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Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31 1961 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1962]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31
1961
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31, 1961.
ROBERT W. BONNER, Q.C.,
Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce.
 The Honourable Robert W. Bonner, Q.C.,
Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31,
1961.
THOMAS L. STURGESS,
Deputy Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce.
 Report of the Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce
For the Year Ended December 31, 1961
FOREWORD
The economy of British Columbia began to show definite signs of growth in
the late spring months of the year under review. This encouraging reversal from
the preceding downturn in the business cycle is expected to continue unabated
through 1962. Surveys conducted by this Department point to further recovery
in levels of sales and production for practically all manufacturing industries with
significantly greater development of our forestry and mining resources.
During 1961 the recorded values of production in our four basic industries
all increased over 1960 levels. Current estimates, with 1960 figures in parentheses,
are as follows: Forestry, $685,000,000 ($675,000,000); agriculture, $130,000,-
000 ($127,000,000); fishing, $70,000,000 ($52,000,000); and mining, $182,-
000,000 ($180,000,000). The total value of manufacturing in British Columbia
is estimated at $1,935,000,000 in 1961, which represents a gain of $24,000,000
over 1960 manufacturing output.
A rise in the total Provincial labour force in the past year and the improvement
in the economy in the summer led to a new record employment level of 567,000
people during July and August. Unfortunately the early months of the year were
marred by unemployment of considerable volume, brought on in part by the recession in the United States and uncertain domestic conditions. Another serious
though temporary setback to employment was occasioned by the three-month closure of the Aluminum Company's smelter while tunnel repairs were under way.
Capital investment for industrial plant and machinery was highlighted by the
construction of a $35,000,000 oil pipe-line from Fort St. John to Kamloops. This
all-British Columbia line is already encouraging the construction of new feeder-lines.
The project will undoubtedly be a favourable factor in opening up the Province's
gas and oil resources. Another major development was the completion of the
$18,500,000 Craigmont copper-concentrator, located near Merritt. Pulp- and
paper-mill modernization and expansion in 1961 included a complete overhaul of
the Woodfibre plant, owned by Rayonier, where expenditures totalling $15,000,000
were completed.
The value of exports through British Columbia's customs ports is estimated at
$980,000,000 in 1961. While this represents a record figure, part of the gain was
attributable to the large-scale shipment of grain to China. However, exports of
forest products were maintained, with decreases in lumber, plywood, and shingles
compensated for by larger shipments of pulp and paper. Although the United States
and the United Kingdom remained our most important customers, there was a considerable expansion of trade with Japan for such products as our copper, coal, iron
ore, and pulp. The change in the Canadian dollar exchange rate in terms of the
United States dollar gave considerable encouragement to the exporting segments
of the economy. As well, the more favourable competitive position of the domestic
manufacturer in relation to the United States is expected to show up in greater
production in this direction during the coming year.
 Q 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The following sections of this Report record the activities of the several divisions of the Department—namely, Industrial and Trade Office; British Columbia
House, London; Bureau of Economics and Statistics; Mechanical Tabulation Division; British Columbia House, San Francisco; and, in addition, the board of management and structure of the British Columbia Research Council, located on the
campus of the University of British Columbia.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1961 Q 7
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE OFFICE
The main function of this office is to promote new industrial and commercial
enterprises throughout the Province, provide assistance when necessary to established businesses, and develop the domestic and export trade. The office also
provides industry with data on location-sites, land-use maps, availability of raw
materials, and information on the services offered by the British Columbia Research
Council on matters concerning industrial and scientific research.
This work is carried out in co-operation with other Provincial Government
departments, Federal Government departments, Boards of Trade, Chambers of
Commerce, the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, industrial commissions, railway industrial agents, and foreign trade representatives in Canada and overseas.
BRANCH PLANT AND MANUFACTURING UNDER LICENCE
INQUIRIES
During the year under review there was considerable activity in branch plant
and manufacturing under licence inquiries. Many of the inquiries received were
the result of our direct mailing campaign to selected firms. One of the most interesting inquiries came from a firm that is looking for fully serviced industrial land
in the Lower Mainland area. This particular firm indicated that it would require
at least 20 acres of property for the establishment of a suitable manufacturing plant.
Several industrial sites comprising this acreage were indicated on our composite
industrial map of the Lower Mainland together with other pertinent facts. Officials
of the company are presently studying every aspect of British Columbia's economy,
and they hope to reach a decision early next year.
Several Eastern Canadian firms opened branch offices in British Columbia
during the year. In some cases the Department was contacted for assistance, and
the Industrial Commissioner visited officials of these firms to discuss Government
regulations, etc., on establishing a new business in the Province. Some of the firms
contacted indicated that serious study will be given to establishing a branch plant
when volume of sales warrant such an undertaking. Others had already taken the
first step by acquiring warehousing facilities. The Department will continue to
follow up these contacts.
Numerous licence manufacturing proposals from England, United States, and
Eastern Canada were directed to the Department during the year, and these items
are being examined by British Columbia firms. Included in these items were a
portable debarking-machine, a portable wood-chipping machine, and a concrete-
spraying machine. Several inquiries were received from plastic-manufacturers,
and two companies are investigating the possibility of utilizing peat from the Fraser
Valley to manufacture peat pots for growing and transplanting shrubs, flowers, etc.
Negotiations with one large company are under way at the present time.
COMPOSITE INDUSTRIAL MAP OF THE LOWER MAINLAND
Requests for this map have been so numerous that it was necessary to print a
new edition during the year. Requests for copies were received from real-estate
firms, manufacturers, and businessmen throughout Canada, the United States, and
the United Kingdom. The map indicates the zoned and potential industrial areas
of twelve municipalities, extending from North Vancouver to Port Coquitlam, a distance of approximately 14 miles.   The 1961 edition now includes the area extend-
 Q 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ing to the United States border.   The map can be purchased for $1, which includes
the 5-per-cent social services tax.
HANDICRAFT DIRECTORY
Copies of the tenth edition of this directory were distributed through the year
to retail and wholesale firms, resorts, and other outlets. The directory lists producers in British Columbia who are interested in finding a market and who are in
a position to supply reasonable demands. The usual contact was made with Eastern
Canadian Provinces interested in handicraft development. The four show-cases of
B.C. handicrafts placed in the Empress Hotel last year are still on display, and
hundreds of inquiries have been received from tourists for names of retail outlets
handling these items. At this time the Department would like to thank the management of the hotel for their continued kindness in permitting us to use their facilities
for exhibition purposes. Arrangements are under way to display made in British
Columbia handicrafts in our new office in British Columbia House, San Francisco.
Several handicraft articles have already been shipped for this purpose. It is hoped
that many inquiries will develop from an exhibit of this type.
REGIONAL INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Requests for this survey have been so heavy that it was necessary to print
several hundred additional copies. The Immigration Department of the Federal
Government requested 1,200 copies for distribution in the United States. These
were required after an item was placed in a United States periodical called " The
Kiplinger Letter." To date more than 900 letters have been received by this branch
of the Federal Government, and photostat copies of all correspondence have been
sent to the Department for follow-up purposes. Two hundred additional inquiries
were received by the Department after an item was placed in our British Columbia
Government News, and further inquiries are still being received.
The survey lists many investment opportunities in the fields of hotel and motel
requirements, housing developments, warehousing, and wholesale and retail outlets.
The suggestions were submitted by various Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce throughout British Columbia and certainly have resulted in stimulating the
thinking of people who have capital to invest in British Columbia.
CANADA-UNITED STATES DEFENCE PRODUCTION SHARING
The Department, working in co-operation with our San Francisco office and
with officials of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association and the Federal Government, has concentrated on the development of this project. Numerous companies
were written and information on the programme was provided to show how British
Columbia firms can bid on United States defence contracts. Many British Columbia firms are now registered with Ottawa, thus putting them in a favourable position
to bid on future contracts. Mr. F. C. MacKay, commercial representative for the
Department, has worked very closely with Mr. R. Robinson, the Federal Government representative in Los Angeles, on developing this programme. This could be
a lucrative market for British Columbia firms, and it is the hope of the Department
that the project will develop successfully.
