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ANNUAL REPORT of the MOTOR-VEHICLE BRANCH FOR THE YEAR 1960 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1962

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
ANNUAL REPORT
of the
MOTOR-VEHICLE
BRANCH
FOR THE YEAR
1960
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1962
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
VC, P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Annual Report of the Motor-
vehicle Branch for the year 1960.
R. W. BONNER,
A ttorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., December, 1961.
  REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT
OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1960
The Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C., B.A., LL.B.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Motor-vehicle
Branch for the year 1960.
This Report summarizes the work carried out by the Motor-vehicle Branch hi
administration of the Motor-vehicle Act. It deals with the issuance of licences and
the action of the Branch in driver's licence control. It indicates some of the problems in the Motor-vehicle Branch in meeting the needs of the public and what has
been done during 1960 to meet those requirements.
The Department of Commercial Transport Act, which was enacted in 1959,
provides that the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles is the licensing authority for
commercial vehicles. It is the responsibility of the Motor-vehicle Branch to see
that vehicles are properly licensed under the Department of Commercial Transport
Act in accordance with the gross vehicle weights of the vehicles.
The 1959 Report told of the commencing of a conversion programme to provide for increased mechanical processing of various phases of the Branch's work.
During 1959 the preparation of motor-vehicle licence applications was placed under
the new programme. This development was extended to the driver's licence programme in 1960. This latter action made it possible to send out to licensees, prior
to the expiration of their driver's licence, a notice to remind them of the coming
expiration and to serve as an application form for the renewal of the licence. This
action overcame criticism which existed previously, in that drivers felt it was an
unfair requirement for them to recall the expiration date of their five-year driver's
licence. A further benefit from the conversion programme was that the new driver's
licence could be mechanically prepared, which eliminated a great deal of the clerical
work which taxes the facilities of the various issuing offices and provided for a far
greater degree of accuracy in driver's licence preparation.
A major problem which faces the Motor-vehicle Branch is the inadequate
facilities in the head office in Victoria. I cannot urge too strongly that an early
decision be reached so that more efficient accommodation may be made available.
The present headquarters building does not lend itself at all to developing efficient
production programmes. A great deal of staff time is lost because of the need to
have important record files in various locations in the building. An ideal arrangement would see files centralized so that all divisions of the Branch could readily get
to them. An arrangement should exist so that the mechanical equipment could be
adjacent to the files. It is my firm opinion that this could be only done by the
development of a new building, designed to meet the present-day needs of the
Branch.
The office accommodation available in the Central Registry is entirely unsuitable, but unfortunately there is no place to extend it. Important legal documents,
such as bills of sale and conditional sales, are stored in open shelving which has no
semblance to being fireproof. It is my duty to point out that a fire in this area of
a work operation could be very disastrous. The matter of proving the existence
of mortgages and other encumbrances would be very difficult, if not impossible.
 G 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
I trust that a decision will soon be forthcoming to relieve the accommodation
problem. This Branch is charged with not only the responsibility of the collecting
of large revenue, but with the security of valuable legal documents affecting the
rights of our citizens.
This Report deals with the operation of the Branch under the following headings:—
1. Licences.
2. Accidents and Convictions.
3. Driving Safety.
(a) Safety Responsibility.
(b) Examination of Drivers.
(c) Drivers' Improvement Programme.
4. Encumbrance Registry Division.
5. School Buses.
6. Staff.
1. LICENCES
The number of motor-vehicles licensed in British Columbia in 1960 totalled
560,271. This is an increase of 18,908 over the 1959 total of 541,363, or 3.49
per cent. Passenger motor-vehicles in 1960 accounted for the issuance of 446,050
licences, an increase of 26,628 over the 1959 total of 419,422, or 6.34 per cent.
Commercial motor-vehicles accounted for the issuance of 114,221 licences, compared to 121,941 in 1959, a decrease of 6.33 per cent.
Two factors are involved in the commercial-vehicle licence decrease, both of
which arise as a result of the enactment of the Department of Commercial Transport Act. The higher licence fees caused some operators to refrain from licensing
stand-by equipment. Some vehicles which were operated in the Province on an
interprovincial basis did not come into British Columbia during 1960, again in the
interest of curtailing licence fee expenses, or if they did come, they were covered
by single-trip permits or quarterly licence permits. This result was not unexpected.
It reflected the efforts of operators to make reductions in operating expenses, which
apparently were uneconomical at the higher fee rate. The second point is that all
station wagons were considered as passenger-type vehicles in 1960. Previously
they had been categorized as private passenger-type vehicles or commercial-type
units. This became increasingly difficult to administer. The change to the passenger-type category for all these units overcame many irritations to the public,
particularly in so far as the movement of station wagons on ferries and toll-bridges
was concerned.
The number of trailers licensed in British Columbia continues to increase.
Trailer licences issued in 1960 amounted to 48,658, compared to the 1959 total of
43,682, an increase of 11.39 per cent.
The table which foUows is a comparison of licences and permits for motor-
vehicles and trailers issued for the licence-years 1953 to 1960, inclusive:—
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1960
G 7
Comparative Statement of Licences, Permits, etc., Issued during the
Licence-years 1953 to 1960, Inclusive
Licences Issued
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
Motor-vehicles—
37.532
34.441
44,269
259,212
52,950
288,700
50,990
320,737
43,576
349,761
49,268
370,154
45,364
Passenger (renewal)   .
221,408 |241,720
258,940 [276,161
400,686
303,481
341,650
371,727
393,337
419,422
446,050
Commercial (new)-  	
11,485 1 11,248
74,580 1 80,558
15,845
86,252
102,097"
405,578"
17,827
91,016
15,685
100,432
11,676
106,190
12,985
108,956
9,603
104,618
86,065 | 91,806
l45;005"|367,967"
108,843
450,493"
116,117
117,866
121,941
114,221
487,844
511,203
541,363
560,271
Non-resident   touring   motor-vehicle
1,371
130
2,127
213
1,959
232
1,673
219
1,384
245
1,100
149
965
109
1,302
Non-resident    special    motor-vehicle
198
Non-resident     commercial     motor-
1,555
2,598
3,991
6,519
8,493
10,056
13,197
16,525
Quarterly permits 	
	
