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Minister of Public Works REPORT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1960/61 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1962

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Minister of Public Works
REPORT
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
1960/61
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1962
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
PubUc Works for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1961, in compliance with the provisions of the Public Works Act.
W. N. CHANT,
Minister of Public Works.
Office of the Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, December 21, 1961.
  INDEX
Report of the Deputy Minister	
Report of the Provincial Architect	
Report of the Senior Electrical Designer	
Report of the Construction and Maintenance Architect
Report of the Civil and Structural Engineer	
Page
7
8-9
9-10
11-12
13
Sewage-disposal      14-16
Report of the Mechanical Engineer  17-18
Radioactive Fallout Protection of Buildings  20-21
Report of the Architect-Planner  21-22
Report of the Landscape Architect         23
Historic Fountain, Victoria  25-26
Report of the Personnel Officer  26-29
Report of the Supervisor of Telephones         30
Report of the Chief Inspector of Boilers and Pressure Vessels  32—33
Report of the Inspector of Electrical Energy  36—38
Report of the Chief Gas Inspector         40
Report of the Departmental Comptroller  41-44
Tenders Received and Contracts Awarded  45-46
  The Honourable W. N. Chant,
Minister of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—/ have the honour to submit for your consideration the Annual Report
for the fiscal year ended March 31,1961.
Elsewhere in this Report will be found those of the heads of divisions. These
set out in detail work accomplished and planned, tenders let and accepted, and
Departmental accounts.
During the fiscal year under review continued emphasis was laid upon cost-
control. This was referred to in my report to you for 1959/60, and I am pleased
to report that further advances have been made. A study of the last eight major
projects carried out, having a contract value of $2,713,730, shows that extra costs
amounted to $34,282, or 1.27 per cent— This indicates that insistence on complete
planning and firm specifications has succeeded in reducing these from a previous
average of 8 per cent.
The recession in Canada appears to be passing, and it is my belief that this
Department can expect an upsurge of work over the next few years. Departmental
planning, in so far as personnel and administrative measures are concerned, has been
prepared accordingly, and an accelerated programme can be faced with confidence.
Good relationships with other Government departments continue to grow and
improve, and consequently our design divisions are being more frequently called
upon for assistance. As a service department, this is part of our proper function,
and we both welcome and encourage such requests.
Increased attention has been given to research in design, planning, and construction. Methods and materials are rapidly changing, and we are endeavouring
to keep abreast of developments. Space will not allow of a detailed report of advances made, but it is perhaps sufficient to say that some very significant changes
have been made in construction methods which will provide better buildings at lower
cost.
In conclusion, Sir, I am pleased to report that staff morale is high and productivity has increased. Our Department is fortunate in having a number of very
competent and loyal employees. They will, I know, continue to serve the people of
this Province well.
A. E. WEBB,
Deputy Minister.
 S 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL ARCHITECT
A summary of tenders received and contracts awarded during the fiscal year
1960/61 appears at the end of the Public Works Report, and from this list two
major projects stand out for particular comment.
The first was the final phase of construction of the Victoria Law Courts in the
amount of $1,686,000 calling for the total completion of the building, for which
two prior contracts had previously been let. At the date of this Report the Law
Courts are nearing completion and being readied for an official opening in the
new year.
The second project of major interest was the Classroom and Faculty Building
at Victoria University, situated on the Lansdowne Campus. When it became apparent that there was a very critical problem to be faced with a large influx of students for the fall semester, a crash programme was inaugurated to meet the contingency expeditiously and efficiently.
Plans and specifications were drawn up by the Department of Public Works
with considerable rapidity, and a contract was let in the amount of $329,423 in mid-
July, 1960.
Six months later, with classes actually in operation, the E. B. Paul Building,
named after the first principal of Victoria College, was officially opened by the
Honourable the Premier of British Columbia on January 18, 1961.
Brief mention should be made of two other contracts, both located in Burnaby.
The first, a testing laboratory for the Department of Highways, was planned during
the fiscal year under review, and is currently nearing completion. The second contract called for the erection of steelwork, wall and roof cladding for a plumbing,
steam-fitting and sheet-metal workshop and an electrical workshop. These buildings signalled the beginning of the second phase of development of the British
Columbia Vocational School at Burnaby.
It is anticipated that a high percentage of construction will be achieved by
March, 1963.
Among numerous projects in the active planning stage during the fiscal year
1960/61 were the following:—
(1) Essondale.—Credit Union Building and Telephone Exchange. These
contiguous buildings were required to accommodate expanded credit
union facilities on the one hand and to permit the conversion of telephone
services from manual to automatic on the other.
(2) Prince George.—British Columbia Vocational School. An automotive
and heavy-duty workshop and a heating plant were planned as the initial
development of a vocational-school programme for Prince George and the
surrounding area.
(3) Victoria.—Victoria University. The planning of a complex of science
buildings was commenced to provide for the Faculty of Science offices,
seminar rooms, lecture theatres, and laboratories for chemistry, biology,
and physics. This complex of buildings will form part of the nucleus of
the Gordon Head Campus development.
(4) Vancouver.—Planning was started on the College of Education, located
on the campus of the University of British Columbia. The complex of
buildings comprises four interrelated structures—a central lecture-room
block, an office block, a classroom block, and a gymnasium.
 PUBIC WORKS REPORT, 1960/61 S 9
A contract amounting to $1,103,877 was recently let for the construction of the central block, and planning is proceeding rapidly at the
present time on the balance of the work.
During the year professional assistance was made available to several Government departments, mainly those of the Provincial Secretary, Lands Service, and the
British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service.
Seventeen different projects for senior citizens' homes throughout the Province,
for which the Provincial Government offers a grant, were examined on behalf of the
Provincial Secretary's Department.
Construction reports and criticisms were made on design and construction
details. In several instances, in attempting to adhere to tight budgets, sound construction principles appeared to have suffered. These have been pointed out, with
remedial suggestions, which in the majority of cases have had no significant effect
on construction costs.
Residences and other buildings on the University of British Columbia Endowment Lands have similarly been scrutinized on behalf of the Lands Service. Among
these projects reviewed have been two private residences and two fraternity houses.
The staff member loaned to the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service
continued his research work on specialized hospital areas, and also assisted in the
evaluation of hospital plans submitted to the British Columbia Hospital Insurance
Service for approval.
In the Architectural Division, staff was generally maintained throughout the
year at the same numerical level, but considerable difficulty has been experienced in
securing qualified replacements of high calibre for those members of staff who left
during the year. It is very satisfying to report that the loyal co-operation of the staff
of this Division has made it possible to achieve a high standard and output of work.
W. H. R. Curtis, M.R.A.I.C., A.R.I.B.A., A.N.Z.I.A.,
Provincial Architect.
REPORT OF THE SENIOR ELECTRICAL DESIGNER
The Electrical Design Division has worked to capacity during the year. It was
found necessary to enlarge the draughting staff to cope with the volume of work
being produced by our Architectural Division, and to carry out the many electrical
designs requested by various other departments of Government.
A total of over sixty projects of rewiring, alterations, and additions was designed and carried out for the Construction and Maintenance Division. Included
in the major electrical designs correlated with the Architectural Design Division and
which are now under construction or being planned are the College of Education;
Victoria Law Courts; Prince George Vocational School; Burnaby Vocational
School; Science and Biology Building, Victoria University; and the Animal Pathology Building, Abbotsford.
The co-operation and co-ordination extended by the Architectural, Construction and Maintenance, Mechanical, and Structural staffs have been excellent.
Extensive electrical designs for highway lighting and traffic signals have also
been produced for the Department of Highways. Electrical designs were carried
out on such major British Columbia highway developments as the Deas Tunnel
Throughway, Burnaby Freeway, Upper Levels Highway, Fraser Valley section of
the Trans-Canada Highway, Abbotsford-Chilliwack By-pass, and many other smaller projects.
2
 S 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Under design is the lighting for the new Port Mann Bridge and the China Bar
Tunnel in the Fraser Canyon. This tunnel is comparable in length to the Deas Tunnel, and will have a very extensive lighting and electrical system.
It is worthy to note that over fifty electrical specifications were produced for
the Department of Highways. Tenders were called by this Division, following
Government policy of open tendering on all projects.
Electrical designs were also undertaken during the year for Departments of
Education, Forestry, Commercial Transport, Recreation and Conservation.
Total combined value of electrical work carried out for the various departments
during the year was in excess of $750,000. It has been our pleasure to work with
the various departments mentioned, who give us the utmost co-operation.
Technical advice and guidance were also given to Electrical Maintenance staffs
throughout the year.
In conclusion, I would like to thank the Personnel Officer for his assistance in
obtaining the additional staff which became necessary.
J. R. Walker,
Senior Electrical Designer.
Daylight view of modern highway lighting, Capilano interchanges, Upper Levels Highway, Vancouver. Designed and supervised by Department of Public Works for Department of Highways.
 PUBIC WORKS REPORT, 1960/61 S 11
REPORT OF THE CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE
ARCHITECT
Changes in the organizational structure of the Department of Public Works at
the beginning of the 1960/61 fiscal year make this report a record of the activities
of the Division during its first year of operations in a dual capacity.
The period under review is of special significance, as in addition to its previous
responsibility the scope of the Division's activities was extended to include supervision and control of site construction during erection of all Provincial Government
buildings.
To ensure a superior programme of supervision and control on all new construction work, it is necessary for the following results to be striven for:—
(1) Adherance to the standard of materials and craftsmanship demanded.
(2) Avoidance of extra construction costs beyond the original contract price.
(3) Prevention of error and detection of elements overlooked in drawings and
specifications, and their correction before the contract is started.
The Division has been fortunate in having three project inspectors, who, by
their efforts and loyalty, have enforced a high standard of workmanship and compliance with specifications. Supervision of this type, and site inspection by personnel of the headquarters staff, has achieved successful results in respect to item (1).
