,898
3,538|
1
3,570|
1
3,816
4,366
4,6791
1
5,307
6,271
Papers Marked in June
|
	
1
16,399|  _.
4 5161
1
20,311
5,669
21,042]    24,024
6,028]      5,647
29,765
6,388
1
36,236]
8,055
41,963
9,751
46,227
Grade XIII      	
-    ..     1
11,974
Totals-
21,642
|
20,915|    23,280
]
25,980]
1
27,070]    29,671
1
36,153
44,291]
1
51,714
58,201
Papers Marked in August
!           1
 I    | 	
!
1
6,844]
1,727|
1
8,931|      9,236
Grade XIII-	
 1 1 - -
|
 ]
1,869]      2,489
Totals —	
4,022
1
5,134|
1
4,663
4,914|
1
5,185|
1
5,789
7,031]
1
8,571|
10,800|    11,725
1
In 1958/59 there were 5,342 August candidates, 4,178 University Entrance,
and 1,164 Grade XIII.
Total papers for June and August, 1951/52-59/60, were as follows: 1951/52,
25,664; 1952/53, 26,049; 1953/54, 27,943; 1954/55, 30,894; 1955/56,
32,255; 1956/57, 35,460; 1957/58, 43,184; 1958/59, 52,862; 1959/60,
62,514; 1960/61, 69,926.
II. For 1960/61, examinations were prepared for June and August in twenty-
one University Entrance subjects and in eighteen Grade XIII subjects. In June,
1961, 176 examination centres were established in the Province and twenty-nine
outside British Columbia, with the farthest-removed centres being in England and
the Barbados.
III. There has been a very heavy increase in the number of requests for evaluations of academic standing from those who wish to enrol in British Columbia high
schools or to take night-school or private-study courses to complete requirements,
as well as from those who wish to undertake nurse's training or enter similar professional courses. A very large number of persons has sought evaluations and permission to follow the Interrupted Programme for Adult Students. These numbers
are increasing rapidly with expansion in the number of areas offering academic
courses through night-schools.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
Z 99
IV. Scholarship Awards, 1961
University Entrance.—The fifteen General Proficiency Scholarships, each of
$500, awarded jointly by the University of British Columbia and the Chris Spencer
Foundation were won by the following:—
Place
Name
School
Per Cent
1st in B.C. -.
Robert Byng Gordon  	
Prince Rupert Senior High 	
95.625
2nd in B.C.
95.5
L. V. Rogers Senior High __  __._	
89.875
93.25
Vernon Senior High •  	
87.0
90.375
Evelyn Mary-Ann Johnston _
89.0
92.125
Gwynneth Lynn Davis 	
Eric Anthony Reif	
Lee Frances Kennedy 	
Alan Streatfeild Bell 	
92.375
93.125
St. Ann's Academy, New Westminster	
89.75
Area 10
91.0
Daphne Jane Simms _ 	
88.0
91.5
Area 13	
Christopher Jo Brealey  	
Campbell River Junior-Senior High 	
90.875
The Governor-General's Silver Medal for the highest standing in the University
Entrance examinations was won by Robert Byng Gordon.
The Governor-General's Bronze Medal for the second highest standing was
won by Timothy Charles Padmore.
Grade XIII.—The six Royal Institution Scholarships, each of $200, awarded
by the University of British Columbia for general proficiency were won by the
following:—
Name
School
Per Cent
90 0
87 4
87 2
86.9
84.4
84.1
Financial Assistance
I. In 1959, for the first time in British Columbia, the Government entered the
field of extensive scholarship awards to hi?h-school graduates, Grade XIII students,
and to students of the University of British Columbia and Victoria College. To
qualify, candidates must be domiciled in the Province, are required to apply, and
must undertake a full-year winter session undergraduate programme at the University or Victoria College or in Grade XIII in public high schools of the Province to
receive the award. Selection of winners is made on the basis of the final Grade XII,
or Grade XIII, or University of British Columbia or Victoria College examinations.