344
Totals                   	
1,555 |    2,598
3,991
6,519
7,787"
    _
8,493
10,056
13,197
16,869
1,806
2,612
3,998
	
11,575
13,333
18,100
7,805
	
_.  |	
	
16,273
Totals                      	
1,806 |    2,612
3,998
7,787
11,575
13,333
18,100
24,078
Permits for temporary  operation of
790
810
829
983
1,070
1,100
1,220
1,425
Motor-cycles—
508
3,317
470
3,274
532
3,233
536
3,188
602
3,112
577
3,464
678
3,450
603
3,477
Total motor-cycles  	
3,825  |    3,744
3,765
3,724
3,714
4,041
4,128
4,080
15,417
682
889
10
8
903
18,205
687
873
10
9
875
20,855
691
883
10
5
843
24,581
722
995
12
7
947
29,663
724
979
11
6
908
34,928
730
925
15
7
919
43,682
755
970
31
19
1,024
48,658
Motor-dealers—
748
989
Original motor-cycle dealer licences.—
Additional motor-cycle dealer licences
40
16
1,008
Transfers—
173,954
33,626
2,630
286
172,256
37,540
2,847
466
191,642
41,718
2,846
505
210,463
44,928
2,904
672
258,967
215,896
45,671
3,173
830
265,570
218,513
46,536
3,190
1,046
269,285
229,655
48,061
3.0P0
1,513
282,309
224,037
40,612
2,750
Trailers..- ,	
1,318
210,496 |213,109
236,711
4,627
4,011
48,406
939,920
9,690
268,717
Chauffeurs—■
4,546
4,128
42,862
712,517
4,541
4,001
43,486
668,319
4,978
4,243
59,443
630,112
13,166
5,251
4,269
65,159
805,528
13,123
5,207
4,112
61,556
639,269
12,785
5,295
4,485
64,359
328,115
13,018
5,368
4 756
65,209
887,170
12,297
Safety  responsibility  insurance  certifi-
Drivers' Licences
Drivers' licences issued by the Motor-vehicle Branch during 1960 totalled
198,711, which more than doubles the 1959 total of 90,947 licences. Licences
issued to original applicants totalled 43,878, compared to the 1959 total of 45,814.
First licences issued to persons under 21 years of age totalled 16,499, compared to
16,198 in 1959. Original adult licences amounted to 27,379, compared to 29,616
in 1959.
The large increase in the driver's licence issuance volume came in the issuance
of renewal drivers' licences. This totalled 154,831 in 1960, compared to 45,126
in 1959. It is necessary to keep in mind that September, 1960, was the commencement month of the third cycle of five-year driver's licence issuance.   The twelve-
 G 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
month period from September, 1960, requires the renewal of a large percentage of
licences. From September, 1961, for the following four years, the licence renewal
rate would be at a much lower monthly level. It was in this aspect of our work
that we found the mechanized programme to be of great assistance. It is pointed
out that the additional work was carried out without the need of additional staff.
The number of licensed drivers in British Columbia at the end of 1960 totalled
675,000.
Chauffeurs' Licences
The comparative statement of licences, shown on a previous page, shows the
number of chauffeurs' licences issued during the period of 1953 to 1960. Chauffeurs' licences are divided into three categories. The Class A chauffeurs' licence
is required by an operator of a vehicle carrying passengers for hire where the capacity of passengers carried exceeds nine. The Class B chauffeur's licence is for an
operator of a vehicle carrying passengers for hire where the capacity of passengers
carried does not exceed nine. The Class C chauffeur's licence is required by an
operator of a vehicle carrying personal property when the operator does that driving
as a means of earning his livelihood.
The total number of chauffeurs' licences issued in 1960 was 75,333, as compared to the 1959 total of 74,139, an increase of 1.61 per cent. The increase in
1960 continues the trend of the previous year and reflects in the fact that better
enforcement is evident. In some years there was a decline in the chauffeur's licence
issuance total as compared to an increased number of commercial vehicles. I am
pleased to draw attention to the fact that the various police departments are giving
this matter the attention it requires.
Distribution of Motor-vehicles
The following table shows the distribution of motor-vehicles in British Columbia according to the locations where vehicle licences are obtained. It is pointed out
that this distribution table does not provide an accurate figure of the number of
vehicles operated in any given area because it frequently happens that a vehicle
may be licensed at one centre and may have to go to another location through a
change of business interest or residence. However, it is a good guide of the distribution of motor-vehicles throughout the Province. This information is apparently of considerable interest to community planners.
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1960 G 9
Distribution of Motor-vehicles
The following table shows a breakdown of motor-vehicle licence issuance by
centres:—
Place
Passenger Motor-vehicles
Commercial Motor-vehicles
Grand
Used
New
Renewals
Total
Used
New
Renewals
Total
Total
109
69
30
4
22
274
25
272
233
280
113
159
40
141
442
8
294
23
157
10
213
60
28
20
50
112
279
824
308
40
198
517
30
350
71
11
54
52
10
46
31
31
89
1,899
698
672
32
136
1,127
82
459
347
33
56
593
5
528
435
363
137
198
401
HI
276
1
192
73
664
503
307
20
33
330
723
511
3,374
1,280
58
620
348
136
678
321
27
142
56
12
112
163
150
527
8,306
2,969
3,863
59
653
3,238
198
5,196
5,650
737
27
700
9,036
630
12,637
6,925
4,483
1,585
43
6,081
1,047
2,057
542
1,479
1,499
6,638
228
6,732
1,780
796
888
2,942
9,350
6,074
50,009
14,426
1,726
6,280
3,933
2,805
6,294
2,488
748
2,124
1,138
828
2,139
1,254
1,292
5,091
64,110
37,028
26,130
790
6,503
65,590
2,178
5,764
6,066
800
31
778
9,903
660
13,437
7,593
5,126
1,835
400
6,522
1,299
2,775
551
1,965
1,595
7,459
238
7,448
2,147
844
941
3,322
10,185
6,864
54,207
16,014
1,824
7,098
4,798
2,971
7,322
2,880
786
2,320
1,246
850
2,297
1,448
1,473
5,707
74,315
40,695
30,665
881
7,292
69,955
2,458
"446,050 "
36
6
10
18
10
22
6
38
14
112
31
155
8
120
351
2
144
7
23
5
36
6
2
4
7
13
41
52
16
11
30
375
1
88
6
1
23
13
7
17
9
4
6
71
52
13
20
18
58
17
208
59
14
2
28
194
16
227
88
155
78
119
119
54
232
2
142
65
207
2
113
37
6
27
72
153
151
385
67
42
126
271
16
277
59
12
82
54
9
68
83
105
83
930
822
197
39
227
839
105
2,045
1,149
436
40
577
3,065
553
4,197
1,818
1,793
1,113
44
1,772
638
1,600
267
1,091
959
2,903
151
2,292
367
445
542
1,058
2,509
2,694
7,824
2,519
827
1,986
2,789
797
3,280
835
386
1,390
488
161
1,296
979
814
1,112
11,343
6,385
2,281
792
3,203
15,373
1,640
2,289
1,214
460
60
615
3,281
575
4,462
1,920
2,060
1,222
318
1,899
812
2,183
271
1,377
1,031
3,133
158
2,441
410
453
573
1,137
2,675
2,886
8,261
2,602
880
2,142
3,435
814
3,645
900
399
1,495
555
177
1,381
1,071
923
1,201
12,344
7,259
2,491
851
3,448
16,270
1,762
8,053
7,280
1,260
Atlin 	
91
1,393
Chilliwack 	
13,184
1,235
Cloverdale —	
17,899
9,513
Cranbrook -—
Creston — —
Dawson Creek1	
Duncan	
Fernie 	
7,186
3,057
718
8,421
2,111
4,958
Ganges	
Golden  _ 	
822
3,342
2,626
Kamloops _ —
10,592
396
Kelowna 	
9,889
2,557
1,297
1,514
4,459
12,860
9,750
62,468
18,616
2,704
9,240
8,233
3,785
10,967
3,780
1,185
3,815
1,801
1,027
3,678
2,519
2,396
6,908
86,659
47,954
33,156
1,732
10,740
86,225
4,220
Merritt	
Mission    -
Nelson ... _ 	
New Westminster2—
North Vancouver3—
Oliver -	
Penticton 	
Pouce Coupe1 	
Prince George __.	
Quesnel  ...
Revelstoke — —    -
Rossland ...  	
Terrace —	
Trail              	
Vancouver East	
Vancouver-Point Grey
Vanderhoof—	
Totals..	
10,775
34,589    1
400,686
2,135
7,468
104,618
114,221
560,271
1 Dawson Creek-Pouce Coupe Area (Dawson Creek office opened September 12th, 1960) (does not include
256 commercial plates issued for National Defence vehicles that operate throughout British Columbia): Passenger, 5,198;   commercial, 3,497.
2 New Westminster (includes issuance at Haney, a temporary office at Burnaby during rush neriod, and
mail-order issuance to New Westminster area from Victoria):   Passenger, 55,709;   commercial, 8,465.
3 North Vancouver (does not include 969 commercial plates issued for National Defence vehicles that operate throughout British Columbia):   Passenger, 16,014;   commercial, 1,633.
4 Vancouver (includes issuance from Motor Licence Office at 1730 West Georgia Street, 2410 Nanaimo
Street, and 5986 East Boulevard and mail-order issuance to Vancouver area from Victoria; does not include
issuance at North Vancouver; issuance at Sechelt and Squamish, which account through Vancouver, has been
deducted):   Passenger, 158,485;  commercial, 23,036.
5 Victoria (does not include mail-order issuance to other areas; in addition to these totals, 953 passenger
and 3,511 commercial plates were issued for Provincial Government vehicles and 418 commercial plates were
issued for National Defence vehicles which operate throughout British Columbia): Passenger, 47,541; commercial, 7,810.
2
 G 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Mail-order Issuance
Mail-order issuance is carried out by the Motor-vehicle Branch at the Victoria
office. There is a fairly constant requirement to provide this type of service. It had
been hoped that with the obtaining of additional issuing facilities in Vancouver and
the commencement of Issuing Offices in some of the smaller centres over the past
few years that the mail-order issuance might have declined. However, it seems
that a fair number of vehicle-owners want this service maintained, as evidenced by
their use of it. The 1960 total of licences issued by mail amounted to 36,343,
compared to the 1959 total of 40,137. Whilst this shows a drop of 10 per cent
from the previous year, it is not clear whether it is a trend which will continue.
Perhaps the next year or two will show whether there will be a greater reliance on
the service of the local Issuing Offices as compared to the mail-order service, which
is the desire of the Branch. A synopsis of the 1960 mail-order issuance follows
and shows the types of licences issued and some indication of the place of residence
of the applicant:—
7960 Mail-order Synopsis, January 1st, 1960, to February 28th, 1961
Vancouver
New
Westmii
ster
Vancouver
Island
and
Islands
Balance
of
Province
Out of
Province
Total
Passenger plates  	
Provincial Government passenger plates
Commercial plates
Provincial Government commercial plates
Motor-cycle plates	
National Defence plates  _._ 	
" CF " plates 	
Farm tractor plates	
Section 7 " X " plates .
Totals.... 	
4,578
953
575
3,511
30
418
3
1
186
14,676
974
42
239
11
532
1,502
69
3
12
123
1,538
292
12
3,643
992
37
18
5
93
289
45
400
10,255    I  16,474    |     1,709
1,958
5,406
102
248
2
183
6
541
26,039
953
3,150
3,511
126
418
744
62
1,340
36,343
Revenue
Revenue quoted by the Motor-vehicle Branch for the issuance of licences,
permits, and other services in the 1960 licence-year (March 1st, 1960, to February
28th, 1961) totalled $18,755,133.28, as compared to the 1959 total of $14,659,-
511.77, the increase being 27 per cent. The increase amounted to $4,095,621.51.
Slightly over $3,000,000 was increased revenue on commercial-vehicle licensing.
The Motor-vehicle Branch offices collected $12,733,600, or 68.1 per cent of the
total revenue collection. The balance of $5,981,733, or 31.9 per cent, was collected
by the various Government Agencies of the Department of Finance which carry out
licence issuance services in the areas of the Province not served directly by the
Motor-vehicle Branch offices.
The following are the locations of the Motor-vehicle Branch offices with the
1960 revenue collection for each noted:—
Vancouver (Georgia Street)      $2,943,978.09
Victoria         2,921,355.82
New Westminster       1,859,771.65
Vancouver East       1,612,926.69
Vancouver-Point Grey   868,674.47
Cloverdale     584,842.19
North Vancouver  478,045.68
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1960      G  11
Chilliwack 	
Kamloops 	
Abbotsford   	
Trail 	
Mission 	
Dawson Creek
$455,248.34
373,176.96
287,505.92
205,208.78
152,211.22
30,415.05!
Total   $12,773,360.85
i Commenced operation September 6th, 1960.
Refunds
There are several statutory provisions which provide for the issuance of refunds
of the unused portions of licences when the licences are surrendered. Mention is
made here of this act because it is becoming an increasing work volume. The
development of a higher licence fee schedule for commercial vehicles and the desire
of vehicle-owners to recover the unused portions of the licence fees caused a large
increase in refund requests during 1960.
Refunds are divided into various categories, as follows:—
(1) Drivers' Licences.—It was the policy, when the five-year licence programme was developed in 1951, that licensees could obtain refunds of the
unused portions of their licences if they left the Province or ceased driving.
In the case of the deceased, licence refunds were available by the estates.
(2) General Refunds.—This category concerns cases where licence fees are
collected in error in excess of the proper fee. It also covers instances
where, through some error, tv/o licences are obtained for a vehicle. In
other instances, improper fees are collected on driver's licence issuance,
particularly in the under-21 category where the fee varies according to
the age of the applicant.
(3) Relinquishments.—This category covers motor-vehicle licences which are
surrendered as a result of the vehicles being burned, damaged beyond
repair, or removed from the Province.
(4) Seasonal Refunds.—For many years the Motor-vehicle Act has provided
for the refunding of licence fees for vehicles of owners who lived east of
the Cascades, provided the owners surrendered their licences in October,
November, or December. This policy goes back to the time when winter
conditions restricted the use of vehicles in that part of the Province east
of the Cascades. The provision has not been removed from the Motor-
vehicle Act despite the fact that better vehicle and highway engineering
reduces the validity of it.
(5) Refunds on Transfers.—This is a new provision as a result of the Department of Commercial Transport Act. It provides that when a vehicle with
an annual licence fee not in excess of $50 is transferred, the transferor is
entitled, providing the licence-plates are surrendered, to a fee return of
the unexpired quarters of his licence. There is good reason for this type
of a refund in that when the subsequent owner purchases a vehicle in this
category, he may have a differnt type of use than the original owner,
resulting in a different gross vehicle weight and a different rate for the
licence fee.
 G  12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The following table sets out the number of refunds and the amounts of money
refunded for the 1960/61 fiscal year:—
Type of Refund Number Amount
Driver's      1,311 $3,509.00
General—■
Motor-vehicle Act ______ 1,287 $12,044.67
Department of Commercial Transport
Act      717 26,515.53
     2,004             38,560.20
Relinquishments—
Passenger   4,686 $28,657.01
Regular commercial      876 27,132.70
Farm commercial        29 322.67
  5,591       56,112.38
Seasonals—
Passenger       441 $2,535.38
Regular commercial      428 17,973.84
Farm commercial        55 718.05
  924             21,227.27
Transfers—
Regular commercial      195 $32,936.25
Farm commercial        59 895.00
 ■       254             33,831.25
Totals  10,084 $153,240.10
Total   under   Motor-vehicle
Act   7,725 $46,746.06
Total under Department of
Commercial   Transport
Act   2,359 106,494.04
10,084
$153,240.10
2. ACCIDENTS AND CONVICTIONS
Motor-vehicle Accidents
The following table
gives a summary of the accident frequency during the
period 1952 to I960:—
Motor-
Number
Accidents
per 1,000
Deaths
per
10,000
Vehicles
Registered
Average
Deaths
per 100
Million
Miles
Fatal
Fatal
Accidents
vehicles
Registered
of
Accidents
Vehicles
Registered
Injuries
Deaths
Property
Damage
Accidents
per 100
Million
Miles
1952	
317,553
21,189
66.70
7,197
209
6.5
$304.32
9.44
177
7.99
1953 .__	
345,005
22,096
63.05
7,737
208
5.9
322.59
8.49
183
7.47
1954._.	
367,967
22,425
61.05
7,582
211
5.7
325.67
7.38
181
6.33
1955 __
405,578
22,030
55.10
8,263
225
5.6
392.79
7.51
194
6.47
1956	
450,493
24,905
55.34
9,700
316
7.0
437.05
9.03
272
7.77
1957___	
487,844
25,976
53.24
9,521
252
5.1
482.76
6.70
224
5.96
1958 —
506,398
24,583
48.54
9,814
282
5.5
480.72
7.01
246
6.12
1959	
536,120
25,536
47.63
10,541
309
5.7
478.79
7.55
268
6.55
1960	
566,144
26,091
46.08
11,311
294
5.2
474.78
6.73
253
5.79
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1960       G 13
The total number of accidents increased in 1960 from the 1959 total by 2.2
per cent. Increases were reflected in injuries and a higher total of property damage.
There was a decrease in the number of deaths from 309 in 1959 to 294 in 1960.
It will be noted that the rate of deaths per 100 million miles of highway travelled
decreased from 7.55 in 1959 to 6.73 in 1960, and that fatal accidents per 100
million miles travelled decreased from 6.55 in 1959 to 5.79 in 1960. This is an
important point to notice. It does indicate an improvement in the frequency rate,
which could be the result of better driving, better vehicles, better driving conditions,
or a combination of all or any of the three factors.
Accidents—
1959 _ ....... 25,536
26,091
10,541
11,311
1960               	
Injuries—
1959  	
Increase of 2.2 per cent.
1960  	
Deaths—
1959  	
Increase of 7.3 per cent.
1960  	
Property damage—
1959  	
Decrease of 4.8 per cent.
1960 	
309
294
$12,226,545.90
Increase of 1.3 per cent.
The tables following set out accident statistics for the various cities, municipalities, villages, and districts of British Columbia for 1959 and 1960.
 G 14
CITIES
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in
municipalities
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
Place of Occurrence
1959
1960
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1959
1960
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1959
1960
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1
Per Cent
100.0
— 100.0
— 100.0
— 100.0
-loo.o
—50.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
— 100.0
— 100.0
50.0
100.0
— 100.0
1
Per Cent
100.0
— 100.0
— 100.0
21
6
45
26
13
25
18
2
2
4
18
Per Cent
— 14.2
— 100.0
2
1
	