BRITISH COLUMBIA INDUSTRIAL DESIGN COMMITTEE
The Committee includes representation from the Federal Department of Trade
and Commerce;   Provincial Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1961 Q 9
Commerce; Department of Education; University of British Columbia; Canadian
Manufacturers' Association; Vancouver Board of Trade; Vancouver School of Art;
British Columbia Research Council; Association of Professional Engineers of British Columbia; Canadian Association of Consumers; Architectural Institute of British Columbia; and Community Arts Council of Vancouver.
The purpose of the Committee is to encourage appreciation of industrial design
and its importance as a factor in production and marketing of British Columbia
products.
The Committee was very active throughout the year, and some of its activities
included the setting-up of a ten-week course on industrial design through the Vancouver night-schools and in co-operation with the architectural centre. The class
is under the direction of Mr. J. Johnstone, president of the British Columbia Industrial Design Committee. Other activities included making arrangements for a
formal opening of the stainless-steel exhibition in the Vancouver Public Library;
finalizing plans to sponsor a school design award programme, resulting in the sum
of $200 being set aside to cover the cost of the awards to be presented in 1961; and
the planning, designing, and construction of an industrial design exhibit which was
on display at the British Columbia International Trade Fair, held in Vancouver
May 3 to 13, 1961.
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS' TRADE AND INDUSTRY COUNCIL
The Council members are official representatives of all the Provincial Governments' departments concerned with the development of trade and industry in
Canada.
The aims of the Council are: To provide interprovincial consultation and
co-operation on matters of trade and industrial development; to supply traders and
manufacturers from Canada and abroad with a nation-wide Provincial service in
these fields; and to promote greater understanding throughout Canada of the
economic conditions affecting the development of each of the Provinces and all of
Canada.
This year the thirteenth annual conference was held in St. John's, Newfoundland, with the Industrial Commissioner being elected secretary-treasurer of the
Council for the next two years.
REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
As in past years, the regional development work of the Department was carried
on extensively during 1961. This office continued to work closely with industrial
establishments, Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce, research organizations, and all other groups interested in or actively engaged in the industrial development of the Province of British Columbia. The close co-operation between the
Department and these groups is a vital factor in the continued expansion of our
existing industries and the promotion of new industries.
Many Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce were visited by members
of the Department and assisted in their effort to locate new industries and commercial enterprises for their respective areas. Periodic field-trips were made by
the Industrial Commissioner and the Field Representative, in the course of which
they maintained the close liaison of past years with all regional groups engaged in
the general field of industrial development. Along with the Boards of Trade and
Chambers of Commerce, these groups include transportation and utility companies,
bank branches and departments, and municipal officials.
 Q 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Many inquiries received from companies and individuals were dealt with by
this office, and a great deal of general and specific information about the industrial
opportunities in British Columbia was forwarded to them. Close contact was
maintained with the British Columbia Research Council, and numerous inquiries
and problems were referred to that organization.
1961 BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR
The second British Columbia International Trade Fair, sponsored by the
Department, was opened in Vancouver on May 3rd by the Honourable W. A. C.
Bennett, Premier of British Columbia. In his opening remarks the Premier stressed
the importance of external trade to the economy of the Province and made a strong
appeal for liberal trading policies among the nations of the world. The Trade Fair
closed on May 13th, and it was generally considered by all concerned to have been
a thoroughly imaginative and worth-while enterprise.
During the ten-day period the fair was open, an estimated 5,000 buyers and
150,000 visitors passed through the gates. The 140 exhibits were grouped in four
sections—the Hall of Nations, Hall of Commerce and Industry, Hall of Modern
Living, and the Automobile Pavilion.
The careful thought given by the Trade Fair directors to the general layout and
co-ordination of design was strikingly evident in the pleasing and dignified over-all
effect. The standard of exhibits was noticeably higher than at the first Trade Fair
in 1958, and the interest shown by trade buyers and the general public was markedly
greater. This was due in great measure to the publicity arranged by the organizer
and individual exhibitor and the great interest displayed by the local radio and
television stations.
The second British Columbia International Trade Fair, though not as large
as some international trade fairs, was admirably staged and succeeded in attracting
a wide measure of interest among exhibitors from overseas, trade buyers, and the
general public. It brought home to the people of British Columbia the importance
to the Province of two-way trade and illustrated the keen competition among manufacturing nations for the favour of the British Columbia customers.
Government displays were done by Australia, Republic of China, Canada,
Czechoslovakia, Denmark, France, Italy, West Germany, the Netherlands, and the
United Kingdom. Most of these were extremely attractive composite displays of
consumer goods, including foodstuffs, but with an admixture, notably on the Czechoslovakia, Japanese, and the Netherlands stands, of machines and equipment for
industry.
For the space-age enthusiast, the United States Government's Mercury capsule,
complete with dummy astronaut, was of great interest, as was the cut-away scale
model of the United States atomic submarine " Nautilus."
The mornings were reserved for trade buyers, while the afternoons and evenings
were for the general public.
Among the outer exhibits capturing popular appeal were the Lloyd's of London
replica of the Coffee House in London, replicas of the famous diamonds of the
world, and an outdoor exhibit of a 40-foot model of the Dutch liner " Rotterdam,"
reputedly the largest model of a ship in the world.
A daily International Fashion Show and the first Trans-Canada Car Rally were
supporting features. Both were well organized and won considerable interest.
Fashions from around the world had considerable appeal to the ladies. The worldwide interest in the Car Rally is such that it could become one of the leading international car events.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND  COMMERCE, 1961 Q  11
The Department would like to take the opportunity to thank Mr. W. J. Borrie,
the President of the Trade Fair and Chairman of Pemberton Securities Ltd., and
his able and public-spirited directors and staff for their whole-hearted support in
organizing and staging a highly successful event.
DEVELOPMENT OF EXTERNAL TRADE
During the past year this office has continued its close association with the
Western Representative of the Department of Trade and Commerce, the British
Columbia Products Bureau of the Vancouver Board of Trade, and the members
of the Vancouver consular corps. The Administrative Assistant has continued his
visits to secondary industry of the Province to ascertain what products could be
exported to foreign markets. Overseas markets for numerous products have been
found, and many additional firms have been included in the Canadian Exporters
Directory, a publication which is used by the Canadian Trade Commissioners serving all over the world for the development of exports.
The trade offices of the Department have under way a survey which will list all
British Columbia manufacturers and agencies engaged in or interested in external
trade. This will be of considerable help to our Industrial and Trade Representatives
in London, England, and San Francisco, California, and should help to increase our
export markets.
WESTERN SPACE-AGE INDUSTRIES AND ENGINEERING EXPOSITION,
APRIL 25 TO 29, 1962, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA
The trade office, in co-operation with the Industrial and Trade Representative
at British Columbia House, San Francisco, is arranging a small composite exhibit
of selected items from the secondary industries of our Province. The objects of the
display are twofold: firstly, to promote British Columbia products in one of the
most important industrial buying regions of the United States of America, and,
secondly, to focus the attention of industry and commerce in this region on new
facilities at British Columbia House, 599 Market Street, San Francisco.
TRADE AND INDUSTRY BULLETIN
During the year under review the bulletin completed twelve years of continuous
publication, listing trade inquiries, licence manufacturing opportunities, and news
of commercial interest. The increased use of the bulletin by the trade representatives of other nations bears out the importance of this publication to the commercial
and industrial organizations in Western Canada. The direct circulation of 650
copies per month is greatly increased by the kind co-operation of the Western Journal of Commerce, which reprints the items listed in the bulletin as a public service
feature.   The Department appreciates this continued co-operation.
 Q  12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
OFFICE OF THE AGENT-GENERAL FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, LONDON, ENGLAND
GENERAL
On October 1, 1961, Dr. J. V. Fisher, former Economic Adviser to the British
Columbia Government, succeeded Maj.-Gen. B. M. Hoffmeister as Agent-General.
During his three years at British Columbia House, Major-General Hoffmeister carried out a number of business trips to the Continent. Particularly successful were his
contacts in respect to timber, plywood, pulp, and paper. In this context, meetings
were held in France and Belgium by the Agent-General in connection with the Common Market Timber Tour, scheduled to visit British Columbia in 1962. This tour
was announced by the Honourable R. W. Bonner during a visit to Prince George.
