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Mental Health Services Branch PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED MARCH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1962

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 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES
AND HOSPITAL INSURANCE
Mental Health Services Branch
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED
MARCH 31st
1961
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1962
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Annual Report of the Mental Health
Services Branch, Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance, for the
vear ended March 31st, 1961.
ERIC MARTIN,
Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance.
Office of the Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Victoria, B.C., December 4th, 1961.
 Department of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Mental Health Services Branch,
Vancouver, B.C., December 1 st, 19 61.
The Honourable Eric Martin,
Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Mental Health
Services Branch for the twelve months ended March 31st, 1961.
A. E. DAVIDSON, B.A., M.D., F.A.P.A.,
Deputy Minister of Mental Health Services.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
PART I.—HEADQUARTERS
Page
Report—Director of Mental Health Services  7
Report—Business Manager.  19
Report—Personnel Officer.  30
Report—Supervisor of Psychiatric Social Work  36
Report—Director of Nursing Services  40
Report—Department of Nursing Education  41
PART II.—CREASE CLINIC OF PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE
AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
Report on Crease Clinic—Medical Superintendent  44
Report on Provincial Mental Hospital—Medical Superintendent  48
Report on Treatment Services—Clinical Director  68
Statistical Tables—Crease Clinic  71
Statistical Tables—Provincial Mental Hospital  83
PART III.—THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
Report—Medical Superintendent  100
Statistical Tables  111
PART IV.—PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME
Report—Medical Superintendent  118
Statistical Tables  120
PART V.—GERIATRIC DIVISION
Report—Medical Superintendent  125
Statistical Tables—VaUeyview Hospital, Essondale  138
Statistical Tables—Dellview Hospital, Vernon  144
Statistical Tables—Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace  149
PART VI.—MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
Report—Director of Mental Health Centre  153
Statistical Tables  158
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 Report of Mental Health Services Branch
For the Twelve Months Ended March 31st, 1961
PART I.—HEADQUARTERS
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
A. E. Davidson, M.D., Deputy Minister of Mental Health Services
and Director of Mental Health Services
General developments recorded in the Annual Reports for the last two years
have continued this year. Whereas in previous years the major emphasis has been
placed on the care of patients in the in-residence institutions of the Branch, there is
now developing a greater interest and responsibility for the mental-health care of
those who continue to live in the community. The care of patients in mental hospitals and schools for the retarded is still regarded as of great importance. It is,
however, recognized that mental-health involvement in areas outside the institutions
requires greater consideration than it has received. The treatment of patients in
their home communities, preventive aspects of mental health, mental-health education, diagnostic and consultative services to agencies dealing with human problems
are all of concern to the Mental Health Services Branch and are accepted as part of
its function.
In this context the move of the Branch office from the Crease Clinic, Essondale,
to the Provincial Health Building, 828 West Tenth Avenue, Vancouver, has real
significance. The move, which was made in June of 1960, has facilitated an increase
in contacts with the community and has thereby permitted new developments along
the lines indicated above.
The American Psychiatric Association has completed the study of the mental-
health needs and resources of British Columbia. The report of the survey was received in the spring of 1960. There are many worth-while suggestions contained in
this study which this Branch will be able to follow during the course of the next few
years.
Following the comprehensive survey by the central inspection board, the
American Psychiatric Association awarded its certificate of approval to the Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic. The geriatric services of the VaUeyview
Hospital are included in the approval since they were considered as the geriatric
wing of the Mental Hospital at the time of the survey. The full accreditation granted
by the American Psychiatric Association indicates that the care and treatment of
psychiatric patients in the approved hospitals is of high standard, comparing favourably with similar institutions in Canada and the United States. It is of interest to
note that only twenty-seven other public mental hospitals on this continent have
been awarded the American Psychiatric Association certificate of full approval.
In 1951 a similar inspection was made by the central inspection board, following which the facUities at Essondale received conditional approval. The many
changes and improvements that have been made since 1951 have resulted in the
central inspection board granting fuU approval in 1960.
 H 8
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Also in 1960, following the survey of the central inspection board, conditional
approval was granted to The Woodlands School, New Westminster. This was the
first occasion that The Woodlands School had been inspected, and it indicates that
a satisfactory and high standard of care is maintained in this institution.
STATISTICAL COMMENTS
Some idea of the amount of service provided by the units of the Mental Health
Services may be obtained by studying the tables covering movement of population
of the Mental Health Services Branch. It will be noted that the number of people
receiving service is showing a steady and progressive increase.
During the past year 3,923 patients were admitted to the various units of the
Mental Health Services, compared with 3,296 admissions in the previous year. An
increase in admissions has been noted in all divisions.
In the Psychiatric Division (that is, the Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease
Clinic) 1,860 patients were first admissions while 1,517 patients were readmissions.
This compares with 1,737 first admissions and 1,252 readmissions for the year
1959/60.
The rate of voluntary admissions to the Psychiatric Division and the number
of admissions by Order in Council has increased significantly.
It will be noted that separations totalled 4,225. This figure gives an indication
of the active therapeutic programme which is being provided by the service.
At the end of the year there was an increase of forty-two in the resident population of the institutions. This increase occurred in the schools for mental defectives
and the Geriatric Division. ActuaUy, there was a decrease of ninety-two patients in
residence in the Psychiatric Division. The Provincial Mental Hospital alone decreased in population by eighty patients by the year's end.
The total number of patients receiving care in the various units of the Mental
Health Services in 1960/61 was 10,831, compared to 10,362 patients in 1959/60.
The Mental Health Centre provided a service to both adults and children who
did not require hospitalization. Five hundred and twenty adults and 1,260 children,
making a total of 1,780, received help. The Mental Health Centre provides diagnostic, assessment, consultative, therapeutic, and follow-up services.
The details of the operation of each institution may be studied in the various
separate unit reports hereunder.
Table 1.—Showing Patients in Residence in the Various Institutions of the Provincial Mental Health Services, April 1st, 1960, and March 31st, 1961, Together
with Increase or Decrease.
Institution
In Residence, Apr
.1,1960
In Residence, Mar
31, 1961
Increase (+)
Men
Women
Total
Men
Women
Total
Decrease (—)
Crease Clinic	
Mental Hospital, Essondale 	
120
1,608
288
752
109
206
106
288
145
1,411
635
451
128
265
3,019
288
1,387
109
657
234
28-8
108
1,608
288
758
147
246
105
279
136
1,340
640
26
484
124
	
244
2,948
288
1,398
173
730
229
279
—21
-71
The Woodlands School	
+ 11
+64
VaUeyview Hospital, Essondale—	
+73
_5
-9
Totals	
3,477
2,770
6,247
3,539
2,750
6,289
+42
 HEADQUARTERS
H 9
Table 2.—Showing in Summary the Admissions and Population Increase of the
Provincial Mental Health Services for the Thirteen-year Period April 1st, 1948,
to March 31st, 1960.
Year
Total
Admissions
Admissions
65 Years
and Over
Admissions
15 Years
and Under
Voluntary
Admissions
Population
Increase
Index of
Increase1
1948/49...	
1949/50 	
1950/51 	
1951/52 ... 	
1952/53 	
1953/54..... 	
1954/55 ...
1955/56 ._	
1956/57  	
1957/58 ....	
1958/59  	
1959/60	
1960/61              	
1,260
1,415
1,811
2,175
2,518
2,437
2,492
2,855
2,720
2,936
2,993
3,296
3,294
270
230
262
306
357
347
348
392
385
442
425
506
580
63
72
148
97
179
169
71
58
57
106
135
182
254
165
297
504
637
768
834
884
1,153
1,083
1,012
1,118
1,316
1,695
354
306
235
285
290
215
88
26
—78
38
-90
20
42
28.09
21.62
12.98
13.05
11.54
8.82
3.53
0.91
—2.87
1.29
-3.00
0.61
107
Totals -
34,829
4,923
1,591
11,466
1,731
i Percentage ratio of increase in population to admissions.
TH.    AMERICAN   P$vCHtA7MC  -\ .. OC S Al I ON
APPROVES
. 8,0V.tNiC.AU MENTAL HOSPITAL & CREASE CLINIC
INSPECTION  BOARD
> \ ,,'•*< .     .1 •! i'.
MAJOR EVENTS AND TRENDS
Continued efforts have been made to expand the open-door policy to additional
wards of the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital. It is recognized that
this removal of restraint and this increased freedom are of definite therapeutic value.
By the end of the year the entire Crease Clinic was functioning on an open hospital
basis. In the Mental Hospital, fifteen of the twenty men's wards were open and
seventeen of the twenty-four women's wards were open. It is very gratifying to note
that the emphasis on custody is rapidly disappearing, and that the main accent is
now on the treatment of the patient's illness.
 H 10 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
During the year, significant progress was made in developing a boarding-out
care programme for patients from the long-term treatment units of the Mental
Hospital. This programme has been developed in close collaboration with the
Department of Social Welfare. Suitable boarding homes have been selected for this
programme. The homes and the patients selected for placement therein are supervised by the social workers of the Mental Health Services Branch. During the year
some eighty patients were placed in boarding homes. This is a very worthy programme, which it is hoped wiU expand. SJJ
A most regrettable incident occurred at the Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz,
in AprU. A patient who had had ground privileges for a number of years was able
to obtain possession of a gun and ammunition. During the search that was conducted to apprehend him, one of the police officers was shot and kiUed. This is the
first time that any serious accident of this nature has occurred in the Mental Health
Services. This incident was thoroughly studied and reviewed. Adjustments have
been made in the operation of the Mental Home at Colquitz with a view to preventing a similar occurrence in the future.
The development of VaUeyview Hospital as a separate unit for the care of
geriatric patients suffering from mental symptoms has continued. The admitting
wards in the VaUeyview Building have been opened, and all admissions to this
hospital are now direct from the community rather than through the Mental Hospital wards at Essondale, as was previously the case. The Home for the Aged Act
has been repealed. VaUeyview Hospital now operates under the Mental Hospitals
Act. Departments of dentistry, pharmacy, and religion have been developed and
staffed there this year. A social service department for the unit has been organized
and has started to operate. This makes possible better screening processes for those
patients seeking admission. In certain cases consultative help facilitates other more
suitable arrangements being made for those seeking admission. It has also been
possible to make arrangements for boarding- and nursing-home care for a limited
number of patients from the VaUeyview Hospital. It is hoped that this service may
be further developed.
This year, arrangements were made for the opening of a tuck-shop at VaUeyview Hospital. The renovation of the building to be used for this purpose was made
by the Public Works Department. The operation of the tuck-shop is carried out by
the volunteers of the Canadian Mental Health Association. This new service is
much appreciated by the many elderly patients who are able to use it and also by
the relatives of the patients who visit.
It is necessary to transfer patients between VaUeyview Hospital at Essondale
and Skeenaview at Terrace periodically. Heretofore these patients have been transferred by train, and the trip has taken some two days. This year it has been possible
to arrange for this transportation to be effected by air. The new arrangement is
much more satisfactory and convenient to both patients and staff involved.
The development of the Tranquille School for the care of the mentally retarded
has continued. This year additional space has been prepared and additional staff
provided for the care of mentally retarded girls. The girls have been transferred
from The Woodlands School, and this transfer has provided accommodation for
additional admissions to The Woodlands School. GraduaUy the school at Tranquille
is being transformed into a multi-purpose hospital-school for the mentaUy retarded.
It is planned that direct admission to the School from the community wiU be possible
eventuaUy.
A traveUing diagnostic team was established this year at The Woodlands
School. The team consists of psychiatric, psychological, and social-work staff.
Its purpose will be to visit various communities where mentally retarded children
 HEADQUARTERS
H 11
may be seen for assessment and consultative purposes. It is felt that this additional
service wiU be of great benefit to retarded children in the community, many of
whom are being considered for admission to a school for the retarded.
The thirty-day admission programme at The Woodlands School has functioned
quite actively this year. The programme provides for the admission of mentally
retarded chUdren to the School on a temporary basis, thereby giving some relief to
parents who are bound down by the need to provide constant care for their retarded
children. It also gives The Woodlands School staff an opportunity for adequate
clinical assessment of these chUdren. During the year some 206 patients were
admitted to The Woodlands School on this temporary basis.
Definite steps have been taken to increase the treatment facilities at the Mental
Health Centre, Burnaby. A start has been made in a day treatment centre for chUdren. This service was initiated in the fall of 1960. A teacher was seconded from
the Burnaby School Board to assist. A limited number of children with emotional
problems in the pre-school age-group and in the primary-school age-group have
attended the day treatment centre. The new service is meeting a well-recognized
need.
The Mental Health Centre has extended its services in the community by providing professional help directly to several health and welfare agencies in the City
of Vancouver. A psychiatrist visits these agencies and is able to offer immediate
diagnostic and consultative advice. Seven agencies have been serviced in this manner during the year. This type of service enables the staff from the Mental Health
Centre to offer direct consultative help in the programme of care which is being
carried on in the agencies.
The traveUing clinic service from the Mental Health Centre has been organized
to provide diagnostic and consultative services to many outlying areas of the Province. It is the only source of professional psychiatric help available for people in
these areas presenting emotional disturbances. The visits have of necessity not
been frequent enough to meet all the needs and to see aU cases requiring help.
Increasing demands have been made for more frequent service and for more foUow-
up care. It is clear that these demands can only be met in the long run by the
establishment of regional clinics close to the communities where the needs must be
served.
In anticipation of the development of regional services, a modification has been
made in the travelling cUnic programme to the Okanagan area, which includes the
North Okanagan Health Unit, the South Okanagan Health Unit, and the South-
Central Health Unit. Major urban centres in these units have been visited more
frequently and more regularly in order to provide a better service. At the same
time an attempt has been made to increase the amount of diagnostic and consultative service to the Kootenay areas and also to the Upper Fraser Valley Health Unit.
GENERAL COMMENTS
The thirtieth graduation exercises of the School of Psychiatric Nursing were
held in the Vincent Massey Junior High School auditorium on the evening of April
28th. Dr. J. Ranton Mcintosh, Professor and Director of Secondary Education,
University of British Columbia, gave the graduation address. One hundred and
eleven students graduated, consisting of eighty-three women and twenty-eight men.
These nurses were presented with their diplomas in psychiatric nursing.
This year the period of training in psychiatric nursing which the affiUate nurses
from the general hospitals have been receiving has been increased from two months
to three months.   These nurses, who are taking their general nursing training in
 H 12 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
general hospitals, receive their psychiatric training in the Department of Nursing
Education of the Mental Health Services Branch. The increase in time spent with
the mental health units will enable this group of nurses to receive more adequate
training and experience in this special nursing field. The number of affiliate nurses
in the programme has also been increased.
A clinical course for graduate nurses was initiated in October, 1960. The
training is for six months. Eight nurses were enroUed in the first class. The course
enables the registered nurse to increase her knowledge and skiU in the specialty of
psychiatric nursing.
Continued effort has been made to familiarize the pubUc with the problem of
mental illness and with the functions of the various units of the Mental Health Services. To this end, many individuals, both singly or in groups, visited the different
units of the Mental Health Services and have been taken on tours to familiarize
them with what is taking place in this field. On May 7th, during Mental Health
Week, all units of the Mental Health Services Branch in the Lower Mainland held
open house. Units participating were the Crease Clinic, the Provincial Mental
Hospital, the VaUeyview Hospital, The Woodlands School, the Mental Health Centre, and the Department of Nursing Education. Many interested visitors were able
to view the facUities and programmes of care.
On January 23rd, 1961, a special tour of these same facilities was arranged
for members of the Legislature. Some twenty-five members, fourteen of whom
were accompanied by their wives, visited. This type of visit is very beneficial in
that it is possible to familiarize many people with the varied services provided by
the Mental Health Services Branch.
The CouncU of Psychiatric Nurses held its annual meeting on May 18th, 1960.
New members serving on the council are Mr. L. J. Wallace, Deputy Provincial
Secretary, appointed by the Mental Health Services Branch, and Mrs. S. Mackenzie,
psychiatric nurse, appointed by the British Columbia Psychiatric Nurses Association. This year the Council awarded two bursaries to psychiatric nurses to assist
them in further study in the field of psychiatric nursing. Mrs. S. Mackenzie and
Mr. M. Doran were the recipients of the bursaries. Both attended a course in group
development given by the Laboratory of Human Relations in Bethel, Maine.
Acknowledgment is made of the contribution which is being made to the
Mental Health Services Branch by the Canadian Mental Health Association and
the Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia. These organizations
continue to provide their helpful contacts with the patients of the various units of
the service. The many volunteers from the Canadian Mental Health Association
provide services to patients in the mental hospitals by their regular visiting, through
fashion shows, the Christmas gift programme, and other activities. The Association
for Retarded Children of British Columbia has organized auxiliaries to The Woodlands School and the Tranquille School. The contributions of these organizations
are truly appreciated by both patients and staff of the Mental Health Services
Branch.   Their dedication is unfailing.
The therapeutic and economic roles of the institutional farms were studied this
year. It has been recommended that the farms be transferred to the jurisdiction
of the British Columbia Department of Agriculture, to be used for experimental
and demonstration purposes. This reorganization will become effective on April
1st, 1961.
The AlcohoUsm Foundation and the Narcotic Addiction Foundation have
continued to have representation on their boards of directors from the Mental
Health Services Branch. Dr. F. G. Tucker has served on the board of the Alcoholism Foundation and Dr. A. E. Davidson has served as a board member of the
Narcotic Addiction Foundation.
 HEADQUARTERS H  13
MENTAL HEALTH GRANT
The Government of Canada, through the Department of National Health and
Welfare, made available to this Province a Mental Health Grant " to assist in an
extended programme for the prevention and treatment of mental illness, including
rehabilitation and free treatment." This is the thirteenth year that the Mental
Health Grant has been avaUable.
The grant provided for 1960/61 was $790,742. Projects to the total value
of $712,264.57 were submitted to and approved by the Department of National
Health and Welfare. Expenditures made and claims submitted to the Federal
Treasury by March 31st totalled $656,220.02.
The major areas of expenditure are detailed hereunder.
Professional Training
Dr. Anthony Greiner, of the Mental Hospital staff, commenced a year of graduate study in internal medicine at Shaughnessy Hospital in July.
Dr. Gordon Kirkpatrick, Senior Psychiatrist of the ChUdren's CUnic at the
Mental Health Centre, took a six months' refresher course in child psychiatry at
the Montreal ChUdren's Hospital.
Nine physicians were granted bursaries to enable them to enrol for graduate
specialist training in the Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University
of British Columbia.   These bursaries, tenable for one year, commenced in July.
Another physician was granted a bursary to permit him to enrol in the Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, for similar training.
Ten social workers were granted bursaries to permit them to enrol in the
School of Social Work, University of British Columbia, for an advanced course
during the academic year beginning in September.
Five registered nurses were granted bursaries tenable for one year of advanced
training in the School of Nursing, University of British Columbia.
Two clinical psychologists were awarded bursaries to allow them to enrol for
an academic year of postgraduate study in their specialty at the University of British Columbia.
All the persons granted these bursaries have signed agreements to give a return
in service to the Mental Health Services Branch of the Province at the conclusion
of their training periods.
A number of short courses and institutes for staff personnel were supported
by the Mental Health Grant as foUows:—
Three social workers attended the Pacific Northwest Regional Institute of the
Family Service Association at Maple Valley, Wash., in September.
Four social workers attended the Medical Social Work Institute convened by
the National Association of Social Workers at Maple Valley, Wash., in September.
Dr. F. E. McNair, Dr. F. G. Tucker, and Mr. C. B. Watson attended the
Twelfth Mental Hospital Institute of the American Psychiatric Association, held in
Salt Lake City, Utah, in October.
Twenty-five members of the institutional cooking staff attended a course in
hospital kitchen management for cooks given under the auspices of the School of
Home Economics, University of British Columbia. The course was given on
twenty evenings in the period January to March.
Equipment and Supplies
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.—The Surgical Department was provided with a defibrillator and the medical ward was provided with a cardiac resus-
citator.
 H 14 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
The psychophysiological research chassis previously provided for the Department of Psychology was expanded by the provision of an electromyogram, pneumograph, and an electronic timer and stimulus controUer.
The Physiotherapy Department of the Centre Lawn Building was equipped
with two treatment tables, a standing-table, a set of walking parallel bars, and a
Guthrie-Smith frame.
The Woodlands School.—The chnical laboratory was supplied with a Coleman
custom junior spectrophotometer complete with accessories.
The Tranquille School.—Three weaving-looms were supplied for the Occupational Therapy Department.
Dellview Hospital.—Eight wheelchairs and one complete oxygen tent were
supplied.
Skeenaview Hospital.—Two Stryker turning-frames were provided.
Community Mental-health Programmes
The mental-hygiene programme of the Metropolitan Health Committee of
Greater Vancouver was again supported by a grant, which this year totalled $34,-
986. This sum provided the salaries for one psychiatrist, two chnical psychologists, two psychiatric social workers, and one clerk-stenographer.
The Vancouver School Board was assisted in providing an advanced in-service
training course in mental hygiene for senior school counsellors. This year ten
trainees were enrolled. The salary and travelling allowance of the course director
are derived from a Mental Health Grant.
The Esther Irwin Home for Emotionally Disturbed Children, organized by
the ChUdren's Foundation of British Columbia, commenced operations this year.
Assistance is provided from a Mental Health Grant, which suppUes three-fifths of
the salary of the psychiatrist, who is the executive director of the home.
The programme of the British Columbia Epilepsy Society was assisted with a
grant of $11,500 to assist in the payment of professional personnel.
Psychiatric Services in General Hospitals
The psychiatric division of the out-patients' department of the Vancouver General Hospital was assisted by a grant to provide the salaries for two psychiatric
social workers, a psychiatric senior clerk, and a medical stenographer.
Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia
The Department of Psychiatry of the University of British Columbia was aided
in the estabhshment of a graduate training programme for ten students in order to
ensure a supply of well-trained psychiatrists for the public service in British Columbia. A Mental Health Grant of $46,475 was made available this year. The
grant provided salaries for a clinical psychologist, social worker, and a secretary.
Stipends for psychiatrists engaged in the tutorial supervision of the ten residents
were included. Honoraria and travel expenses for visiting lecturers were supplied.
Equipment, such as tape recorders, dictation machines, and basic office furniture,
was authorized. Professional books and journals to the value of $2,000 were
provided.
Personnel for Mental Health Services
The stipends of the consultants in neurosurgery, general surgery, orthopaedic
surgery, internal medicine, and dermatology are derived from a grant to the Provincial Mental Hospital. These consultants provide services to all the institutions
of the Branch in the Lower Mainland as required.
J
 HEADQUARTERS
H 15
The hospitals and clinics of the Branch have again received assistance in the
provision of salaries for members of the treatment staff, including such specialists
as psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses, laboratory technicians, clinical psychologists,
social workers, and dieticians.   In all, 108 personnel are involved in these grants.
Research Projects
Several major research projects continue to be supported with funds obtained
from the Mental Health Grant. The studies are conducted in the Faculty of Medicine of the University of British Columbia. The departments conducting the research are Department of Pharmacology and Department of Neurological Research.
The sum of $74,756 was appropriated for research studies this year.
COMPARATIVE SUMMARY OF INCREASES AND DECREASES IN RESIDENT POPULATION BY MAJOR DIVISIONS OF MENTAL HEALTH
SERVICES BRANCH, 1952/53 TO 1960/61.
Fiscal Year
Provincial
Mental
Hospitals
Schools for
Mental
Defectives
Geriatric
Division
Crease
Clinic
Total
1952/53..
1953/54_
1954/55-
1955/56...
1956/57-
1957/5S-
1958/59-
1959/60-
1960/61-
—64
+62
+44
+2
—70
-49
-135
-253
—71
+277
+ 104
+ 19
+ 19
+ 14
+76
+ 86
+93
+75
+49
+50
""+15
+9
— 15
—30
—30
+ 156
+28
— 1
+25
— 10
— 31
+26
— 11
+24
—21
+290
+215
+88
+26
-78
+38
-90
+20
+42
COMPARATIVE SUMMARY OF TOTAL PATIENTS UNDER CARE FOR
MAJOR DIVISIONS OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES BRANCH BY
FISCAL YEARS 1952/53 TO 1960/61.
1952/53-
1953/54-
1954/55-
1955/56_
1956/57-
1957/58-
1958/59-
1959/60-
1960/61-
Fiscal Year
Provincial
Mental
Hospitals
5,227
5,040
5,051
5,247
5,335
5,408
5,377
5,458
5,530
Schools for
Mental
Defectives
1,130
1,278
1,263
1,278
1,275
1,373
1,481
1,740
1,868
Geriatric
Crease
Division
Clinic
1,202
1,436
1,255
1,499
1,292
1,606
1,330
1,894
1,287
1,721
1,349
1,714
1,373
1,744
1,459
1,705
1,587
1,846
8,995
9,072
9,212
9,749
9,618
9,844
9,975
10,362
10,831
 H 16
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION IN INDIVIDUAL INSTITUTIONS,
APRIL 1st, 1960, TO MARCH 31st, 1961
Psychiatric Division
Crease Clinic
Provincial Mental Hospitals
Essondale                <$£
Total
M.
*
T.
M.
f.  ; T.
M.
M.
1
1     F.
1
1
1    T.
In residence, April 1st, 1960	
On   probation,   carried   forward
from 1959/60              _
120
145
265
1,608
110
8
1,411
197
4
3,019
307
12
288
1
1
2,016
111
9
1,556
197
4
3,572
308
On escape, carried forward from
1959/60                           	
13
Total   as   at  April   1st,
1960                 	
120
145
265
1,726
1,612
3,338
290
2,136
1,757
3,893
Admissions—
First   admissions   to   Mental
466
21
190
595
39
266
1,061
60
456
499
93
389
!
i
300 |     799
153        246
366 j     755
965
114
579
895
192
632
1,860
306
1,211
Readmissions to different institutions „	
Readmissions to same institution    	
677
4
900
1,577
4
981
42
819 ;  1,800
46 ■]       88
14
1,658
60
1,719
46
3,377
106
Total admissions to individual institution	
681
900
1,581
1,023
865
1,888
14
1,718
1,765 ■
3,483
Total under care 	
801
1,045
1,846
2,749
2,477 | 5,226
304
3,854
3,522
7,376
Separations—
Discharged in full 	
Died
666
3
872
1
1,538
4
825
76
121
4
751
52
308
1
1,576
128
429
5 '
3
5
1
1
1,494
84
122
5
1,623
53
308
1
3,117
137
On   probation   but   not   discharged 	
Escaped but not discharged	
430
6
669
873
1,542
1,026
1,112 | 2,138
10
1,705
1,985
3,690
24
36
60
115
25 |     140
6
145
61
206
Total  separations  from
individual institution..
693
909
1,602
1,141
1,137
2,278
16
1,850
2,046
3,896
Net increase or decrease	
— 12
-9
—21
.... | _7i | _7i ; —
-12
—80 ■
—92
In residence, March 31st, 1961.—
108
136
244
1,608
1,340 | 2,948
288
2,004
1,476
3,480
Schools for Mental Defectives
The Woodlands School,
New Westminster
Tranquille School,
Tranquille
Total
M.
F.
T.
M.
R
T.
M.
F.
T.
In residence, April 1st, 1960	
On   probation,   carried  forward  from
1959/60...     __	
752
16
635
-
1,387
22
i
109
i
1 |   	
109
1
861
17
635
6
1,496
23
Total as at April 1st, 1960	
768
641
1,409
110
110
878
641
1,519
Admissions—
First  admissions  to  Mental  Health
Services. —        	
Readmissions to different institutions _.
Readmissions to same institution	
101
4
33
82
41
183
4
74
  1   	
  |   	
	
101
4
33
82
"Tl
183
4
741
138
13
123
2
261
15
47
26
73
138
60
123 '
28
261
88
Total admissions to individual
151
125
276
47
26
73
198
151
349
Total under care  	
919
766
1,685
157
26
183
1,076
792
1,868
Separations—
Discharged in full	
Died                                 	
95
6
12
77
9
11
172
15
23
1
	