2
1
	
36
29
21
20
26
1
6
—20.0
11.5
61.5
—20.0
	
44.4
— 100.0
1
1
	
— 100.0
-100.0
—50.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
-100.0
— 100.0
50.0
100.0
-100.0
100.0
— 100.0
—50.0
50.0
1
1
2
55
1
36
19
49
18
305
120
44
47
37
37
61
30
10
12
14
32
3,433
35
358
19
44
2
51
15
78
19
334
156
38
49
55
45
56
44
15
13
2
48
3,467
26
418
24
—20.0
1
1
4
2
100.0
2
1
1
5
2
41.6
—21.0
59.1
5.6
4
1
2
4
1
2
9.5
3
3
3
3
30.0
— 13.6
4.3
2
2
48.6
21.6
2
100.0
— 100.0
3.3
— 100.0
-20.0
-100.0
2
—8.2
1
1
46.6
50.0
1
1
1
1
	
8.3
—85.7
Trail                     -
50.0
30
1
5
1
31
30
1
5
1
31
3.3
-100.0
—20.0
-100.0
1.0
—25.7
4
4
16.7
White Rock                                 	
26.3
55
541      —1.8
55
53
-3.6
4,934
5.156!          4.5
11
2
7
14
1
13
1
2
1
1
1
2
4
2
1
Per Cent
27.3
—50.0
85.7
—50.0
11
2
5
13
1
9
Per Cent
18.2
—50.0
80.0
586
24
102
677
14
130
6
127
106
36
Per Cent
15.5
—41.7
27.5
100.0
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
— 50.0
91
115
46
1
33
21
131
135
59
27
39.6
Delta                                           	
—7.8
100.0
100.0
—21.7
— 100.0
2
—50.0
100.0
-33.3
—42.9
100.0
100.0
20.0
—50.0
2
1
1
2
4
1
1
-50.0
100.0
— 33.3
-33.3
—50.0
53
37
131
137
81
31
60.6
76.2
3
7
2
1
3
6
2
1
1.5
37.3
14.8
105
44
1
1
27
214
160
15
75
21
541
154
33
1
30
245
167
21
73
17
581
1
124
46.7
Oak Bay                  _	
1
1
1
1
100.0
100.0
—25.0
— 100.0
11.1
5
4
1
6
6
2
1
6
13
4
4
1
5
6
2
1
5
50.0
—50.0
14.5
4.4
40.0
—2.7
— 13.3
— 100.0
— 19.0
15
15
13
-13.3
7.4
100.0
1
1
-100.0
142
— 12.7
71
73
2.8
66
66
	
2,717
3,013
10.9
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1960      G  15
the Province for the Calendar Years 1959 and 1960
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damage
Increase
Increase
Increase
Increase
1959
1960
or(-)
Decrease
1959
1960
or (-)
Decrease
1959
1960
or (-)
Decrease
1959
1960
or (-)
Decrease
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
14
12
-14.2
89
107
20.2
52
67
28.8
$25,809.11
$32,532.34
26.0
6
— 100.0
18
10
—44.4
12
7
-41.7
4,860.50
2,329.35
—52.0
34
26
—23.5
238
195
— 18.0
128
105
— 17.9
53,591.75
41,703.96
—22.2
19
19
102
100
—2.0
62
61
— 1.6
31,009.97
24,266.29
—21.7
10
17
70.0
102
109
6.9
54
61
12.9
21,106.29
24,623.16
16.7
17
14
-17.6
147
171
16.3
80
88
10.0
29,269.55
35,931.77
22.8
15
19
26.6
88
84
—4.5
50
51
2.0
18,326.50
16,941.31
—7.6
2
— 100.0
5
2
—60.0
4
1
-75.0
24,237.00
350.00
-98.5
2
1
-50.0
21
12
—42.9
12
6
—50.0
2,945.30
1,467.00
— 50.2
3
5
66.6
24
32
33.3
14
20
42.9
5,868.34
6,503.11
10.8
5
7
40.0
2
4
100.0
700.00
1,890.00
170.0
40
33
— 17.5
336
349
3.9
184
182
— 1.1
89,421.96
85,259.24
—4.7
1
2
100.0
5
8
60.0
3
6
100.0
908.00
1,964.00
116.0
23
37
60.8
198
240
21.2
108
135
25.0
43,179.35
48,563.30
12.5
15
10
—33.3
70
82
17.1
41
46
12.2
13,753.46
13,858.46
0.7
31
49
58.0
290
360
24.1
161
201
24.8
68,422.76
83,158.36
21.5
16
10
-37.5
99
82
— 17.2
53
44
— 16.9
24,506.00
19,647.39
— 19.8
229
224
—2.2
1,820
1,840
1.1
935
927
—0.9
394,396.55
407,406.80
3.3
92
116
26.0
648
687
6.0
338
366
8.3
136,075.45
140,639.72
3.4
32
31
—3.1
182
229
25.8
111
123
10.8
35,263.80
44,125.85
25.1
35
35
	
286
281
— 1.7
152
153
0.7
66,026.70
57,907.61
— 12.3
25
39
56.0
184
212
15.2
96
112
16.6
43,442.73
57,763.95
32.9
27
33
22.2
107
157
46.7
60
89
48.3
29,481.36
44,177.45
49.8
43
44
2.3
474
400
— 15.6
252
214
— 15.1
99,809.50
87,807.50
— 12.0
29
36
24.1
246
298
21.1
141
175
24.1
48,315.08
62,272.67
28.9
7
12
71.4
88
52
—40.9
48
29
—39.6
19,404.82
11.475.00
—40.9
7
8
14.2
58
40
—31.0
35
23
—34.3
10,803.69
10,298.90
—4.7
9
2
—77.7
40
20
— 50.0
25
12
—52.0
9,228.25
4,000.17
—56.7
25
26
4.0
164
172
4.9
92
97
5.4
28,465.18
44,059.81
54.8
2,539
2,519
— 19.6
16,711
15,615
-6.6
8,579
8,389
—2.2
3,429,063.11
3,316,038.80
—0.3
25
17
-32.0
214
159
—25.7
114
85
—25.4
41,631.05
35,859.66
— 13.9
284
319
12.3
1,959
2,026
3.4
1,032
1,070
3.7
351,036.49
366,634.83
—5.6
13
17
30.8
72
64
— 11.1
41
40
—2.4
15,640.54
14,394.20
-8.0
3,669
3,732
26.0
25,090
24,202
—3.5
13,071
12,989
—0.6
$5,216,000.14
$5,145,851.96
-0.1
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
385
438
13.8
2,755
3,134
13.8
1,423
1,652
16.1
$666,382.53
$781,836.19
17.3
13
11
— 15.4
52
53
1.9
33
37
12.1
13,439.69
17,117.78
27.4
69
65
—5.8
343
335
—2.3
211
215
1.9
116,081.41
108,415.94
—6.6
1
100.0
2
100.0
1
100.0
2,100 00
100.0
67
94
40.3
403
490
21.6
222
278
25.2
100,017.37
114,559.80
14.5
65
55
-15.4
293
225
—23.2
189
158
— 16.4
116,284.12
96,841.58
-16.7
33
28
— 15.2
192
169
— 11.9
111
99
— 10.8
48,228.46
46,284.63
—4.0
1
-100.0
2
7
250.0
1
4
300.0
555.00
1,081.00
94.8
20
20
77
72
—6.5
54
52
—3.7
39,505.45
27,256.18
28,147.22
34,570.63
28 6
10
20
100.0
112
116
3.6
59
64
8.5
26.8
69
77
11.6
437
404
—7.6
243
230
—5.3
123,610.71
108.379.16
— 12.3
78
90
15.4
486
439
—9.7
279
254
-9.0
151,805.23
136,788.09
—9.9
36
45
25.0
264
261
— 1.1
155
147
—5.2
72,395.88
66,355.55
— 8.3
18
15
— 16.7
101
101
 	
64
67
4.7
30,834.10
38,633.92
25.3
1
549
621
— 100.0
13.1
1
301
338
— 100.0
12.3
165.00
— 100 0
85
110
29.4
119,062.04
138,516.70
16.3
38
22
—42.1
161
159
— 1.2
93
89
-4.3
36,891.26
34,042.83
—7.7
1
-100.0
1
3
200.0
1
2
100.0
150.00
1,700.00
103.0
1
— 100.0
3
9
200.0
2
5
150.0
529.00
1,567.87
196.0
23
24
4.3
93
148
59.1
64
92
43.8
21,438.00
36,840.44
71.8
154
180
16.9
884
982
11.1
470
538
14.5
273,474.97
236,169.35
-13.6
104
121
16.3
625
630
0.8
352
377
7.1
146,145.35
157,479.73
7.8
9
13
44.4
56
76
35.7
39
48
23.1
20,287.29
20,858.90
2.8
31
40
29.0
169
189
11.8
95
115
21.1
76,668.98
72,241.31
—5.8
15
10
—33.3
81
53
—34.6
50
33
—34.0
25,231.14
11,958 05
—52.6
366
372
1.6
2,311
2,184
—5.5
1,186
1,172
— 1.2
595,764.31
558.960.91
-6.2
1
100.0
7
7
6
6
1,560.00
168,665.56
1,710.00
170,746.84
9 6
97
83
-14.4
704
649
-7.8
364
352
~6,425
-3.3
5.9~
1.2
1,788
1,935
8.2
11,162
11,518
3.2
6,068
$2,992,429.03
$3,023,904.42
1.1
 G  16
VILLAGES
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
Place of Occurrence
1959
1960
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1959
1960
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1959
1960
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
	
Per Cent
Per Cent
17
4
9
3
1
9
4
Per Cent
—47.0
—25.0
	
100.0
1000
6
25
3
— 100.0
1
100.0
—64.0
	
1
33.3
	
1
8
14
7
2
1
4
8
2
2
3
100.0
100.0
-ioo.6
—87.5
	
—71.4
14.3
	
	
100.0
7
2
—71.4
50.0
loo.o
-100.0
1
	
1
8
4
10
1
8
100.0
14
4
2
	
100.0
Ladysmith .... . — —
2
	
-28.6
—75.0
100.0
	
Lytton    .   	
-100.0
100.0
1
6
9
8
4
2
9
4
1
1
3
12
1
8
1
3
11
2
4
15
100 0
—loo.o
100.0
1
4
7
8
7
3
3
— 100.0
1
1
1
1
50.0
28.6
1
1
1
1
1
1
— 100.0
-100.0
—42:9
—33.3
200.0
	
	
100.0
— 100.0
1
2
7
9
1
Princeton  	
1
— 100.0
1
—50.0
—57.1
Quesnel     	
33.3
—
— 100.0
Sechelt 	
100.0
4
3
3
7
5
3
2
100.0
166.6
	