The Industrial and Trade Secretary arranged similar meetings in Germany and
Holland.
The Deputy Agent-General, on the occasion of the establishment of Trans-
Canada Air Lines' new Hudson Bay route, was able to visit the Province in order
to discuss matters of mutual interest with various Government departments and to
familiarize himself with the economy of the Province generally, and more particularly with the vast developments that are taking place in British Columbia.
The recent appointment of Mr. J. C. Stepler (late of the Southam Press) as
Press Adviser to the High Commissioner at London improved greatly press reports
concerning Canadian affairs generally, and current indications suggest that an
expansion in British exports and an increase in the monetary reserves of the United
Kingdom will assist in the resumption of a satisfactory level in the exchange of goods
and services between the Province and Great Britain.
SETTLEMENT
Inquiry respecting settlement in the Province has been extremely light compared to previous years. This is occasioned for two reasons: first, that, as mentioned above, Canada's publicity is not good and intending settlers were warned
away by the stories of unemployment in Canada; second, the standard of living
in the British Isles has risen considerably over the past ten years, and as wages
increase and living conditions improve there is a lessening desire for people to emigrate. However, the office replied to some 485 letters regarding immigration, and
over the counter and by telephone attended to another 350 inquiries.
SCHOOL-TEACHERS
Facilities of the office were placed at the disposal of the Department of Education in the recruitment of school-teachers. A scheme was entered into, but it was
not nearly so comprehensive as in past years. In the first place, the number of
vacancies was less than a year ago and appointments were made by correspondence
and not given directly by a recruitment officer from the Department as in former
years. The number of applications was considerably less than last year, caused
apparently by the fact that school-teachers (especially in the secondary-school categories, which are quite well paid in the United Kingdom) are less inclined to reach
for something unknown when their conditions at home have improved. Only a
mere handful of teachers went forward this year.
STAFF
The transfer of Miss Elspeth Macdonald to San Francisco enabled the promotion of Miss Barbara McCaul as secretary to the Agent-General and the appointment
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND  COMMERCE, 1961 Q 13
of a former resident of British Columbia, Miss Audrey Mortlock, as secretary to the
Deputy Agent-General after suitable advertising.
VISITORS
During 1961 some 3,295 visitors registered at British Columbia House, and
during the year the reception staff handled some 21,700 letters for visitors. This is
quite a considerable increase over last year, which indicates that more and more
British Columbians are visiting Europe. We are pleased to see this trend, as it gives
our people from the Province a closer insight from personal contact with the problems facing Europe, and at the same time affords them an opportunity of renewing
family and other ties with this country.
FILMS AND PUBLICITY
Distribution of British Columbia films in the United Kingdom from British
Columbia House for the year ended December, 1961, amounted to 487 showings
to audiences totalling 31,764. Our library of films has been augmented by a few
additional subjects, but we must stress the great need of extra films to assist in
publicizing the industrial opportunities of British Columbia. The value which
accrues from this form of publicity cannot be overstressed, and we find it imperative
to replace worn-out films by new ones, greatly to enlarge the number available and
to improve the type of films in order adequately to meet modern trends and public
requirements.
The publicizing of British Columbia has been supplemented through the
medium of the news-letter, which is widely distributed and regarded highly by its
recipients. Furthermore, technical pamphlets have been widely circulated to
attract the attention of bankers, credit corporations, and, more particularly, potential users of British Columbia products. Visits to Europe, however, have demonstrated clearly that publicizing of British Columbia and its potentials must be
increased greatly, owing to the lack of positive and effective information. Solicitations have been made to persuade interested and potential exporters to assist British
Columbia House in this particular endeavour.
TOURISM
Discussions took place between this office and Dr. D. B. Turner, the Deputy
Minister of Recreation and Conservation, with a view to encouraging more travel
from the British Isles to British Columbia. It has been decided to take over some
of the ground-floor space in British Columbia House, including one window on
Regent Street, and there to set up a tourist office and exhibition area. The function
of this office would be to disseminate information about the Province and at the
same time afford space for British Columbia exporters to display the products of
the Province. Plans are being drawn at the moment for the conversion of the
existing space to our needs.
ADMINISTRATION
Necessary action was taken to renovate and modernize the offices of the
Deputy Agent-General and the Industrial and Trade Secretary. These offices now
conform to the attractive modern appearance of the rest of the decorative scheme.
Certain leases have been renewed during the year at most favourable rentals,
which has meant a substantial increase in income.
 Q  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
SALES PROMOTION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA PRODUCTS
The question of the United Kingdom participating in the European Common
Market is still unresolved, but it is becoming increasingly apparent that if British
Columbia goods are to maintain their place, further efforts must be made in the
promotion of sales, not only in the United Kingdom, but more particularly in the
various countries participating in the E.E.C. (European Common Market) and the
E.F.T.A. (Outer Seven).
It cannot be overemphasized by this Department that the sale of British Columbia goods within these areas must be planned and that British Columbia producers
must take a more active part in the expanding markets of all the countries participating in these new and lucrative trading areas.
It is therefore recommended once again that more British Columbia businessmen visit Europe and see for themselves what the possibilities are, take time to make
their own contacts, and whenever possible establish their own branch sales offices
in either or both the United Kingdom and Continental Europe.
This office has received many inquiries from British Columbia firms who wish
to export or become established in some way in these expanding markets. We feel
that any such moves will benefit the economy of our Province and thus serve to
create more employment in British Columbia.
TRADE INQUIRIES FROM BRITISH COLUMBIA
During 1961 (up to the end of November) eighty-nine British Columbia firms
made inquiries through this office. As a result of these inquiries, some useful contacts were initiated. In some cases direct sales were effected. It is pointed out,
however, that the initial sale of British Columbia products made by Government
officials in an office such as this is only a start to a continuing trade being developed.
It is therefore suggested that once an initial contact is made, British Columbia producers send over representatives who would be able to quote prices, attractive credit
terms, and ensure early and continuing deliveries.
As examples, this office has arranged for the Saanich Fruit Growers' Association to sell 20 tons of fresh frozen loganberries to British processors and for the sale
of bulk honey from the Fort St. John area. These must be regarded as only the
start of continuing trade, which has every prospect of assuming considerable proportions, as the superior quality of British Columbia specialty food products is
recognized in Europe.
The number of inquiries received from various countries during the first eleven
months of 1961 was as follows:—
United Kingdom ,  205
France     12
Germany     23
Netherlands     12
Scandinavia     31
Italy     21
Switzerland      10
Belgium     10
Other countries -      12
Total  336
These inquiries are of every type and are broken down under the following
headings:   Agencies, commodities, or machinery requiring special service;   retail
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1961 Q 15
outlets; wholesale distribution; mill, factory, branch-plant establishment; licence
manufacture; partial manufacture or assembly; professional services; investment;
personal immigration (where it concerns establishment of a business).
During 1961 eleven firms established sales offices or appointed permanent
agents in British Columbia. There are many more British and European firms who
require representatives able to organize distribution throughout the Western Canadian Provinces, thus taking advantage of the low freight rates prevailing via the
Panama route. Inquiries from interested British Columbia firms and individuals
are therefore invited.
The Agent-General and the Industrial and Trade Secretary represented British
Columbia on a mission of Provincial Government purchasing agents, organized by
the United Kingdom Government and the Dollar Exports Council. Visits were
made to factories of firms producing hospital equipment, road-building machinery,
and educational supplies. The object of the mission was to encourage further
Canadian purchases from British sources in these particular fields.
LICENCE MANUFACTURE
Too much stress cannot be laid on the possibilities for the licence manufacture
of European products in Western Canada. This pattern of trade is becoming more
and more important throughout the world, and it is felt that great opportunities
exist in British Columbia if such agreements are concluded.
Licence manufacture is an excellent method of using extra plant capacity which
might be available in engineering firms and factories in the Province, and could be
of special interest to smaller communities who wish to establish new industries
serving their particular district.
Although this office received many inquiries on this matter from various European and United Kingdom firms, few definite offers from the Province have been
received, and it is feared that this medium for increasing the secondary industry
of the Province is not fully appreciated.
INVESTMENT IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
The transfer of sterling funds and funds from European sources to Canada
slowed up considerably during 1961 because of restrictions imposed by the United
Kingdom and European Governments, and because of the unfavourable publicity
given to Canada in general over the last two years. Also investment in the Common
Market countries has become more attractive.