1
96
6
12
9
173
15
23
113
48
97
29
210
77
1
9
	
1
9
I'M
57
97
29
211
86
Total   separations  from  indi-
161
126
287
10
10
171
126
297
+6
758
+5
+ 11
+38
+26
+64
+44
+31
+75
In residence, March 31st, 1961  	
640
1,398
147
26
173
905
666
1,571
 HEADQUARTERS
H  17
Geriatric Division
VaUeyview Hospital,
Essondale
Dellview Hospital,
Vernon
Skeena-
view
Hospital,
Terrace
Total
M.
*■
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
M.
F-
T.
In residence, April 1st, 1960-
Admissions—
First   admissions   to   Mental
206
50
2
1
451
134
7
1
657
184
9
2
105
47
3
128
25
1
1
234
72
4
1
288
13
600
110
5
1
579
159
8
2
1,179
269
Readmissions to different institutions  	
Readmissions to same institu-
13
3
Total admissions	
53
142
195
50 '
27
77
13
116
169
285
Transfers in	
79
24
103
1
1
19
99
24
123
Total admissions to individual institution
132
33*~
166
617~
298
955"
51
27
78
32
215
193
408
Total under care„	
157
155
312
320
815
772
1,587
Separations—
Discharged in full 	
Died                           	
5
71
3
2
116
8
7
187
11
1
47
1
30
1
77
1
1
39
7
157
3
1
2
146
8
9
303
On   probation   but   not   dis^
charged  	
On escape but not discharged ..
11
1
Total separations	
79
126
205
49
30
79
40
168
156
324
13'
■
20
3
1
4
1
17
8
25
Total separations from
individual institution
92
133
225
52
31
83
41
185
164
349
Net increase or decrease
In residence, March 31st, 1961.	
+40
246
+33
484
+73
730
— 1
105
—4 ■
124
—5
229
—9
279
+30
630
+29
608
+59
1,238
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES,
APRIL 1st, 1960, TO MARCH 31st, 1961
Psychiatric
Division
Schools for Mental Defectives
Geriatric
Division
Total
1
M.  j   F.
1
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.   I   F.
1
T.
?_.01fil 1.55., 3.572
861
17
635
6
1,496
23
600
579
1,179
1           1
3 477  9.770
6,247
331
On probation, carried forward from
1959/60 	
I'll      197
91        4
308
13
128
9
203
4
On   escape,   carried  forward   from
1959/60 	
 1	
13
Total as at April 1st, 1960 .
2,136; 1,757] 3,893
878
641
1,519
600
579] 1,179
3,614, 2,977
6,591
Admissions-
First admissions to Mental Health
965
114
579
895
192
632
1,860
306
1,211
101
4
33
82
183
4
110
5
1
159
269
1,176
123
613
1,136
200
675
2,312
323
Readmissions to different institu-
8      13
2|        3
Readmissions to same institution
41'|      74
1,288
1,658] 1,719
60]      46
3,377
106
138
60
1231    261
28]      88
116
99
169
24
285
123
1,912] 2,011
219]      98
3,923
317
Total  admissions to  indi-
1.718'i 1.765
3.483
198
'   1S1|    349
215
1
1931    408
2,131] 2,109
5,526] 4,988
4 240
1,587
Total under care 	
3,854] 3,522] 7,376
1,076
792| 1,868
815
772
10,5141
Separations—
Discharged in full... 	
Died          ._„ _	
1,494 1,623 3,117
84|[      53     137
122     308     430
5]        l|        6
96
6
12
77
9
11
173
15
23
7
157
3
1
2        9
146J    303
S|      11
1,597
247
137
6
1,702
208
327
1
3,299
455
On probation but not discharged ..
464
7
X9871
Total separations	
1,705
145
1,985] 3,690
61]    206
114
57
97
29
211
86
168
17
156
a
324
2,238
4,225
317
Total separations from in-
'          i
1,850J 2,046] 3,896
171
126
297
185
^-30
630
1
164     349
~+29P+59
1
2,206] 2,336
~+62]~—20
4,542
Net increase or decrease	
-12] -80] -92
4-44
+31
+75
+42
In residence, March 31st, 1961    ....
2,004] 1,476] 3,480
905
666
1,571
608
1,238
3,539| 2,750
6,289
i Total under care for all Mental Health Services includes total as at
sions to individual institutions minus transfers out.
2
April 1st, 1960, plus the total admis-
 H 18
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Mental Health Services Branch Conference
Front, left to right: Miss B. Mitchell, R.N., B.S.N., Director of Nursing Services;
Miss A. K. Carroll, B.A., M.S.W., Provincial Supervisor, Psychiatric Social Work;
Miss A. Dingle, Consultant, Medical Records and Statistics.
Back, left to right: F. E. McNair, B.A., M.D., CM., Director, Mental Health
Centre, Burnaby; C. B. Watson, M.A., Assistant to the Deputy Minister; J. Dowling,
Personnel Officer; T. G. Caunt, M.D., F.A.P.A., Medical Superintendent, Provincial
Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine, Essondale; A. E.
Davidson, B.A., M.D., F.A.P.A., Deputy Minister and Director of Mental Health
Services; B. F. Bryson, B.A., M.D., CM., F.A.P.A., Medical Superintendent, Valley-
view Hospital, Essondale; L. A. Kerwood, M.D., D.P.M., Medical Superintendent,
The Woodlands School, New Westminster; F. A. Matheson, Business Manager.
Absent from this photograph are L. G. C. D'Easum, M.D., Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, and F. G. Tucker, M.B., B.S., Clinical
Director, Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine,
Essondale.
 HEADQUARTERS H 19
BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT
F. A. Matheson, Business Manager
Attached hereto are the financial reports of the in-patient care units of the
British Columbia Mental Health Services together with those of the community
services in Burnaby and Victoria for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1961.
Table A shows a daily average population for all institutions of 6,292.37, an
increase of 121.15 over the previous year. This increase is accounted for mainly
by an increase at The Woodlands School and the Tranquille School of 92.13 and
at the VaUeyview Hospital of 135.25. The population of the Provincial Mental
Hospital shows a decrease of 127.46.
Partly as a result of the above-mentioned increase in the population of the
institutions, the gross operating costs increased from $14,531,218.39 in 1959/60
to $15,409,097.08 for 1960/61, an increase of $877,878.69.
The gross daily per capita cost for the year is $6.71, an increase of 28 cents
over the previous year. The net per capita cost is $5.88 per day, an increase of 25
cents over last year.
Maintenance revenue for 1960/61 was $1,906,847.71, as compared to collections of $1,821,810.53 for 1959/60, an increase of $85,037.18.
Dairy produce, meats, fruit, vegetables, and canned goods valued in excess of
$450,000 were purchased from the institutional farms at Essondale, Colquitz, and
Tranquille during the year.
Expenditures totalling $656,220.02 for equipment, personnel, and staff-training
were made under approved projects of Federal health grants during this fiscal year.
A detailed statement covering these expenditures is attached.
It should be noted that in Tables C, D, E, F, G, H, I, and J a number of changes
in the breakdown of expenditures have been made, and also that salaries are now
shown as a separate item instead of being included along with the expenses under
the various sub-headings.
The financial statements for the Community Services Section also reflect the
changes made this year in the administrative set-up by combining the Child Guidance Clinic, Burnaby, and the Mental Health Centre, Burnaby, into one operation.
Separate statements on the operation of The Vista Rehabilitation Centre and
The Venture Rehabilitation Centre have also been prepared. In previous years the
cost of the operation for these two units has been included in the statements of the
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
The new general administration offices in the Provincial Health Building,
Vancouver, were completed, and the Deputy Minister and his staff moved from
Essondale to their new quarters on lune 1st, 1960.
During this year a major change was made in the operation of the business
offices with the patients' maintenance accounts and trust accounts being transferred
from the general administration business office at Essondale to the various branches.
I regret to advise that on January 14th and 15 extensive flooding took place in
the lowlands around Essondale. There were four breaks in the dykes of the Wilson
Ranch section of Colony Farm, flooding the Wilson Ranch to a depth equal to the
top of the dykes. As a precautionary measure, some 250 patients were evacuated
from the Colony Farm area to the Crease Clinic and the VaUeyview Hospital.
Fortunately there was no serious damage as a result of this flooding.
Plans were completed during the year for the transfer of the Colony Farm, the
Colquitz Farm, and the Tranquille Farm to the Department of Agriculture on April
1st, 1961.
The buildings, grounds, equipment, and furnishings at all institutions have been
well maintained during this year, and in addition we were also able to make a
number of improvements in all areas.
 H 20
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
FINANCIAL TABLES
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence Each
Year, the Total Amounts Spent for Maintenance, and the Gross
Yearly and Daily per Capita Cost, 1951/52 to 1960/61.
Institution
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Yearly
per Capita
Cost
Daily
per Capita
Cost
1951/52
Provincial Mental Hospital, New Westminster —	
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam	
Home for the Aged, Vernon _ .-__. _
Home for the Aged, Terrace	
799.47
3,485.14
282.68
381.03
216.43
208.97
188.82
$1,284,649.25
4,021,001.69
407,123.16
504,668.17
309,649.05
265,697.50
689,466.11
$1,606.88
1,153.75
1,440.23
1,324.48
1,430.71
1,271.46
3,640.85
$4.39
3.15
3.94
3.62
3.91
3.47
9.95
5,562.54
$7,482,254.93
$1,345.11
$3.68
1952/53
Provincial Mental Hospital, New West-
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale ..
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz _	
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam	
Home for the Aged, Vernon	
Home for the Aged, Terrace	
949.24
3,440.34
284.79
442.94
224.18
292.07
230.77
$1,590,703.00
4,441,278.38
433,108.50
617,445.55
384,971.73
325,842.57
759,406.04
$1,675.76
1,290.94
1,520.80
1,393.97
1,717.24
1,115.63
3,290.75
$4.59
3.54
4.17
3.82
4.70
3.06
9.02
5,864.33
$8,552,755.77
$1,458.44
$4.00
1953/54
1,150.76
3,491.15
285.28
469.13
228.26
293.19
235.16
$1,768,922.31
4,393,682.65
421,622.61
683,511.48
378,006.20
330,968.40
788,302.36
$1,537.18
1,258.52
1,477.93
1,456.98
1,656.03
1,128.85
3,352.20
$4.21
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale _.
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz.	
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam	
Home for the Aged, Vernon	
Home for the Aged, Terrace	
3.45
4.05
3.99
4.54
3.09
9.18
6,152.93
$8,765,016.01
$1,424.53
$3 90
1954/55
1,204.60
3,517.75
285.74
527.33
230.72
296.42
238.63
$1,811,848.81
4,685,444.76
426,786.04
739,859.92
368,726.10
328,553.97
860,673.73
$1,504.11
1,331.94
1,493.62
1,403.03
1,598.15
1,108.41
3,606.73
$4.12
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale...
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam	
Home for the Aged, Vernon	
Home for the Aged, Terrace	
3.65
4.09
3.84
4.38
3.04
9.88
Totals for the year 	
6,301.19
$9,221,893.33
$1,463.52
$4.01
1955/56
1,219.45
3,508.79
285.30
539.27
229.62
287.30
257.96
$2,032,263.32
5,377,708.34
428,248.27
797,392.10
371,438.14
351,087.68
935,501.07
$1,666.54
1,532.64
1,501.05
1,478.65
1,617.62
1,222.02
3,626.54
$4.55
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale...
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam... .
Home for the Aged, Vernon 	
Home for the Aged, Terrace 	
4.19
4.10
4.04
4.42
3.34
9.91
6.327.69
$10,293,638.92
$1,626.76
$4.44
1956/57
The Woodlands School
1,232.48
3,503.60
284.81
541.83
232.58
288.45
232.85
$2,246,193.06
5,851,370.53
446,497.91
831,370.73
402,867.14
350,880.96
996,288.31
$1,822.50
1,670.10
1,567.70.
1,534.38
1,732.17
1,216.43
4,278.67
$4.99
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam	
Home for the Aged, Vernon  	
Home for the Aged, Terrace. 	
4.58
4.30
4.20
4.75
3.33
11.72
Totals for the year . ....
6,316.60
$11,125,468.64
$1,761.31
.   $4.83
 HEADQUARTERS
H 21
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence Each
Year, the Total Amounts Spent for Maintenance, and the Gross
Yearly and Daily per Capita Cost, 1951/62 and 1960/61—Continued.
Institution
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Yearly
per Capita
Cost
Daily
per Capita
Cost
1957/58
1,266.21
3,410.79
285.36
538.56
231.34
288.63
235.31
$2,484,024.86
5,716,745.90
460,863.85
898,225.93
395,584.86
379,826.63
1,077,897.96
$1,961.78
1,676.08
1,615.03
1,667.83
1,709.97
1,315.96
4,580.76
$5.37
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale—
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz—   ...
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam	
4.59
4.42
4.57
4.68
Home for the Aged, Terrace	
Crease Clinic... ..   .
3.61
12.55
Totals for the year 	
6,256.20
$11,413,169.99
$1,824.30
$5.00
1958/59
The. W-nrHan "s Srtinnl
1,377.31
3,301.84
282.99
539.13
226.33
282.92
236.88
$2,968,725.50
6,088,091.20
488,028.69
961,921.63
410,529.00
386,804.84
1,149,344.46
$2,155.45
1,843.84
1,724.55
1,784.22
1,813.86
1,367.19
4,852.01
$5.91
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale—
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz..	
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam	
5.05
4.72
4.89
4.97
Home for the Aged, Terrace
3.75
13.29
Total.? for th<> Yr-ar
6,247.40
$12,453,445.32
$1,993.38
$5.46
1959/60
226.80
3,135.48
1,395.44
53.74
283.50
560.16
230.92
285.18
$1,233,254.59
6,672,849.09
3,443,231.64
400,957.24
523,480.74
1,400,239.30
444,975.54
412,230.25
$5,437.63
2,128.17
2,467.49
7,461.06
1,846.49
2,499.71
1,926.97
1,445.51
$14,86
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale...
The Woodlands School         	
5.81
6.74
Tranquille School, Tranquille	
20.39
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz.    ...
VaUeyview Hospital, Port Coquitlam	
Dellview Hospital, Vernon   	
5.05
6.83
5.26
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace...         	
3.95
Totals for the year __
6,171.22
$14,531,218.39
$2,354.68
$6.43
1960/61
237.72
3,008.02
1,415.30
126.01
287.16
695.41
232.05
290.70
$1,313,678.32
6,775,567.11
3,637,555.12
542,556.16
518,591.72
1,754,500.08
448,792.02
417,856.55
$5,526.16
2,252.50
2,570.17
4,305.66
1,805.93
2,522.97
1,934.03
1,437.41
$15.14
6.17
7.04
11 80
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale __.
The Woodlands School  ..
Tranquille School, Tranquille	
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz
VaUeyview Hospital, Port Coquitlam	
Dellview Hospital, Vernon
4.95
6.91
5 30
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace. .     ._ 	
3.94
Totals for the year	
6,292.37
$15,409,097.08
$2,448.85
$6 71
 H 22
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table B.—Summary Statement Showing the Gross and Net per Capita
Cost of Patients in All Mental Health Services Institutions for
the Year Ended March 31st, 1961.
Gross operating costs—
Crease Clinic  $ 1,313,678.32
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale  6,775,567.11
The Woodlands School, New Westminster  3,637,555.12
Tranquille School, Tranquille	
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
VaUeyview Hospital, Port Coquitlam
Dellview Hospital, Vernon	
Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace	
542,556.16
518,591.72
1,754,500.08
448,792.02
417,856.55
Gross costs of all institutions  $15,409,097.08
Less collections remitted to Treasury       1,906,847.71
$13,502,249.37
Daily average population  6,292.37
Gross per capita cost, one year  $2,448.85
Gross per capita cost, one day  6.71
Net per capita cost, one year  2,145.81
Net per capita cost, one day  5.88
Revenue (Patients' Maintenance Collections) of the Mental Health
Services for the Past Ten Years
1951/52    $928,398.83
1952/53  1,147,831.65
1953/54  1,300,056.89
1954/55  1,343,848.02
1955/56  1,358,708.26
1956/57  $1,546,266.32
1957/58  1,724,046.70
1958/59  1,838,158.33
1959/60  1,821,810.53
1960/61  1.906,847.71
Table C.—Expense Statement of the Crease Clinic of Psychological
Medicine, Essondale, for Twelve Months Ended March 3 1st, 1961
Salaries, Supplies, and Operating
Expense
Net Vouchered
Expenditure as
per Public
Accounts
Services and
Supplies from
Public Works
Department
Actual Cost
of Operations
Yearly per
Capita Cost
Salaries      —
Office expense  	
Travelling expense	
Office furniture and equipment... —
Heat, lisht, water, and power _	
Medical care	
Dietary   	
Laundry  	
General supplies.. _. 	
Transportation    	
Occupational and recreational therapy
Incidentals and contingencies  _..
Buildings, grounds, etc  	
Totals   	
$981,827.23
5,673.73
2,393.78
925.26
24,000.00
79,167.24
117,355.30
9,600.00
24,664.14
4,200.00
12,964.26
736.55
$1,262,034.39
,827.23
,673.73
,393.78
925.26
.000.00
.167.24
.355.30
600.00
664.14
,200.00
.964.26
736.5J
,643.93
li51,643.93~! $1,313,678.32"
$51,643.93
$981.
5.
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9.
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51
$4,130.18
23.87
10.07
3.89
100.96
333.03
493.67
40.38
103.75
17.67
54.54
3.10
217.25
$5,526.16
 HEADQUARTERS
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H 25
Table H.—Expense Statement of the Valleyview Hospital, Port
Coquitlam, for Twelve Months Ended March 31st, 1961
Salaries, Supplies, and
Operating Expenses
Net Vouchered
Expenditure
as per
Public Accounts
Services and
Supplies from
Public Works
Department
Actual Cost of
Operations
Yearly per
Capita Cost
Salaries   	
Office expense 	
Travelling expense. 	
Heat, light, water, and power..
Medical care	
Dietary  	
Laundry	
Transportation	
General supplies
Occupational and recreational therapy..
Audio-visual.
Incidentals and contingencies-
Buildings, grounds, etc	
Totals	
$1,247,714.50
4,740.52
749.34
62,400.00
72,637.46
211,745.09
18,000.00
4,800.00
62,934.69
4,073.84
15.79
5,126.59
$59,562.26
$1,247,714.50
4,740.52
749.34
62,400.00
72,637.46
211,745.09
18,000.00
4,800.00
62,934.69
4,073.84
15.79
5,126.59
59,562.26
$1,794.21
6.82
1.08
89.73
104.45
304.49
25.88
6.90
90.50
5.86
.03
7.35
85.65
$1,694,937.82
$59,562.26
$1,754,500.08
$2,522.97
 H 26
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1960/61
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 HEADQUARTERS
H 27
Table K.—Expense Statement of the Community Services for
Twelve Months Ended March 31st, 1961
Mental Health Centre, Burnaby
Salaries
Office expense
$351,271.18
4,900.70
Travelling expense       10,113.70
Office furniture and equipment	
Heat, light, water, and power.
Medical care	
Dietary 	
Laundry 	
Transportation ...
General supplies
Occupational and recreational therapy
Incidentals and contingencies	
Buildings, grounds, etc	
Total
18,381.74
9,008.30
8,440.76
1,500.00
3,360.30
3,467.42
2,444.63
2,445.87
31,461.14
$446,795.74
Salaries 	
Office expense	
Travelling expense	
Office furniture and equipment
Incidentals and contingencies _
Mental Health Centre, Victoria
$42,292.32
372.71
1,644.29
193.43
227.07
Total     $44,729.82
Grand total, $491,525.56.
 H 28 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table L.—Expense Statements of the Rehabilitation Centres for
Twelve Months Ended March 31st, 1961
Vista Rehabilitation Centre
Salaries   $ 10,461.60
Office expense  202.00
Heat, light, water, and power  907.93
Medical care  2.09
Dietary   2,501.34
General supplies  86.87
Incidentals and contingencies  176.49
Buildings, grounds, etc  1,842.86
Total     $16,181.18
Venture Rehabilitation Centre
Salaries1    $ 12,416.00
Office expense  330.96
Travelling expense  21.28
Heat, light, water, and power  1,013.63
Dietary   2,800.22
General supplies  4.78
Incidentals and contingencies  175.11
Buildings, grounds, etc  2,488.88
Grand total, $35,432.04.
Total     $19,250.86
i Included with Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, salaries in Public Accounts.
 HEADQUARTERS H 29
Expenditure Made under Federal Health Grants for Province of
British Columbia, Year Ended March 31st, 1961
Assistance to Provincial Mental Hospitals—
Equipment     $2,406.10
Staff salaries  277,432.61
  $279,838.71
The Woodlands School, New Westminster—
Equipment     $2,643.85
Staff salaries  116,807.37
119,451.22
VaUeyview Hospital, Essondale—
Equipment         $766.00
Staff salaries       3,060.00
         3,826.00
Dellview Hospital, Vernon—Equipment         1,810.60
Mental Health Centre, Burnaby—Staff salaries       11,345.00
School of Psychiatric Nursing         5,400.00
Study of combined course in psychiatric and general nursing—
Equipment  $23.80
Staff salaries       1,266.14
         1,289.94
Assistance to the Department of Psychiatry       25,994.11
Neurophysiological Research Unit at University of British Columbia—
Identification and quantitation of aromatic compounds in schizophrenic urine  $19,747.24
Central effect of biologically active factors in the
urine extracts of normals and schizophrenics __    21,653.56
Disturbed metabolic pathways as causal factors in
schizophrenia     17,974.98
Electroencephalographic effects of psychic energizers
and their possible relationships to adrenergic
mechanisms in the brain     15,380.77
       74,756.55
Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Psychiatry       13,748.54
Metropolitan Health Committee—
Mental-hygiene programme  $28,027.00
Training of senior school counsellors       9,540.00
       37,567.00
Assistance to epileptic programme in British Columbia         8,564.40
Assistance to The Children's Foundation         7,200.00
General personnel training—
Short courses in mental health     $2,032.88
Postgraduate training     63,395.07
      65,427.95
Total  $656,220.02
 H 30 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
PERSONNEL REPORT
J. Dowling, Personnel Officer
During the fiscal year the number of persons, excluding students, employed by
the Mental Health Services has risen from 2,927 to 3,101, an increase of 174. The
increase has been distributed over the several units as follows:—
Crease Clinic     15
The Woodlands School     39
Tranquille School     21
VaUeyview Hospital     62
Other units :     37
Total   174
The monthly staff average, excluding students, has risen from 2,841 in the
preceding fiscal year to 3,058, an increase of 217. The fact that the increase in the
monthly staff average exceeds the expansion figure for the fiscal year is accounted
for by higher short-term relief requirements, due mainly to the revision of vacation
regulations.
Over-all staff turnover has increased slightly, as shown in Table C.
Recruitment into professional classifications has been easier, and the department's position has improved in all but a few categories, as shown in Table B. As
of March 31st, 1961, the department had on staff ninety-nine more psychiatric
nurses than on the same date a year earlier, including thirty-nine who were employed
on a part-time three-day-per-week basis. This has relieved the acute shortage of
psychiatric nurses for the time being at least. There has been no significant change
in the rate of turnover in the psychiatric nursing classifications.
The department's programme of professional training under Mental Health
Grant bursaries continued. This is fully covered in the report of the Director of
Mental Health Services.
Twenty-four senior cooks, employed in various units of the Mental Health
Services, enrolled in and completed a course in hospital kitchen management given
by the Extension Department of the University of British Columbia.
The Personnel Officer participated in the following matters of some importance
during the year:—•
(1) A study of the Medical Records Section of The Woodlands School, including related clerical and stenographic activities. A report was presented,
and most of its recommendations have been implemented.
(2) Implementation of amendments to the various " leave " regulations, which
became effective April 1st, 1960.
(3) Implementation of the group life insurance plan, which became effective
July 1st, 1960.  The plan was enthusiastically received.
(4) Introduction of payroll deductions to facilitate contributions to the United
Good Neighbour Fund.
(5) The transfer of institutional farm staff to the Department of Agriculture,
effective April 1st, 1961.
(6) Staffing action, in conjunction with the Civil Service Commission, to open
additional patient facilities as follows:—
(a) The admitting ward in the VaUeyview Hospital:
(b) The main building at the Tranquille School to accommodate
female patients.
 HEADQUARTERS H 31
The Personnel Officer acted as secretary to the monthly meeting of Business
Managers.
The departmental personnel office was established in 1954. In the intervening
period, considerable expansion in treatment facilities has taken place, accompanied
by a staff increase of 1,025 persons, or 44 per cent. This rapid growth has presented problems throughout the Branch, but particularly so at points of central
administrative control. Accordingly, the Personnel Department was included in the
over-all plan for administrative decentralization, and it was reorganized, effective
April 1st, 1960. New quarters were provided in the Provincial Health Building and
occupied on June 1st, 1960. Under the reorganization certain personnel authorities
and responsibilities were delegated to Unit Business Managers. The objectives
were:—
(1) To develop more acceptable arrangements between the unit administrators
and General Administration in respect to personnel matters:
(2) To improve efficiency by shortening lines of communication and accelerating the routine paper-flow.
By the end of the fiscal year substantial improvement had been achieved.
 H 32 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1960/61
STATISTICAL TABLES
Table A.—Summary Showing Over-all Staff Totals in Relation
to Separation and Recruitment
Staff recruited, excluding students      899
Staff separated, excluding students      725
Increase      174
Total staff, excluding students, as of March 31st, 1961  3,101
Total staff, excluding students, as of March 31st, 1960  2,927
Increase      174
Monthly staff average, excluding students, 1960/61  3,058
Monthly staff average, excluding students, 1959/60  2,841
Increase      217
Male        Female Total
Student enrolment as of March 31st, 1961     82        193        275
Student enrolment as of March 31st, 1960     89        214        303
Change  —7      —21      —28
Student monthly average, 1960/61      267
Student monthly average, 1959/60      261
Change      + 6
 HEADQUARTERS
H 33
Table B.—Breakdown by Classification of Recruitment and Separation
Activity for the Mental Health Services, Excluding Student
Psychiatric Nurses.
Recruited
Physicians   28
Medical interns  18
Registered nurses  33
Female psychiatric nurses  198
Male psychiatric nurses  73
Female psychiatric aides  165
Male psychiatric aides  92
Teachers   5
Occupational therapists   12
Recreational therapists
Industrial therapists	
Psychologists 	
Social workers 	
Dieticians 	
Cooks 	
Kitchen helpers
  2
  3
  10
  20
  1
  6
  44
Clerks ..                              14
Stenographers   41
Trades 	
Laundry-workers   24
Miscellaneous professional   21
Miscellaneous technical  10
Miscellaneous   66
Farm labour  13
Separated
21
18
24
131
41
134
89
4
13
2
4
10
11
2
10
34
13
34
1
22
18
10
64
15
Totals
899
728
 H 34
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table C.—Summary of Staff Turnover
By Major Classification
Classification
1959/60
1960/61
Change
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
1'9.7
23.8
+4.1
21.8
22.1
+0.3
8.4
9.1
+0.7
27.2
26.4
—0.8
32.5
26.1
-6.4
Overall 	
Student psychiatric nurses.
Male psychiatric nurses	
Female psychiatric nurses ...
Registered nurses ._._	
Note.—Items 1 and 2 have been calculated against the monthly average and other items have been calculated
against the year-end staff totals.
By Pay Division
Pay Division
1959/60
1960/61
Change
Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale .
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz  	
The Woodlands School  	
Tranquille School  	
VaUeyview Hospital    	
Dellview Hospital   	
Skeenaview Hospital— _ _
Mental Health Centre   —
Per Cent
1'8.5
6.0
25.4
10.0
37.6
24.5
27.7
Per Cent
23.4
19.7
16.6
15.5
30.9
21.3
20.3
28.0
Per Cent
+4.9
+ 13.7
+ 20.9
— 16.3
—4.2
+0.3
Note.—Percentages calculated against year-end staff totals.
Table D.—Comparison of Staff Totals by Unit with Totals for the
Preceding Fiscal Year
Unit
Fiscal Year 1959/60
Positions
in Establishment as of
Mar. 31,
1960
Number on
Staff as of
Mar. 31,
1960
Fiscal Year 1960/61
Positions
in Establishment as of
Mar. 31,
1961
Number on
Staff as of
Mar. 31,
1961
General Administration 	
Collections Office (transferred)
Department of Nursing Education-
Mental Health Centres	
Sub-totals.-
In-patient care—
Crease Clinic .   	
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale..
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz	
The Woodlands School 	
Tranquille School..
VaUeyview Hospital..
Dellview Hospital	
Skeenaview Hospital-
Total of vote	
Farms—
Colony Farm.
Colquitz Farm.
Tranquille Farm-
Total of vote-
Total Civil Service positions-
Student psychiatric nurses	
Totals _	
30
3
24
98
155
285
1,151
80
740
61
408
77
59
2,861
52
8
29
89
3,105
325
3,430
29
3
21
83
136
270
1,139
82
704
50
329
77
57
2,708
52
8
23
83
371
551
98
190
2821
1,1131
80
742
95
409
77
59
2,857
52
8
28
2,927
303
3,135
325
3,230
3,460
49
85
170
285
1,137
81
743
71
391
80
59
2,847
52
8
24
84
3,101
275
3,376
1 Changes from preceding year, due mainly to reorganizational inter-unit staff transfers.
 HEADQUARTERS
H 35
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H
 H 36 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SUPERVISOR OF
PSYCHIATRIC SOCIAL WORK
Miss A. K. Carroll, Provincial Supervisor
Throughout the psychiatric hospital admission areas there has been a great
rise in social service intake case loads during the fiscal year. This situation is
attributable primarily to higher rates of admission and discharge of patients in these
areas. Because of the fact of a fixed social-work establishment, the situation has
had to be managed by the introduction of social services, brief enough in nature
to cover some aspect of the need of the increased number of patients being admitted
to and discharged from these areas and referred at these points to social service.
As a result, the case loads of social workers in these areas have increased 29.5 per
cent. From the research findings of social workers engaged in these areas, it is
indicated that they are dealing with over 54 per cent of the total patient-group
hospitalized in the psychiatric hospital division; that the average length of hospitalization of this group is nine and one-half weeks, with the disposition of some 73
per cent being discharged in full. Because of the fact that a notable percentage of
this group being admitted to and discharged from the admission areas was without
resources of any kind in the nature of interested family or friends, a job to return
to, or an interested employer, and totally without financial resources, the social
workers in these areas additionally engaged in accelerated referrals of large numbers
of patients to public welfare agencies for material help. The processing of the
aforementioned referrals and similar types of brief social services accounted for
a large proportion of all social workers' time in the psychiatric hospitals' admission
and discharge areas. From the experience of social workers in these areas, it is possible to recommend the need for a more effective organization, administration, and
staffing of reception and discharge areas of the psychiatric hospitals, as well as the
working-out of definitive policies for effective referral to community agencies of the
large group of patients who, on discharge, are in need of some form of social assistance and interim accommodation.
Throughout the psychiatric hospital units of the Mental Health Services there
has been a significant increase, over that of the previous year, in the numbers of
patients and their families to whom it has been possible to extend social services.
This is partly due to the reorganization of administrative and clinical services in the
psychiatric hospitals division, on the unit plan. This has resulted in a closer integration of social services with other clinical disciplines and contributed markedly
to a further strengthening of the team approach to the study and treatment of
patients in hospital. To illustrate the latter, it is interesting to note that 1,283 more
patients were helped this year, and that the increased incidence of contact through
therapeutic interview with individual patients and family members was 8.6 over the
last year in comparison with 2.1 in the fiscal year 1953/54. There has been an
increased incidence of contact through therapeutic interview with individual patients
out of hospital and family members over this period from 1.5 in 1953/54 to 2.8 in
the last year. Reflected in this increase in numbers of patients given social services
and in the increase in incidence of interviews per patient are the higher qualifications held by social workers in the psychiatric hospital units (55.6 per cent now
have basic minimal training) and the increases in the establishment for social work
in this division over the last nine years. In 1953/54 the establishment for social
workers in the psychiatric hospitals division stood at sixteen; to-day it stands at
thirty-six. However, preceeding 1953/54 the development of the Crease Clinic of
Psychological Medicine doubled the admissions of patients.   Recently the develop-
 HEADQUARTERS H 37
ment of boarding- and foster-home care in the long-term treatment units of the
Provincial Mental Hospital has made such demands on the social workers that less
than 50 per cent of their total monthly in-patient man-hours are now spent in services to patients during their hospitalization. This is due to the fact that the administration of the present boarding-home programme (180 patients) demands 52 per
cent of the total monthly in-patient man-hours of social work. It is respectfully
recommended that the social-work establishment be increased in order to develop
this valuable and already well-justified programme, as evidenced by the increasing
capacity for both satisfactory adjustment in the boarding home and for independent
activity on the part of the improved chronically mentally ill patients who have been
placed to date. Additionally, this programme will need to be extended to cover the
needs of the aged and mentally sub-normal patient, and will care for increased
establishments in the social service departments of VaUeyview Hospital and The
Woodlands School.
In the out-patient divisions of the Mental Health Services, the increased
development of travelling clinic services and sustaining evening clinic services has
demanded 25 per cent of the social workers' total monthly out-patient man-hours.
With the extensions into community-based psychiatric services there has occurred
a sometimes unmanageable disequilibrium throughout the service in the ratio of
social workers to the psychiatrists. A few years ago the ratio of social workers to
psychiatrists in out-patient divisions of the Mental Health Services was 4 to 1.
To-day in all divisions of the Mental Health Services the ratio is IVi to 1. The
American Psychiatric Association recommends a staff pattern of two or three social
workers to one psychiatrist.
PERSONNEL AND RECRUITMENT SOCIAL SERVICE
DEPARTMENTS, MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
The recruitment of social workers to the Mental Health Services is facilitated
almost entirely by the bursaries which can be offered to graduate university students
through the auspices of the National health grant. For the past two years the Mental Health Services has not managed to recruit social workers graduating from
schools of social work or available from the pool of practising social workers. This
year eight students were recruited to the Mental Health Services by the award of
bursaries for postgraduate study in social work; two bursaries were awarded to
members of staff holding a Bachelor of Social Work degree. In February of this
fiscal year an additional six university graduates (three holding B.S.W. degrees and
three holding B.A. degrees) were recruited to the Mental Health Services through
application for National health grant bursaries. Four staff members holding B.S.W.
degrees applied for bursaries to complete the Master of Social Work training course.
The broad recruitment programme, developed in collaboration with the Personnel
Officer of the Civil Service Commission, continues to go forward with the use of
media of education, interpretation, advertisement, contacts (personal and through
correspondence) with graduate schools of social work across Canada, and the Provincial and National bodies of the Canadian Association of Social Work.
PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES, SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS, MENTAL HEALTH
SERVICES.
The training programme for student social workers who are placed for field-work
experience in the Mental Health Services, affording, as it does, opportunities for
contact with professional field supervisory personnel and student personnel of the
I
 H 38 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
University of British Columbia, is an excellent medium for the development of staff,
as well as recruitment to staff of the Mental Health Services. The students, for their
part, contribute much to the staff as a whole, and in particular to the professional
growth and development of their social-work supervisors in the Mental Health
Services. For many of the latter, student supervision was a new and stimulating
experience this year. Altogether, fourteen School of Social Work students had their
field-work placements in the Mental Health Services. The students appeared to be
well satisfied with their field-work experiences as ones which were good in terms of
new learning and in terms of practical application of theoretical knowledge.
As in previous years, education responsibilities with respect to other disciplines
continued to be carried out throughout the social service departments of the Mental
Health Services, as well as to those directly related to social work. In the former
regard, medical staff meetings, nursing education, and occupational therapy have
been oriented to the contribution, functions, and responsibilities of social work in
clinical settings; in the latter regard, groups of in-service trainees from the Department of Social Welfare were oriented to the various divisions of the Mental Health
Services. Additionally, groups of relatives, parents, volunteers, members of church
organizations, and service and professional groups in the community were oriented
to the various divisions of the Mental Health Services, whether through the means
of conducted tours or formal lectures, including educational lectures concerning
mental-health principles and practices.
The regular weekly meetings of medical and nursing personnel which take place
within the units of the Provincial Mental Hospital, and in the clinics concerned with
diagnoses, treatment, and rehabilitation which are active throughout the Mental
Health Services, are of great value in the professional development of social-work
personnel.
It was possible during the year to arrange for representation at such conferences
and institutes as the Canadian Conference of Social Work, the National Conference
on Social Welfare, the Northwest Regional Conference of the Medical Social Work
section of the National Association of Social Workers, Pacific Northwest Regional
Institute of the Family Service Association of America, Second British Columbia
Conference on Ageing, and Field Instructors' Institute, University of British Columbia. The aforementioned educational opportunities provided by administration
indicate a belief in the importance of opportunities for the continuing development
of staff on the job. Attendance at these institutes promotes professional growth
and development and improves standards of practice throughout the social service
departments.
Other forms of staff development have constituted the planning and formulation
of orientation programmes for beginning social workers employed in the various
divisions of the Mental Health Services. Still others have taken the form of papers
prepared and submitted on the various functions of the social-work job—administration, supervision, direct services, community education, and social-work research.
In the out-patient division, four papers focused on the clarification of theory and
the development of practice were written concerning border-line personality, character disorder, psychosomatic problems, and aspects of the psychoses. The School
of Social Work has since sought permission to prepare this material for use of
second-year students, as the papers contained material and a point of view which
the School wishes to teach.
 HEADQUARTERS
H 39
SOCIAL-WORK CONSULTANT SERVICE
Consultation
Consultation services were requested by the following divisions of the Mental
Health Services: Provincial Mental Hospital, Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine, Mental Health Centre, The Woodlands School, and VaUeyview Hospital,
entailing an expenditure of 35 per cent of the consultant's monthly man-hours.
During the year a social service department was established in VaUeyview Hospital
—the Geriatrics Division of the Mental Health Services—which engaged approximately 41 per cent of the consultant's monthly man-hours of work. Direct consultative services to all divisions concerned the following matters: Recruitment,
staffing and staff patterns; organizational and functional changes to permit expansion of services; development of casework supervisory skills; intake and discharge
functions in social service departments of the psychiatric hospitals; the development
of statistical forms for social service in VaUeyview Hospital; revision of statistical
forms for the social service department of The Woodlands School; and the beginning
of a procedure manual and brochure for boarding-home and family care.
Central Branch Responsibilities
The consultant has also prepared special reports for the Branch administration
concerning the financing and administration of the boarding-home and family care
programme in the psychiatric hospitals division; report of the interdepartmental
committee on the problems of mental deficiency; special reports regarding the needs
of individual children with behavioural and emotional disorders; special reports
regarding the needs of individual mentally sub-normal children and their families.
Community Organizational and Developmental Services
The consultant has taken responsibility in the community development and
social policy activities of the following voluntary bodies: Division of the Handicapped and the Welfare and Recreational Council of the Community Chest and
Council, the scientific planning committees of the Association for Retarded Children
of British Columbia, the Children's Foundation, and the Canadian Mental Health
Association. Meetings with the Medical Services Section of the Vancouver City
Social Service Department, the social welfare administrators of municipalities adjacent to the Mental Hospitals Division, the Superintendent of Child Welfare, and the
Metropolitan Health Committee took place during the year for the purposes of
defining co-operative services and delineating service responsibilities and agency
function.
The consultant gratefully acknowledges the contribution and signal effort of
all social-work staffs throughout the Mental Health Services. These staffs have
exhibited singular courage, resourcefulness, and professional discipline in facing
the expanding demands of a growing mental-health service.
 H 40 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF NURSING SERVICES
Miss B. J. Mitchell, Director of Nursing Services
Work with the senior nursing personnel in the four units of the Lower Mainland was centred largely on the need for improved and increased nursing services.
Changes in the therapeutic programmes precipitate and enhance changes in nursing
goals and organization. A major study of the reorganization of a nursing department is well under way. Three units conducted in-service educational programmes
for their nursing staffs. A number of nursing personnel attended institutes and
educational programmes conducted in Vancouver, Seattle, Fredericton, New Brunswick, and Bethel, Maine. Five nurses are attending the School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, with the assistance of Federal Mental Health Grant
bursaries.
On April 1st Miss Margaret Lonergan returned from postgraduate studies at
the University of Washington and assumed her position as Associate Director of
Nursing Education. As will be noted in her report, the nursing educational programmes were strengthened; the faculty and nursing service personnel were helped
to identify and develop learning opportunities; and the nursing students were aided
in their growing ability to assume responsibility for their own activities. The need
for skilled nursing personnel continues to increase. Provided that an adequate
number of instructors can be recruited, the Department of Nursing Education will
be prepared to offer increased learning opportunities for nurses, both student and
graduate.
The Mental Health Services continues to work closely with the School of
Nursing, University of British Columbia, in providing clinical experience in psychiatric nursing for twenty-four nursing students enrolled in the basic degree programme and senior field experience for twelve nursing students. The educational
programmes are controlled and conducted by the University faculty, but various
staff members of the Mental Health Services also participate. The placement of the
students on the long-term wards for men patients has had beneficial effects.
The Unit Nursing Conference, organized in December, 1959, proved to be an
effective vehicle for permitting the Superintendents of Nurses and Chief Psychiatric
Nurses to share information, ideas, and problems. Within the structure of the conference, a Nursing Procedure Committee was formed, with respresentatives from
the units in the Lower Mainland. The nurse representative is also chairman of a
sub-committee in his own unit, and in this way work on nursing procedures is
shared between the units. Revision of the forms used in the patients' ward chart is
the first task of the Committee. An Institute on Nursing Administration will be held
for all members of the Unit Nursing Conference on April 20th and 21st at Rock-
woods centre.
Mr. Alan Thomas, from the Extension Department of the University of British
Columbia, has assisted the Planning Committee to develop a programme which will
enable the participants to consider actual nursing administrative problems.
In October the Mental Health Services Branch, with the assistance of a Federal
Mental Health Grant, began a study which would explore the need for and the
feasibility of establishing a combined course (experimental in nature) in psychiatric
and general nursing in British Columbia and, if feasible, to set forth the objectives
of such a course and the means by which these objectives might be achieved.
Advisory and executive committees were formed, with broad representation from
the Registered Nurses' Association, Psychiatric Nurses' Association, University of
British Columbia, Mental Health Services, and consultants from the fields of medicine, education, sociology, social work, psychology, and others. A project co-ordi-
nator was appointed to facilitate the work of the committees. The project is
proceeding according to schedule, and the interest and generous assistance from all
members are greatly appreciated.
 HEADQUARTERS
H 41
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING EDUCATION
Miss M. Lonergan, Associate Director of Nursing Education
The purpose of the Department is to assist in meeting the health needs of the
people of British Columbia by preparing nursing personnel with varying degrees of
skill in the prevention, care, and rehabilitation aspects of mental illness. The
Department carries out this purpose by conducting four nursing programmes.
1. THE PSYCHIATRIC NURSING PROGRAMME
Number of students, March 31st, 1961  271 (191 women, 80 men)
Number graduated, April 27th, 1960  111   (83 women, 28 men)
Number accepted, 1960/61 fiscal year   168 (123 women, 45 men)
Number withdrew, 1960/61 fiscal year     58
Academic requirement for entrance remains a minimum of Grade X. Nevertheless, the average academic level for each class is steadily rising: 50 per cent of
the August, 1962, class and 33 per cent of the February, 1963, class hold University Entrance standing. The entrance age requirement for men has been reduced
from 19 to the 18 years required of women applicants.
Men students acquired a new uniform in December, 1960. The uniform is
received upon entering the programme and distinguishes the student from other
nursing personnel.