Item (2) is often found to arise from causes mentioned in item (3). Although
the Division has been successful in forestalling extra costs arising from many causes,
the full implementation of safeguards in respect to item (3) depends upon adequate
means being made available.
During the year, project inspectors were appointed to, and site inspections
carried out on, the following projects designed by the Architectural Division:—
(a) Extension to the Random Poultry Testing Station, Abbotsford.
(b) New Provincial Government offices, Mission.
(c) Fire-escape stairs and bridges, Essondale.
(d) Wilson Ranch barn, Colony Farm, Essondale.
(e) Sallyport, Haney Correctional Institution.
(/)  Classroom and faculty block, Victoria University.
(g) Law Courts, Victoria (Contracts 2 and 3).
In addition to the above, the Division also prepared sketch plans, working
drawings, and specifications for the following construction, which was subsequently
supervised in the construction stage by this Division's personnel: —
(1) Conversion of the Young Offenders' Unit, Oakalla Prison Farm, into a
hospital.
(2) New extension to provide additional office and clinic facilities at the Health
and Welfare Building, Kamloops.
(3) Conversion of the old B.C. Telephone Building, New Westminster, into a
Judicial Annex to the Court-house. (As drawings of the original structure
were unavailable, personnel of this Division also measured and surveyed
the structure to enable subsequent redesign work to be accomplished.)
(4) Complete renovation of the existing premises and a new addition to the
Charlie Lake Mines Building to provide office, laboratory, and extensive
core-storage space.
(5) Renovation and provision of additional cell accommodation, R.C.M.P.
quarters, Penticton Court-house.
 S 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
In response to inquiries from Government agencies and boards, this Division
has continued to provide consultant services by preparing specifications and inspecting repairs and alteration work found necessary.
A continuation of our previous year's programme has enabled many recommendations contained in the Fire Marshal's reports to be implemented, thus removing fire-hazards and improving protection afforded. Sprinkler systems were installed
and are now operative in Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace; Dell view Hospital, Vernon;
Marpole Infirmary; and Jericho Hill School.
This Division has been confronted with instances where immediate major repairs to older structures were imperative. Repiping of water-supplies, reconstruction and preservation of stone and brick surfaces, renewal of floor coverings, and
many other items have either become obsolete or defective after many years of
service. As this work has often entailed an expenditure much greater than the
allocated funds for the designated building in the current fiscal period, it has resulted
in a serious drain on funds available for preventive maintenance.
During the year a number of municipal sewerage systems in areas where Provincial Government buildings are located, have become operative. These local improvements have entailed a number of new sewer connections to be made, and
should help in reducing the troublesome and expensive repairs to septic tanks we
frequently encounter.
The Division has maintained continuous liaison with our electrical and
mechanical divisions, and their representatives have on a number of occasions
accompanied members of our staff on inspections of various Government buildings.
This has ensured a complete coverage of all the buildings services. A system of
reporting by members of all divisions of any hazardous conditions which they may
encounter when visiting buildings has been of help in providing adequate building
inspection of all Government property. I would respectfully suggest every Government property should be visited by a senior member of this Division's staff at least
once a year.
Arising from building inspections and reports received from our various agents
throughout the Province, specifications have been prepared, notices posted, and contracts for work embracing many trades have been awarded. In this respect it is
interesting to record this procedure has been followed in minor and major repair and
redecoration work with a value of $100 to $10,000. Work above this amount was
also advertised in local and trade papers.
Our Superintendents of Works have continued to resolve the daily problems
of keeping buildings in their areas in operational conditions. As a result of their
efforts, renovations, decorations, and maintenance have been achieved with a minimum disruption to the occupying Government departments' operations. Together
with their staffs, they have continued to achieve a high standard of workmanship,
which has contributed to the success of this years' programme.
We would like to take this opportunity of thanking all Government Agents,
District Engineers, and others who, by their splendid co-operation, have made it
possible for us to carry out our work with dispatch and efficiency.
E. C. Clarkson, M.R.A.I.C., A.I.A.A.,
Senior Construction and Maintenance Architect.
 PUBIC WORKS REPORT,  1960/61 S 13
REPORT OF THE CIVIL AND STRUCTURAL ENGINEER
Many varied and interesting projects were undertaken during the year by the
Structural and Civil Engineering Division of the Public Works Department.
In last year's report our research on the use of light-weight aggregrates was
mentioned. One of the larger projects was the initial phase of the College of Education at the University of British Columbia, and it ushered in an important change
in structural design policy. This building is of reinforced concrete, with the largest
proportion of the concrete being composed of semi-lightweight expanded shale.
Used in an experimental way on smaller projects, it has been found that semi-lightweight concrete is justified by cost considerations, providing a building is designed
for its use. Great care needs to be exercised in the placing of light-weight concrete
in order to avoid flotation of the lighter aggregate; this involves minimum slumps
and the prudent use of vibrators.
The third and final contract for the completion of Victoria Law Courts was let
during the fiscal year, and marked the end of one of the largest and most interesting
jobs that our office has worked on in recent years. Other large projects completed
were the E. B. Paul Building at Victoria University, electrical shop at Burnaby
Vocational School, and Mission Court-house. The final phase of the Law Courts at
Victoria contained the largest plumbing contract let out during the year.
During the year a collapse of the water-supply intake structure at Tranquille
occurred, which necessitated emergency repairs, with final repairs and improvement
taking place a few months later. The water-supply system at Tranquille consists
of storage dams at Tranquille and Truda Lakes, which are approximately 30 miles
from the institution. Flow of water to the institution, in Tranquille Creek, is regulated by three dams, which are filled in winter and emptied in summer. The water-
intake structure is located about 2 miles north of the institution, and from there
water is piped to the institution and farm. Tranquille Creek is a mountain stream
running partly through barren country, and heavy rains create a sudden run-off,
which assumes flood proportions at lower levels. These sudden flood conditions
erode clay banks along the course of the river and create a high concentration of
suspended solids in the water. These suspended solids are partially removed by
settling in the intake structure and partly by filtration. During the spring freshets
a large quantity of water, high in suspended matter, flows through the intake and
overtaxes the settling action in the intake and the operation of the filters. The question is one of relative economics as to whether or not it would be justified to install a
large filtration plant to remove excess solids for a comparative short period of time
during the freshet season. As a result of these problems, a firm of consulting engine-
eers was engaged to prepare a full report on the quality and quantity of water.
We are indebted to the Materials Division of the Department of Highways for
the work it has performed on our behalf in respect to soils testing and concrete
testing. All the concrete testing on Victoria Law Courts and a considerable programme of soil tests at Victoria University were done by the Materials Division.
J. R. Simpson, B.Sc, A.M.T.C.E., P.Eng., Dip.Pub.Admin.,
Senior Civil and Structural Engineer.
 S 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
SEWAGE-DISPOSAL
Human life depends on an adequate supply of clean drinking-water.
In order to protect water-supplies, man has had to find a way to keep water-
borne wastes away from these sources. Among the first historical traces of such
measures are remnants of sewers, constructed in India about 3750 B.C. A number
of similar structures were found in the Middle East around Bagdad. These were
built about 2500 b.c. The first sewer by-laws were brought in by the Romans about
a.d. 80 in order to protect their well-built sewer systems. Their main sewer, the
" Cloaca Maxima," is still in use in to-day's Rome. The origins of modern city
sewerage go back only for the last 160 years or so. Construction of these systems
began nearly simultaneously in great cities as New York, Boston, London, Paris,
and Vienna. In smaller centres, large-scale collection of human wastes into sewers
began only in the twentieth century. Thus for centuries the problem of pollution
was solved by ducting water-carried waste out of sight and away from the water-
supply source. This worked well until the population increases of this century
brought the end of the sewer-line of one city dangerously close to the water-supply
of the neighbouring one. In some highly industrialized areas of the world, as in the
Ruhr Valley in Germany, there are several cities located on the same river within
a few miles. As the water has to be reused in these areas several times, the need
for the treatment of sewage and raw water had to originate here.
Public opinion to the contrary, treatment costs now and probably for years
to come exceed the value of recoverable constituents in sewage. No process of
domestic sewage treatment that delivers an unobjectionable effluent has so far been
devised that returns a profit. Some of the treatment costs may be defrayed by the
recovery of valuable products. These include liquid for irrigation or coolant for
power plants, sludge for its fertilizing value, grease for industrial reuse, grit for filling material, and sludge digestion gas for fuel. To these may be added any charges
for capital expenditures which may be saved by a shorter sewer run to a plant instead
of to a river or the open sea.
Overriding all these cost considerations are the intangible but very real benefits
brought by non-pollution of water sources, rivers, streams, and beaches. On a continent where in many places shortage of water is causing concern, this aspect is
assuming very real importance. There is also the economic consideration of using,
rather than dumping, waste which has real value.
Growth of population in countries with high living standards necessitated treatment much more urgently than in areas with low ones, as the chemical wastes which
appeared in ever-growing quantities in the sewage produced special problems. Also
in countries with a high living standard, regard for the condition of beaches and
bathing-places is high. First efforts to dispose of sewage by treatment were made
around 1870. However, it was not until the 1930's that improved and more
scientific methods were used.
Treatment, generally speaking, is done by the municipality where the buildings
are located. Therefore, sewage-disposal of Government buildings located in municipalities has presented no problems so far, and consist only in tying the plumbing of
the building into municipal sewers. Where such are not available, a standard septic-
tank and tile-drain system has been constructed.
Unless complaints about odours or pollution are received, this system is usually
left to run itself.
Recently rural waste-disposal grew more and more complicated. There are
two main reasons for this.   First, subdivisions began to encircle institutions which
 PUBIC WORKS REPORT, 1960/61
S 15
were not so long ago fairly distant from the city, and, second, detergents and new
disinfectants began to appear in ever-increasing quantities in institutional waste.