However, despite these difficulties, we are pleased to report that inquiries were
received from seventeen firms wishing to invest capital in the Province.
Visible evidence of the desire of British investors to participate in the growth
of British Columbia's economy can be seen in two developments: the expansion of
the Park Royal shopping centre in West Vancouver by the Guinness interests and the
opening in May this year of the Fidelity Life Building in Vancouver, financed by the
Canadian subsidiaries of the Friends Provident & Century Insurance Offices of
London.
There has been an increase in the amount of capital transferred by emigrants
from Germany, Holland, the United Kingdom, and from the countries of Southern
Africa.
BUSINESS IMMIGRATION
There has been a gratifying increase over the last few months of businessmen
and successful farmers from various parts of the world wishing to move their capital
and become established in British Columbia.    People of this type make, we feel,
 Q 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
the best immigrants to the Province, inasmuch as they bring in capital and establish
business or agricultural enterprises of various kinds. But they do ask for definite
offers, and the more suggestions of business or farm opportunities we can receive
at this office, the better we can advise such inquirers.
COMMON MARKET TIMBER TOUR, 1962
During the year considerable time was devoted to preparing for a party of timber importers and representatives of the timber trade and user associations from
Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, France, and Italy to visit the Province in 1962.
This tour, sponsored by the Government of British Columbia in co-operation
with the British Columbia Lumber Manufacturers' Association, the Plywood Association of British Columbia, the Council of Forest Industries of British Columbia,
and the Interior lumber associations, will take place in May. The delegates will
represent importers, users, and organizations concerned with the promotion of
British Columbia softwoods as a building material. It is expected that this tour
will have a most beneficial effect on the sale and use of British Columbia timber,
plywoods, and other forest products throughout the Common Market countries.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1961 Q 17
BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND  STATISTICS
Before proceeding to review the work accomplished by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics during 1961, it may be useful to explain that the Bureau is
a fact-finding and advisory body. It has two primary functions: the first is to provide economic counsel and, when necessary, to conduct investigations into economic
questions affecting the Province; the second function is to collect and compile
economic statistics of interest to the Province.
To ensure technical proficiency, the Bureau has endeavoured to follow the
policy of building up a small corps of professionally trained persons who can be
relied upon to perform a variety of difficult economic analyses. It has also been
the policy to make the services of the technical personnel continuously available to
all other departments of the Government.
Since other Government agencies are also concerned with the collection of
statistics, a series of working agreements designed to prevent overlapping or duplication has been arranged in recent years between this Bureau and the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, as well as with the Provincial Departments of Mines
and Petroleum Resources, Labour, Provincial Secretary, Health Services and Hospital Insurance, and Social Welfare. During 1961 the essential statistical services
performed for the other Provincial departments as well as for the Department of
industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce were maintained. A description
follows of the various services performed during the year.
ECONOMIC RESEARCH
One of the Bureau's functions is to provide economic counsel to the Government. This is done partly through the medium of a weekly report to the Premier
and to the Minister of each department. This report reviews significant events and
developments in the field of economics. As well, from time to time, technical assistance is given to the various branches of the Government as it is requested. There
are many publications prepared to keep government and industry informed on
current business conditions. The two most widely distributed are the Monthly
Bulletin of Business Activity, containing a brief description of current changes in
monthly business indicators, plus statistical tables and charts, and the Annual Summary of Business Activity, recording the past year's performance and including
numerous charts and historical series illustrating the economic position of the Province. In recent years an executive opinion poll has been conducted at the end of
each year to gauge the outlook of industry for the coming year.
Many requests are received for information dealing with the Provincial economy from private individuals, corporations, trade-unions, newspapers, business publications, and Boards of Trade. The Bureau's files and library contain much of the
information requested, but often special surveys and considerable research are
necessary.
The annual study of wage rates for selected occupations in the metropolitan
areas of Vancouver and Victoria and centres in northern and southern areas of the
Province was again prepared and published. The Civil Service Commision, as well
as other Government agencies and the public, was provided with these comparative
wage rates.
 Q 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1959, 1960, and 1961
Unit cr
Base
Period
1959
1960
1961
Preliminary
Estimates
Mining—
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
M b.m.
Mb.m.
Tons
Tons
$000
Cases
$000
$000
Bushels
Bushels
Mft.
Rf. Sq.
Cwt.
Gallons
000 kwh.
Tons
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
Units
$000
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
$000
149,568
44,169
33,542
11,424
19,025
14,028
4,498
3.922
5,421
5,472
6,021
6,176,197
4,948,585
1,840,000
1,045,834
643,302
1,077,097
66,377
124,448
4,174,000
1,965,000
1,512,000
1,765,681
341,048
321,968,000
12,373,217
12,047,665
1,707,057
407,280
313,804
241,406
255,711
18,240
17,627,000
115.1
116.9
112.9
110.2
165.4
71.1
74.8   '
123.1
121.8
118.4
112.9
1,897,000
179,850
50,911
38,662
17,715
18,830
15,993
9,584
7,102
6,600
5,242
7,087
7,074,486
5,467,546
2,062,120
1,089,156
675,000
632,089
52,259
127,051
5,379,000
1,800,000
1,584,490
1,913,681
156,174
333,829,000
13,445,990
12,557,705
1,661,782
394,560
292,056
243,468
195,712
13,857
18,018,609
114.7
117.2
107.7
117.6
175.6
70.4
81.8
121.1
125.9
117.6
106.4
1,998,000
181,850
45,400
40,900
Miscellaneous metals (iron concentrates, nickel,
cadmium, etc.)   	
Structural materials (sand, gravel, cement, etc.)
Industrial minerals (asbestos, sulphur, etc.)	
20,000
19,700
16,000
9,500
Natural gas      	
8,600
7,875
6,200
1            5,675
Forestry—
6,700,000
Lumber production  _	
5,800,000
2,250,000
1,075,000
Total value of production  ..  	
Fisheries—
685,000
1,403,994
70,000
Agriculture—
Farm cash income  	
Apples—
134,250
4,416,000
1,650,000
External trade—
1,640,000
1,557,780
336.960
Internal trade—
336,808,000
13,233,716
12,500,000
Total retail sales   	
1,650,000
395.200
280,000
245,000
Construction—
205,000
New residential units completed  	
11,500
19,300,000
Employment—■
114.0
117.0
101.0
115.0
187.0
Mining  	
71.0
70.0
114.0
127.0
119.0
Construction— ,         	
Labour income  	
95.0
2,020,000
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1961 Q 19
Economic Indicators in British Columbia
Z80
260
240
220
200
BUILDING PERMITS
160
1Z0
100
80
60
40
20
1945      1947      1949      1951      1953      1955        1957      1959      1961
YEARS
AV
ERJ
GE
WEEKLY WAGES
1949      1951       1953      1955
YEARS
1957      1959      1961
3 i
FREIGHT LOADED
BANK CLEARINGS
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
0
9
8
6
5
3
2
1945      1947      1949      1951      1953      1955
YEARS
1957      1959      1961
160
140
EMPLOYMENT
1
120
1
I
194
9 =
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IETAIL TRADE
1400
<: 1200
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o
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600
400
200
0
1945      1947       1949
1951       1953       1955
YEARS
1957       1959      1961
1945      1947
1949      1951       1953      1955        1957       1959      1961
YEARS
 Q 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1961 Q 21
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 Q 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1961
Q 23
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 Q 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1961
Q 25
TRANSPORTATION AND TRADE
Transportation
The recommendations contained in the first volume of the report of the Mac-
Pherson Royal Commission on Transportation were most gratifying to the Bureau
since they included many of the proposals put forward in British Columbia's submission, in which the Bureau played an active part. The general view-point expressed in the Commission's report was in fact parallel to that incorporated in British
Columbia's brief. The publication of the second volume of the Commission's report,
dealing with local, regional, and industrial problems, has just been received and is
being carefully scrutinized by the Province's experts on freight rates. While it is
too early to endorse the report in full, it appears that many features of it coincide
with British Columbia's original proposals.
The Bureau assisted many industries through the negotiation of freight rates.