Curriculum work included an assessment of ward learning experiences available
for preliminary students and the placement of these students following first-term
block classes on selected wards for a four-week controlled programme.
Prior to each of the three blocks of classes, instructors met to plan the programmes and schedules concerned and, following each block, to evaluate the progress
of students. Evaluation is on the basis of academic and clinical performance and
assessment of the individual student's personality and health. In respect to this
evaluation, the assistance of supervisors, deputy chiefs, and charge nurses through
ward reports, participation in meetings, and written comments is gratefully acknowledged.
For many students the psychiatric nursing programme has been strengthened
considerably through ward classes, clinics, interviews, and discussion periods offered
by clinical instructors in the Crease Clinic and the Provincial Mental Hospital. The
instructors in turn have relied upon and received support from the nursing staff by
the latter's assistance and co-operation in clinical supervision.
Graduation week, commencing April 24th, 1960, saw 111 students (83 women
and 28 men) welcome relatives and friends at a tea in Residence XI, followed by
an evening church service at Queens Avenue United Church with the Reverend
Fullerton officiating. A dinner-dance at Capilano Gardens was dignified by the
presence of the Honourable Eric Martin, Dr. and Mrs. A. E. Davidson, and Miss
Beverly Mitchell. The graduation ceremony at Vincent Massey High School in
New Westminster was highlighted by the guest speaker, Dr. J. R. Mcintosh, Professor and Director of Secondary Education, University of British Columbia.
2. THE AFFILIATE PROGRAMME
Two hundred General Hospital students received a twelve-week affiliation programme in psychiatric nursing through this Department during the fiscal year.
Students are in the second year of their home-school programmes and are becoming
accepted as contributing members of the ward staff, as opposed to their previous
 H 42 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
roles of observers. Classroom lectures are being rapidly reduced in number as clinical instructors are able to offer regular ward classes and teaching becomes patient-
centred.
Home schools have been encouraged to become more familiar with the programme offered to their students. This has been promoted through meetings with
home-school representatives, questionnaires, and course descriptions. Instructors
from home schools now visit their students once during the affiliation, observe their
activities, and are more informed concerning progress and changes occurring in the
wards and in patient-care.
3. CLINICAL PROGRAMME FOR GRADUATE NURSES
The programme, with eight students enrolled, commenced October 3rd, 1960,
and is six months in length. Its purpose is to enable the registered nurse to increase
her knowledge and skill in psychiatric nursing so that she may be able to accept her
role and function effectively in the psychiatric setting and in the field of mental
health. Courses in psychiatry and the social sciences are offered largely through the
medium of group discussion and are supplemented by field-trips, assignments, and
seminars. Clinical experience focuses on the nurse-patient relationship in acute and
long-term areas of the Crease Clinic, the Provincial Mental Hospital, the Mental
Health Centre, and The Woodlands School.
An advisory committee with representation from the Mental Health Services
(medical and nursing staff and the Department of Psychology), the University of
British Columbia School of Nursing, and the Registered Nurses' Association of
British Columbia has offered valuable assistance and guidance in establishing this
programme and evaluating its effectiveness.
4. THE AIDE-TRAINING PROGRAMME
The purpose of this programme is to orient the new lay employee to the Mental
Hospital, its personnel and policies, and to the duties of the psychiatric aide. The
programme is offered several times yearly as a group of new aides is employed.
It consists of classes, practice periods, and tours.
A second purpose of this programme is to provide a short training course for
aides currently employed in the Mental Health Services. Two one-week courses
were offered in February, 1961, to VaUeyview Hospital employees.
Faculty
In March, 1961, the faculty numbered fourteen. In July, 1960, Miss Willy
Van Est returned to the Department, having earned her teaching and supervision
certificate with the University of British Columbia. Mr. F. Tudgay commenced
duties in April and was assigned to North Lawn. Mrs. J. Busslinger transferred
from a nursing supervisor position and was assigned as clinical instructor to Centre
Lawn in November. The Department regrets the departure of Mrs. C. Upton and
Miss O. Darcovich.
The faculty was fortunate in being able to attend a two-day curriculum workshop sponsored by the Registered Nurses' Association of British Columbia at the
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, and directed by Miss Florence
EUiot, a National League of Nursing consultant. Mrs. I. Smith, senior instructor
responsible for the affiliate programme, attended a one-week workshop at the University of New Brunswick on mental-health concepts in nursing.
 HEADQUARTERS
H 43
The post-basic course, extending over three months, was completed in June.
Ninety-two hours of lectures, films, and discussion periods were directed by Mrs. I.
Smith, and considered by the eighteen senior staff attending to be a useful refresher
programme.
A total of 230 Department examinations, with material based on administration and supervision, medical-surgical nursing, pharmacology, and psychiatric nursing, were prepared and corrected by a faculty committee. The examinations were
prepared for nurses qualifying for licensure and nurses applying for promotion.
The faculty undertook various projects designed to lay a foundation for improving the educational structure of the Department. Of these, the establishment of
a group consisting of the clinical instructors and the supervisors, deputy chiefs, and
charge nurses with whom these instructors work has been most helpful in promoting
understanding and communication between the students' clinical areas and this
Department.
In January, 1961, Miss C. Murray was appointed faculty adviser to psychiatric
nursing students. Her function is to promote healthy communication between
students and faculty and to assist the student council in the discharge of its
responsibilities.
It is appropriate to conclude this report of the 1960/61 fiscal year with an
expression of appreciation to all those in the many departments of the Mental
Health Services whose interest, co-operation, and assistance are making is possible
for students to become better nurses.
 H 44
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
PART II.—CREASE CLINIC OF PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE
AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
REPORT OF THE CREASE CLINIC OF
PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
T. G. Caunt, Medical Superintendent
The Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine completed its tenth year of service
to the mentally ill of British Columbia with the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1961.
The Crease Clinic has operated at capacity and efficiently in all departments.
Residential intensive treatment care continues to be provided for those patients who
are believed capable of benefiting from four months or less of psychiatric treatment.
The community doctor first screens incoming patients and may be assisted by
the Clinic admitting doctor regarding the suitability of the patients being considered
for admission.
More use is being made of the Crease Clinic service, as the following table
indicates, and more of the mentally ill of British Columbia are seeking this service
voluntarily.
Examination of the following table, which is a summary of population in the
Crease CUnic for the year ended March 31st, 1961, shows that the number of
patients admitted (1,581) was 117 more than the previous year's total of 1,464
patients.
Male
Female
Total
120
145
265
Admissions—■
First admissions _._. — 	
Readmissions to a different institution of Mental Health Services
466
21
190
4
595
39
266
1,061
60
456
Admitted direct from Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale	
4
681'
900                  1,581'
801
1,045        |         1.846
Separations—
666
24
3
872
36
1
1,538
Discharged direct to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale	
Died                                                                                	
60
4
693        [           919                1,602
— 12                   —9                 —21
In residence, March 31st, 19611   _	
108                    136                   244
1
The voluntary admission rate to the Crease Clinic shows a further increase
from 886 or 61 per cent in the previous fiscal year to 1,077 or 65.8 per cent of
admissions for the year ended March 31st, 1961.
The table indicates 677 male and 900 female patients were admitted; that is
223 or 33.08 per cent more female patients. This compares with 35.74 per cent
the previous year. An increase of fifty six male patient admissions over the previous
year is noted.
January and May were again the months of the highest number of admissions.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
H 45
A total of 1,602 separations is noted for the year ended March 31st, 1961.
Of these, sixty patients—twenty-four men and thirty-six women—were admitted to
the Provincial Mental Hospital for continued treatment, or 3.74 per cent of the
discharges. This compares with 3.7 per cent in the previous year. One thousand
five hundred and forty-two or 96.26 per cent of the patients were discharged directly
to the community.
The Crease Clinic has six wards for patient treatment and care—three for men
and three for women. All wards are now classed as open wards, thus permitting the
patients further freedom and more free access to the hospital grounds. No complications have been noted during the year.
Previous reports have indicated that all patients admitted to the Crease Clinic,
whether voluntarily or certified, retain their civil rights, with the exception of those
few who, in the opinion of the Clinical Director, are too sick to properly look after
themselves or their own affairs. During the year ended March 31st, 1961, when
1,581 patients were admitted to the Crease Clinic, 68.12 per cent, or all, with the
exception of 266 patients, were capable of exercising their full civil rights during
the course of their treatment.
Among further changes and improvements at the Crease Clinic noted this year,
patients may be admitted directly to various wards now in the Clinic, each area
having complete clinical treatment teams available.
The Men's and Women's Occupational Therapy Departments were combined
by moving both departments to the west side of the Clinic. This move improved
patient treatment and the efficiency of the department.
Team nursing was instituted in the Crease Clinic and it is proving to be useful.
Dr. R. W. Harrington, specialist in psychiatry, rejoined the Clinic staff and
was appointed Admitting Officer.
As a result of an inspection by the central inspection board of the American
Psychiatric Association, the Crease Clinic, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale,
and VaUeyview Hospital were fully approved. It was indicated that only fifty-three
hospitals were fully approved in North America and, of these, only twenty-seven
were public hospitals.
Operating-room
The standard of service provided has been maintained at an excellent level by
our surgical residents and consultant staff. The surgical residents were Dr. G. Clay
and Dr. A. C. Tanner. During their six-month rotations each resident has provided examination of patients requiring surgical investigation and follow-up of all
patients who had surgical procedures.
The department continues to be very active, providing specialized service to
the several units of the Provincial Mental Health Services. The operating-room
and surgical ward were used efficiently and close to their capacity during the year.
The operative procedures in summary were:—
General surgery, major       131
General surgery, minor      179
Neurological surgery        27
Orthopaedic surgery         99
Genito-urinary surgery         92
Chest surgery
E.N.T. surgery
Eye surgery	
Plastic surgery _
Dental surgery .
23
19
25
28
23
 H 46 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Plasters with anaesthetics          13
Blocks   3
Total surgical procedures       662
Total number of consultations and examinations done in the operating-room   2,939
This is the first year that it has been necessary to perform major chest surgery
and have the need to do two endarterectomies.
Arrangements were made for the residents to visit the VaUeyview Hospital to
do follow-up care of surgical consultations, which averages thirty to forty cases per
month.
The small surgical-ward bed occupancy has averaged 94 per cent this year.
The placement of the stenographer within the department has made a great
improvement in the completion of records.
The programme established with the appointment of the Oxygen Therapist has
shown an appreciable saving in the use of oxygen.
Department of Neurology
The Department of Neurology has functioned efficiently under the able direction of Dr. W. P. Fister and has contributed a very valuable service to the branches
of the Provincial Mental Health Services and other Provincial institutions.
This department has undergone a reorganization in that patients with organic
involvement of the central nervous system have been given complete clinical supervision and treatment instead of the previously established consultative advice. This
has entailed considerably more clinical and clerical work.
The out-patient follow-up studies of former patients have continued. An
increasing number of patients from The Woodlands School and the Mental Health
Centre have had both laboratory and consultative procedures carried out on them.
The Willingdon Avenue School for Girls, Oakalla Prison Farm, and Haney Correctional Institution have availed themselves, as before, of our facilities.
Twenty-eight neurosurgical procedures were carried out by Dr. Frank Turn-
bull, who had seen a further thirty-nine cases in consultation.
Dr. E. V. Mellor has been actively engaged in clinical assessments, electroencephalogram interpretations, and carrying out of pneumoencephalograms. As
before, lectures and clinical demonstrations were arranged for medical students,
students of abnormal psychology, nurses-in-training, and affiliate nurses.
A detailed account of the laboratory studies for the year is tabulated herewith:—
Electroencephalograms  1,3 67
Pneumoencephalograms      243
Neurosurgical operations        28
Lectures        18
The 1,367 electroencephalograms were done for the following groups:—
Provincial Mental Hospital  458
Crease Clinic  511
The Woodlands School  199
Out-patients  57
Oakalla Prison Farm  34
Haney Correctional Institution  7
Girls' Industrial School  28
Staff   12
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL H 47
British Columbia Penitentiary  2
New Haven   2
Mental Health Centre and Child Guidance Clinic        57
Library
Miss Helen Walsh, librarian, resigned in July, 1960, and the vacancy was filled
in October by Mrs. Silvia Reeves. Mrs. E. Killeen is assistant to the librarian.
A Ubrary committee was formed, with Dr. F. G. Tucker as chairman, Miss D. R.
Begg and Mr. J. W. Borthwick as members, and Mrs. S. Reeves as secretary.
Mr. W. Ireland, Provincial Librarian and Archivist, attended the first meeting.
The main purpose of the Library Committee is the selection of professional
literature in psychiatry and allied fields. A number of useful reference works have
been purchased, amongst others the Cumulated Catalog of the National Library
of Medicine in Washington, which is invaluable in cataloguing and book ordering.
Psychological abstracts have been bound, and the staff is being encouraged to make
use of these abstracts in locating articles in professional journals. A list of new
acquisitions is being issued periodically and distributed amongst the staff. Some
new shelving has been installed to provide more space for the growing collection,
and all the current journals are displayed on handy low shelves, which has resulted
in a much wider use of current medical periodicals.
Circulation of books to patients from the Crease Clinic was increased by over
a thousand books over the previous year. Library service to VaUeyview Hospital
and to two of the units of the Provincial Mental Hospital was improved through the
establishment of rotating deposit collections of 200 to 300 books in each place.
Medical Library
Book collection ... 2,722
Books bought        83
2,805
Losses        25
Total collection  2,780
Current journal subscriptions      111
Circulation of books      998
Circulation of journals      229
Interlibrary loans received        77
Interlibrary loans sent  7
Patients' Library
Book collection   3,998
Books bought      268
Books donated      188
Discards     75
Losses     89
To North Lawn  350
To Skeenaview  150
To Dellview      115
4,454
779
Total collection  3,675
Current journal subscriptions        15
Circulation of books 10,231
 H 48 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL,
ESSONDALE
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
T. G. Caunt, Medical Superintendent
The year ended March 31st, 1961, saw the completion of the eighty-eighth
year of continuous service provided for the mentally ill of British Columbia by the
Provincial Mental Hospital.
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION
The table shows that more patients were admitted, treated, and discharged
than in the previous year.
I have received and have appreciated the fullest co-operation and support from
all staff members in all departments of both the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental
Hospital, Essondale. The Deputy Minister's office and other divisions of the Mental
Health Services Branch have been co-operative and helpful, as have all departments
of Government and community services associated with the welfare of our patients.
All accepted and proven types of therapy are available and continue to be used
for the benefit of the patients in the Provincial Mental Hospital.
There has been a marked increase in admissions and discharges in the Provincial Mental Hospital area of approximately 50 per cent in the past six years. This
has greatly increased the work load of every department of the hospital. Advances
have been made in many areas, with improved operation, and unitization in some
areas with closer integration of departments.
The open-door policy is followed wherever this is possible. Fifteen of the
twenty men's wards are open, as are seventeen of the twenty-four women's wards.
This policy has resulted in further improvement in patient and staff morale. The
supervision of the hospital grounds has been reorganized and improved.
Changes and improvements are being made in many areas of the hospital.
The following are some of these.
Visiting hours to the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital have been
increased from 1.30 p.m. to 4 p.m. every day of the week, and in addition from 7
to 8 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays.
The direct admission of aged patients to the VaUeyview Hospital, instead of
admitting them to the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, and then transferring
them to the VaUeyview, has proved more efficient and provides a better service to
these patients.
The Social Service Department has vastly improved service to the West Lawn
men's buUding with two more psychiatric social workers. This service has greatly
assisted the doctors in that area with the treatment and care of these patients.
More patients this year were granted day, night, week-end, or longer leave in
the community. This is therapeutic for them and has assisted in their rehabilitation
in many instances.
The reorganization of the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital on a
unit basis has contributed to improved service. The Unit Director's morning meetings with unit staff officers vastly improves treatment, patient-care, communication
and supervision within the unit.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
H 49
There was a noticeable improvement in nursing techniques and a greatly increased interest in staff lectures with in-service and community study. A further
improvement was the addition of more University of British Columbia and general
hospital affiliate nurses.
More patients this year have been placed in boarding homes. This has worked
to the patients' advantage and freed hospital space required for the more acutely iU.
The following table gives a summary of the movement of population of the
Provincial Mental Hospital for the year ended March 31st, 1961:—
Male
Female
Total
1,608
110
8
1,411
197
4
3,019
" 307
12
Total as at April 1st, 1960     ____	
Admissions—
First admissions      	
Readmissions to a different institution of Mental Health Services
Readmissions to the same institution...    _ _	
1,726
499
93
389
24
6
11
1
1,612
300
153
366
36
7
3
3,338
799
246
755
60
Transfers from Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz.	
6
18
4
1,023
865
1,888
2,749
825
4
76
14
93
■
121
4
2,477
751
"52
...
23
308
1
5,226
Separations—
1,576
4
Died     _ 	
128
Transferred to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz__.     	
14
116
Transferred to The Woodlands School  	
6
429
5
1,141
1,608
1,137
-71
1,340
2,278
—71
In residence, March 31st, 1961...  	
2,948
The admission services have again been extremely busy and show a further
considerable increase in patient admissions, when 1,800 patients were admitted
directly. This is an increase of 201 over the preceding year's figure of 1,599. In
addition to the direct admissions, eichty-eiffht patients were transferred from other
units of the Mental Health Services branch. Thus a total of 1,888 patients was
admitted to the Provincial Mental Hospital this year.
The male admissions increased by 188 to total 1,023, and the female admissions increased by 101 to total 865. This total of admissions is 289 greater than
the record reported in 1959/60.
Although the number of admissions to the Provincial Mental Hospital was the
highest on record, the total treatment programme was such that it has again been
possible to reduce the number of patients in residence. The total in residence at
March 31st, 1960, was 3,019, and the total in residence at March 31st, 1961, was
2,948, a reduction of seventy-one.
This is an excellent separation rate, which reflects credit on the treatment team.
This reduced in-residence figure of 2,948 on March 31st, 1961, is especially noteworthy in view of the increased number of patient admissions noted above, which
in effect means the total patient count was reduced 360.
The percentage of patients recovered or improved, as compared to admissions,
was 75.1 per cent. This compares with 76.2 per cent the previous year. The percentage of deaths to the number under treatment was 2.4 per cent. The percentage
of discharges to admissions (exclusive of deaths) was 113.9 per cent.
 H 50 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
The average daily patient population was 3,008.02. This is a reduction of
150.78 from the previous year, when the daily average population was 3,158.8.
During this year 126 Order in Council patients were admitted. This is an
increase over the previous year, when ninety-five such patients were admitted.
On March 31st, 1961, there were forty-six Order in Council patients in this
Hospital.
During the year the admission rate of Federal cases requiring psychiatric treatment dedined. The Department of Veterans' Affairs and the Department of Indian
Health Services most frequently requested our service. On March 31st, 1961, the
foUowing Federal cases were in residence:—
Department of Veterans' Affairs  172
Imperial veterans (D.V.A.)       1
Indian Health Services     40
Yukon Territorial Government       9
British Columbia Penitentiary       1
Total  223
Women's Nursing Division
The Women's Nursing Division has completed a busy year, in which much
energy has been directed toward improving patient-care.
One of the gratifying trends has been the increasing interest and communication
between this Hospital and the community. During Mental Health Week in May,
1960, "open house" was attended by many visitors, who displayed a growing
awareness of mental health and illness and demonstrated a keen interest in the
benefits offered the patients within the Hospital.
The summer of 1960 was the first year in which the assignment of affiliate
students from the general hospitals was maintained throughout July and August.
Their participation in patients' activities is most enthusiastic and stimulating.
In July, Ward H 4, one of the few closed women's wards, in East Lawn, was
divided into two areas, resulting in one group of patients receiving open-ward
privUeges.
In East and North Lawn a complete case review has been in progress during
the year. This reassessment of long-term patients was helpful in planning for
eventual discharge of the patients to both families and boarding homes.
Additional staff has been assigned daily to grounds supervision to care for
the increasing numbers of patients on grounds privileges.
In November reorganizational changes within the Crease Clinic established
each of the three wards as admitting and treatment, as well as open wards. This
has resulted in more individual and consistent patient-care, as well as better ward
administration.
The value of ward clerks in relieving nursing staff of much clerical detail has
been recognized by Ward East 3 in the Crease CUnic. This service was initiated
on a trial basis in November, and it is hoped it may be developed on other wards.
The staff rostering for nursing service is now decentralized as a step toward
futvire planning for unitization.   The supervisor assigns the staff within her area.
The post basic course offered to a small group of supervisors and charge nurses
by the Department of Education was considered outstanding and of great benefit.
An oxygen therapist was appointed in September. This service has proven
to be most helpful throughout the Hospital as instruction and assistance are provided at ward level in all buildings.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL H 51
Staff members continue to benefit from instruction in fire prevention and the
handling of related emergency situations.
During the year, representatives of nursing staff have been granted the opportunity to attend the workshop on group processes at the University of British Columbia, courses of lectures on tuberculosis nursing at Willow Chest Centre in Vancouver, and two institutes offered by the School of Nursing, University of Washington. One of the senior psychiatric charge nurses attended a three-week course
at the Laboratory of Human Relations in Bethel, Maine. These opportunities are
of much value to the individual, and other staff members receive the interesting!
reports presented on their return to the Hospital.
This spring the supervisory staff has been engaged in an in-service programme
for their own group. Through a study of their work in all shifts in the four buildings, they have been able to write job descriptions. These define and clarify their
responsibiUties and provide a basis for orienting new supervisors.
Again this year, four staff members, including the Superintendent of Nursing
Service, are on leave of absence to attend the University of British Columbia.
The enthusiasm and interest in in-service education was again noted in the
record attendance at planned lectures for all levels of staff. Questionnaires foUow-
ing each series of lectures indicated the general opinion that much benefit had been
derived, as well as the desire for future programmes.
The prevailing interest and enthusiasm in further nursing abUities and quaU-
fications noted throughout all levels of staff is most encouraging. It is indeed a
favourable omen for the future of the psychiatric nursing service.
Men's Nursing Division
In the past year there has been a steady advance in the treatment of the mentally ill and also in staff education. The philosophy and clinical policy have taken
on a different aspect. The nursing staff are more involved than previously and
have derived much benefit, not only because they have taken new interest and
satisfaction from this type of work, but also they are constantly being educated
informaUy and now feel that they are more and more an important part of a treatment team.
Two major changes which have caused this were the estabUshment of Unit
Directors and the appointment of two additional Chief Psychiatric Nurses—Grade 2
(Mr. T. L. Knight and Mr. N. Clare) on November 1st, 1960. With a senior
supervisor in each of the four male nursing service areas now, plus a Unit Director,
it has now been possible to have closer teamwork and correlate more effectively
the efforts of various members of the team, which represent several departments
in the Hospital.
The introduction of a psychotherapeutic team in Crease Clinic is more concentrated and effective than the previous method team approach and is more demanding of staff's time but does provide a very effective service.
Eighteen senior nursing staff completed a 100-hour post basic course in June
to better prepare them for more senior positions.
With the appointment of two Chief Psychiatric Nurses—Grade 2 in November,
1960, we now have a constant clinical supervisor with authority in each of the
four male service areas. The value of this move has manifested itself in better
co-ordination of staff and activities, better co-operation, closer teamwork, more
adequate informal staff education, and ultimately in better nursing care for our
patients in each area.
 H 52 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Liaison nurses are functioning very effectively and have become almost indispensable to medical and other staffs. They are rotated every four months; that is,
prospective liaison nurses are four months on the wards understudying, then four
months as liaison nurses, four months back on the same ward to act in case of
Ulness of liaison nurses, then they are removed to another area and three new nurses
are brought in to repeat the cycle.
In August, Riverside Annex was changed to an open ward; thus we have
fifteen of twenty wards open in male services.
Mail privileges similar to those of open wards have been extended to aU
wards.
A number of male patients went on several berry-picking expeditions with
escorts, in the Langley area, by arrangement with the farmers. This experiment
was very successful, therapeutic, and helpful to the patients concerned.
A special therapeutic programme was set up this year, specifically for insulin-
therapy patients, male and female. In this programme they have group therapy,
occupational therapy and recreational therapy, together as a group, apart from
other patients.   This programme keeps them busy all day.
Remotivated groups of patients have been very active in West Lawn Building,
and particularly Riverside BuUding. Many small projects, such as picnic tables,
benches, painting, gardening, etc., have been carried out. A picnic shelter is being
constructed in the old airing-court and a park-site is still under development at
Riverside. Mr. Finnie's Farm-view garden project, behind West Lawn Building,
is steadily progressing, with more land being cleared and more gardens being
formed.   A picnic shelter is also being erected in this area.
Six additional nurses have completed a remotivation course with the help of
the Psychology Department.   They are helping to train others now as well.
The Riverside area held open house on two wards for patients and famUies
and friends between Christmas and New Year's. This new experiment was very
successful and was another means used to involve the community in Hospital
functions.
Due to potential danger from the flooding of the Coquitlam River in January,
the Disaster Committee went into action and moved 106 Riverside Annex patients
to temporary quarters in East 1, twenty to A 1, eight from R 2 to D 2. Also, fifty-
six patients were moved from Riverside Cottage to VaUeyview 1. Plans were made
to move the balance of the patients in that area if necessary. The whole operation
went off very smoothly due to planning of the Committee and the co-operation of
many people. Two days later, the danger being over, the patients were returned
to their home area.
The grounds supervisors interviewed a total of 2,801 patients for privileges
during the year (1,463 male and 1,338 female). Due to the large area to be
supervised, it was decided that additional staff be assigned to assist in counselling
and supervision of this group, and that they should have a senior person acting as
charge nurse. In February, 1961, Mr. Webb, psychiatric nurse, was put in an
Acting Charge Nurse position, and to his staff of three men we added three more
male aides and two women, plus relief. With DayUght Saving time in effect, two
more women were added to the staff.
By arrangement with the Medical Superintendent, three officers of the Vancouver Police Academy each spent a week at the Hospital over a period of three
weeks. Their time was spent chiefly on wards and with heads of other departments
concerned with treatments.    This was a move to better acquaint police with the
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL H 53
Hospital and its function. It is hoped this practice can be extended to include other
police departments.   The officers were appreciative of their opportunity.
A formal in-service programme has been conducted for nurses throughout the
year and has now been extended to include aides. Various forms of in-service education are being carried out at every opportunity by means of films, dinics, conferences, group meetings, lectures, etc.
Mr. Doran (psychiatric nurse) was fortunate in getting a bursary to attend
a group development course in Bethel, Maine, last August.
Mr. Huddleston (psychiatric nurse) attended a two-day conference on alcoholism at the University of Washington.
Thirten male and five female staff completed a post basic course in June, 1960.
The course was set up by the School of Nursing for senior psychiatric nurses to
prepare them more adequately for more senior positions. One of the graduates,
Mr. N. Clare, was appointed a Chief Psychiatric Nurse—Grade 2 on November 1st,
1960.
We have had several groups of students for short periods, from other hospitals,
on male wards working with our staff this year. There have been University of
British Columbia students taking postgraduate studies, affiliates from other hospitals, and a selected postgraduate group under the supervision of Miss Van Est,
of the School of Nursing at this Hospital.
Psychological Services
The Department of Psychology in the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental
Hospital at the end of the year reached its best level of staffing for several years.
Recruitment has been improved by better liaison with the University and through
the use of Federal training grants. For the first time this year, four students,
graduating with honours from the University of British Columbia and proceeding
on to graduate work, were hired for four months during the summer. During this
time the students were occupied with special research and group activity projects.
Two graduate students were sponsored by us to take Federal training grants in
graduate psychology at the University of British Columbia. They will be joining
our department at the beginning of the 1961/62 fiscal year.
During the year 1,001 psychological reports on patients were made, based on
interviews and the administration of 2,612 psychological tests. A new routine
admission battery was administered to those patients capable of being examined
upon their admission to Crease Clinic. The tests were administered with the cooperation of the nursing staff, and reports and interpretations were made by the
Psychology Department.
Lectures and discussions on a variety of psychological topics were given to
many groups from within and outside the Hospital. The largest single groups were
the classes in psychiatric nursing, who receive a formal course and are examined
in the principles of psychology. The increasing activities of nursing education in
areas of affiliate training, the new graduate clinical programme, and various in-
service training programmes have added several new demands for guest speakers
from this department. These lectures are time-consuming, not so much in their
actual delivery, but in their preparation. Altogether 110 hours of lectures, talks,
and discussions were given.
Activities in group work were curtailed somewhat this year, but began again
near the end of the year when our numbers increased. During the summer the
four students from the University of British Columbia conducted about forty sessions with patients in the West Lawn Building.    Our own staff conducted forty-two
 H 54 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
group sessions, and near the end of the fiscal year became more active when one
member began acting as co-ordinator of the coma insuUn group. There were forty-
two sessions of group therapy during the year and ninety-six sessions of individual
therapy and counselling.
A number of duties of a psychological nature but not strictly related to chnical
psychology were completed. During Mental Health Week the department co-ordinated the preparations and activities of the hospital " open house." Press releases
concerning activities within the Hospital are now gathered through the Psychology
Department. The department conducted a number of tours for visitors during the
year, including students from the University. The department has taken part in
a number of committees, ranging from the Library Committee and a committee
looking into the development of rehabilitation resources.
Research has continued in co-operation with psychiatry in the evaluation of
new drugs and their effects on behaviour. The department itself has been gathering
data on the usefulness in the hospital setting of certain group and short-form tests
for the assessment of personality variables and intellectual functioning.
Social Services
The increased admission and separation rate is reflected in all Hospital departments, but is especially noticeable in the clinical treatment services such as the
social service.
One of the programmes with which the Social Service Department has been
active during the year 1960/61 was the placement in boarding-home care of patients
in the long-term treatment units of the Hospital. Similar programmes are in
existence throughout the North American Continent, including several Canadian
Provinces. Their purpose is to give care and supervision for those patients whose
primary need is for domiciliary care of a more individualized nature than can be
provided on large mental hospital wards.
As of March 31st, eighty patients, mainly from the East and West Lawn
Buildings, have been placed in boarding care under the continuing supervision of
Hospital services. This programme entails well-integrated clinical services, together
with close co-operation with the Department of Social Welfare, which in most
instances provides and finances the boarding-home placement. It has also required
that the Hospital social workers devote an increasing proportion of time to these
services. Already, however, there are indications that the programme is well justified, as evidenced by the increasing capacity for independent activity on the part
of many of the patients so placed. In the majority of instances they have adjusted
satisfactorily to the boarding-home setting, although, as could be anticipated, certain
patients have found it necessary to return to the Hospital periodically for short-term
treatment, following which they have again been able to carry on under this type
of care.
In line with current efforts to establish closer liaison between the Mental Hospital and the community, a small group of interested male patients from the West
Lawn Building was given an opportunity during the past summer to take short-term
employment under Hospital supervision on berry-farms located in the Fraser Valley.
Through co-operation with the National Employment Service, the Hospital social
workers were in direct contact with those farmers interested in employing Hospital
patients at current rates of pay. The greatest success was experienced with the
blueberry-crop, the farmer in question expressing marked satisfaction with the work
done. Such a project seems to have provided definite therapeutic benefits for the
patients concerned in that it not only took them closer to the community, but also
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL H 55
gave them a sense of accomplishment and productivity, which in five instances
would appear to have been a motivating factor in their subsequent discharge.
Future programmes of this type might well include women patients in the long-term
treatment group.
The reorganization of the Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic during
the past year on a unit basis has contributed to a closer integration of social services with other clinical disciplines within the units. Consequently there has
been an increase in social-work participation in matters concerning indvidual units,
and more specificaUy in the planning and carrying-out of team projects designed
to improve patient services and treatment. At the same time, however, higher
admission rates to both the Hospital and the Clinic as compared with the previous
year have pointed to increased demands on social-work time generally and has
resulted in a need for more accelerated services throughout the department and an
increase in the provision of brief rather than sustained services. This situation
applied particularly to the Centre Lawn Building, where a significant percentage
of those patients discharged to the community was entirely without employment or
financial resources and, therefore, in urgent need of referral to public welfare agencies for material help. The processing of such referrals and similar types of brief
services accounted for a large proportion of social-work time in this unit.
Additionally, the reorganization of clinical services on a more definite team
basis in the Crease Clinic seems to have contributed markedly to the development
of a team approach. Again, because of the rapid patient turnover in this unit, and
also because of their location on specific wards and resulting proximity to the
patient, the social workers have been much more actively engaged with in-hospital
services than in the provision of these on an out-patient basis. This is illustrated
by the fact that the average number of in-hospital interviews ranged from 105 to
115 per social worker per month, whereas the out-of-hospital average for discharged
patients ranged between ten and twenty-five interviews per social worker per month.
As in previous years, educational responsibilities with respect to other disciplines continued to be carried out, as well as those related directly to the profession
of social work. In this latter regard, arrangements were made to orient groups of
in-service trainees from the Department of Social Welfare to hospital and clinical
services and to provide supervised field-work placements for eight students—(five
first year (that is, B.S.W. degree) and three second year (that is, M.S.W. degree)—■
from the School of Social Work, University of British Columbia. In addition, four
members of the social service staff of the Clinic and Hospital were granted educational leaves in order to complete the requirements for the master's degree in social
work under Federal mental-health bursary. Although staff shortages incurred by
such leaves constituted a temporary handicap to the department, the use of training
grants in furthering educational qualifications has been of the utmost value in terms
of better services to the patients.
The statistical summaries of the Social Service Department indicate that 1,736
patients in the Provincial Mental Hospital and 1,409 patients in the Crease Clinic
were in receipt of social services during 1960/61, as compared with 1,342 and
1,194 respectively in the previous year. It would seem, therefore, that the greater
rise in intake to Mental Hospital case loads within the past year is primarily attributable to the higher rates of admission and discharge which have prevailed particularly in the Centre Lawn Building and which have been met by an increase in the
provision of brief social services.
In addition, a total of 5,920 casework interviews was held with Provincial
Mental Hospital patients and 4,115 with Crease Clinic patients. These figures
include both in-patients and out-patients.    Similarly, in the Provincial Mental Hos-
 H 56 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
pital, interviews with relatives totalled 1,755 and were largely concerned with
interpretive and supportive services to some 809 individuals, whereas in the Crease
Clinic a total of 1,772 casework interviews were associated with 701 individual
contacts for the same purpose. A third important group with whom the social
workers in psychiatric institutions usually maintain contact are those collateral persons in the community who are interested in individual patients and whose help
is so necessary in effecting satisfactory social and vocational rehabilitation. During
the year 4,114 interviews were held with 1,803 such persons concerning Provincial
Mental Hospital patients and 1,368 interviews with 655 persons in regard to Crease
Clinic patients.
Despite such collateral contacts, the community on the whole has still insufficient resources to meet the needs of discharged patients. The proposed development of further rehabilitation services directly concerned with the mentally ill should
do much to compensate for this lack.
Occupational Therapy
This department has had a very successful year, which can be attributed in
a large measure to the leadership of Miss O. M. Curtis, O. T. (Reg.), Supervisor,
Occupational Therapy Department.
The year has been one of steady progress, made possible by the greater understanding and co-operation of all departments. It has been a year of discussion and
experiment, with an increased interest in the scientific and more complete treatment
of our patients, understanding and meeting their needs to a much greater extent
than was possible previously. The concept of the team approach has done much
to facilitate and speed this.
The relocation of the Occupational Therapy Department in West 1 at the
beginning of the year, divided into separate areas for the treatment of the patients
of individual services, helped establish a team approach. Members of the team are
now able to see their patients in the activity setting, whUe the patients have a greater
feeling of continuity between treatment on the ward and in the department. Largely
as a result of this change, more thought has been given to the effectiveness of certain techniques, with the result that greater use has been made of play-reading,
discussions, dancing classes, panel games, etc., all of which increase interpersonal
relationships. Other areas of treatment are also being discussed both by the treatment team and by occupational-therapy staff groups.
In conjunction with other clinical departments, the Occupational Therapy
Department has examined its programmes for long-stay patients, particular consideration being given to the needs of those patients being rehabilitated to boarding-
home and other forms of sheltered care. In East Lawn Building a basic rehabUi-
tation programme was inaugurated. It has been developed to include a wider
variety of basic skills essential to all patients returning to the community after prolonged hospitalization. A beginning was also made in designing more specific
rehabilitation programmes. The first is an Activities of Daily Living unit, which
has been delayed due to structural alterations needed in the present department.
However, a temporary area has been found, and the unit is scheduled to go into
operation at the beginning of the new fiscal year. Efforts have been made to integrate the rehabilitation programme in East Lawn Building with both Riverside unit
