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Annual Report of the Director of Correction for the YEAR ENDED MARCH 31 1961 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1962

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Annual Report
of the
Director of Correction
for the
YEAR ENDED MARCH 31
1961
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1962
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Annual Report of the Director
of Correction for the year ended March 31, 1961.
ROBERT W. BONNER,
A ttorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., January, 1962.
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Director of Correction's Letter to Attorney-General  7
Oakalla Prison Farm  11
Haney Correctional Institution  31
New Haven  60
Prince George Gaol  61
Kamloops Provincial Gaol  67
Report of Senior Medical Officer  72
Report of Senior Protestant Chaplain  77
Report of Senior Roman Catholic Chaplain  79
Report of Personnel Officer  81
Report of Librarian  8 3
Report of Gaol Psychologist  87
Provincial Probation Branch  8 8
Statistical Appendix  92
  Report of the Director of Correction, 1960/61
The Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the Annual Report covering the activities of the Provincial Gaols and the Probation Branch for the year ended on March 31, 1961. In so
doing, I would like to draw attention to certain highlights of the Report and mention
some of the more significant developments which have been made in the corrections
service of this Province during the past year.
The Wardens of our various institutions and members of the headquarters staff
have covered in detail the activities of the part of our programme for which they
are responsible, and their reports generally indicate continued progress.
The most significant, I think, are the developments which have taken place in
our hospital service, our staff-training programme, and the additional facilities that
became available to us at the Kamloops Gaol. We are given to understand that
the Young Offenders' Unit building at Oakalla, which is being converted for use as
a hospital at some considerable cost, will be ready within a few weeks, and I trust
that nothing will interfere with the use of this resource, which has been so urgently
needed for so many years.
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police moved from that portion of the Kamloops
Gaol building which they have been using since 1950. This additional space is of
the utmost importance to our programme at Kamloops. Funds have been requested
in the estimates for the year 1961/62, so that this space may be converted especially
for programme purposes for our Interior Gaol.
With the addition of Mr. Matheson to our staff at headquarters, his responsibility being for the development of a staff-training programme and attention to
personnel problems of the corrections service, we have taken a significant step
forward. Mr. Matheson was formerly Deputy Warden at the Haney Correctional
Institution. He left to pursue graduate study at the University of Southern California and has returned to us with all the course requirements having been completed
toward the degree of Doctor of Public Administration.
We have developed a promotional policy and a training policy which includes
a training manual, and are presently in the process of drafting new gaol rules and
regulations.
During the year a most interesting institute on group counselling was held at
the University of British Columbia for senior staff, and as a result of the inspiration
received there through the leadership given by Dr. Maxwell Jones, specialist in this
field, we are hopeful of being able to enter into a group counselling programme in
each of our institutions at an early date.
Extension courses in social work and psychology at the University have been
well attended by members of the gaol service staff. Other members have been
encouraged to pursue further studies, and our institutional staff-training courses
have been now established on what we feel is a good basis. It is interesting to note
six senior staff members from the Alberta gaol service were in attendance at one of
our earlier basic training courses at Haney Correctional Institution.
There are some comments on our correctional system which I think should be
made at this point. Particularly, I would like to draw your attention to the importance of classification as being basic to our whole system. For some time past I have
been concerned about the fact that this is presently a responsibility of Oakalla Prison
 T 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Farm. I feel that this is not in keeping with a good diversified programme, and that
it should be the responsibility of the headquarters staff. My recommendation is that
provision should be made in the forthcoming fiscal year for the addition of staff to
headquarters to take care of this most important function.
Another concern is the increasing number of disturbed inmates who are being
admitted to Oakalla Prison Farm. The only recourse the Oakalla administration
has is to request Orders in Council transferring these inmates to the Mental Hospital
at Essondale because of the lack of adequate facilities for treatment of this type of
person in the gaol. This presents a real problem to the Mental Hospital administration because of the security aspect. It becomes then more apparent that we will
have to make some provision for a special unit to give adequate treatment to this
type of individual.
The increasing use of probation as a means of treatment by the Courts has led
to the inevitable result that those persons who are finally institutionalized are now
proving to be the ones with rather severe behaviour problems. We must face this
fact and make provision for the type of facility especially equipped to take care of
these people, who are most difficult to handle with our existing resources.
This situation, together with the lack of adequate hospital facilities and equipment and tremendous pressure that is being made on our medical staff, has been very
clearly pointed out by Dr. Richmond in his report.
There has been a wider use of parole, with the resulting increase of pressure
on our Parole Board and more especially on the secretary. I am of the opinion
that this Board should be strengthened by an addition to its numbers, and that some
more exact terms of reference should be laid down by the Department for the
Board's guidance. To this end the secretary is presently drawing up a manual of
procedure and policy which will be referred to you for your approval at a later date.
The forest camp programme still proves to be a successful part of our correctional picture. A fourth camp on the Chilliwack River is now in the planning stage,
and it is hoped it will be completed and in use within the next few months. Conferences have been held with the Department of Lands and Forests concerning the
possibility of extending this type of programme into the Prince George area, and it
is now recommended that we make use of camp buildings which are the property
of the Department of Lands and Forests at Aleza Lake. This would relieve the
overcrowding at Prince George to some extent and would obviate the transfer of
inmates from that institution to Oakalla Prison Farm.
A further suggestion has been made concerning the establishment of an additional camp in the Kamloops area. It is hoped that definite arrangements can be
worked out along this line very soon so that the camp programme can be further
extended in the Interior of the Province. The advantage of establishing these camps
in close proximity to the outside gaols is, of course, obvious. Our experience with
the Clearwater Camp has proved beyond a doubt that the results accomplished in
these areas are equally as great as those accomplished in the Lower Mainland.
In closing, I would express my thanks to all our many friends who have assisted
in our efforts to make the penal programme of this Province a constructive one.
Thanks are extended to the various private agencies, such as the John Howard
Society, Elizabeth Fry Society, the Salvation Army, for their after-care work, to a
press which has shown itself at all times favourable to our policies, to officials of
other Government departments of all levels for their co-operation, and to all others
who by their encouragement and understanding have assisted in what is, we feel,
a well worth-while programme of rehabilitation, but none the less at times very
trying on personnel.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61
T 9
The Wardens, senior staff, guards, matrons, and clerical staff of all our institutions, staff at headquarters, and Probation Officers are again to be commended for
their loyalty and conscientious application to the task at hand.
I would submit the following recommendations for your consideration:—
(1) As has been pointed out in several previous Reports, we are still without
proper chapels in any of our institutions. Since the work of the chaplains
is most important in the rehabilitation of those people in our gaols, and
since we pride ourselves on being a Christian country, there would seem
to be no reason why we cannot provide adequate facilities for this most
important part of the rehabilitative programme.
(2) The old Oakalla Gaol, which was condemned in 1912 and which is known
as Annex A, is still in use for the housing of short-term inmates as the
pressure of population demands. We are supported in the condemnation
of these quarters by reports of our own Fire Marshal's office, and I feel
that we cannot justifiably continue to use this section of the gaol, which is,
to say the least, a fire trap. It is urgently recommended that sufficient
funds be allocated for the construction of new and more adequate quarters
for this type of inmate so that the old gaol can be closed once and for all.
(3) Several years ago we purchased a very fine site for a new women's gaol.
Admittedly with the uncertainty regarding the implementation of the
recommendations of the Fauteux Committee, there has been justification
in not proceeding with the construction of this building. However, as it
would appear now that nothing is likely to be done in regard to an
arrangement with the Federal Government and that we will have to continue to look after our own women prisoners irrespective of the lengths
of their sentences, and as the present quarters at Oakalla Prison Farm,
even though most efficiently administered, are not suitable considering the
size of that institution and the proximity to the men's quarters, it is once
again recommended that plans be proceeded with at once for a cottage-
type women's gaol at Ruskin.
(4) There are a number of the most urgently needed capital projects at the
Haney Correctional Institution which have still not been completed.
These deficiencies have been pointed out in several Reports and have been
included each year in submissions to the Department of Public Works as
being urgently required. To date there has been no action, and it is
strongly recommended that pressure be brought to bear to at least provide
adequate refrigeration and storage facilities, conversion of some of the
dormitories into smaller units, and the completion of the radio system,
which was left uncompleted when the building was turned over for further
use.
(5) It is obvious that the present cell accommodation at Prince George Gaol
is not adequate for what we can expect in the way of population. We
have been faced with a continuous overflow for the past two years, necessitating the transfer of groups of prisoners from that institution to Oakalla
Prison Farm. Some time ago plans were drawn up for additional space
at Prince George Gaol which would allow more cell accommodation and
better facilities for the training programme. These plans have not as yet
been implemented, and it is recommended that some action along this line
be taken without further delay.
(6) There has been a rapid expansion of the Probation Branch over the past
few years, but the number of supervisors has not kept pace with these
2
 T 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
additions to the staff. In 1957, when a staff supervisor was appointed,
there were twenty officers under his supervision. At this date we have
thirty-nine on staff and still have only one supervisor. This is entirely
inadequate, and in order to maintain staff morale and train junior and
inexperienced personnel, we must have at least two additional supervisors
immediately, and they should be stationed in regional offices throughout
the Province, not at our head office in Vancouver.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
E. G. B. STEVENS,
Director of Correction.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 11
OAKALLA PRISON FARM
E. G. B. Stevens, Esq.,
Director of Correction,
1075 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the reports covering the activities of the units
operating as part of the Oakalla administration for the fiscal year ended March 31,
1961.
The major change in the operation of these units during the past year will be
found in the greater intensity of service required to deal with the greater concentration of medical, psychiatric, and custodial problems now accommodated, and the
decentralization of authority into smaller more manageable units, which has been
necessary to cope with the situation.
The Classification Unit this year studied and planned placement for 12,891
admissions, requiring 40,000 movements of prisoners, an increase of 1,800 admissions over the previous year. The improved job being done by the Department's
probation staff and private agencies in dealing with the more normal offenders outside of institutions is obvious in reviewing the work of the classification staff, who
are finding it increasingly difficult to supply the more normal type of prisoner
required for New Haven, Haney, and our industries and camps, where programme
requires the ability to readily absorb instruction and training without intensive supplementary treatment. More precise study of the total correctional procedure being
carried out and what is indicated to best apply our resources to the growing treatment requirement is obvious, and the addition of one well-trained person to the staff
in this key diagnostic setting, to be responsible solely for research, would be a sound
investment.
The Hospital Unit's transfer of eighty-eight prisoners to the Mental Hospital
over and above the increasingly large number of border-line cases held at Oakalla
indicates the extent to which deeply disturbed prisoners have to be dealt with as a
matter of daily routine. This increase in the amount of mental illness and emotional
disturbances which must be dealt with in the prison setting is to some extent the
result of the gradual disintegration of recidivist group in an increasing prison population, but may also to some extent be the result of progress toward an open-door
policy in treatment in our mental hospitals, which makes it more difficult for them
to admit mentally ill inmates who are aggressive security problems without loss of
effectiveness in the treatment of other patients. The great need for a new unit either
at the Mental Hospital or one of the prisons to deal with this increasingly large
number of people who, because of their aggressive characteristics, are no longer
suitably placed in a modern mental hospital and, because of the depth of their mental
illness, are not able to be treated in the prison setting as it is to-day has been discussed and acknowledged for some time by both Departments involved. Whether
this unit is most appropriately placed in the mental hospital or the prison setting at
this time does not concern us as much as the nature of its programme, which will
require direction from both correctional administration and psychiatry. It has been
suggested that this programme might be best set up to-day under the prison setting
with psychiatric direction provided through staff seconded from the mental hospital
setting, but some movement toward the solution of this problem by the Mental
Health Services or our own is urgently needed.
The increasing number of homeless and friendless old men who take refuge in
alcoholism and petty delinquencies, and the number of breaches of the Government
 T 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Liquor Act, have risen to the point where we now have in our temporary accommodation unit a population of roughly 190 people at any given time. This group is
shuttled back and forth for short-term sentences, and the accommodation which we
are able to provide is quite inadequate. As long as these men must be considered
as offenders rather than welfare cases, the setting in which they should be housed
should not place sleeping, eating, bathing, and toilet facilities for over 100 people
all in one room. If less degrading facilities were provided, the Courts would
undoubtedly commit many of these people for terms of more than the five to ten
days which now keep them endlessly grinding through the gutter, the police cells,
and our judicial and institutional machinery. This would increase our inmate
population in this group to necessitate a building accommodating 300, but this
change is essential, and it is recommended that an amount of money be set aside
immediately to at least allow a beginning. Present hopes provide for the Prison
producing its own concrete blocks and building its own quarters, which could be
used as completed, and eventually provide the care necessary for this less criminal
combination of destitute old people and the 4,569 people committed over the year
for breaches of the Government Liquor Act.
The number of male drug addicts admitted during the year decreased slightly
to 539, but rose sharply in the Women's Unit, to show an increase of 78 per cent in
women's admissions. We now have at any given time over 250 addicts in custody.
From this addict group, ten male addicts and ten female addicts are segregated into
separate accommodation where a research programme under psychiatric direction
attempts to gain insight into the treatment of these people. It appears obvious that
most addicts are quite treatable through methods which are not out of harmony with
the usual practice in related disorders, but, although our successes to date lend
support to the fact that these people are well worth our effort, we have not been
successful in finding methods which are sufficiently economical to be considered
within the limits of present Prison appropriations. Our work in this regard will
therefore continue to search for better methods, and in the meantime it would appear
from our point of vantage, and comparing the situation with other countries, that
the work being done by the various police departments in suppressing the drug
traffic has unquestionably stemmed what would otherwise have been a much more
rapidly increasing addict population. A greater lack would appear to lie in the
generally apathetic attitude of adults to drugs and the impression given young people
generally that drugs or anything else which avoids the facing of difficulties is desirable. Such agencies as the Narcotic Addiction Foundation and related private
agencies which have participated in addict treatment, and a better understanding of
the proper use of drugs, deserve recognition for the contribution they have made.
The production programmes being attempted under the Westgate B Unit have
made some progress, but the short terms we have to train prisoners and their degree
of emotional blocking require extremely skilled f oremanship and instructional qualities on the part of staff and the breaking-down of production into very simple
machine operations rather than those requiring individual judgment and well-
developed talent. While a commendable progress has been made in this regard,
development in this area is far too slow, and an increased outlay for necessary
equipment and salaries which will hold the type of staff who can combine training,
production, and individual therapy will be required before the situation can be
considered satisfactory.
The Chilliwack Camps have been used to good advantage during the year, and
their normal capacity of 180 was exceeded frequently when overpopulation was a
problem at the main institution.    These units are operated purely as a wholesome
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 13
work setting catering to the small percentage of our population who, near the end
of their sentences, are sufficiently stable to survive without supplementary assistance.
We are now approaching the point where we are unable to find the type of prisoner
necessary to expand this type of operation, but if additional programme could be
added to provide the supplementary therapeutic services necessary to maintain less
stable people and our more frail personalities in this setting, the considerable saving
in capital outlay which this would allow and the more wholesome setting than the
alternatives which we now have in our congested prisons would well justify the
current increase in staff required. It is therefore recommended that additional
attention be given to the improvement of forestry camp programme to the point
where it can take over a greater segment of our population who, under the present
limited camp programme, would not be able to manage the minimum-security
setting.
As suggested throughout this report and the supplementary reports of the
various units which follow, there has been a fundamental change in the personality
quality of the prisoner being admitted to-day, all of which is a credit to the preventive services, without which our prison populations would be rising much more
sharply. As mentioned, it has been necessary to cope with the greater intensity of
problems presented by providing increased staff-training and much higher demands
being made for staff in this area of work. It has also been necessary to make
administrative changes which offset the mass nature of the large administrative
organization Oakalla represents and break its operation up into smaller units which
operate sufficiently independently to allow the more personalized and individual
attention and therapy which is necessary to maintain the level of security, productivity, and rehabilitative services required. This administrative reorganization and
programme changes instituted on the basis of emergent need have been done within
the limits of the budget and authority previously authorized. The situation now
requires a complete review and, while staff have without complaint taken on additional responsibility without remuneration, it will be necessary during the coming
year to deal with and recognize the reclassifications involved.
In closing, may I express on behalf of the staff of all Oakalla units our very
sincere thanks to the Minister and Deputy for their interest shown in their visits
made to all units this year and to local headquarters for the support and advice so
generously extended in their areas of specialization.
Respectfully submitted.
Hugh G. Christie,
  Warden.
WESTGATE A UNIT
Hugh G. Christie, Esq.,
Warden, Oakalla Prison Farm.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit the annual report of the Westgate A Unit
from its date of inception on December 1, 1960, to March 31, 1961.
Population, Medical Categories, and Sentence Statistics
During the four months covered, 481 inmates were admitted, 51 per cent of
whom were serving sentences under two months. Although these inmates have
considerable potential, the shortness of sentence and their youth, 35 per cent being
under 25 years of age, required considerable training on the job to allow the complete maintenance of the Oakalla buildings and shops plus capital building projects
with this work force.    Twenty per cent of our inmates had medical categories
 T 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
requiring light duty, but all inmates worked on a minimum-security basis, including
the 5 per cent of our population on indefinite sentences.
Work Programme
The partition of Westgate into two 150-man units, making Westgate A headquarters for the complete maintenance of the total institution, has proven to be very
advantageous. It has allowed the advantages that segregation and individual attention make possible in smaller institutions; furthermore, the institution is better
maintained now than it was a year ago.
All inmates are required to take part in a full work programme; however, due
to the cut this year in staff it is frequently necessary to lock some inmates up for
a day or longer when a member of staff reports sick, or when there is some special
duty for a staff member to perform. It is felt that at least one more qualified electrician should be taken on staff if we are to make any progress in the maintenance
and repair of the ever-increasing amount of electrical equipment throughout the
institution. The plumbing-shop is also in need of a second qualified tradesman for
at least two days a week in order to bring these services up to an acceptable standard.
The motor mechanics shop and the furniture and upholstery shop provide practical
experience while completing many useful jobs for the institution. The inmates
selected for these shops are able, with competent direction, to gain sufficient knowledge and experience to qualify for semi-trained work in the community.
The carpentry, plumbing, electrical, and other maintenance shops, although
not used as intensively as vocational training areas, do excellent work in teaching
the interested individual through an apprenticeship type of experience. Many of the
people assigned to these areas have become proficient, and have acquired the ability
to work side by side in their work with the vocationally trained; many qualify as
leading tradesman in their respective shops. Emphasis is placed on good work
habits and over-all performance that would be expected by a prospective employer.
In the past year, over and above the maintenance of equipment and services
throughout the institution, a number of capital projects were completed. Considerable work was completed in the old Young Offenders' Unit building supplementary
to the contract to rebuild the new hospital. The north boundary perimeter security
fencing was extended to Deer Lake, and is near completion. A start has been made
on the final lap of the fencing along a portion of our Royal Oak boundary. Approximately 1 mile of farm roads was reconstructed and brought to a reasonable standard.
The Westgate retaining-wall has been completed, leaving only a low secondary wall
to be completed. The exterior of the Women's Gaol building was sand-blasted and
received a fresh coat of paint, which has enhanced its condition and appearance
considerably. The extensive recommendations of the Fire Marshal's office were
completed, with the few exceptions where funds have not been authorized. The
partition of Westgate and construction of offices, clothing-rooms, etc., was accomplished, as well as a number of other changes and renovations of a smaller nature.
Recreational Programme
Group counselling has been given greater emphasis recently and would appear
to be helpful in encouraging individual growth. We have seven groups of approximately twenty members each that enter into group counselling discussions twice
weekly.
The music group is a continuation of an interest in musical instruments fostered
by a citizens' group who supplied the instruments two years ago. This enthusiasm
was sustained and developed into the present music group, consisting of approxi-
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 15
mately eighteen members, who have been well received in playing for such organizations as the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, where an orchestra for the
patients' social evenings would otherwise not be available. The group has proven
to be a credit to the institution and themselves.
The Alcoholics Anonymous movement in Westgate A has gathered momentum.
The inmate population have not only availed themselves of this service, but they
have started to form their own chapters, which they chair and conduct with very
little outside help.
Group hobbies are an important part of the unit programming at Westgate A.
Hobbies, such as jewellery-making, driftwood lamps, plastic ornaments, petit-point,
picture frames, provide constructive outlets for individuals and their groups. The
finished articles are disposed of through hobby sales to relatives and visitors. All
profits realized are credited to the group fund, which purchases the new materials
required. Moneys from this group fund can also be used to purchase recreational
equipment and various sundries for the group's use. This group approach to
hobbies allows some experience in democratic procedure and benefits the total group
rather than any one specific individual.
An established library room has greatly improved the reading facilities at
Westgate A. It is stocked with a representative selection of works from the central
library. This has proven to be a decided improvement over the former mobile
library which was in effect prior to the division of Westgate. The library follows
recognized library procedures and meets the reading requirements of the inmates
adequately.
Westgate A is without a school-teacher. However, it is hoped that this situation will improve with the help of volunteer school-teachers from the community.
In the interim, staff members fill the vacanacy to the best of their ability to facilitate
the correspondence courses undertaken.
The individual groups have their own ball teams and play in an inter-house
league. The various groups take part in all activities, especially competitive games,
with each group putting forward its representatives. Sportsmanship is encouraged
to the point where it is noteworthy in all inter-group competitions.
Through the use of volunteers, the physical education classes have continued
to function despite the staff cut-back. These compulsory physical education classes
involve each group for two hours per week and are supplemented by further voluntary activity to suit the individual's particular interest and aptitude.
Religious services were provided for Protestant and Roman Catholic faiths.
Regular Sunday services are held by ministers from the community, who are assisted
on occasion by church choirs and the Salvation Army band. The Legion of Mary
group provides mid-week counselling to those who wish to participate. The church
has played an important part in easing some of the difficulties of the individuals
concerned with family and community problems.
Westgate visits have continued on a monthly basis and allow for a one-hour
period, in an open setting, on any Sunday afternoon. There is an approved list
governing all visits. The special family visits, held during Christmas and Easter,
where special services are arranged and on occasion children are allowed, were a
particular success this year. On two occasions the drama group presented the plays
" Of Mice and Men " and " Command Decision." These presentations were very
well received and enjoyed by all. Refreshments were served, provided by inmate
donations, and although much of the responsibility was taken by inmates, their
relatives, and staff on their own time, these special occasions were extremely well
managed and useful projects.   These special visits and family church services seem
 T 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
to contribute to an effective rehabilitation programme, and we hope they will be
able to continue in the future.
In-service Training
The role of the Correctional Officer as a group worker has become more essential to the success of the unit programme. This necessitated an increase in the
amount of staff-training. Literature, tapes, and films were utilized on a scheduled
basis with theory and practical instruction on social group work. The training
enabled the staff to function more adequately as group supervisors, and better able
to help the inmate maintain a high level of performance without the usual custodial
and discipline problems.
In conclusion, we feel that the decentralization of the Westgate A Unit to allow
more effective use of the staff and facilities available has resulted in a more personalized and more effective operation; with the continuing encouragement and assistance
of your central administration, we look forward to further improvement in the
coming year.
Respectfully submitted.
G. J. Chapple.
E. A. Loveless.
CLASSIFICATION UNIT
Hugh G. Christie, Esq.,
Warden, Oakalla Prison Farm.
Sir,—Since our last report the addition to the South Wing quarters for classification was completed and occupied. Though temporary in nature, this represents
a decided improvement in our office arrangement.
Many admissions are dealt with categorically without need for detailed study
and classification in the South Wing Unit, but the classification decisions during the
year were made on 9,186 prisoners; of these, 7,929 non-addicts and 374 addicts
were transferred to Oakalla units, 824 to the Haney Correctional Institution, and
fifty-nine to the New Haven Borstal Home.
The effectiveness of probation in dealing with the more normal offender outside
prison has resulted in a noticeable increase in the more difficult inmate admitted to
prison. Considerable credit must be given to the staff of the working units for
dealing so effectively with these more disturbed and hostile inmates. Westgate B,
the closed unit which handles production, has been receiving the greatest share of
these problems, and from our observations has dealt with them very effectively
though not without considerable hazard to its production programmes.
It becomes increasingly difficult to provide the more normal type of trainee for
the vocational programmes at the Haney Correctional Institution, and quite a number have therefore had to be returned to Oakalla. Whether programme can be
structured in the various units to deal with the more complicated training and
personal problems of the changing prison population or whether criteria will have
to be altered will no doubt be a matter for thoughtful consideration in the coming
year.
Research should be given more attention in an area with the potential which
this unit has in this regard. This has not been possible with present staff but should
be given consideration in the future.
There were three inmates in the condemned tier, which is also dealt with by
this unit; however, I am pleased to report that there were no executions during this
period.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1960/61 T 17
In closing, may I express our thanks for the continued co-operation that the
senior staff have extended to us during the fiscal year 1960/61.