Of particular note was the rate established for the copper mines in the Merritt area.
This settlement has helped to set the pattern for the export rate on copper.
External Trade
Special interest in trade with Japan and the rapid changes taking place in the
trading patterns of Western Europe resulted in a steady damand for a variety of external-trade statistics. Special reports and compilations were prepared for members
of the Government and senior departmental officials in connection with visits to
Japan, the United Kingdom, and the Continent.
During the year numerous requests for statistical data on imports and exports
were answered. These requests originated from a wide variety of inquiries, which
included commercial, industrial, and trading organizations, foreign governments,
universities, libraries, and private individuals, and other Government departments.
In obtaining this material, extensive use was made of the statistics on trade through
British Columbia customs ports compiled by the Department's tabulation division,
using punch cards received each month.
Two major trade reports were published during the year. The first was the
Annual Preliminary Statement of External Trade, which was distributed to some
600 interested parties. The other report was a revised edition of a listing of imported items indicating potential " import replacement " industries.
Other activities included preparation of statistical and written material for the
Bureau's annual and monthly reports.
The two tables following summarize the external trade of British Columbia
from 1950 to 1960. These figures differ from the regularly published trade statistics
in that they are confined to exports of products of British Columbia origin and to
imports from foreign countries for British Columbia consumption. The regular
figures deal with all items imported and exported through British Columbia customs
ports.
 Q 26
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INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1961 Q 27
STATISTICS
The Bureau is responsible for the collection, analysis, interpretation, and publication of statistical information. Also, one of its duties is to assist other departments
in the compilation of statistical information and to assist in establishing uniform
statistical methods throughout the service. In addition, it co-operates with other
statistical bureaux in the elimination of duplication and answers inquiries relating
to statistical data.   Following is a brief outline of the Bureau's activities in this field.
Co-operative Statistical Agreements
Over the years the Bureau of Economics and Statistics has entered into several
co-operative statistical agreements with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics with the
object being to eliminate wasteful duplications of collection and to improve the
over-all efficiency of surveys. Fields of co-operation include practically all branches
of the Bureau's work where regular statistical collection is involved. The latest
agreements concluded are those relating to labour statistics and electric-power
statistics.
Conferences between the Provincial and Federal statistical bureaux are now
held annually. As a consequence, it is anticipated that continued progress toward
the elimination of duplication will be made.
In addition, conferences are now held periodically with the Federal Department
of Labour, and the elimination of duplication is under way, especially in the fields of
trade-union statistics and working-conditions statistics. In respect to forestry statistics, a meeting with Federal authorities has been suggested for 1962 to determine
ways to improve coverage and collection of returns. Co-operative agreements
have resulted in savings to governments, to union secretaries, and to private industry.
British Columbia Cost-of-food Survey
The regular compilation of the quarterly cost-of-food index for Vancouver,
Victoria, and New Westminster was carried on during 1961. Trade-unions, individuals, and Government departments were supplied with information on food costs
during the year.
Forestry
The primary and secondary forest industries of British Columbia comprise the
most important industrial group in the Province. In 1959 the industry produced
70 per cent of the lumber sawn in Canada, 12 per cent of the pulp, and approximately 80 per cent of the plywood produced in Canada. Also in 1959 the industry
provided employment for some 67,000 people, who received some $293,000,000
in salaries and wages.
British Columbia's most important primary industry, the logging industry, cut
a record 7,074,486,000 board-feet of timber during 1960, an increase of 15 per cent
over the 1959 cut. Operations in the Coast region accounted for 4,209,341,000
board-feet, with hemlock the leading species at 1,450,897,000 board-feet, followed
by Douglas fir at 1,179,465,000 board-feet. Interior operations cut the remaining
2,865,145,000 board-feet, with Douglas fir the leading species at 1,108,371,000
board-feet, followed by spruce at 951,384,000 board-feet. The total cut (timber
scaled) for 1961 is estimated to be 6,700,000,000 board-feet, a decrease of 6 per
cent from the 1960 cut. Heavy inventories together with an extreme fire season
have resulted in this decrease.
 Q 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Principal Statistics of the Forest Industries in British Columbia, 1959 (Preliminary)
Industry
Establishments
Employees
(Number)
Salaries
and
Wages
Cost of
Fuel and
Electricity
Cost at
Plant of
Materials
Used
Value of
Factory
Shipments
Value
Added by
Manufacture1
225~
198
1,358
17
66
17,056
$000
90.780
$000
$000
22.756
$000
257,650
$000
234,894
Furniture	
Sash, door, and planing mills
2,105
3,741
27,289
6,483
1,033
7,877
14,576
100,664
25,080
3,793
234
1,190
6,197
1,196
274
12,246
51,307
188,547
43,115
10,031
24,734
78,975
363,035
83.818
12,255
26,688
168,292
38.958
Miscellaneous wood-using industries 	
1
17,070    |        7,247
Sub-totals, wood-using
industries	
1,864
40,651
151,990
9,091
305,246
567,632    j    253,440
15
13
9
1,311
7,637
175
5,276
43,832
640
220
12,717
23
16,726
86,417
1,506
28,694
240,679
2,604
12,983
Pulp and paper  	
Miscellaneous paper-using industries _	
140,879
1,106
Sub-totals,   pulp   and
paper    _	
37
9,123
49,748
12,960
104,649
i
'   271,977    |    154,968
66,830
292,518
432,651
1,097,259
643,302
1 Value added by manufacture (net value):  Value of factory shipments plus or minus changes in inventories
of finished goods and goods in process, less cost of materials, fuel, and electricity.
Source:   Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa.
During 1960 British Columbia's most important single industry, the lumber
industry, produced 5,468,000,000 board-feet of lumber. Mills in the Coast region
produced 2,808,000,000 board-feet, while those in the Interior produced 2,660,-
000,000 board-feet. In 1945 Interior mills produced only 20 per cent of the lumber
sawn in British Columbia; now they are producing practically 50 per cent of the
total. Lumber production in 1961 is estimated to be 5,800,000,000 board-feet, an
increase of 6 per cent over 1960's total.
The pulp and paper mills of the Province during 1959 used 1,999,000 cords of
pulpwood and 1,099,000 cords of waste wood (sawmill and veneer-mill chips, etc.)
to produce 1,884,000 tons of pulp. Over half of the pulp produced was used in
the Province to make 1,045,834 tons of paper. The pulp-mills produced 2,062,000
tons of pulp in 1960, and it is estimated that they produced 2,250,000 tons in 1961.
The pulp and paper industry is one of the fastest-growing industries in British
Columbia. In 1950 the net value of the industry accounted for 13 per cent of the
total net value of the forest industry; in 1959 it accounted for 22 per cent of the
total net value. The portion of the total net value accounted for by the lumber
industry, for the same period, decreased from 36 per cent in 1950 to 26 per cent
in 1959.
During the year the Bureau handled a large number of requests from the
industry and other Government departments. The previously published Statistical
Record of the Logging Industry was up-dated to December 31, 1960.
Mining
The Bureau collects and compiles production statistics on all minerals with the
exception of coal, natural gas, and petroleum. These statistics are published in
detail in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
The preliminary estimate of mineral production in British Columbia for 1961
is approximately $182,000,000, up about 1.2 per cent from the 1960 value of
$179,849,790, and is the highest value ever attained for a single year, except for
1956, when the value reached $190,067,465.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1961 Q 29
Final figures for 1960 show that the principal metals, consisting of placer and
lode gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc, accounted for $112,843,187 or 63 per
cent of total mineral production for that year, compared with a total of $93,651,572
for the previous year. All of these metals, with the exception of placer gold, showed
an increase over 1959. Miscellaneous metals amounted to $17,714,969 or 10 per
cent of total mineral production. The corresponding figure for 1959 was $11,424,-
134. Increased shipments of iron concentrates and nickel were mainly responsible
for the higher figure in 1960.
Industrial minerals totalled $15,992,776, as against $14,028,058 in 1959, with
asbestos showing the greatest increase. The value of industrial minerals represented
roughly 9 per cent of total mineral production.
Structural materials is the only general category that decreased in 1960 relative
to 1959. The 1960 total of $18,829,989 was down only slightly, however, from the
1959 figure of $19,025,209.