— 66.7
1
100.0
1
57.1
—60.0
Warfield
33.3
Williams Lake
650.0
Totals	
6
5
-16.7
6
5
-16.7
192
184
—4.2
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1960       G 17
Province for the Calendar Years 1959 and 1960—Continued
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damage
1959
1960
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1959
1960
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1959
1960
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1959
1960
Increase
or (-)
Decrease
12
4
7
3
1
9
3
2
1
2
8
1
2
2
8
Per Cent
-41.7
—25.0
100.0
— 100.0
—50.0
100.0
—66.7
-77.8
33.3
100.0
—50.0
100.0
96
9
3
30
106
48
97
17
5
19
70
27
2
24
13
11
92
2
17
21
45
22
6
26
21
12
2
3
10
50
47
1
57
22
8
9
2
8
20
15
67
2
8
25
27
22
2
92
17
10
58
Per Cent
1.0
88.9
66.7
—36.7
—33.9
—43.8
100.0
167.0
—40.9
—68.6
39.4
-66.7
112.0
250.0
— 100.0
125.0
175.0
—40.0
8.3
31.3
20.0
100.0
—25.0
100.0
2.0
-6.0
—66.7
46.2
37.5
—70.4
28.6
100.0
700.0
5.3
-11.8
—28.7
-60.0
300.0
13.6
— 100.0
—25.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
21.4
233.0
11.5
51
7
2
15
57
24
50
10
3
10
42
17
1
14
8
9
46
1
11
12
26
12
4
15
13
10
1
2
5
28
27
1
33
13
4
5
2
4
12
9
39
1
5
14
15
'I
53
9
7
37
Per Cent
—2.0
42.9
50.0
—33.3
—26.3
—29.2
100.0
133.0
—33.3
—66.7
27.8
—66.7
57.1
200.0
— 100.0
136.0
200.0
—20.0
15.4
18.2
100.0
100.0
$19,405.34
795.00
699.00
8,263.10
34,919.25
10,737.53
$15,308.47
2,662.00
420.00
5,312.21
20,443.98
5,696.18
450.00
3,997.62
2,530.00
3,702.50
17,560.69
1,425.00
2,665.08
5,857.13
Per Cent
—21.1
235.0
—39.9
2
18
3
—35.7
—41.5
—46.9
100.0
1
3
9
6
9
22
35
66
6
8
6
6
20
8
10
24
16
10
6
12
27
36
3
7
4
4
11
4
5
13
11
5
2,033.10
4,217.05
11,580.00
13,749.35
1,235.00
1,933.36
1,200.00
700.00
3,145.00
640.00
3,464.00
5,073.00
4,494.27
1,295.00
750.00
347.60
10,857.00
12,198.61
415.00
7,645.00
6,212.00
5,370.00
1,221.68
96.6
—40.0
—68.0
27.7
15.4
4
2
37.8
388.0
— 100.0
17,863.00
3,535.00
1,540.00
9,658.00
6,099.56
2,516.00
200.00
290.00
1,720.48
9,435.00
10,801.41
200.00
14,402.86
4,283.70
1,225.00
4,175.00
1,400.00
959.16
3,030.60
7,195.00
16,282.75
150.00
2,049.00
4,334.50
5,207.87
4,468.00
245.00
30,471.45
1,881.11
1,492.50
15,521.85
468 0
452 0
3
4
1
5
1
100.0
4
90 4
3
—66.7
100.0
100.0
— 100.0
25.0
14.3
16.7
—25.0
—33.3
35.7
100 0
4
5
49
50
3
39
16
27
7
2
3
29
28
2
21
11
14
5
—61.3
1
66.7
-3.4
-3.6
-50.0
57.1
18.2
-71.4
395 0
4
7
6
4
3
3
5
8
7
3
2
3
2
1
1
2
10
1
3
1
3
8
2
3
11
— 13.1
— 11.5
—41.7
88.4
—31.0
-77.2
242.0
100.0
—50.6
—50.0
100.0
-100.0
1000
—25.0
—66.7
600
—50.0
50.0
450.0
100.0
300.0
9.1
—25.0
-43.5
—66.7
400.0
7.7
100 0
1
1
19
17
94
5
2
22
1
36
11
46
14
3
52
1
11
12
51
3
1
13
'■-20
7
100.0
2
4
5
1
3,896.50
9,955.00
20,392.76
1,050.00
130.00
7,280.00
1,200.00
6,442.34
2,360.00
—22.2
—27.7
—20.2
-85.7
1,476.0
—40.5
100 0
4
3
3
—25.0
85.7
100.0
104.0
12.5
250.0
23.3
— 19.2
89.3
100.0
5
4
2
2
26
8
2
30
12,530.35
3,355.00
600.00
13,934.04
143.0
—43.9
149.0
11.4
135
139
3.0
1,061
1,133
6.8
604
654
8.3
$257,721.23
$270,664.66
5.0
 G  18
UNORGANIZED
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
Detachment
1959
1960
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1959    1960
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1959
1960
Increase
or (-)
Decrease
2
Per Cent
100.0
— 100.0
2
Per Cent
100.0
25
3
5
14
22
-1
15
30
24
64
4
7
9
24
Per Cent
156.0
33.3
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
— 100.0
100.0
40.0
—35.7
100.0
9.1
2
1
4
1
1
18
27
13
3
—83.3
1
4
1
100.0
-100.0
— 100.0
1
— 100.0
— 100.0
200.0
100.0
100.0
— 100.0
100.0
-25.0
—33.3
— 100.0
-75.0
—50.0
20.0
— 10.0
—45.8
100.0
200.0
100.0
100.0
— 100.0
100.0
-16.7
— 100.0
—85.7
1
3
3
2
1
3
3
2
3
29
47
38
24
14
4
30
122
26
36
30
21
21
13
26
96
1
67
51
12
56
30
55
85
14
19
28
5
29
11
63
15
15
10
48
30
9
16
92
41
44
105
3
85
26
24
7
29
37
— 10.3
—23.4
1
1
1
1
—21.1
— 12.5
3
50.0
225.0
6
6
5
6
4
6
2
4
3
4
1
— 13.3
—21.3
100.0
Courtenay  	
2
7
1
67
62
10
41
19
51
73
21
20
28
5
34
7
33
18
7
21
27
36
8
11
97
41
31
91
1
58
8
46
15
23
17
— 17.7
20.0
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
36.6
50.0
100.0
— 100.0
100.0
600.0
-100.0
—50.0
57.9
2
1
1
1
7
4
3
2
2
7
2
7.8
100.0
— 100.0
100.0
100.0
— 100.0
— 33.3
—33.3
100.0
100.0
—50.0
16.4
En derby 	
1
1
1
3
3
3
1
—33.3
-5.0
2
2
2
— 14.7
57.1
4
1
4
2
100.0
90.9
— 16.7
114.0
11       1O00
2
2
2
7
1
1
6
1
1
2
1
4
6
2
6
—52.4
2
2
2
1
2
2
6
6
2
6
2
1
2
3
—50.0
— 100.0
ioo.o
—25.0
500.0
100.0
77.8
— 16.7
— 100.0
100.0
—42.9
500.0
100.0
12.5
45.5
8
1
1
6
—5.2
41.9
15.4
—50.0
200.0
7
1
—71.4
100.0
-100.0
100.0
-100.0
4
1
2
1
2
46.6
225.0
100.0
-100.0
100.0
-100.0
—47.8
2
2
-53.3
3
26.1
3
1
117.0
2
1     —50.0
2
1
-50.0
27
1
15
19
4
5
25
20
19
65
15
17
8
7
30
11
1
26
7
15
69
26
— 37.0
700.0
	