Respectfully submitted.
J. Hawthorn.
J. MacLeod.
WEST WING UNIT
Hugh G. Christie, Esq.,
Warden, Oakalla Prison Farm.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report on the operation of the West Wing
Unit (waiting trial, waiting appeal) for the year ended March 31, 1961.
Administration
During the year the only major change which has taken place regarding the
policy of this waiting-trial unit has been the fact that inmates appealing any sentence
less than two years are now classified to other units, where they are able to take
part in full programme rather than being held unsegregated and inactive in the West
Wing facility.
Staff
The unit still continues to be staffed with officers of good quality, but young in
experience since considerable turnover takes place. Some members have been
transferred to other units to gain experience in other fields of the Prison, and a large
number, as soon as they are trained, feel obliged to move out of the service for
better-paying positions.
Besides the on-the-job training given, two officers have attended the University
of British Columbia taking courses in public administration and the social sciences.
The staff members attending the local training courses held here in Oakalla
seemed to benefit from this training, but we feel that more advanced training should
be given to staff with regard to dealing with inmate personality problems and the
more disturbed type of inmate now being admitted in substantial numbers. The
staff of thirty-three for an inmate population fluctuating from 150 to 200, or a 1-5
to 1-7 ratio, allows a tidy custodial operation but no programme, after over 2,000
movements back and forth to Court are also processed.
Medical and Dental
The Prison Medical Officer has visited the unit every evening to examine the
new inmates received that day and any other inmates that require medical attention.
This service and the two regular sick parades a week, Mondays and Thursdays, have
been a great help to us during the past year as the incidence of drug withdrawal and
other medical care has increased with greater intake.
The dental picture has improved over the past year to the point where we now
have no problem where emergency extractions are required.
Religious Services
Both Protestant and Roman Catholic services are held on Sunday mornings.
The Roman Catholic service is held in the main building, and the Protestant service
is conducted in the gymnasium.   The West Wing has a very good attendance record
3
 T 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
at these services, and the inmates express their appreciation also for the help received
with their individual problems during mid-week interviews.
Maintenance
While the unit provides little more than custody without segregation, it is in
a good state of repair and is not difficult to keep clean and tidy. Painting and small
repairs are going on all the time, but no major repairs have been necessary.
Custody and Control
The fact that no escapes have taken place during the past year indicates that
we have this aspect under control and that our policy as it stands is effective. Nevertheless, there is cause for some concern, because the inmates in our unit are locked
in their cells for too many hours every day. We do not have sufficient staff to do
more than handle admissions, discharges, visits, meals, and very short exercise
periods during the day or in the evenings, so these inmates remain in their cells
continuously, except for two-hour exercise morning and afternoon during good
weather. This places undue strain on the nerves and patience of inmates and staff.
Fortunately the situation has been met by the fact that staff have arrived at the point
of training where an inmate's problems are being dealt with skilfully and with the
consideration and success which would be associated with the best psychiatric nursing. Both control and morale are somewhat hampered by the rather strict policy
laid down by the administration regarding mail and visits for the inmates waiting
trial, but the Deputy Wardens do allow exceptions where special circumstances exist.
We had very few inmates taken to the Warden's Court, and in nearly all cases
disturbances were due to emotional strain caused by inactivity, worry, sickness, or
withdrawal from drugs.
Drug addicts are an increasing problem that we have to deal with. These
inmates' emotional and physical problems and the smuggling they attempt are very
difficult to handle, but the staff, as stated, through training and experience, have
gained a great deal of knowledge in dealing with these very sick inmates. This
additional special work knowledge and psychiatric nursing knowledge have fortunately reduced what at one time was a great worry to us to a routine duty. We
nevertheless look forward to the new hospital being opened, as we feel that some of
the problems would be more appropriately handled in that setting.
Library
The new system of library books for the West Wing seems to be working very
well. These books, which the inmates request direct from the central Prison library,
arrive in good condition and within a reasonable time. For a wing which has no
programme, this appears to be a better system than the unit library. Furthermore,
there has been a great reduction in the number of books damaged or lost since this
system of issuing was instituted.
Food
We must voice appreciation to the kitchen staff for the quality of food we
receive in the unit. This is a great help to us in controlling our inmates, who often
have to spend a long period of time with us. The system of serving food which has
often to be carried individually up five tiers of steps to be eaten in the inmate's cell
is, of course, difficult for the sick or older men and does something less than add
aesthetic quality to the situation.   A physical plant equipped with adequate facilities
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 19
for normal feeding and activity, as well as better segregation, will, we hope, be given
consideration as soon as possible.
In conclusion, we would like to thank you and the supporting administrative
staff for the support and encouragement given during the past year.
Respectfully submitted.
J. Cooke.
EAST UNIT
Hugh G. Christie, Esq.,
Warden, Oakalla Prison Farm.
Sir,—I beg to submit the following report for the fiscal year 1960/61. During
the year the population in the East Unit ranged from 131 to 266, and we have been
able to keep an average of 180 inmates usefully and constructively employed. This
unit receives the inmates considered unsuitable for other units, and the population
tends to be largely addicts and habitual delinquents whose experience from childhood, in most cases, is such that they have lost hope of rehabilitation.
Work Programme
The farm was assigned to the East Unit in January, 1961, and the usual planting, weeding, and maintenance, assisted by good weather, have resulted in a marked
increase in tonnage of vegetables produced.
A new fire-hall was constructed of cement blocks. Roads were maintained,
and some were widened and prepared for black-top. Landscaping was carried out
in a number of areas of the institution. Land was cleared, and the fencing has been
extended.
In the boiler-house the new gas-burning operation has been in effect since
December, 1959, with increased efficiency and cleanliness. Correspondence courses
are readily made available to those employed in the boiler-house. Some have received fourth-class tickets through their efforts. All are under the supervision of
qualified steam engineers.
The kitchen, also the responsibility of the East Unit, produces approximately
3,200 meals per day for the institution. The standards in this area were improved
by the addition of a dietician to the staff, and a considerable number of the inmates
employed in this area receive enough basic knowledge in food preparation to enable
them to acquire work in this field upon their release. Correspondence courses are
also available in the culinary field for those wishing to take advantage of such
courses.
The laundry handles the washing for all male Oakalla units plus the Chilliwack
Camps and New Haven. The increase in admissions and use of sheets and larger
towels have resulted in a heavier demand in this area. The work has been handled
to date, but improvements in the laundry to meet current demands may require
consideration in the near future.
Leisure-time Programme
To date a larger part of the unit's leisure-time programme revolves around the
field and gymnasium area, where a variety of activities are undertaken. Physical
training is not always welcomed, but, for the first time this year, teams from this
unit played in a recognized outside league and were both praised and accepted for
their sportsmanship.
 T 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
In order to foster meaningful community contacts, open-type family visits were
held on two occasions and were, we felt, very successful.
Respectfully submitted.
A. McGilltvary.
G. R. Casford.
HOSPITAL UNIT
Hugh G. Christie, Esq.,
Warden, Oakalla Prison Farm.
Sir,—We beg to submit the annual report of the Hospital Unit for the fiscal
year ended March 31, 1961.
As in previous years, the responsibilities of the Hospital Unit increased with
the prevalence of inmates with a lower medical category and with the increase in
the number of inmates admitted. Under established policy, inmates with a low
medical category are seldom transferred from Oakalla to other institutions, and
inmates from other centres in the Provincial gaol system who, after being admitted,
are found to require prolonged medical treatment are sent to the Oakalla Prison
Farm. The increased volume of work required some reduction in standards, but
ailments were diagnosed and treated within the limits of the facilities. Some minor
surgical operations were performed. Numerous referrals were made to social and
medical agencies outside the institution to assist rehabilitation in the post-discharge
period.
The most notable changes which occurred during the period under review
were the substituting of a full-time medical doctor, Dr. G. E. Singer, in place of
the three temporary doctors previously holding the post, and a dentist, Dr. W. J.
Johnson, was also hired on a full-time basis to serve both Oakalla and the Haney
Correctional Institution.
Despite what was accomplished in medical services, there remain many serious
problems to be solved. The most important discrepancies were noticed in the lack
of segregation facilities and psychiatric treatment facilities. A significant change
was noted in the types of patients admitted to the hospital. We have never had a
higher number of seriously ill drug-addicted patients, mentally disturbed patients,
patients with homosexual problems, and people who generally were unable to cope
with normal prison programme. Quite apart from the obvious needs where contagious diseases are involved, segregation facilities in the hospital are of foremost
importance where these more seriously disturbed inmates are concerned, and it is
therefore with regret that we report that this absence of segregation has exposed
to addiction a large number of these mentally and emotionally troubled inmates
who, desperately seeking some escape from emotional torment, are most vulnerable.
The treatment of mentally ill inmates was the second most outstanding problem. Unfortunately mental illness and anti-social characteristics are often found
in the same person, but it is possible to transfer only the conspicuously psychotic
and the suicidal patients to the Provincial Mental Hospital. There remained a large
number of mentally ill inmates for whom the Oakalla hospital could offer very
limited treatment. Although the doctors and staff contributed many hours of overtime work to help these patients, more appropriate facilities and professional help
are required to handle the problem at a level which in any way approaches an
effective standard.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1960/61 T 21
Following is a statistical synopsis of the inmate population who received treatment during the past year:—
Total admissions to hospital  1,543       :
Total patient-days in hospital  16,881
Average length of hospitalization (days)   10.8
Admissions to Vancouver General Hospital  123
Total patients-days in Vancouver General Hospital  1,701
Average length of hospitalization (days)   13.8
Total women inmates to Vancouver General Hospital clinics  397
Physical examinations—admissions and transfers  12,301
Inmates deceased—
Oakalla Prison Farm  3
Vancouver General Hospital  4
Judicial hangings  Nil
Interviews by Dr. J. C. Thomas  138
Committals to Provincial Mental Hospital  88
Dental Department—
Number of patients  2,297
Extractions, treatments, and examinations  2,507
Fillings and dentures  629
Total general X-rays  1,019
Total general X-rays positive  342
Tuberculosis Control—
Total diagnostic X-rays  417
Total miniature X-rays  7,401
Total cases handled, Oakalla Prison Farm  52
Vancouver General Hospital clinic—
Tuberculosis Control  11
Venereal Disease Control  67
B.C.C.I .  24
Vancouver General Hospital and Crease Clinic—E.E.G.  30
Total treatments dispensed, Oakalla Prison Farm  4,067
Total laboratory determinations and analysis  1,991
Total electrocardiographs  119
Respectfully submitted.
E. M. Pierce.
DRUG RESEARCH
Hugh G. Christie, Esq.,
Warden, Oakalla Prison Farm.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit the annual report for the Narcotic Drug
Addiction Treatment Unit for men for the year ended March 31, 1961. The project
has continued its research emphasis during the year, and programme conducted
was therefore as a medium for the research being directed by the psychiatrist in
charge.
Woodworking, gardening, and general maintenance provided an active, useful,
and interesting work programme. Through these activities, inmates were taught
better work habits and given the opportunity to develop adequate standards of
on-the-job behaviour through staff supervision.
 T 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Through the efforts of a member of our guard staff who has had some teaching experience, education has received renewed emphasis. Scheduled classes and
study periods are helping inmates to further their academic standing.
The Protestant and Roman Catholic padres have met weekly with their respective groups. Individual counselling and group discussions have provided spiritual stimulation to this group.
Opportunities to participate in various sports and hobbies are provided, and
inmates are encouraged to make positive and active use of their recreational opportunities in order to aid their adjustment in other areas of programme and in order
to stimulate them to make future satisfactory use of their leisure in the community.
Selected films were shown weekly, and these were followed by discussion groups
that attempt to relate films viewed to individual problems of members in the group.
Because of the selected small group of inmates, interviews are available at any
time and are provided initially by the psychiatrist, Dr. G. H. Stephenson, who
directs the programme. Individual contacts at the psychiatric, casework, and counselling level are available to assist him to make the maximum use of the unit's
facilities and of those resources available to him in the community upon his release.
A programme of joint interviews continues to provide a structured medium for
inmates and primary family persons with the objective of developing increased
understanding and harmony between the individual and his family. The group
counselling programme continues with scheduled sessions each week.
After-care
The after-care officer has led one of our group counselling sessions once
weekly as a medium for better understanding and relationship with the people he
will later supervise. The outside visitors' programme was taken on with renewed
vigour by the Vancouver Jaycees, who visit the group weekly. This provides an
opportunity to develop an understanding of the roles and values of successfully
self-sustaining representatives from the community and an understanding resource
for after-care. Close supervision was provided for fifteen of the twenty-two individuals released during the year.
It is extremely difficult to pin-point the specific progress made in this research
unit other than in subjective terms, which suggests that successful treatment of
addicts requires a combination of control and therapy not inconsistent with the
treatment of other types of personality disturbances. The major problem facing
us is to find methods we can afford to apply.
Respectfully submitted.
C. L. Clegg.
WESTGATE B UNIT
Hugh G. Christie, Esq.,
Warden, Oakalla Prison Farm.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit the annual report of the Westgate B Unit
for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1961.
Westgate B came into being as a separate unit on November 26, 1960, when
Westgate was split into two sections, Westgate B housing the production portion
of the programme.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 23
Rehabilitation Areas
Our primary effort, with due regard for the limits of good security and custodial practice, has been to provide a programme wherein inmates coming to the
Westgate B Unit from Classification can endeavour to work out their own particular
problems of social adjustment. It has been the endeavour of the staff of this unit
to help the inmate in as many ways as possible, with the emphasis put on helping
him to help himself.
For programming purposes, these problems have been divided into five areas
of concentration—work, recreation, education, home, and religion. Our staff-
training meetings have concentrated on techniques for helping inmates in each of
these areas while endeavouring in all instances to keep the staff informed of the
work being done in the other areas so that we would have an integrated programme.
This has been based on the premise that all staff should have full knowledge of an
inmate's problems in order to work with the inmate most efficiently.
Classification and Guidance
All inmates received at the Westgate B Unit have been interviewed on admission. This unit classification experience has two main objectives. The first is to
assess the inmate's skills and aptitudes so that as far as possible he can be placed
in a work area where he will be of most value to the production programme, and
where the training and experience will be of most value to the inmate himself. The
second is to place the inmate in a group setting where he will be able to make as
useful an institutional social adjustment as possible. The inmates' needs in the area
of personality and character development and the individual and group resources
which can be brought to bear for the purpose of treatment are of major importance
in this aspect of placement.
From this point there is continuous reclassification that makes possible any
necessary changes that are needed to keep the inmate from stagnating or retrogressing. This is necessary as each individual has different problems, different ways
of reacting to problems, and different rates of progress.
Work and Training
All inmates are required to take part in a full work programme. This work
programme endeavours to combine the needs of the institution in the area of production and also to establish in the inmate the formation of good work habits, and
where possible a considerable amount of practical training. This situation has
made the job of the work area officer fairly difficult in numerous cases and has also
been a problem in the area of unit classification. In spite of these difficulties, it can
be seen by the shop reports that production is up and efficiency has been increased.
Education
Since the loss of a regular school-teacher, the educational programme of this
unit has tried to function by using the Government correspondence courses, supervised by one of the unit officers in addition to his regular duties. This proved to be
an inefficient way of conducting the educational programme for the more disturbed
type of inmates. The major reason for this is that it has been proven that a great
deal more is accomplished if there is a steady schedule and a personal contact,
allowing the inmate to ask questions and get immediate answers and establish a
relationship with the teacher, often necessary to improve motivation and performance.
 T 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Special Interest Groups
During the course of the past year three special groups have been formed in
this unit.
1. Two groups were formed for the purpose of group counselling. These
proved to be reasonably successful. They were comprised of one tier living-in
group of between eighteen and twenty-two inmates. Individual problems were discussed by the group as a whole, with the inmates taking part and leading the discussion themselves. Another group of individuals with distinct disturbed personality
problems met on the same basis. This particular group proved to be the more
interesting but most difficult to supervise. These groups were discontinued during
the course of the summer holidays but are scheduled to start again in the fall.
2. Chronic Inebriates. This group was composed of approximately ten volunteer members under the supervision of a staff member. Besides group discussions of their problems, they also had guests who sat in on their meetings. The
majority of these guests were from the staff of the institution and from all levels of
seniority. It is felt that this was beneficial to the inmates, who found that they were
able to talk about their problems in front of strangers and also to the staff members,
who were able to gain a better insight into the problems faced by this type of inmate.
This group has continued to meet throughout both winter and summer.
3. Indefinite Group. This is a volunteer group of inmates, each with the
common bond of an indefinite sentence and the possibility of parole. The group
was limited to those inmates having four months or less of their definite sentences
left. The average size of this group was ten inmates. The group met once a week.
Guests were invited to the meetings. The Parole Officer in the Oakalla Prison area
was contacted, and he was pleased to help this group as much as possible. This
was proven in the valuable contribution in time and advice to the group. Conditions of parole and problems that would be faced while on parole were discussed,
and also the importance of the conduct of the inmate in regard to the obtaining of
his parole were discussed. The Parole Board has shown a definite interest in the
formation and progress of this group.
4. Music Group. The music group became an established orchestra. They
performed for many of the Provincial institutions, such as Essondale and The
Woodlands School. They also performed for a Kiwanis luncheon and took part
in a Boy Scout Jamboree fund-raising effort.
Films
During the fall, winter, and spring programme, educational films were used
extensively from the Provincial Mental Hospital Audio-Visual Department, Provincial Education Department, and the University of British Columbia film library,
as well as films obtained from various large companies such as the B.C. Electric,
Shell Oil Company, etc. It was found that educational films were of most value
when shown in the individual-tier group programme rather than mass showings.
The films were also used for staff-training where feasible.
Visits
Visits have been run on a weekly basis. Inmates are allowed one visit per
month. Special or family visits were continued this year and were held at Easter,
Father's Day, and Christmas. Refreshments and entertainment were provided for
the families of the inmates participating.    Contributions were made toward the
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 25
refreshments by all inmates of the units taking part.   It is felt that this type of visit
contributes immensely toward the rehabilitative programme.
Library Service
The library in the Westgate B Unit was opened after Christmas and has proven
itself to be very effective in spite of the small number of books involved. It is hoped
that this number can be increased as soon as possible so that this library can be
used to full efficiency.
Recreation and Physical Education
Hobbies and physical education have been handled very effectively by our own
staff in the past, and it will be interesting to see whether the handling of this area
by volunteers can be effective. A number of volunteers were made available to us,
with the result that we have been able to maintain this area of programme at a
fairly adequate level.
Social Services
In the past year private and public agencies have attempted to meet our inmates' needs for outside assistance. Representatives of the National Employment
Service, John Howard Society, and the Salvation Army have helped with family
problems and community contacts.
Two successful blood donor clinics were held during the year, sponsored by
the Red Cross.
Finally, we wish to extend our thanks to you, Sir, and to your administrative
staff for the direction and leadership accorded us in our endeavours.
Respectfully submitted.
R. E. Burns.
V. Blackman.
CHILLIWACK CAMPS
Hugh G. Christie, Esq.,
Warden, Oakalla Prison Farm.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report on the three Chilliwack
Camps, and on their work and progress during the fiscal year ended March 31, 1961.
The inmate population has continued to increase as the programme expanded.
The inmate movement for the year was as follows:—
Received from Oakalla Prison Farm  1,300
To Oakalla Prison Farm for regular discharge      976
To Oakalla Prison Farm for medical and dental      253
To Oakalla Prison Farm as unsuitable or for Warden's Court        78
To Oakalla Prison Farm for parole and other interviews        60
Escape from the camps  5
Daily average population , ,      185
 T 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The majority of the inmates continue to be employed on projects allocated by
the Reforestation Branch of the Forest Service.    These are as follows:—
Work Projects
Place
Number of
Inmate-days
Right-of-way clearing _ 	
Road construction and maintenance .
Trail work ...   	
Stand improvement...	
Planting...
Nurseries..
Snag-falling   	
Project construction  	
Tools and saw-filing	
Motor maintenance and repair..
Sawmill 	
Chilliwack lake and fire access roads  	
Chilliwack lake and fire access roads  	
Lindeman, Pierce, Lihumitson Lakes, and lookout	
Clearing, thinning, and pruning approximately 120 acres in
the Chilliwack Valley  _     .
53,000 trees planted in the Tamahi and Chilliwack Valleys.
Borden nursery increased to 360 beds;   Slesse No. 1 prepared and 270,000 trees transplanted;   at Slesse No. 2,
5 acres cleared for seeding in 1962   ....
Chilliwack Valley      „  	
Forestry buildings in the Chilliwack Valley 	
Tools used on projects -
Logging	
Horse and drivers..
Oakalla Prison Farm and forestry vehicles and equipment...
291,000   f.b.m.   used   in   Chilliwack   Valley   and   Oakalla
Prison Farm ... __.. 	
Logs to the sawmill   	
Clearing, nursery, etc   	
2,924
2,064
626
7,895
260
4,434
383
385
1,515
2,440
2,454
1,949
308
Work on camp maintenance and improvements has continued in the three
camps, and a beginning has been made on a fourth camp with the partial construction of an office and administration building. There were two fires of serious
consequence in the central Camp 2. The first on April 15th, when the ablution
building was burned through a gas lantern exploding during the night. This was
rebuilt with improvements added. The second was the vehicle repair-shop, which
was the result of what appears to have been carelessness on the part of an inmate
while servicing a vehicle. Present plans are to rebuild this building with help from
the Forest Service.
The recreation period for the inmates consists of inter-camp sports and the
television available in Camps 1 and 2. It is suggested that more facilities be made
available for self-improvement in the educational and vocational training.
Religious services and counselling are provided by visiting ministers and voluntary workers in this field from the Chilliwack area. Religious discussion groups
are held weekly by volunteer chaplains from Chilliwack Ministerial Association, who
are also available for counselling. Roman Catholic mass and counselling are held
each week.
The health standard in all camps has continued at a high level, thanks to careful
selection and regular tours and discussions on health measures by Dr. Richmond.
As an indication of the high standard which has prevailed, there was a total of
52,872 days worked by the inmate population, with only 391 inmate-days missed
through sickness or injury. The relatively high morale of the inmates transferred
to the camps has continued, and the effectiveness of both interest selection and group
responsibility are emphasized by the low escape figure of five for the year.
We would like to emphasize what appeared to us to be the ever-increasing value
of the camps, in providing wholesome training for an expanding inmate population
and at the same time, through co-operative efforts of other departments, a direct
contribution to the development of the Province's natural resources.
I would like, in conclusion, to pay tribute to the continued interest and enthusiasm of our staff in the development of the camps. Also, I would like to thank the
staff at Oakalla Prison Farm, without whose practical interest and assistance the
development of the camps to their present state would not have been possible.
Respectfully submitted.
T. H. Tobiasson.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 27
WOMEN'S BUILDING
Hugh G. Christie, Esq.,
Warden, Oakalla Prison Farm.
Sir,—I beg to submit the annual report on the operation of the Women's Unit
for the year ended March 31, 1961.
Administration
The over-all aim of the programme at the Women's Gaol during the past year
has been to more adequately integrate the general techniques involving care and
control with the techniques involved in treatment.
The small-group living units, the vocational classes, and supervised work teams
lend themselves to on-the-spot spontaneous lay counselling, both on an individual
and group basis. Instructors, teachers, and group supervisors have acquired, through
training and experience, an understanding of the aims of the therapeutic community.
All staff are capable of making helpful and well-prepared referrals to the medical and
classification staff. If we are to retain this desirable climate and the potential of
staff, it will be necessary to acquire professional staff to give direction to treatment.
There is now an acceptance by staff of the need for a more professional approach to
rehabilitation, and the integration of present staff with the professional at this stage
of development would be a relatively easy matter if such a plan were supported.
Personnel
Staff continued to take a keen interest in the over-all programme and their
individual groups. Basic training and a variety of group training discussions aided
in communicating ideas and keeping enthusiasm alive at the staff level.
Population
The average daily count for the year was 117, which is an increase of fourteen
over the previous year. The actual daily count fluctuated from 83 to 151, requiring
programme to be kept flexible enough to handle these rapid changes, which require
weekly adjustments in all areas. There were 947 admissions during the year; 313
were from outside Vancouver, mainly native Indian women from Kamloops, Williams Lake, and Prince Rupert areas. There was an increase in the number of girls
under 21 years of age; many were young teen-agers on very serious charges. The
majority were already fully experienced in their association with other delinquents,
having served terms in juvenile institutions and gone through the unfortunate experiences associated with all that is required to survive during escapes. There is an
increase in the number of disturbed and hostile young girls admitted and an increase
in drug addiction in this group, but in spite of this the segregation allowed by the
cottages and the improving performance of staff have resulted in an early adjustment
of these youngsters to the training programme.