At first the design of improved sewage-disposal treatment facilities was based
on the miniaturization of city plants. As most big cities handle waste by the same
principle as the ordinary septic tank, this principle was followed through in the
design of three mechanized plants—namely, at Colquitz, Haney, and Oakalla. The
treatment consists of clarifying anaerobic digestion and filtering. This means that
after having separated the solids from the liquid by reducing the velocity of the flow,
the solids are pumped or dropped into a digester, where they are decomposed.
Sewer gas is produced. Decomposition is done by bacteria which do not require
any oxygen, hence the process is called anaerobic. The process requires a few
weeks if the digester temperature is kept between 85° and 95° F. At Provincial
institutions, however, the installation and maintenance of special heating equipment
would not be economical, and it is preferred to enlarge the digester, thus providing
the longer storage capacity required for a cooler and slower process. The digested
product is a black, slightly tarry-smelling, cake-like substance, which is an ideal
soil-conditioner and a mild fertilizer. The liquid leaving the clarifier has to undergo
further treatment. This is done by dropping it through a stone filter by way of self-
propelled rotating sprinkler. An algae-like green substance growing on the stones
eats the waste remaining in the liquid. To get a better treatment, the effluent from
this filter is recirculated once or twice through the clarifier before finally being discharged into a ditch or creek. Filtering requires the presence of oxygen, and is
therefore called aerobic. The entire process, while very efficient, requires an investment of about $100 to $150 per capita and considerable operating time.
Sewage lagoon, Tranquille School.
 S 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Since about 1956, institutions and subdivisions began using a process which
seems much more direct and simple. This process keeps air bubbling through raw
sewage in great quantities. Bacteria in this air eat the sewage in the same manner
as in a filter. Air is either sucked in by turbulence created by electrically driven
propellers or blown in by blowers. This process was used in Burnaby in the design
of a treatment plant which serves three Provincial institutions. Investment costs
of such a plant area only about $20 to $30 per capita, and operating time is only
about half of the digester-filter type. This process, however, uses substantially more
electric power and is very sensitive to chemicals and disinfectants contained in the
sewage. At the present time the National Research Council is experimenting with
a small plant using the same process. This experimental unit does not require any
fresh water, as it uses the purified liquid over and over again. Another advantage
of this plant is the complete lack of any odours, so that it could actually be constructed in or near any heating plant or other service building. This, of course,
would make operation and maintenance even more economical.
A method which is remarkable for its simplicity and low cost, and which has
come to the fore in recent times, is known as " lagooning." Lagoons are ponds 3
to 5 feet deep, and sewage is discharged directly into them. They are, in effect, open
septic tanks. The layman could be pardoned if he found it difficult to believe that
these lagoons do not produce objectionable odours, but this is so. They can be
landscaped and need not be unsightly. Operation costs are practically nil. On the
debit side is the fact that they require fairly large areas in open locations, and byproducts are lost. This Department, admittedly with some skepticism, installed
such a lagoon a few years ago at the institution at Tranquille. This was done at
the recommendation of the then Superintendent of Works, Mr. J. C. Martin, whose
initiative was responsible for what, at that time, was considered a bold experiment.
The lagoon has been an unqualified success, and this Department has provided many
inquirers with plans and details.
Waste-treatment processes suited to special problems are under study. At the
time these lines are written, this Department, in co-operation with the Health Department, is studying waste-disposal of an animal pathology laboratory. Due to the
work done in the building and its location, special precautions, such as sterilizing
wastes by heat, may have to be taken to prevent the spreading of diseases by water-
borne pollution.
The entire subject of sewage-disposal, while not pleasant, is one that must be
given more attention. It bears repetition that our water-supplies are too important
to be jeopardized. Even in Canada, with its relatively low population, instances
of rivers (such as the Saskatchewan) being polluted for hundreds of miles by waste
and chemicals are becoming more common. This is a matter which must be dealt
with now—not left for future generations to correct. To change established methods
and habits is always difficult; what must come first is a realization that the need
exists.
THEY    DIDNT   SAY   ANYTHING
ABOUT   SITE    CLEARING
A. Paul,
Engineer-in-training.
 PUBIC WORKS REPORT,  1960/61 S 17
REPORT OF THE MECHANICAL ENGINEER
GENERAL
The Romans became famous for their beautiful and elaborate baths. People
of all ages, and through the ages, have enjoyed the exhilaration of bathing and swimming in crystal-clear water. The sport is more popular now than ever, primarily
because we have more pools. The modern pool is much simpler than its Roman
counterpart, but the water is purer. Along with the pleasure of bathing, it has been
discovered that pools have a decided therapeutic value. To this end, the Provincial
Government operates and maintains five pools in five institutions.
It is no accident that the water in these modern pools is clear and sparkling,
and has a beautiful blue cast or shade. There are three principal ways in which
water in the pools can be kept fresh and clean: —
(1) The fill and draw, in which the pool is filled with fresh water, used for a
time, emptied and refilled.
(2) The flow through, in which the pool is supplied by a continuous flow of
fresh water.
(3) The recirculated, wherein the water is recirculated, filtered, and sterilized,
with only enough fresh water added to make up losses.
In most cases the recirculated pool has somewhat higher first cost, but is
cheaper to operate (especially if the water has to be heated), and also provides the
highest water quality. Water is a universal solvent which dissolves part of everything it touches. Natural waters are really never very pure. The impurities which
affect the quality of the water used in pools are inorganic and organic. The inorganic impurities are usually the carbonates, which cause hardness in water, and
are relatively easily disposed of by inorganic chemical, displacement, and filtering.
The organic material is quite a different story. Algae cause turbidity in pool
water, and certain bacteria are very harmful to health. These are removed by
chlorinating and fine filtering of the recirculated water. However, since both
regenerate in water, constant testing and attention to the water quality is required.
Pools operated by the Provincial Government are all of the recirculating type.
All are checked very closely by the department staffs, as well as by the Department
of Health inspectors. We take pride in maintaining the water quality well above
the minimum standards set by the Department of Health.
CAPITAL PROJECTS
Most of the capital projects designed and built by the Department this year
are described elsewhere in this Report. The Mechanical Division participated in
these projects to the extent of approximately 15 per cent of their contract value.
It has been a year of steady growth, but with no particularly outstanding projects
as far as this Division is concerned. It is an appropriate time to compare the
estimate of growth pattern with actual growth.
In 1955 we conducted an intensive study of the requirements of the steam plant
at the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale. The Hospital needed additional
steaming capacity in the steam plant, but how much was economically justified?
A study of the probable growth pattern of the Hospital was made in conjunction
with the Mental Health Services.   The accompanying curves show the comparison
with the forecast at that time (o o o) with the actual loads encountered
(x x x).
 S 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The actual growth pattern of the demand curve has increased, but not quite at
the same rate as the forecasted demand.
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1956
1957 1958
Year
1959
The main reasons for the divergence, of course, have to do with the Mental
Health Services. Sufficient here to say that the growth of the Hospital was not as
great as was expected in 1955.
MAINTENANCE OF MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT
Two trends have continued this year, and we expect they will continue. These
are the replacement of hand-fired coal-burning furnaces in the smaller detached
buildings and houses with automatic oil-burners and the installation of summer
cooling in Government offices.
Due to the increasing difficulty of obtaining coal in small amounts in smaller
towns and villages of the Province, and the price which has to be paid, it is cheaper
to install automatic oil-burners and burn oil for heating purposes. This is in addition to the added convenience.
Requests for summer cooling of buildings are still being received. Bearing
in mind costs, only a few evaporative coolers have been installed, but the programme
is continuing.
Maintenance of mechanical equipment continues, but the age of some of it
requires fairly large expenditures to be made in the near future. This Division is
making every endeavour to promote a policy of preventive maintenance, but its full
implementation depends upon bringing existing equipment up to date.
We wish to take this opportunity to thank the various operating staffs for their
co-operation during the year.
W. E. Mills, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Dip.Pub.Admin.,
Senior Mechanical Engineer.
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Diagramatic sketch of water-supply system at Tranquille School, Tranquille, B.C.
 S 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
The detonation of a nuclear weapon near the ground causes large quantities of
earth and debris to be forced up into the fireball and the resulting mushroom-shaped
cloud—a cloud which may reach an altitude of 15 miles or more before levelling off.
Earth and debris particles in the cloud vary in size from fine powder to large grains,
and it is radiation from these particles that can damage living cells.
Most of the particles fall back to the earth's surface within two days (early
fallout), while some remain aloft far longer (delayed fallout). In a nuclear attack
the immediate and most serious danger would be from early fallout. Therefore, the
term "fallout," as used in this article, means early fallout, and is the fallout considered in the evaluation of protection factors. Significant amounts of fallout do not
arrive outside the blast area until approximately half an hour after an explosion.
From then on it begins to cover an increasingly large area, and may eventually cover
thousands of square miles.
The deposition of fallout may be likened to a fall of snow, and it is assumed
that the fallout covers the area surrounding a structure in all directions uniformly.
Three different kinds of radiation are associated with fallout—alpha particles, beta
particles, and gamma rays. The primary aim of a fallout shelter is to provide a
shield against the latter. Exposure doses of gamma radiation are measured in units
called roentgens, and these doses are cumulative. The radioactivity of fallout decreases with time—rather rapidly at first, but more slowly as time passes.
Protection from the effects of radiation from fallout may be achieved in two
ways. The first method is to place a barrier between the fallout field and the individual; this is termed " barrier shielding." The second method is to increase the
distance of the individual from the fallout field and (or) reduce the extent of the
fallout field contributing to the individual's dose; this is termed "geometric shielding." In most analyses it is necessary to consider the effects of both barrier and
geometric shielding.
The term " protection factor " expresses the relative reduction in the amount
of radiation that would be received by an individual in a protected location compared to the amount he would receive if he were in an unprotected location. From
no protection (or zero), the scale or degree of protection moves upward, and it is
considered that for the shelter of personnel a minimum protection factor of 100 is
required. It is this figure which has been used when considering the shelter value
of existing Government buildings.