	
—53.3
57.9
McBride      -
— 100.0
100.0
100.0
— 100.0
-100.0
175.0
1
1
— 100.0
100.0
1
1
1
— 80.0
4.0
2
4
1       100.0
      —100.0
-65.0
1
3
—21.1
Nanaimo — 	
— 100.0
6.2
73.3
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1960      G  19
Province for the Calendar Years 1959 and 1960—Continued
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damage
Increase
Increase
Increase
Increase
1959
1960
or(-)
Decrease
1959
1960
or(-)
Decrease
1959
1960
or (-)
Decrease
1959
1960
or (-)
Decrease
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
18
34
88.9
126
149
18.3
86
111
29.1
$50,670.43
$62,226.45
22.8
3
3
11
4
—63.6
8
4
-50.0
3,095.40
1,325.00
-57.2
4
4
32
40
25.0
22
27
22.7
11,949.35
20,505.00
71.6
9
14
9
12
32
89
35
73
9.4
-17.9
25
60
24
60
—4.0
15,087.00
37,088.00
15,031.62
43,440.00
-0.4
17.1
— 14.3
—80.0
6
100.0
18
3
16
100.0
— 11.1
10,200.15
1,175.00
7,892.24
100.0
—22.6
5
1
22'!       241.         9.1
10
12
20.0
84
89
6.0
57
60
5.3
30,587.21
29,512.55
—3.5
14
15
7.1
94
71
-24.5
64
52
— 18.8
51,554.81
34,414.10
— 33.2
12
9
—25.0
63
79
25.4
42
49
16.7
21,290.00
23,110.85
8.6
2
100.0
5
6
20.0
3
4
33.3
815.00
3,547.50
335.0
3
81
2
84
— 100.0
100.0
3.7
2
i
60
— 100.0
100.0
-4.8
1,700.00
— 100.0
100.O
-2.6
333.00
43,025.00
16
15
—6.3
63
44,166.24
28
22
—21.4
148
104
—29.7
94
73
—22.3
62,009.00
49,251.82
-20.6
21
17
— 19.0
84
99
17.9
59
67
13.6
45,180.45
34,353.50
-23.9
16
14
— 12.5
49
50
2.0
41
39
—4.9
28,623.91
19,710.73
-31.1
11
10
—9.1
65
55
-15.4
48
35
—27.1
20,820.00
23,009.83
10.5
3
7
133.0
19
31
63.2
13
20
53.8
6,224.00
16,676.02
168.0
16
13
-18.8
105
107
1.9
79
70
— 11.4
48,473.00
48,405.80
-0.1
65
64
-1.5
365
288
—21.1
231
197
-14.7
113,986.29
84,255.03
-26.1
1
100.0
22.2
11
100.0
6
100.0
1,327.00
100.0
36
44
153
161
5.2
107
111
3.7
57,216.10
67,158.55
17.4
26
34
30.8
164
146
— 10.9
120
1131      —5.8
67,560.33
74,872.36
10.8
8
9
12.5
28
61
117.0
21
37
76.2
8,503.00
16,964.33
99.5
25
29
16.0
114
129
13.2
84
95
13.1
43,717.94
73,352.57
67.8
10
22
120.0
27
74
174.0
21
52
148.0
12,829.00
28,004.55
118.0
37
29
—21.6
178
146
— 17.9
125
102
—18.4
88,608.10
97,167.60
9.7
41
50
21.9
191
178
-6.8
128
129
0.8
68,418.93
68,390.52
— 0.1
12
8
-33.3
50
27
-46.0
37
20
—45.9
18,796.80
12,390.00
-34.1
14
11
—21.4
52
40
-23.1
38
30
—21.1
40,606.00
20,307.86
-49.9
19
15
-21.1
77
75
—2.6
59
56
—5:i
42,379.00
39,972.00
—5.7
2
3
50.0
21
11
—47.6
16
9
—43.8
40,113.00
7,805.00
—80.5
22
22
91
112
23.1
71
86
21.1
81,610.68
82,481.90
1.1
4
10
150.0
12
31
158.0
9
22
144.0
4,400.00
11,541.00
162.0
23
33
43.4
156
190
21.8
108
128
18.5
74,211.10
116,273.57
56.7
9
6
— 33.3
42
34
-19.0
28
22
—21.4
13,027.00
29,061.00
123.0
7
10
42.9
38
29
-23.7
24
22
-8.3
7,422.05
6,917.53
-6.8
8
15
8
23
46
119
47
108
2.2
—9.2
34
81
38
77
11.8
—4.9
17,795.94
75,946.23
16,855.91
48,673.00
—5.3
—35.9
53.3
19
22
15.8
87
100
14.9
65
78
20.0
54,907.20
40,998.94
—25.3
5
5
46
30
—34.8
33
22
—33.3
14,394.95
21,115.00
46.7
9
6
— 33.3
54
71
31.5
38
48
26.3
17,790.80
35,410.00
189.0
50
52
4.0
238
283
18.9
154
183
18.8
146,076.91
123,810.85
— 15.2
19
29
52.6
110
154
40.0
81
110
35.8
56,832.22
128,087.53
125.0
23
22
—4.3
151
167
10.6
106
116
9.4
59,244.54
66,609.33
12.4
56
60
7.1
297
259
— 12.8
217
196
-9.7
144,777.87
146,299.11
1.1
1
3
200.0
20
22
10.0
13
13
6,036.78
6,575.00
8.9
39
50
28.2
177
196
10.7
124
134
8.1
79,583.64
68,552.69
— 13.9
7
12
71.4
50
61
22.0
38
46
21.1
18,490.65
29,823.00
61.3
21
12
—42.9
74
92
24.3
48
58
20.8
29,812.50
28,755.06
—3.5
8
5
— 37.5
26
19
—26.9
19
13
— 31.6
13,465.00
8,315.00
— 38.2
17
20
17.6
84
96
14.3
56
66
17.9
40,898.02
36,619.61
— 10.5
14
17
21.4
60
49
-18.3
46
37
-19.6
24,737.55
18,256.79
—26.2
2
81
2
53
1
56
1
40
300.00
56,390.00
500.00
22,316.00
66.7
-60.4
15
To
—33.3
-34.6
—28.6
1
5
400.0
22
19
— 13.6
9
9
3,857.73
6,820.00
76.8
7
4
-42.9
78
46
-41.0
48
28
-41.7
26,296.03
19,952.09
-24.1
12
13
8.3
42
48
14.3
33
39
18.2
18,759.00
20,049.00
6.9
3
8
167.0
22
53
141.0
17
38
124.0
6,328.87
17,135.00
171.0
2
1
—50.0
12
13
8.3
11
8
—27.3
5,270.00
2,567.90
-51.3
16
12
-25.0
67
72
7.5
48
54
12.5
41,981.26
42,153.00
0.04
12
6
—500
51
48
—5.9
32
37
15.6
13,273.13
20,433.17
53.9
8
11
37.5
69
54
—21.7
45
37
— 17.8
24,685.14
16,913.78
-31.5
37
38
2.7
194
202
4.1
128
130
1.6
77,023.65
|       76.869.861        0.08
8
14
75.0
30
44
46.7
23
33
43.5
21,270.00
126,178.00!      493.0
 G 20
UNORGANIZED—Continued
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the
Killed
Fatal Accidents
Injured
Detachment
1959
1960
Increase
or (-)
Decrease
1959
1960
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1959
1960
Increase
or(-)
Decrease
1
1
1
2
Per Cent
— 100.0
100.0
— 100.0
100.0
-40.0
100.6
200.0
44.4
100.0
—33.3
— 100.0
-40.6
_
1
1
2
Per Cent
— 1UU.U
100.0
— 100.0
46
4
44
8
3
35
13
~34
6
1
20
4
19
117
8
88
68
54
100
13
38
2
21
7
22
11
11
29
31
14
8
38
16
54
21
18
30
24
58
5
47
Per Cent
—4.3
100.0
1
1
1
1
100.0
23
28
46
1
1
25
7
88
2
66
86
41
68
8
3
36
1
15
14
6
17
3
21
26
7
5
32
3
47
43
3
19
30
50
19
64
52.2
100.0
—66.7
—53.6
5
3
3
1
—26.1
500.0
100.6
2
2
—20.0
100.0
2
9
6
13
3
6
1
3
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
3
2
2
6
2
12
2
5
1
3
100.6
100.0
— 16.7
— 100.0
— 80.0
-100.6
100.0
100.0
171.0
32.9
300.0
9
1
1
5
6
1
1
3
33.3
—20.9
31.7
47.1
62.5
6
— 100.0
—83.3
5
1
5.6
100.0
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
— 100.0
100.0
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
40.0
—50.0
267.0
—35.3
—50.0
—50.0
100.0
100.0
267.0
38.1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
—50.0
100.0
19.2
100.0
60.0
1
18.8
100.0
—80.0
—66.7
8
4
1
1
2
1
3
2
3
1
3
100.0
1
433.0
—75.0
—75.0
200.0
—33.3
—25.0
100.0
—40.0
5
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
m
14.9
Trail                                     	
—51.2
500.0
3
4
—33.3
—75.0
100.0
—40.0
—9.2~~
57.9
3
4
5
141
—20.0
16.0
Wells                	
—73.7
5
—26.6
177
162
— 8.5
2,698
2,958
9.6
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1960      G 21
Province for the Calendar Years 1959 and 1960—Continued
Injury Accidents
Vehicles Involved
Accidents Reported
Property Damage
Increase
Increase
Increase
Increase
1959
1960
or(-)
Decrease
1959
1960
or (-)
Decrease
1959
1960
or(-)
Decrease
1959
1960
or(-)
Decrease
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
21
24
14.3
93
123
32.3
69
88
27.5
$53,677.50
$62,613.97
16.6
3
5
66.7
19
36
89.5
15
23
53.3
7,150.00
22,030.00
229.0
2
100.0
3
6
100.0
2
5
150.0
1,150.00
2,575.00
124.0
16
16
56
56
39
44
12.8
23,334.32
31,339.00
22,494.52
18,649.00
—3.6
13
10
—23.1
68
40
—41.2
51
32
—37.3
—40.5
4.2
2
103
82
— 100.0
—20.4
1
66
58
— 100.0
-12.1
130.00
— 100.0
24
25
61,660.06
36,309.99
—41.1
1
5
400.0
13
21
61.5
9
14
55.6
3,235.00
6,155.00
90.3
1
1
4
1
—75.0
2
1
—50.O
1,220.00
30.00
—97.5
13
14
7.7
79
86
8.9
60
64
6.7
35,632.02
43,483.41
1.2
3
100.0
3
11
267.0
2
7
250.0
380.00
2,405.00
533.0
5
10
100.0
20
34
70.0
15
25
66.7
12,635.00
13,680.00
8.3
46
60
30.4
364
380
4.4
230
255
10.9
139,576.73
133,600.16
—4.3
1
2
100.0
8
21
163.0
5
16
220.0
2,875.00
10,320.00
259.0
34
48
41.2
180
180
136
124
—8.8
97,772.52
91,367.33
95,763.19
66,017.81
—2.1
44
45
2.3
404
337
— 16.6
180
152
-15.6
—27.7
25
31
24.0
122
134
9.8
86
103
19.8
52,745.00
55,249.16
4.7
43
58
34.9
202
230
13.9
145
174
20.0
102,766.65
105,947.00
3.1
4
8
100.0
22
19
— 13.6
15
14
—6.7
5,115.00
7,160.00
39.9
1
— 100.0
17
4
-76.5
13
3
—76.9
10,100.00
3,400.00
—66.3
22
19
— 13.6
94
82
— 12.8
71
62
— 12.8
47,917.00
43,096.75
-10.1
1
2
100.0
3
6
100.0
3
5
66.7
1,575.00
3,495.00
122.0
12
10
— 16.7
55
61
10.9
40
42
5.0
38,307.93
28,393.50
—25.9
8
4
—50.0
30
41
36.7
24
30
25.0
12,350.00
20,691.23
67.5
4
14
250.0
42
42
31
33
6.5
17,544.50
18,584.76
5.9
5
8
60.0
25
32
28.0
17
20
17.6
22,481.00
14,726.00
-34.5
1
7
600.0
27
29
7.4
20
23
15.0
9,301.00
15,440.00
66.0
11
17
54.5
40
74
85.0
28
45
60.7
15,214.60
22,475.33
47.7
15
19
26.7
106
99
—6.6
72
67
-6.9
48,554.84
36,833.35
-24.1
6
8
33.3
46
60
30.4
32
44
37.5
14,730.00
19,046.29
29.3
3
6
100.0
25
28
12.0
19
21
10.5
40,978.00
11,132.00
—72.8
19
18
—5.3
83
91
9.6
63
60
—4.8
38,344.39
34,019.88
— 11.3
250.0
1
10
5
57
400.0
470.0
1
7
3
37
200.0
429.0
1,000.00
2,520.00
1,900.00
42,780.73
90.0
2
7
160.0
2
100.0
1
100.0
174.00
100.0
21
35
66.7
158
172
8.9
104
119
14.4
55,233.14
84,647.83
53.3
24
16
-33.3
104
115
10.6
74
73
— 1.4
47,447.69
35,956.87
—24.2
3
8
167.0
25
27
8.0
17
19
11.8
5,288.00
13,590.00
157.0
91.6
2
118
138
-100.0
16.9
1
68
80
-100.0
17.6
250.00
25,856.18
27,791.23
— 100.0
11
21
7.5
19
14
—26.3
92
66
—28.3
66
48
—27.3
29,138.03
34,270.99
17.6
34
37
8.8
121
161
33.1
88
113
28.4
62,006.20
82,957.15
33.8
7
5
—28.6
36
29
— 19.4
21
21
15,616.00
105,715.99
12,304.24
—21.2
36
29
— 19.4
249
225
-9.6
170
154
—9.4
123,147.34
16.5
1,551
1,738
12.1
8,454
8,702
2.9~
5,793
6,023
4.0
$3,760,395.50
$3,947,170.68
0.5
 G 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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0
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1960       G 23
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1960—Continued
2.                    HOUR OF OCCURRENCE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
12 to   1 a.m.... 	
882
753
560
342
250
171
199
859
1,133
789
986
1,109
1,058
1,153
1,405
1,771
2,343
2,504
1,497
1,746
1,297
1,027
1,070
1,170
17
23
12
7
5
7
4
2
6
3
5
3
6
6
10
12
13
14
22
15
25
15
14
10
12
1
267
195
165
102
59
49
52
161
300
197
289
270
303
331
417
549
666
754
467
565
403
295
324
359
5
592
1 to   2 a.m _ _	
2 to   3 a.m	
546
388
3 to  4 a.m _. _ . . .
235
184
5 to   6 a.m  	
118
145
7 to   8 a.m 	
692
8 to  9 a.m _ _  .
830
9 to 10 a.m...               	
587
10 to 11 a.m	
694
11 to 12    m.                                         	
833
12 to   1 p.m   	
749
812
2 to   3 p.m.                                                	
976
1,209
4 to  5 p.m 	
1,663
1,728
1,015
1,156
879
718
6 to   7 p.m 	
7 to   8 p.m   	
8 to   9 p.m.. _	
9 tn 1(1 p m
10 to 11 p.m....                                                           	
736
11 to 12 p.m..  	
799
11
Totals  	
26,091
252                7,544
18,295
DAY OF OCCURRENCE
Number of Accidents
Total
Personal
Property
Injury
Damage Only
42
1,174
2,524
36
867
2,081
31
866
2,239
22
798
2,199
32
1,048
2,653
36
1,283
3,143
53
1,508
3,456
1. Sunday	
2. Monday	
3. Tuesday	
4. Wednesday..
5. Thursday	
6. Friday	
7. Saturday	
8. Not stated....
Totals.
3,740
2,984
3,136
3,019
3,733
4,462
5,017
26,091
252
7,544 18,295
4.             TYPE OF VEHICLES INVOLVED
Number of Vehicles Involved
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
39,626
5,187
308
211
5
194
23
1
256
68
4
2
1
10,906
1,232
117
66
1
166
11
1
28,464
2. Truck	
3,887
3. Bus                                         	
187
143
4
27
12
8. Not stated	
45,555
331         1       12.500        1      32.724
5.                     RAILROAD CROSSINGS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
51
9
1
2
1
1
1
17
7
1
1
33
2
1
6. Signal not given  	
7. Not stated  	
64
2        1             26
36
 G 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1960—Continued
6.                    MANNER OF COLLISION
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Angle collision  __  	
9,302
4,058
6,753
396
1,072
4,510
54
76
8
2
112
2,295
1,319
1,834
30
108
1,958
6,953
2,663
4,911
364
2. Head-on collision or head-on side-swipe  _	
5. Side-swiped other vehicle going same direction	
6. Not stated        	
964
2,440
Totals _   _ 	
26,091
252
7,544
18,295
7.     DRIVERS INVOLVED, DESCRIPTION OF
Number of Drivers
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Male     	
2. Female  	
3. Not stated            	
39,632
5,689
234
302
26
3
10,692
1,778
30
28,638
3,885
201
45,555
331
17.50O          1        39.794
Age of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. 16 to 20 years	
2. 21 to 24 years	
3. 25 to 30 years	
4. 31 to 40 years .
5. 41 to 50 years	
6. 51 to 60 years	
7. 61 to 64 years	
8. 65 to 69 years	
9. 70 years and over..
5,750
5,788
8,012
10,626
8.065
4,451
1,261
491
837
53
48
50
66
45
32
9
13
12
1,654
1,617
2,147
2,872
2,199
1,208
374
142
251
4,043
4,123
5,815
7,688
5,821
3,211
878
336
574
Driving Experince
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Less than 3 months  	
710
244
755
9,066
34,345
435
2
1
3
78
216
31
234
60
231
2,532
9,352
91
474
183
521
6,456
24,777
6. Not stated                       	
313
Condition of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
43,238
349
137
404
1,123
165
139
264
8
4
6
27
22
11,818
129
46
107
316
44
40
31,156
212
87
291
780
99
7. Not stated               	
99
Licence of Driver
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
43,794
510
967
284
296
13
15
7
11,968
182
297
53
31,530
2. Unlicensed. -  	
315
655
224
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1960      G 25
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1960—Continued
ACTION OF DRIVER CONTRIBUTING
TO ACCIDENT
Number of Drivers
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
No improper driving  	
Driving off roadway	
Did not have right-of-way 	
Car standing in roadway (not parked).
Following too close.
On wrong side of road 	
Failing to signal   .  	
Through street—did not stop .
Passing at intersection	
Exceeding speed-limit	
Careless driving  	
Cutting in 	
Car ran away..
Passing on curve or hill-
Passing on wrong side ...
Hit and run  	
Railroad—did not stop...
Cutting left corner	
Parked legally .
Driving through school zone-