and West Lawn Building programmes whenever possible, as the patients in these
areas receive less treatment and tend to be more isolated. To this end, various
social functions have been arranged, including picnics, lunches (cooked and arranged by the female patients), and social afternoons of various types.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL H 57
FoUowing the reassessment of the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital as training centres for occupational-therapy students, six interns at various
levels of training were sent from the Universities of Toronto and Montreal during
the summer months, most of them staying for periods of two months. The cooperation shown by all departments in instructing the interns was most appreciated,
and it is gratifying to feel that the experience gained by those students was thought
valuable enough for the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists to assign
the Hospital five graduate students in the next year.
Much time has been given to increasing the Uaison between this department
and the Department of Nursing Education. Lectures have been given at the School
of Psychiatric Nursing and in the individual buUdings. Great efforts have been
made to assist the affiUate students to develop skills in activating patients on the
ward. In some areas now the therapists meet on a regular basis with the nursing
groups to discuss programming for the ward. This system is working well. There
has been maximum co-operation between the two departments.
The annual sale of work was most successful, raising a record total of
$3,559.86. The standard of work was, on the whole, better, and with the extra
space afforded by the use of the coffee-shop in Pennington HaU more room was
avaUable to display articles.
At Christmas the department produced a short Nativity play, in which patients
and staff from all parts of the Hospital participated.
Recreational Therapy
" People in hospitals and institutions are troubled people. Their need for the
happiness that is best maintained through wholesome recreation is even greater,
and harder to satisfy, than is the need of the average person who fives at home and
is in good health."—Joseph Prendergast, Executive Secretary, National Recreation
Association.
This brief excerpt from a recruiting brochure for recreation personnel indicates
the purpose, the scope, and the chaUenge motivating the continuing activities of the
Recreational Therapy Department. The year has been notable chiefly as a period
of consolidation following the rapidly changing pattern of programme developments
experienced in recent years. As attached statistics wiU show, most regular phases
of the activities programme outhned in previous Reports have continued to develop
on a desirable level.
For the first time in memory, personnel and the related area assignments have
remained unchanged throughout the year, while the establishment of the new unitization plan has gone a long way toward providing a means of better communications and integration within the various areas. As a result of these continuing relationships, recreational-therapy staff members are finding it possible to develop
better understanding of the needs of the patients and greater appreciation of the
problems and limitations imposed by varying clinical requirements and procedures.
Continuity, in turn, is helping them gain fuller understanding, acceptance, and cooperation among nursing and other personnel.
More frequent planning, evaluation, and a co-operative assessment of programme desires, needs, and possibilities on a unit level have made for a marked
extension and enrichment of opportunities for the patient-group as a whole. This
new development, taken together with the estabUshed pattern of ground-privileged
activities, has made possible real progress toward the realization of the concept of
providing a truly therapeutic community.
 H 58 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1960/61
Crease Clinic.—Continuation of regular five-day-a-week sessions throughout
the year has seen a considerable gain in total patient attendance. In addition,
establishment of special recreational programmes for insufin patients and group
therapy groups in co-operation with the related special leadership has seen considerable increase in total patient participation in this area. Regular patterns of ward,
interward, and building-wide social recreation programming continues to be most
popular. Swimming, outdoor sports, special outings and events have been organized with increasing frequency and with highly desirable results in terms of helping
patients adjust to necessary institutional and treatment disciplines.
East Lawn.—Here, based both on energetic, imaginative leadership and the
availability of a special recreational area within the buUding, it has been possible
to maintain and extend the desirable patterns developed over the past three years.
In particular, the situation has made possible the enhstment of the voluntary participation and support of a corps of selected patients who have made extensive
progress in terms of regained confidence and developing personal skUls through
leadership opportunities afforded in an extensive and varied programme. Here,
too, close co-operation with Canadian Mental Health Association volunteers has
brought about most active and constructive results.
West Lawn and Riverside.—The developing " unitization " plans, together
with the appointment of deputy nursing supervisors in these areas, are serving to
provide a recreational service in response to requests rather than attempting to
superimpose programmes which meet indifferent response. Increase in the age
level and involvement of an even larger percentage of the patient-group in daily
work assignments has necessitated a gradual change in emphasis toward more
evening social and recreational endeavours. On this basis a number of areas, such
as Riverside Annex and Cottage, are becoming much more active. Special attractions offered to patients in these areas included fishing trips and weekly visits to the
New Westminster arena for the hockey games.
Centre Lawn.—Considerable gain in the total level of activity and the degree
of staff and patient involvement was noted during the year. Regular report and
planning sessions convened by the Unit Director have been of material help in this
regard, but the general feeling is that much more may be expected following the
transfer of infirmary wards from this building and the allocation of suitable recreational space. Regular publication of a news bulletin by and for patients of Centre
Lawn has been an interesting development during the year.
North Lawn.—In addition to the programmes regularly offered in and for this
area, the Recreational Therapy Department has been pleased to be able to cooperate with an intensive programme of activation initiated by the Unit Director.
Daily activation programmes for men and women are supplemented by swimming
and bowling sessions held twice weekly, weekly dancing and games periods, year-
round mystery bus trips, and weekly outings and picnics throughout the summer.
Billiard-rooms, Bowling-alleys. — Attendance figures continue to reflect the
great increase in the number and enthusiasm of ground-privilege patients able to
seek recreational opportunities on their own initiative. The fall and winter season
saw the successful completion of the first official patient bowling league—thirty men
and women organized in four teams who bowled regularly throughout a nineteen-
week season, complete with recorded scores and averages and finished off in traditional fashion with a closing banquet in Pennington Hall featuring a presentation of
trophies to the winning team, male and female high average, and high three games.
Horseshoe-pits, archery-range, tennis-courts, regular drop-in swimming periods, and particularly the pitch-putt golf-course have been other areas reflecting this
more active independent participation.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
H 59
Patient Orchestra.—In terms of its contribution to the pleasure and entertainment of total patient-groups in every area of the Hospital, this new programme
feature, made possible through the enthusiastic leadership of Mr. Jack Lynes, rates
special mention. More than a score of patient musicians have taken part at some
time during the year, and the orchestra has performed on invitation on a total of
147 occasions, an average of three or more ward or area parties each week, and for
a host of special events. Desire to share in this popular musical activity has put
real determination into individual and group practice sessions, in addition to the
formal rehearsals held weekly.
Special Events.—While Carnival Day, because of its scope and colour and the
number of patients and staff involved, must always lead the parade under this heading, a very considerable range of events was carried out during the year. Special
outings to attend or participate in plays, exhibits, musical and sports events were
supplemented by sixteen major entertainments provided by outside groups in Pennington Hall and on the outdoor stage. Mystery trips, Stanley Park outings, fishing
expeditions, etc., continued to add interest to the lives of many hundreds of the
patients.
Co-operation with the Department of Nursing Education programme through
provision of lectures, workshops, demonstrations, and orientation tours, in addition
to encouragement of personal recreational participation for the student-group, was
continued and expanded during the year.
Opportunities for further education, in-service training, and growth experiences
for Recreational Therapy Department staff were sought on all possible levels.
Through reading, conference attendance, lectures, discussions, and regular staff
meetings, staff members were given encouragement toward sharpening their tools
and techniques for the important work we are privileged to share.
The statistical report continues to show great increases in every type of activity.
The number of group sessions, 4,072, increased by 511 over the previous year, and
the total patient attendance of 177,056 is an increase of 29,312. The sessions and
attendance were made up as follows:—■
Sessions Attendance
Crease CUnic      677 21,906
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale  2,399 151,161
Music therapy      734 3,989
Staff recreation      262 8,216
Totals
4,072
185,272
Physiotherapy
The Physiotherapy Department, under the direction of Mr. Borge Dahl, reports
an active year.
The remodelling of the department in the Centre Lawn Building was completed, with the result that there is now a special hydrotherapy unit and a gymnasium
equipped with standard apparatus. A portion of the main clinic has been divided
into three curtained cubicles, which is a great improvement since it gives the
patients a feeling of privacy and security.
The opening of a small clinic in new quarters in the West Lawn Building is
proving to be of great assistance to the patients domiciled there.
The staff consists of physiotherapists, psychiatric aides, and chiropodist. There
continues to be a considerable demand for physiotherapy for the treatment of many
types of physical disabilities. The chiropody section provides a very useful service
to our older patients especially and those requiring continued treatment.
 H 60 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1960/61
Hydrotherapy, infra-red, short-wave diathermy, massage, exercise, ultraviolet
light, wax baths, faradic, and galvanic were included in the types of treatments given.
Six hundred and nineteen male patients received 5,309 treatments and 681
female patients received 5,503 treatments, making a total of 1,300 patients receiving
a total of 10,812 treatments.
Department of Radiology
This department, under the direction of Dr. J. M. Jackson, reports that the
X-ray Department at the VaUeyview Hospital is this year reported separately. This
new department has saved the transport of some 2,300 patients to the Crease Clinic
for X-ray services in the past year.
We also note over the past three years a steadily progressive increase in work
done by the Surgical Department, for which we supply diagnostic X-ray services.
The increase is in the order of the following figures from the operating theatre:
1958/59, 266 patients;  1959/60, 318 patients;  1960/61, 372 patients.
There has also been a steady increase in speciaUzed X-ray examinations requiring anaesthetic and usually consultant surgeons: 1958/59, 58 cases; 1959/60, 73
cases; 1960/61, 81 cases. These would include retrograde pyelograms, broncho-
grams, cerebral arteriograms, O.R. cholangiograms, etc.
Department of Laboratories
Dr. G. A. Nicolson, Director of Laboratories, in his summary of the procedures
carried out in the laboratories of the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Health
Services, reports an increasing demand for the services provided by his department.
The total number of tests performed is 57,641, an increase of 390 over the
previous year. This increase was fairly evenly distributed throughout the departments of chemistry, bacteriology, hematology, and histology. A greater number of
the more complex procedures in chemistry were undertaken, such as seventeen ketos-
teroid determinations, chromatograms, and electrophoretograms. Serum electrolytes and blood cross-matching procedures have increased to correspond with the
increased activity of the surgical service. Surgical specimens examined totalled 402,
and autopsies performed totalled 203, more than in any previous year for the Provincial Mental Health Services. This has produced a rate of 84 per cent, which is
exceptionally high.
The technician-training programme has produced two more successful candidates for certification by the Canadian Society of Laboratory Technologists, and
three other students have completed a year of training and have thereby become
eligible to write the Canadian Society of Laboratory Technologists examinations.
Although this training programme exerts considerable extra pressure on our senior
laboratory personnel, it has provided us with a source of replacements for staff
separations. It is now fifteen years since we first received approval as a training-
school for laboratory technologists, and during this period we have trained more
than thirty student technicians, all of whom were successful in the examinations.
The autopsy rates reported for the year ended March 31st, 1961, were 84 per
cent for the Provincial Mental Hospital and 100 per cent for the Crease Clinic.
Pharmacy Department
The setting-up of a formulary last year has proved to be highly successful, and
the standardization of drugs has enabled this department to make savings. The
Pharmacy Committee has been active and has made every effort to keep up with
the new medications and to evaluate their effectiveness.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL H 61
The department has continued to serve the pharmacy needs for the whole of
the Mental Health Services both on an in-patient and out-patient basis.
We had, as has been customary, a pharmacy student who worked in the
department between May and September.
Optical Department
Mr. H. H. Woodbridge, optometrist in charge of the Optical Department,
reports on the completion of another year of active service to our patients.
The following figures indicate a further increase in work in this department
since the previous year. The previous year he had a total of 1,038 procedures.
For the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1961, a total of 1,131 procedures was carried
out, consisting of 646 examinations, 285 major repairs, and 200 minor repairs.
Dental Department
The year brought some changes in the staff of the Dental Department. Dr.
W. C. Cusack was appointed Director when Dr. Campbell transferred to the Geriatric Division. Dr. Smithurst was taken on the staff, keeping the number of operators to two, as was formerly the case. Dr. Campbell, however, still operates part
time for the Mental Hospital; two-fifths of his time is spent at the North Lawn
Building. Some additional programmes are in progress to make for more efficient
services to the patients. At the present time a programme of examinations of aU
patients is being carried out. One half-day a week is set aside for examinations and
recording of mouth conditions. These findings are entered in a ledger opposite each
patient's name, and appointments are made, giving priority to the more urgent cases.
By this means it is expected to cut down considerably the emergency requisitions
that come in. All cases are followed up until work is completed. Eventually all
patients will be examined and charted.   To date, two wards are completed.
Another service being done is visiting the wards where patients are in wheelchairs and confined to bed, and doing the necessary extractions there. This eliminates the difficult and time-consuming task of transporting these patients to the
Dental Clinic. This service will be continued wherever it is practical and feasible
to operate. The patient's welfare is always paramount in this regard. Although
there was lost time because of sickness in the staff, the dental services were kept to
a high degree of efficiency, and by the end of the year 10,729 operations were performed. There is still a great demand for dentures, with many new patients being
admitted to hospital without dentures and for those patients who have had their
extractions completed here. However, our dental laboratory is operating efficiently,
and there are fewer make-over cases and fewer dentures being lost than in previous years.
Chaplain
Rev. John F. O'Neil, E.D., B.A., L.T.A., the resident chaplain, and Rev.
Father A. Frechette, B.A., O.F.M., and visiting clergy have provided a very valuable
service to the patients in providing opportunities for worship.
The year has been normal with respect to the work of the chaplain with two
major exceptions. Opportunities for worship have been regularly provided for aU
Protestant patients and for most of the Roman Catholic patients who were well
enough and wished to avail themselves of these opportunities.
The main effort has been the providing of two services each Sunday in Pennington Hall auditorium so that the patients would have the feeling of leaving their
place of residence and actively going to church.   Almost one-quarter of these ser-
 H 62 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
vices in Pennington Hall were Roman Catholic and just over three-quarters of them
were Protestant services.
To try to meet the needs of those patients who through illness, infirmity, or
legal restrictions cannot go to Pennington Hall, Protestant services were conducted
regularly but with varying frequency on six of the wards and in North Lawn
auditorium.
The first of the two major events of the year was when the Protestant chaplain
took sick and was away for two months, from the middle of October to the middle
of December, and refief had to be arranged through the Anglican Synod office.
The second event was the requisitioning and the filUng of the establishment for
a chaplain at VaUeyview Hospital, thus reUeving the chaplain at the Provincial
Mental Hospital from having to cover VaUeyview Hospital. The immediate result
of this has been, first, that opportunities for worship have been provided for a wider
range of patients who could not leave their wards; second, that the seriously ill
patients have been more frequently visited and ministered to by the chaplain; third,
that most of the newly admitted patients are seen very briefly by the chaplain within
their first week in Hospital; and, fourth, that more patients can now be given individual help by the chaplain.
Business Administration
In June, 1960, the business administration offices of the Crease Clinic and
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, were completely reorganized. Mr. W. E.
Gueho, formerly supervisor of the general office, became responsible to the Hospital
Administrator for the operation of the general office, the pay office and personnel
section, and the information desk.
Unitization of pay and personnel functions had been completed by this time,
and the unitization of general office functions was completed on January 1st, 1961,
with the transfer of aU patients' hospital bilUng records, patients' trust account
records, and staff meal-ticket sales to the individual units of the Mental Health
Services. The relative bank accounts were closed out to the Treasury, and a voucher
system was instituted for receipts and expenditures of trust account and revenue
funds.
A number of physical improvements were made, including a new wicket-type
counter in the general office for better service and cash control.
During the year the pay and personnel offices handled payroU functions for a
staff of around 1,800 employees and raised approximately 600 staff requisitions
covering 450 hirings and 150 promotions, reclassifications, and transfers.
In this period the general office collected $1,751,286.34 in-patient maintenance
charges, $5,871.51 for staff long-distance telephone caUs, $45,057 from meal-ticket
sales, $1,792.50 from staff for transportation services, and received trust funds on
behalf of individual patients totalling $237,545.10.
Three thousand two hundred and twenty-eight lots of patients' personal valuables were received, checked, and stored. Pension applications on behalf of patients
totalled ninety-three, of which approval was received for seventy-five.
Audio-Visual Department
During the year, motion-picture shows gained considerable popularity with
patients. The educational film Ubrary was well used by borrowers both from outside the Hospital and from within the Hospital. With the appointment of a film
council, we will be augmenting this library with additional films and renewing older
ones.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL H 63
We are now taking pictures of patients on admission with a Polaroid camera
and film, thus reducing the time and work involved by 70 per cent. These pictures
are developed in a few seconds and turned over to the records office on the same
day that they are taken.
The Mental Health Centre is making a 16-millimetre film on child activities,
for which, on their request, we are providing them with help through the use of our
equipment. We are, furthermore, providing assistance to the Department of Neurological Research of the University of British Columbia. It is making a film record
of the evaluation of various agents in the control of drugs used in Parkinsonism.
The four-channel sound system is now augmented with a record request programme.   This is handled by patients, who do all the programming and selecting.
The Sports Day Festival held on July 13th, 1960, taxed our resources nearly
to the limit, since we supplied ten complete public address units used for the main
platform stage, the dance, and all the smaller activities.
The following statistics will give an indication of the regular activities of this
department:—
The 35-millimetre films at Pennington Hall were shown 146 times to a total
of 45,281 patients, and in The Woodlands School they were shown sixty-one times
to 20,214 patients.
The 16-millimetre ward shows shown at Essondale, Riverside, and VaUeyview
were shown 431 times to 35,388 patients. There was also a weekly 16-millimetre
show at The Woodlands School; Dellview Hospital, Vernon; Allco Infirmary,
Haney; and at the Provincial Home, Kamloops, and at Tranquille, which was run
by their own staff. The educational film library now has 329 registered borrowers,
who used 1,383 films from our library.
Industrial Therapy Department
Mr. R. Herring, supervisor of the Industrial Therapy Department, reports a
successful year from the point of view of both therapy and productivity. This has
been accompfished through the manufacture and repair of hospital goods and
throueh the enrolment to capacity of male and female patients, who have gained
many benefits in the nature of trade training and rehabilitation.
A greater number of female patients are being enrolled into the masculine arts,
such as metalsmithing, printing, and mattress and canvas manufacture; further
encouragements will be directed toward the electronics, furniture-finishing, and
automotive fields.
The following statistics indicate the volume of patients working in and through
this department:—
Total patients employed in trade-shops during year  2,549
Patients progressed to hospital work level        73
Patients discontinued, returned to ward        14
Patients discharged to community      139
The following figures are indicative of the productive results of the department,
sponsored by a large patient training and rehabilitation programme:—
Manufactured Repaired
Items Items
Printing Section  1,864,867             	
Canvas and Mattress Section  6,617 2,415
Cabinet Section      388 2,071
Shoe Section          327 5,652
Upholstery Section  412 1,131
 H 64 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Metalsmithing and Machine Section          2,106 1,024
Tailoring          6,705 12,679
Uniform Section .        11,603 9,168
Mending Section  106,674
Dry-goods Section        89,827 _
Hospital magazine issued  15,480 copies
Fire Department
Mr. A. P. Lowry, Fire Chief, and his staff are to be commended in the efficient
operation of their department. Due to their effectiveness, there was no injury or
loss of life due to fire suffered by patients or staff. The Essondale fire-prevention
staff-training programme is of very great value to the several divisions of the Provincial Mental Health Services, and over 1,600 staff members have now received
the benefit of this training.
During the year 1960 this department attended four fires in buildings housing
patients or staff, seven fires in other buildings, seven grass and brush fires, eight
rubbish fires, eight false alarms, two car fires, and one inhalator call, for a total of
thirty-seven emergency caUs.
There were sixteen fires in mattresses, couches, garbage-cans, etc., extinguished
by members of the staff, and twenty-nine smoke calls were investigated.
Our training programme is proceeding as planned. There were fifteen fire drills
held for both patients and staff, twenty-six one-hour lectures were given, and forty
four-hour classes were held. The four-hour training periods were attended by 435
people, and by the end of the year this training had been given to a total of 1,014
persons. During the week of September 12th this four-hour class was carried on at
Dellview Hospital in Vernon, and during the week of October 3rd it was held at
Skeenaview Hospital in Terrace. A total of sixty hours was spent instructing volunteer firemen, and 141 practices of one to two hours' duration were held for both
volunteers and paid firemen.
All buildings and shops at Essondale, The Woodlands School, and the Mental
Health Centre were inspected, and 700 fire-extinguishers in the three hospitals were
checked quarterly, tested, and given annual recharge. Firemen supervised the work
of the chimney-cleaning contractor, and continuous maintenance work on aU fire-
fighting trucks and equipment was carried out.
Laundry Department
During the year there was an increase in the volume both of laundry and dry
cleaning through this department. There was an increase of 1,586,382 pounds of
linen as compared with the previous year, such that 8,963,880 pounds were processed during the year. There was an increase in dry cleaning of 7,295 pounds,
giving a total for the year of 132,320 pounds processed.
A study of the department was made by a committee consisting of the Hospital
Administrator, the Business Manager for The Woodlands School, and the Business
Manager for VaUeyview Hospital. The study confirmed the fact that the existing
quota system should be continued and, further, confirmed the fact that, with figures
that were available, the poundage per patient-day and the cost per pound compared
favourably with costs from other Provinces in Canada.
Medical Records
During the year this department was reorganized and consolidated, such that
now it consists of members doing essentially medical records work.   Stenographic
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL H 65
staff performing work for departments, such as social service, nursing, and individual doctors, are under their respective department heads.
There was a marked increase in admissions and discharges, particularly during
the last three months of the year, and this has reflected in an increased work load
for the staff involved with Provincial Mental Hospital patients. As a result of the
pressure, filing procedures were reviewed and changes were made to lessen the
amount of stenographic time being taken for reports from the various departments.
With the appointment of Unit Directors, daily staff meetings have been held;
these are attended by members of the medical records staff in each unit and are
providing a helpful means of communication.
Improvements in office facilities and provision of dictating equipment have
increased the efficiency of the medical records staff of the West Lawn Building.
A study has been undertaken with a view to improving the routine for the
collection and distribution of census figures on patient movement. The object of
this is to obtain accurate figures and to provide departments with these on a daily
basis in a standardized form.
During the year, assistance was given to a social-work student and to medical
students on research projects in connection with their university studies.
In the operating-room in the Crease Clinic, the provision of improved dictating
equipment has proved helpful. The relocating of one of the Crease Clinic stenographers into the operating-room area has enabled us to provide a better service in
this area.
Dietary Department
Aside from the daily duties and many catering services, both large and smaU,
performed by our department, several changes and innovations have taken place.
Probably the most interesting item to cooks and dieticians throughout the
service was the formation of the British Columbia Food Technicians' Association.
This is comprised of cooks from The Woodlands School, VaUeyview Hospital,
Crease Clinic, and Provincial Mental Hospital. Because of their initiative, they
were successful in securing a special course in hospital kitchen management covering
all phases of food service in institutions, including diet therapy. Evening lectures
were given at the University of British Columbia by University instructors. So successful was this course that it is to be included in the 1961 night-school curriculum
of the University Extension Department.
The year saw the opening of a staff coffee-room in the Crease Clinic kitchen
block, the further planning for West Lawn dining-room renovations, and a programme for the provision of night nourishment in East Lawn Building.
The complete revision of an eight-week rotation menu, together with accompanying diets, was undertaken. Now our daily menus not only provide patients
and staff with a greater variety of foods, but also permit of revisions that may be
due to medical and dietary advancements.
Visitors to the Hospital
This year there have been many visitors to the Hospital, coming individually
or as members of visiting organizations. Visiting of patients is permitted every day
and is encouraged by Hospital staff. Such visiting is therapeutic and helpful to
both our patients and to their relatives in the community.
The Honourable Eric Martin, Minister of Health Services and Hospital Insurance, visited on many occasions.
Dr. A. E. Davidson, Deputy Minister of Mental Health Services, and members
of his staff visited this Hospital quite frequently during the fiscal year.
 H 66 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Many branches of the Canadian Legion, through their Women's AuxUiary,
visited patients. The Women's Auxiliary of the Army and Navy Veterans' Association of Canada visited frequently. Dr. E. Johnson, Director of the Provincial
Mental Health Services of Manitoba, visited Essondale.
University of British Columbia and Western Washington College of Education
students of abnormal psychology were given classes by our Psychology Department
on several occasions.
Surgical-ward rounds were held on two occasions by Dr. A. D. McKenzie,
Professor of Surgery, University of British Columbia School of Medicine, with our
Hospital consultants specialist staff.
On January 23rd, 1961, we were fortunate in having twenty-five members
of the Twenty-sixth Legislative Assembly visit Essondale.
Professor Dennis-Brown, Professor of Neurology, Harvard University, lectured
to the Hospital staff.
Volunteer Activities
Mr. T. G. Dodsworth, the Essondale co-ordinator for the volunteer service
of the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Mental Health Association, again
reports a very active year. The number of men and women volunteers contributing
their time and skills is increasing, and many hospital volunteer activity areas show
considerable expansion of service.
This large group of volunteers who faithfully visit the Hospital, in all weathers,
is making a valuable contribution to the welfare of the patients. The very fact of
the volunteers' presence in the Hospital is visible proof to the patients that they are
not forgotten and that the community does care and is willing to help.
During the year approximately 250 men and women volunteers have visited.
Most of the volunteers visit each week, and thereby cover every day and evening.
They donated some 50,000 hours of their time to the service of the mentally ill.
The apparel-shops have been able to continue their high standard of operation.
The women's shop is open an extra day per week. It is now open four days per
week. During the year 6,000 articles of clothing were distributed to over 2,000
patients. Several people who had been discharged on probation have come back
to get additional clothing. The men's apparel-shop moved into its new quarters on
the main thoroughfare of the Hospital. Since this time the number and quality of
the donations of men's clothing has improved considerably, although the shop is
open only one day per week.
Several hundred patients have been taken out to private homes and restaurants
for luncheons this year. We have sent male and female patients both separately and
together to these luncheons all over the Lower Mainland. Many more patients
have been taken to concerts, shows, picnics, drives, fishing, bowling, and camping
out overnight.
On three occasions this past year, volunteers have had a barbecue on Ward A4.
These patients are not able to get out, so the volunteers brought the barbecue in.
Once again at Christmas time, gifts were distributed to the patients by volunteers. Every woman in Hospital received at least one Christmas gift, and most of
the men received one. Unfortunately we did not receive quite enough gifts for every
man, but all those who have been in Hospital for some time received one.
In December the volunteer headquarters moved into new quarters in a large
house which provides a good lounge, a meeting-room, kitchen facilities, and storage
area for the apparel-shops.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL H 67
Gifts
Sister Superior Mary Augustine, of Little Flower Academy, Vancouver, with
forty girl students, prepared and equipped the powder-room in East Lawn Building
for the use of patients. The room was turned over to Ward F3 on November 12th,
on which occasion the students of Little Flower Academy presented a very exceUent
concert to the patients.
Tickets were received for our patients from Pacific National Exhibition officials.
The Vancouver Shriners donated many tickets and transportation, enabling many of
our patients to attend the Shrine Circus at the exhibition.
Athletic organizations donated gifts of tickets to hockey games in New
Westminster.
The foUowing list of entertainers donated their time and talent for the benefit
of our patients:—
West Vancouver Boys' and Girls' Band (ninety pieces)—Mr. Bryson.
Oakalla Players, " Three Men on a Horse "—Warden Hugh Christie.
West Gate " Rhythmnaires" Dance Band (three times)—Warden H. Christie.
South Cambie Community Concert Association (director, Mrs. Frame)—■
sponsored by New Westminster Lions Club, Mr. Don Blad, president.
Jack Bourne Accordion Band—Mr. Jack Bourne.
Haney Correctional Institutional Variety Concert Party—Warden John Braithwaite.
International Dancing School—Miss Hunt, director.
The " Rhythmnaires " Handicapped Group Dance Band—Mr. John Dehring.
BiUy Jones Dance Band, Patients' Christmas Party—Mr. Billy Jones.
Billy Jones Dance Band, Annual Staff Dance—Mr. Billy Jones.
Dolores Kirkwood School of Dancing, Variety Group—Miss Kirkwood.
School Choir, District No. 43—Mr. R. B. Stibbs.
South Cambie Group, Patients' Christmas Parties—Mrs, Frame.
Burnaby Boy Scout Group, Christmas Concert—Mr. A. DeLange.
OakaUa Dance Band, Hallowe'en Party—Warden Hugh Christie.
Queens Park Arena, Weekly Hockey Games—Mr. William Phillips.
Vancouver Firemen's Band, Outdoor Concert—Mr. Hugh Bird.
Oakalla Players, "Command Decision"—Warden Hugh Christie.
Kitsilano Community Concert Association (director, Mr. Ted Gandy)—sponsored by Burrard Lions Club.
Capilano Stadium, patients' league players see Mounties—Mr. L. M. Little-
john, manager.
Marge Berry School of Dancing, Outdoor Concert—Mrs. Marge Berry.
H.M.C.S. " Discovery " Band (Commander A. W. Ross)—sponsored by Musicians' Union Trust Fund—Mr. Jack Townsend.
15th Field Regiment, R.C.A., Band Concert—Lieut-Colonel Garrett.
CoUingwood Community Concert Party—Mrs. R. J. Sivertson.
West Vancouver Boys' and Girls' Band—Mr. Ken Arnott.
 H 68 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
TREATMENT SERVICES
F. G. Tucker, Clinical Director
In the realm of mental health our psychiatric armamentarium at times seems
woefuUy inadequate in the face of mounting demands and increasing pressures for
the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of mental Ulness. It would seem often
that we have reached an impasse which can only be overcome by a continual and
careful examination of our accepted psychiatric concepts and a flexibility in the
use of our present treatment methods. There should be a constant attempt to outflank the problems besetting us, with increased emphasis on neurophysiology at one
end of the spectrum and a new awareness of the phUosophical aspects of mental
illness at the other end. The Third World Congress of Psychiatry held in Montreal
this year seems to promise advances along these Unes in the years immediately
ahead. Meantime a remustering of our resources takes place, and whUe broad
strategy is developed, tactical moves within the Provincial Mental Hospital and
Crease CUnic continue.
The large number of patients admitted to the Crease Clinic and Provincial
Mental Hospital over the year have made heavy demands upon the treatment services. This has been noted especially in the admitting services of the Provincial
Mental Hospital, where admissions have increased 17 per cent over 1959/60. The
treatment load was accentuated by a high intake of Order in Council patients during the latter months of the year. These patients continue to be a confusing and
disturbing influence in the admitting and treatment wards. The increased demand
upon the chnical staff was further compounded by high levels of expectation in the
form of patient-care and psychiatric treatment. There has been an improved quality
of recruitment to the treatment services this year. We have been fortunate in gaining the services of a number of experienced psychiatrists. These gains in recruitment, together with an intensive in-service training programme, continue to raise the
level of skill demonstrated by treatment teams in all areas.
In order that we might deal more effectively with the three basic types of
patient described in my report of 1959/60, unitization of treatment services took
place in September, 1960. This has allowed for more individualized treatment programmes and simplifies the medico-administrative problems of a large hospital.
The Crease Clinic has become one treatment unit geared to give relatively
intensive short-term treatment to acute neurotic and psychotic patients. There has
been an increasingly successful attempt to involve private physicians in the patient's
hospitalization to the extent that good liaison exists between our Admitting Officer
and many physicians in the community, so that adequate ward assignment of the
patient on admission can be arranged. Liaison with physicians of discharged patients has improved. Relatives, too, are becoming more involved in the treatment
procedures and in the ward recreational events. Monthly parties are held in many
wards, at which the patients are encouraged to entertain their friends and relatives.
It is hoped that the limited development of group psychotherapy for relatives can
be expanded during the coming year. A further refinement in the Crease Clinic
has resulted from the establishment of each female ward as a self-contained sub-unit.
The three wards are staffed by a senior and junior psychiatrist and a social worker,
and have allocated to them one occupational therapist. This has enabled the staff
to develop a considerable sense of identification in their treatment area, to understand their failings, their assets, and their obligations in a treatment team, and it is
hoped that it has allowed the individual ward to develop a sense of individuahty
and purpose.    Team nursing is being developed, so that each doctor can work
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL H 69
closely with his own group of nurses and thereby offer highly individualized treatment to all patients. The Crease Clinic patient is admitted to one ward, where he
remains until his discharge, on an average of four to six weeks later. Administratively this has simplified many procedures and has added to the patients' well-
being in that they no longer have constantly to adjust to the new patients and nurses
as they move from one ward to another. In this setting the clinical services are
functioning efficiently. As yet no similar procedure has been adopted in the male
wards. All wards are now open, and with increasing co-operation from referring
physicians the Crease Clinic has handled efficiently a large number of admissions
in spite of the necessity of maintaining a short waiting-Ust of female patients.
The second unit is that of the admitting services in Centre Lawn Building oi
the Provincial Mental Hospital. An increase of admissions to this unit, coupled
with economic problems in the community, has resulted in considerable difficulty
in rehabilitation. As many as 70 per cent of patients admitted to the Centre Lawn
unit appear to have no resources available to them in the community. Their relocation in society presents almost insuperable problems to the Social Service Department in many cases.
The remaining units are those of the male and female continued-treatment
areas, which have been defined as separate units by reason of their size. It has
been possible to increase and stabilize the medical staff in these areas during the
year, with considerable improvement in our ability to give more intensive therapy
to selected patients. The appointment of a Grade 2 Superintendent of Nurses for
the West Lawn and Riverside area has greatly increased the nursing efficiency and
co-ordination of treatment in these units. West Lawn BuUding demonstrates the
high returns in therapeutic results which can derive from relatively minor renovations and alterations to the buildings. These also produce increases in staff and
patient morale.
We have noted particularly gratifying results from the placement of patients
in boarding-home care. Over eighty patients have been placed to date, and it is
hoped that this programme will continue to expand during the coming year. Preparation of the institutionaUzed patient for life in the community has been undertaken by the basic rehabilitation programme set up by the Occupational Therapy
Department and has been enhanced by many other departments of the Hospital.
It has been particularly helped by the work of the volunteers, who continue to provide the main contact with the " world outside " for many patients. Visits to theatres and to volunteers' homes, together with the many other outings, have proven
invaluable.
During the year a thorough survey of patients in both the male and female
continued-treatment areas has been undertaken and has allowed for accurate assessment of their needs. The discharge rate has remained satisfactory, but the provision of after-care and the availability of medication to the needy discharged patient
remains a problem.
" The Venture " and " The Vista " have continued to provide a useful service.
One hundred and nineteen patients were transferred to these half-way homes from
the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital during the year. The difficulty in
obtaining employment, particularly for male patients, made for many difficulties in
rehabilitation planning.
The four Unit Directors have assumed a functional control of their staff.
Administrative control remains vested in the appropriate department head. Such
unitization is merely a beginning, but it is hoped will set the stage for further reorganization which will enable us to elaborate more specific programmes of treatment.
 H 70 .   .  MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
In.the coming year we hope to unitize and, co-ordinate those services dealing with
acute medical, surgical, and infirmary cases.
No new treatments have been instituted. Somatotherapies continue to be used
in the form of electroconvulsive therapy and, in decreasing measure, coma insulin
therapy. There has been considerable success in the treatment of a limited number of resistant cases of paranoid schizophrenia with the use of prolonged sleep
therapy. The phenothiazine and anti-depressant drugs continue to play a useful
part in the treatment of disturbed and depressed patients. Prime interest, however,
centres around group and mUieu therapy, and it would seem that these, together
with developing community and after-care programmes, wiU offer the greatest possi-
biUty of success in the treatment of the mentaUy ill in the immediate years to come.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
H 71
STATISTICAL TABLES
CREASE CLINIC
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Crease Clinic, April 1st, 1960,
to March 31st, 1961
Male
Female
Total
In residence, April 1st, 1960-
Admissions—
First admissions	
Readmissions to a different institution of Mental Health Services _
Readmissions to same institution '. :. 	
Admitted direct from Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
Total admissions .. .1 	
Total under care..
Separations—
Discharged in full-
Discharged direct to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale..
Died _	
Total separations..
Net increase or decrease-
In residence, March 31st, 1961.
120
466
211
190
4
681
801
666
24
3
693
— 12
108
145
595
39
266
900
1,045
872
36
1
909
-9
136
265
1,061
60
456
4
1,581
1,846
1,538
60
4
1,602
-21
244
 H 72
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table 2.—First Admissions to Crease Clinic, by Health Unit and School
District of Residence and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
Metropolitan Health Committee,
1
2
3
„   2 _	
5
1
6
School District No. 44. 	
17
32
49
„   3	
2
2
4
„         „         „   45	
4
14
18
„   4.	
1
1
Simon   Fraser,   New  Westmin
, 5	
1
1
2
ster—
Selkirk, Nelson—
School District No. 40    ...
26
26
52
4
6
10
, 43
20
20
40
„   8	
2
2
North Fraser Valley, Mission—
School District No. 42.	
„   10	
1
1
4
9
13
West Kootenay, Trail—
„   75	
3
8
11
1
3
4
„         „         „   76
2
3
5
„   11	
8
5
13
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 47 	
 12	
5
. 1
6
1
6
7
„   13	
4
2
6
 71    	
4
6
10
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
„   72	
1
2
3
School District No. 14. ,, „
7
3
10
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
„   15.  _
2
7
9
School District No. 50	
1
1
„   16	
2
2
,.   52  _.
7
6
13
„   23  -
10
6
16
 ,   53.....	
2
2
4
„   77	
2
2
4
„   54	
2
1
3
North Okanagan, Vernon—
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
5
2
7
School District No. 59   ...
2
2
4
 ,   20  	
5
6
11
 60	
3
3
6
„   21	
1
1
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board
„   22	
7
4
11
of Health—
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 61 (part1)-
8
9
17
School District No. 24	
7
14
21
Saanich  and  South  Vancouver
 25 	
1
1
2
Island—
 26	
	