Shielding against the effects of fallout is largely provided in buildings by a
barrier of dense material between the occupants and the source of radiation. In
general, there are two main sources of radiation in a building—from radioactive
material on the ground and radioactive material on the roof.
Protection from roof radiation is mainly effected by the floors, roof, and interior
partitions, and height of roof above the shelter area; protection from ground radiation is effected by exterior walls, interior partitions, and depth of the shelter area
below ground. The depth below ground, the number and size of windows, and the
type of construction are the most important factors in considering protection. Buildings with basements below ground obviously offer a higher degree of protection than
those without basements.
Taking all this into consideration, it becomes obvious that structural design is
the really important factor in fallout protection. Depth in the ground, thickness of
floors and walls, and density of materials used all play a part. It is also obvious
that the best, sometimes the only, time to render a building reasonably safe is at
 PUBIC WORKS REPORT,  1960/61 S 21
the time of construction. It is a matter of pride to this Department that it has taken
the lead in planning of this kind, and its efforts have brought widespread interest
and duplication. To date three new Government buildings have been planned to
provide high protection—the Law Courts building in Victoria, the Court-house at
Mission, and the Animal Pathology Laboratory at Abbotsford. Others will follow.
Extra cost of providing this safety factor is surprisingly low—less than 1 per cent—
but the practice imposes problems on the architect, who must endeavour to retain
solid walls and floors, keep window areas small, and yet produce a good looking and
efficient building. A good example, to the informed observer, will be the Victoria
Law Courts building.
This Department has nearly completed a survey of all Government buildings
to determine protection against fallout. It has been found that frame construction
offers little protection, and consequently buildings with this type of construction can
be disregarded. In general, concrete and masonry buildings with concrete floors,
provided they do not have too many window openings, offer the best degree of
protection. Even if the protection factors of these buildings fall below the minimum, they can be improved at a reasonable cost. The protection offered by a
material varies directly with its density (and thus its weight). The denser materials,
such as lead, steel, concrete, brick, etc., are good, but economics limit the use of
lead and steel for any large-scale use.
The writer had the privilege of attending a course at Arnprior, Ont., dealing
with fallout protection, which was invaluable in assessing our own Government
buildings. This experience, coupled with many spontaneous observations by others,
reveals that our Department is recognized as playing a prominent part in what could
be termed a necessary, but rather distasteful, subject.
J. R. Simpson, B.Sc, A.M.I.C.E., P.Eng., Dip.Pub.Admin.,
Senior Civil and Structural Engineer.
REPORT OF THE ARCHITECT-PLANNER
" Let the Municipal Council make this city of my birth great in the
amenities of life, health and sanitation, let music and art grow under their
auspices and make the dwellings of citizens the abodes of joy: let her citizens of all races and all sects and communities unite in goodwill and keep
her fair name untarnished and her peace undisturbed; this is my prayer."—
Sir Rabindranath Tagore, Bengali poet and Nobel Prize winner, 1913.
This year's work cannot, by any stretch of the imagination, be termed monotonous, for it has contained much of interest, of disappointment, of elation, of surprise,
and of frustration. A planner, in his true colours, never gives in, so if one route
leads to a dead end, the answer may be found in some other mode of attack. Work,
therefore, continues unabated on major schemes, which having received setbacks
for a variety of reasons have now, through changed conditions, returned with
renewed vigour.
The year commenced with an extremly successful one-day planning conference
organized and held in Victoria. Favourable comment and reaction in town planning
circles were forthcoming for its originality and content.
The Department was also represented at the International Town Planning
Conference held in Vancouver.
The Department's exhibit at the Pacific National Exhibition has been brought
up to date and additions made. Assistance was also given by the Division at the
Junior Chamber of Commerce Fair and the Horticultural Exhibition, both in
Victoria.
 S 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Schemes were prepared, and it is still hoped interest will be fostered, both
public and private, in an urban renewal development around Bastion Square, Victoria. The Provincial Government, as the owner of five buildings in that vicinity, has
a large stake in its environmental health.
A decision has now been handed down with regard to the perimeter of the
Legislative Precinct, which necessitates a reappraisal of schemes already prepared,
and this work is under consideration.
The most rewarding, yet to many others may be perplexing, event of the year
now ending was the eventual taking-over of additional acreage at the Gordon Head
Campus for the development of Victoria University. This will allow a steady and
continuous development for generations to come. There will be a very difficult
interim period with a split campus before the University can settle properly in its
final location. Decisions of importance will need to be made with regard to the
continuance, consolidation, and maintenance of the Lansdowne Road site.
The survey of Government properties continues unabated with the help of
the Lands Department, and a new compilation of Government-held properties in
built-up areas is now in the process of being steadily recorded.
Policy briefs have been prepared concerning Government parking, Provincial
museums, siting of Government buildings within specified conditions, mimeographing and safe storage of essential Government records. Interdepartmental committees have now been set up to deal with these problems.
Continuing projects are concerned with traffic planning in the James Bay area,
buildings required at Essondale, Jericho Hill School, and Court-houses for smaller
communities.
An important project which has required great care and nurturing to keep alive
is the civic centre project for the capital, of which the Law Courts building is an
integral part. This scheme has now been adopted by the Centennial Committee as
part of the Victoria City centennial project, but there are still many bridges to cross
before finality can be claimed.
Planning saves time. By making provision for future growth we can avoid
having to redesign our cities a few generations from to-day.
Planning saves money. We are spending millions correcting the mistakes of
others. We should not duplicate or worsen these effects. A well-prepared plan for
the development of any area means careful spending of public funds and ultimate
savings for every taxpayer.
Proper planning ensures that our society is allotted the best available land for
the purpose in mind.
The planner who persists in regarding his plan as an end in itself, regardless of
public contribution, should be reminded to reflect that the ostrich who hides his head
in the sand presumably exposes his valuable tail feathers to the raider!
The planner's plot: "Always behave like a duck—keep calm and unruffled on
the surface, but paddle like blazes underneath " (with apologies to Lord Brabazon
of Tara, 1938).
W. D. LOUGHER-GOODEY,
A rchitect-Planner.
 PUBIC WORKS REPORT,  1960/61
S 23
REPORT OF THE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT
The joint efforts of the architect and the landscape architect produce the aesthetic environment of any building or group of buildings. Between them they
create the external physical environment—the first impression—which pleases. The
architect's work, on the one hand, has its functional as well as its aesthetic values,
and it has become accepted and expected that he will produce a building pleasing
to the eye. The landscape architect's function, however, being almost entirely in
the realm of the artistic, has been accepted more slowly, most probably because
his is a cost that can be omitted.
The art of landscape is therefore comparatively young, and it will probably
be many years before the desirable balance is reached. It is most encouraging,
however, to notice that even the most down-to-earth business and industrial corporations now insist on some form of landscaping around their buildings. Public
buildings, it is felt, should take the lead in the presentation of landscape effects.
To do so is to encourage others.
During the year this Division has designed, contracted, and produced several
important developments. Of these, some are more worthy of note than others for
their interest. The Victoria Law Courts, now nearing completion, has presented
challenging problems in the treatment of grounds because of the limitations of space.
To overcome these, extensive planters have been incorporated in the structure.
These must be protected from leaching during the summer and yet provide adequate
drainage during winter. Bearing in mind maintenance costs, these planters have
been equipped with automatic sprinklers.
An unusual condition of this project, for British Columbia anyway, is turfing
of all lawn areas around the building, thus producing green sward which, after three
months, should give the appearance of having been in place for years and without
the usual two to three years' treatment for weed eradication. This turf was trucked
from the Vocational School site at Burnaby, where some 65,000 square feet of lawn
was to be torn up to make way for new buildings. This turf has also been used to
finish lawn areas at the Girls' Industrial School, the Testing Laboratory, and the
Social Welfare building in Burnaby and Vancouver. Some will also be used at
Victoria University.
In designing landscaping features, every effort has been made to use courts,
patios, paved areas, and planters rather than extensive flower-beds and plantings.
This policy results in easier and less costly maintenance.
Gardening staff at Victoria and Vancouver have been consolidated into one
staff under one supervisor of grounds in each area. This has proved to be most
satisfactory, allowing greater flexibility and better coverage of work. It has also,
in company with a policy of using mechanized equipment whenever and wherever
possible, succeeded in lessening the amount of casual workers needed for seasonal
work.
Two large projects for automatically controlled lawn irrigation have been
devised and are nearing completion. These are at Government House and Victoria
University. Controlled by time-clocks, these will provide unattended watering of
lawns at times when full value will be obtained, and will sharply curtail the need
for casual summer-time help.
A steady programme is being continued whereby grounds of Government
buildings will be a credit both to the Government and to the community in which
they are located. _   TT _ ., . TT   .
J R. H. Savery, M.A.I.L.A.,
Landscape Architect.
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 PUBIC WORKS REPORT,  1960/61 S 25
HISTORIC FOUNTAIN, VICTORIA
The historic fountain to be placed at the centre of the Parliament Buildings
Precinct has been designed and will be built by the Department of Public Works.
This is a pioneering lead in demonstrating how the work of the landscape architect
can accent that of the architect. The present scheme is limited to a main walk
between buildings with a piazza or square as a central motif. This will form the
hub for a final scheme which will be developed in time.
A fountain was selected for two reasons. First, the ever-changing play of
water by day and illumination by night provide high interest at all times. Secondly,
it was the wish of the Government that a feature having historic significance and
symbolism should form the centre of the area in which future expansion of Government buildings would occur. As the first exploration of British Columbia was from
seaward, it seemed appropriate that a theme suggesting the sea should dominate.
The fountain design has arisen from a desire to devise something which is imaginative and unusual.