Driving through safety zone-
Totals _- _	
25,182
1,434
2,517
1,249
1,682
950
708
818
259
714
5,f02
317
365
102
80
501
30
317
2,287
36
26
141
27
8
6
1
21
4
1
43
59
7,352
409
600
372
411
234
150
214
47
190
1,873
35
67
26
9
67
11
49
299
13
9
17,689
998
1,909
871
1,270
695
558
600
211
481
3,870
282
296
76
71
428
17
265
1,981
23
17
45,376
12,437 32,608
9.                         TRAFFIC CONTROL
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
19,067
310
3,224
2,242
655
211
3
7
12
10
5,437
90
995
623
224
13,419
217
3. Automatic traffic signal 	
2,222
1,607
421
Totals   -	
26,091
252                 7,544
18,295
10.
PEDESTRIANS INVOLVED, ACTIONS OF
Number of Pedestrians
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Crossing at intersection—no signal-
In street—not at intersection	
Coming from behind parked or moving vehicle .
Crossing at intersection with signal-
51
157
161
1
5
10
50
152
151
Crossing street diagonally—not at intersection .
Walking on or along highway	
Playing in street-
Crossing at intersection against signal-
Not on roadway
Getting on or off another vehicle-
Riding or hitching on vehicle	
Working on car or roadway	
Crossing street diagonally	
In pedestrian crosswalk	
Standing on safety-isle__	
Not known.__  	
Totals
195
8
187
90
4
86
116
8
108
97
17
80
107
7
100
29
29
13
1
12
3
3
6
6
7
3
4
13
13
87
6
81
102
6
96
1,234
76
1,158
Condition of Pedestrian
Number of Pedestrians
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1. Normal.
2. Physical defect	
3. Confused by traffic.
4. Impaired	
5. Not known 	
6. Not stated	
Totals _
851
2
19
101
60
201
37
1
7
22
3
6
76
814
1
12
79
57
195
1,158
 G 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1960—Continued
11.                         CLASSIFICATION OF VICTIMS
Number of Victims
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1. Passengers.—	
5,716
4,153
1,230
326
128
15
37
103
104
76
6
2
3
5,613
2. Drivers           	
4,049
3. Pedestrians	
1,154
4. Bicyclists  	
320
5. Motor-cycle drivers _                 	
126
6. Others (persons in horse-drawn vehicles, etc.)  _.
12
7. Motor-cycle passengers      	
37
8. Not stated	
Totals. -    	
11,605
294
11,311
12.                                 NATURE OF INJURIES
Number of Victims
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
1. Slight shock and shake-up   _ _   . _.        ._ .
2. Fractured skull  .__
7,954
176
50
1,177
1,051
236
154
10
21
20
3
752
1
1
113
20
27
4
105
2
20
1
1
7,953
63
3. Fractured spine _ _ ~ _   	
30
1,150
1,047
131
154
8
21
10. Drowned             ....
11. Burned  	
2
12. Asphyxiated        ..   ..
751
13. Not. stated
1
Totals        __	
11,605
294
11,311
13.
LIGHT CONDITIONS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Property
Injury
Damage Only
15,452
98
4,411
10,943
7,728
128
2,268
5,332
1,347
8
407
932
1,213
13
352
848
292
5
92
195
59
14
45
1. Daylight 	
2. Darkness 	
3. Artificial light—good _
4. Dusk or semi-darkness..
5. Artificial light—poor..—
6. Not stated	
Totals
26,091
252
7,544        |       18,295
PROPERTY DAMAGE.—Amount of property damage for period covered by this report, $12,387,591.72;
amount for same period last year, $12,226,545.90.
15.
CONDITION OF VEHICLES
INVOLVED
Number of Vehicles
Total
Fatal
Personal
Property
Injury
Damage Only
43,688
309
11,995
31,384
494
1
90
403
516
3
147
366
177
4
51
122
48
1
18
29
155
2
43
110
100
2
28
70
110
1
39
70
33
2
13
18
22
6
16
152
3
51
98
60
3
19
38
1. Apparently good — 	
2. No chains (slippery road)	
3. Brakes defective  	
4. Steering mechanism defective..
5. Head-lights dim	
6. Puncture or blow-out	
7. Head-lights out (both) 	
8. Tail-light out or obscured	
9. Glaring head-lights   . 	
10. Head-light out (one light)	
11. Other defects	
12. Not stated	
Totals.
45,555
331 12,500
32,724
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1960       G 27
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1960—Continued
16.                    DIRECTION OF TRAVEL
Number of Vehicles
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
31,630
5,508
2,739
1,613
496
954
465
64
298
945
S3
307
287
126
237
45
20
2
4
16
1
1
1
4
9,135
1,404
614
431
63
230
49
18
82
280
16
66
84
28
22,258
4,059
2,105
4. Slowing down or stopping  _	
5. Backing (not to or from curb)	
1,180
429
708
415
86
215
665
67
240
13. Avoiding object or pedestrian 	
199
98
Totals  	
45,555
331
12,500
32,724
17.
ROAD SURFACE
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Dry surface...
2. Wet surface _
3. Icy surface _
4. Loose sand or gravel-
5. Snowy surface	
6. Muddy surface	
7. Not stated.   _
13,479
8,559
2,392
599
839
68
155
165
57
18
7
3
1
1
4,188
2,459
484
185
156
14
58
9,126
6,043
1,890
407
680
53
96
Totals ..
26,091
252
7,544
18,295
18.
ROAD CONDITION
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Normal  	
2. Defect in roadway 	
3. Obstruction in road 	
4. Road under repair	
5. Obstruction not marked or lighted..
6. Other	
7. Not stated  	
23,050
394
235
256
109
1,924
123
226
6
2
6
4
7
1
6,766
113
60
74
33
466
32
16,058
275
173
176
72
1,451
90
Totals.
26,091
252
7,544
18,295
19.
TYPE OF ROAD
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Asphalt ....
2. Gravel —
3. Concrete.
4. Earth	
5. Brick or cobble _
6. Other .  	
7. Not stated	
Totals.
22,414
2,246
885
281
28
171
66
26,091
212
32
1
5
252
6,652
511
261
56
3
40
21
7,544
15,550
1,703
623
220
25
129
45
18,295
 G 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statistical Summary of Motor-vehicle Accidents in the Province
for the Year 1960—Continued
20.                   WEATHER CONDITIONS
Number of Accidents
Total
Fatal
Personal
Injury
Property
Damage Only
1. Clear     	
2. Rain.    	
3. Cloudy 	
14,785
6,206
2,828
819
1,049
62
342
161
34
46
6
2
1
2
4,357
1.790
836
251
191
21
98
10,267
4,382
1,946
562
5. Snow _       	
856
40
7. Not stated.   	
242
Totals  	
26,091
252
7,544
18,295
Motor-vehicle and motor-cycle licences issued to December  31st,   1959—
536,120; to December 31st, 1960—557,262.
Convictions
In accordance with the Motor-vehicle Act, the Courts in the Province are required to report to the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles of convictions entered
against motor-vehicle drivers and owners for infractions of certain sections of the
Criminal Code of Canada, the Motor-vehicle Act, and the Motor-vehicle Act and
regulations. This information forms the basis of action taken by the Superintendent
under the drivers' improvement programme. It is a credit to the Courts of this
Province that this information comes to the Motor-vehicle Branch promptly and in
its entirety. We enjoy a situation in British Columbia that does not exist in all
Provinces in Canada in this regard. During 1960 the number of convictions received totalled 94,978, compared to 87,099 in 1959. The large increase in the
number of convictions reported between 1957 and 1960 will be noted. This indicates a stepped-up level of enforcement. It might be that this is a factor in the
lower frequency ratio of accidents. However, it is going to be increasingly important in the years to come to step up the enforcement programme to maintain this
favourable trend. It is a known fact that the motoring public respects the presence
of traffic-control vehicles on the highways. In areas where there is a very active
traffic programme, the public co-operation in operating vehicles within the confines
of traffic laws is most noticeable.
The table which follows summarizes conviction reports received by the Motor-
vehicle Branch from 1957 to 1960.
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1960       G 29
Convictions under Motor-vehicle Act and Criminal Code of Canada, 1957—60
Offences
1957
1958
1959
7
1
8
98
99
404
424
117
98
3,622
3,059
816
792
26
16
1960
Under Criminal Code of Canada—
Causing death by criminal negligence, sec. 192	
Causing bodily harm by criminal negligence, sec. 193	
Criminal negligence in operation of motor-vehicle, sec. 221 (1)..
Failing to stop after accident, sec. 221 (2).
Driving motor-vehicle while intoxicated, sec. 222  — _ 	
Driving a motor-vehicle while ability impaired by alcohol or drugs,
sec. 223   — —  	
Driving while driver's licence under suspension, sec. 225 (3)	
Unlawfully taking a motor-vehicle without consent of owner, sec. 281
Driving to common danger, sec. 285 (6). _—	
Personation at examination, sec. 347 _ 	
Under Motor-vehicle Act—
Failing to obtain or display motor-vehicle licence or permit as required, sees. 3-10, 57 ___   _.	
Failing to notify re change of address, sec. 11, 18 (11)	
Failing to report change in motor-vehicle, sec. 12 _	
Failing to transfer motor-vehicle, etc., sec. 14
Failing to notify of removal or destruction of motor-vehicle, sec.
16 (1)   __._ —- 	
Failing to register as a tourist, sec. 17   	
Driving motor-vehicle otherwise than as restricted on driver's licence,
sec. 18 (8), 18 (7) (a) _   ___.	
Driving without obtaining driver's licence, sec. 18   (1),  (2),  (3),
(4), (5)    	
Driving without having driver's licence in possession at time, sec. 19
Driving while right to obtain licence is under suspension, sec. 20 (1)
Driving as a chauffeur without chauffeur's licence or permit, sees.
21-28...       	
Operating as dealer without licence, misuse of dealer's plates, etc.,
sees. 29-35                  	
Operating with " D " plates without salesman's licence or permit,
etc., sees. 36-39 ... 	
Operating vehicle not properly equipped, sec. 40   -—
Failing to obtain replacement of licence or  chauffeur's badge  if
mutilated, sees. 41, 42 _ _	
Liability of parent re minor, sec. 46 — —	
Carrying too many passengers on motor-cycle, sec. 43—	
Improper disposition of licence-plate, dismantled vehicle, sec. 45	
Failing to report accident, etc., sec. 54.
Making false  statement,  permitting  another  to  use  licence,  etc.;
sec. 55 	
Using licence belonging to another, refusing to show licence, etc.
sec. 56  _	
Failing to stop on request of police or state proper name, sec. 58	
Altering number-plates and using fictitious plates, sec. 59	
Permitting person not properly licensed to drive motor-vehicle, etc.,
sec. 69         . _   _	
Failing to surrender licence on suspension, sec. 99  	
Removing or releasing impounded vehicle without authority, sec. 100
Producing invalid financial liability card, etc., sec. 102	
Failing to  give proof of financial responsibility for  certain  ages,
sec. 115      	
Failing to obey emergency instructions of a peace officer, sees. 122,
124 ____..       	
Failing to obey traffic-control signal legend, sees. 127, 128, 152	
Defacing  traffic-control   devices  by  advertising   or  removal,   etc.,
sees. 129, 131, 136 _    	
Failing to obey special signal signs re highway construction, sees.
133, 135, 137 	
Careless driving, sees. 138, 139..
Exceeding maximum speed-limit, sec. 140 ...	
Exceeding speed-limit passing schools and playgrounds, sec. 141	
Exceeding speed-limit overtaking stopped school bus, sec. 142	
Failure to drive on the right, sec. 143       	
Infractions of " lane " driving, sees. 144-146 „
Infractions of " passing," sees. 148-151, 153, 154 	
Infractions of turning, starting, and directional signals, sees.  155-
159,160-162 _  	
Failure to yield right-of-way, sees. 163-167 ...
Not exercising due care re pedestrians, sees. 168-172.
15
1
119
356
79
3,224
721
24
1,840
63
6
14
2
12
1,162
3,131
698
45
459
51
29
3
3
1
67
74
21
21
250
15
1
3
1
4
2,051
113
4,663
15,066
2,586
1,415
681
1,557
604
352
1,433
167
2
17
1,554
245
3
19
2
5
2,008
2,380
3,952
1,613
71
2,959
1,570
40
487
457
43
14
29
25
4
6
3
1
157
1
1
145
81
80
118
30
9
180
41
2
292
2
1
4
296
4
8
8
9,392
11
17,214
5
1
144
4,675
16,415
3,408
10
67
3,186
748
61
3,839
22,349
3,867
8
134
2,288
1,289
71
513
98
2,936
920
20
4,541    |    5,091    |    4,496    |    4,558
1,737 2,304
1,168 1,382
272 1,074
I
1,604
272
2
26
1
3,044
2,884
1,305
46
398
19
20
195
79
177
26
9
250
2
26
21,130
31
3,661
23,686
2,503
32
113
3,154
1,300
2,369
1,461
1,142
 G 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Convictions under Motor-vehicle Act and Criminal Code
of Canada, 1957-60—Continued
Offences
1957
1958
1959
1960
Under Motor-vehicle Act—Continued
Failure by bicycle operators to obey rules, sec. 173-
Failure to stop at railroad crossing, sees. 174-176	
Failure to stop at intersections, sec. 177	
Illegal stopping or parking, sees. 178-181	
Leaving vehicle improperly parked, sec. 182-
Backing vehicle illegally, sec. 184 _
Operating motor-cycle with more than one person, sec. 185..
Requirements of safe driving on highway, sees. 186, 187	
Fire-vehicle safety, sees. 189, 190    _.	
Driving on sidewalk, sec. 191.
Horse-racing on highway prohibited, sec. 193 .
Opening door requirements, sec. 194 	
Transporting explosives, sec. 196
5
508
2,315
519
131
51
4
17
5
6
1
12
39
Failing to carry adequate safety equipment, sees. 197, 198..
Illegal use or defacement of signs, sec. 201 	
Motor-vehicle Act miscellaneous 	
Regulations under Motor-vehicle Act—
Operating defective vehicle after ordered off road, sees. 2.02, 7.09	
Number-plates, sec. 3 _   	
Driving without proper head-lamps, sees. 4.01-4.06 	
Driving without tail-lights, reflectors, other required lamps,  sees.
4.07-4.10       	
Driving without clearance-lights, lamps on projections,  etc.,
4.11-4.13...   	
Driving without adequate brakes, sees. 5, 6 	
Driving vehicle with  defective horn  or miscellaneous  equipment,
sees. 7.01, 7.02  	