Facilities
Throughout the year at least fifty-five inmates were housed in the small minimum-security units. The congested nature of the area, the heavy traffic, and
proximity of the men's prison placed many restrictions on the activities of the
women. This again pointed up the fact that a cottage system for women loses much
of its effectiveness when located on the grounds of a men's prison. Although we
are given considerable understanding and support in our efforts, we still create a
problem for all concerned which minimizes the value of programme for both the
men and the women.
 T 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The addition of the new Admitting Unit relieved the pressure in the administration area, resulting in more adequate office space and interview rooms. Admissions
for the year were 1,179, a number which would have been impossible to handle
under former conditions.
Socialization
Training of these basically anti-social people in the patterns necessary to live
with people is basically a group living experience. Programme for the consciously
structured family groups moved toward more discussion periods and planning of
activities, which helped to make them more aware of their expected role as contributing individuals in their community. This awareness was fostered by participating in
limited community programmes. Visiting teams were encouraged to take part in
volleyball, basketball, and baseball. Square dancing, drama, and concerts were
conducted with the aid of volunteers and service organizations.
Group counselling was given greater emphasis as part of the treatment programme. Many staff were reluctant initially to attempt this without professional
supervision, but all groups participated, and the remedial association with the supervisor and exchange of thinking with peer group members were, we feel, useful. The
inmates' behaviour in the group was readily assessed by all members, and the inmate
acquired a better understanding of herself in relation to others. Whether she was
hostile, withdrawn, or domineering was obvious. What was lacking was the diagnostic and treatment service that would help staff to understand and put this information to further practical use.
Classification
Perhaps the primary function of the Classification Department is to collect data
which will be of use when consideration is given to the placement of individual
inmates in living groups or work teams. This department is becoming increasingly
concerned with making contacts with and securing information from agencies in
the community, however, and to this end much of the present work in classification
is directed. The institution must be aware of the community situation from which
the inmate has come and to which the inmate will return if the necessary assistance
is to be given in formulating realistic plans for each individual. These liaison
functions are of particular importance in those cases in which parole is being
considered or the welfare of children is involved.
Because the resources of the Classification Department are limited, and are
becoming increasingly taxed by the amount of clerical work involved in parole
applications and reports, individual casework services cannot be provided for all
those requiring them. The liaison functions of the Classification Department then
extend to the making of referrals to visiting caseworkers from both public and
private welfare agencies, and to the co-ordination of these services to ensure their
most effective utilization.
With this stress upon liaison with the community, the question of interpretation
becomes a more pressing one for the Classification Department. Not only is there
a need to interpret the community services available to the client, but there is a
complementary need to interpret the needs of the client to the various agencies.
Community welfare agencies are not, as a rule, well versed in the peculiar problems
of the incarcerated women, nor are they well versed in the type of service which
the institution is able to provide. Once again the Classification Department must
become the enabling body which will establish good public relations and improve
understanding between the inmate of the institution and the community, this time
with the focus of attention being the welfare agencies of the community.   While our
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1960/61 T 29
initial experience with classification this year has proven its usefulness, there will
need to be a more realistic staff complement authorized if this work is to meet the
standards required to properly assist the treatment programmes now being developed.
Vocational and Work Programme
Classification helped to structure teams and classes, sorting the population into
the most logical groups for training. High standards of performance were encouraged, and many inmates made full use of their potential.
Production was fairly high, the building well kept, and the meals served of
good quality throughout the year. The supervisor's role as counsellor and teacher
was stressed, and the various departments were effective in teaching appreciation
for and adjustment to the demands which should be expected of the average worker
in society.
Medical and Orientation Unit
The Medical and Orientation Unit has had up to a population of thirty-eight,
among whom there was a complex overlapping of the awaiting trial and the sick,
the newly admitted drug addicts undergoing withdrawal, the mentally ill under
observation, Doukhobors on hunger strikes, epileptics, expectant mothers, TB.
patients, and those anxiously awaiting appeal.
Because of the increasing medical problems of the inmates admitted here, this
unit was in a perpetual turmoil that taxed the durability of staff. Lack of safe facilities was a hazard to the psychotic individual, who is frequently suicidal and combative and requires constant observation. Eventually twenty-five patients were
transferred to the Mental Hospital, and another ten were treated at the Women's
Gaol with the help of the diagnostic services of the Vancouver General Hospital and
Provincial Mental Hospital.
Of the 948 admissions, 179 were treated for narcotic withdrawal symptoms.
They were markedly emaciated and subject to severe convulsions, a result of a bar-
bituate supplement used with their usual heroin dosage. Many were critically ill
and had obviously fortified themselves with a large dose of " goof balls " before
entering gaol, further complicating the prescription of medication which would ease
withdrawal and prevent collapse.
The 454 treated for alcoholic conditions responded quickly but were unfortunately usually discharged before they were well enough to develop a real understanding or wish to control their use of alcohol.
Full use was made of a special prenatal and gynaecological clinic which cared
for an average of six women each week. Eventually five were admitted to the
maternity ward at the Vancouver General Hospital.
Special attention was given to the pregnant women, who usually felt quite
helpless about their ability to care for themselves or their expected children. In
many cases they were inadequate people and felt apprehensive and anxious concerning their family's future. It was difficult to give help for their complex problems,
but medical attention and counselling did ease the tension in this emotionally
charged group, who were often tearful, hostile, and given to hysterics. Long-range
help without greater community resourc.es for after-care is difficult to provide on
an effective basis.
Each Wednesday the Public Health Branch conducted a clinic at the gaol,
involving an average of forty-five inmates. Treatments were prescribed and were
carried out by the gaol staff. As there appears to be an increase in venereal disease
which is resistive to treatment, more intensive medication and staff service were
required than in past years.
 T 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Religion
Both Roman Catholic and Protestant services were held each Sunday. Although
attendance was not compulsory, it was encouraged. Instruction in catechism was
held each Tuesday evening. Religious films and discussions were used for Protestant
instruction. Bible courses and group discussion helped stimulate interest and the
development of a more permanent relationship with the padre's work.
Summary
The work during the past year has unquestionably increased in complexity,
and the staff have been particularly grateful for the assistance given by outside
groups and private agencies. The proximinity to the men's institution had both
advantages and disadvantages, but we do wish to extend our thanks to you, Sir, and
to your administrative staff for the direction, leadership, and practical assistance
accorded to us in our endeavours throughout the year.
Respectfully submitted.
B. E. Maybee,
Chief Matron.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61
T 31
HANEY CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION
E. G. B. Stevens, Esq.,
Director of Correction,
1075 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the annual report of the Haney Correctional
Institution and its satellite camps for the fiscal year which ended on March 31,
1961.
Details of the accomplishments of the various departments of the Institution
are contained in the individual reports submitted by the department heads concerned. However, I would like to emphasize a few of the highlights of our total
programme over the past year.
Business Department.—This department has continued to provide efficiently
the necessary services for other departments to operate successfully. This has been
done despite the challenge of maintaining and, indeed, increasing in quality and
quantity our total programme on a budget reduced from the previous year.
A continuing concern affecting both the efficiency and the economy of our
operation is the need for adequate maintenance-shops. The construction of these
shops would assist greatly in meeting the problem of increasing maintenance requirements as the building, our equipment, and our vehicles grow older.
Another urgent need continues to be the lack of adequate refrigeration for
storage facilities. Until this type of storage is available, our food costs will continue to rise despite all efforts to economize.
Camps Department.—Although there was no increase in the number of camps
this year, staff interest and enthusiasm was maintained by developing, within both
the Gold Creek Forestry Camp and the Pre-release Camp, a more intensive programme, to include not only work and some vocational training, but organized recreation, increased contacts with the community, a liberal visiting programme, and
an academic programme enriched by the presence of a part-time school-teacher.
Experimentation has resulted from this desire to develop programme within
the camps. The Gold Creek Camp has from time to time been used as a special
treatment unit for some of our more disturbed trainees, including those serving
determinate/indeterminate sentences. We have also used it during the summer
months as a temporary placement for some fifteen men from the main institution.
The programme of the Pre-release Camp has been greatly increased during
this first full year of its operation. Much of the credit for this increase is due to
the co-operation and active involvement in the programme of such groups as the
John Howard Society, the Salvation Army, the Catholic Charities Organization,
the National Employment Service, the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, the
British Columbia Federation of Labour, the legal profession, Magistrates, and the
police.
A good deal of credit must also go to the Pre-release Advisory Committee,
under the guidance of its able Chairman, Inspector Dan Brown of the Vancouver
Police Department.
Another agency that deserves special thanks in relation to the pre-release programme is the National Parole Board. Experiments in residential release for
employment or educational purposes, the granting of short paroles, and the use of
parole in principle are all manifestations of the National Parole Board's co-operation in the development of this programme.
 T 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
It is felt that in our two camps the most intensive programme of its type has
been developed. It is sincerely hoped that, in the not too distant future, the experience gained by the staff in developing these programmes may be put to use in the
creation of another camp for selected young offenders serving determinate/indeterminate sentences. I am certain that the staff are equal to the challenge. Moreover,
there is on our property and the adjacent lands many years of reforestation work,
which would provide not only a work programme for the men involved, but also a
very tangible return to the Province.
Correctional Programme Department.—During the past year further steps were
taken to capitalize on the additional experience of the staff in the development of a
more relaxed programme, controlled more by relationship than regimentation. The
staff members of this department are now responsible not only for security and discipline, but also for the general work programme, the complete recreational programme, and for carrying out a major part of the responsibility for both group and
individual lay counselling. The results of the efforts of these staff members are
reflected in fewer violations of institutional rules and a considerably more relaxed
atmosphere within the Institution, despite an increasingly younger, more problem-
ridden population.
Specialized Programme Department.—This department has been given the
responsibility of developing certain more specialized programme resources, as well
as providing the leadership for the general basic programme.
One of the more notable changes this year has been the development in our
vocational training programme of courses that can be completed in a relatively short
period of time and that are suitable to the general intelligence, interest, and aptitude
level of our population. For example, we have dropped from our programme the
electrical and the stationary diesel maintenance courses. In their place we have
substituted a decorating course and a heavy-duty equipment operators' course. We
have also added to our staff the position of a relief vocational instructor. The presence of this position has resulted in our obtaining many more community resources
at little or no cost to our budget, and has also enabled us, during the fall and winter,
to run a limited night-school programme for the trainees, particularly in welding.
One of our most notable achievements during the past year was the obtaining
of permission from the Department of Education to grant vocational certificates to
students successfully completing their courses in the Institution. These certificates
are issued by the Department of Education and are identical to those awarded by
vocational schools in the community.
There are some obvious needs within this department, however, if we are to
obtain its optimum potential. We do require the services of at least one more
teacher, vocational instructor, and counsellor. The counsellor would be used in
relation to the intensified pre-release programme. The additional teacher and the
vocational instructor would be used to increase the enrolment in the trainee night-
school programme.
We also have a need for some specialized dental technician's equipment in order
that we can obtain the utmost production from the dental technician, who has obtained his training in this profession while a member of our hospital staff.
Finally, but possibly most important of all, an appropriate chapel is required
in order to give proper emphasis to our religious programme. Both trainees and
members of the public have contributed financially toward such an objective. However, the cost of a chapel cannot realistically be met directly from these two sources,
and it is sincerely hoped that some Government funds will be made available during
the forthcoming fiscal year.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1960/61 T 33
Public Relations.—During the past year we have continued our policy of giving
every possible attention to our public relations programme. In this regard we have
tried not only correctly to interpret our own programme to the community, but also
related programmes in the total Corrections Branch.
Our night-school programme in the Institution for members of the local community operated again this year with success.
Our drama programme, under the direction of Mr. Antony Holland, achieved
its greatest success to date. In the fall of 1960 the group presented the American
play " Boy Meets Girl." Early in 1961, " Lady Audley's Secret," a satirization of
a nineteenth-century English melodrama, was presented. This play proved to be
the most successful of any production yet attempted. Both the male trainees and the
female staff members and private citizens who participated in this programme are to
be highly commended. Their efforts culminated in their entry of Act I of " Lady
Audley's Secret" winning first place in the Vancouver One-act Play Festival, and
Mr. Holland received the award for the best director.
Over 10,000 citizens saw the drama productions during this year. This aspect
of programme continues not only to entertain, but also to enlighten the public.
It is, I think, appropriate at this time that we again extend our thanks to all the
various organizations, agencies, and private citizens who have helped in the continued development of our programme. The successes which we have experienced
over the past year have not been achieved without the whole-hearted support of these
people in the community, as well as the staff of sister institutions and related Provincial and Federal services. It is not possible, in the limits of a short report, to mention each one by name, but our appreciation is none the less sincere.
Finally, I must extend to all staff members of this Institution my whole-hearted
thanks for the support given to our programme and, in particular, to me during the
past year.
Respectfully submitted,
J. W. Braithwaite,
Warden.
BUSINESS DIVISION
J. W. Braithwaite, Esq.,
Warden, Haney Correctional Institution,
Haney, B.C.
Sir,—The 1960/61 fiscal year proved to be a busy and a challenging one, but
the vast amount of practical knowledge gained over the past three and one-half
years has helped to ensure a relatively smooth operation. The challenge has been
not only to retain the existing high standards, but also to enlarge the programme
and improve facilities despite a reduced budget.
Certain maintenance work and repairs which had to be done in the interests
of safety plus other drains on our income, such as the unforeseen imposition of an
additional Provincial fuel tax and the continued rise in the cost of living, ensured
an overexpenditure in certain areas from the start of the fiscal year. Ultimately,
despite stringent economy, it proved to be impossible for varied reasons to keep
within our total allocation under Vote 65 and at the same time maintain the minimum standards required.
 T 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistically it is interesting to note that in this period the official cost-of-living
index reflected a figure of 128.4, a rise of over 5 points since September, 1957 (this
index is based on 100 as at 1949).
With regard to the trainee population, a most significant factor is the increasing
proportion of youthful offenders. In 1959/60 some 50 per cent were in the 18-25-
year age bracket, whilst in the period under review 80 per cent come into this category. This factor, coupled with a high proportion of short sentences, does not
always lend itself to successful on-the-job training. Despite the fact that the majority
of trainees classified to the Business Division fell into this general category, much
valuable training and knowledge were imparted to them while working in kitchen,
garage, boiler-house, stores, or on general maintenance work. However, it has also
been found that with a trend toward a younger population there is a correspondingly
larger increase in clothing issues and food consumption.
The Institution has now been in operation for nearly four years, and the
facilities are naturally generally beginning to show increasing signs of wear and tear.
Heavy calls have been made on maintenance staff to carry out the type of maintenance forced upon us by budget restrictions; that is, that of emergency rather than
preventive. Due to the absence of centrally located maintenance-shops, a great
deal of efficiency is lost which does not reflect in any way upon the maintenance staff
themselves, and it is hoped that sufficient funds will be allocated to provide for these
shops.
The system, which was inaugurated last year, whereby all maintenance staff
are grouped under a foreman-overseer carpenter has worked very well. Efficiency
has also been improved by us being allowed to adopt the recommendations of the
Inspector of Electrical Energy and acquiring an additional maintenance electrician.
The quality of trainee engaged upon this type of maintenance work has been
relatively high.
The rugged conditions under which most of the Institutional vehicles must
operate result in heavy maintenance costs and pressure of work on the maintenance
mechanic. In common with all maintenance tradesmen, he is greatly hampered by
inadequate working space and conditions. Many of our vehicles have now reached
the point where maintenance costs are prohibitive and exchanges for new vehicles
are an economic necessity.
In the period under review, much work has been carried out in beautifying the
grounds, road-making, irrigation, and improving outdoor facilities generally.
As a result of staff reorganization, the position of Personnel Officer was removed from the official authorized establishment, and this responsibility is now that
of the Business Manager.
The consolidated reports of the sections in Business Division are forwarded
herewith in support.
Maintenance
Despite having to work under adverse conditions, the Maintenance Section carried out some 200 projects during the course of the year. Despite the continuing
need for centralized maintenance-shops, many valuable projects have been completed. A major portion of the Institution was repainted, and more offices, storage
space, and a dental laboratory were created. In addition, the maintenance garage
kept all our vehicles operating.
Boiler-house
Due to a slight increase in plant efficiency, coupled with an unusually mild
winter, the double effect of a peak trainee population and extra facilities provided
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1960/61 T 35
since last year was not apparent. Fuel-oil consumption for the year was down by
approximately 13,000 gallons. The savings on this were reduced somewhat, however, as the Provincial fuel tax on fuel-oil of one-half cent was applied this year.
Additional metering and recording devices, including the weather station provided by the Canada Department of Transport, have been put into operation and will
provide valuable information for future needs.
Boiler inspections carried out during the year have determined that the boilers,
pressure vessels, and related equipment have been maintained in a clean, safe, and
satisfactory condition.
Boiler Plant Statistics.—Total fuel burned amounted to 302,069 gallons; total
steam generated, 45,329,436 pounds. Average cost per 1,000 pounds of steam,
$0,511.
Generator Statistics.—Total hours run 3,630; total power generated, 167,376
kwh.; value of power generated at 1.26 cents per kwh., $2,108.94.
During the year two trainees successfully passed the Boiler Inspection Branch
examination for fourth-class steam engineering.
Supply Section
Stores
The Stores Department continued to operate smoothly during the fiscal year,
supplying goods and services to the main institution, Gold Greek Camp, the Prerelease Camp, and New Haven.
The quantity and variety of items stocked in the stores continued to increase;
average stock on hand throughout the year was approximately $20,000. It will be
seen from the annual expenditures that Sub-head 010 (Provisions and Catering) was
overspent. The main reason contributing to this was the fact that a considerable
amount of spoilage occurs constantly through the lack of adequate refrigeration.
Canteen
Ventilation in the canteen, although improved by the introduction of a small
air vent, still leaves much to be desired.
A 200-bar candy machine was acquired by the Welfare Fund for the use of
visitors in the visiting area. This is in addition to two coke-vending machines which
cater to both staff and public and dispense an average of 120 cases per month. All
profits from these machines are devoted to the Haney Correctional Institution
Trainee Welfare Fund.
Change-room
A full year's operation in the new location within the stores itself was a great
advantage to both staff and trainees. The service wicket made it possible for
changes to be made at the change-room instead of the living units. This made better
clothing-control possible.
Despite these advantages, however, a severe clothing shortage problem developed in the latter months, occasioned mainly by the shortage of funds. Despite
the help of a seamstress and Oakalla, the short supply of serviceable clothing became
acute in the last three months.   An obvious need exists for adequate repair facilities.
Laundry
During the last year the laundry has served not only the main institution, but
Gold Creek Camp, Pre-release Camp, New Haven, and Allco Infirmary.
 T 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Total production amounted to 18 3 lA tons for the year.   The following statistics
are given for information:—
Number of Pieces Lb.
Haney Correctional Institution  290,752 274,707
New Haven     21,129 16,752
Gold Creek Camp     19,074 16,308
Pre-release Camp      44,490 40,396
Allco Infirmary     20,974 18,453
Totals   396,419 366,616
(183*4 tons)
In commercial terms the value of this service is approximately $54,000.
Apart from the Cook Washette machine which was added last year, no new
equipment has been acquired. In this connection, the acquisition of a Puff-press,
a tumbler-drier, and a dry-cleaning plant would realize the full potential of our
laundry.
Culinary Department
The operation of the kitchen, in the main, ran smoothly last year.
This is a real compliment to staff in view of the youthfulness and turnover of
the trainee crew. To serve 500 meals in a dining-room three times a day successfully, the trainees must first have a definite interest in the job, be of an average age
of not less than 25 years, and be serving a sentence of not less than one year, preferably more.
The bakeshop production again increased this year. The size of the shop still
restricts the staff to one instructor and four trainees.
The bakeshop must now operate seven days a week, and the addition of a
rotary oven and a hand-operated pastry-roller would greatly increase the efficiency
and variety from this shop.
The butcher-shop continued its high output of meats with one instructor and
three trainees on a five-day week. The monthly output of this shop is some 18,500
pounds of all meats.
The lack of refrigeration and deep-freeze facilities in the stores has again hindered the economy of ordering. Apart from a great wastage of produce, which has
to be brought in twice weekly, at extra cost, frozen vegetables must be brought in a
few hours before use. Deep freezing would enable large amounts of produce to be
stored, and frozen goods could be stockpiled during low-priced periods.
Development and Maintenance of Grounds
Steady progress in developing our grounds continued to be made in the fiscal
year 1960/61, with an average of eighty-eight trainees being employed as a labour
force each day on a variety of tasks. Work has continued throughout the year on the
construction of a fire-break perimeter road. This is a major project involving
surveying, clearing brush, bulldozing the track, ravine filling, and the use of large
quantities of gravel.
The landscaping and construction of soccer fields for the Institution and the
Pre-release Camp were completed during the year. Work continues on the Institution's running-track, which is now in the process of being overlaid with cinders.
Landscaping within the perimeter fence is carried out on a continuous basis.
In this connection a nursery-site and greenhouse have been completed and will be of
considerable assistance in the future toward the supply of flowers and shrubs.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 37
Land-clearing and boundary brushing are continuing projects. Future projects
include bush land on either side of the access road being steadily cleared, with the
eventual object of establishing a tree nursery, the reforestation of the property, the
creation of an orchard, and the conversion of some 400 to 500 acres into park land.
Accounts
Trainee Welfare Fund
This Fund, which derives its income mainly from profits on canteen sales to the
trainee population, has continued to provide many benefits otherwise unavailable.
As in previous years, the furnishing of loans to trainees without funds for canteen purchases has been the largest single item. During the year there was a gross
turnover of some $15,500, with a total value of loans granted of $8,100.
Total canteen sales for the year amounted to $32,364, of which the net profit
of some $6,000 was distributed on a percentage of sales basis to Haney Correctional
Institution, Gold Creek Camp, and Pre-release Camp Welfare Funds.
Records
For the period from April 1, 1960, to March 31, 1961, 890 trainees were
received direct from headquarters classification. There were 820 new admissions,
and seventy trainees were readmitted, consisting of the following: Twenty-seven
parole violators; thirty-two trainees were returned from Oakalla Prison Farm after
having undergone medical treatment; two were readmitted who had been returned
to Oakalla Prison Farm for disciplinary reasons; eight were recaptured after having
escaped; and one trainee was returned from a temporary parole.
The discharges for the year amounted to 869. There were 384 trainees released by expiration of sentence; one was transferred to New Haven; twenty-two
were released by Court orders (Appeal Court judgments, etc.); ninety-two were
released on National parole licences; five were deported; thirteen by escape, four
by payment of fines; six transferred to the Provincial Mental Hospital; ninety-one
returned to Oakalla Prison Farm; two released by temporary paroles; and 249 by
British Columbia paroles.
The following percentage graphs indicate the length of sentences, educational
status, ages, and the employment of trainees.
 T 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
W
O
<
H
W
U
W
70.
60.
50.
40.
30.
20.
10.
DURATION OF TRAINEE
SENTENCES
FOR 1960-61
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61
T 39
o
<
H
w
o
PES
w
EDUCATIONAL STATUS
OF TRAINEES
FOR 1960-61
 T 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
40-
35.
30-
W
025
H
g20-
W
&15-
10.
AGES OF TRAINEESJ
FOR 1960-61
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 41
Mail Censor
The increase in the number of letters a trainee is permitted to send out each
week (three personal and seven business letters) has greatly increased the flow of
outgoing and incoming mail. Last year our mail censor handled approximately
33,500 pieces of outgoing mail and more than twice that amount of incoming mail.
Identification Officer
The identification officer developed a total of 1,279 negatives and 13,966
prints, made up 1,590 identification cards, consisting of new and reissued trainee
identification cards and staff identification cards, and dry mounted 4,920 prints,
plus obtaining vital statistics from every new trainee and finger-printing all new staff.
Personnel
Breakdown of resignations, appointments, transfers, and other related data
within the period April 1, 1960, to March 31, 1961, inclusive, is as follows:—
Resignations—
Custody Division   28
Business Division  14
Training Division   13
Camps      4
59
Appointments—
Custody Division  30
Business Division   14
Training Division  13
Camps      5
62
Promotions   6
Reclassifications   4
Retirements   1
Deceased   1
R. A. Cook,
Business Manager.
CLASSIFICATION AND COUNSELLING SECTION
/. W. Braithwaite, Esq.,
Warden, Haney Correctional Institution,
Haney, B.C.
Sir,—During the period under review the Classification and Counselling Section continued to provide a specialized service to trainees and at the same time provide consultative services to the other divisions and sections.
These services followed the pattern which has been developed since the opening of the Institution, with casework treatment for the trainees being a major
function. However, the classification has involved all staff to a large degree. Each
new trainee has been interviewed by many staff members, whose evaluations are
integrated by the counsellors into a case-history and admission summary. To
augment this work, psychiatric and psychological evaluations are also included.