As in past years, the fuels section of mineral production continued to register
an increase over the previous year. The 1960 total of $14,468,869 represents a
26-per-cent increase over 1959.
There was an actual increase in the quantity of coal produced in 1960, but the
average price dropped from $7.93 to $6.64 per short ton, with the result that the
value of coal shows a lesser amount than for 1959. There was a substantial increase
in the quantity of natural gas delivered to pipe-lines, whereas there was a slight
decrease in the production of crude petroleum. Subsequent years will, of course,
show substantial increases in petroleum production now that access to markets has
been provided by the Taylor-Kamloops pipe-line.
Labour
Continuing with the Federal-Provincial arrangement concerning British Columbia labour statistics, the Bureau of Economics and Statistics again prepared the
statistical section for the Annual Report of the British Columbia Department of
Labour on the same basis as used by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa.
A summary of the findings for the year 1960 and the first ten months of 1961
are contained under heading of " Statistical Report on Trades and Industries " in
the Annual Report of the Department of Labour for the current year.
Provision for monthly data on payrolls and employment has now become
possible through the regular processing of current monthly information received
from Federal sources. The broad field of regional distribution of statistical material
from this source has to be explored, and further joint Federal-Provincial discussions
are planned for later this year, when attendant problems in this connection may be
resolved and the way opened for further progress in this direction.
In the realm of labour statistics, projects completed during the year included
the following:—
(1) Statistical sections for the 1961 Annual Report of the British Columbia
Department of Labour.
(2) The 1961 survey of British Columbia salary and wage rates.
(3) A study of wage and salary rates in industry and business, by various
areas, prepared for the Civil Service Commission, Victoria, B.C.
(4) A directory of trade-unions and labour organizations, completed together
with a survey of organized labour in British Columbia, for the Department of Labour.
(5) A survey of clerical salary rates in the Vancouver area, tabulated for the
Vancouver Board of Trade.
 Q 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
And continuing work in the maintenance of current labour statistics in use by the
Bureau.
The following table shows the estimated annual labour income totals in British
Columbia for the years 1947 to 1961:—
Estimated Annual Labour Income in British Columbia
Year Annual Income Year Annual Income
1947  $641,000,000 1955    $1,426,000,000
1948  794,000,000 1956..     1,649,000,000
1949  825,000,000 1957 ._   1,765,000,000
1950  915,000,000 1958   1,755,000,000
1951  1,072,000,000 1959  1,897,000,000
1952   1,214,000,000 1960  1,998,000,000
1953  1,279,000,000 1961  2,020,000,000
1954  1,302,000,000
Source: Estimates of Labour Income, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa.
MARKET RESEARCH
Keen interest is being shown by business and industry in the market potentiai
of the Province, and a large and varied number of requests is received for market
data and assessments of industrial and commercial opportunities.
The Bureau of Economics and Statistics is continually on the alert to detect
products which present a good opportunity for local manufacture, and in this connection has prepared several industry studies, including two completed this year,
"Asbestos Products in British Columbia " and the " Confectionery Industry."
Another aspect of market research which has continued to receive attention
relates to the study of specific areas of the Province. The Kamloops study was
released this year, and work is now progressing on surveys of the Kelowna and
Fernie areas.
PUBLICATIONS
Monthly Bulletin of Business Activity. — This publication contains special
articles of current interest and also incorporates a monthly review of current changes
in the principal segments of the Provincial economy.
Summary of Business Activity in British Columbia.—This publication is a
companion of the above publication. It summarizes the current year's economic
picture and presents historical series relating to business activity in the Province.
External Trade.—Summary of monthly statistics covering external trade is
contained in the aforementioned monthly bulletin. A statement of external trade
through British Columbia customs ports and covering commodities with an aggregate value of $50,000 and over is published annually.
British Columbia Trade Index.—This publication lists the manufacturers in
British Columbia, together with their products. A new issue will be released early
in 1962.
British Columbia Regional Index.—This index contains available statistics on
a wide range of subjects covering all areas of the Province. It is in the course of
revision, and pending completion of the project as a whole, sections will be released
individually. At the present time the Vancouver Island section is complete and
available for distribution.
British Columbia Facts and Statistics.—The fourteenth edition was released in
1961.   This publication provides graphic, general, and historical facts and statistics
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND  COMMERCE,  1961 Q 31
relating to British Columbia under the following headings: Population, Education,
Government and Finance, Judiciary, Banking, Transportation, Communication,
Retail Trade, Agriculture, Fisheries, Mining, Forestry, Manufacturing, Water Power,
Tourist Statistics, and Economic Activity.
Establishing a Business in British Columbia.—A revised edition of this brochure was released in 1961. This publication gives to prospective investors information relating to the establishment of a business in British Columbia.
Salary and Wage Rate Survey.—This annual publication provides the salary
and wage rates in selected clerical, professional, and trade occupations in business
and industrial establishments for metropolitan Vancouver and Victoria, Southern
Interior, and northern centres.
Business Outlook. —This publication was released late in 1961. It reviewed
business conditions during 1961 and indicated the outlook for 1962. It covers the
following economic factors: Sales, prices, employment, wages, earnings, and capital
expenditure. It is based on a survey of 250 of the major companies in British
Columbia.
Selected Import Items Which Could Possibly Be Produced in British Columbia.
—A revised edition was released in September, 1961. Commodities are classified
according to purpose or use, as follows: Producers' materials, producers' equipment, fuel, electricity and lubricants, transportation equipment, and consumer goods.
Asbestos Products in British Columbia.—This publication was released early
in 1961. It is a study made to acquaint industrialists with the asbestos-products
situation as it affects British Columbia. It deals particularly with the possibility of
establishing an asbestos-cement pipe plant in the Province.
Confectionery Industry.—This publication was released in the fall of 1961. It
is a study for the purpose of examining the present state of development in the
industry and its prospects for future expansion. Particular attention is drawn to the
liquid chocolate and sugar confectionery items in the industry.
Area Surveys.—The following have been released to date: Kamloops and district in 1961, Chilliwack and district in 1960, and Hope and district in 1959. Work
is progressing on surveys of the Kelowna and Fernie districts, and they will be published in 1962. A survey of the Armstrong-Enderby area is also being conducted
jointly with the Federal Government. Special emphasis is placed on the present
state of commercial and industrial development, and on the favourable opportunities
for further expansion in each area.
Manual of Resources and Development. — A new edition was published in
December, 1961. This publication contains up-to-date information about the location and development of British Columbia resources. It is well documented with
maps and diagrams. It is also published in German and French translations for
distribution abroad.
 Q 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MECHANICAL TABULATION DIVISION
The Mechanical Tabulation Division continued to operate as the data-processing centre for those departments of the Government requiring the services of electronic equipment to handle computing and large-scale statistical or accounting
procedures.
To meet the demands for more complex computations, a magnetic drum computer was added to the equipment at the beginning of the year. The installation of
the computer has greatly added to the scope of work that can be handled in the
Division, and most of the applications are new work that could not previously be
handled because of the limitation of the conventional punched-card equipment.
All the equipment is rented on a monthly basis, and although no charge is
made to the users, job costs are maintained through a time-card system, enabling the
Division to assess the value of work done for each department. Machine utilization
studies and a check of machine operating efficiency are also available from these
records.
For operating purposes the Division is divided into seven sections, each responsible for a unit of work, which is determined by the volume and nature of work
involved. At present the following sections are in operation: Health and Welfare
Section, Liquor Control Board Section, Forestry Section, Annual Report Section,
General Statistical Section, Computing Section, and Key Punch Section. Each of
these sections is headed by a senior member of the staff, who is responsible for the
particular unit of work.
In addition to these sections, the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service
and the British Columbia Forest Service maintain Key Punch Sections, whose work
is tabulated on the equipment in this Division.
To operate the equipment, a well-trained staff has to be maintained and at
present consists of a supervisor, an assistant supervisor, a computer programmer,
a console operator, five senior machine operators, seven machine operators, one keypunch supervisor, fourteen key-punch operators, and one senior clerk-stenographer.
In addition, three members of the Liquor Control Board staff are attached to the
Division to maintain liaison and handle clerical functions in conjunction with their
work.