Driving vehicle without muffler, sec. 7.03 	
Driving vehicle without rear-view mirror or unobstructed rear view,
sec. 7.04      	
Inadequate windshield-wiper, etc., sec. 7.05 —
Driving vehicle without mud-guards, sec. 7.06 ...      _	
Failing to have proper connection between motor-vehicle and trailer,
sec. 7.07  	
Sale of unapproved equipment, sec. 8
Failing to obtain temporary permit for moving motor-vehicle or
trailer from place to place, sec. 14  	
Failing to sign driver's licence, sec. 15  _ —.—
Oversize loads, sees. 19.01, 19.02       _
Inadequate  tires,   insecure   loads,   excessive   speed  with   unloaded
trailer, sec. 19.04      	
Excessive weight, sec. 19.05..
Failure to report for weight inspection, sec. 19.06	
Failure to obtain overweight or oversize permit, sec. 19.07-
Miscellaneous infractions 	
186
674
34
127
36
834
22
76
179
2
32
301
4,142
Vancouver City by-laws—
Juvenile Delinquents Act-
1,774
Total of all convictions..
50,650
12
222
5,021
1,325
293
204
7
10
23
11
22
I 153
3
2
210
6,149
803
473
321
1
20
21
16
~~29
1
138
2,396
5,389
1,396
1,615
234
6,158
1,014
868
415
29
25
10
184
7
136
41,750 | 58,921  I 75,599 | 79,993
3
4
77
260
339
1,775
222
709
53
134
96
285
40
76
1,033
1,097
14
25
35
114
60
204
16
52
2
1
3
1
r 184
249
J  195
73
1  234
230
6
14
14
19
39
68
14
203
954
1,072
206
565
84
1,400
38
278
204
79
1
5
233
120
99
34
41
57
5,687
2,236
2,368
68,075 I 87,099 | 94,978
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1960      G 31
3. DRIVING SAFETY
(a) Safety Responsibility
During 1960 the Safety Responsibility Division received 13,849 British Columbia financial responsibility insurance certificates from motor-vehicle liability
insurance companies, submitted as proof of financial responsibility on behalf of persons whose actions or omissions in the operation of motor-vehicles required them
to submit proof, in accordance with Part II of the Motor-vehicle Act. The 1960
total of certificates is 6.03 per cent less than the 1959 total, and indicates the trend
being adopted by insurance companies to leave on file present certificates instead
of refiling each year upon renewal of the policy by the insured. The Safety Responsibility Division is still concerned with the problem of incorrect certificates submitted
by insurance companies, which represented in 1960 some 11.8 per cent of the total
number of certificates received. Those certificates, which total 1,636, were rejected
because of inadequate information on the certificates by failing to properly identify
the driver or the vehicle concerned.
Insurance certificate cancellation notices totalled 12,836 in 1960, compared
to 13,655 in 1959, being a decrease of 6 per cent. This decrease is in line with the
decreased number of filings, mentioned in the paragraph above, and therefore in
itself is not a significant factor or an indication of a change in insurance company
policy.
The $2 filing fee is charged for the filing of each certificate of financial responsibility. This produced a revenue of $24,426 in 1960. The filing table gives full
information with regard to the filing and cancellation of British Columbia financial
responsibility insurance certificates.
Comparison of Financial Responsibility Certificates Received, Filed,
and Cancelled in 1959 and 1960
1959
1960
Increase
Decrease
Per Cent
14,738
13,115
1,623
10,736
1,303
1,076
13,655
$26,230
13.849
12,213
1,636
10,207
1,162
844
12,835
$24,426
13
889
902
529
141
232
820
$1,804
6.03
6.88
Total number of certificates returned—	
Owner's policy certificates and garage and sales agency certificates filed    _  _	
11.81
4.93
10.82
21.56
Certificate cancellations _	
6.00
6.88
A number of persons or corporations have given proof of financial responsibility by way of a bond of a guarantee or surety company or by a deposit of security
with the Minister of Finance. In some cases the corporation is classed as a self-
insurer by providing the Superintendent of Insurance with adequate evidence to
that effect. In 1960, 365 financial responsibility cards, evidencing compliance with
the financial responsibility provisions of the Motor-vehicle Act, were issued to
cover motor-vehicles or persons or corporations.
Motor-vehicles which are not covered by liability insurance, involved in highway accidents where there is an injury or death or property damage in excess of
$250, are impounded. Vehicles remain impounded until the owner of the uninsured vehicle either obtains a release of liability from other parties or deposits security with the Minister of Finance to cover estimated damages or six months lapses
from the time of the accident, provided that no legal action is pending.   During
 G 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
1960 there were 2,160 motor-vehicle impoundments. The 1959 impoundments
totalled 1,992. This represents an increase of 8.43 per cent. However, during
1960 a total of 1,996 motor-vehicles were released from impoundment because the
owners were able to meet the releasing provision of the Motor-vehicle Act. This
represents an increase of 9 per cent over the 1959 total of 1,832 vehicles released.
During 1960 security in the amount of $23,408.74 was deposited with the Minister
of Finance by persons who were uninsured at the time of an accident.
Court orders and recommendations by Judges or Magistrates, arising from the
convictions for driving offences, resulted in the suspension of 2,898 drivers' licences
for definite periods of time. This total is 12.7 per cent higher than the 1959 figure
of 2,553 Court suspensions. The following table indicates the periods of suspension ordered or recommended by the Judges or Magistrates:—
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES, 1960       G 33
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 G 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Convictions for serious driving infractions and failure to satisfy Court judgments caused the suspending of 11,871 drivers' licences until proof of financial
responsibility was provided on behalf of the persons. This is 2.17 per cent higher
than the 1959 total of 11,618. Proof of financial responsibility was given by 8,288
persons and permitted the reinstatement of their driver's licence. This is a 6.04-percent increase over 1959, when 7,816 licences were reinstated.
The following table indicates the various causes for this type of suspension and
reinstatement action:—
Drivers' Licences
Offence Suspended       Reinstated
Accident—careless driving   2,438 1,756
Accident—criminal negligence   24 59
No accident—criminal negligence   38 43
Accident—drunken driving   26 16
No accident—drunken driving   70 28
Accident—impaired driving  651 406
No accident—impaired driving   1,961 1,203
Accident—failing to remain at scene of accident  399 201
Accident—driving under suspension   19 23
No accident—driving under suspension  120 43
Accident—suspension due to accident   1,416 1,110
Accident—speeding   90 14
Accident—unsatisfied judgment   87 3
Conviction and judgment outside Province   242 39
Unsatisfactory driving record  235 106
Suspension by Superintendent   72 48
Death by criminal negligence  16 6
Bodily harm by criminal negligence       1
Further or additional financial responsibility  3,967 3,183
Totals   11,871 8,288
All told, some 14,769 suspension notices were issued to persons in 1960 for
the various forms of suspension under Part II of the Motor-vehicle Act. This was
a 4.08-per-cent increase over the 1959 total of 14.190. Of those who were notified
to comply with the requirements, 27.1 per cent either did not file proof of financial
responsibility or surrendered their licences. As a result, it was necessary to look
to the various enforcement agencies to provide a personal service regarding the
suspension notices.   A total of 4,003 drivers was in this category.
The giving of proof of financial responsibility is a continuing obligation.
However, it is a policy that if a person has established a clear driving record for
a period of three years from the date of his last conviction and has no judgment
outstanding against him, he may apply to be released from this obligation. During
1960 the number of drivers released in this manner totalled 5,495, an increase of
16.54 per cent over the 1959 total of 4,715.
The control exercised by the Safety Responsibility Division to ensure that
drivers are required to comply with the financial responsibility requirement of the
Motor-vehicle Act necessitates a continual check of all new vehicle registrations,
transfers of motor-vehicle licences, and all original driver's licence applications.
There are 55,000 persons who must maintain evidence of financial responsibility in
order to hold a licence. Under this programme, 400,000 name checks were made
to ensure compliance with the law in 1960.
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1960      G 35
(b) Examination of Drivers
Drivers' examinations were provided for 104,613 persons during 1960, compared to the 1959 total of 103,466. Examiners of drivers conducted 128,233
individual examinations, which indicates that 23,620 examinations were in instances
where two or more tests were required due to failures on the first test.
The Drivers' Examination Programme in British Columbia is divided into two
parts. There is the examination of drivers for their first or original British Columbia
licence, and the periodic re-examination of persons who previously qualified. It has
been the objective of the Branch to reduce, to the minimum, the persons who obtain
an original licence prior to an examination conducted by a qualified examiner of
this Branch. This is a difficult goal to achieve when it is to be considered that many
licences are issued in the smaller communities of the Province where the services
of a full-time examination office are not warranted. However, in the few areas
where licences are issued prior to a complete examination, the licensees are required
to appear before the examiner on the next occasion when the examiner is in the
area. It must be the ultimate objective of the Motor-vehicle Branch to provide
even a greater service in the smaller areas of the Province to reduce to the bare
minimum the number of persons who do get their licence prior to proper examinations, but it is going to take increased staff and additional funds for travelling
expenses to meet this need.
The following table is a summary of examinations given to original driver's
licence applicants, totalling 46,793. The table shows the number of applicants
that failed to qualify, which amounted to less than 1 per cent. It is the feeling of
the Branch that this indicates both a greater degree of preparedness by new applicants prior to presenting themselves for examination and also a greater reluctance
by those who, for various reasons, are not suitable for driving to present themselves
for examination. Some 24.5 per cent of successful applicants were issued restricted
driver's licences for one or more of the various reasons set out.
 G 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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Re-examination of Drivers
The driver's examination policy strives for the objective of re-examination of
drivers every five years, except that there is an objective to annually re-examine
drivers over 70 years of age. In reality it has not been possible to reach this objective, and, generally speaking, the average span for drivers' examinations for the
under-70 group is between seven and eight years. The Branch is presently striving
to examine all drivers over 70 years between the twelfth and twenty-fourth month
from the previous examination. However, the Branch is handicapped in this matter through inadequate examining staff to meet the work volume.
During the conducting of re-examinations, the examiners are required to watch
for any physical defects which the licensees may have, and when these defects are
noticed to require the persons to produce evidence of a medical examination. In
the over-70 category, medical examinations are required in every instance, but it
is proper to say that there are as many or more persons under 70 who need to produce medical evidence as there are drivers over that age.
A great deal has been accomplished in the past year in co-operation with the
British Columbia Division of the Canadian Medical Association in developing reasonable standards for medical fitness. The standards developed in this Province
have been used widely in other Provinces of Canada.
The following table summarizes driver re-examination and shows that 32 per
cent of all drivers re-examined were issued restricted driver's licences. Failures to
requalify amounted to 1 per cent, which again indicates a great degree of preparedness by the driver together with an awareness by the driver himself, in certain circumstances, that he has reached the point where he is no longer competent enough
to drive and results in the voluntary surrendering of his driver's licence prior to
examination. It is important to emphasize that in re-examinations it is not the
failure rate that is indicative of the success of the programme, but rather that the
programme does keep a continual check on various physical factors of the drivers.
In the past there has been a tendency on the part of the drivers to fail to realize