1
1
School District No. 61 (part2)
6
3
9
„   29	
1
1
1
2
2
3
„   62	
„   63	
1
1
1
3
2
„   30.	
4
 31	
3
1
4
„   64 	
1
1
2
Cariboo, Prince George—
Central Vancouver Island, Na
School District No. 27	
3
1
4
naimo—
 ,   28	
1
6
7
School District No. 65	
1
5
6
„   55	
1
1
 66	
1
1
2
„   56	
3
3
„   67	
2
2
4
„           „          „    57.	
8
8
16
„           „          „   68	
7
8
15
„   58	
2
1
3
„   69	
1
1
2
Upper    Fraser   Valley,    Chilli
,.   70.	
7
9
16
wack—
„         „         „   79	
1
2
3
School District No. 32 	
3
3
School districts not covered bv
„   33._	
10
18
28
health units—
„   34	
10
13
23
School District No. 46	
5
5
Boundary, Cloverdale—
„   48  _
2
1
3
School District No. 35 _.
4
8
12
„   49	
2
2
 36	
36
39
75
„         „        „   61 (part3)
2
5
7
 37.	
2
9
11
 73	
„   74	
1
2
■
1
Metropolitan Health Committee,
2
Vancouver—
 >   80 	
2
2
4
School District No. 38	
14
23
37
Unorganized	
1
2
3
„   39	
139
181
320
Unknown	
1
1
41
24
42
66
3
2
5
Totals ....   	
491
634
1,125
1 Includes Victoria and Esquimalt only.
2 Excludes Victoria, Esquimalt, and Oak Bay.
3 Includes Oak Bay only.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
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MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
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 H 78
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table 6.—First Admissions to Crease Clinic by Marital Status, Mental
Diagnosis, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 7.—Readmissions to Crease Clinic by Marital Status, Mental
Diagnosis, and Sex, April 1st; 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 8.—First Admissions to Crease Clinic by Mental Diagnosis, Years
of Schooling, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 9.—Readmissions to Crease Clinic by Mental Diagnosis, Years of
Schooling, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 10.—First Admissions to Crease Clinic by Citizenship, Age-group,
and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 11 .•—First Admissions to Crease Clinic by Religion and Sex,
April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 12.—First Admissions to Crease Clinic by Previous Occupation and
Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
Table 13.—Live Discharges from Crease Clinic by Condition on Discharge,
Disposition to, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Disposition to—
Condition
Home
Clinic
Agency
General
Hospital
Welfare
Institution
Other
Mental
Hospital
Other
Total
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
63
60
471
66
46
47
716
56
—
~
	