6
 T 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
With new trainees arriving weekly, the reception programme and preparation
for classification is considered a very important part of the over-all institutional programme. Classification, to be effective, must be based on knowledge of the trainee's
strengths and weaknesses, his past performance and future potential. It is the role
of the counsellor to investigate every source of information in order to present as
complete a history of the man as possible. With this information at hand, the
counsellor is then ready to recommend the best type of training for the trainee.
Many trainees arrive lacking education, ambition, or the basic knowledge of the
work-a-day world, so that the counsellor also has to do a job of interpretation and
motivation.
To motivate a hostile, anti-social, inadequately educated individual requires
workers of the highest skill.   It requires time for interviewing and for understanding
on the part of both the counsellor and the trainee.   With heavy case loads and a
constantly changing inmate population, it is encouraging to find that classification is
so effective.
Counselling Services
After classification, the Classification and Counselling Section has a big job to
perform in the field of individual counselling. Each counsellor has a case load of
between sixty and seventy trainees. Some of these trainees require very little of the
counsellor's time. The majority, however, require constant attention. Their progress, or lack of progress, in the over-all institutional programme is of concern to the
counsellor, who must advise, guide, or sometimes lead toward better performances.
The counsellor must also be concerned and active in pre-release planning and postrelease plans. Where progress seems to be static, the counsellor must seek the cause
and recommend changes to stimulate interest and promote progress.
Trainees have many problems, most of which are of a personal nature. Many
of these are of such nature that they impede progress. It is the counsellor's responsibility to help solve these problems so that the trainee can cease to worry and to
concentrate on his studies.   This is a heavy duty to perform for over fifty cases.
Over and above the counselling services to trainees, the counsellors are called
upon to write reports of various types. One very important report is the pre-parole
summary for both Federal and British Columbia Parole Boards, which must also be
supported by the counsellor at a meeting of the British Columbia Parole Board.
Unit Teams
We have continued the process whereby the unit counsellor meets with as many
unit staff members as possible on a monthly basis to consider the progress of trainees
in their units. In addition, a meeting is held in the unit once a week. The counsellor,
members of the unit team, and all trainees attend. This allows a useful opportunity
for communication and the ventilation of feelings.
Lay Counselling
During 1960 lay counselling was started. After a training course which was
sponsored by the Section and carried out by Mrs. M. Pedlingham, M.S.W., twenty-
nine staff persons from other sections undertook the counselling of trainees. Each
lay counsellor was allotted two or three trainees, with whom he worked under supervision.   A great deal of success has been achieved, and it is hoped that this service
can be expanded.
Special Professional Services
Dr. P. M. Middleton, psychiatrist, visits the Institution weekly and holds
diagnostic interviews with selected trainees who are referred by the counsellors or
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 43
medical officers. Following diagnosis, a planned treatment programme is carried
out under the supervision of Dr. Middleton. This is a team approach, involving the
psychologist and the counsellor, which is a universal practice in dealing with difficult cases.
For the first time we have a psychologist on a full-time basis. He administers
tests and gives advice to counsellors and others who have individual contact with
trainees.
The year was one of progress despite a considerable turnover in staff. We were
fortunate in securing some very good replacements.
Plans for the new year include more intensive work on the casework level and
the development of group counselling.
The co-operation of all staff enabled this Section to fulfil many of its objectives.
Two staff groups merit special mention. We would like to express appreciation for
the co-operation of the unit sergeants and officers for their efforts on the unit teams.
The support and assistance of the academic and vocational staff throughout the past
year were also worthy of special mention.
W. Lemmon,
Supervisor.
SPECIALIZED PROGRAMME DEPARTMENT
/. W. Braithwaite, Esq.,
Warden, Haney Correctional Institution,
Haney, B.C.
Sir,-—The Specialized Programme Department, formerly the Training Division,
has experienced changes in both personnel and in function during the past year.
In order to provide a greater number of staff members a responsible and active
part in the programme, and to give a greater continuity to the programme, the staff
and the responsibility of the social training programme have been transferred to the
Correctional Programme Department.
During the past year Father E. Hulford, our Protestant chaplain; Mr. E. Sever-
son, Supervisor of Academic Education; and Mr. I. Smith, Supervisor of Classification and Counselling, resigned and were succeeded by Canon Higgs, Mr. G. Fry,
and Mr. W. Lemmon respectively. Mr. A. Holland, our librarian and drama director, resigned and was succeeded by Mr. R. S. Taylor, a former Correctional Programme officer. Fortunately Mr. Holland has continued as drama director on a
part-time basis. These new section heads have made very good adjustment to their
new jobs, and it is felt that our programme has continued to grow.
A dental laboratory has been equipped and is in operation in the hospital area.
We have also been successful in training one of our hospital officers as a dental
technician.   This will allow a greater amount of restorative therapy.
Our programme has continued to attempt, where applicable, to bring to the
Institutional community resources comparable to those available in the " outside "
community. The educational and counselling programme specifically requires more
personnel in an attempt to bridge this gap. Finally, we require a research unit to
evaluate our total programme.
The reports of the various section heads of the department follow.
H. Watson,
Director.
 t 44 british columbia
Vocational Education Section
The fourth year of operation of the Vocational Section has been an active one
in all areas.
Arrangements were completed with the Department of Education for a regular
certificate to be issued for those trainees who successfully completed a vocational
course. These certificates are signed by the Director of Technical and Vocational
Education for the Province and are similar to those issued from vocational schools
under the direct authority of the Department of Education. Since the process has
begun, thirty-four such certificates were issued to trainees who had completed their
course.
A number of trainees have been referred to the various vocational schools in
the Province for further training. We have succeeded in finding a number of apprenticeship placements for our shop graduates.
One of our great problems in this area is that the general trend of trainees
which we receive indicates a younger and more immature lot, and in most cases
less formal education than those who were received in previous years. This not
only means that the instructors must give more time to individual group counselling,
but also means that many of the trainees cannot be brought up to the top grade of
training as many of their emotional problems must be resolved prior to any extensive
integration of formal education.
We should emphasize again that our goal is not qualified tradesmen, but respectful contributing members of a community. Vocational training is only one of several
means available to us for achieving this goal.
We have had two staff changes during the past year. Our electrical instructor
resigned, and this aspect of vocational training was re-evaluated, and we decided,
because of lack of trainees with proper qualifications to take advantage of such
training and the constant demand for newer and more extensive equipment, that
we would no longer continue with this training, but would rather enlarge our paint-
shop area and give formal educational vocational training in the paint-shop. The
staff member who had been instructing this area previously was then hired as a vocational paint instructor. This transition was very easily handled as the instructor
had attended several educational courses and has a good portion of his required
educational credits at this time.
We hired a new diesel instructor and have planned to move from the stationary
and marine type of training to heavy-duty operating equipment and heavy-duty
mechanics. It is possible to train more men in a shorter period of time in both
the diesel operators and painting courses.
We have acquired the services of a relief instructor who aids not only in relieving instructors when they are ill, on holidays, or taking further training, but also
in order that their shop can remain supervised if they take a group of trainees into
the community for orientation and educational reasons.
During the summer of 1960 the plumbing instructor attended the six weeks'
instructors' training course at the University of Toronto. Fortunately the courses
are now being given in Vancouver, and more specific attention will be given to the
requirements of the Province.
Eleven of our instructors have now received Vocational B or permanent certificates, and are now investigating means of obtaining renewals to certification. Two
of our instructors require only to complete a course of study, while our two new
instructors must acquire all their credits plus two years' teaching experience prior
to applying for certification.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 45
Our instructors were again inspected by Mr. T. A. Quayle, Assistant Director
of Technical and Vocational Education, and the reports were most gratifying. They
indicated that our instructors had made progress during the past year, and that our
methods of instruction met the standards of performance set by the community
vocational training institutions.
The educational programme has continued to work with the community in
educational programme and other programmes wherever possible. We were fortunate to have a meeting of the British Columbia Adult Education Council in this
Institution, and our Academic Supervisor, Mr. G. Fry, is our regular delegate to
the association's meetings in the community.
Our Barber-shop Advisory Council has functioned very well, and we have
succeeded in placing every graduate of our shop. We have had a number of members of the community who are tradesmen or working in industry tour our Institution, and we have asked them for advice, not only in training procedures, but also
in job placements.
As in the past year, we operated an active night-school programme in conjunction with the Maple Ridge School District (No. 42). Ten courses were offered,
but because of lack of enrolment, only five were carried. This trend was also
reflected in the general night-school programme in our community. In addition to
the programmes operating at the Institution, four of our staff were active in teaching
or instructing in the programme offered at the Maple Ridge night-school.
Our instructors visited a number of shops in the community, and many of
them took groups of trainees along with them as an aid in the teaching and orientation to industry.
All shops were quite active in designing and completing projects which were
not only of value to the shop teaching situation, but also to our Institution as a whole.
Some of the more notable projects included the remodelling of the ablution
hut at Gold Creek Camp and the installation of a new water-heater; the construction of a combination greenhouse and classroom unit; the production of desks,
blackboards, and benches for use in the Institution; and the completion of necessary
duct work for improving heating and ventilation throughout the Institution.
In addition, the machine-shop produced many items, including jigs and tools,
which, if purchased, would cost several thousand dollars. In co-operation with the
welding-shop, numerous repairs were carried out to items that would require a large
amount of money to replace.
The auto-body and auto-mechanics shops continued to effect repairs and maintenance for both Institution and various Government department vehicles in a very
satisfactory manner.
The diesel shop, in co-operation with the electrical shop, completed the installation of new power plants at Gold Creek Camp and also the rewiring of the entire
camp. In addition, the electrical shop completed and (or) revised the wiring of
some of the Pre-release Camp buildings. The diesel shop also adapted or produced
equipment, such as a donkey-engine, which could be used for the maintenance of
grounds, new road construction, and the training of operators.
To further the training programme, representatives from a number of companies have given lectures, shown films, and put on demonstrations for various
shops.   This has been a means of bringing industry into the Institution.
To complete the picture, select groups of trainees were taken on trips to see
industrial plants and displays in order to enhance their training programme.
S. W. Fisk,
Vocational Supervisor.
 T 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Academic Section
The past year has been a time of change in the Academic Section. These
changes have been partially due to changes in staff and partially due to attempts
being made to improve the service provided by this Section.
In the purely academic classrooms, an attempt was made to implement a system
of teaching by six-week units. Two six-week courses were scheduled during the
year, and it was noted that it did improve the learning situation. It made greater
use of teaching skills and was more stimulating than the individual study programme
normally used.
Another effort was designed to increase the interest of the individual study programme. This was the reduction of the academic day to a half academic and half
work day. The effects of this were quite noticeable, and teachers noted a comparative absence of trainee boredom and minor discipline problems. It is interesting
to note that a slight increase in average student productivity occurred coincidental
with this change. This indicated that the average trainee is now producing slightly
more than the average trainee produced in twice the time under the previous system.
It also permitted classroom assistance to be given to twice as many trainees and
eliminated the waiting-list to get into classrooms.
At the present time one classroom includes trainees working on correspondence
courses at the high-school level.
Another classroom has a morning class of trainees who are at an elementary
level. These persons are usually below the Grade V level and some have been
illiterate.
During the winter, night-school classes were offered twice a week. Normally
about fifteen trainees were in attendance. It was necessary to cease these classes
at the end of the fiscal year in order to effect economy. The practice of sending a
teacher to Gold Creek Camp one evening per week has, however, been continued.
Correspondence courses are available to trainees throughout the Institution,
and 213 courses are presently being taken by trainees.
The exploratory shop continued in its role of exploring the interests of trainees
assigned to the shop by the Classification Committee. During the year it provided
direction for fifty trainees. Another eighty-eight benefited from part-time work in
this shop. This shop performs a very important function and has had remarkable
success in dealing with problem individuals.
The draughting-shop has had a busy year. Six trainees were granted Department of Education certificates for satisfactory completion of the complete course.
A record of over 17,000 man-hours was accumulated in this shop, and the median
length of stay rose from 282 hours to 468 hours. Better results have been largely
due to improved selection, which has placed potentially better trainees in this shop
and has left them there for longer periods. The market for draughtsmen has been
relatively good, and several were placed in draughting positions when released from
this Institution. Also, the draughting-shop has completed a number of Institutional
projects.
Two one-hour classes in typing are given daily. These classes are normally
filled to capacity. An increased demand for commercial courses has been noted,
and record-keeping and book-keeping courses have become fairly popular.
Mr. I. H. R. Jeffrey, District Superintendent of Schools, has visited this Institution regularly.   This service and his advice have been greatly appreciated.
The above gives a reasonably accurate picture of the Academic Section. The
system appears to be working smoothly, efficiently, and making maximum use of our
facUities- G. A. Fry,
Academic Supervisor.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1960/61 T 47
Medical Section
The Medical Section has continued its services to the Institution and to satellite camps. The staff remains the same with a part-time medical officer, dental
officer, optometrist, and eight full-time hospital officers. The breakdown of the
various services is indicated below.
Direct Services
Sick Parades. — Sick parades are held three times daily. A broad general
breakdown follows:— TotaJ
Treatments
Common cold and influenza  1,038
Eye, ear, nose, and throat  767
Injuries    1,018
Skin conditions  523
Foot conditions, mainly athlete's foot  271
Pre- and post-dental treatment  229
Gastro-intestinal  211
Chronic chest conditions  9
Parasitic infections  135
Confidential and N.Y.D  9
Total number of attendances at sick parade  14,863
Hospital.-—The breakdown on trainees admitted to hospital is as follows:—
Total number of admissions to Institution hospital      435
Total number of patient-days in hospital  1,935
Average stay per patient (days)     4.44
Transferred to Oakalla Prison Farm (medical reasons)        37
Returned from Oakalla Prison Farm        23
Transferred to Provincial Mental Hospital (Essondale)  6
The majority of admissions to hospital fall under one of the following categories: Muscular-skeletal injuries, pyrexias due to colds, etc., infections, gastrointestinal disturbances, and anxiety states.
Transfers to Oakalla Prison Farm (medical) include a number of trainees
admitted to Vancouver General Hospital for treatment, both chronic and acute.
Physical Examinations.—The physical examinations are all performed by the
medical doctor, and this demands a considerable amount of time. These are most
valuable in the early discovery and control of disease and contribute to the classification of trainees.
New arrivals  852
Tickets of leave and transfers  172
Sports   78
Immigration   20
Staff   19
Staff Compensation Cases.—The following figures are low and represent the
results of an intensified safety programme:—
Accidents reported and treated  19
Referred to the doctor  11
Accidents requiring loss of time     1
Loss of time in days  10
 T 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Surgery.—Minor surgery includes suturing of wounds and wart and cyst removals. The category of outside consultations relates to referrals for surgery and
medical specialists. Chest X-ray survey was conducted by the Division of Tuberculosis Control and the figure includes 225 staff and 486 trainees.
Minor surgery  140
X-rays other than chest  135
Chest X-rays (Tuberculosis Control), rechecks       4
Surgery in outside hospitals     15
Chest X-rays (mobile survey)—
Trainees   486
Staff  225
Casts applied     17
Outside consultations  148
Blood donor clinic  645
Polio vaccine programme  159
Dental.—The dental services during the past year were divided between Dr.
J. H. Bridges, D.D.S., and Dr. W. Johnson, D.D.S. Dr. Bridges functioned on a
part-time basis and attended the Institution one day per week until August 1, 1960.
On that date Dr. Johnson was appointed full-time dental officer, operating between
Oakalla Prison Farm and Haney Correctional Institution. Consequently the dental
services improved, as Dr. Johnson attended Haney Correctional Institution two
full days each week.
It is, of course, obvious that owing to the age-group of the trainees housed
here and their previous environment, it would be impossible to completely solve
their dental problems. However, restorative work is becoming more the rule than
the exception. The completion of the dental laboratory and the training of one of
our staff as a dental technician will help in restorative work.
Laboratory Tests.—The functioning of a laboratory in our medical set-up is
paralleling the advancement and increasing importance of laboratory aids to medicine in general. The need for laboratory testing in aid of diagnosis is essential, and
the figures below indicate the tests performed:—
Total tests  246
Urine  117
W.B .C     3 6
C.B.C     18
Smears     19
Cultures     28
Differentials      20
Sent to other laboratories       8
Optical.—Dr. M. Schmidt, our part-time optometrist, provides the necessary
service and visits the Institution if and when the need arises. Services provided in
the past year are indicated below:—
Total appearing for refractions  226
Glasses supplied (Government cost)   116
Glasses supplied (patients' cost)      38
Glasses repaired      12
This service has made it possible for many trainees to participate in academic
and vocational training, which would otherwise be prohibited.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 49
Related Services
Services to Camps.—Gold Creek and Pre-release Camps have been visited
regularly on a weekly basis by one of the medical staff. Appointments are made
for dental, medical, and other treatment at this time. First-aid kits and equipment
and sanitary facilities are inspected on a regular basis. All trainees in the Prerelease Camp receive polio shots just prior to discharge. They are supplied with a
record card and instructions for the follow-up polio vaccine programme.
Services to New Haven Borstal Institution.—The senior hospital officer has
visited New Haven when necessary. He has aided them in setting up a proper
pharmaceutical programme.
Contributions to the Classification Committee.—All new arrivals are examined
and medical categories are submitted in order that appropriate assignments can be
made.   In addition, re-examinations are carried out to aid in reclassification.
Public Health Education.—Films and other visual aids have been distributed
to facilitate instruction in good health practices.
Safety Programme.—Our safety programme has continued under the auspices
of the British Columbia Safety Council. Bronze and silver awards were won by our
vocational shops. Bronze awards were won by the educational rooms, Pre-release
Camp, and silver awards were won by the culinary and outside labour groups.
Community Services.—Two blood donor clinics were held under the auspices
of the Canadian Red Cross. Participation in these clinics was voluntary. The total
amount of blood collected was 585 pints.
Staff-training.—Members of our staff who have skills in various areas have
continued to pass their knowledge on to other members of staff. Mr. Taylor, one
of our hospital officers, has taken training and has been awarded a certificate as a
dental technician.
Summary
Our hospital service is becoming increasingly involved in all aspects of our total
programme. There is a continuing problem of minor accidents caused by trainees
using machinery and implements to which they are not accustomed. We also have
the continuing problem of community medical facilities being some distance from the
Institution, and the problem of transportation and staffing of community visits for
medical purposes are difficult ones.
L. Boechler,
Senior Hospital Officer.
Library Section
Trainee Lending Library
This library is visited by an average of sixty trainees per night, Monday through
Friday. Although the advent of television in all units has resulted in a slight fall-off
in library attendance, the number of books on loan in any one day remains at about
300, and a demand has been noticed for non-fiction books dealing with subjects
first encountered by trainees through television programmes.
The " charging out" system has been improved and now works satisfactorily.
Overdue books are followed up, with the co-operation of the unit officers, and a
considerable amount of damage to books has been eliminated. At the same time
about 300 previously worn books have been repaired and returned to the shelves.
 T 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The library has been fortunate during the past year in the calibre of trainees
assigned to it and in those who have volunteered time in the evenings. In the main
they have worked hard and conscientiously. Plans are being made for a rearrangement of the library, designed to give more shelf and floor space.
Contact was made with consulates, travel agencies, and the British information
officer, who supplied posters, both decorative and educational, for display in the
library.
During the summer of 1960 the Corrections Branch librarian and his assistant
carried out a physical stock check, and over the following months a shelf catalogue
was compiled.
Academic and Vocational Library
Daily supervision is supplied by the educational clerk, who has continued to
accompany the librarian on unit searches. During the past year, those books which
were not actually required for training courses were transferred to the trainee library,
where they are available to all trainees and find more readers.
Staff-training Library
During the year this branch of the library was transferred to the conference
room, where the Warden's secretary can charge the books out. It is visited daily
by the librarian. A system has been worked out whereby an interchange of books
can take place between the Institution and the headquarters library.
Several books and many publications have been added to this library, and an
order has been placed with the vocational shops for a filing-cabinet to hold
pamphlets, magazines, etc. Notices are sent to staff publicizing new acquisitions
and the contents of Provincial magazines.
Gold Creek Camp
The monthly change of about eighty books continues to operate satisfactorily
and is carefully rotated to give a wide selection.
Pre-release Camp
This camp also exchanges about eighty books a month, and trainees visit the
Institution library, from which they may draw an additional book. The librarian
visits this camp every month to check books and consult with programme staff.
The library is considered the cultural centre of our Institution, and the following activities exemplify this concept.
Music Appreciation Group.—This group was formed in November of 1960
and has met continuously since then, its membership varying between twelve and
twenty. Classical music and progressive jazz are played. Discussions have been
organized and films shown on various aspects of music and opera.
Play-reading Group.-—-This group was formed in January, 1961, and its membership varies around a dozen. Many plays were read, including Shakespeare's
" Hamlet," and play-reading has provided useful practice for those wishing to join
the drama group.
All replacements for the cast and back-stage crew of the long-running " Lady
Audley's Secret " have been provided from the play-reading group, which also read
and recorded " The Man Bom to Be King " for the Protestant Easter service.
Newspaper Group.—This group, based on the library, has continued to publish
the H.C.I. Weekly News, under the energetic editorship of the trainee librarian.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1960/61 T 51
The paper has become widely read by the Institution population, each issue being
written and made up by from one to ten trainees.
In summary, the past year has been a successful one from almost every aspect.
The Corrections Branch librarian has been available for professional advice
and consultation.    His help and that of his assistant, Mr. Linfoot, is gratefully
acknowledged.
R. S. Taylor,
A cting-Librarian.
SENIOR PROTESTANT CHAPLAIN
/. W. Braithwaite, Esq.,
Warden, Haney Correctional Institution,
Haney, B.C.
Sir,—As near as can be ascertained, the programme followed by Father Hul-
ford, the former chaplain, has been followed closely. The pattern of Sunday services
at Haney Correctional Institution and at Gold Creek Camp remained unchanged,
and programmes at both places, with some changes for the summer months, were
maintained.
Group Activities and Clubs
The Actomist Club.—Programmes followed the established pattern, with the
exception that a programme of regular debates was initiated, in which participation
was keen and interest was very real. Debates among club members, with the staff,
and with other clubs were held, and good co-operation among groups and from staff
members was obtained. A fine panel of speakers was maintained throughout the
year, and a great debt of gratitude is due from us all to them.
Church Advisory Council.—The experiment of appointing one or two trainees
from each unit has proved to be very successful, and a strong working council has
been maintained ever since. Efforts of this group greatly assisted the Remembrance
Day programme and all the activities surrounding the pre-Christmas service, Christmas holidays, Holy Week, pre-Easter and Easter services.
Padre's Discussion Group.—A successful programme of discussions, sometimes
with the aid of films, has been maintained. The Church Advisory Council forms
the main body of this group, with a fair number of others participating. The
Effective Living Course, as used in New York State, has been used as a guide.
Discussion is keen and valuable.
Bible Study Group.—A group for Bible study has met regularly. Attendance
varies, though a number have maintained regular attendance. This is a valuable
item in the general programme.
Golden Group, Alcoholics Anonymous.—This group, partly due to a fight
summer programme, was down in members in the fall. With a request for Sunday
afternoon meetings by the outside sponsoring group, which was permitted, it was
decided to continue the Wednesday evening meetings and to change the programme
so as to place emphasis on the educational aspects of an alcohol-control programme.
The Protestant chaplain attended the full sessions of the week-day meetings and as
often as possible on Sundays. The strength of the group grew impressively and
was maintained. Some excellent speakers and good programmes were appreciated.
Most appreciated co-operation and direction were received from the Warden and
 T 52 BRITISH COLUMBIA
staff. The assistance of the outside A.A. sponsors is greatly appreciated. Plans to
extend the sponsorship to the central committee of the Alcoholics Anonymous for
Vancouver and the Lower Mainland were under way at the end of the year.
Sunday Services
The general programme of Sunday services has remained unchanged. There
have been a number of special services. Regular times for Sunday Services are
1100 hours at Haney Correctional Institution and 1615 hours at Gold Creek Camp.
Special arrangements are made for holy communion services, which are incorporated
as part of the Sunday service programme.
Attendance at these regular services varies between twenty-five and forty-six,
and at Gold Creek between twelve and twenty-four. There is no question but that
the inclusion of organ and piano music adds greatly to these devotional exercises.
The one factor at Haney Correctional Institution which seriously militates
against a better church programme is, of course, the lack of a chapel. It is greatly
to be hoped that temporary quarters will be made available as soon as possible.
However, this will not satisfy the need for a proper permanent chapel.
Special Church Services
During the past year special religious services were held on Remembrance Day
and during the Christmas and Easter period.
As part of the Remembrance Day service, the two minutes' silence was observed throughout the Institution, with complete success.
The Christmas programme was planned in co-operation with both chaplains.