The British Columbia of to-day came about by reason of the union of four
colonies and territories: (1) The Crown Colony of Vancouver's Island (established
1849); (2) The Territory of the Queen Charlotte Islands (established 1852);
(3) The Crown Colony of British Columbia (established 1895); (4) the Stickeen
Territory (established 1862).
Also, it is coincidental, but factual, that these four areas have each their own
separate and distinct Indian society. These were: (1) Vancouver Island—Kwa-
kiutl, Nootka, and Salish; (2) Queen Charlotte Islands—Haida; (3) British
Columbia—Interior Indians;   (4) Stickeen Territory—Tahltan and Tlingit.
There is thus a good reason and means of tying the two sets of facts together.
An additional one, which is most important, is that the first economic reason which
brought about early exploration of this coast was the hunt for the sea otter. The
skins of these animals were very much sought after and resulted in many expeditions.
To bring these together we have used animals as symbols. These will be supported by plaques setting out the historical facts. The centrepiece shows two sea
otters—one looking down into the water, while the other looks up at two gulls
wheeling overhead. The otters, the gulls, and a central rock plinth denote the sea.
The four animals on the rim of the fountain are those most commonly used by the
Indian societies (not tribes) as the leading or top figure on their totem-poles. They
are the eagle (Vancouver Island), the raven (Queen Charlotte Islands), the wolf
(Stickeen Territory), and bear (British Columbia). We have avoided pure Indian
styling.
The fountain is of the surge and recirculate type. The motion of the water will
suggest the waves of the sea breaking against a rock. It will be forced from many
small jets spaced around the perimeter of the basin. Electrically controlled, it will
surge in three successive waves, with the final one breaking on the central rock
plinth. Fog jets will create an illusion of spray. A wind-force regulator located in
the nearby Connaught Library will tune the force of water to the wind conditions,
turning the pressure down when the wind is high and vice versa. The water will be
recirculated by pumping, and only losses made good from city mains.
Night illumination will again be electrically controlled to provide an ever-
changing play of colours. These will be predominantly blues and greens to accentuate the impression of the sea.
The symbolic theme was the thought of the Deputy Minister of Public Works,
Mr. A. E. Webb.    Historical material was prepared by Mr. Willard Ireland, Pro-
 S 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
vincial Archivist; Indian material by Dr. G. Clifford Carl and Mr. Wilson Duff,
of the Provincial Museum.
Design, clay models, and drawings were the work of Mr. Robert Savery, Landscape Architect to the Department of Public Works. With the help of the United
Kingdom Trade Commissioner, bids were submitted by British statuary makers,
and the firm of Birmingham Guild Limited has been commissioned to make the
bronze figures and plaques.    Public Works staff will carry out the construction.
The target date for activating the fountain is May 21, 1962. Progress to date
indicates this target will be met.
REPORT OF THE PERSONNEL OFFICER
In common with the policy followed over the past two years, this year's
Report will introduce staff members of the Department of Public Works.
Scattered throughout this Report will be found photographs of engineers and
draughtsmen of the Structural Division, together with a small sample of artwork produced by them.
Early in 1960 it became evident that the Department would not be able to
effectively discharge its increasing responsibilities unless the Department was organized on a simple basis that would allow flexibility to cope with new situations as well
as fit the Department's needs and functions.
Many difficulties are encountered in organizational planning, but, if the organization is considered as the foundation upon which to build, and if all are aware of
their part in it, then many rewarding results are provided. This office is the first to
realize that no organization is ever perfect for all time, but ours is now tailored to
fit present needs. Changes will likely occur. Planning must be considered a continuing process in order that a full team effort is achieved and maintained. Lastly,
an organization is only as good as those working within it. An organization is not
an object, but a collection of people.
An organization chart is attached to this report, and the functions of the
various divisions will be briefly outlined.
GENERAL
Under the authority of the Department of Public Works Act come construction,
landscaping, heating, maintenance, and telephone communications of all Government buildings throughout the Province. This Department is also responsible for
the administration of the Gas Act, the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act, and the Electrical Energy Act. The primary function of the Department is service to other
Government departments and to the general public.
SPECIFIC
Architectural Division.—The purpose of this Division is to design and prepare
sketch plans, presentation and working drawings, and specifications for all authorized capital projects and major alterations to existing buildings.
Accounts Division.—This Division is shared with the Department of Highways,
and is responsible for the accounting for revenue and expenditure, preparation of
budgets, and advising the executive on financial policies.
 PUBIC WORKS REPORT,  1960/61
S 27
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 S 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Administration Division.—This Division is responsible for the general administration of the Department, preparation and dispatch of all specifications covering
construction of Provincial buildings, advertising contracts for tender, approving and
processing of accounts covering contract construction and furnishings for new buildings, and keeping division heads informed as to financial standing of work votes.
Construction and Maintenance Division.-—This Division is responsible for the
supervision of all construction performed under contract to ensure that the contractor's work complies with the design and terms of the contract and that materials
purchased are as specified, the preparation of all plans and specifications for renovations and minor alterations of existing buildings, instruction and supervision of
Superintendents of Works and maintenance crews, working in close co-operation
with the Planning Division of the Department, recommending repairs as required,
and approval of requisitions for purchase of maintenance materials.
General Office.—This office is also shared with the Department of Highways,
and is responsible for mail distribution, compiling and controlling of Departmental
files.
Landscape Division.—The primary function of this Division is to design and
complete plans and specifications for the ground areas of new buildings, supervise
actual construction work, and review from time to time existing grounds where
revised landscape treatment is necessary. It gives technical direction, instruction,
and supervision to gardening staff.
Mechanical Division.—It is the function of this Division to deal with the
mechanical and administrative matters related to the design, supervision, operation,
and maintenance of mechanical services connected with office buildings, laboratories, institutions, etc. The mechanical services which are the responsibility of this
Division include: Steam and hot-water boiler plants and distribution systems; heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems; refrigeration plants; mechanical
equipment and services connected with laundries, dairies, canneries, kitchen equipment, hospital sterilizing equipment, swimming-pools, and incinerators.
Personnel Office.—This office is responsible for personnel administration within
the Department. It also assists and works in co-operation with the Department of
Highways. The major work of this office is administering personnel policies and
instructions, job analysis and evaluation, organization staffing, employee relations,
performance standards and evaluation, employee rights and obligations, personnel
records and reports, and personnel research.
Structural Division.—This Division is responsible for the design, drawing, specifying, and supervision of structural design in reinforced concrete, structural steel,
and wood for Government buildings and other structures, civil engineering design
of site works, such as excavations, roads, drains, sewers, ordinary and mechanically
operated sewage-disposal plants, water-supplies (including wells), water storage,
pipe-lines and exterior fire-fighting systems, design and layout of plumbing and
piping systems.
Telephone Communications Division.—This Division is responsible for the
general supervision of all Government switchboards, the training of all Provincial
Government telephone operators, service for new buildings, conversion, traffic
studies, load balance, equipment charges, preparation of internal directories, and
liaison between Government and operating telephone companies.
Boiler and Machinery Inspection Division, Vancouver.—This Division administers the provisions of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act, being responsible for
approving the design of pressure vessels and their installation and related machinery.
 PUBIC WORKS REPORT, 1960/61
S 29
Electrical Inspection Division, Vancouver.—This Division is responsible for
administering the Electrical Energy Act, which governs the inspection and approval
of all electrical installations in unorganized areas of the Province, municipalities and
cities where service is required, and the approval of all plans and specifications for
electrical installations within the industry.
Gas Inspection Division, Vancouver.—This Division is responsible for administering the provisions of the Gas Act, which governs the inspection of all installations
of gas appliances in unorganized portions of the Province and in municipalities and
cities where service is required.
This office would like to gratefully acknowledge the help, co-operation, and
courtesy given by the other divisions of this Department, the Civil Service Commission, and the Superannuation Branch.
W. R. Henderson,
Personnel Officer.
7^\
BUT— WE  FOLLOWED
THE   CODE!"
A. J. Perry-Whittingham,
Junior Draughtsman.
J. Relling,
Senior Draughtsman.
A. Dery,
Engineer—Grade 3.
J. Davies,
Engineer-in-training.
T. O. White,
Technical Draughtsman.
 S 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF TELEPHONES
The Telephone Division has again experienced a busy year, with the main portion of activity centring around the Parliament Buildings Telephone Exchange.
The Parliament Buildings switchboard, being the central telephone exchange
for forty-six buildings, has increased its equipment facilities almost continuously
since the original installation in 1909.
The first switchboard was a single-position fully manual board. It served
eighty offices in the main building. In 1930 a two-position semi-automatic was
installed. This piece of equipment served 300 locals. In 1951 the switchboard
had reached its capacity, which was 400 locals, and a completely new switchboard
was installed in the basement of the Douglas Building. The new board had a
capacity of 700 locals and carried four positions. This was thought by all concerned
to contain enough equipment for at least ten years. It was the largest automatic
installation within the Province.
However, in 1958 traffic had built up to the point that orders were issued for
a fifth position and 200 additional locals. In 1960 the traffic increased beyond all
expectation and the sixth position was installed.
Figures taken from annual traffic counts since 1951 show the steady increase
until 1957, and from this time forward a continued rapid growth, which we are
still experiencing. Daily average in incoming calls: 1951, 2,000; 1952, 2,150;
1953, 2,300; 1954, 2,450; 1955, 2,600; 1956, 2,650; 1957, 2,700; 1958, 2,900;
1959, 3,400; 1960, 4,400.
In total, we now supervise forty-four positions of switchboard, of which there
are ten different types, ranging from completely manual-type operation to the newest
in the smaller-type automatic that does not require an operator. These switchboards carry as few as eighteen locals to the larger boards carrying up to 900. Staff
requirement for switchboard service now totals more than seventy operators. Some
of our switchboards are only open during business-hours, the larger institutions
being staffed twenty-four hours per day.