—
	
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8
17
6
30
1
3
1
~~6
631
61
482
84
46
47
729
86
109
Much improved-
108
1,211
170
Unimproved	
Totals -.
660
865
—
l
	
—
-—
—
25
36 |      5
6
690
908
1,598
1 Includes one probationary case returned to Essondale for release.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
H 79
Table 14.—Live Discharges from Crease Clinic by Mental Diagnosis, Condition on Discharge, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Mental Diagnosis
Condition on Discharge
Recovered
M.
Much
Improved
M.      F.
Improved
M.
Unimproved
Total
M.
F.      M.
Grand
Total
With Psychosis
Schizophrenic disorders	
Manic-depressive reaction	
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states..
Senile psychosis _
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis.
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology	
Other and unspecified psychoses-
Anxiety reaction without mention of somatic symptoms   	
Hysterical reaction without mention of somatic symptoms..   	
Phobic reaction   	
Obsessive-compulsive reaction.
Neurotic-depressive reaction.
Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms (somatization reaction) affecting digestive
system   ___ „...
Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms (somatization reaction) affecting other systems   	
Psychoneurotic disorders, other, mixed,
and unspecified types 	
Chronic brain syndrome with neurotic reaction      	
Total with psychosis  _	
Without Psychosis
Pathological personality 	
Immature personality- 	
Alcoholism  _..
Other drug addiction 	
Primary childhood behaviour disorders	
Mental deficiency   _
Other and unspecified character behaviour
and intelligence disorders
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural
reaction    	
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S. _
Epilepsy-
Other diseases of central nervous system
not associated with psychosis	
Observation without need for further medical (psychiatric) care	
Total without psychosis..
Grand totals  	
27
4
1
12
151
24
13
6
1
1
8
8
14
46
14
1
5
76
60 |    46 |    54 |    47
236
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4
10
38
59
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26
22 I 216
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42
39
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34
52
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8
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I
63
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28
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521
75
61
16
5
9
16
28
79
123
51
6
15
314
5
27
15
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1
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1
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4
19
18
14
28
1
4
88
55
42 |    31  |  140
86
226
482 I 729
84 |    86 | 690 | 908 | 1,598
 H 80
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1960/61
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 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
H 83
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Male
Female
Total
1,608
110
8
1,411
197
4
3,019
307
12
Totals as at April 1st, 1960             .     	
1,726
1,612
3,338
Admissions—■
499
93
389
24
18
300
153
366
36
10
799
Readmissions to a different institution of Mental Health Services
246
755
60
28
1,023
865
1,888
2,749
2,477
5,226
Separations-
825
4
76
111
121
4
751
52
25
308
1
1,576
4
Died     __	
128
Transferred to other units 	
136
429
5
1,141
1,137
2,278
	
1,608
-71
1,340
—71
In residence, March 31st, 1961 _  	
2,948
 H 84
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table 2.—First Admissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by
Health Unit and School District of Residence and Sex, April 1st,
1960, to March 31st, 1961.
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
Metropolitan Health Committee,
School District No. 1	
1
1
2
5
1
3
2
8
3
School District No. 44     	
16
8
18
3
34
„   3	
„   45	
11
„    4	
1
2
1
3
2
5
Simon   Fraser,   New   Westmin-
„   5	
 18 	
1
1
32
16
48
Selkirk, Nelson—
 43	
14
11
25
School District No. 6 	
1
1
North Fraser Valley, Mission—
,,         „         „   7 ....	
2
2
School District No. 42	
13
7
20
, 8	
1
1
2
„   75	
1
6
7
„   10	
1
1
 76	
Upper Island, Courtenay—
3
3
West Kootenay, Trail—
1
1
2
3
3
4
School District No. 47
3
2
3
3
6
„   11..	
„   71-	
5
„   12 	
1
1
2
3
1
 72 -	
1
1
„   13	
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 50 	
2
2
4
School District No. 14 —
1
2
3
„   52  --.
4
6
10
„   15 	
2
2
2
1
4
3
„   53	
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
2
1
3
„   16 —
„   23 _. .
2
7
9
School District No. 59	
3
4
7
„   77
4
4
„   60
3
2
5
North Okanagan, Vernon—
„   81	
1
1
School District No. 19	
4
1
5
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board
 ,   20	
4
1
5
of Health—
„   21        	
1
1
School District No. 61 (parti)
Saanich   and   South   Vancouver
19
13
32
 22	
11
7
18
„   78    ._.  	
1
1
2
Island—
School District No. 61 (part2)
10
7
South Central, Kamloops—
17
School District No. 24	
5
9
14
„   62 ..-
1
1
2
„   25	
2
2
„   63.	
4
1
5
„   26	
1
1
2
 64	
1
1
„   30  .
1
1
2
Central Vancouver  Island, Na
„   31	
2
2
naimo—
Cariboo, Prince George—
School District No. 65.. ._	
2
1
3
School District No. 27 	
6
7
13
 66 	
2
2
4
„    28—	
3
3
6
„   67.—	
2
2
„    56	
1
1
 68	
8
5
13
 57 ,_
10
5
15
„   69	
5
5
„   58 _
1
1
, 70	
8
2
10
Upper    Fraser    Valley,    Chilli
 79-	
1
1
wack—
School districts not covered by
School District No. 32	
4
2
6
health units—
„   33	
9
11
20
School District No. 46	
5
3
8
 ,    34	
10
4
14
„   48 	
1
2
Boundary, Cloverdale—
„   49 	
1
School District No. 35	
3
4
7
„   61 (parts)
5
6
„   36 	
25
26
51
 ,   73	
2
3
„   37	
1
3
4
„   74	
1
2
Metropolitan Health Committee,
„   80 	
	
1
Vancouver—
Unorganized _.  	
4
	
4
5
10
15
11
5
16
 39	
„   41	
262
33
177
32
439
65
Totals	
615
484
1,099
1 Includes Victoria and Esquimalt only.
2 Excludes Victoria, Esquimalt, and Oak Bay.
3 Includes Oak Bay only.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
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 H 90 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table 6.—First Admissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by
Mental Diagnosis, Marital Status, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March
31st, 1961.
Table 7.—Readmissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by
Mental Diagnosis, Marital Status, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March
31st, 1961.
Table 8.—First Admissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by
Mental Diagnosis, Years of Schooling, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to
March 31st, 1961.
Table 9.—Readmissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by
Mental Diagnosis, Years of Schooling, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to
March 31st, 1961.
Table 10.—First Admissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by
Citizenship, Age-group, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961.
Table 11.—First Admissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by
Religion and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 12.—First Admissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by
Previous Occupation and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961.
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
H 91
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MENTAL HEALTH
SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
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 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
H 93
Table 14.—Resident Population of Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, by Mental Diagnosis, Number of Previous Admissions, and Sex,
December 31st, 1960.
Table 15.—Resident Population of Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, 25 Years of Age and under, by Mental Diagnosis, Length of
Stay, and Sex, December 31st, 1960.
Table 16.—Resident Population of Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, 26 to 49 Years of Age, by Mental Diagnosis, Length of Stay,
and Sex, December 31st, 1960.
Table 17.—Resident Population of Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, 50 Years of Age and over, by Mental Diagnosis, Length of Stay,
and Sex, December 31st, 1960.
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
Table 18.—Live Discharges from Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale,
by Condition on Discharge, Disposition to, and Sex, April 1st, 1960,
to March 31st, 1961.
Disposition to—
Condition
Home
Clinic
Agency
General
Hospital
Welfare
Institution
Other
Mental
Hospital
Other
Total
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Recovered	
Much improved	
Improved-	
Unimproved	
10 |    20
15 |    12
611 I 629
71  |    51
—
—
3
—
1
2
9
106
5
26
1 j      1
2
771     202
333 j    10'
11
18
701
210
21
12
656
87
32
30
1,357
297
Totals
707  | 712 |
1           1
—
3
—
1
2
116
31
113 |    31
1
940
776
1,716
1 Includes 5 escapees.
2 Includes 11 escapees.
3 Includes 15 escapees.
4 Includes 5 escapees.
 H 94
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table 19.—Live Discharges from Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale,
by Mental Diagnosis, Condition on Discharge, and Sex, April 1st,
1960, to March 31st, 1961.
Condition on Discharge
Total
Mental Diagnosis
Recovered
Much
Improved
Improved
Unimproved
Grand
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
With Psychosis
4
1
2
1
3
7
1
4
3
2
2
11
1
1
1
1
1
8
1
1
311
8
3
7
4
7
48
5
2
12
3
1
18
1
5
1
349
33
26
2
1
11
26
20
15
10
8
1
40
1
5
3
54
2
1
13
17
4
1
1
1
1
1
2
31
1
3
7
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
380
11
3
8
17
24
55
7
3
13
6
2
20
1
1
6
4
395
35
31
2
4
19
30
21
17
13
12
2
41
1
5
3
1
775
46
34
10
21
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis. 	
.Alcoholic psychosis   	
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology
43
85
28
20
Anxiety  reaction  without mention of so-
26
Hysterical reaction without mention of somatic symptoms . 	
Obsessive-compulsive reaction             _
Neurotic-depressive reaction.	
Psychoneurosis    with    somatic    symptoms
(somatization  reaction)   affecting  diges-
18
4
61
1
Psychoneurosis    with    somatic    symptoms
(somatization   reaction)   affecting   other
1
Psychoneurotic   disorders,    other,    mixed,
6
Chronic brain syndrome with neurotic re-
1
9
Syphilis and its sequela? -	
5
11  |    19 |    16 |    10 | 436
551
98
52
561
632
1,193
Without Psychosis
	
1
1
1
1
60
12
160
3
9
7
6
8
33
10
26
6
5
8
2
4
1
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1
34
3
21
11
1
18
5
3
15
1
11
2
5
5
1
3
4
1
3
94
16
182
3
20
1
25
11
11
15
1
44
13
32
12
6
11
3
8
1
10
3
1
138
29
214
..._  1       1
15
Primary childhood behaviour disorders..	
1
6
31
Other and unspecified character, behaviour,
and intelligence disorders   	
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural
4
33
12
Epilepsy  	
Other diseases of the central nervous sys-
21
18
Observation without need for further medical (psychiatric) care   —
|
2
Total without psychosis.  	
2 |      2 |     2 | 265
105
112
35
379
144
523
11  1    21  1    18 1    12
701
656
210
87
940
776
1,716
 CREASE CLINIC AND PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
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 H 100
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
PART III.—THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL,
NEW WESTMINSTER
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
L. A. Kerwood, Medical Superintendent
PATIENT POPULATION
The Woodlands School.—On March 31st, 1961, the total cases on register,
including cases on probation, were 1,421. There were 1,398 cases in residence at
The Woodlands School.
Tranquille School.—On March 31st, 1961, there were 173 in residence at the
Tranquille School.
ADMISSIONS
During the year a Bed Bureau Section has been established in the Deputy
Superintendent's department. The Social Service Department has the function of
investigating and assessing family situations and indicating priority ratings, but the
maintenance of the official waiting-list and the heavy correspondence on the patients'
prospects of admission are now handled by the Bureau, which also controls all
admissions and discharges and all internal and external transfers.
The summer thirty-day admission programme provided a temporary stay at
The Woodlands School for 109 children. This programme was made possible by
using the beds of those pupils who returned to their homes during the summer
holiday period. It will be appreciated that these vacancies are mostly in our less
severely retarded wards.
The following table shows the movements of population during the fiscal year:—■
Male
Female
Total
752
16
635
-
1,387
22
Total as at April 1st, 1960     .
768
641
1,409
Admissions—
101
4
33
9
4
82
41
~2
183
Readmissions to a different institution of Mental Health Services 	
4
74
9
6
151
125
276
919
766
1,685
Separations—
10
85
6
47
1
12
8
69
296
3
11
18
Discharged in full from temporary care
Dird
154
15
73
Transferred to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale	
On probation and still out
4
23
161
126
287
+6
758
+5
640
+ 11
1,398
In residence, March 31st, 1'961_ __	
It should be noted that temporary admissions have not been identified within
the total admission group, although a separate entry has been made under " separations of cases discharged from temporary care."  One hundred and thirty-six of these
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
H 101
temporary admissions were granted an extension to their thirty-day stay (sixty-nine
males and sixty-seven females) and thirty-one thirty-day admission cases were
eventually certified (seventeen males and fourteen females). I would like to point
out the increasing use that is being made of the beds at the School. It should be
noted that with a total resident population of approximately 1,400, 663 patient
movements (admissions, discharges, and transfers) have occurred during the year.
This has been achieved on a basic staff calculated on long stay and slow turnover,
and it is my opinion that the medical and nursing divisions and the Social Service
Department are very fully occupied in keeping up with such a large patient-flow.
With the continuing expansion of the Provincial population, provision should
be made for increased bed facilities for those mentally subnormal individuals who
cannot be maintained in community or home without grave disturbance either to
the family or the community.
The development of other specialized facilities, such as residential homes for
the maladjusted, residential schools for the educationally subnormal, short-stay
hostels, day occupation centres, sheltered workshops, slow learners' classes in the
public school system, adequate diagnostic and counselling services to parents and
community, the utilization of foster homes, boarding homes, and group home care,
are all facilities which must be developed if there is not to be continuing pressures
on the residential school beyond the possibility of these being met. All these
developments are necessary for the proper management and control of the problem
of subnormality in this Province.
On January 23rd, 1961, a party of thirty-nine, including twenty-five members of
the Legislative Assembly and fourteen wives, accepted an invitation from the Minister
of Health Services and Hospital Insurance to visit the hospitals of the Mental Health
Services branch located in the Lower Mainland area. They are shown here as they
watched a swimming demonstration at The Woodlands School, New Westminster.
 H 102 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
The policy of decentralization of unit administration is reflected in the operations of this department during the last fiscal year. The establishment of Unit
Business Administrators, the establishment of monthly Business Managers' conferences, reorganization of many administrative policies and procedures have been
moves in the direction of unit administrative responsibility.
I am pleased to report that Mr. W. O. Booth, Business Manager, successfully
graduated from the Canadian Hospital Association extension course in hospital
organization and management with high credits.
During the past year a review of the administrative area has been made, and
many constructive recommendations and certain staff alterations have ensued. Organizational charts showing line and function have been formulated, and these will
serve as the background for effective planning and better administration. A payroll
clerk was promoted to office supervisor and a casual Clerk—Grade 2 hired to handle
the payroll responsibilities. A casual clerk-typist was hired to assist in the personnel area.
The Business Manager has now been relocated in a temporary new office, and
the general business section has been enlarged. Our reception and switchboard area
has been completely renovated, and the special psychiatric nurse has been replaced
by a clerk-receptionist. A considerable extra load of work was incurred by the
transfer of certain personnel functions, vouchering, and patients' accounts from
headquarters during October and December, 1960.
DIETARY DEPARTMENT
I am pleased to report that Mrs. J. Fremont, dietician, commenced duty on
July 11th, 1960. Her appointment has improved the dietary section considerably.
She has been active in in-service training programmes, rerostering of staff, changing
of menus, introduction of new diets, and increasing the number of salads and baked
desserts for the pupils. In September, 1960, Mrs. Fremont set up a course in
quantity cookery instruction for the dietary staff. This is given in conjunction with
the Vancouver Vocational Institute and British Columbia Dietetics Association.
In January, 1961, we held our first course in " Sanitation for Food Service Workers," carried on in conjunction with the Medical Health Officer of the Simon Fraser
Health Unit.    Seven hours of instruction were given to the kitchen helpers.
PHARMACY
The supervisory control of the pharmacy was transferred from the Medical
Superintendent's office to the Business Manager during the fiscal year 1960/61.
Mr. C. C. Wells was appointed to the position of Pharmacist on November 1st,
1960, and subsequently a Stockman—Grade 3 position was approved. Security
measures were recommended and structural alterations in the pharmacy area have
been carried out. The Woodlands School Pharmacy Committee was established,
consisting of both medical and administrative heads. This relates to the Mental
Health Services Branch Pharmacy Council, and we may look forward to a more
efficient pharmacy operation as a result.
CENTRAL SUPPLY
This department was established in 1959 as it was realized that internal control at The Woodlands School needed strengthening. All requisitions, invoices,
bills of lading, purchase orders, and other supply media flow through the Central
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL H 103
Supply area. Physical inventories and spot checks are made by the Central Supply
clerk on all wards and various departments. Inventory control is now centralized
in this area.
LAUNDRY
A Laundry Committee, established at the request of the Deputy Minister and
consisting of the Administrator, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, the Business Manager of the VaUeyview Hospital, Essondale, and the Business Manager of
The Woodlands School, reviewed the Mental Health Services laundry problems
and made recommendations for improvements to the service. It is hoped that
hereby the best possible use can be made of the existing facilities of the laundry at
the Provincial Mental Hospital.
HOUSEKEEPING
Many of the day-to-day housekeeping activities in The Woodlands School were
carried out with the help of the less severely retarded pupils, but with the transfer
of large numbers of these persons to Tranquille, difficulties were first experienced
in maintaining housekeeping services. The Building Service Worker staff has been
increased by the addition of one service worker to maintain all the stairwells, tunnels, etc., one addition to the office area, one window-washer, and two> wall-washers.
Our housekeeping staff now totals eight persons, under the leadership of Mr. W.
Newman.
Consideration is being given to introducing housekeeping at the ward level,
and surveys and time studies have been made and proposals put forth for the inauguration of this service.
TRANSPORTATION
The Transport Division, under the head of Mr. W. Wilson, has continued to
give maximum service during the past year.
The Co-ordinating Committee of the Auxiliary to The Woodlands School
kindly donated a land train for the School, which was completely overhauled and
put in good order under the direction of the transport supervisor with the helpful
co-operation of the Public Works Department. This has to date given much
pleasure to many of the pupils at The Woodlands School.
MEDICAL RECORDS
Medical records were transferred from the line supervision of the Medical
Superintendent to that of the Business Manager during 1960. Miss E. Henshaw
has been reclassified and placed in charge of Medical Records Division. Statistical
surveys have been undertaken, files have been reorganized, and a considerable
general procedural reorganization effected in this area. Much effort was put forth
by the supervisor of this department, together with the Unit Business Manager, in
assisting the Committee on Admissions and Discharges, which has been set up at
the request of the Deputy Minister, for review of procedures.
DENTAL DEPARTMENT
There were 3,929 dental procedures completed for the year ended March 31st,
1961.   Summary of work is as follows:—
Number of patients  1,674
Examinations      623
Prophylaxis and scaling      382
 H 104 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1960/61
Fillings  1,221
Extractions  937
Dentures  61
Dentures repaired or refined  22
Periodontal treatments   163
X-rays  93
Miscellaneous treatments   427
Patients treated on wards   68
EDUCATIONAL
During the year there was a maximum of 255 pupils enrolled in the school
classes. A complex arrangement had to be entered into between School Occupational Therapy and Recreational Therapy Departments so as to make the best possible use of available rooms and teachers. Certain children in the imbecile range
had to be excluded from school under a policy decision to make available to those
less severely retarded a fuller school-day. The school principal and her staff
responded very well to this challenging alteration of time-table and put in a very
considerable amount of time and effort in trying to achieve the maximum utilization
of teachers and staff to cover the maximum number of pupil-patients.
I am pleased also to report that after-school classes were instituted during the
year, the following clubs and attendances being started. These certainly enriched
the lives of the pupils here very much and were well worth while.
Girls' Glee Club  32
Country Dancing  16
Junior Boys' Choir  16
Girls' Orchestra  30
Boys' Orchestra  16
Drama Club (mixed)   10
Personal Development (girls)      6
Woodwork (boys)      9
Badminton (mixed)   13
Social Games (mixed)      8
Art (mixed)  12
Square Dancing (mixed)   16
Boys' Cooking Club    6
Rhythms (girls)   25
Fluteophone Band (boys)   12
LABORATORY
A total of 17,083 tests was performed by The Woodlands School laboratory
during the year March 31st to April 1st. The Coleman junior spectophotometer,
received through a Federal health grant, is now in full operation and has added to
the value of the work of this department. The department has also increased its
range of work to include urinary excretion of xanthurenic acid and metachromatic
granules, quantitative fascal fats, serum chlorides, and carbon dioxide combining
power.
MEDICAL STAFF
It was reported in last year's Annual Report that Dr. P. Hughes resigned on
January 31st, 1960. On October 17th, 1960, Dr. W. W. Laughland joined the staff
as Deputy Medical Superintendent.   Since that time he has made a valuable contri-
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL H 105
bution by operating the Bed Bureau, arranging all interward and interhospital
transfers, supervising the physicians' rostering, and many other medical administrative duties.
MENTAL RETARDATION TRAVELLING CLINIC
This clinic was established under Federal Mental Health Grants; it began to
function from November 17th, 1960. Its primary purpose was to provide diagnostic and counselling services in connection with cases on the waiting-list. By means
of a team operating as an out-patient clinic at the School and as a travelling clinic
elsewhere throughout the Province, several aims were defined:—
(1) Full evaluation and diagnosis of all cases on the waiting-list for proper
administration of admissions to the School.
(2) Examination of needs (medical, psychological, education, social, etc.) of
the individual cases on the waiting-list for appropriate service and assistance to the families concerned.
(3) Review of community facilities in order to stimulate development of additional resources which might
(a) relieve some of the pressures for admission;
(b) extend the work of caring for the mentally subnormal in the
community;
(c) realize more of the assets of the mentally subnormal citizens in
British Columbia.
FEMALE NURSING DIVISION
Education Programmes
From April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961, 119 psychiatric student-nurses
have received instruction and training at The Woodlands School. Forty-three full-
time and ten part-time psychiatric graduates have come on staff during this time.
This is almost double the quantity employed during the previous fiscal year. It is
felt, therefore, that the teaching programme organized at The Woodlands School
has been a benefit in staff recruitment. Student-nurses from the Royal Columbian
Hospital, New Westminster, spend two weeks of their senior year in a leadership
programme and one afternoon is spent at The Woodlands School.
Clinical Programme for Registered Nurses.—In January, 1961, five of these
nurses spent two weeks of their six months' training programme in psychiatric nursing, organized at Essondale, gaining experience in the care and development of the
retarded child at The Woodlands School.
Registered Nurses
Three positions were reclassified from Head Nurse to Superintendent of Nurses
—Grade 1 in April, 1960. Miss Pratt came on staff as Superintendent of Nurses—
Grade 1 to replace Mrs. A. McClymont, whose tragic death in a car accident
occurred in April, 1960. Miss R. Tinkiss was employed as Head Nurse for our
infectious-diseases area in November, 1960.
Patient Movements
Seventy-five female pupils have been transferred to Tranquille subsequent to
March 22nd.
Community Placement Programme at the Lodge (Girls' Rehabilitation Unit.)—■
Cooking classes commenced in October, 1960, under the direction of Mrs. R. Brand-
 H 106 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
ner, psychiatric charge nurse. Eighteen girls were involved in projects, making
small cakes for vending-machines for employee groups in communities and catering
for organizations as required. Cakes, sandwiches, and cookies were made by this
young adult group of patients.
Knitting for St. Mary's Hospital Auxiliary
The Superintendent of Nurses reports that there has been more emphasis placed
on the activation and motivation of pupils and an ever-increasing interest is shown
by the nursing staff. I would like to acknowledge the indebtedness of the administration to the enthusiasm and dedication of the nursing divisions, who are undoubtedly contributing a much richer and more satisfying programme each year for the
children at The Woodlands School. This is due, in great measure, to the enthusiasm
and leadership shown by the senior nursing personnel.
MALE NURSING DIVISION
Mr. William Russell left our service after eighteen years in the Government
service, and Mr. Harvey Sayer died, having given twenty-seven years of service.
Repetitive training classes have developed in various areas. The training programme in Ward 8, under the direction of Mr. Julius Erdelyi, has developed into
one of the outstanding such training programmes in British Columbia and is being
studied by many authorities in this field. In Ward 5, classes in self-care and diversified activities for cerebral-palsied pupils are progressing satisfactorily. In Ward 7
a programme in personal hygiene and self-care and the H Ward part-time classes for
junior severely retarded are developing satisfactorily.
Mention is also made by the Chief Psychiatric Male Nurse of the need for occupational therapy being developed for the more severely retarded adult pupils.
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
I regret to report that Mrs. P. Eydmann, M.A.O.T., who entered service in
July, 1960, resigned March 24th, 1961. Very good work has been done by the two
handicraft instructors in this department and by Miss Somers in the Cerebral Occupational Therapy Department. Arts and crafts of a diversional nature occupy a considerable amount of time and output of this department. The annual sale of the
Occupational Therapy Department was held in November. Net proceeds were
approximately $170.
PHYSICAL CARE AND THERAPEUTIC PROGRAMME
Infectious Diseases.—During the year the following infectious diseases were
notified to the public health authorities: Shigella sonnei, 11 cases; scarlet fever, 6
cases; mumps, 18 cases; chicken-pox, 30 cases; Shigella flexneri, 21 cases; paracolon, 1 case; erysipelas, 1 case.
PHYSIOTHERAPY
The following number of treatments were given in this department during the
year:—
Male  2,717
Female  2,389
Staff        30
Total  5,136
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
H 107
The consultant in orthopaedics has seen forty-nine patients during the year, and
three of these have received elective surgery. In January of 1961 we were fortunate
to secure the honorary consultant services of Dr. Pinkerton, Director of the G. F.
Strong Rehabilitation Centre, as a consultant in the cerebral palsy area, and his
services have been much appreciated.
PSYCHOLOGY
With the return of Miss H. Walter on May 1st, 1960, from her leave of absence
for study at the University of British Columbia, where she successfully completed
all her course work for her M.A. degree, the activities in the department showed
a general increase. I am pleased to report that Mr. Nuttall has continued his close
association with the Department of Psychology at the University and was also invited
to join the Faculty of the University of British Columbia summer session. A statistical breakdown of the operation of this department is appended.
Patient Testing Programme
Reports on referrals—
Written reports ...
Verbal reports	
1960/61   1959/60   1958/59
79
28
107
134
35
106
104
31
11
252
Reports for diagnostic clinics	
Reports for community placement and assessment
clinics 	
Other reports     22
Total reports completed   298
Miscellaneous Duties
Diagnostic clinics attended     83
Community placement and assessment clinics attended     69
Noon conferences	
Interdepartmental meetings 	
Lectures, tours, etc.	
Tests Administered
Vineland Social Maturity Scale 	
Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test	
Revised Stanford Binet Forms L and M  48
Stanford Binet Intelligence Scale Form LM  40
Draw a Person Test	
Bender Gestalt Test	
Goodenough Test of Intelligence by Drawing.
Rorschach 	
Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale 	
Wechsler Bellevue Intelligence Form I	
Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children...
Cattell Infant Intelligence Scale	
Arthur Point Scale	
Progressive Matrices (1938 and 1947) __..
23
10
7
87
82
32
11
212
1960/61
1959/60
83
115
69
33
149
113
39
22
23
28
1960/61
1959/60
180
154
92
88
127
63
47
53
22
49
73
48
21
40
50
32
23
32
12
20
18
 H 108 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Thematic Apperception Test     13 1
Weigl-Goldstein-Scheerer Colour Form Sorting Test       6 7
Mill Hill Vocabulary Scale       5 8
Griffiths Mental Development Scale       5 8
Symonds Picture Story Test       4 2
Kent Emergency Scales       3 1
Los Angeles Diagnostic Tests       3        	
Make a Picture Story Test       2 14
Children's Apperception Test       1        	
Kent-Rosanoff Word Association Test       1        	
Other   6
Total tests administered  740 594
PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT
We are pleased to report that the following major projects have been commenced or completed during the past year:—
(1) Plans for the renovation of Nurses' Home 2 and its utilization as administrative and laboratory facility.
(2) J Ward has been completely renovated.
(3 ) Playground fences have been installed.
(4) A start has been made on toilet access and playground toilets.
(5) Fire regulations have been prepared by management and procedures
printed by the Department of Public Works.
(6) A major sewage blockage occurred in September, 1960, which resulted in
the replacement of our main sewer-line through the British Columbia
Penitentiary property.
(7) Street-lighting was installed.
(8) Storm-sewers were installed at the auditorium.
(9) Curbing was installed at the back entrance road.
RADIOLOGY DEPARTMENT
The following work was accomplished during this past year:—
Chests survey  768
Chests X-rayed  2,405
Shoulders  7
Pelvis  13
Abdomens  36
Spines  41
Hips  3
Gall-bladders  3
Mandibles  9
Extremities ....  275
Nasal sinuses  3
Skulls  186
Noses  11
Ribs  6
I.V.P.S  9
Total  3,773
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
H 109
RECREATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT
Staff changes in this area were as follows: Mr. C. A. Balfry, Chief Instructor,
resigned at the beginning of July, 1960, at which time Mrs. H. Lindo took over in
this position; Mrs. Lindo resigned on April 10th, 1961, and Mrs. E. Thornton came
on staff as Chief Instructor on June 1st, 1961. In the intervening few weeks Mr. R.
Poll was Acting Chief Instructor.
In general this has been a successful year in the Recreational Therapy Department, and good use has been made of the physical facilities.
Recreation has been carried further forward into the more severely retarded
areas with the active participation of nursing staff.
SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT
The complement of this department has been increased from two to five social
workers, and the amount of service that we have been able to give, both to pupils
and to persons on the waiting-list, has increased proportionately. A representative
month for comparison might be of some interest. For example, February, 1960,
compared with February, 1961, is as follows:— Feb., i960       Feb., i96i
Families contacted directly  32 106
Type of contact—
Home visits  12 42
Orientations     6
Office interviews     2
Telephone calls  12
Collateral interviews  —
17
138
35
Visitors to The Woodlands School are always impressed when they see the various
training programmes demonstrated. Here, Mr. Julius Erdelyi, a teacher, and a few
of the boys in his classes show some of their achievements.
 H 110 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
The supervisor of the Social Service Department, in his annual report, makes
certain comments which I think are relevant and which will therefore be quoted:—
"A careful selection of pupils for casework services has been adopted. This
selection is provided through the community placement programme, which is a series
of weekly team sessions for the review and assessment of pupils who are likely candidates for return to their own homes, foster or boarding care. . . . This committee
has reviewed 128 pupils (59 men and 69 women) whose intellectual ability is in
the high imbecile range or better. With each review, a plan of treatment and the
date to report progress is established; thus these pupils are kept before the vision
of administration. The pupils we have reviewed in this programme are predominantly older, and their families have either lost interest in them or are too elderly to
give them care in the family home. For these pupils we need boarding homes with
programmes of financial maintenance, occupation, and recreation. These are not
available, and the lack of them is a serious handicap to rehabilitation. Many of the
pupils are of an intellectual ability comparable to many citizens who are financially
independent. Our pupils need the opportunity of being trained in vocations commensurate with their aptitude. . . . The training-on-the-job programme of the
Provincial rehabilitation office is our most appropriate training plan, but it is dependent upon finding a willing employer. . . . Employment of a director of training
who would co-ordinate the potential areas of training and set standards of vocational
training that would be comparable to commercial demands is urgently needed."
THE TRANQUILLE SCHOOL
Patient-care (Nursing Department)
Male Division.—Total establishment, twenty-nine. The staff has been increased
by one psychiatric aide, making a total of five nurses and twenty-two psychiatric
aides.
Female Division.—Total establishment, twenty-nine. During the latter part of
March the Female Nursing Division was opened. The present complement for this
department, with the first floor in the main building in use, is made up as follows:
One charge nurse; two assistant charge nurses; four psychiatric nurses; eight psychiatric aides.
Patient Population
Male.—At the beginning of the year there was a total population of 109; at
the end of the year, a total of 147.
Female.—Twenty-six female patients were transferred from The Woodlands
School on March 22nd, 1961, with further groups to be received on the 5th and 19th
of April.
Patient Movement
Male.—During the year nine patients were returned to The Woodlands School
for medical, surgical, or behaviour problems. Forty-seven were transferred from
The Woodlands School during the year.
Medical and Dental Attention
At Tranquille School medical and dental services are given by local arrangements with physicians and dentists in the community.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
STATISTICAL TABLES
H HI
THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
Table 1.—Movement of Population, The Woodlands School, New Westminster, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Male
Female
Total
752
16
635
6
1,387
22
Total as at April 1st, 1960  _ 	
768
641
1,409
Admissions—■
101
4
33
9
4
82
41
2
183
Readmissions to a different institution of Mental Health Services	
4
74
9
Transfers from Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale 	
6
151
125
276
919
766
1,685
Separations—
10
85
6
47
1
12
8
69
9
26
3
11
18
154
Died                                           	
15
73
4
23
161
126
287
Net increase or decrease.	
In residence, March 31st, 1961	
+6
758
+5
640
+ U
1,398
 H 112
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table 2.—First Admissions to The Woodlands School by Health Unit
and School District of Residence and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March
31st, 1961.
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
Simon  Fraser,   New  Westmin
School District No. 3    ,.
2
2
ster—
„   5	
1
1
School District No. 40	
4
4
8
„   18......   ...
1
1
„   43	
4
1
5
Selkirk, Nelson—
North Fraser Valley, Mission—
School District No. 7	
1
1
2
School District No. 42  _.
1
3
4
„   10	
2
2
„   75 	
1
1
West Kootenay, Trail—
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 9 ....
1
1
School District No. 47	
1
1
2
 11    ..
5
2
7
„   72	
1
1
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 15	
3
3
School District No. 50 	
1
1
 16	
2
2
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
„   77	
1
1
School District No. 59	
1
	