During the first year the Computer Section has been operated on a semi-open-
shop basis, with programmers from the various departments writing the programmes
for their particular applications, which were tested and debugged with the assistance
of our staff programmer. Once the programmes have been proved, they are left with
our staff for the routine computing procedures.
All applications for new work on the computer are submitted to the Electronic
Data Processing Committee for approval.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND  COMMERCE,  1961
Comparative Cost Statement
Q 33
Department and Branch
Agriculture—
Horticultural Branch	
Herd Improvement Branch	
Totals	
Attorney-General—
Credit Union 	
Securities Office 	
Fire Marshal Act	
Official Committee 	
Motor-vehicle Branch-—	
Liquor Control Board- ____.
Totals  _ ;..___
Education—
General Administration	
Tests, Standards, and Research .
High School Correspondence	
Totals  —
Finance—
Minister's Office   	
Mechanical Tabulation _
Totals 	
Forest Service—
Engineering Services	
Forest Surveys 	
Forest Management -
Totals 	
Health Services and Hospital Insurance-
Vital Statistics.	
Hospital Insurance Service ,	
Totals  	
Highways—
Bridge Engineering Branch    	
Locations Branch — . 	
Research and Development 	
Totals,..   __
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce—Bureau of Economics and Statistics   _ _ _	
Labour—General Administration	
Lands—
Surveys and Mapping, Legal Surveys Division      —_	
Geographic Division.—  	
Water Rights Branch Administration
Hydraulic Investigation  	
Totals .    _	
Provincial Secretary—
Queen's Printer .  	
Superannuation Branch 	
Civil Service Commission	
Totals 	
Recreation and Conservation—
Parks Branch—       .
Social Welfare—Accounts Division	
Municipal Affairs—Regional Planning	
Commercial Transport—Industrial Transport    	
Other—B.C. Power Commission _
Grand totals -
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
$5,709.61
$4,641.61
$5,709.61
$4,641.61
$187.16
105.86
8,628.48
28,857.43  |
$430.07
1,227.01
174.34
7,592.25
25,089.79
$37,778.93
$34,513.46
$35,455.27
$41,743.63 |
$43,622.38
$1,549.56
$1,703.73
1,620.81
$1,349.43
5,035.64
1,393.93
$3,672.38 |
7,378.33 j
1,123.76 |
$1,497.93
8,199.65
1,138.54
$1,549.56
$3,324.54
$7,779.00
$12,174.47 ;
$10,836.12
!
r
$1,308.39
1
922.22
$15.05
49,763.56
$3.79
49,243.21
$49,778.61  |    $49,247.00
S30 15
6,692.22       $13,476.98
i,722.37 j    $13,476.98
$11,121.94  $12,188.18
$3,251.04
$3,384.33
$462.07
9,767.21
$164.77
10,478.65
$10,229.28
$10,643.42
$12,895.97
6,567.77
$9,100.04
186.19
5,834.41
$19,463.74
$15,120.64
$442.46
$32.78
$10,760.17
$12,121.14
$236.49
$433.98
 	
i
$1,662.62 '
8,078.91
$6,007.51
$3,649.45
$6,007.51
$9,741.53 !
$3,649.45
$1,184.86
183.66
7,338.24
26,748.51
$553.94
851.66
327.42
9,740.77
30,269.84
SI, 389.90
1,249.51
245.31
7,712.19
33,025.47
$2,230.61
$117.90
30,804.47
162.10
$3,102.63
28,632.44
$3,227.54
64,380.45
281.66
$31,084.47 j $31,735.07 j $67,889.65
   j $601.96 [ $39.06
$23,364.74 \ 21,780.58 j 19,616.98
$23,364.74 ] $22,382.54 i. $19,656.04
i j
   j  ! $1,638.29
  1   i 1,577.90
 :  $275.03 I 137.48
$275.03 [,
$3,353.67
$14,869.98
i
!
$8,153.18 j
$7,031.32
$4,016.77
$654.55 |
$768.59
$7,983.75
$25.22 [  $8,832.13
   |     15.05
13,062.73 I  10,143.23
4,154.73
$7,983.75 | $13,087.95~[—~$23,145.14
I I
$10,593.36 j $12,050.62 \ $10,355.73
3,049.54 j. 1,649.42 | 6,787.40
5,797.66 | 5,634.42 I 4,048.60
$19,440.56 | $19,334.46 j $21,191.73
$464.67
$14,576.99 ; $19,057.94 j S23.948.08
f   [    561.37
$181.96 !  j	
[    $40.03 |  $1,860.04
$164,761.00 j $178,845.05 j $229,744.19
 Q 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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ui
IS
z
5
5
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 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND  COMMERCE, 1961 Q 35
UTILIZATION OF COMPUTER
 Q 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER FOR TRADE AND TOURISM
FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE,
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA.
British Columbia House, located at 599 Market Street, San Francisco, was
officially opened August 9, 1961, by the Honourable W. A. C. Bennett, Premier of
British Columbia, assisted by the Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C., Attorney-General
and Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, who used a chain
saw to cut a log, symbolic of British Columbia's major basic industry.
Speakers at the ceremonies included the Honourable Glenn Anderson, Lieutenant-Governor of California; His Honour Mayor George Christopher of San
Francisco; the Honourable E. C. Westwood, Minister of Recreation and Conservation; Dr. A. E. Ault, Canadian Counsul-General, San Francisco; and Mr. N. P.
Steacy, Commissioner for Trade and Tourism, in charge at British Columbia House.
Accompanying the Premier in his official party were the Honourable R. G.
Williston, Minister of Lands and Forests; the Honourable W. N. Chant, Minister
of Public Works; the Honourable W. D. Black, Provincial Secretary; the Honourable L. R. Peterson, Minister of Education; the Honourable Mrs. Buda Brown,
Minister without Portfolio; Mr. Donald Smith, M.L.A. for Victoria; Mr. Waldo
Skillings, M.L.A. for Victoria; and Mr. Donald Robinson, M.L.A. for Lillooet.
During the ceremonies Mrs. Newton Steacy was hostess to Mrs. W. A. C. Bennett
and other ladies visiting from British Columbia and from San Francisco, including
ladies of the San Francisco press.
The City of San Francisco provided an honour guard in a motor cavalcade of
police for the Premier and his party, escorting them through the city to British Columbia House. An escort of Royal Canadian Mounted Police formed an honour
guard at the office. Five young ladies, Tourist Counsellors of the British Columbia
Government ferry service, acted as hostesses during the opening ceremonies.
At the opening, 887 visitors attended, seventy-four registering from British
Columbia. Since the opening, 2,088 visitors have registered and approximately
2,200 additional visitors have called.
Premier Bennett paid an official visit to the office of Mayor George Christopher
and received the key to the city in appreciation for the establishment of British Columbia House in San Francisco. His Honour cited the close associations existing
through the years between California and British Columbia. At a later date Mayor
Christopher received Commissioner Newton P. Steacy at the City Hall, presenting
him with the key to the city, with complimentary commendations, and congratulating
the foresight of the Government of British Columbia for opening the offices in California to promote trade, industry, and tourism between the two countries.
Many British Columbians use British Columbia House as a mailing address
and the facilities of the office and staff to assist them in making their visit in California more pleasant and informative.
There have been many inquiries regarding emigration to British Columbia, the
purchase of land, the establishment of businesses, investments, the purchase of
motels, hotels, housing development possibilities, resorts, marinas, and general
opportunities.
STAFF
Mr. Newton P. Steacy      _.. Commissioner for Trade and Tourism.
Mr. F. C. MacKay  Commercial Representative.
Mr. A. E. Abram  Tourist Trade Representative.
Miss Elspeth MacDonald      Secretary.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1961 Q 37
FILMS
From our present library since September 1, 1961, to November 30, 1961, we
have shown our 16-mm. colour sound pictures to audiences of 7,375. The films
feature hunting, fishing, and the scenic beauties of British Columbia. Our film
library will be increased to embrace industrial development and tourist areas.
CANADA-UNITED STATES DEFENCE PRODUCTION
SHARING PROGRAMME
British Columbia House has established liaison with the various procurement
offices of the United States Department of Defence (Army, Navy, and Air Force)
in the San Francisco Bay area in an effort to assist British Columbia manufacturers
interested in participating in this programme. We have also kept in contact with the
Liaison Officer of the Canadian Department of Defence Production in Los Angeles,
who has kept us posted on the developments in his area to enable us to advise British
Columbia manufacturers of activities in the Los Angeles district.