There are 1,071 business installations within the Province. These range from
a single telephone to instruments carrying up to four central-office lines (thirteen
instruments), nine stations of office intercommunication, and other specialized
equipment. Other services include leased lines, private lines which carry fire-alarm
circuits, teletype lines, control circuits for our two radio systems, and many other
special services.
Foreign exchange service has now become our major portion of special services. We have lines betwen Victoria and Vancouver, also a few on the Lower
Mainland. The Victoria-Vancouver Foreign Exchange circuits have proven most
satisfactory. At the in-service date the average monthly traffic was 2,300 calls at
a cost per call of $2.16. To date we are averaging 16,000 to 17,000 calls per month
at a cost of 32 cents per call.
Now that the telephone industry has made such great advances in the field of
automation, we find the newer types of equipment have not only increased the
efficiency of Government offices, but in some cases actually decreased costs. Surveys are being taken continuously to modernize existing equipment.
The partial take-over of telephone accounting by the Public Works Department
has been quite successful. The second phase of the operation will be completed
within the next fiscal year, at which time all Provincial Government telephone
accounts will be scrutinized, checked, and vouchered by this Division.
(Miss) Ruth E. Thompson,
Supervisor of Telephones.
 Illit
1930: Two positions, 300 locals, one operator.    Equipment was located in the same room.
1960: Six positions, 900 locals.
 S 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF INSPECTOR OF BOILERS
AND PRESSURE VESSELS
In accordance with the provisions of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act, I have
the honour to submit the fifty-ninth annual report of the Boilers and Pressure Vessels
Inspection Division for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1961.
GENERAL
The gradual increase of industrial density in the Kootenay and Prince George
areas over the last ten years now warrants the establishment of resident district
inspectors in Nelson and Prince George.
To this end, two young graduate mechanical engineers were appointed, which
will enable us to rearrange staff so that by the summer of 1961 an office can be
opened in Nelson, and by April of 1962 an office is planned for Prince George.
This will result in a more efficient service in these areas than the annual itinerary
method in force hitherto.
In the training of stationary engineers and welders, we have worked in close
co-operation with the principals of the Vocational Schools in Burnaby and Nanaimo,
the Vancouver Vocational Institute, and with the Director of High School Correspondence.
As a committee member, the Chief Inspector attended the Canadian Standards
meeting at Ottawa in September to discuss interprovincial uniformity on rules
governing boilers and pressure vessels.
REGULATIONS
Much work has been done in the preparation of regulations governing welding
and the qualification of welders. Meetings have been held with employer groups
and labour delegations, resulting in valuable contribution to the proposed rules.
It is expected these regulations will be ready for presentation in August, 1961.
NEW CONSTRUCTION AND INSTALLATIONS
In spite of the recession, 131 new steam-boilers and 343 hot-water boilers
were installed.
British Columbia boiler-shops built ninety-three boilers and 1,240 pressure
vessels.
ACCIDENTS AND REPAIRS
Three boilers were bulged by overheating and required patching. One new
boiler was damaged by low water and required new tubes. No persons were injured.
All repairs were made under an inspector's direction.
Three pressure vessels exploded and a valve on an air-compressor blew off.
Three workmen suffered injuries.
 PUBIC WORKS REPORT,  1960/61
SUMMARY OF WORK
S 33
1960/61
1959/60
1958/59
Designs registered   —
Boilers built under inspection 	
Pressure vessels built under inspection .
Total boilers inspected  	
Total pressure vessels inspected.— _
New boiler installations.... 	
Engineers examined 	
Welders examined.  	
560
115
1,245
3,899
2,226
740
555
1,828
528
126
869
4,371
2,043
408
623
1,923
ENGINEERS' EXAMINATIONS
Class
Number
Examined
Passed
Failed
24
13
56
126
229
43
79
10
13
10
39
100
154
30
62
7
11
First, B       	
3
17
Third                           	
26
Fourth        	
75
Boiler operator, A...	
13
17
3
Totals       	
580
415
165
WELDERS' TESTS
Grade
Number
Examined
Passed
Failed
A.S.M.E.                           	
635
558
194
106
131
549
473
153
99
130
86
B. Electric  	
85
41
7
1
1,624
1,404
220
D. Denham, P.Eng.,
Chief Inspector.
/£b
D. Walton,
Draughtsman—
Grade 2.
   S 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE  INSPECTOR OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY
In accordance with the Electrical Energy Inspection Act, I have the honour to
submit my annual report for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1961.
BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS
The Honourable Minister of Public Works has been pleased to appoint the
following members to the Board, effective January 1, 1961: K. McRae, electrical
contractor, representing the Associated Electrical Contractors of British Columbia;
G. Woodley, electrical contractor, representing the Vancouver Electrical Association; and C. Kilpatrick, electrical inspector for the City of Vancouver, representing
cities and municipalities. Other members of the Board are L. Robson (Chairman),
Chief Inspector of Electrical Energy, and G. A. Harrower, Assistant Inspector of
Electrical Energy.   Eleven meetings were held throughout the year.
The total number of certificates of competency in effect during the year was
as follows:—
Class A   199
Class B  420
Class C  551
Class PA     69
Class PB      127
Class PC      212
Class TB  1
Total   1,579
Three hundred and forty-two candidates for electrical contractors' certificates
of competency were examined during the year, with the following results:—
Class
Number of
Candidates
Examined
Passed
Failed
A              .  "
56
111
175
24
42
79
!       32
B        ....
69
c    ■	
96
342
145
|        197
PERMITS
The total number of permits issued during the fiscal year was as follows:
April, 1960 :.. 3,077 November, 1960     3,886
May, 1960  3,639 December, 1960     3,006
June, 1960  3,648 January, 1961     2,988
July, 1960  3,328 February, 1961      2,524
August, 1960  3,955 March, 1961     2,997
September, 1960  3,966 	
October, 1960   4,238 Total  41,252
 PUBIC WORKS REPORT, 1960/61
DISTRICT OFFICES AND INSPECTIONS
The following is a record of inspections undertaken during the year:
S 37
Office Location
Inspections
1960/61
1959/60
1958/59
Abbotsford   " _  	
3,607
2,287
2,382
3,259
2,042
1,427
2,849
1,556
2,268
2,087
2,760
2.219
5,398
2,556
1,964
5,121
1,794
2,007
3,550
1,648
1,964
1,000
2,157
8,031
3,753
2,213
2,601
3,317
2,149
1,657
3,230
1,080
2,929
2,520
2,868
2,123
8,056
2,214
1,951
5,470
1,852
1,933
6,130
579
2,203
1,394
2,727
8,622
3,548
2,865
2,995
2,825
2,576
1,440
2,946
Fort St. John ...   	
1,317
2,859
3,013
2,255
1,969
New Westminster (three inspectors)      	
6,107
2,362
2,205
Prince George (two inspectors) ..	
5,251
1,746
1,491
Richmond (two inspectors)..  	
6,109
Trail        _.	
1,712
Vancouver (West Coast, Gulf Islands, and Lillooet) 	
Vernon,.               	
1,105
2,824
8,231
Totals 	
65,943
73,651
69,324
Effective May 1, 1960, inspections for The Corporation of the City of Penticton were undertaken by this Division. The City of Penticton was incorporated
with the district area, which was being inspected from an office located in Penticton.
REGULATIONS
The regulations governing certificates of competency for electrical contractors
were revised during the year. Provision has now been made for a group of bona
fide property-owners or tenants to undertake the construction of overhead electric
lines in rural areas for the purpose of transmitting electrical energy to their several
properties. This step was taken in order that such persons might contribute their
labour in lieu of cash or other considerations for such construction and could in
some instances make possible the extension of long rural lines formerly considered
to be uneconomic.
Provision has also been made for the issuance of restricted certificates to cover
specific types of electrical work and for special certificates which would cover
installations of a special nature. Recognition has also been included for persons
registered as professional engineers in the field of electrical engineering without the
need for further qualifying examinations.
The schedule of fees remains at the same level, with the exception of fees for
probational certificates. These are now at the same level as full certificates of
equivalent rating.
CANADIAN STANDARDS ASSOCIATION
The Chief Inspector continued to represent the Province on the Approvals
Council of the Canadian Standards Association and on committees on the Canadian
Electrical Code.    He continues to act as Chairman of the Canadian Electrical Code,
 S 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Part I, Committee, which Committee is responsible for the preparation and editing
of the Canadian Electrical Code.
Two meetings of the Canadian Standards Association Approvals Council
(Electrical) and of the Committee on the Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, were
attended, the first during June in Vancouver and the second during November in
Toronto. In addition, a meeting was attended in Montreal during the month of
January to consider the proposal for manufacturer certification. Due to the limited
scope of the Approvals Laboratories, some investigation has been under way with
a view to supplementing laboratories approval service with a licensing scheme operated by Canadian Standards Association to permit a manufacturer to certify that
electrical merchandise has been constructed in accordance with recognized engineering specifications. It is anticipated that when this proposal is finalized, it will
be of great assistance to this Division in so far as deciding the basis for acceptance
for electrical equipment which is beyond the normal scope of Testing Laboratories.
It is anticipated that a request will be made for an enabling Order in Council at an
early date.
The rules for the installation of electrical equipment are constantly under
review in order to keep them up to date with respect to new materials and practices
which are developed by industry from time to time.
EXAMINATION OF MOTION-PICTURE PROJECTIONISTS
The Division assisted the Provincial Fire Marshal in conducting four examinations for projectionists. The regulations covering such examinations provide that
the Inspector of Electrical Energy be a member of this Examining Board in company
with the Fire Marshal. In this connection, all fees arising from these examinations
accrue to the credit of the Fire Marshal's department.
POLE-LINE PERMITS
During the year the Division checked 972 applications for the erection of pole-
lines on Crown lands or Provincial highways. Recommendations on each application were forwarded to the Regional Engineer of the Department of Highways. This
was an increase of 217 over the previous year and reflects the continuing activity
in providing electrical service throughout the Province.