1
North Okanagan, Vernon—
„   60	
1
1
School District No. 21	
1
1
2
Victoria-Esquimalt   Union
„   78	
1
1
Board of Health-
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 61 (part1)
3
5
8
School District No. 24
4
2
6
Saanich and South Vancouver
Cariboo, Prince George—
Island—
School District No. 27	
1
1
School District No. 61 (part2)
3
1
4
 57	
1
3
4
 62	
1
1
2
Upper   Fraser   Valley,   Chilli
„   63	
2
	
2
wack—
Central Vancouver Island, Na
School District No. 33	
3
3
naimo—■
„   34	
4
1
5
School District No. 67	
1
	
1
Boundary, Cloverdale—
 68   ...
4
1
5
School District No. 35- _
1
	
1
 70	
2
1
3
, 36	
7
3
10
„   79	
1
1
„   37	
1
.
1
School districts not covered by
Metropolitan   Health   Commit
health units—
tee, Vancouver—
School District No. 46	
1
1
School District No. 38	
2
2
4
 48 -
1
1
2
 39	
25
24
49
„   61 (part3)
2
2
4
 41 _	
7
5
12
Unorganized.  	
3
	
3
„   44	
8
2
10
„   45	
1
1
2
Totals    _	
110
83
193
1 Includes Victoria and Esquimalt only.
2 Excludes Victoria, Esquimalt, and Oak Bay.
3 Includes Oak Bay only.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
H 113
Table 3.—First Admissions and Readmissions to The Woodlands School
by Method of Admission, Age-group, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to
March 31st, 1961.
Age-group (Years)
Method of Admission
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.|F. 1M. [F. |M.1F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
First Admissions
1
1
17
~1
6
~1
"~3
15
3
3
8
1
3
2
i
1
-j
~2
2
2
_...
1
19
1
89
17
I 66
1
2
__
5
16
4
3
29
4
22
36
Urgency	
Temporary admission.....
....
1
155
Totals	
 |    3| 21[ 15| 32| 26
19|    7| 14| 18| 101 11
6|    1|    4
2|    4|_..._.
110| 83|    193
Readmissions
Warrant 	
—
—-
2
1
i
3
6
7
10
4
5
2
6
3
15
1
2
1
1
5
2
1
2
	
3
	
1
20
20
1?
1
33
Temporary admission....
291     49
Totals	
	
3
i
9
17
9
2
6
18
3
2
5
2
3
	
3
41
42
83
Table 4.—First Admissions and Readmissions to The Woodlands School by
Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st,
1961.
Age-group (Years)
Total
Mental Diagnosis
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.  F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
First Admissions1
Mental deficiency—
Idiocy and imbecility-
Moron _	
Border-line intelligence 	
Mongolism	
—
i
i
i
15
3
1
2
13
1
1
19
8
1
4
16
5
2
3
9
7
1
2
3
2
2
2
9
1
2
5
10
1
2
2
3
4
1
2
4
4
1
__
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
~~2
2
47
16
10
16
40
8
13
8
87
24
23
24
Totals 	
 |    3| 211 151 32] 26
19|    7|  14|  18|  10|  11
61    1|    4|    2
4|
110| 83
193
Readmissions3
I
1
Mental deficiency—
Idiocy and imbecility-
Moron     	
Border-line intelli-
-—
3
1
6
1
14
1
5
3
2
1
4
3
11
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
	
1
1
19
13
21
15
40
28
:::
z:|z:
	
~2
1
1
1
—-
1
2
1
	
1
	
1
	
5
4
1
5
<;
Mongolism 	
4
	
	
9
Totals	
3
1
9
17
9
2
61  18
3
2
5
2
3
	
3
—
41
42
83
1 Of the first admissions, 68 had epilepsy:   37 idiots and imbeciles, 20 morons, 7 border-line intelligence,
and 4 mongols.
2 Of the readmissions, 40 had epilepsy:   20 idiots and imbeciles, 16 morons, 2 border-line intelligence, and
2 mongols.
 H 114
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table 5.-—-First Admissions to The Woodlands School by Mental Diagnosis,
Years of Schooling, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 6.—First Admissions to The Woodlands School by Citizenship,
Age-group, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 7.—First Admissions to The Woodlands School by Religion and Sex,
April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 8.—First Admissions to The Woodlands School by Previous Occupation and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
Table 9.—Resident Population of The Woodlands School by Mental
Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, December 31st, 1960
Age
-group (Years)
Total
Mental Diagnosis
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.iF.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Mental deficiency—
Idiocy   and   imbe
1
cility 	
1
20
16
32
40
50
37
87j 77   791 69
67
61
391 41
37
56
411
3981   809
1
11
6
17
1
36
201 431 29
43
39]    81 16
I      1
10
17
173
1291   302
Border-line   intelli
gence	
1
1
2
1
2
10
4) 12|    6
12]    31   7]    4
31    4
47
251     72
Mongolism	
1
	
15
6
31
17
19
23| 28| 17
18) 231    91    9
9|    51130
1001   230
Other and unspecified
1
1      1
1
1      1
types. 	
	
11    1     2
2
2
5|    3|    1
4
3
3|_
15| 12]     27
Schizophrenic dis
1
1
1
1      I
orders  	
...... |_
-__-
—
- 1- 1	
_—| _.
71-
71-- I       7
Totals
I    1
1
22
17
60| 55| 96| 59
1      .      1
154|129|165|122
1      1      1
144|1291 631 70
1      1      1
79] 82
1
783|664]l,447i
1      1
1 Includes 135 males and 147 females with epilepsy.
Table 10.—Resident Population of The Woodlands School by Mental
Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex, December 31st, 1960
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
H 115
Table 11.—Live Discharges from The Woodlands School by Mental Diagnosis, Condition on Discharge, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st,
1961.
Condition on Discharge
Mental Diagnosis
Recovered
Much
Improved
Improved
Unimproved
Total
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Mental deficiency—
56
43
15
22
40
38
7
16
56
45
20
22
40
39
11
16
96
2
5
1
4
84
Border-line intelligence	
Mongolism	
31
38
7
5
136
101
143
106
249
Note.—Of the above cases, 76 had epilepsy;   36 idiots and imbeciles, 24 morons, 9 border-line intelligence,
and 7 mongols.
Table 12.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in The Woodlands
School by Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to
March 31st, 1961.
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
Under
1
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Live Discharges1
Mental deficiency—■
Idiocy and imbecility- 	
1
1
9
2
2
5
1
17
5
2
6
18
5
1
3
10
6
1
1
3
2
3
10
1
1
5
12
6
4
7
5
7
1
3
1
1
7
10
6
1
3
6
3
2
6
2
4
3
2
6
3
3
3
1
1
3
5
1
56
45
20
22
40
39
11
16
96
84
Border-line   intelligence 	
Mongolism 	
31
38
Totals 	
__|    2| 13|    6
30| 271  18|    5
15| 23
23|    6
24|  14| 15|  14
5]    9|143|106|   249
Deaths2
Mental deficiency—
Idiocy and imbecility
—
__.
	
1
2
1
—
1
1
2
—-
1
3
1
1
1
	
.._.
	
5
1
6
1
1
1
11
2
1
1
Moron   .
Border-line   intelligence	
Mongolism..— 	
Totals	
—
	
	
—
1
3
—
2
2
	
1
4
1
1
—
6
9
15
1 Of the live discharges, 76 had epilepsy;  36 idiots and imbeciles, 24 morons, 9 border-line intelligence, and
7 mongols.
2 Of the cases who died, 6 idiots and imbeciles had epilepsy.
 H 116
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table 13.— Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in The Woodlands
School by Mental Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex, April 1st, 1960,
to March 31st, 1961.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
Table 14.—Deaths Occurring in The Woodlands School by Cause of Death,
Age-group, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Age-group (Years)
Cause of Death
1-3
4-6
7-9
10-14
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
—-
1
1
1
1
—
1
~1
__
1
—
1
1
1
1
1
1
	
1
—
—
1
2
1
2
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
Diseases  of the  central  nervous
3
2
Diseases of the digestive system	
Diseases of the musculo-skeletal
4
1
Congenital malformations „ 	
3
Totals _	
1
3
—
2
2
	