Approximately 9 billion dollars of the total United States appropriation for
defence work is placed in California and its adjoining States. There appear to be
numerous items in which British Columbia firms could submit bids.
A survey of British Columbia firms interested in this type of production has
been conducted to determine their capabilities for defence production. When this
has been completed, selected " invitations for bids " and " requests for proposals "
will be forwarded directly to these companies having the capability and production
facilities to bid competitively.
Up to the end of November, 1961, forty-three British Columbia firms have
registered with British Columbia House in San Francisco for participation in the
Canada-United States Defence Production Sharing Programme. There are many
more opportunities for British Columbia manufacturers to share in the programme
as sub-contractors. It would be of advantage for them to have their representatives
call on the prime contractors on the West Coast to make their capabilities and production facilities known to these United States firms or provide British Columbia
House with greater detail to allow us to act in their interests. British Columbia
House personnel will give every assistance possible.
WESTERN SPACE AGE INDUSTRIES AND
ENGINEERING EXPOSITION
British Columbia House has contracted to take 360 square feet of display area
in the Western Space Age Industries and Engineering Exposition to be held in the
Cow Palace in San Francisco from April 25 to 29, 1962. This space is made available to British Columbia manufacturers for the display of their products. The
exposition is being sponsored by the United States Department of Defence in cooperation with the Governments of the thirteen western States. This will allow our
British Columbia manufacturers an excellent opportunity to meet the procurement
officers and prime contractors of the West Coast as well as the general purchasing
agents of California.
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE INQUIRIES
Numerous inquiries have been received at British Columbia House resulting
in contacts being made in industrial areas and trade centres. This has become an
interesting part of our work. Although this type of work is time-consuming and
concrete results are difficult to assess, it is felt by this office that this form of pro-
 Q 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
motional work is invaluable in making the Province of British Columbia and British
Columbia House well known in the San Francisco Bay area. California firms are
presently investigating the potential of British Columbia as a site for Canadian-based
operations, ranging from a sales office to the establishment of a branch manufacturing plant.
TRADE INQUIRIES FROM BRITISH COLUMBIA
In the comparatively short time that British Columbia House, San Francisco,
has been open, many British Columbia businessmen have called personally at the
office, while many others have written for assistance in exploring the California
market. Several products of British Columbia manufacturers are being promoted
for sale in the San Francisco Bay area. These products include heavy industrial
machinery, building material, consumer goods, and special services. The services
and facilities of British Columbia House are available to our manufacturers, including a large display area in which their products can be attractively displayed along
with pictures, brochures, and all forms of printed matter.
Personal contacts are advisable in finalizing sales. We suggest that many
British Columbia firms would benefit from periodic trips to this market, which has
a population greater than all Canada. British Columbia House will gladly cooperate with them in every way to assist them in making contacts and securing information. To date fifteen British Columbia firms have been in contact with this
office concerning the possible sale of their products in California.
LICENCE MANUFACTURE AGREEMENTS
Every effort is being made to interest California manufacturing firms in the
advantages of having a British Columbia firm produce their products under licence
or royalty arrangement. Many British Columbia producers have the facilities to
undertake extra production.
INVESTMENTS
Continuous liaison is being maintained between British Columbia House and
financial interests in the San Francisco Bay area. There is considerable interest
in British Columbia as a capital investment area. Contact made through this office
has assisted a group of San Francisco businessmen, headed by a former Canadian,
negotiating for the development of a large marina resort and a subdivision. This will
require the investment of a large sum of money.
PUBLICITY
The data issued in the Government bulletins, booklets, brochures, and reports
have been valuable in supplying information covering industrial development and
natural resources. The booklets issued by the Department of Lands and Forests,
supplying information on every part of the Province, are in demand by persons
interested in emigrating to British Columbia. Mining brochures have created considerable interest, and the statistical reports and " Establishing a Business in British
Columbia," published by the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and
Commerce, have all proven their value.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND  COMMERCE, 1961 Q 39
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL
The Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce is ex officio
chairman of the board of management of the British Columbia Research Council,
and as such presided at regular meetings of the board throughout the year. The
laboratories and offices of the Council are located on the campus of the University
of British Columbia in Vancouver.
The broad objectives of the British Columbia Research Council are to provide
scientific and technical services not otherwise available to the industry of the Province, and to conduct basic studies leading to the establishment of new industries
and the development of the natural resources of British Columbia. In order to meet
these objectives, the Research Council, through its laboratories, provides a wide
range of services and facilities to industries of all types. The work carried out by
the Council generally falls into a number of categories:—
(1) Fundamental or Basic Research.
(2) Product and Process Research and Development.
(3) Industrial Trouble-shooting.
(4) Specialized Testing.
(5) Approvals Testing.
(6) Economics and Industrial Market Research.
(7) Operations Research.
The Research Council was established in 1944 with a few employees working
in provisional quarters in University buildings. Because of industry's demand for
research services, the staff now numbers about seventy, working in a modern well-
equipped three-story laboratory building. Reduced expansion in many of the Province's industries in 1961 held the Council's earned income down to the 1960 level
of about $300,000.
In addition to its contract work, the Research Council receives a substantial
portion of its annual budget, $250,000 in 1961, from the Government of British
Columbia through the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce. It also receives a limited amount of financial assistance from the National
Research Council and other organizations. It is thereby possible for it to extend
to Provincial industry many additional services, such as free technical information,
and to carry out some investigations of importance to the Provincial economy.
Through the programme of contacts with industry throughout the Province, it
brings the fruits of research a little closer to industry's door.
In October of 1961 Dr. Paul C. Trussell, formerly head of the Division of
Applied Biology, was appointed Director of the Research Council. He succeeded
Dr. G. M. Shrum, who resigned upon assuming the duties of President and Chairman
of the Board of the British Columbia Electric Company Limited.
During 1961 the board of management of the Research Council consisted of
the following:—
The Honourable R. W. Bonner, Minister of Industrial Development, Trade,
and Commerce of the Province of British Columbia, Victoria, B.C. (chairman).
F. E. Atkinson, Assistant Director, Canada Agriculture Research Station, Summerland, B.C.
E. W. Bassett, Deputy Minister of Lands, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Dr. J. J. R. Campbell, Department of Dairy Science, University of British
Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
The Honourable J. V. Clyne, Chairman of the Board, MacMillan, Bloedel and
Powell River Limited, 1199 West Pender Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
 Q 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
R. M. Hungerford, President, Clayburn-Harbison Limited, 1025 West Seventy-
seventh Avenue, Vancouver 14, B.C.
W. C. Koerner, Chairman of the Board, Rayonier Canada Limited, llll West
Georgia Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.
Dr. D. M. Morrison, 3666 Marine Drive, West Vancouver, B.C.
P. J. Mulcahy, Deputy Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Dean D. M. Myers, Faculty of Applied Science, University of British Columbia,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
R. B. McDonell, President, McDonell Metal Manufacturing Company Limited,
1250 Boundary Road, Vancouver 6, B.C.
C. H. McLean, President, British Columbia Telephone Company, 768 Seymour
Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
R. D. Perry, Vice-President and General Manager, The Consolidated Mining
and Smelting Company of Canada Limited, Trail, B.C.
Dr. G. L. Pickard, Director, Institute of Oceanography, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Dr. H. L. Purdy, Vice-President, British Columbia Electric Company Limited,
970 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
H. B. Simpson, President, S.M. Simpson Limited, Box 220, Kelowna, B.C.
The Honourable J. Sinclair, President, Lafarge Cement of North America
Limited, 1051 Main Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.
T. L. Sturgess, Deputy Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, Victoria, B.C.
Dr. John P. Tully, Scientific Director, Pacific Oceanographic Branch, Fisheries
Research Board of Canada, Nanaimo, B.C.
H. Wright, Commissioner, Workmen's Compensation Board, 707 West Thirty-
seventh Avenue, Vancouver 13, B.C.
Dr. P. C. Trussell, Director, British Columbia Research Council, University
of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1962
660-162-6766

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