ACCIDENTS
There were nineteen accidents recorded during the year, which is an increase
of two in the number of accidents reported for the previous year. Seven of the
accidents reported were fatal.
May I again express my appreciation for the splendid co-operation and continued interest in our problems by the Departmental staff during the year.
L. Robson, P.Eng.,
Inspector of Electrical Energy.
 Interior views of old Girls' Industrial School (800 Cassiar Street, Vancouver)
remodelled into office space.
 S 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF GAS INSPECTOR
THE ACT
New regulations governing the installation, protection, and maintenance of gas
mains, services, and meters in the Province of British Columbia were made by Order
in Council No. 1707, approved July 19, 1960, and published in Part II of The
British Columbia Gazette dated August 11, 1960.
Regulations respecting interim approval and interim listing of gas appliances
were amended by Order in Council No. 1708, approved July 19, 1960, published
in Part II of The British Columbia Gazette dated August 11, 1960.
The regulations governing the installation of gas piping, appliances, and venting
in British Columbia were amended by Order in Council No. 1709, approved July,
1960, published in Part II of The British Columbia Gazette dated August 11, 1960.
THE DIVISION
At present the staff consists of the Chief Inspector, Assistant Chief Inspector,
sixteen Gas Inspectors, one Senior Clerk (Office Manager), one Clerk—Grade 2,
one Clerk—Grade 1, two Clerk-Stenographers—Grade 2, one Clerk-Typist—Grade
1, plus one Clerk—Grade 1 (half time) in our Victoria office and one Clerk-
Typist—Grade 1 (part time) in our Abbotsford office.
Night-school courses were once again conducted in Vancouver, Burnaby, Victoria, Nanaimo, Abbotsford, Vernon, Trail, Nelson, Kamloops, and Prince George.
These courses were conducted jointly by this Division, the gas utility, and the School
Boards. In the over-all picture, in excess of 1,100 persons attended these gas
courses.
Natural gas was not distributed to any new areas during the year. The utilities
continued to expand their distribution systems in areas presently serviced.
The use of natural gas is being more widely resorted to by industrial, commercial, and domestic establishments. There is every reason to expect this trend
will continue, even though the rate of increase during the past fiscal year was below
that of the previous, this being mainly due to a decrease in the number of new homes
built. Plastic mains and services used in certain rural areas by the utilities have lived
up to expectations.
ACCIDENTS
During the fiscal year there was one death in the City of Victoria which was
attributable to monoxide poisoning.
SUMMARY OF WORK
1960/61
1959/60
1958/59
New designs checked, industrial approval  _	
Gas Codes distributed     	
601
2,182
1,413
535
862
184
71
239
14,635
12,883
485
639
574
1,002
553
1,190
303
123
343
19,624
17,328
662
411
811
1,137
568
1,281
264
Gas-fitters' re-examinations    —..   —	
137
277
Number of gas permits issued, municipalities 	
17,428
16,230
Permit application pads distributed        	
A. G. Kaneen, P.Eng.,
Chief Gas Inspector.
 PUBIC WORKS REPORT,  1960/61
S 41
REPORT OF THE  DEPARTMENTAL COMPTROLLER
The following pages present in detail the expenditures relating to the construction, alteration, and repairs on the various Government buildings and institutions
for the fiscal year 1960/61.
A. E. Rhodes,
Departmental Comptroller.
 S 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, FISCAL YEAR 1960/61
ADMINISTRATION AND MAINTENANCE VOTES
(For details see Public Accounts.)
Vote 299.    Minister's Office      $21,249.01
Vote 300.    General Administration     174,643.83
Vote 301.    Parliament Buildings (Maintenance)     865,576.74
Vote 302.    Government House (Maintenance)       87,856.28
Vote 303.    Government Buildings (Maintenance) 3,422,333.98
Vote 305.    Rentals      421,642.49
Vote 306.    Gas Division     164,616.03
Vote 307.    Steam-boiler Inspection      141,380.37
Vote 308.    Electrical Energy Inspection     301,538.14
  $5,600,836.87
Less credits—
Rentals, etc., Government buildings        137,866.41
Repayable items, Rental Vote  320.00
$5,462,650.46
CAPITAL
Vote 304.    Construction of Provincial Buildings {see expenditures by buildings
listed below)   $2,964,411.87
Less Federal Government contributions         148,653.14
$2,815,758.73
SUMMARY
Net expenditure, Department of Public Works—
Administration and maintenance  $5,462,650.46
Capital     2,815,758.73
8,278,409.19
VOTE 304—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS
Project No.                                                             Description Expenditure
332-B           Alterations to Allco Infirmary   $9,997.17
242-B-2       Random Sample Poultry Testing Station, Abbotsford  53,868.89
299-B           Burnaby Vocational School   75,245.42
320-B            New residence, Department of Mines, Charlie Lake   15,760.60
322-B           New residence, Department of Highways, Charlie Lake  16,500.90
333-B Charlie Lake Operation Centre and Core-storage Site, Department of
Mines   121,835.05
6-B-31      Replacement of Wilson Ranch barn. Colony Farm  39,381.24
353-B          Connaught Fountain Garden, Superior Street, Victoria  5,159.43
9-B-18      Remodelling barn, Colquitz Mental Home  *
25-B-10      Sprinkler system, Vernon Home for Aged (Dellview)  4,720.86
355-B           Purchase of equipment, Douglas Building and Michigan Street Cafeterias   1,166.54
Essondale—
5-B-21              100-bed nurses' home and training centre  1,037.25
5-B-34             Renovations to butcher-shop   *
5-B-41              Sewage-disposal   1,323.22
5-B-53              300-bed unit, Port Coquitlam (Valleyview)  12,788.34
5-B-65             Addition to boiler-house  1,896.64
5-B-82              Water-distribution system  *
5-B-87              Laundry equipment  1,104.97
5-B-97             Fire-escapes, Home for Aged, Buildings 1, 2, and 3  2,020.86
5-B-101            New substation and overhead circuits  6,977.29
5-B-102           Alteration and renovations to kitchens and staff changing-rooms 22,427.61
5-B-112           Ventilation, West Lawn Building  6,356.48
5-B-115            New cemetery   10,000.00
5-B-116            Landscaping, roads, and parking   15,000.00
5-B-119           Garbage-handling and incinerators  37,294.24
* Funds released but no expenditure during fiscal year.
 PUBIC WORKS REPORT,  1960/61
S 43
VOTE 304—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.
5-B-124
5-B-125
5-B-126
5-B-127
5-B-128
5-B-129
289-B
208-B
311-B
335-B
371-B
123-B-2
123-B-5
123-B-6
123-B-ll
123-B-13
123-B-14
79-B-5
79-B-8
342-B
319-B
372-B
354-B
346-B
341-B
338-B
308-B
39-B-18
39-B-51
39-B-55
39-B-57
39-B-61
39-B-62
292-B
368-B
337-B
201-B-l
312-B
317-B
313-B
351-B
24-B-5
331-B
340-B
10-B-12
10-B-37
10-B-38
10-B-39
10-B-40
10-B-41
10-B-42
10-B-43
369-B
89-B-l
345-B
150-B-l
178-B-l
352-B
Description
Fire-escapes, East Lawn Building	
Installation of new telephone equipment _.
Sterile supply centre, East Lawn Building
Bathing facilities, Ward F 1
Construction of Occupational Therapy Department
Toilet facilities 	
General expenses, surveys, supplies, etc.
Girls' Industrial School, Burnaby
Remodelling old Girls' Industrial School, Cassiar Street, Vancouver
Timber-clearing, Girls' Industrial School, Burnaby 	
Waterproofing Court-house, Grand Forks 	
Haney Correctional Institution—
Awnings, Administration Building	
Development of grounds and irrigation system	
Concrete footings for perimeter fence
Alterations to the main electrical switchboard
Sallyport 	
Water-supply 	
lericho Hill School—
Sprinkler system
Playground area (sidewalk and steps)	
Air-conditioning Forestry Building, Kamloops 	
Additions to the Health and Welfare Building, Kamloops
Ventilation of the Legislative Chambers 	
Fire precautions, Marpole Infirmary 	
Provincial Government offices, Mission and District
Motor-vehicle Branch accommodation for additional equipment 	
Conversion D.C. elevator. New Westminster Court-house	
Purchase of a building in New Westminster for emergency Courthouse accommodation and for interior amenities	
Oakalla—
Security fence (South Wing and Royal Oak-Avenue)	
Fire Marshal's recommendations 	
Conversion of supply circuits 	
Additional steam capacity
Renovation of Young Offenders' Unit building to hospital
Roads 	
Structural alterations, Parliament Buildings 	
Renewal of steam-lines, Parliament Buildings	
Cell-block and renovations, Penticton Court-house 	
Prince George Government building for Civil Defence
Prince George Vocational School 	
Waterproofing Prince Rupert Court-house	
Government Agent's residence, Prince Rupert 	
Water-main extension on Interurban Road, Saanich ...
Sprinkler system, Skeenaview Hospital	
Addition to Court-house, Terrace 	
Alterations to Topaz Avenue storage vault	
Tranquille School—
Water-supply and sewage-disposal	
Installation of showers 	
Fire-truck 	
Renewal of steam-lines	
Houses 	
Alterations to main building	
Boiler No. 1	
Renewal of steam-lines to residences
College of Education, University of British Columbia (Vancouver)..