A family service, followed by a buffet luncheon, was held on Sunday, December 18,
at the Institution. A similar service was held at Gold Creek Camp on the same day.
For the first time a midnight service and holy communion were held at the Institution on Christmas Eve. A most gratifying response from the trainees resulted in
this being the largest single church service held during the year; 133 attended the
Protestant service and forty made their communion.
Earlier the same evening, the chaplain was privileged to select the Christmas
Eve film, " The Inn of Sixth Happiness." A sing-song conducted by the padre's
daughter and son-in-law preceded the showing of this film.
Christmas morning service was held at 1030 hours in the visiting area, and
a surprising number attended.
During the season of Lent a special series of sermons and instruction was presented, with particular emphasis on preparation for Good Friday and Easter. The
series was well received.
A family service was held at the Institution on Palm Sunday, March 26. Over
100 guests attended, and following the service the guests and their trainee relatives
and friends enjoyed lunch in the dining-room.
Good Friday morning was marked by a service of meditation on the Passion
and Crucifixion. In the evening a recording of Dorothy L. Sayers play " The King
of Sorrows " was presented, accompanied by special music and projected pictures
of the Crucifixion. Following this, the film " Friendly Persuasion," which has a
religious motif, was shown.
A sunrise service had been planned for Easter Sunday morning, but weather
conditions made it impossible to hold this service. However, a later service in the
gymnasium was well attended, and twenty-seven trainees made their Easter communion.
At Gold Creek Camp the Easter family service was held in conjunction with the
regular family visit.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 53
Gold Creek Camp
Upon assuming the post of chaplain, regular Sunday visits with a service each
Sunday were planned, and also a regular visit each Tuesday evening, with films or
discussion programmes. After a few weeks it was thought advisable to spend the
nights at Gold Creek Camp, returning to the Institution in the morning. This plan,
with very few exceptions, was followed for the balance of the year. A good deal
of counselling was possible under these arrangements, and it is believed that much
benefit has resulted both to trainees and to the total programme.
Excellent co-operation has always marked the chaplain's work at the camp,
and also with those through whom facilities for the work are maintained at Haney
Correctional Institution;  for example, transport, films, projects, etc.
Public Relations and Pre-release Planning
On a number of occasions, trainees were allowed to make trips to the community to visit churches and to attend services. The chaplain, as part of his responsibility, contacted clergymen of a number of faiths to administer to the spiritual
needs of trainees of their specific faith. A number of clergymen in the community
were contacted when trainees were about to be discharged to their area.
In our quest for a separate chapel, one of the Institutional plays, " Lady Audley's Secret," was performed by the regular cast on three different occasions in
a Vancouver theatre.   The profits from the performances went into a Chapel Fund.
Thanks
My sincere thanks are expressed to the Warden, department heads, and all
other staff for their most welcome support at all times. I have enjoyed my association with them and look forward with confidence to the future development of the
religious programme.
Respectfully submitted.
Stanley E. Higgs,
Protestant Canon and Chaplain.
SENIOR ROMAN CATHOLIC CHAPLAIN
/. W. Braithwaite, Esq.,
Warden, Haney Correctional Institution,
Haney, B.C.
Sir,—Once again, with genuine pleasure, I submit my annual report as part-
time Roman Catholic chaplain of the Haney Correctional Institution, from April 1,
1960, to March 31, 1961.
During this year all Catholic trainees of the Institution have been reached
through lectures, interviewing, counselling, and especially through the religious services (programmes) held regularly every week. They all have had the opportunity
of receiving the necessary spiritual and moral help according to their dispositions and
the limitation of time. The general response of the trainees has been very satisfactory.
The regular religious programme of the Roman Catholic chaplain was carried
out in the Institution, and consists of the following:—
 T 54 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(a) Sunday Mass.—This is celebrated every Sunday at 0745 hours. This
service constitutes the most important part of the spiritual programme of
a Roman Catholic chaplain. The attendance to mass on Sundays is
consoling, considering the circumstances and in comparison with other
similar institutions.
The padre's hour, held every Tuesday at 1800 hours (the recitation
of the Holy Rosary followed by a brief talk which is framed to foment
among the trainees interesting and amicable religious and social discussions), has proved to be very inspiring, helpful, and productive.
(b) Weekly Orientation Lecture.—This is given weekly to all new trainees.
It seems to me that the importance of this programme has been manifested
by the obedience, co-operation, and understanding of the trainees toward
staff.
(c) Gold Creek Services.—The offering of the holy sacrifice of the mass for
the trainees who are unable to attend mass on Sundays. The attendance
to this religious service has been exceptionally good—80 per cent. The
full co-operation of the staff of this camp has contributed immensely for
the success of this programme; likewise, the existence of a chapel has
been an important factor toward success.
The Holy Name Society, which was established three years ago, has
not been as successful as in the past. We hope to be able to revive it
again and soon.
(d) Confessions.—These are heard whenever the Roman Catholic chaplain
visits the Institution or camps. This has been a great source of relief and
consolation and encouragement for many trainees.
(e) Counselling and Interviews.—These are given on an individual and group
basis, Tuesdays and Thursday. The trainees, faithful to the private interviews, have shown marked progress in their spiritual life and in their
general conduct.    Religious instructions are given on request.
(/) Choir Practice.—This takes place on Thursdays, a liturgical and musical
programme with the purpose of providing instructions on liturgy and
singing on the most important feasts of the year, such as Christmas, Easter,
and St. Dismas.
Special Roman Catholic Programme during the Year
Midnight mass at Christmas for the first time in the Haney Correctional Institution has been most welcome and has proved to be a success.
The pre-Christmas and pre-Easter services with visitors have been very satisfactory and consoling, creating a nice feeling and better understanding among
trainees, their relatives, and the staff.
St. Dismas Feast Day was celebrated solemnly with a special mass and sermon
delivered by Rev. Father Corradin, P.S.S.C., from Chicago, 111., in honour of
St. Dismas the good thief, patron saint of all prisoners. The service was most
impressive and touching.
Observations
I would like to point out that the work of the Roman Catholic chaplain is not
confined to his regular heavy schedule of the Institution, but it is greatly extended on
the outside by keeping in constant contact with the families, relatives, and friends
of the trainees in order to solve their problems.
A great deal of time is also dedicated to help those trainees who are in dire
need after they have been discharged.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 55
I would like, therefore, to emphasize that the after-care of the trainees is of
vital importance for a solid and complete rehabilitation. My own personal experience has convinced me of the necessity of this after-care work. I welcomed many
of these boys (ex-trainees) to my rectory, giving them a home with companionship
and understanding during their first hard and critical months, the results of which,
so far, have been excellent and most gratifying.
Many Roman Catholic priests touring this magnificent Institution, very efficient
in social activities, were amazed at the lack of a Catholic chapel.
A Catholic chapel would be an important factor for the increasing of our
Sunday mass attendance. It will also provide a devout place, permitting trainees
to seek peace of soul through recollective and meditation in the more depressing and
critical moments of the day.
In presenting this annual report, I take the opportunity to express my sincere
filial devotion to my beloved archbishop, Most Rev. William Duke, D.D., for his
continual interest and moral support given to me in this hard and irksome work.
To the Warden, department heads, and all staff, my grateful acknowledgment
of their sincere co-operation and warm-hearted understanding, which made my work
in the Institution very pleasant.
Respectfully submitted.
Lawrence Dal Bon, P.S.S.C,
Roman Catholic Chaplain.
CAMPS DEPARTMENT
/. W. Braithwaite, Esq.,
Warden, Haney Correctional Institution,
Haney, B.C.
Sir,—The Camps Department includes Gold Creek Forestry Camp and the
Pre-release Camp.
During the past year we have improved the units already in existence and
expanded specialized work programmes and training facilities. This has contributed to a successful year of operation generally.
The basic administrative structure of the department was not altered during
the year, but the Camps Director was assigned additional responsibilities, which
will be outlined more specifically in this report.
Haney Pre-release Camp
The Haney Pre-release Camp is located on the Haney Correctional Institution
property, one-quarter of a mile north-west of the Institution. This camp was officially opened on July 6, 1959, and has as its main objective the reorientation of
trainees prior to their return to community life.
During the year, 525 trainees went through the Pre-release Camp programme.
Of all the men classified to this unit, seven (1.33 per cent) absconded, forty-three
(8.19 per cent) were returned to the Institution for disciplinary or security reasons,
thirty-four (6.47 per cent) completed their pre-release programme and will return
to the Institution to await discharge, nineteen (3.61 per cent) were returned to the
Institution at their own request, and the balance (80.4 per cent) were discharged
on parole or termination of sentence.
 T 56 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Daytime Programme
The daytime programme is primarily a work-oriented programme designed to
closely approximate those situations that would be found in the community. For
example, it is the trainee's responsibility to get up on time and prepare himself for
the particular work placement that he will have to attend for the day.
On the average.25 per cent of the trainee population commutes on foot daily
to the Institution for academic and vocational training. An additional 25 per cent
of the total population also return to the Institution daily, but they are employed
in on-the-job training or key maintenance placements. The remaining 50 per cent
of the camp population have as their primary objectives the maintenance and development of the camp and participation in a forest-management programme.
The construction programme for the camp has been completed, with the exception of the recreation building. The construction projects completed included a
dry storage-room extension on to the kitchen, a tool storage and maintenance building, a volatile-supplies storage building, and a recreational field.
The completion of the aforementioned construction projects made it possible
for an expanded outside work programme. This work programme included such
projects as clearing the area adjacent to the B.C. Electric Road, clearing of the
proposed Institutional perimeter security and fire-break road, cleaning the fire-
burned sidehills adjacent to the camp, salvage logging on both the Institutional
reserve property and the University of British Columbia research forest, land-
clearing the Institutional range land of stumps, snags, and debris, and log salvage
from flood jams on the Alouette River.
All in all, the Pre-release Camp daytime work programme has been varied,
interesting, and productive, to such an extent that it has not been difficult to maintain interest amongst the staff and men.
Leisure-time Programme
The leisure-time programme of the Pre-release Camp can best be described
as community-oriented. The trainees are taken on frequent community trips, in
small groups, for either cultural, recreational, or employment purposes.
A cultural trip might be a visit to the Vancouver Art Gallery, the Queen Elizabeth Theatre, the Vancouver Maritime Museum, the old fort at Langley, the studios
of CBUT, the British Columbia Building on the Pacific National Exhibition grounds
in Vancouver, or the Vancouver Theatre under the Stars.
As a general rule, recreational activities were visits into the community as
spectators or participants in various athletic endeavours. It was possible for trainees to participate in basketball, soccer, and other sports activities, and on limited
occasions rental of the local bowling-alley was much enjoyed by the men.
Employment-seeking is a major aspect of the pre-release programme. This is
done by taking people out to employment interviews, to the National Employment
Service for registration and interview, and any other employer resource that may
be productive in terms of trainee placement.
In addition, there is always the possibility of regular special outings, such as
church services in the community.
In order for a man to qualify for a community trip, other than an employment
interview, the particular trainee participating has to be a good custodial risk, and
also on the last thirty days of his sentence. It is interesting to note that even after
these precautions, and even after carefully thought-out security measures, two men
chose to abscond from a community trip. However, it is also interesting to note
that this was only two men out of 2,841 man-trips.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 57
Staff
The staff have worked long and hard in the performance of their duties. The
lieutenant in charge of the camp was instructed to lay on certain in-service principles pertaining strictly to camp operation. It can therefore be said that there was
staff-training on the job throughout the entire year. At this time, staff development
in the Pre-release Camp has been such that there is great potential existing within
this group of men, and certain individuals are capable of assuming greater administrative responsibility. Throughout the entire year there was not one incident of
inadequate staff performance.
Special Camp Programme
Special camp programme includes the presentation of lectures by speakers
from certain agencies within the community. Before continuing further on the
description of this area of programme, I would first like to commend and thank
those people from the various agencies that participated in this programme.
The representatives of these agencies included Inspector Dan Brown, of the
Vancouver Police Department; Messrs. Shield and Mitchell, of the National Employment Service; Brig. Hector Nyrerod, of the Salvation Army; Messrs. Barrett,
Gilliland, and Campbell, of the John Howard Society; and Messrs. McRae and
Huggins, of the Alcoholism Foundation.
These people should be commended for their unfailing interest and enthusiasm.
The wealth of information transmitted to trainees through their very provocative
lectures is greatly appreciated.
The purpose of the special programme in the Pre-release Camp is to try to
acquaint as many trainees as possible with the functions and resources of as many
community agencies as possible.
Miscellaneous
It is interesting to note that during the past year seven men escaped from the
camp in four specific incidents. Because of the ever-present problem of possible
escape, and the experience of escapes during the first year of operation, it was
decided to keep a close tabulation on the method of escape, and any other information that might be helpful from a statistical point of view. The following information is therefore the result of the escape survey. All the escapees were serving
definite- and indeterminate-type sentences and their average age was 18 years. The
time of escape varied, but usually occurred on the week-end. All the escapees were
either scheduled to see the British Columbia Parole Board or were under review
by the Parole Board.
Gold Creek Camp
The Gold Creek Forestry Camp is a minimum-security training camp located
in Garibaldi Park and administered from the Haney Correctional Institution. The
camp is approximately 15 miles from the town of Haney and approximately 8 miles
from the Institution.
Placement to the camp is a function of the Haney Correctional Institution
Classification Committee, using three broad criteria. In general terms, these criteria are an ability and willingness to serve the specific sentence, serve the public,
and serve oneself. Naturally, the men must be physically fit, good security risks,
desirous of transfer to the camp, and people who would not benefit from or wish to
acquire further formal academic or vocational training.
 T 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Daytime Programme
The daytime programme at the camp does not alter appreciably from one year
to another. The reason for this is that the men represent a labour force available
to assist the Department of Recreation and Conservation in the development of
southern Garibaldi Park.
The work, therefore, consists of any type of labour that can be done with
basic hand-tools. Some samples of finished work projects include the installation
of a 15,000-gallon water-tank and water-distribution system to service the picnic-
sites, fire-hydrants, and the new change-room building; the clearing of approximately 10 acres of lake-frontage; the construction of foot-paths; the construction
of camp-sites and the seeding of lawns; general maintenance in the park; the construction of a new boat-launching site, complete with concrete pads; cutting cord-
wood for use in the camp-sites; and culvert installation and repair.
Work projects in Garibaldi Park have always been plentiful, and it would
appear that there are a great many construction programmes yet to be undertaken.
It would therefore also appear that the advisability of maintaining Gold Creek Camp
in Garibaldi Park for at least the next five years is a valid one.
Leisure-time Programme
The leisure-time programme at Gold Creek Camp is completely voluntary, with
the exception of certain selected trainees being assigned specific academic courses.
In this way, trainees are encouraged to participate in, and also plan, various recreational programmes, and trainees who wish academic training by correspondence are
not denied the opportunity of living in a camp setting.
Through the year the camp is visited regularly each week by the Protestant and
Catholic chaplains, a part-time school-teacher, and a hospital officer. The Salvation
Army also extends its welcome services to the camp. The work of all these people
is reflected in an enriched evening programme.
Regular visits are still part of the camp programme, and take place on the
second Sunday in each month. In addition, holiday week-ends are considered as
special visiting-days. This particular privilege is much appreciated by the men,
and facilities are made available for each trainee to serve as host to his wife and
family.
The evening programme will naturally vary from summer to winter. In the
summer there is a desire for more strenuous activity. Therefore, the men are
encouraged to swim, hike, and play softball, volleyball, and other more active sports.
In the winter there is a turn to such activities as academic programme, hobby craft,
educational films, and group discussions.
There can be no doubt that the evening programme offers many opportunities
for people to utilize their time in a constructive way.
Staff
The staff have taken their responsibilities seriously, and the esprit de corps can
be considered to be good. Staff conferences were held quarterly. These conferences and the use of reading assignments help develop the skills of staff.
Special Camp Programme
From May 30 to August 12, 1960, twelve to fifteen men worked in Mount
Seymour Park. These men were taken to the park on a Monday morning and
returned to Gold Creek Camp on the following Friday afternoon.    During their
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1960/61 T 59
absence from camp, men from the Institution vocational shops were transferred to
the camp so that the work force in Garibaldi Park would not be depleted. This
then allowed for maximum output in Garibaldi Park, and also a commuting work
force in Mount Seymour Park. This programme was enjoyed by both the staff and
trainees alike, and was completed without incident.
It is hoped, and indeed recommended, that summer work programmes of this
kind be continued on an annual basis.
Miscellaneous
Frequently the staff and trainees are called upon to provide services of an
emergency nature.   Two such incidents are related below.
Fire.—On Monday, July 18, 1960, a crew from the Gold Creek Camp successfully extinguished a forest fire within Garibaldi Park. This was made possible by
prompt action on the part of the camp personnel.
The staff and trainees involved in the suppression of this fire were subsequently
commended for their efforts by both the Forest Service and the Department of
Recreation and Conservation.
Escape.—On August 30, 1960, Clifford Olson escaped from Gold Creek
Camp. This was the first escape or walk-away from Gold Creek Camp after four
years and eight months of operation. The escape lasted only two hours due to
prompt action of the staff.
Accident.—On Saturday, November 12, 1960, three private citizens were
seriously injured in a truck accident across Gold Creek. Camp staff and trainees
were called upon to provide assistance to the injured. The injured parties were
subsequently removed to a safe area and an ambulance and doctor were brought in.
Conclusion
There can be no doubt that a camp programme is good for certain selected
individuals. In addition, camp programmes are the most financially reasonable to
operate, and also present fewer disciplinary and administrative problems per year.
Finally, the tremendous number of man-hours contributed to public works projects
in any given year creates a pride in both staff and inmates when they consider their
past achievements.
Norman Baker,
Camps Director.
 T 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
NEW HAVEN
E. G. B. Stevens, Esq.
Director of Correction,
1075 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Sir,—During the fiscal year 1960/61, New Haven had a total of ninety-five
trainees enrolled. We commenced with thirty-four on register as of April 1, 1960,
received sixty-one on admission, and released sixty on parole or expiry of sentence.
We entered the fiscal year of 1961/62 with a total of thirty-five enrolled. Our
daily average was thirty-three and our maximum accommodation was forty.
It is recommended that we increase our accommodation number to fifty trainees
to enable us to carry a daily average of approximately forty. This would appear to
be necessary because of the increased enrolment in academic classes, which takes
personnel out of the vocational and maintenance areas. By some minor changes
the housing accommodation could be easily increased.
The increased enrolment in the academic classes has been brought about
because of demands from employers that the applicant in most cases have a Grade
XII standing and not lower than a Grade X. We are pleased to report that those
screened to take this additional schooling have done very well, to suggest that we
should increase our attention to cater to those who can prove to us that they are
capable and willing to concentrate on educational advancement. It is also noted
that an increasing number are being paroled with the condition that they continue
their schooling. We have had reports from school principals to the effect that
trainees who had previously been disciplinary problems, achieving little or nothing,
were applying themselves to their studies with high marks. We have found that it
is of little avail to place a trainee in full-time or half-time education until he has gone
through a vocational-therapy course to teach him habits of concentration.
This year has been a difficult one for the after-care officer and the National
Employment special placement officers. Employment has been hard to find, but
much credit is due to all concerned for the fact that nearly all trainees had employment before leaving. In the few cases where a trainee was released for compassionate reasons without firm employment, it was noted that the sponsors had a more
difficult time to keep the man motivated toward following the conditions of his
parole. It is therefore good policy not to let a man out without a firm job and a
good standard of living accommodation.
We have been hard pressed this year to keep the institution coverage adequate
and the treatment programme up to the required standards. During the year, illness,
promotion, and retirement cut the active staff to an all-time low; however, with
ingenuity we were able to carry on. Three staff members had lengthy periods of
illness, two were promoted to the parole service, and one was retired. All of this
seemed to come at about the same time, leaving a very reduced staff to cope with
the situation. Happily, we can predict a good year in this respect for 1961/62 by
recruiting some very promising new staff members to bring us up to complement.
However, within this prediction we would pray for a more realistic budget, within
which we could make the progress which is potentially here. We feel that two years
running is long enough to hold the line and hope for some considerable adjustment
upwards to relieve the tenseness of operation.
The detailed statistics this year have been compiled and forwarded to the
Haney Correctional Institution to be completed from its books. Hence the Haney
and New Haven statistics will be compiled on the same submission.
Respectfully submitted. Geqrge WarnqcK;
Director.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 61
PRINCE GEORGE GAOL
E. G. B. Stevens, Esq.,
Director of Correction,
1075 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the annual report of the Prince George
Provincial Gaol for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1961.
POPULATION
While the inmate population has remained high for the two-month period prior
to this writing, the average daily population for the last fiscal year was 80.17, a
decrease of 7.08 from the fiscal year 1959/60.
Transfers during the year were as follows: To Oakalla Prison Farm, 57; to
Kamloops Provincial Gaol, 16; to Oakalla for the British Columbia Penitentiary,
10; and to the Provincial Mental Hospital at Essondale, 2. Total number of inmates transferred, 85.
ADMINISTRATION
Senior Guard Instructor T. S. Pink was promoted to Senior Correctional Officer (Training) when his former position was reclassified in January. First-class
Guard E. Lupul was officially appointed Records-Identification Officer, and Mrs.
Thehna Mclntyre was appointed clerk-stenographer. Six members of the permanent staff, including Senior Guard R. E. Udahl, resigned or were separated from
the service during the year. Senior Guard S. G. Jones, of the Oakalla staff, has
replaced Mr. Udahl.
Administration of the day programme was reorganized, and on March 2nd,
after several months of planning, a new identification-allocation-occupational routine was placed into effect. The new routine included the settinq-ur> of a Classification Board to interview all convicted inmates on admission and to place them in
living and occupational groups in accordance with their individual needs; setting-un
of individual inmates' files; revision of visiting and correspondence records and
routines; and restructuring of duties and routines of inmate occupational groups.
At the same time, additional improvement of inmates' housing-quarters facilities
were effected. This included the issuing of sheets, pillows, etc., to all inmates and
the placement of small desk cabinets in all of the cells. The new routine was
planned to maintain the continuous operation of an as efficient and complete a day
programme as possible with maximum utilization of staff and facilities. At this
writing we are pleased with the over-all effect of the new routine, both from an
administrative as well as from a training view-point.
SECURITY
Good security was maintained throughout the year. Searches and inspections
were made frequently, and no escapes or attempts were reported.
INMATES' TRAINING PROGRAMME
Occupational
Inmates were again employed throughout the year as follows:—
(a) At maintenance of the housing quarters as wing stewards.
(b) General maintenance of corridors, offices, washrooms, etc.
 T 62 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(c) As inmate cooks and kitchen helpers.
(d) Two groups of up to twelve inmates were employed at the garden,
grounds, and general outside maintenance.
(e) The laundry and tailor-shop.
(/) The woodwork-shop.
(g) The boiler-room and mechanical maintenance of the physical plant.
(A) Hospital and change area orderlies.
Additional indoor vocational space and facilities are still urgently required.
Sufficient gainful or constructive employment is still not available for all inmates
when our population count goes over eighty, especially during the winter and spring
break-up months.
Socialization
The " family " atmosphere produced by having the inmates dining together
with the staff in the cell blocks, with some improvement of facilities, has done much
to lessen tension and improve staff-inmate relationships. Staff have continued to
work closer with inmates during the afternoon shifts, giving supervision, guidance,
and counselling to as many of the inmates as possible.
Group counselling was carried on throughout the year. Inmate groups met
once weekly under the leadership of Mr. Pink. Several other staff members took
part from time to time. Two hundred and seventy inmates are recorded as having
taken part in group discussions during the year. There is no doubt that organized
group discussions do provide a positive outlet for thoughts and feelings of many
inmates who previously supressed their beliefs in the presence of staff and some
inmates. The treatment effect of group counselling appears obvious to many of
the staff and inmates at Prince George Gaol, and we hope to expand this part of
our programme during the current year.
Religion
Routine religious services were conducted or organized for by Protestant and
Roman Catholic chaplains throughout the year. The Roman Catholic chaplain,
Father Carroll, or his assistant, Father Raynor, held private and group discussions,
while Rev. M. K. Brown, the Protestant chaplain, presented a weekly film programme and conducted a discussion group throughout the year.
In addition to their scheduled duties, both chaplains answered calls from senior
staff from time to time to assist and deal with inmates' family and social problems.
The chaplains' contribution to our inmates' training programme is indeed praiseworthy.
Recreational
A playing-field was constructed west of the main gaol building, and twice
weekly during the summer months convicted inmates enjoyed supervised outside
recreational activities. Inmates played softball during the summer with several
outside teams, including a girls' team from the City of Prince George. Good conduct and sportsmanship prevailed.
We were able to purchase a film projector for the institution during the year,
and consequently our film programme was stepped up from approximately one
showing per month to one to two showings a week. Feature films are still preferred,
and are difficult to obtain with any regularity because of the expenditure involved.