There are two awards—first class for all students who obtain an average of 80
per cent or higher based on a full year's programme, and second class, available for
up to 2,000 top-ranking students with high second-class standing. The second-class
awards are divided among Grade XII (University Entrance), Grade XIII, University
undergraduate students, and Victoria College undergraduate students, and among
the various faculties and groups roughly proportionate to enrolment. First-class
awards amount to one-half the tuition fee of the next year of undergraduate study,
and second-class awards similarly to one-third the tuition fee.   An average of at least
 Z  100
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
70 per cent, subject to minimum adjustment for certain groups, is required for a
second-class award. Awards vary in amount, depending on the institution and
faculty attended.
The plan commenced with those writing examinations at the end of 1958/59,
with awards being made to those who would undertake training in 1959/60, and
has continued similarly annually.
Candidates writing University Entrance or Grade XIII examinations apply
through the Division of Examinations, University students through the University,
and Victoria College students through that institution. All applications are then
considered by the Scholarship Selection Committee, representative of the University of British Columbia, Victoria College, and the Department of Education,
chaired by the Registrar. Notification to all candidates is made from the Registrar's office, with cheques issued through the Departmental Comptroller. Figures
covering Government of British Columbia scholarships follow, based on applications received.
Examination
Year
Original Applications
Final Awards
Number
Received
Eligible
First
Class
Second
Class
Total
First
Class
Second
Class
Amount
1958/59 	
1959/60.—	
1960/61  	
2,703
3,466
4,223
1,860
2,300
2,557
552
635
703
1,308
1,665
1,854
1,782
2,192
531
612
1,251
1,580
$229,175.16
276,513.32
University Entrance Examinations
Grade XIII Examinations
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
First class (80 to 100 per cent)	
Second class (70 to 79.9 per cent) ...
268
337
189
82
298
492
290
113
313
554
371
135
26
104
53
47
37
133
90
80
33
169
127
Ineligible  —  — -	
144
Total applications —
876        ]     1,193
1
1,373
230
340
473
To assist local school authorities, complete tabulations showing schools concerned and final academic averages obtained by all Provincial Grade XII and Grade
XIII scholarship candidates are provided to the District Superintendents of Schools.
II. The Provincial Government, with some assistance from the Federal Government, annually provides Government bursaries to assist students to undertake
further training. An average of 65 per cent is required together with evidence of
financial need. Assessment is based on the last academic studies undertaken.
Awards vary from $50 to $300, depending on academic standing and need, with
most awards in the range $100 to $150. These awards may be made available to
those undertaking University of British Columbia or Victoria College undergraduate
study, recognized nurse's training in the Province, and for recognized University
study outside British Columbia in undergraduate courses of training not available
in this Province;  for example, dentistry, veterinary.
All bursary applications proceed through the Registrar's office, and Bursary
Selection Committees, representative of the University and of Victoria College and
chaired by the Registrar, determine awards. Notification to all candidates is made
from this office, with cheque issue through the Departmental Comptroller.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
Z 101
Figures covering Government bursaries follow, based on applications received
by the deadline. A relatively large number of applications cannot be considered
because of late submission.
Original Applications
Final Awards
Year
Number
Received
Eligible
Number
Amount
1959 „                             	
821
1,071
1,395
693
904
1,171
653
865
$82,650
1960                             	
113,465
1961 .        ..                                      ....
III. In 1959 a significant change was made in respect of loan assistance. By
amendment to the British Columbia University Act authority was given for establishment of " The Student Aid Loan Fund " of up to $2,000,000. A joint committee composed of two representatives of the University and two representatives
of the Department of Education (at present the Registrar and the Departmental
Comptroller) authorizes loans. The Department of Education no longer provides
loans. Loan assistance may be provided to undertake undergraduate training at
the University of British Columbia, Victoria College, the Vancouver School of Art,
or recognized university undergraduate training outside the Province when such
training is not available in British Columbia.   Loan awards have been as follows:—
Ye. r Number of Awards Amount
1959/60  843 $397,570
1960/61   842 435,130
Strathcona Trust
For many years the Province has participated in the Strathcona Trust. An
annual grant has been received, in recent years approximating $1,600, with the
moneys to be utilized to encourage physical fitness in the schools and cadet-training
and rifle shooting. Cadet awards have been made to the four leading corps for
proficiency, to the National Cadet Camp, to the annual Cadet Trades Training
Camp at Vernon, for cadet rifle shooting competition, and to British Columbia
cadets attending Bisley.