Administration offices—Seventh Floor, Provincial Health Building,
Vancouver 	
Street-lighting, Heather Street, Vancouver 	
Storage space, Polio Pavilion, Vancouver	
Alterations, Victoria University
Victoria University Furniture, Classroom and Faculty Block
Expenditure
$58,202.95
5,490.63
7,884.76
1,052.86
3,697.89
7,536.86
150,583.50
1,914.12
2,860.00
5,560.00
16,500.00
6,066.45
585.98
47,198.97
3,619.10
15,415.48
1,177.13
14,123.00
77,375.61
14,361.42
16,183.20
161,517.75
3,999.52
2,265.00
118,270.01
19,551.14
8,482.89
1,065.80
5,589.61
68,217.73
7,202.20
47,062.46
12,073.55
8,727.07
10,709.49
54,269.81
15,000.00
261.90
*
14.152.25
2,652.42
2,909.35
8,160.70
3,616.73
27,825.00
1,985.04
24,308.42
74,919.71
5,161.10
23.10
2,933.08
84,154.62
*
19,802.91
188.69
* Funds released but no expenditure during fiscal year.
 S 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOTE 304—CONSTRUCTION OF PROVINCIAL BUILDINGS—Continued
Project No.
352-B
339-B
279-B-4
31-B-3
31-B-5
31-B-6
7-B-14
7-B-36
7-B-37
7-B-40
7-B-41
7-B-42
7-B-43
359-B
370-B
379-B
363-B
334-B
365-B
327-B
358-B
324-B
377-B
378-B
367-B
381-B
325-B
357-B
21-B
323-B
380-B
366-B
360-B
309-B
362-B
326-B
348-B
382-B
356-B
Description
Victoria University—Contract No. 1 (clearing and excavation for
Classroom and Faculty Building) and Contract No. 2 (Classroom and Faculty Block)   	
Victoria Law Courts 	
Alterations to switchboard, Victoria 	
Landscaping, Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital
Fire-alarm, Tuberculosis unit, Tenth and Willow, Vancouver __
Renovations and waterproofing, Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital
The Woodlands School—
Storm-sewers 	
Fly-screens  	
Electrical distribution and rebuild vault .	
Landscaping, fencing, paving, etc.	
Renovation to old kitchen	
Toilet facilities, playing area  	
Sewer-line 	
Highway garages, sheds, etc.—
Material- and chemical-storage shed, Alberni _
Equipment-shed, Anahim Lake (South Cariboo) 	
New wiring, Atlin garage (Atlin (North))  	
Dry storage shed, Burns Lake (Omineca (West)) 	
Living accommodation,  Chetwynd  maintenance camp   (South
Peace River)  	
Three-bay equipment-shed, Cherryville (North Okanagan)	
Material- and chemical-storage shed, Gibsons (North Vancouver)
Material- and  chemical-storage  shed,  Horseshoe  Bay   (North
Vancouver)    	
Three-bay equipment-shed, Hope (Yale) 	
Construction of a bunk-house for single men and install a pump-
house and stand-by light plant at Honeymoon Camp (Fort
George)   	
Construction of a dry storage shed at Houston (Omineca (West))
Three-bay equipment-shed, Kimberley (Cranbrook)  	
Exhaust system in Merritt garage (Yale)   	
Additional garage facilities, Nelson (Nelson-Creston) 	
Material- and chemical-storage shed, North Vancouver (North
Vancouver)  	
Heating system, Port Clements garage (Prince Rupert) 	
Addition to main garage, Prince George (Fort George) 	
Exhaust systems  in  the   Princeton   and  Allison   Pass  garages
(Similkameen) 	
Four-bay equipment-shed,  Rock Creek   (Grand Forks-Greenwood)   	
Material- and chemical-storage shed, Mayne Island  (Nanaimo-
Islands)
Materials for small storage shed at Say ward (Comox) 	
Dry storage shed, Smithers (Skeena (East)) 	
Material- and chemical-storage shed,  Squamish   (North  Vancouver)
Heating for Tete Jaune equipment-shed (Fort George) 	
Exhaust system in Vernon garage (North Okanagan) .	
Material- and chemical-storage shed, Westview  (North Vancouver)   	
Expenditure
$74,577.04
842,389.56
3,340.40
42,957.26
3,935.00
16,400.86
8.746.53
1,031.00
8,300.00
172.29
1,208.44
27.46
10,975.66
4,600.00
7,319.84
521.77
4,500.00
8,800.00
12,000.00
4,268.05
1,233.87
22,000.00
10,000.00
4,500.00
11,695.03
500.00
57,595.46
4,265.42
2,898.25
22,138.79
130.91
19,924.54
3,400.00
1,500.00
3,000.00
1,155.71
3,791.00
2,299.77
$2,964,411.87
* Funds released but no expenditure during fiscal year.
299-B
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT CREDITS
Burnaby Vocational School 	
$148,653.14
 PUBIC WORKS REPORT, 1960/61
S 45
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
Sprinkler System, Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace:
Fred Walsh & Son Ltd.
$13,364.00
17,100.00
13,550.00
13,884.00
122,031.50
105,360.00
15,666.00
12,814.00
15,197.00
13,300.00
106,444.00
108,872.00
113,234.00
82,813.00
90,033.00
89,914.00
93,410.00
77,610.00
127,888.00
399,569.00
341,655.00
355,000.00
365,963.00
369,948.00
357,890.00
370,602.00
329,423.00
14,400.00
20,041.00
16,654.00
39,493.38
35,640.00
34,855.00
35,200.00
46,558.00
51,972.00
65,000.00
46,500.00
1,956,088.00
1,686,000.00
1,758,723.00
1,768,912.00
1,997,366.00
87,452.00
83,885.00
85,065.00
89,945.00
99,797.00
33,500.00
34,524.00
9,318.00
8,90O.CO
16,135.16
8,202.05
10,330.00
10,300.00
Grinnell Co. of Canada Ltd	
The Bay Co (B.C.) Ltd                                           	
Awarded.
Janitorial Services, Provincial Government Buildings, Vancouver Area:
Air-conditioning, Forestry Building, Kamloops:
H. Giddens Ltd., Kamloops     —  	
M. & M. Heating, Vancouver. , 	
Alterations and Additions to Department of Mines Building, Charlie Lake:
Klassen Construction Ltd „. ,. 	
Awarded.
British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby, Phase 2, Contract No. 1:
Alpha Steel Co. Ltd        	
Western Bridge & Steel Fabricators Ltd     	
Pacific Steel Erectors Ltd.    ._ ...	
Victoria University, Victoria. Contract No. 2 (Classroom and Faculty Block):
E. J. Hunter & Sons        	
Luney Bros. & Hamilton Ltd    	
M. P. Paine Co. and Patterson Construction Co. Ltd.- 	
Farmer Construction Ltd  — - —	
Conversion to Oil Firing of the Boiler Plant at Victoria University, Victoria:
W. R. Menzies & Co. Ltd  ,	
C. J. McDowell Plumbing & Heating Ltd.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Landscaping Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital, Vancouver:
Lloyd G. Scott Kitimat               	
Clearing, Foundations, and Structural Steel Frame for One Building, British Columbia
Vocational School, Prince George:
C. J. Oliver Ltd.                 	
Contract No. 3, Law Courts, Victoria:
Addition to Health and Welfare Centre, Kamloops:
Wilson & Dalgleish   ... 	
McGregor Construction Co. Ltd.  	
Taylor & Son Ltd  	
Awarded.
Thomas F. Hall Ltd   	
M. & G. Construction Co. Ltd.        . .
Landscaping Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital, Vancouver, Part 2 (Construction):
Beaver Construction Co. Ltd	
E. H. Shockley & Son Ltd 	
Additions to Drainage System, The Woodlands School, New Westminster:
Mainland Installations Ltd.  	
Manson Bros. Ltd....  	
Salmac Construction Ltd.  	
Fownes Construction Co. Ltd.	
The Bay Co. (B.C.) Ltd  	
Ward & Son Ltd.     	
 S 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED—Continued
Description of Work and Names of Tenderers
Amount
Remarks
Janitorial Service, British Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby:
American Building Maintenance Co. Ltd     —
21,032.40
14,416.00
14,656.21
17,748.00
22,593.00
14,110.00
32,980.00
35,505.00
27,572.00
26.208.00
Foundations, Buildings, Sewers, and Water Services, Incinerator Installation, Essondale Mental Hospital, Essondale:
P. B. Ford & Co         	
The Bay Co. (B.C.) Ltd                          _ ~
36.000.00
28,000.00
26,755.00
28,841.00
26.938.00
C   F, BfrifP.rT.tr1.
50,581.00
27,881.00
Klassen Construction Ltd           __      	
Conversion of Building at 800 Cassiar Street (Old Girls' Industrial School), Vancouver:
M. & C. Contractors Ltd.               ...
23,250.00    | Awarded.
198,893.00    1
C. J. Oliver Ltd                  	
189,950.00 . I
188,666.00    j
205,910.00    |
Beaver Construction Co. Ltd	
E. H. Shockley & Son Ltd	
184,658.00    ( Awarded.
199.954.00
195,300.00
192,309.00
194,272.00    '
196,000.00
192,500.00
191,789.00
19,849.00
20,259.00
28,990.00
28,550.00
20,000.00
Ward & Son Ltd.               ... ....                                  	
Supply and Installation of Underground Steam and Condensate Mains to Serve Residence, Tranquille:
Awarded.
The Bay Co. (B.C.) Ltd   	
The A. & A. Plumbing & Heating Ltd                             	
26,360.00
Lockerbie & Hole (Western) Ltd.     — -                            	
28,964.00
21,409.62
21,455.00
106,170.00
96,417.00
91,273.00
96.000.00
G. P. Morrow Ltd       ...     	
Highways Laboratory Building, Burnaby:
P. B. Ford & Co  	
96,867.00    j
97.156.00    :
E. H. Shockley & Son Ltd            . . _                          	
92,172.00
114,000.00
91,053.00
89,516.00
93.634.00
93,920.00
92,808.00
95,240.00
Beaver Construction Co. Ltd	
Metro Construction Co. Ltd _	
Awarded.
Ward & Son Ltd.   	
Mainland Construction Co. Ltd 	
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1962
410-162-6816
  

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