Rental costs for these films must be borne by the Inmates' Welfare Fund, and it is
difficult for an institution of this size to maintain an inmates' fund of adequate
amount to allow for the rental of films as frequently as desired.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1960/61 T 63
Ice skates were purchased through the Department for winter recreation for
inmates. The skates were delivered near the end of the cold-weather period, however, so a planned outdoor rink could not be completed this year. We hope ice
skating and hockey will be featured in our coming winter recreational programme.
Unit games and scheduled indoor recreation were again arranged throughout
the year. Special programmes were organized for the festive season and long
week-ends.
The institutional library was supplemented during the year, and now consists
of approximately 1,500 volumes. Library facilities continued to be well appreciated by inmates, especially during the winter months.
The maintenance of a worth-while hobby programme proved to be somewhat
of a problem, sufficient funds not being available from the Inmates' Welfare Fund
for the replacement of hobby and handicraft materials. Hobby and handicraft sales
seem to have dropped off during the year, hence the restriction of hobby activities.
It is hoped that some suitable approved arrangement can be made in the future
for sale of hobby and handicraft articles so that this important part of the indoor
recreational programme can be perpetuated.
General
The Deputy Director of Correction, Mr. Rocksborough-Smith, and the writer
met with officers of the British Columbia Forest Service in June and visited the
Aleza Lake Forestry Station to consider it as a possible future correctional camp.
This setting appears to be ideal for our needs at Prince George. Buildings and
facilities are already available at Aleza Lake, thus obviating the necessity of expenditure of funds for construction. Productive and educational-occupational forestry
programmes are available in abundance at this site. It seems certain that forestry
officers would be willing to advise and instruct in this work. We believe that a correctional camp as a satellite to this institution would be the most desirable possible
addition to our occupational programme. The majority of the inmates sentenced to
the Prince George Gaol are not metropolitan types but rural outdoor workers and
woodsmen, to whom the camp setting should prove very suitable and beneficial.
It is our belief that if a forestry camp programme were available in connection
with the Prince George Gaol, Courts in Northern and Central British Columbia
would be sentencing more inmates to the Prince George Gaol, thus relieving to some
extent overcrowding at Oakalla Prison Farm.
I wish to recommend that we continue to press for the establishment of a correctional forestry camp for this institution at Aleza Lake.
In February radio station CKPG recorded an interview with the Warden,
covering institutional facilities and programme at Prince George Gaol. The recording was one hour in length and was broadcast over CKPG on Easter Sunday.
HEALTH AND WELFARE
Mr. B. K. Stevenson, regional representative of the National Parole Service,
visited the institution several times during the year. Eleven inmates were granted
parole.
The chest miniature X-ray unit was finally installed and became operational
late in the year.
Miss M. McCurdy, Corrections Branch Dietician, visited the institution in May
and assisted and advised the chief steward and senior staff in connection with menu
planning and food service problems.
 T 64 BRITISH COLUMBIA
A guide book for inmates, compiled and written by Guard Engineer T. White
and approved by the Director, was placed in circulation in the institution during
the year.
Members of the local John Howard Society again faithfully visited inmates,
whose requests were referred to them, and arrangements were made with Mr. B.
McKenzie, special placements officer of the National Employment Service, to make
regular visits to the institution. Mr. McKenzie has been successful in placing eight
inmates in suitable employment upon their release. He was also able to give valuable assistance in the way of counsel and advice to many others.
Medical attention was provided by Dr. J. M. Sturgess and Hospital and First-
aid Officer A. W. Gunther.
The Alcoholics Anonymous group remained active, although interest seemed
to drop during the summer months. This programme is now in the process of being
revitalized by interested staff and outside A.A. members.
Additional housing quarters for segregation and isolation purposes is still one
of our most urgent requirements from a health and welfare point of view, as well
as for security reasons. Additional plumbing and improved lighting in some of the
units still have not been provided. It is imperative, for health reasons alone, that
these improvements be made as soon as possible.
GARDEN AND GROUNDS
Snow-removal again was the main outside task during the winter. The main
entrance road was kept clear by the Department of Highways with the occasional
support of our tractor operator.
We understood that the construction of the long-awaited root-crop storage
building was to be commenced in the latter part of the fiscal year, but this did not
materialize. This is our foremost requirement as far as outbuildings are concerned.
In spite of the annual renovation of our existing improvised root-house, we still
continue to have substantial losses of stored root vegetables because of frost penetration and improper ventilation during the winter months.
Garden production for the year was approximately as follows: 223 bags of
potatoes, 40 bags of onions, 60 bags of carrots, 14 bags of parsnips, 2,100 pounds
of cabbage, 690 pounds of beets, 510 pounds of Swiss chard, 295 pounds of radishes,
165 pounds of peas, and 20 pounds of beans.
Some land-clearing and wood-cutting was again done during the winter. Additional garden space is planned so that a rotation-crop and summer-fallow land-use
programme can be followed in the future.
About 40 cords of stove-wood were produced and advertised for sale through
the Purchasing Commission.
MAINTENANCE AND CONSTRUCTION
The interior of all the offices and administrative areas of the institution were
redecorated during the spring. Our new paint work is occasionally threatened,
however, as the roof of the main gaol building still continues to leak under certain
weather conditions in spite of several efforts by a local firm to effect satisfactory
repairs.
A new rack for our 2-ton truck was manufactured and mounted by our
woodwork-shop crew. Construction of cell desk cabinets was commenced during
the latter part of the year.
With the assistance and co-operation of the Department of Highways, an interceptor ditch was opened along the north side of the Gaol property to check spring
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 65
run-off drainage-water from flooding the Pacific Great Eastern Railway yards
immediately below the Gaol-site. A wooden flume was necessary to carry the
interceptor-ditch water across our sanitary unit, which is located close to the edge
of the bank. This flume, about 125 feet long by about 5 feet in width, set on concrete, was also constructed by inmates from the woodwork-shop.
A temporary extension to the inmates' exercise-yard with the use of spruce
poles and a surplus supply of barbed wire was completed during the year. A communication system between this new enclosure and the control corridor should be
installed before the new yard is used. When this is done we will have the additional
outdoor exercise space required to maintain some segregation of inmates taking part
in this activity.
A wooded ravine about three-quarters of a mile south-east of the Gaol was
cleared for use as a landfill-type garbage-disposal area for the institution. Establishment of this facility has meant that better custodial control can be maintained
over garbage-disposal, and the long time-consuming daily trips to the city garbage-
disposal area have now been terminated.
The laundry and tailor-shop were well managed again by Mr. W. R. Bailey
throughout the year. An extra load of work was placed on the laundry with the
issuance of bed linen to all inmates. This is being handled well, but we believe that
the laundry is now operating to near its maximum capacity at the present schedule
of one shift per day, five days per week. In addition to carrying out all necessary
clothing and linen maintenance repair work for the institution, the tailor-shop also
manufactured the following: 315 pairs of trousers, 272 shirts, 160 pieces of underwear, 16 white jackets, 30 cooks' hats, 12 aprons, 20 tablecloths, 319 sheets, 11
smocks, and various miscellaneous articles.
STAFF-TRAINING
The usual arms practices were held several times during the year.
Several staff meetings and senior staff meetings were held alternately each
month throughout the year. Uniform inspection parades preceded each of the
general staff meetings. Senior staff members addressed the general staff at these
meetings. Visiting speakers were Mr. Rocksborough-Smith, Deputy Director of
Correction, Rev. Newton Stacey, and Mr. B. K. Stevenson, of the National Parole
Service.
Five officers who were due for promotion to the first-class rating were given
practical orientation periods throughout different parts of the Gaol. Each was
given written and oral tests after the orientation.
A basic staff-training course was conducted again during the winter, with the
result that all members of the permanent staff have now completed some form of
basic staff-training.
Senior Correctional Officer T. S. Ping travelled to Tehachapi, Calif., in March
with other members of the Corrections Branch to study group counselling and community living programmes now in effect at the California institution.
Practical on-the-job training and instruction of general staff were continued
throughout the year by members of the senior staff.
SUMMARY
The Deputy Provincial Medical Health Officer, Dr. Taylor, and Dr. McLean,
of the Tuberculosis Control Survey Division, visited the institution during the year.
Magistrate Thompson, of Dawson Creek, was also a visitor.   Magistrate Stewart, of
 T 66 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Prince George, visited us several times, showing, as always, his sincere concern and
interest in correctional work.
A staff wives' social gathering and tour of the institution was arranged on
August 3rd. Senior members of the staff addressed the visitors, and refreshments
were served after the tour.
The fiscal year 1960/61 was a busy and progressive year for our institution.
I am pleased to report our further development in the broadening of institutional
programme and the training and experience of a keen and devoted staff. To keep
pace with these developments, additional facilities, some of which are mentioned
herein, are urgently required. May I respectfully request that these be given every
consideration.
Finally, I wish to again express our sincere thanks to all who have assisted in
making 1960/61 a progressive and successful year for Prince George Gaol.
Respectfully submitted.
W. H. Mulligan,
Warden.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1960/61 T 67
KAMLOOPS PROVINCIAL GAOL
E. G. B. Stevens, Esq.
Director of Correction,
1075 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the annual report of the Kamloops Provincial Gaol, including the Clearwater Forest Camp, for the fiscal year ended March
31, 1961.
1959/60        1960/61
Population received (male and female)  1,209 1,526
Transferred to Oakalla Prison Farm  145 178
Transferred to Clearwater Forest Camp.  357 402
Total prison days  34,621 37,658!
1 Kamloops Provincial Gaol, 17,543; Clearwater Forest Camp, 20,115.
The above excerpts from the summaries of annual statistics show an increase
in the number of new admissions to the Gaol and in the total Gaol population for
the fiscal year 1960/61. The transfers of inmates to Oakalla Prison Farm have
again increased; also five inmates were transferred to Prince George Gaol. We
were able to draw twenty-five inmates from Prince George Gaol and six from
Oakalla Prison Farm; these were transferred to the Clearwater Forest Camp.
MEDICAL CARE AND HOSPITALIZATION
The general health of the inmate population, with a few exceptions, was good.
Two cases of infection and a broken hand, contracted prior to admission to the
Kamloops Gaol, required hospitalization at the Royal Inland Hospital. We also
had an emergency appendectomy performed at the hospital.
The normal colds and other minor ailments were handled by the staff, and
doctors from the Burris Clinic served as Gaol physicians for cases requiring the
services of a medical practitioner. At Clearwater Camp, Guard-Medical Orderly T.
Thompson, a qualified first-aid man, supervised first aid to all injuries and treatment
of minor ailments and injuries. The more serious cases were returned to Kamloops
Gaol for treatment by the Gaol physicians.
WELFARE AND RECREATION
At the Kamloops Gaol, the library and radio with the usual checkers, cards,
magazines, etc., were the only forms of recreation available owing to lack of facilities. A number of new books were added to Gaol and camp libraries, procured
through A. Woodland, Corrections Branch librarian. At the Clearwater Camp,
table-tennis and an outdoor volleyball court were added to the horseshoe pitch and
softball available at the camp.
ESCAPES AND RECAPTURES
I am pleased to report that there were no escapes from the Kamloops Gaol or
the Clearwater Camp during the fiscal year ended March 31, 1961.
DISCIPLINE
Discipline was well maintained throughout the year. Breaches of prison rules
and regulations amounted to seventeen—eleven in the Kamloops Gaol and six in
 T 68 BRITISH COLUMBIA
the Clearwater Camp. In all cases, charges were laid before me, and all the offenders found guilty. Fifteen were sentenced to a period of confinement with loss of
privileges and two were sentenced to loss of remission.
STAFF
The staff under my command have performed all their duties well, including
extra duties whenever called upon. The senior officers' response and ingenuity in
carrying out their duties was in most cases excellent. The junior officers continue
to gain experience and show progress in their work. One temporary man was
added to the staff at Clearwater Camp to cover periods when regular staff members
were on leave.
One of the junior officers at the Clearwater Camp has made exceptional
progress. Mr. A. Irvine, of whom I have already spoken to you, is proving to be
an exceptionally capable officer, one quite capable of performing the duties of a
senior officer.
KAMLOOPS GAOL WORKS PROGRAMME
Several construction projects were carried out by inmate crews during the year
and the usual assistance rendered to all departments and maintenancemen. The
following are some of the projects carried out by inmate crews from the Kamloops
Provincial Gaol:—
(1) Replaced fuel-pipe ducts at the heating plant. This included excavating,
removing old ducts, building new ducts, and back-filling. Heating-plant
engineers supervised this project.
(2) Scraped and painted boats for the Fish and Game Branch.
(3) Under direction of Public Works staff:—
(a) Removed an old concrete floor in the Provincial Home, excavated to give more height to the basement, and poured a new cement floor.
(b) Removed an old ceiling in the Provincial Home.
(c) Assisted engineers to change heating-pipes in the Provincial
Home.
(d) Removed a wooden floor from a Provincial Home storehouse
and replaced it with a concrete floor.
(4) Hung fire-hoses and recoiled them when dry for the Forest Service.
(5) Mixed and poured a foundation for a building at the Kamloops Forest
Ranger Station.
(6) Dug and back-filled water-lines in front of the Provincial Home.
LAWNS AND GROUNDS
The Gaol continued, as in the past, to supply the manual labour for the
maintenance of the grounds in this area, assisting the staff gardener in the greenhouses, flower-beds, and rockeries.
In the winter, inmate crews kept all walks, driveways, fire-escapes, porches,
and steps in the area free of ice and snow. Crews maintained driveways and walks
in the area at all times.
PROVINCIAL HOME CEMETERY
Inmate crews from the Kamloops Gaol again, as in past years, assisted at burials
and in maintaining the Provincial Home Cemetery. These crews assisted in thirteen
burials during the year and carried out usual maintenance, cutting and clearing
weeds, cutting grass, irrigating, and clearing debris periodically.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 69
KAMLOOPS GAOL FARM, GARDEN, AND MAINTENANCE
The farm and grounds were well maintained during the year. Weeds were kept
under control along irrigation-ditches, roads, in yards, and in the fringe areas of
the farm and grounds. The irrigation system was maintained and improved, and
some levelling carried out in the slack season to improve the farm.
Most farm crops were satisfactory. Potatoes and vegetables were produced to
supply the Gaol and Clearwater Camp kitchens for most of the year. The orchard
again produced a good yield of apples; these were used in the kitchens at the Kamloops Gaol and the Clearwater Camp and served fresh to the inmates.
We received manure again from the stockyards and exhibition grounds; as in
previous years, this was gratis for the piling and hauling. An estimated 864 yards
were hauled and spread on the Gaol gardens and fields. The Forest Service once
more supplied a truck for our use in carrying out this project.
CLEARWATER FOREST CAMP MAINTENANCE AND
WORK PROJECTS
Camp Buildings and Grounds
Inmates, under the direction of staff members, at the Clearwater Camp completed a number of projects during the year. Lawns with walks and steps between
buildings were installed; the walks were coated with shale obtained in the area.
Basements and central heating are now complete in all but one of the camp buildings.
This provides more living area in the huts, makes them easier to clean, and improves
the appearance of the interiors of the buildings. The basement areas are being
used for recreation (ping-pong and darts), storage, toolrooms, garages, and for
carpenter-shops.
To provide more recreation for the inmates, a volleyball court was installed;
this is coated with shale, as the walks are. The camp ball diamond was improved
further during the year.
Tests were carried out for television reception in the camp area; these did not
prove satisfactory as clear and continuous pictures and sound could not be obtained
at that time.
Access Road to Clearwater Camp and Wells Gray Park
This project continued to be primarily a winter programme during the
November-April period when driving and road conditions are at their worst in the
Wells Gray Park area. The following is a brief outline of work carried out on this
project:—
(1) Slashed approximately 3 miles of road right-of-way between Trout and
Hemp Creeks to a width of 60 feet. This area is at the south entrance to
Wells Gray Park. The right-of-way was surveyed by Department of Highways personnel, and slashing carried out was to their specifications.
(2) Slashed approximately 2 miles of right-of-way south of First Canyon
Bridge.   All suitable material was utilized for firewood, fence-posts, etc.
(3) Slashed some right-of-way north of Clearwater Camp to a width of 60
feet (Department of Highways specifications). Permission was obtained
in writing from all land-owners concerned before work commenced. This
project will be continued next year.
(4) Inmate crews cut firewood for Department of Highways buildings at Birch
Island; this was cut on the right-of-way along the access road to Clearwater Camp.
 T 70 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(5) Burned slash cut previously and left unburned because of weather
conditions.
(6) Gravelling, installing culverts, filling holes, and draining was carried out
as before on this road. This work and the slashing carried out since the
opening of the camp have improved road conditions, especially during the
periods of spring break-up.
(7) The sanding of hills and bridges was carried out during the winter when
required for safe driving.
Main Camp Projects, Wells Gray Park
Under the direction of Mr. C. Shook, supervisor of Wells Gray Park, the following projects were carried out by inmate crews under staff supervision:—
(1) Approximately 2Vi miles of 40-foot right-of-way were slashed for a park
access road. The driving surface was constructed by parks personnel with
their own machinery, but all ditches, culverts, and a bridge were constructed by inmate crews.
(2) A large amount of gravel and fill was hauled and spread on the south end
of the park road in areas designated by Mr. Shook.
(3) Some slashing on the park road was carried out to allow snow-removal to
be carried out in the winter months.
(4) Some moose range was slashed; this project will be used as a fill-in
between more important projects.
(5) Cut and hauled firewood to park camp-sites.
(6) The park area at Bear Creek was cleaned up during the winter work
programme.
Mobile Camp, Clearwater Lake
A new location was selected for the mobile camp, and the crews moved in on
May 30, 1960. The camp was operated till October 28, 1960, except the period of
July 15th to August 23rd, when all camp crews were employed on fire-suppression
duties. With material supplied by the park people, a kitchen was added to the two
trailers in use; this enabled us to increase the crews from nine to fourteen men.
This kitchen is not mobile, as the trailers are, but it can be dismantled and reassembled if required.   Projects carried out by these crews included:—
(1) Continued construction of camp units started during the 1959 season.
(2) Slashed right-of-way along the access road south of Clearwater Lake to
allow snow-removal in winter months.
This is the second year the mobile camp has operated without any great problems.   I believe this venture has been and will continue to be successful.
SUPPRESSION OF FOREST FIRES
Inmate crews from the Clearwater Camp fought forest fires from July 15 to
August 23, 1960. Five separate fires were fought; the smallest required a crew of
five inmates and one officer to control it, and the largest required up to thirty-five
inmates under three officers before it was controlled. Three of these fires were
burning at one time, the last one being brought under control on August 23, 1960.
At all times, inmate crews, though under the immediate control of staff from
the Clearwater Camp, were directed by staff from the park and forestry departments.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1960/61
T 71
PUBLIC RELATIONS
The staff at Clearwater Camp, and inmates if called upon, have at all times
given all assistance possible or required to members of the public, local residents,
and tourists alike. Directions, information, and assistance if in trouble have been
supplied to all requesting help.
All assistance seems to be appreciated, and we hope the goodwill with which
the Clearwater Camp has been accepted in the Clearwater area will continue to
grow.
SUMMARY
This is my last annual report, and I again draw your attention, as in past years,
to the conditions that exist at the Kamloops Provincial Gaol. The Gaol is obsolete
and inadequate for the requirements of the area it is serving, and this condition
grows more acute each year.
The inmate population, both those charged with summary and indictable
offences, continues to grow, making the execution of duties by my officers increasingly difficult and places them in an increasingly vulnerable position while carrying
out these duties.
I therefore submit, as in previous years, that the Department start planning for
a new and larger institution to serve this Southern Interior area.
Respectfully submitted.
W. T. Teal, Warden.
 T 72 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF SENIOR MEDICAL OFFICER
E. G. B. Stevens, Esq.
Director of Correction,
1075 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the annual medical report for the following
institutions.
OAKALLA PRISON FARM
The year under review has seen the stretching of all resources to their utmost
by reason of the increased flow of population. Medically, this has resulted in a
marked increase in numbers requiring medical attention of all degrees—sick parades,
out-patients and in-patients at the Vancouver General Hospital, in-patients in the
Prison hospital, and more extensive demands on ancillary services, such as those
of radiology and laboratory. Your Department has been made fully aware of our
inability to meet these requirements in our present hospital location, and with staff
at its present establishment we would be unable to administer medical services in
the new hospital building unless the staff is supplemented. Every consideration is
being given to the utmost possible economy, and we await the decision of your
Department as regards the future of medical services in Oakalla.
An overwhelming burden on our hospital has been imposed by the accommodation therein of grossly disturbed individuals untreatable in the Mental Hospital,
untrainable by present correctional techniques. These inmates detract from the
very necessary attention which should be given to those physically ill. Many are
extremely disruptive and injure themselves or others. Without segregation, space,
and adequate supervision in our present situation, they require a special unit of
a psychiatric nature. Whereas in earlier years they could exist without undue disturbance in a laissez faire type of environment, the more recent and progressive
classification and activities throw them into prominence as unable to meet pressures.
Their hostility, depressions, and anxieties become gravely accentuated, without any
hope at present of treatment. We have sent many for treatment at Essondale, but
we are assured that there is also no treatment available for them there. The service
of a part-time psychiatrist is urgently needed. Neither my colleague, Dr. Singer, nor
myself have time to give to the frequent treatment sessions which are necessary.
Perhaps it is not too much to hope that in the future we shall see a professor or
associate professor of forensic psychiatry appointed, who would be responsible for
psychiatric services in the various Prison units, and who would have assisting him
many postgraduate physicians training in psychiatry.
The pressing need is the provision of a unit for a young offender too disturbed
for classification to Haney Correctional Institution or New Haven, and for whom
the Young Offenders' Unit was previously a welcome resource. Westgate B Unit
perseveres with many, but some have to be detained in the Prison hospital among
habitual offenders, narcotic addicts, and sex deviates. The " Tower " in the hospital, which is an attic section containing at times forty to fifty inmates without any
staff present for other than occasional visits, is a serious threat to the morality of
any young person.
It is hoped that shortly we will be able to obtain a 9-bed section at Vancouver
General Hospital exclusively for our patients. In the meanwhile, all out-patient and
in-patient treatment of inmates is on an emergency basis and we are providing
private consultations and treatment, largely at the Gaol hospital.   Some surgery is
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 73
carried out in the Royal Columbian Hospital, if possible on a very short-time basis
of four to six hours' stay, and at Burnaby General Hospital. Owing to staff shortage,
too, we are sending out much of our laboratory work to a private laboratory, though
our part-time technician and the Provincial health authorities assist as much as
possible.
The four female nurses have continued to offer valuable service, and we feel
greatly encouraged thereby, and much appreciate being able to retain them, although, of course, we are reminded that they are not supernumerary to our present
hospital establishment and that each takes the place of a male staff member. They
represent the most progressive step in the nursing of male prisoners. Were it not
for the assistance rendered by inmates in all of the medical sections, we would be
unable to offer even minimal services.
We have been fortunate to obtain the services of a full-time physician, Dr.
Singer, in place of three part-time physicians. This enables us to obtain medical
coverage with a doctor within the Prison for fifteen hours out of the twenty-four
for five days a week. Two week-ends in the month are serviced by one of the two
full-time doctors, and two by a part-time physician, Dr. Arthur Robertshaw. This
coverage, of course, is only made possible by additional hours of the doctor's services. Normally, as Senior Medical Officer in the Gaol Service, I am absent from
Oakalla three half-days a week at one of the other institutions.
During the year we were very sorry to lose the dedicated administrative service of Mr. John MacLeod, who for so many years has worked so closely and
helpfully with us. His place has been taken by Mr. Eric Pierce, who has taken the
baton from him most competently and is facing his difficult task with wisdom and
enterprise. My gratitude to the entire hospital staff is not easily expressed in this
brief and formal report. They are perpetually faced with pressures of work and
responsibility under conditions which demand the highest qualities of character and
skill. It is earnestly hoped that with the additional establishment of the new hospital
some of the staff will be rewarded with a well-earned promotion.
Statistics show increasing calls on all the medical departments. The full-time
dentist, Dr. Walter Johnson, shared with Haney Correctional Institution, has contributed fuller dental services. We are greatly in need of a supply of dentures to
many inmates, whose health suffers for lack of them. If the dental technician at
Haney Correctional Institution were allowed to spend his full time in the laboratory
there, this would be rendered possible. The issue at public expense of tooth-powder
and tooth-brushes to indigent inmates has been a progressive step.
Tuberculosis-control has continued to be supervised by Dr. A. Hakstian, who
has given, as usual, his expert advice and assistance. The tuberculosis unit has
accommodated more than the customery number of active tuberculosis cases. We
have been able to transfer many cases to the Pearson and Willow Street tuberculosis Hospitals, where some have proved a considerable disciplinary problem.