their physical disabilities which distracts from their driving ability. Drivers need
to be continually concerned of maintaining good physical standards.
 G 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1960      G 43
(c) Drivers' Improvement Programme
The programme of driver's licence control in British Columbia is rounded out
by what is known as the Drivers' Improvement Programme. This is the programme
which deals with drivers who have shown themselves to be problem drivers by their
many convictions and (or) accidents. The steps the programme uses are as
follows:—
(1) A continuing review of the driving record of each driver. This involves
the screening of each record with the addition of information of each new
conviction or accident placed into the licence file of the driver. In 1960
this involved the screening of 95,246 records through the presenting of
conviction notices and 45,555 accident reports:
(2) Adjudication of records to determine the appropriate action; and
(3) Steps to implement the action deemed necessary. This may be in the
way of
(a) a warning letter sent to the licensee, which discusses his driving
record;
(b) the requirement of the driver to report for personal interview
at an office of this Branch to discuss his driving record;
(c) an action to suspend the driving privileges.
It is important to point out that it is the policy of the Branch not to suspend
a driver's licence until the licensee has been given an opportunity to show cause why
his licence should not be suspended. Experience has shown that in many instances
drivers who receive these notices do not attempt to show cause, obviously from the
fact that they accept that some kind of action is necessary to restrain them in their
driving habits. Others make submission by personal appearance with an interviewing officer or by nature of a written presentation, very frequently through legal
counsel. A total of 1,219 persons was interviewed last year under this programme.
Whilst this is a time-consuming effort, it is felt to be an extremely valuable programme in that it is an across-the-table attempt to solve a serious social problem
of our time and an attempt to persuade the driver that by altering his poor highway
conduct he can not only assist himself, but provide a greater degree of safety to
other highway-users.
An indication of the work of this programme is shown by the fact that 76,131
driving records were reviewed in 1959 and 60,211 reviewed in 1958. Statistics
follow to indicate the volume of cases handled in this programme.
 G 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1960      G 45
4. ENCUMBRANCE REGISTRY DIVISION
The Bills of Sale Act, Conditional Sales Act, Mechanics' Lien Act, Companies
Act, and the Co-operative Associations Act have provided for a number of years
for the registration, with the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles, of documents created under those Acts which concern motor-vehicles. This service has been carried
out in the Encumbrance Registry Division since 1932. Its purpose has been to
provide a central location for the registration of appropriate documents, and to be
able to advise the public of the state of titles of motor-vehicles.
The 1960 amendments to the Bills of Sale Act and the Conditional Sales Act
provide for the establishment of a central registry, under the Registrar-General, with
the objective of altering the locations of encumbrances or other documents against
all chattels into one central location to be known as the Central Registry. Commencing January 1st, 1961, the need ceased to exist for the registration of these
documents in the twenty-two County Court Registries in the Province. Commencing that date, the sole location of registration is with the Registrar-General, and
the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles was named, by Order in Council, to be the
Registrar-General. The obvious purpose of this programme is to simplify not only
the registering of documents, but the problem of searching for encumbrances against
chattels.
This report then is the last report of the Encumbrance Registry Division as it
was known prior to January 1st, 1961. This report deals solely with transactions
which concern motor-vehicles.
The following table indicates the volume of business transacted in the Encumbrance Registry in 1959 and 1960:—
Statement of Comparison of Transactions under Provisions of Bills of Sale Act,
Conditional Sales Act, Mechanics' Lien Act, Companies Act, and Co-operative
Associations Act, 1959 and 1960.
1959
1960
Increase
Decrease
Per Cent
Increase
Per Cent
Decrease
Item
Registrations under Conditional Sales Act
Registrations under Bills oj Sale Act 	
Registrations under Mechanics' Lien Act...
Registrations under Companies Act .	
Registrations under Co-operative Associations Act    	
Releases filed under Conditional Sales Act
Releases filed under Bills oj Sale Act 	
Searches under Conditional Sales Act	
Searches under Bills oj Sale Act	
Documents copied, certified, etc.. _
Total number of items.—.	
Revenue
Value of law stamps sold 	
Value of law stamps attached to documents when received.	
Value of conditional sales and bills of
sale search fees   	
Fees under Companies Act
Fees under Co-operative Associations Act
Miscellaneous copying and certification
fees	
Total revenue .
67,342
37,341'
3,337
226
3
732
1,692
50,926
49,206
333
54,035
39,81'5
4,936
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2
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1,551
45,297
45,297
323
2,474
1,599
211,133     |    191,945     |
$195,525.00
104,515.50
39,141.50
127.00
453.00
$188,438.00
104,363.00
46,856.00
646.00
$339,762.00 !$34O,3O3.O0
$7,715.00
18,307
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5,629
3,909
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$7,087.00
152.00
19.71
0.15
19.76
40.26
33.33
24.31
8.33
11.05
7.94
_3.00_
9.09
3.26
0.14
 G 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
5. SCHOOL BUSES
The Motor-vehicle Act places the responsibility with the Superintendent of
Motor-vehicles for the control of school buses used for the transportation of students
to and from public schools in the Province. This control extends to the setting of
minimum standards for the construction and maintenance of school buses, and
provides for the periodic inspection of school buses, which is carried out for the
Superintendent of Motor-vehicles by mechanical inspectors of the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police and the Motor Carrier Branch of the Public Utilities Commission.
The Superintendent requires evidence of insurance coverage in substantial amounts
proper to the issuance of a permit to allow the use of a bus for this type of transportation. This form of control has existed in British Columbia for twenty-five years.
The standards of construction have always been strict, and school-bus inspectors
have been very conscious of their efforts to see that vehicles are maintained, by the
School Board or private carriers, in a condition so that maximum safety is provided
for the students. It is occasionally necessary to condemn a school bus when the
inspector determines that it is no longer fit for this type of transportation and the
operator seems reluctant to neither replace the vehicle or bring it up to the minimum
standards.
British Columbia law has required, for many years, that school-bus drivers be
the holders of a Class A chauffeur's licence. A driver who applies for this form of
licence is subject to frequent re-examinations, at which time he is required to submit
a report of medical examination. Unfortunately it becomes necessary to suspend,
on the advise of our medical officers, the chauffeur's licence for some school-bus
drivers when medical reports divulge that there is a degree of risk which could
reduce the level of safety of the school students being transported.
A change in the Motor-vehicle Act in 1960 required the stopping of all vehicles
on highways when the vehicles were approaching a school bus which had stopped to
load or discharge students, providing the school bus displayed flashing red lamps.
This law change was sought by the British Columbia School Trustees Association,
and it brought British Columbia into line with a number of jurisdictions which have
this type of legislation. Whilst the record in British Columbia during the preceding
years had not been a problem with students getting on or off school buses, it was
felt that the faster movement of traffic warranted this extra safety factor being placed
into the Motor-vehicle Act.
In 1960, school-bus permits totalling 586 were issued, compared to 610
permits issued in 1959.
During 1960, accidents which involved school buses totalled twenty-three.
Students injured totalled eleven. In the majority of accidents, property damage
was the only factor. It is very pleasing to note there were no fatal accidents involving students in 1960. When one considers the large number of students transported
by our school buses every day during the school-year, the realization then exists of
the high level of safety enjoyed in this field of transportation. It is, indeed, a credit
to the school-bus drivers and the School Board that controls this service.
6. STAFF
Permanent staff positions assigned to the Motor-vehicle Branch in 1960
totalled 253, all of which were filled. Forty temporary staff members were employed by December 31st, 1960, making a total staff of 293. This is an increase
of two from the total at December 31st, 1959, both additional employees being in
the temporary category.
 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTOR-VEHICLES,  1960       G 47
It speaks well for the calibre of our staff that they have coped with continuing
work increases without commensurate staff increases. The two extra positions were
assigned to our method conversion programme, under way at the year-end. Supervisors continue to display initiative in developing better work methods. Procedures
are always under review to ensure that only the useful ones are retained. Last year
I mentioned that the staff co-operation toward our conversion programme was at
a high level.   This still exists, for which I am very grateful.
My sincere appreciation is expressed to all the staff members for their continuing loyalty to their work.
CONCLUSION
The Motor-vehicle Branch meets with the natural growth in the volume of
business, resulting in more vehicle registrations and drivers, and with these increases
a greater number of vehicle accidents. Enforcement has been stepped up and entails
the work of filing a greater number of driving convictions, which in turn places a
much greater load on our driver's licence control programme. The Branch must,
therefore, be prepared to cope with the inevitable annual increases in work volumes.
The public expects the Motor-vehicle Branch to take a firm hand in this work
because of the safety factors which are at stake in our modern society, which
depends on the use of highway transportation.
The requirements of the Branch are evident and necessary. We must continue
to improve methods that will establish procedures for more efficiency in licensing
problems; we must explore and continue to provide legislation which will keep our
traffic laws in step with the society in which we live so that we will have laws that
are in tune with the uniform traffic code, laws which are realistic, respected, and
accepted.
It is clear that the Branch must continue to extend its service into the more
rural areas of the Province, particularly into some of our smaller communities, which
now show signs of expansion in our economy, and it is recognized that the people of
these areas are entitled to service.
These requirements strain all the available resources of the Branch. It is
specially pointed out that staff additions will be imperative from time to time.
The alternative is a gradual decrease in the effectiveness of services now rendered.
In my opening remarks, I mentioned the need for better office accommodation
in Victoria. I feel I must stress this point again. Only when these premises are
provided can we expect to attain the maximum level of efficiency from the staff at
our disposal. Valuable records are insecurely stored. A fire in the headquarters
building could reach disastrous proportions. Records of vehicle ownership, driver's
licence records, registered chattel mortgages and conditional sales could be quickly
consumed in a fire. This warrants serious consideration for providing suitable
premises.
I express my gratitude to all who have assisted this Branch in its many efforts.
Members of your Department have always readily given to us of their services, and
for this I am grateful. Other branches of the Government have likewise willingly
assisted us in our work. Without the splendid co-operation of the Officer Commanding and the other officers and members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police,
and the chiefs, constables, officers, and members of the various municipal police
departments, our work would have been indeed difficult. Appreciation is expressed
to them all for their help.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE LINDSAY,
Superintendent of Motor-vehicles.
 Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1962
410-1061-4991

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