Physical Education Shield awards have been provided for each district super-
intendency, with four in Vancouver and two in Victoria, for presentation to the
schools showing the greatest proficiency or the most significant improvement. These
awards were discontinued at the end of 1959/60, with the shield to be retained by
the winning school and utilized for internal competition within the school.
To recognize and encourage physical education, Strathcona Trust bursaries
have been provided in recent years to teachers wishing to undertake further undergraduate course work in physical education. These bursaries recently have been
$125 in value. Five awards were made on 1958/59 standings, five on 1959/60,
and six on 1960/61.
The Local Committee, Strathcona Trust for British Columbia, administers the
moneys received, and consists of military representatives and representatives of the
Department of Education. The Registrar has continued as Secretary, Local Committee, for some years and is British Columbia representative on the Executive
Council, Strathcona Trust Fund.
 Z  102
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1960/61
Certification of Professional Librarians
New regulations for the certification of professional librarians became effective
in November, 1954. The Registrar acts as Secretary, Board of Examiners for Certification of Professional Librarians, maintains records, and issues certificates authorized. Since new regulations were introduced, the numbers of certificates issued
were as follows:   1955, 57;  1956, 62;  1957, 16;  1958, 18, 1959, 10;  1960, 17.
Correspondence
Volume and detail continue to be two major problems because of continual
growth. New filing procedures have not permitted the maintenance of records
indicating correspondence volume. For some years records were maintained of
letter volume, as shown below. These figures do not include application and other
forms, circulars, instructions, examination papers, and similar items, but refer to
correspondence volume only.
Normally Require Reply
Initiated
by Branch
Year
Exams
Inward
Registrar
Inward
Total
Exams and
Registrar
Outward
Total
1950
5,920
6,278
6,071
7.220
7,756
8,092
8,900
10.111
13,676
14,370
14,971
17,231
19 630
3,649
4,802
4,923
5,187
5.776
17,709
1951
19,777
1952          -       	
20,555
1953             .
23,352
1954                                     ...                   _    -
7,465      |    12,165
8,222      j    13,398
8.339      1     14.671
26,842
1955 -
21,620    |      5,628
73.010     I       6.680
29,249
1956     .             .                                           	
30,537
1957
8.130      n
1958
9,084      ! |
1959
10113      1 f New recording system precludes tabulations.
1960
11.867      ! 1
\J
In those years for which accurate figures are no longer available, it is known
that volume exceeded 41,000 in 1958, and similar increases continue.
 EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT Z  103
EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT
REPORT OF MRS. FREDA KINSMAN, SECRETARY
OF THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1960/61 a total of 244 applications was considered
by the Commission. Of these, forty-one were turned down, the chief reason being
that family income was higher than that set by the Commission for grant purposes.
Two hundred and three applications were approved for grants. Students were
distributed by grades as follows: Grade IX, 50; Grade X, 59; Grade XI, 53;
Grade XII, 41. During the year nine students dropped out and grants were discontinued.
The students in the greatest financial need received $105.80 for the year; the
balance received $90.80. In addition, fifteen students who showed outstanding
ability were granted a bonus of $25.
  STATISTICAL RETURNS
  STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 107
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OhOh
,   «   C4  4
  EXAMINATION PAPERS
Separate booklets of examination papers for University Entrance and Senior
Matriculation, including complete sets of papers for June and August in each year,
may be obtained from the Director, Text-book Branch, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.
Price for booklets that are STILL AVAILABLE are as follows:—
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1952. Price, 74 cents.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1959.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1960.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1961.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1952.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1953.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1961.
Price, 74 cents.
Price, 74 cents.
Price, 74 cents.
Price, 53 cents.
Price, 53 cents.
Price, 53 cents.
Note.—The above prices include the 5-per-cent social services tax.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1962
4,060-262-7535
I
 

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