Dr. E. Lewison has completed his eighth year of plastic nasal surgery, carried
out generously without any remuneration, except that of the grateful response of
his inmate patients.
The general health of the inmates has been satisfactory on the whole, although
we recorded seven deaths. These include two young women who died during their
withdrawal from narcotic drugs. We believe that the increasing use of barbiturates
together with narcotics is a grave threat to the survival of a narcotic addict, though
the more serious phenomina have so far been almost solely evident amongst the
women.
From the point of view of hygiene, we are still seriously handicapped by lack
of an adequate reception and bathroom area.   Through lack of these, for example,
 T 74 BRITISH COLUMBIA
we have too many verminous occupants of the Prison. The kitchen is infested with
cockroaches in spite of frequent fumigation. The insulating tiles in the ceiling
serve as breeding-grounds. The ventilation is inadequate in the kitchen. The
dietary has been very satisfactory. We welcome with much appreciation the services of the dietician, Miss Margaret McKirdy. Laundry and clothing services
have been satisfactory. The provision of sheets to all inmates has, medically speaking, been one of the most progressive moves in the physical care of prisoners in
Oakalla Prison Farm. We are glad to observe the supply of pyjamas and sandals
to patients in the Prison hospital.
I have visited the Chilliwack camps at regular intervals. They remain an
excellent medium for physical and mental welfare. The number of serious accidents
has been surprisingly small, and speaks well for the supervision and accident prevention. It is greatly to the credit of the staff that many have now obtained industrial first-aid certificates. It is urged that each camp should contain an establishment for an officer duly qualified in industrial first aid, and that he should be given
trades pay. Should any fatal accident occur by the standard present, we might very
well be criticized because we have not yet attained the required standards of medical
care obtaining in forestry or logging camps.
The staff of the Women's Building has valiantly struggled to keep the programme going in full, but overcrowding has hampered all efforts. Medically, the
amount of serious illness during narcotic withdrawals, as mentioned previously,
has caused anxiety. The Coroner for the City of Vancouver visited and inspected
our provisions for sick women inmates, especially in regard to the placing of those
undergoing withdrawal in the isolation unit. We should be satisfied that those
segregated in that unit have as immediate attention and observation as those accommodated in other parts of the building, on all shifts. We should also ensure that a
registered nurse is in nursing charge on each shift. We are again indebted to the
Provincial Health Services for the great assistance rendered by the weekly visits of
Dr. Kennedy and Dr. Chan, and for their examination and advice on all women
admitted. We have greatly appreciated the assistance of the out-patient department
of the Vancouver General Hospital for women patients, more especially that of the
obstetricians and gynaecologists. Perhaps of all Prison medical problems, those
presented by women prisoners are the most exacting, and we are most grateful for
the leadership of Miss Maybee and the patience and persistence and skill of her
staff.
The Pan-Abode units for the treatment of selected narcotic addicts, male and
female, under the direction of Dr. Gordon Stephenson, have struggled with seemingly insoluble situations and have maintained activity programmes. We have read
with much interest the graduation thesis submitted by Dr. William Carpenter to Dr.
Tyhurst, Professor of Psychiatry at the University of British Columbia. He wrote
on the men's Pan-Abode unit, and we understand his thesis will be published in
due course.
I have examined all inmates appearing before the Classification Panel with
sentences of three months and over, and, where necessary, medical recommendations have been made, and all these inmates have been given medical categories.
HANEY CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION
I visited this Institution on a regular basis and examined inmates as referred
and have been in frequent consultations with the Deputy Warden. Medical difficulties arise owing to the shortage of escorts for trainees requiring out-patient and
short-stay general hospital treatment.   It has been a custom to transfer any trainee
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61
T 75
requiring guards as an in-patient at Vancouver General Hospital to Oakalla, though
Oakalla finds it equally difficult to supply guards. It is indubitably desirable that
a trainee should, if at all possible, obtain his treatment at Haney Correctional Institution, or at any rate not interrupt his training by returning to Oakalla. So far
as has been possible, trainees on completion of their treatment in an outside hospital
have been returned immediately to Haney Correctional Institution. If, after classification, treatment is required for a prospective trainee, this is carried out in Oakalla
before the inmate is transferred to Haney. Many trainees complain of physical
disabilities only on or after arriving at Haney Correctional Institution and add to
the medical burdens there. As at Oakalla, with shortage of staff and escorts to
Vancouver General Hospital, the frequency of private consultations and treatment
increases.
As mentioned previously, the sharing of the full-time service of Dr. Walter
Johnson has ensured adequate dental attention, though, until a dental technician is
enabled to work full time in his laboratory, the supply of dentures to trainees can
only be very minimal and none at all can be undertaken for Oakalla inmates.
The general health of the trainees has, on the whole, been good. The standard
of dietaries has been exceptional in spite of the youthful age of the kitchen workers.
Experienced older men in Prison kitchens have always been considered a sine qua
non, but it has been found difficult for the Classification Panel at Oakalla to find
such appropriate individuals to send to Haney Correctional Institution for this work.
Dr. Middleton has continued to contribute a great deal to the success of the
training programme by virtue of his psychiatric services, and Dr. A. Trudel has
again given abundance of his time and skill as medical officer.
I have visited Gold Creek Camp and the Pre-release Camp; both camps, from
the point of view of hygiene, attain a standard which is most creditable.
NEW HAVEN
There has been an inevitable increase in the numbers of those classified to New
Haven who present graver character disorders, and the advantages of so small a
unit to accommodate them have been almost dramatically apparent and go far to
dispel the illusion that highly disturbed young offenders cannot be contained in an
open institution, though clearly the success depends on the quality of staff and
programme. It is encouraging to observe the achievement of rehabilitation of so
many without psychiatric services and by utilizing the experience of staff members
highly skilled in the wholesome training of character.
The initiation of group counselling has opened an additional field of correctional endeavour which has an almost ideal nidus in such a unit as New Haven.
It is early as yet to submit a medical opinion as to its efficacy, but it is giving every
promise of success beyond all expectations.
Medical care has been somewhat disrupted by the sickness and retirement of
the staff member who has been responsible for the medical administration and
first-aid duties, and lack of continuity in this service has been inconvenient. However, now that his place has been filled, we anticipate a return to stability in this
aspect. Arrangements whereby the provision of medical supplies has been the
responsibility of Haney Correctional Institution is proving unsatisfactory. Owing
to delay in obtaining supplies, many prescriptions have been compounded by the
pharmacist at Oakalla Prison Farm or by a local druggist. The general health of
the New Haven inmates has been good. As regards hygiene, there is no comment
to make, except that adequate pasteurization of the milk is not possible with the
present lack of pasteurizing equipment.
 T 76 BRITISH COLUMBIA
CONCLUSION
We are faced with relatively high expenditure for medical services due to
rising population, the loss of out-patient services at Vancouver General Hospital,
and the cost of drugs. As the standards of medical care in the community at large
are raised, prison medicine, however laggardly, must follow in its wake; also, as
rehabilitation becomes more and more the target of penal systems, to release an
individual with a correctable disability may detract from or nullify the training—
perhaps expensive—which has been attempted. Thus dentures, glasses, prostheses,
surgery to correct disfigurements, deformities, ruptures, and indeed any condition
which, if not treated, may restrict earning capacity can threaten morale, and produce
feelings of inadequacy to a crippling level. If we employ the term " correction,"
a great deal is involved which is perhaps not at first apparent. Oakalla has to
accommodate as a high proportion of its population what are now universally
recognized as medical problems—alcoholics and drug addicts—and under present
Gaol conditions, unhappily money expended on them represents a total loss.
In closing we wish to record our deep appreciation of the utmost co-operation
we have received from yourself, your Deputy, and your Wardens.
Respectfully submitted.
R. G. E. Richmond, M.D.,
Senior Medical Officer.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 77
REPORT OF SENIOR PROTESTANT CHAPLAIN
E. G. B. Stevens, Esq.,
Director of Correction,
1075 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
CHAPLAINS
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the annual report of the Protestant chaplains
in the British Columbia Corrections Branch for the fiscal year 1960/61.
Senior chaplain:  Rev. W. D. G. Hollingworth.
Haney Correctional Institution:  Rev. Canon S. Higgs.
Oakalla Prison Farm: Rev. Horace West (part time) and Mr. S. Fraser, student at Union College (voluntary).
Prince George Gaol:  Rev. M. K. Brown (part time).
Chilliwack Forestry Camp:   Rev. R. Jantzen (voluntary).
Women's Gaol:  Mr. J. Morris, student at Union College (voluntary).
THE ROLE OF THE CHAPLAIN
Within correctional institutions the role varies but slightly from year to year.
The chaplain is not a social worker, nor a secular teacher, nor a mail censor, though
in these and other areas he offers a co-operation which results in a more truly effective team programme. Above all else, however, he seeks to lead and direct men to
a knowledge of God as revealed in Jesus Christ and to a willing obedience to His
will. In a word, he endeavours to direct the thinking, realign the allegiance, alert
the conscience, and encourage the spirit of the inmate. This is not an easy role, nor
is there a routine method by which it may effectively be carried out. Keeping in
mind always that these are souls precious in the sight of God, the chaplain accepts
them as they are and where they are, but does not wish to leave them there. As he
wins the respect and the confidence of the inmate, the process begins, though slowly.
THE CHAPLAIN'S TECHNIQUES OR METHODS
These naturally differ according to the temperament and ability of the individual chaplain. In every situation, however, he recognizes that the majority of
inmates possess rather tenuous links with the Christian church. Thus services of
worship are simple, yet dignified, and, within the limits of the type of building used,
conducted in an atmosphere of reverence.
The " Padre's Hour " is still the most effective method of religious education.
The use of suitable religious films, interpreted by the chaplain and followed by
discussion in small groups, is a learning process which has elicited a gratifying
response.
In addition, classes on effective living, Bible study, correspondence courses on
understanding the Holy Scriptures, and individual pastoral counselling are fundamental to every chaplain's programme.
Because of the nature of the entire programme at Haney Correctional Institution, the chaplain sponsors two very active organizations—the Actomist Club and
the Church Advisory Council, programmes which involve the chaplain in a more
intimate and personal relationship with some inmates than would be possible
otherwise.
In each institution where there is an Alcoholics Anonymous programme, the
chaplain is the local sponsor.
 T 78 BRITISH COLUMBIA
1960/61
Staff changes during this year included the appointment of Rev. Horace West
as part-time chaplain at Oakalla Prison Farm and Rev. Canon Stanley Higgs as
full-time chaplain at Haney Correctional Institution.
Reviewing the work of the past year, one cannot but feel impressed by the
limits one has to set for one's self by the amount of time available. Those most in
need of the type of help which the chaplain is best able to give are not always the
ones he is able to reach. Inevitably frustration occurs, and it requires a strong faith
in one's self and one's God to continue week after week with the knowledge that
the work is being done in only a fragmentary fashion. Under present conditions
little or no elaboration of the chaplain's programme can be entertained. The use of
volunteer workers, which is desirable and effective in many areas, requires careful
screening and constant supervision, which the chaplain is not available to give
because of his other and more specific duties.
PRESENT PROBLEMS AND NEEDS
As has been stated year after year, a primary need is a suitably furnished
chapel in every institution.
The atmosphere and surroundings in which the worship of Almighty God is
conducted are by no means conducive to the continuity of attendance nor to inspiration or worship. Visiting areas, gymnasiums, libraries, or a temporarily unoccupied
room have to be used. As long as these conditions prevail, no effective ministry
of public worship can be maintained.
THANKS
The chaplains are appreciative of the co-operation of the churches of the
community, their ministers and their choirs, the various organizations which concern
themselves with the after-care of inmates on release, the Wardens personally, and
the Director of Correction, who by his support has greatly encouraged us in all our
efforts.
W. D. G. Hollingworth,
Senior Protestant Chaplain.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61
T 79
REPORT OF SENIOR CATHOLIC CHAPLAIN
E. G. B. Stevens, Esq.,
Director of Correction,
1075 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour, Sir, to submit to you the report of the Senior Catholic
Chaplain of the Provincial Gaol Service. In the over-all picture of the Gaol Service,
Catholic inmates have been administered to for their moral rejuvenation, religious
re-education, and spiritual rehabilitation in the many correctional establishments
throughout the Province by many holy and zealous priests.
Father Lawrence Dal Bon, P.S.S.C, as part-time chaplain, has faithfully
administered to the Catholics of the Haney Correctional Institution, Gold Creek
Camp, and the Pre-release Camp. Rev. John P. Carroll, O.M.I., as part-time
chaplain of Prince George Gaol, has received many complimentary words from
Warden W. H. Mulligan of this Gaol. We are sorry we are going to lose Father
Carroll this coming July; he is being transferred by his superiors to another part
of the Province. I have been assured that an equally zealous priest will be presented
to continue Father's great work.
Rev. John W. Mclntyre, of Kamloops, has faithfully administered to the Gaol
of that city, and Rev. E. J. Kane, O.M.I., has attended to the Clearwater Camp,
90 miles from Kamloops. On one occasion Father conducted his bishop, the Most
Rev. J. M. Harrington, D.D., on a tour of Clearwater Camp.
Rev. Gordon McKinnon, of Chilliwack, has administered zealously to the three
forestry camps of that area. The latter three priests serve in a capacity of part-
time chaplains with permission of their respective Wardens, but without salaries,
conducting weekly religious services, interviews, and group discussions. At other
times they deliver urgent messages to Catholic inmates. Some remuneration should
be considered for these priests.
The Senior Catholic Chaplain also administers directly to the following institutions: Oakalla Prison Farm Women's Gaol, Oakalla Prison Farm, and New
Haven Borstal School.
Religious Services (Holy Sacrifice of the Mass)
Oakalla:
Main Gaol—Sundays, 8.15 a.m.; holy days, 5.00 p.m.
Women's Gaol—Sundays, 9.15 a.m.; holy days, 7.30 p.m.
New Haven Borstal School:   Sundays, 10.30 a.m.; holy days, 6.45 a.m.
Group Counselling (Legion of Mary)
Westgate A and B:  Thursdays, 7 to 8 p.m.
East Wing:  Thursdays, 8 to 9 p.m.
Hospital:  Thursdays, 8 to 9 p.m.
Women's Gaol:  Thursdays, 7 to 8 p.m.
 T 80 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Individual
Interviews and counselling 965               Contact family  457
Personal matters   142                Visit family   105
Cheque cashing  14                Letters to family  208
Family problems  586                Contact lawyer  270
Spiritual problems  317                Visit lawyer  10
Fare home  20                Legal aid   71
Payment of fine  11                Language priests   22
Clothes   152                Inquiries    50
Deportation   19
Indian Agent  31                Legion of Mary  416
Catholic hostel  24                Verbal requests   739
Deaths   42                Appeals   175
Appreciation and thanks are extended to the Warden, Miss Maybee, Mr.
Warnock (New Haven), and their respective staffs for their interest and co-operation during the past year, which has facilitated the work of the chaplain. I would
also like to express my gratitude to the members of the Legion of Mary for their
faithful attendance at weekly meetings.
It has been held since time immemorial that man is composed of body and
soul. The Corrections Branch is to be complimented on the high quality of facilities
which are available for the rehabilitation of the inmate, yet many return to prison
because only half of the inmate (if I may use the word) is rehabilitated. All
facilities are for the body, none for the soul. Rehabilitation begins with the soul
(understanding, intellect, will, and memory—these are faculties of the soul); without this acknowledgment there is no correction, no rehabilitation, no body changing
its erring ways. Who can think of a doctor without a hospital, or a clinic, a dentist
without an office, or at least a chair, a chaplain without a church, or at least a
chapel. If we can look to any success in the future (it cannot be found in the past),
consideration must be given to the individual's soul for the moral rejuvenation,
religious re-education, and rehabilitation of the whole man—body and soul.
Respectfully submitted.
Thomas Francis M. Corcoran,
Senior Catholic Chaplain.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 81
REPORT OF PERSONNEL OFFICER
E. G. B. Stevens, Esq.,
Director of Correction,
1075 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Sir,—In June of 1960 I returned from the University of Southern California
and was appointed to the headquarters staff as Personnel Officer. With this appointment, personnel services for the gaol service were centralized at headquarters and
individual personnel files were established for all members of the gaol service. These
files, along with a card index system, allow for control and supervision of staff
transfers, appointments, reclassifications, and other routine procedures processed
by the Personnel Officer. In addition, a survey was made of all positions and
salaries within the gaol service, so that now all reclassification requests can be
processed by the Personnel Officer along with all staff evaluations.
In step with the development of personnel services, a promotion policy was
drafted in conjunction with the office of the Director of Correction and the heads of
institutions. This promotion policy was approved by the Department and put into
force in February of 1960. With this new policy a staff member may be promoted
to any institution within the service, as all positions above the Senior Prison Guard
level are advertised for competition throughout the Corrections Branch. An additional feature of the promotion policy is that standards have been set for promotion
in each level. As an officer advances up the hierarchy, he must compete in terms
of successfully completing courses and qualifying on promotional examinations.
In addition, his performance ratings are forwarded to his headquarters personnel
file on a regular basis and are available for study at the time of promotion.
A training policy was also drafted in conjunction with the office of the Director of Correction and heads of institutions, which was also approved by the Department in February of 1960. This policy provides for the orientation training of a
new staff member immediately upon his recruitment. This is followed by a period
of field training conducted on the job. This field training programme is controlled
through a field training manual that records the duties in which the officer has been
instructed and has demonstrated his ability to perform. Basic training for guards
has been increased to 160 hours and centralized for the service as a whole at Oakalla
Prison Farm. A pilot course was conducted in March of 1961. This course proved
to be successful and will be repeated in the future. We were fortunate in having six
senior staff members from the Alberta gaol service attend one of the earlier basic
training courses at the Haney Correctional Institution, which was run as a preview
of the centralized course at Oakalla Prison Farm. Their insightful comments were
valuable in the design of our new course.
Advance training of two weeks' duration is conducted for the service as a
whole at the Haney Correctional Institution. A pilot course at this level of eighty
hours' duration was conducted and subjected to evaluation. This course also proved
to be successful and will be repeated in the future. For the advantage of the senior
staff at the Prince George Gaol, this course was recorded on tape, and the tapes
forwarded to Warden Mulligan for the use of his senior staff.
An instructor's manual for basic training containing lesson outlines and guides
to teaching has been developed. A copy of this was requested and forwarded to
Mr. A. Kitchen, Director of Correction for Manitoba, to assist in the development
of its staff-training programme.
An instructional technique course was conducted at the Haney Correctional
Institution for a period of twenty hours.   Senior staff from Oakalla Prison Farm and
 T 82 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Haney Correctional Institution who instructed in basic and advanced training
attended this course. In this manner they were assisted in the development of their
lesson outlines and the proper method of presenting their material.
The staff-training grant of $4,000 was used to its fullest this year. Staff were
sent to extension courses in social work and psychology at the University of British
Columbia. One-half the fee of these courses was paid out of the grant. In addition,
eight staff members were sent to the California institution for men at Tehachapi,
Calif., to study the group counselling programme in operation at that institution.
This latter group was very impressed by the programme and recommended strongly
its development in British Columbia. This was followed up by a conference at the
University of British Columbia of forty senior staff from March 22nd to 24th. The
focus of the conference was on group counselling, and Dr. Maxwell-Jones, well
known for his work in this area in England, was used as a consultant. As a result
of this conference, specific plans were developed to implement group counselling in
the institutions of this Province.
Funds were again made available to staff members working toward a degree
in social work. Two staff members from Haney completed their Bachelor of Social
Work degree, and three members from Oakalla are continuing to work on their
degrees. All of these officers were assisted financially in the payment of fees. Part
of the grant was used to send senior staff to the Congress of Corrections in Toronto.
Due to the need for additional medical coverage at the Chilliwack forestry camps,
six staff members were selected to attend the St. John Ambulance first-aid course,
the fees for this course being paid out of the staff-training grant.
As mentioned above, specific plans were developed for the implementation of
group counselling at the University of British Columbia conference in March. These
plans included the development of a pilot programme at the New Haven Borstal.
This programme proved to be successful, and as a result was expanded to include
the male drug hut and four groups of the Westgate Unit at Oakalla Prison Farm.
Planning is also under way to include this as a feature of the programme at the
Haney Correctional Institution. To evaluate the impact of group counselling on
inmates, research is being conducted to measure the changes it creates in group
behaviour.
M. A. Matheson,
Personnel and Staff Training Officer.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 83
REPORT OF LIBRARIAN
E. G. B. Stevens, Esq.,
Director of Correction,
1075 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
It is now three years since the revised system of handling the Corrections
Branch library service was set up, and it continues to work well and efficiently.
Recognition of the value of a library service to staff and inmates has increased, and
the co-operation given to the librarian by the senior staff of all institutions is most
satisfactory. There is naturally need for improvement and expansion, and it is
necessary to guard against the idea that because a library is functioning adequately
there is no more work to be done.
A library is a living collection of information and ideas, and it must be capable
of adaptation to the ever-changing world around it. Books wear out or become out
of date and must be replaced. New books must be added. Funds must be available
to make this replacement and addition possible.
The necessity of keeping up to date is never more important than in the provision of reading material for staff. If the corrections movement is to be a movement and not just the acceptance of a laid-down policy, the staff at all levels must
be aware of the results of research and experiments throughout the world. If these
results are not available, and if the staff do not read, then any movement will slow
to a standstill. As an example of this, mention may be made of the literature search
that was made by the librarian prior to the visit of Dr. Maxwell-Jones at the staff
conference at the University of British Columbia. From the bibliographies on
criminology and correction, medicine, sociology, and psychology, a list of books
and pamphlets relating to group counselling and the concept of the " therapeutic
community " was made, and certain of these books were purchased for headquarters
and the institutions. One of the most important duties of the librarian is to make
sure that the material is available when required.   This also requires adequate funds.
The library budget should never be seen as a sum of money that can be used
elsewhere when required. We cannot remain at the head of the corrections movement without constant recourse to the written word.
CORRECTIONS BRANCH
The librarian worked with the Personnel and Staff Training Officer and other
staff in the selection and ordering of books and journals for the headquarters staff
library.
PROBATION BRANCH
The use of this library by Probation Officers and others has continued to grow.
The librarian worked with the staff member in charge on the purchase of books and
periodicals.
NEW HAVEN
Work commenced on a new library, which had been in the planning stage since
1958. A lending library, reference library, and study-room are being provided in
what was the chapel, and a high standard of library service will be available next
year.
The entire library is being classified, catalogued, and arranged by the assistant
librarian and a member of the New Haven staff under the direction of the librarian.
 T 84 BRITISH COLUMBIA
OAKALLA PRISON FARM
Main Gaol
The librarian worked closely with the senior staff and met with the treatment
staff at least once a week throughout the year. The latter group in particular have
made every effort to assist the librarian in the provision of a good library service
under difficult physical conditions. Improvements in the service to inmates are still
necessary, and the operation of the bindery leaves much to be desired. This is
mainly due to its physical position and the difficulty of staffing it with the right kind
of inmate, but it is felt that this problem could be overcome. At least four inmates
are needed daily if the large backlog of books awaiting repair and binding is to be
removed.
East Wing
Inmates of the East Wing continued to have access to the main library during
the year, and the high standard of book treatment and behaviour noted last year,
when the library was opened, has been maintained. This high standard can be
maintained only if the staff of the wing are interested, and if there is enough money
to supply new books when the old wear out.
Two new book collections were opened in Westgate. The East Wing staff
have worked hard to make the library a valuable part of their programme.
West Wing
Inmates awaiting trial in the West Wing have not had the same interest in the
maintenance of a good library service, and books which were placed in the wing
were treated extremely harshly. All books were therefore withdrawn from the wing,
and those that were salvable were repaired and placed in the main library. Others
are still awaiting binding. Borrowing of books for interested inmates in the wing is
carried out on a personal basis from book fists—an inadequate procedure, but the
only one under the circumstances.
Westgate
After the division of this unit into A and B, two separate collections of books
were placed in two small library rooms. In the past the provision of books to West-
gate from a central library room in the gymnasium building has never been satisfactory. The location of small, carefully selected libraries to which the inmates may
come in small groups is a break-through, particularly as Westgate has now been
reorganized on the group association principle.
Reports on the use made of these two libraries and of the standard of behaviour
of the inmates using them were given to the librarian by the senior staff of both
units. The reports are good, and the experiment appears to be extremely successful
so far. It is hoped that these libraries may be built up into useful, general collections of books in the future.
Hospital and Condemned Tier
The officer in charge of the library in the Main Gaol has provided books and
periodicals to these special units as and when required. The service to inmates
sentenced to death is carried out on a personal basis.
Drug Hut
Since the closing of the library room in the gymnasium building and the opening of the two small libraries in Westgate, service to the Drug Hut has been unsatis-
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 85
factory.   The librarian will be meeting with the staff concerned to work out the
best means of providing books to this small isolated group.
Women's Gaol
Discussions have been held with senior staff members, and books and periodicals have been selected and purchased for staff and inmates. The librarian met
with the Matron in Charge once each week at the senior treatment staff meeting, and
any problems arising out of the operation of the library programme were discussed
then.
Chilliwack Camps
The librarian visited the three Chilliwack camps and obtained lists of all library
books held there to assist in future book selection. The book budget provided for
this fiscal year was inadequate to provide a good library service to these separate
and somewhat isolated groups.
Oakalla is a complex arrangement of buildings and services and is a difficult
place in which to operate a satisfactory library programme for the total population.
Much could be done that is not being done. The Corrections Branch librarian,
with many tasks to perform in many different areas, cannot hope to provide the
service required. There is an untrained officer in charge of the library who does his
best to keep up with the tidal wave of requests and jobs required, but he cannot
hope to handle more than the daily routine work related to the East Wing, West
Wing, South Wing, and hospital.
At the end of 1962 the first group of graduates will be leaving the Library
School at the University of British Columbia, and it is hoped that by this time
provision will be made in the Oakalla staff budget for a full-time trained librarian.
It will still be necessary for the headquarters librarian to do much of the work
related to staff library provision of books, journals, and information, and liaison
between Oakalla and other institutions. A librarian at Oakalla would be kept fully
occupied with library provision to the 10,000 or so inmates that pass through Oakalla
in the course of a year.
PRINCE GEORGE PROVINCIAL GAOL AND
KAMLOOPS PROVINCIAL GAOL
As in previous years, the librarian has not been able to find the time to visit
these institutions, but has maintained close contact with the staff responsible for
library provision through correspondence. Books and periodicals have been
selected and purchased for staff and inmates throughout the year.
HANEY CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION
A full report on this library has been prepared by the acting-librarian and is
included in the annual report of the Director of Special Programme.
During the period before the appointment of the present acting-librarian, the
Corrections Branch librarian and his assistant classified the academic and vocational
library, and a catalogue was made for each instructor. The staff library was
reorganized, and the trainee library was reorganized, reclassified where necessary,
and expanded.
Haney Correctional Institution has suffered to some extent by the absence of
a trained librarian on its staff. Repeated efforts to hire such a person have failed,
but it is hoped that once the graduates begin leaving the University of British
Columbia Library School this situation will be remedied.
 T 86 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Corrections Branch librarian has been responsible for training the acting-
librarian, and since his appointment the library has again begun to play an important, active part in the life of the trainee community.
Throughout the year the librarian remained in contact with the library world
outside the Institution. Visits were paid to Fraser Valley Regional Library headquarters, Vancouver Public Library and branches, and the New Westminster Public
Library. Although the main reason for these visits was to consult the book-
selection aids, which only large libraries can afford, they were also valuable in that
they allowed frequent discussion with other librarians. Without this it is possible
to become narrow and insular in outlook, and the selection of books and the running of a library programme may suffer.
The librarian also visited the Social Science Department of the University of
British Columbia to search the literature published by the United Nations on correction and related subjects. By arrangement with the University, extra copies of
books of interest to us are supplied by the United Nations and placed on extended
loan to the Corrections Branch.   This is a unique and valuable service.
In conclusion, I would like to record my appreciation of the work, often tedious
and wearisome, which has been done by my assistant. Without the knowledge that
the daily routine tasks were being handled speedily and competently in my absence,
I would not have been able to carry out my duties to the widespread library service
points of the Corrections Branch.
Respectfully submitted.
Alan Woodland,
Librarian.
"I
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1960/61 T 87
REPORT OF GAOL PSYCHOLOGIST
E. G. B. Stevens, Esq.,
Director of Correction,
1075 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the British Columbia Corrections Branch
psychologist for the fiscal year of April 1, 1960, to March 31, 1961.
The psychological services have been maintained in Oakalla Prison Farm,
Haney Correctional Institution, and New Haven as in previous years, except for
staff changes which have occurred. Dr. DesLaurier, who was the psychologist at
Haney Correctional Institution, resigned toward the end of 1960, and a new psychologist, Mr. G. Johnson, was appointed to the Haney Correctional Institution
staff at the beginning of 1961. Oakalla Prison Farm and New Haven have continued to have psychological services on a part-time basis.
Supervision of Central Classification services has become much more difficult
over the past year, as Central Classification has become more and more concerned
with classification matters and procedures relative to the peculiar needs of Oakalla
Prison Farm, and consequently it has become a problem to distinquish Central
Classification's local classification responsibilities from its broader responsibilities.
It has become apparent, it is believed, that the structure, purposes, and functions
of Central Classification must be redefined, and that the policies which are to guide
it must be set forth in as much detail as possible, possibly in the form of a manual.
It has been estimated that Central Classification interviewed 2,054 inmates,
with sentences of three months or more, during the fiscal year, or an average of
eight per day. Of these, 878 or 42 per cent were directed to Haney Correctional
Institution, 61 or 4 per cent to New Haven, and the balance, 1,115 or 54 per cent,
remained in Oakalla Prison Farm.
R. V. McAllister,
Gaol Psychologist.
 T 88 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PROVINCIAL PROBATION BRANCH
E.G. B. Stevens, Esq.,
Director of Correction,
1075 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Sir,—It is with pleasure that I submit to you the annual report for the Provincial Probation Branch covering the year ended March 31, 1961.
In general the report discloses increased services rendered by the Branch over
the previous fiscal year—a greater number of persons were placed on probation
under the supervision of the Branch, and a greater number of pre-sentence reports
were prepared on offenders where some disposition other than probation was made
by the Court.
As in previous years, certain staff changes were effected. Mr. R. Evans
resigned at the end of April to accept employment with the Northern Affairs Branch
of the Federal Government. Mr. Evans was replaced in the Cranbrook office by
Mr. R. Cutler. On May 1st Mr. John Hogarth, a graduate of the Faculty of Law,
joined the staff. After orientation in Vancouver, Mr. Hogarth moved to Dawson
Creek, where a new branch office was established to give services to the Dawson
Creek-Fort St. John area. On the same date, Mr. N. McLeish transferred to the
Probation Branch from the staff of New Haven. He remained in the Vancouver
office, where he took over the pre-release planning and parole work in connection
with Oakalla Prison Farm. This work was previously done by Mr. R. Boyce, who
resigned at the end of June to take summer school courses at the University. About
the middle of June, Mr. Brian Wharf transferred from the staff of Haney Correctional Institution, and after a short period in the Vancouver office moved to Victoria,
where he took over the probation work in the new Family and Juvenile Court for
Greater Victoria.
On June 27th Mr. Edward Stanton was appointed to the staff. He came to us
with many years' experience in the same work in Scotland. Following a period in
the Vancouver, Burnaby, and Abbotsford offices, Mr. Stanton was transferred to
Trail to replace Mr. Pisapio, who moved to Kelowna to establish a new branch
office in that city. Early in July Mr. Herman Litsky, previously a practising solicitor
in Winnipeg, was appointed to the staff, and after an orientation period in the
Nanaimo office was transferred to Williams Lake, where he replaced Mr. P. Bone,
who returned to the Vancouver office.
During the summer we missed Miss E. Goodacre, who was granted five months'
leave of absence in order to return to England.
Mr. R. E. Yerburgh transferred to the Probation Branch from the staff of
Oakalla Prison Farm in July, and after several months in the Vancouver office was
moved to Cranbrook, where he replaced Mr. R. Cutler, who was moved to the
Penticton office.
All staff members mourned the death, on September 19th, of Mr. Geoffrey
Woodhams. Mr. Woodhams made a lasting impact on all who knew him by his
interest in and thoughtfulness of others.
Mr. R. J. Clark, staff supervisor, tendered his resignation in September to
accept employment with the Federal Government. This vacant position was filled
in January with the appointment of Mr. John Wiebe. Concomitant with Mr.
Wiebe's appointment as staff supervisor, with headquarters in Penticton, a limited
decentralization was effected whereby the flow of work from Cranbrook, Trail,
Nelson, Penticton, Kelowna, Vernon, Kamloops, and Williams Lake oiiices is
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 89
channelled through Mr. Wiebe's office in Penticton. Mr. Wiebe's appointment has
made possible regular supervision for the Lower Interior branch offices, thereby
improving the quality of the service given by these offices. At the same time, the
Penticton office can now be effectively utilized as a training placement for newly
appointed officers.
Mr. B. Barton resigned from the staff in September to return to university, and
Mr. Byman was moved from Richmond to replace Mr. Barton in North Vancouver.
The vacancy in Richmond was filled by Mr. Bone, who was transferred from the
Williams Lake office.
In November other staff changes took place. Mr. J. Selkirk and Mr. C. Farmer
both resigned to accept employment with the Federal Government. These resignations were offset by the appointments of Mr. Gordon Mabbet, Mr. Ronald Kennett,
and Mr. Nigel Turner. Mr. Mabbett came to the Branch on transfer from the staff
of the Industrial School for Boys, while Mr. Kennett transferred from the staff of
New Haven. Mr. Turner previously was employed by the Family and Children's
Services in Victoria, where he worked in the treatment centre for emotionally disturbed children.
During November a new branch office was established in Haney, with Mr. B.
McLean the officer in charge. This new office took over part of the area previously
served by the New Westminster and Abbotsford offices and so effectively reduced
the case loads being carried in these two offices and at the same time cut down
travelling time both for the Probation Officer and his clients.
Mr. J. E. Rowe was also appointed to the staff late in October, but after being
transferred to Kamloops submitted his resignation in February, 1961.
The last appointment to staff made during the year was that of Mr. John
Webster, who came to the Branch with experience gained with the John Howard
Society both in Vancouver and Regina.
As at March 31, 1961, the staff of the Branch was deployed as follows:—
Vancouver office: E. G. B. Stevens, Chief Probation Officer; C.D.Davidson,
Assistant Chief Probation Officer; H. W. Jackson, J. M. Putnam, Miss
E. Goodacre, W. J. C. Haines, J. M. Armstrong, E. P. Bone, J. A. H.
Kirkpatrick, R. Kennett, N. E. McLeish, N. Turner, and J. Webster, all
Probation Officers; M. G. Stade, secretary to British Columbia Board of
Parole.
North Vancouver office: A. Byman, Probation Officer.
Burnaby office: O. J. Walling, Probation Officer.
New Westminster office:  O. E. Hollands and K. A. Holt, Probation Officers.
Haney office: B. E. McLean, Probation Officer.
Abbotsford office:  N. Fages, Probation Officer.
Chilliwack office:  H. Ziegler, Probation Officer.
Penticton office: J. Wiebe, Staff Supervisor; R. Cutler, Probation Officer.
Kelowna office: L. Pisapio, Probation Officer.
Vernon office: D. Guest, Probation Officer.
Kamloops office:  S. A. Thorvaldson, Probation Officer.
Nelson office: M. Brandon, Probation Officer.
Trail office: E. Stanton, Probation Officer.
Cranbrook office: R. Yerburgh, Probation Officer.
Williams Lake office: H. Litsky, Probation Officer.
Prince George office: R. McKellar, Probation Officer.
Dawson Creek office: J. Hogarth, Probation Officer.
Prince Rupert office: St. John Madeley, Probation Officer.
 T 90 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Courtenay office: L. Penegar, Probation Officer.
Port Alberni office: K. Richardson, Probation Officer.
Nanaimo office:  E. H. B. McGougan, B. Savory, and G. Mabbett, Probation
Officers.
Victoria office: A. E. Jones and T. Blackwood, Probation Officers.
Family and Juvenile Court for Greater Victoria:  B. Wharf, Probation Officer.
The accompanying statistical report details the increases in services given by
the Branch during the year and forcefully points up the growth of the Branch since
its inception. Of particular interest is the trend which is showing up with respect
to the number of new probation cases and the number of pre-sentence reports
prepared in which a disposition other than probation is made by the Court. In the
early years of the Branch the number of new probation cases was greater than the
number of pre-sentence reports, but in the past few years the situation has reversed
to the point that over 500 more pre-sentence reports were prepared than the number
of new probation cases. Undoubtedly several factors are involved in this change
of ratio, but one feels the trend is toward Magistrates and Judges wanting to know
more about the convicted offender than is disclosed by his previous Court record
or information that may come out during the trial, so that their disposition of his
case will protect society and at the same time give the offender the best prospects
for rehabilitation.
During the year close liaison was maintained with the British Columbia Board
of Parole, and the officers doing parole work attended meetings of the Board at
the various institutions. It should be noted the figures for new follow-up cases for
the year include forty-seven cases paroled under the authority of the National Parole
Board but in which Probation Officers were requested by the National Parole Service
to give parole supervision.
At the end of the year under review, 1,544 probation cases, 234 follow-up cases
and 210 pre-release cases, a total of 1,988 cases, were active and carried over to the
fiscal year of 1961/62.
While some new branch offices were opened during the year, there are still
areas within the Province which are not receiving any probation service, and these
needs will have to be met in the years to come. In some areas the case load being
carried by the Probation Officer is too large for the officer to give the frequent,
individualized attention the client needs. This situation can only be remedied by
an increase in the Branch's establishment.
In the annual report for the past two years, your attention has been drawn to
the need for an increase in supervisory personnel. The establishment of the Branch
has been increased, but the supervisory establishment has remained constant. With
the increased establishment, the need for more supervisory personnel is very acute,
bearing in mind that recently we have not been able to recruit fully trained Probation
Officers.
The number of resignations and staff changes during the year is a matter of
real concern. Several staff members resigned to accept employment with the
Federal Government at a higher salary scale. It is hoped that in the coming year the
salary structure for Probation Officers may be reviewed and up-graded to offset the
more favourable offers being made by other agencies and departments.
The work of the Branch as a whole cannot go forward without the close cooperation of social agencies, institutions, and other services. To these groups, on
behalf of the Branch, I wish to extend our thanks.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61
T 91
The increased services rendered by the Branch during the year may be attributed to the tireless efforts of all staff members, whose loyalty and eagerness to serve
their clients is to be complimented.
Provincial Probation Branch Statistics
Year
New
Probation
Cases
New
Follow-up
Cases
Presentence
Reports
Total
Cases
Miscellaneous
1942/43-
1945/46-
1948/49..
1951/52-
1954/55..
1957/58..
1959/60-
1960/61-
Total number since inception..
63
105
276
591
831
1,431
1,593
1,745
12,649
24
50
36
33
151
395
489
448
2,982
49
84
262
472
892
1,602
1,896
2,255
13,721
136
239
574
1,096
1,874
3,428
3,978
4,448
29,352
74
238
80
95
93
1,499
New Probation Cases
Year
Under
20 Years
20-25
Years
Over 25
Years
Probationers
Married
Single
Total
1951/52 	
496
710
1,193
1,302
1,371
49
65
124
131
178
46
56
114
160
196
40
58
120
168
194
551
773
1,311
1,425
1,551
591
1954/5S
831
1957/5R
1,431
1,593
1,745
1959/60     -
1960/61...	
New Follow-up Cases
Year
Under
20 Years
20-25
Years
Over 25
Years
Follow-up Cases
Married
Single
Total
1951/52	
22
107
234
267
247
11
41
159
206
195
3
2
16
6
3
8
14
26
17
30
143
381
463
431
33
1954/55 	
151
1957/58. 	
395
1959/60-      	
1960/61  -     -    .
489
448
Respectfully submitted.
C. D. Davidson,
Assistant Chief Probation Officer.
 T 92
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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0
 T 94 BRITISH COLUMBIA
2. Accommodation and Population of Correctional Institutions
Accommodation
Establishment
Cells
Other
Total
Men
Women
Men
Women
Men
Women
Oakalla Prison Farm—
621
100
16
10
360
180
11
288
114
40
29
113
11
10
4
981
180
11
388
114
40
97
123
11
N.D.T. units       	
Haney Correctional Institution—
10
Kamloops—
94
—
60
3
Prince George Gaol 	
—
Population
Establishment
Daily Average
Population
Greatest
Number
Least
Number
Men
Women
Men
Women
Men
Women
Oakalla Prison Farm—
911
185
96.3
1,290
199
11
386
118
105
IS r   III   III
961
151
6
328
90
53~
Women's Gaol ~     .
79
N.D.T. units    '	
9    !       6.7
4
Haney Correctional Institution—
364
105
80.17
	
Kamloops—
3. Sex
1959/60
1960/61
Increase or
Decrease
11,634        I        12,365
874                  1,034
+731
+ 160
12,508
13,399
+891
4. Educational Status
Illiterate         	
Elementary         	
665
7,660
4,011
172
761
8,066
4,359
213
+96
+406
+ 348
+41
Totals                            ..
12,508
13,399
+891
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61
5. Nationality (Place of Birth)
T 95
1959/60
1960/61
Increase or
Decrease
British-
10,553
369
362
11,262
367
445
+709
—2
+ 83
Totals                        .                                  	
11,284
12,074
+790
Foreign—
United States 	
249
934
20
21
228
987
39
71
—21
+ 53
+ 19
+ 50
Totals                               	
1,224
1,325
+ 101
6. Racial
White                                                                               	
9,767
115
2,555
44
10,776
90
2,459
53
+ 1,009
—25
—96
Mongolian	
+9
Totals                                                  —-              	
12,508
13,399
+ 891
7. Civil State
7,542
2,160
419
1,945
442
8,289
2,099
378
2,095
538
+747
—61
—41
Separated  	
+ 150
+96
12,508
13,399
+891
8. Ages
18 years and under..
19-21 years	
21-25    „     	
26-30   „    	
31^t0    „    	
41-50   „    	
51-60   „    	
Over 60 years	
Totals	
590
1,131
1,465
1,689
3,077
2,350
1,604
602
12,508
652
1,170
1,366
1,681
3,495
2,752
1,650
633
13,399
+62
+39
—99
—8
+418
+402
+46
+31
+891
9. Habits as to Use of Alcohol
Abstainers.       	
528
2,759
9.771
634
2,819
+ 106
+60
+725
Totals   .               	
12,508
13,399
+891
10. Habits as to Use of Narcotics
Abstainers    _	
Infrequent users
11,755
71
682
12,594
47
758
+839
-24
+76
Totals
12,508
13,399
+891
 T 96
BRITISH COLUMBIA
11. Creeds (on Admission)
1959/60
1960/61
Increase or
Decrease
Roman Catholic.	
Church of England-
Presbyterian	
United Church _
Baptist	
Lutheran	
Greek Catholic	
Other Christian creeds..
Doukhobor  	
Hebrew	
Buddhist	
Others... __ 	
Atheist— 	
None	
5,853
2,541
982
1,328
283
767
102
111
13
9
4
176
23
316
12,508
6,217
2,688
1,011
1,472
287
756
96
174
33
17
7
155
20
466
13,399
+364
+ 147
+29
+ 144
+4
— 11
-6
+63
+20
+8
+3
-21
-3
J-150_
+891
12. Duration of Sentence
Under 1 month-
1 month and under 2 months	
2 months and under 3 months—
3 months and under 6 months—
6 months and under 12 months	
12 months and under 18 months..
18 months and under 24 months..
Indefinite sentence  	
Sentenced to penitentiary-
Probation 	
Death sentence.	
Suspended.
To mental hospital-
Unfinished 	
Case dismissed	
Not guilty	
Death in gaol	
Immigration	
Totals..
6,490
2,015
631
730
685
274
114
368
313
217
1
43
32
342
27
225
1
12,508
7,128
1,847
779
795
718
296
179
371
227
154
4
300
30
386
20
163
2
13,399
+638
— 168
+ 148
+65
+33
+22
+65
+3
-86
—63
+3
+257
—2
+44
-7
-62
+2
-1
+891
13. Previous Convictions
3,561
1,610
983
649
530
443
374
320
295
217
223
202
179
169
149
137
134
121
120
216
588
421
298
202
364
3,680
1,661
1,112
727
596
482
367
351
321
257
232
222
175
168
183
141
134
132
114
238
722
458
268
200
451
+ 119
1
+51
2         - —.  .,  -
+ 129
^
+78
4                 	
+66
5
+39
6
—7
7
+31
+26
8                 	
0
+40
10
+9
11               ...  	
+20
17
—4
13 	
-1
14
+34
15
+4
16             _    -    	
17           -
+11
18          _ „	
—6
20 - -  - 	
+22
21 30                 	
+ 134
+37
31-40                     	
41 50
—30
51-60
—2
Over 60            	
+87
T"tn1s
12,508
13,399
+891
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1960/61 T 97
14. Offences for Which Prisoners Were Committed and Sentenced during the Year
Committed
(a)  Crimes against the Person
Abduction	
Abortion	
Assault, common.—
Assault, felonious-
Attempted suicide-
Bodily harm-
Shooting with intent-
Manslaughter	
Murder	
Carnal knowledge	
Rape and assault with intent to rape-
Criminal negligence	
Child neglect	
Totals..
(b)  Crimes against Property
Arson and incendiarism	
Breaking and entering	
Robbery 	
Forgery	
Fraud   	
False pretences-
Conspiracy .
Possessing housebreaking instruments-
Uttering
Taking auto without owner's consent-
Receiving stolen goods	
Trespass-
Mischief (damage property)..
Theft-
Over $50
Under $50—	
By conversion-
Totals .
(c) Crimes against Public Morals
and Decency
Bigamy..
Indecent assault—
Indecent exposure-
Gross indecency	
Incest	
Inmates and frequenters of houses of ill-fame.
Keeper of a bawdy-house 	
Juvenile delinquency	
Perjury ~	
Prostitution 	
Buggery-
Preventive detention-
Totals..
(d)  Crimes against Public Order and Peace
Breaches of Government Liquor Act	
Breaches of Excise Act .
Breaches of Narcotic and Drug Act	
Breaches of by-laws (not including B.L.C.A.).
Breaches of Motor-vehicle Act	
Possessing offensive weapon	
Breach of recognizance	
Escaping..
Failing to stop at scene of accident-
Impaired driving 	
Obstructing an officer-
Selling or giving liquor to Indians (not including B.C.L.A.)   ._..
Unlawful shooting .	
Vagrancy-
Causing disturbance ..
Totals	
(e) Other Offences Not Enumerated Above
Other offenders	
Grand totals of (a),
and (e)	
(ft), (c), (d),
12,365
15,234
 T 98
BRITISH COLUMBIA
15. Employment of Prisoners—Daily Average Population
Oakalla Prison Farm
Main
Prison
Women's
Prison
Camps
Drug
Huts
Haney
Correctional
Institution
Main
Inst.
Camps
New
Haven
Kamloops
Main
Bldg.
Camp
Prince
George
1. Manufacturing..
2. Building trades.
3. Vocational training..
4. Mechanical services
5. Farming	
6. Forestry  	
7. Domestic services—
Sewing and mending.
Cleaners	
Labourers...
Gardeners-
Culinary-workers.
Clerks	
Hospital orderlies
Stokers  —
Laundry-workers.
8. Unemployable	
9. Unemployed.
10. Outside employment
11. Classification	
60
32
31
18
37
98
116
9
52
8
2
5
42
138
283
18
13
10
5
10
12
7
14
185
122
20
60
36
19
8
39
21
51
16
6
—
3
19
5
2
1
20
107
17.3
6.7
23.7
5.86
8.54
3.76
19.61
46
13.27
10
2.71
3.83
8.18
12.06
	
2.35
16. Number of Officers and Employees on March 31, 1961
Oakalla Prison Farm
Main
Prison
Women's
Prison
Camps
Drug
Huts
Haney
Correctional
Institution
Main
Inst.
Camps
New
Haven
Kamloops
Main
Bldg.
Camp
Prince
George
Wardens	
Secretaries-
Chief Matron..
Custodial
Deputy Wardens-
Assistant Deputy Wardens	
Senior Correctional Officers	
Senior Prison Guards..
Senior Matrons	
Supervisors	
Matrons 	
Guards.	
Training
Deputy Wardens	
Assistant Deputy Wardens	
Chaplains-
Classification Officer	
Supervisor of Academic
Education 	
Supervisor of Social Education	
Supervisor of Vocational Education	
Educational Officers	
Vocational Officers	
1
3
6
8
73
3
U
6
14
107
20
11
20
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1960/61 T 99
16. Number of Officers and Employees on March 31, 1961—Continued
Oakalla Prison Farm
Haney
Correctional
Institution
New
Haven
Kamloops
Prince
George
Main
Prison
Women's
Prison
Camps
Drug
Huts
!fi£   <*«»*
Main
Bldg.
Camp
Training—Continued
Instructors, Academic—
Instructors, Vocational-
3
18
1
1
4
10
5
2
38
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
6
9
3
40
5
1
1
1
1
3
15
4
4
6
2
2
2
14
4
2
11
6
1
3
4
2
15
1
7
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
13
6
2
10
8
1
2
4
1
1
1
2
1
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