1
4
1
—
—
._...
—
—
6
9
15
Table 15.—Deaths Occurring in The Woodlands School by Cause of Death,
Length of Stay, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 3 1st, 1961
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
TRANQUILLE SCHOOL
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Tranquille School,
April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
H 117
Male
Female
Total
In residence, April 1st, 1960	
109
1
109
1
Total as at April 1st, I960.	
no
47
26
110
73
157
26
183
Separations—
1
9
1
9
10
10
+38
147
+26
26
+64
In residence, March 31st, 1961  	
173
Table 2.—Transfers to Tranquille School by Mental Diagnosis and
Age-group, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
7-9
15-19
20-29
30-39
40-49
50-59
rt
O
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M. 1 F.
1
M.
F.
M.
F.
c
rt
u
o
Mental deficiency—
"I
—
3
5
4
"T
7
7
3
1
2
4
"l
6
1
3
2
1
6
~3
3
1
2
2
—
1
3
16
16
6
9
6
16
~~4
??
32
6
Mongolism   —
13
Totals  	
1
—
12
1
181
7
12
10
4
4
--
4
47
26
73
1 Includes 1 moron readmission.
Note.—Of the above cases, 4 had epilepsy:   1 imbecile and 3 morons.
Table 3.—Resident Male Population of Tranquille School by Mental
Diagnosis and Age-group, December 31st, 1960
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
Total
15-19
20-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Mental deficiency—
4
4
22
20
3
11
21
5
2
2
14
14
1
1
61
39
6
18
Totals
8
56
30
30
1241
1 Includes 8 with epilepsy.
Table 4.—Resident Male Population of Tranquille School by Mental
Diagnosis and Length of Stay, December 31st, 1960
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 H 118 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
PART IV.—PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME, COLQUITZ
REPORT OF MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
L. G. C. d'Easum, Medical Superintendent
In September, 1960, Mr. D. Logan, Chief Psychiatric Nurse—Grade 1, retired,
having reached the age of superannuation after thirty-three years of service. Mr. J.
Lowndes was promoted to Chief Psychiatric Nurse—Grade 1, replacing Mr. Logan.
One psychiatric nurse and one psychiatric aide left the service during the year on
transfer to another department. We were fortunate in being able to fill the nurse
vacancy with a graduate from the nursing-school at Essondale. The other vacancy
was filled by the engagement of a psychiatric aide. The percentage of psychiatric
aides to the total nursing staff is approximately 40 per cent.
The patient population on April 1st, 1960, was 288, and on March 31st, 1961,
it was 288.
During the year fourteen patients were transferred to this institution from the
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, and five patients were transferred from this
institution to the Provincial Mental Hospital.
Two patients were discharged in full, one being discharged on transfer to the
Ontario hospital at St. Thomas, Ont. Three patients were discharged on probation,
and one was returned from probation.
During the year fourteen patients were seen by the Appeal Board. In each
case the Board recommended the patients be detained.
There were five patient deaths during the year, most of these occurring in the
old-age group, which now numbers over sixty patients.
During the year a number of patients were allowed to go home on leave for
varied periods of time, from a week-end to two or three weeks. These patients have
always returned on the appointed date and have not abused their privileges.
As always, the Vancouver Island Chest Clinic has been most co-operative and
has made regular visits to the Home with a portable X-ray unit to X-ray both patients
and staff.
Throughout the year the general health of the patients was good, and there were
no epidemics of any kind to report. Dr. S. S. Avren and Dr. W. Dempsey continued
to care for the physical and dental needs of the patients respectively.
Industrial and Occupational Therapy Department
These two departments were kept busy during the year, and both occupational-
therapy shops were utilized to the fullest. In the various crafts of ceramics, art
metalwork, leatherwork, and woodwork of all kinds, as well as maintenance of
buildings, the two occupational-therapy shops had quite a busy year. A large number of toys were made, others repaired, and taken to the Cosmopolitan Club in
Victoria for distribution to needy families at Christmas.
A group of patients was kept busy during the year, working under supervision,
repairing and maintaining the buildings and equipment. A considerable amount of
redecorating was also done.
A large book-case, a clothes-cabinet for patients' working-clothes in their outside sitting-room, a clothes-cupboard for cooks in the kitchen, a large cabinet for
bread, a tool-cabinet for the greenhouse, plus other smaller cupboards in various
 PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME
H 119
places of the buildings have been built, installed, and painted or varnished during
the year.
The fire-escape at the east end of the main building, which was in very bad
condition, was replaced with a metal one. The fire-fighting equipment was checked
regularly and found to be in satisfactory condition when inspected by the Saanich
Fire Department.
Tailor and Shoe Shop
During the year five patients were kept occupied in the tailor and shoe shop,
and many articles were made and supplied to the stores.
Laundry
The laundry has continued to work to capacity. The amount of work done
was around 3,500 pounds each week and approximately 1,000 blankets a year.
Once again this department was called upon to launder the linen used in the legislative dining-room during the sitting of the Provincial Legislature.
Machinery in the laundry continued to give good service, and Mr. Devine, the
laundryman, reports that he can see no need for added expenditures in the coming
year.
Recreation
A total of thirteen band and variety concerts was presented to the patients this
year. These entertainments were put on by various groups of interested Victoria
citizens, and all were very much appreciated and well attended. In addition to these
concerts, the regular programmes of television, radio, and picture shows were
continued.
Weather permitting, the recreation court was in daily use during the summer
months, and in the winter months the more active patients were allowed outside to
exercise on the cement sidewalks on the inside of the enclosure.
Three sightseeing bus tours were arranged for during the year, and these are
always enjoyed very much by the patients participating.
The Canadian Legion and the Red Cross continued to supply comforts for the
ex-servicemen monthly.
Christmas gifts for the patients were contributed by the Canadian Mental
Health Association, Canadian Legion, the combined Women's Institutes, and the
Salvation Army.
The Public Library Commission continued to supply a library for the institution, books being changed three times yearly.
The spiritual needs of the patients were cared for by the Salvation Army and
Protestant churches on alternate Sundays.
 H 120
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
STATISTICAL TABLES
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz,1
April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Number
In residence, April 1st, 1960  288
On probation, carried forward from 1959/60       1
On escape, carried forward from 1959/60       1
Total as at April 1st, 1960  290
Admissions—Transfers from Provincial Mental Hospital     14
Total under care
Separations—
304
Discharged in full  3
Died  . 5
Transferred to Provincial Mental Hospital  6
On probation and still out  1
On escape but not discharged  1
Total separations
16
Net increase or decrease	
In residence, March 31st, 1961.
1 This institution cares for male patients only.
288
Table 2.—Transfers to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by Health
Unit and School District of Residence, April 1st, 1960, to March
31st, 1961.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
Table 3.—Transfers to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by Method of
Admission and Age-group, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Age-group (Years)
Method of Admission
15-
19
20-
24
25-
29
30-
34
35- 1 40- I 45- 1 50-
39   I   44   1   49   1   54
55-
59
60-
64
65-
69
70
and
Over
Total
1
1
2
2
2
....    | ....    1 ....    |    1
1    | ....    1    1    | ....
1
1
1
7
7
Totals	
1
3
2
2
1    1 ....    |    1    1    1
1
—
—
2
14
 PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME
H 121
Table 4.—Transfers to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by Mental
Diagnosis and Age-group, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
15-
19
20-
24
25-
29
30-
34
I          1          1
35- I 40- 1 45- I 50-
39   I   44   I   49   1   54
1          1          I
55-
59
60-
64
65-
69
70
and
Over
Total
Schizophrenic disorders	
Psychosis with cerebral arterio-
1
z.
....
....
1
1
....
1
....
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
9
1
Totals 	
1
3
2
2
1    1 ....
1
1
1
._.    | ....
|
2
14
Table 5.—Transfers to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by Mental
Diagnosis and Marital Status, April 1st, 1960, to March 3 1st, 1961
Table 6.—Transfers to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by Mental
Diagnosis and Years of Schooling, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 7.—Transfers to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by Citizenship
and Age-group, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 8.—Transfers to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by Religion,
April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 9.—Transfers to Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by Previous
Occupation, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
 H 122
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
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 PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME
H 123
Table 11.—Resident Population of Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by
Mental Diagnosis and Number of Previous Admissions, December 31st,
1960.
Table 12.—Resident Population of Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by
Mental Diagnosis and Length of Stay, December 3 1st, 1960
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
Table 13.—Live Discharges from Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by
Mental Diagnosis and Condition on Discharge, April 1st, 1960, to
March 31st, 1961.
Mental Diagnosis
Condition on Discharge
Improved       Unimproved
Total
Schizophrenic disorders—
Manic-depressive reaction-
Pathological personality-—
Immature personality	
Totals	
Table 14.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Provincial
Mental Home, Colquitz, by Mental Diagnosis and Age-group, April
1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961.
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
Total
20-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-44
45-49
50-54
55-59
60-64
65-69
70 and
Over
Live Discharges
Schizophrenic disorders ...
Manic-depressive reaction
Inadequate personality
Immature personality	
1
....
1
1
....
2
1
....
_..
2
1
6
1
1
1
1
—
—
2
....    |    ....    |      2    |      1
—
-.    |      3    |      9
Deaths
Schizophrenic disorders	
Syphilis and its sequelae	
Paranoia and paranoid
states 	
—
....
—
-
1
1
1
....
1
1
3
1
1
Totals	
....
....
....
—
—
1
1
—
1
....
2
5
Table 15.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Provincial
Mental Home, Colquitz, by Mental Diagnosis and Length of Stay,
April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 H 124
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table 16.—Deaths Occurring in Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by
Cause of Death and Age-group, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Cause of Death
Age-group (Years)
Total
45-49
50-54
55-59
60-64
65-69
70 and
Over
1
1
—
1
-
1
1
3
Arteriosclerosis	
1
1
Totals.	
1
1
....     1        1
....      |        2
1
5
Table 17.—Deaths Occurring in Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, by
Cause of Death and Age-group, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION H 125
PART V.—GERIATRIC DIVISION
REPORT OF MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
B. F. Bryson, Medical Superintendent
During the fiscal year 1960/61 the three units of the Geriatric Division of the
Mental Health Services provided special medical and psychiatric care for over 1,500
elderly citizens of the Province.
The need for this special care is again reflected in the record number of new
applications received for the admission of patients of 70 years or over. During the
year a total of 406 requests was received, representing an increase of nineteen over
the previous year, and averaging more than one new application per day. The
greatest number, of course, was received from the Lower Mainland and Vancouver
Island for admission to VaUeyview Hospital and totalled 304, an increase of twenty-
six over the previous twelve months. From the Okanagan and Kootenay areas of
the Province, new applications for admission to Dellview Hospital increased only
slightly, to a total of ninety-one. However, there was a significant decrease in
requests for admission to Skeenaview Hospital, with a total of only eleven, compared to twenty for the previous year. Of the total number of applications received,
228 were for women and 178 for men.
The Medical Superintendent has continued to follow the policy of allotting
vacancies in the three units to those most in need of the special environment and
treatment facilities provided in each unit, and to arrange for admission to the unit
which is closest to the home and family of each patient, wherever possible. In addition, every effort is made to obtain as much information as possible concerning each
new application in order to evaluate the relative urgency of each case. A great deal
of time has been spent by the Medical Superintendent through interviews with
family members, or by telephone and correspondence with physicians, social
agencies, boarding- and nursing-home proprietors, and general hospital authorities,
in this respect. The appointment of a social service worker to the VaUeyview staff
in May has been of great help in this regard. In a significant number of cases,
advice has been given, or assistance provided whereby alternate sources of care
were found and, proving satisfactory, removed the need for admission to the Geriatric Division. The Medical Superintendent has also had the opportunity, by invitation, on several occasions during the year, to speak to various community agencies
interested in the welfare and treatment of elderly citizens. These invitations were
very welcome and provided opportunity to inform many interested persons as to the
purpose and functions of the Geriatric Division, and to discuss the many ways that
communities and individuals can carry out measures to reduce emotional problems
in our aged population and reduce the need for hospitalization in many cases.
Increased accommodation provided at VaUeyview Hospital during the year,
along with greater pre-admission service and increased separations, made it possible
to reduce the accumulation of applications on file to a significant degree. During
the year 377 applicants were accepted from the community, of which 212 were
required to wait for less than a month after receipt of application. All acutely
urgent cases were accepted immediately. At the Terrace and Vernon units all
requests for admission of men could be accommodated without delay. During the
latter portion of the year the waiting-list for admission of women to the Dellview
Hospital was eliminated for the first time since the opening of this unit.   At the end
 H 126 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
of the fiscal year there were no patients awaiting admission to the Skeenaview or
Dellview Hospitals, and there were a few vacancies available at each unit.
As in past years, the number of direct admissions to Skeenaview did not utilize
all the vacancies which occurred at that unit, so that a number of beds became
available for the care of patients who had been admitted originally to the Essondale
institutions. On June 28th, 1960, nineteen men were transferred from the Provincial Mental Hospital to the Terrace unit via Canadian Pacific Airlines, and constituted the first transfer of a patient-group of this number by air. No difficulties
were encountered, and all patients enjoyed the experience. This method of transportation was found to be of distinct advantage over the long and tedious journey
by rail, as patients were not fatigued with only a three-hour journey, escorting staff
were able to return to duty the following day, and costs were reduced. The ready
co-operation and courteous attention of all C.P.A. personnel involved in making
the arrangements and during the flight made this transfer a pleasant and efficient
experience for both patients and accompanying staff.
With the opening of the two admitting wards in the VaUeyview Building during
the latter part of the year, it was possible to increase the resident population at
VaUeyview by seventy-three. As will be noticed in the accompanying tables, the
resident population in the three units totalled 1,238 as of March 31st, 1961, representing an over-all increase of fifty-nine. Total admissions to the Division numbered
408, including 215 men and 193 women. Of this number, 269 were first admissions
directly from the community to the three units, while 116 were admitted for the first
time to the Provincial Mental Hospital and later transferred to VaUeyview Hospital.
The remainder reflects the few readmissions and transfers to the three units of the
Geriatric Division.
Separations due to death totalled 303, an increase of fifty-two compared to the
previous year, and reflects the increasing debility and advanced age of many patients
resident in the three units. The average age of our patients is slightly over 80 for
both men and women. Although separations due to discharge in full, which numbered only nine, were much fewer than the previous year, it was possible to discharge
on probation an additional eleven, which together bring a total of twenty men and
women, a slight increase over the previous year, who were rehabilitated to their
homes or other sources of community care. Again, as a result of the brief services
of a social worker at VaUeyview, it was possible to lay the groundwork for a probationary rehabilitative programme which will be developed extensively during the
coming year when full-time social workers are available, and which will make
possible the return of many more improved patients to the community.
A census of the resident population of the three units of the Geriatric Division
was taken on December 31st. The results have been tabulated by mental diagnosis,
age, and sex, as shown in Table 10 of each unit.
Valleyview Hospital
The past year has again seen further progress in the provision of increased
accommodation, additions of staff, and new services for the many elderly men and
women resident at Valleyview Hospital.
As of March 31st, 1961, the resident population totalled 730, including 246
men and 484 women. This represents an increase of seventy-three over the number
in residence at the end of the previous fiscal year, and was a result of the opening
of the final two wards in Valleyview Building. On April 5th, 1960, Ward X 4
became available as the first admitting ward at Valleyview and made possible the
direct admission of female patients from the community to this unit.   Following the
 GERIATRIC DIVISION H 127
recruitment of further staff during the summer months, Ward Y 4 was opened as an
admitting ward for male patients. Since that time all six wards in the VaUeyview
Building have been fully occupied.
With the opening of the admitting wards, it was possible to evacuate two of the
older buildings, which are greatly in need of repair and renovation and, in their
present state, are quite unsuitable for the care of elderly patients. Wards V.V. 1
and V.V. 10 have therefore remained empty pending plans for renovation, but will
be avaUable for further accommodation in the future when renovation has been
completed.
The procurement of complete admitting services appropriate for the reception
of geriatric patients has been a major advance, and it is felt that a high standard of
geriatric care and treatment has been reached for the residents at Valleyview. The
general health of this patient-group has remained very satisfactory throughout the
year, and there have been no major medical problems or epidemics.
The Medical Superintendent has been ably assisted during the year by Dr. W.
Lazorko and Dr. K. Greer, who have continued to show sincere interest in the health
and general welfare of their patients. On May 9th Dr. G. Kovacs joined the Valleyview medical staff and has contributed loyally to the increasing medical needs of
this expanding patient-group. Geriatric medicine is becoming increasingly important and demands skill and understanding on the part of physicians who are faced
with the special medical and psychiatric problems of the elderly patients.
The services of the specialist consultant staff of the Mental Hospital have again
played an important part in the care of Valleyview patients. During the year a
total of 224 men and women was referred for consultation for a wide range of ailments. Nearly half of this number was for surgical problems of varying severity.
A total of 134 surgical procedures was required, all of which were carried out in
the Crease Clinic Surgical Department. A large number of major surgical procedures was successfully performed on patients of advanced age, indicating that
age in itself is now no deterrent to surgeons, and our most elderly citizens can also
benefit and be relieved of pain and distress by modern surgical skill.
Infectious illnesses have been minimal throughout the year, with only the usual
seasonal increases of pneumonia and upper respiratory conditions during the fall and
spring months. Several cases of Salmonella intestinal infection have been discovered
in newly admitted patients, but with immediate isolation and treatment no outbreaks
occurred among other patients. Due to improved infirmary facilities, increased
medical and nursing services, and the general use of germicidal cleansing agents by
the housekeeping and nursing staff, the previously difficult problem of staphylococcal
skin infections has been reduced to a minimum.
The annual survey for tuberculous chest infection was also carried out during
the year, and all patients received chest X-rays where indicated. Although the
results in several cases were at first suspicious, and the patients transferred to North
Lawn for further investigation, final assessment did not reveal any patients with
active infection. This aspect of patient-care was carried out under the direction of
Dr. Kilgour, of the Division of Tuberculosis Control.
The tranquillizing medications continue to be an important form of therapy in
the treatment of geriatric patients, and are most useful in the care of newly admitted
patients where anxiety, excessive restlessness, or marked depression is a prominent
feature of their illness. Approximately 40 per cent of the patients are receiving this
type of therapy for varying periods of time. In most cases this form of treatment
can be discontinued as the patient becomes adjusted to the hospital environment.
The prime approach in the treatment of the emotionally disturbed elderly
person, however, is directed toward assessment of the factors that contributed to
 H 128 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
the problem necessitating admission, and the provision of an environment that will
provide a sense of security and belonging for the individual, and which will provide
opportunities for regaining a feeling of independence and a sense of accomplishment.
Adequate diet, regularized living habits, correction of physical defects where possible, activity commensurate with physical ability, manual and social interests of
varying degrees of complexity, and, primarily, the friendship and patient understanding of all who come in contact with the elderly person provide the therapeutic
total environment which is required. This approach involves the close co-operation
and teamwork of all departments and staff within the hospital, and which has been
most evident and gratifying in Valleyview Hospital during the year.
An additional health service became available with the opening of the Valleyview Dental Department and the appointment of Dr. G. Campbell and his dental
assistant, Miss J. Thompson, in December. Since that time many patients have
benefited by dental care which could not be provided previously. Proper attention
to denture care, fillings, and extractions of decayed teeth are often of prime importance in the maintenance of optimum health in elderly patients. Dr. Campbell also
provides dental service to the patients in the North Lawn Building, thus reducing
the pressure of work on the West Lawn Dental Department.
The Valleyview X-ray Department has operated efficiently under the technical
direction of Dr. Jackson, Crease Clinic radiologist, and Miss G. Fuller, X-ray technician. During the year a total of 2,326 patients and staff was examined, involving
the processing of 3,579 films, including many complex procedures, such as stomach
and intestinal investigations with barium and kidney and gall-bladder visualization.
Most staff X-rays were for routine annual chest examinations as recommended by
the Division of Tuberculosis Control. A total of 1,794 films was taken for this
purpose on staff and patients, and were referred to Dr. Kilgour for assessment and
recording.
The Valleyview laboratory has also provided a comprehensive diagnostic service under the capable direction of Miss K. Piro, laboratory technician. During the
year a wide range of diagnostic procedures was carried out, including 1,368 blood
examinations, 205 biochemical estimations, 803 urinalyses, and 5,648 bacteriological examinations. Pathological service has been provided regularly by Dr. G.
Nicolson, Crease Clinic pathologist, who performed eighty-three post-mortem examinations at Valleyview Hospital, representing an autopsy rate of 45 per cent.
The Physiotherapy Department was operative for only a portion of the year
due to the unavailabiUty of trained physiotherapists during the months of June, July,
and August. However, during most of the fiscal year this important medical service
was provided by Miss Sylvia Morissette, who resigned at the end of May, and Miss
E. Roemmele, who took charge of this department in September. During the year
a total of 2,936 treatments was given to 250 patients.
Valleyview nursing services have continued throughout the year at a high
standard under the efficient and devoted leadership of Miss E. Johnstone, R.N.,
Superintendent of Nurses, and all patients have benefited from the skilled attention
and sympathetic understanding provided by the Valleyview nursing staff. There are
now nine female and five male wards in operation at this unit providing varying
types of care, ranging from the special supervisory and investigative care on the
admitting wards, the ambulant and semi-ambulant continued-treatment wards, and
the infirmary wards where special nursing care is required. As nursing personnel
are closely and constantly associated with the elderly residents, it is highly important
that psychiatric nurses and aides be allocated to wards where their individual skills
and personalities will best serve the needs of their patients. It is felt that this desirable goal has been closely approached throughout the year, although problems of
 GERIATRIC DIVISION H 129
ward coverage have occurred due to shortage of staff through illness and other forms
of absenteeism, delays in recruitment of staff, and disruption of routines as new staff
become accustomed to new equipment and surroundings. In addition to the care
of patients on the ward, many demands are made on the nursing department for
escort service for patients leaving the wards for varying reasons, such as attendance
at occupational and recreational programmes, Crease Clinic surgery, or Valleyview
X-ray Deparement. Fortunately there have been very few occasions when off-the-
ward activities have been cancelled due to lack of available nursing staff, and on
many occasions nurses and aides have assumed added duties so that their patients
could benefit from these auxiliary services.
Throughout the year every effort has been made to improve the efficiency of
the nursing staff and to change standard routines or procedures in the light of new
knowledge of geriatric nursing. In June, changes were made in patients' meal-
hours, especially the serving of the breakfast meal at a later hour than has been the
custom. With the assistance of Mr. Kelly, Valleyview pharmacist, a survey of all
wards was made concerning the ward storage and dispensing of medications. As
a result, new procedures were adopted, which have improved this aspect of patient-
care a great deal, as well as initiating increased economy in the use of pharmaceutical supplies. A well-attended in-service training programme was again carried out
for nurses and aides during the winter months. Valleyview nursing supervisors,
medical staff, and various department heads co-operated willingly in the preparation
of relevant instructive material for this course. Several fire drills were held during
the year, and with the assistance of Mr. Lowry, Essondale Fire Chief, instruction
was provided for staff members in fire-fighting and evacuation procedures. Special
fire routines and regulations were drawn up for the new Valleyview Building. On
January 25th the Valleyview staff actively assisted in the evacuation of patients from
Colony Farm during the threat of flooding of the Coquitlam River. Ward V.V. 1,
empty at that time, was used by the Provincial Mental Hospital Disaster Committee
as temporary emergency housing of some of the patients from Riverside Building for
several days. Medical and dietary services, as well as nursing supervision, were
provided by Valleyview staff during this emergency period. In many other ways,
too, the staff of the Nursing Department have demonstrated their eagerness to learn
new methods and acquire new knowledge which will assist them in providing the
best of care and comfort for their patients.
The religious needs of our patients have been met during most of the year by
the continued devotion of Rev. J. O'Neil and Father Frechette. However, this
important aspect of patient-care was greatly enhanced by the appointment of Rev.
R. F. Filer as the first full-time chaplain at Valleyview Hospital on December 1st.
Since that time, Reverend Filer has developed a comprehensive programme of
weekly ward services and patient visitation, in addition to the regular Sunday chapel
services. He has been assisted in his work by Mrs. Filer, who has given unstintingly
of her time on a voluntary basis, and they have endeared themselves in the hearts
of our elderly patients, who look forward to their visits and words of comfort. In
addition, Reverend Filer serves in a similar way the needs of all patients at North
Lawn Building, thus allowing Reverend O'Neil a greater devotion of his time to the
special needs of the patients in the Crease Clinic and the Provincial Mental Hospital.
A further progressive step occurred with the appointment of Miss J. MacLean,
B.S.W., as the first social worker to the Valleyview staff on May 30th. After a brief
period of duty, during which time basic groundwork was laid for the Valleyview
Social Service Department, she returned to the University of British Columbia on
leave of absence to acquire her Master's degree. It is anticipated that full-time
social service will be available for this area with the return of Miss MacLean in early
 H 130 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
spring. Throughout the year, Miss Alice Carroll, Director of Psychiatric Social
Services, has devoted many hours to the planning and initiation of social-work
services for VaUeyview, and during the absence of Miss MacLean carried out specific casework and liaison with community agencies and other potential sources for
rehabilitation of improved patients.
The valuable services provided by the Occupational Therapy Department have
played an important role in the total treatment programme at Valleyview throughout
the year. The new facilities in the Valleyview Building and the additional staff for
this department have made possible the development of an expanded and more
varied programme, and many patients have benefited from this type of stimulating
diversional activity. Miss Alice Anderson, O.T. (Reg.), ably directed this department during most of the year until she left the service at the end of November. Her
assistant, Miss S. Groenewoud, handicraft worker, continued to direct the programme alone during the remainder of the fiscal year, although with some necessary
curtailment in the numbers of patients participating. Special attention has been
given to newly admitted patients in order to assess their needs and abilities for craft
work with a view to providing an early and contented adjustment to hospital, and
to remove the feeling of loneliness and uselessness that so frequently pervades the
life of elderly people and so often is a major contributing factor in the emotional
disturbances leading to the necessity for hospitalization. During the year a total of
457 men and women participated in occupational-therapy activities, many of whom
were regular attenders throughout the year, during which time a total of 7,100
individual treatment sessions were provided, both in the department and on the
wards. The occupational therapists and the recreational therapists have co-operated
closely on many occasions, especiaUy in preparing and conducting special activities,
such as the provision of Christmas decorations and ward parties, Easter activities,
and parade entries from Valleyview on Carnival Day.
Recreational therapy, too, has continued to provide a very important contribution to the welfare and treatment of Valleyview patients, under the skillful and
enthusiastic direction of Mrs. MUdred Franklin and Mr. A. Massey, who was
appointed to the second position of recreational therapist in November. During the
year a total of 186 separate events was organized, which were enjoyed by the
attendance of 9,346 patients. In developing programmes, special measures have
been taken to encourage community participation in the hospital and to stimulate
patients' interest in community life. Interest of community groups in Valleyview
patients has been very evident throughout the year by the increased number of
variety concerts, visiting choirs, dance groups, and other entertainers, who have so
willingly given of their time and talents for the enjoyment of our residents, both in
special concerts in the Valleyview auditorium or on the grounds during the summer
months and in tours about the wards. Many opportunities have also been provided
for groups of patients to be taken to theatrical productions, on car trips, and visits
to various points of interest away from the Hospital. This community interest has
been most appreciated and has contributed greatly toward our efforts to rekindle in
our patients a realization that life can still be meaningful in spite of age and the
handicaps that come with the later years.
The established social and recreational programmes within the Hospital continue to flourish both in the auditorium and on the wards. The weekly dances, bingo
parties, mystery bus trips, ward socials, and, in the summer months, the picnics and
lawn activities have continued to be most popular and well attended. The Happy
Gang Club has been very active and has contributed much to the development of
this type of programme by the elderly for the elderly. During the year outdoor
checkerboards and a horseshoe-pitch were installed in the summer court areas.   An
 GERIATRIC DIVISION H 131
inter-ward checker tournament was carried out and will become an annual event
with a trophy plaque which was graciously provided by the family of a deceased
member of the nursing staff. Other activities available at the weekly open house in
the auditorium also contributed to a very comprehensive programme of sociahzing
interests which vary widely in complexity so that all patients can find satisfaction and
friendships commensurate with their abilities and handicaps.
The Canadian Mental Health Association volunteers have continued to provide
valuable assistance to the recreational therapists by their regular attendance and
devoted interest in our patients. Through their ward visits, distribution of library
books, assistance at social activities, and in many other ways, they have contributed
greatly to the welfare and happiness of the Valleyview residents. Of special importance, however, was the opening of the Canadian Mental Health Association tearoom and visiting centre in Valleyview Lodge during October. This new facihty
provides a tuck-shop and two very attractive areas where visitors and patients may
enjoy refreshment and a quiet period of relaxation amidst comfortable and homy
surroundings. Although space and the necessary equipment were provided by the
Hospital, the continued operation of the centre has been directed by the Canadian
Mental Health Association through the volunteers and their efficient manager, Mrs.
T. Barowny. This popular service has been a most welcome addition to Valleyview
Hospital.
Under the skilled and conscientious direction of Mr. A. I. Smith, VaUeyview
Business Manager, the several departments responsible to his office have continued
to operate efficiently throughout the year.
The Dietary Department, under the professional guidance of our dietician,
Mrs. A. Frith, has maintained a high standard of dietary service to patients and
staff. Kitchen and dietary aide staff have been increased as required to serve the
newly opened wards and the increased patient population. Of special interest was
the introduction of Aervoid food transport containers in April, 1960, and experience during the year has amply proven their worth in a greatly improved service of
food to the outlying wards served by the central kitchen. Several studies have been
conducted during the year concerning the use of various alternatives to the use of
pork and mutton for geriatric patients and appropriate substitutes were made, including chicken, legs of pork, and turkey, which are more suitable from a dietary
point of view, as well as being more economical.
The housekeeping staff, directed by Mrs. A. Warren, have also contributed to
the health and welfare of patients in the Valleyview Building by their efficient and
skilled programme of housekeeping duties on the wards and the public areas, and
their regular attention and daily supplying of ward linens. During September a
large order of ward dayroom furniture was received and placed on Wards V.V. 4
and 5, and was the first phase of a continuing programme to replace outmoded ward
furniture with more efficient and colourful units, adapted to the needs of geriatric
patients.
The Valleyview pharmacy has also contributed to serve the needs of this
patient-group regularly and efficiently. Mr. G. Kelly, pharmacist, has been diligent
in his efforts to maintain a constant supply of necessary pharmaceuticals and allied
nursing and surgical supplies for the wards, and has aided the nursing and medical
staff in many ways in developing controls and changes in routines which have improved the administration of medications more efficiently and economically.
The beauty-parlour, too, has continued to provide a very essential service to
our elderly ladies. Many patients have taken an increased interest in their personal appearance and have experienced a new sense of well-being following the
 H 132 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
professional attention of Mrs. M. Lutner. In November a male barber was added
to the Valleyview staff, and his services have added greatly to the grooming of our
male patients.
The staff of the medical records office have continued to carry out the many
and varied duties required in the maintenance of adequate patient records and the
provision of stenographic and clerical services for other departments as required.
Miss Marlynn Jorgensen, senior clerk-stenographer, has carried out the secretarial
duties of the Medical Superintendent's office in an efficient and courteous manner,
and has also provided supervision and direction for the staff of the clinical office.
The general office assumed additional duties during the year with the completion of the transfer of personnel records and functions for the three units of the
Geriatric Division to the jurisdiction of Mr. Smith. In addition, Valleyview patients'
trust accounts were also transferred to this branch in November. Following the
reclassification of several positions commencing February 1st, 1961, it was also
possible to provide information desk service for twelve hours daily. These changes
have greatly facilitated business-office service to patients and visitors, as well as
increasing the efficiency of personnel and business-management functions. In October the Mental Health Services cemetery, recently established to the north of Valleyview Hospital, came under the jurisdiction of this branch, and a cemetery caretaker
was appointed. At the end of the year marked progress had been made in the
development of the grounds with flower-beds, lawn seeding, and road improvements.
The PubUc Works Department has attended to the maintenance needs of Valleyview Hospital in an efficient manner throughout the year. In addition to routine
maintenance and repairs, several projects were completed, including the installation
of safety rails over toilet cubicles and bathtubs of Valleyview Building, the redeco-
ration and installation of equipment in the lower floor of Valleyview Lodge for the
use of Canadian Mental Health Association tearoom, and the completion of the
Valleyview Building parking-lot in July. Other projects included the installation
of name-plates on all beds and the seeding of the large lawn area in front of Wards
2, 4, and 5. Modifications in the ventilation system servicing the main dish-washer
were completed in October, and required modifications to electrical, drainage, and
ventilation systems in the Valleyview laboratory were finished in December.
Dellview Hospital
The Vernon unit of the Geriatric Division, under the able direction of Mr.
L. W. Fox, the unit Supervisor, and his deputy and Superintendent of Nurses, Miss
H. O. Lipsey, R.N., was able to provide care and treatment for 312 elderly men
and women during the past year.
As of March 31st, 1961, the resident population of Dellview Hospital stood
at 229, including 105 men and 124 women, a slight reduction of five compared to
the resident population of a year ago. Total admissions numbered seventy-eight,
a reduction of fifteen compared to the previous year, and included fifty-one men
and twenty-seven women. Of these, forty-seven men and twenty-five women were
first admissions directly from the community; the remainder included five transfers
from the Essondale institutions and one readmission. Separations were slightly
increased for the year to a total of eighty-three, of which seventy-seven were due
to deaths. One man was discharged in full, and five others were transferred to the
Essondale area for special treatment.
A census of the resident population of the Dellview unit was taken on December 31st, 1960, and the results tabulated by mental diagnosis, age-group, and sex
 GERIATRIC DIVISION H 133
(Table 10). It is interesting to note that of the 232 patients in residence at that
time, a total of 208 were 70 years of age or over, and over half of these were 80
years of age or over.
Although the large majority of this patient-group is very elderly, it is felt that
their general health has been very satisfactory, and there have been no major medical problems encountered in their care during the year. There has been a sUght
increase in the number of fractures due to accidental falls in feeble, unsteady patients, and there are now very few men and women who are physically or mentally
capable of assisting with Hospital chores on a sustained basis.
Dr. J. Smith has continued to give medical care and supervision for the Dellview residents through regular visits to the wards, and has been on caU at all times.
During the year, only two patients required transfer to the Vernon Jubilee Hospital,
where Dr. Smith performed mid-thigh amputations which were necessary because
of severely impaired circulation of the Umbs.
The administrative and technical staffs of the Vernon Jubilee Hospital have
been most co-operative and have provided all required X-ray and laboratory services for our patients.
Auxiliary medical care provided during the year included eye examinations
and corrective lenses, as required, by Mr. W. H. Franks, optometrist, and regular
dental care by Dr. Bishop, who visited the Hospital regularly to perform examinations, extractions, and to fit dentures for those patients who can benefit from their
use.
In December a new oxygen tent was added to the medical equipment of this
Hospital through Federal health grant funds, making possible immediate oxygen
therapy for both wards at all times.
During October the mobile unit of the Division of Tuberculosis Control visited
Dellview Hospital and carried out the annual chest survey of patients and staff.
No positive cases of pulmonary tuberculosis developed during the year.
Nursing services have continued without any major changes in staff or procedures, and a high standard of nursing care has been maintained under the direction
and capable leadership of Miss H. O. Lipsey, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses. All
members of the nursing staff have been conscientious in their efforts to give the best
possible care to their elderly charges, and every effort has been made to keep the
nursing staff informed regarding up-to-date knowledge in the field of geriatric and
general nursing through the use of instructive reading material, group instruction on
the wards, and by the viewing of appropriate films. During September Mr. A.
Lowry, Essondale Fire Chief, conducted a three-day course in fire-fighting and hospital evacuation for all the staff at this unit. This very practical instruction was well
received and appreciated.
The occupational and recreational programme, under the direction of Mrs.
Sherlock, handicraft instructor, has continued to play an important role in the welfare of the Dellview residents. The interest of many patients is stimulated by the
handicraft activities, and the monthly mixed socials, bingo parties, or special celebrations at Christmas and Easter-time serve to develop a sense of security and
friendship among these elderly men and women.
Community organizations have also continued to maintain an active and very
welcome interest in the welfare of the Dellview residents. The volunteer ladies,
under the direction of Mrs. L. W. Fox and Mrs. Sherlock, have been most faithful
in their regular visits to the Hospital during the year, and have provided valuable
assistance in carrying out the various activities of the occupational and recreational
programme.   The ladies of the Royal Purple, the Lutheran Church ladies' group,
 H 134 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
and the men of the I.O.O.F. lodge have been most generous of their time in providing car rides and other types of outings and entertainment for the patients. At
Christmas the C.G.I.T., Girl Guide, and Boy Scout groups again contributed to the
Yuletide festivities by their carol-singing in the wards. In addition, many other
groups and individuals have contributed by generous gifts of fruit, flowers, and
sweets. The members of the Vernon branch of the Canadian Mental Health Association have also maintained their interest in Dellview by visits, the provision of
subscriptions to four popular magazines, and over eighty gifts at Christmas for
patients without relatives or friends.
ReUgious services for our patients at this unit have been regularly provided
by Rev. C. E. Reeve, Reverend Rumsey, Monsignor Miles, and Father Kenny.
In addition, many patients received visits from ministers of congregations of which
they were members before coming to Hospital.
All service departments have functioned efficiently throughout the year, with
no change in senior personnel or routines of operation.
The food service personnel, under the direction of Mr. Owens, Chief Cook,
have provided meals of high nutriment value and appetizing appearance with daUy
regularity, as well as special diets for medical purposes as required. During the
year, changes in meal-hours were instituted, which removed the need for the very
early wakening of patients for the breakfast meal as required by previous schedules.
This change has also been of benefit to the kitchen and nursing staff.
The Laundry Department, under the supervision of Mr. Todd, has been conscientious in providing a regular supply of clean linen for the wards and has willingly worked additional hours and on statutory hofidays when necessary to ensure
a continuous supply during periods when Unen needs of patients have increased
because of the increased numbers of bed patients. An adequate and continuous
supply of fresh Unen is of the greatest importance in the care of feeble, incontinent,
elderly patients, who are so prone to develop skin conditions when confined to bed.
The Dellview laundry has processed an average of 45,155 pounds of soiled linen
each month, for a yearly total of 541,860 pounds. A welcome addition to laundry
equipment was received in December with the installation of a steam-heated drying-
tumbler, which has speeded up the flow of work to the flatwork ironer.
The Stores and Supplies Department has been efficiently supervised by Mr.
Baron, stockman, who has maintained at all times a full stock of supplies required
by this unit. Suppliers have co-operated well in providing prompt deliveries, and
no problems have occurred with respect to quality of goods received.
The many and varied duties in the general office, which includes the maintenance of medical records, have been carried out efficiently. The addition of a part-
time clerk-typist to the staff of this office has been of great help in maintaining
up-to-date business and medical records and in providing improved service to staff
and visiting public.
The Public Works Department has also provided regular utility services and
building maintenance under the supervision of Mr. Baker and Mr. HorneU, senior
personnel in the Engineering and Maintenance Departments respectively. Only
one interruption for a short period of less than an hour occurred during the year
to the essential services of light, heat, and power, when a strong wind blew a tree
against a power-line on the Hospital grounds.
In addition to routine maintenance, the engineers carried out changes in the
boiler-room pumps which will ensure continuous service in the event of failure in
either of the two water-feed pumps. A heating-coil has been installed in conjunction with the male ward dayroom air-cooling unit, which will automatically maintain adequate room temperatures irrespective of outside temperature.   The instaUa-
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
H 135
tion of a fire-prevention sprinkler system throughout the main building and annex,
and the provision of additional fire-extinguishers for other areas, greatly improves
the fire-prevention facUities for this unit.
A major reroofing programme was started during the year to replace graduaUy
the present cover with more durable and fire-resistant composition. A continuous
project of redecorating and repainting has been carried out to preserve the buildings
and maintain their appearance.
The efforts of the gardeners, Mr. Legg, who returned to duty in May, and
Mr. Malowny, have been rewarded by the appreciation of patients and staff for
the continuous supply of colourful flowers and plants for the wards throughout the
year, and by the many complimentary remarks of visitors concerning the beautiful
appearance of the grounds and flower-beds of Dellview Hospital.
Skeenaview Hospital
The Terrace unit of the Geriatric Division has also served the needs for care
and treatment of many elderly men under the capable direction of Mr. W. E. Skilli-
corn, Supervisor, and his deputy, Mr. F. Stewart, Chief Psychiatric Nurse.
During the year the Skeenaview Hospital has cared for 320 patients and completed the year with a resident population of 279, a slight decrease of nine compared to the number in residence at the beginning of the year.
As wUl be noted in the accompanying tables, there has been a general decrease
in the movement of patients through this unit due to fewer admissions and a decrease in the number of available vacancies through separations. Total admissions
to the unit numbered thirty-two, including thirteen direct admissions from the community, a decrease of eleven from the previous year, and nineteen transfers from
the Essondale area. Separations due to death also registered a decline from fifty-
one the previous year to thirty-nine for the year covered by this report. Plans are
under way, however, for the transfer of patients in the earlier part of the new year
to utUize the existing vacancies.
There have been no major medical problems during the year, and the general
health of the patients has been very satisfactory, although there has been a noticeable increase in the number of partially ambulant patients, especially among those
who have been resident here for a number of years. Despite this increasing feebleness, very few patients required prolonged bed care. As usual during the spring
and faU months, the incidence of respiratory infections increased, but there were no
problems of an epidemic nature, and all cases responded well to early intensive
treatment.
The annual chest X-ray survey of staff and patients by the travelling clinic of
the Division of Tuberculosis Control took place during October, with a recheck of
suspicious cases the foUowing February. No incidence of tuberculosis infection
occurred during the year.
The medical care and supervision of the Skeenaview residents have been conscientiously provided by Dr. R. E. Lee, specialist surgeon and Dr. J. R. Nicholson,
his assistant. Seven patients required major surgery, including two men for whom
leg amputations were performed because of circulatory difficulties, one received
hernial repair, and four required abdominal operations. No patients required orthopaedic care. All operations were performed at the Terrace and District General
Hospital, but the patients were returned to our unit on the foUowing day for postoperative care. This has been possible through the institution by Dr. Lee of new
procedures and staff instruction at the Skeenaview Hospital, and by the conversion
 H 136 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
of previously unused space on the wards into special sick-bays with adequate equipment and Gatch-type hospital beds.
The administrative and technical staff of the Terrace and District General Hospital have been most co-operative and helpful in the care of our patients, and the
opening of the new and very modern 50-bed hospital has provided the best of diagnostic facUities for Skeenaview residents.
Nursing services have been provided conscientiously and at a satisfactory
standard by the nursing staff under the direction of Mr. F. W. Stewart, Chief Psychiatric Nurse. Four nursing aides left the service during the year, but were immediately replaced with female aides recruited from the local community, bringing the
total female staff to ten. The presence of female nursing staff at this all-male unit,
as inaugurated during the previous year, has continued to be appreciated and has
further demonstrated the importance of a woman's touch in the day-to-day nonprofessional nursing care of elderly male patients and ward housekeeping procedures.
The occupational and recreational needs of the patients have been accelerated
by the nursing staff during the year, and in addition to daily ward activities of deck-
type shuffleboard, crokinole, bingo, and various card games, regular weekly tournaments have been instituted to further stimulate the interest and participation of
more patients. Twice-weekly movie films and the library and reading-room have
also contributed greatly to the total diversional programme for these men. During
the summer months, car rides and lawn activities add to the various interests now
available for the Skeenaview residents.
The interest and generosity of the community have continued through the
donation of gifts of books and periodicals for the library and by visits and special
entertainment for patients, especially during the Christmas season.
Religious services and patient visits were regularly conducted by Father
Mohan and Archdeacon Hinchliffe, although the services of Archdeacon Hinch-
liffe were regrettably terminated early in the year by severe illness. His place has
been ably filled by a student-minister, although the interest and many kindnesses of
the Archdeacon have been missed by patients and staff alike.
The Dietary Department, under the direction of Mr. H. F. Piffer, Chief Cook,
has maintained a stable staff, and has continued to provide nourishing and appetizing menus regularly throughout the year. Special emphasis has been given to
little dietary extras on special occasions and holidays, to which patients look forward, and from which so much pleasure is derived.
The general office has effectively carried out the various routine business and
medical-record duties required, and in addition has made a start toward implementing the decentralizing of certain business and accounting procedures affecting
the operation of this unit, and which were previously carried out at the Crease Clinic
Business Department. To accommodate the increased responsibilities of this office,
the area was remodelled and enlarged and new clerical equipment provided. In
July Miss H. Denbow, who has loyally and efficiently provided all clerk-stenographic
services during the past five years, left the service, and her place has since been
filled by Mrs. M. Schaeffer, on transfer from the local office of the Department of
Highways.
The Stores Department has also experienced change with the transfer of Mr.
J. Morgan to the Colquitz institution in July. His place has been taken by Mr.
M. E. Olson, formerly of the Skeenaview engineering staff, who has maintained the
efficient supply service formerly enjoyed by the Hospital. Supplies generally have
been of good quality and kept at satisfactory levels.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
H 137
The laundry staff have continued to supply regular service to the wards under
the supervision of Mr. Norton, and the quaUty and quantity of work has been maintained, although with difficulty at times when patient help became minimal. On
many occasions it has been necessary to assign nursing aides from ward staff to
assist in the laundry during periods of increased laundry requirements.
The Public Works maintenance and engineering staff, under the direction of
Mr. McLaughlan, Chief Engineer, have also operated efficiently throughout the
year, and have carried out all routine maintenance requirements and maintained
steady utility services. The staff painter completed the painting of the new fire-
prevention sprinkler system which was installed in the main building during the
year, and also completely redecorated the interior of five of the staff apartments.
Redecoration of two ward dayrooms, as well as all dormitories and dayroom lavatories, beds and bedside tables, has greatly improved the appearance of these areas.
In addition to general repairs, the maintenance carpenter was able to complete
the remodelling of the general office, convert unused space on the wards to efficient
sick-bays, and to build staff washroom facilities in the laundry.
Several projects were undertaken during the year by contract, including surface repairs of all fire-walls and cement steps and the installation of the fire-prevention sprinkler system. A start was made on the exterior painting of aU buildings,
but inclement weather prevented the completion of work, except on the water tower
and tank. A new entrance road from the main highway to the front of the hospital
building, when finished early in the new year, will eliminate a hazardous corner
situation previously existent with the former entrance road to the southern end of
the property.
L
 H 138
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
STATISTICAL TABLES
VALLEYVIEW HOSPITAL
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Valleyview Hospital, Essondale,
April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Male
Female
Total
In residence, April 1st, 1960     	
Admissions—
206
50
2
1
2
77
451
134
7
1
1
23
657
184
Readmissions to a different institution of Mental Health Services	
9
2
3
100
132
166
298
338
617
955
Separations—
5
71
9
4
3
2
116
7
7
r>i>d
187
16
4
11
92
133
225
+40
246
+33
484
+73
730
 GERIATRIC division
H 139
Table 2.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Health
Unit and School District of Residence and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to
March 31st, 1961.
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
Simon  Fraser,  New Westmin
School District No. 1 	
1
1
ster—
 4 	
1
1
School District No. 40	
7
6
13
Selkirk, Nelson—
„    .     „         „   43	
3
5
8
School District No. 7    ....
1
1
North Fraser Valley, Mission—
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 42.	
5
2
7
School District No. 11 ...
1
1
„   76	
1
1
2
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 15..	
2
2
4
School District No. 47-     .
1
2
3
„   23	
1
1
„   72.....	
1
1
 ,   77	
4
4
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 53	
1
1
School District No. 19-	
1
1
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
„   20 	
2
2
School District No. 59	
1
1
 22. 	
1
1
 60	
1
1
South Central, Kamloops—
Victoria-Esquimalt    Union
School District No. 24	
3
3
Board of Health-
 ,   30. 	
1
1
School District No. 61 (part)>
2
1
3
Cariboo, Prince George—
Saanich and South Vancouver
School District No. 57..	
2
2
Island—
Upper   Fraser   Valley,   Chilli
School District No. 61 (part) 2
4
4
wack—
„   62	
1
1
2
School District No. 33 	
2
1
3
„   63	
2
2
 34....	
3
1
4
„   64 _	
1
1
Boundary, Cloverdale—
Central Vancouver Island, Na
School District No. 35	
1
1
2
naimo— '
 36 	
6
6
12
School District No. 65
1
1
„   37.-.	
2
2
 67	
1
1
Metropolitan  Health  Commit
„   69 -	
2
2
tee, Vancouver—-
School districts not covered by
School District No. 38      	
2
5
7
„   39 	
52
94
146
School District No. 46	
2
2
 41	
14
4
4
10
5
2
24
9
6
2
1
3
„   44	
 45	
Totals...	
131
165
296
1 Includes Victoria and Esq.
limalt o
nly.
* Excludes Victoria, Esquim
alt, and
Oak Ba
..
 H  140
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table 3.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Method
of Admission, Age-group, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st,
1961.
Age-group (Years)
Method of Admission
30-39
40-49
50-59
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Total
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Voluntary  _  	
2
	
	
—
3
1
1      1
— —     1
9|    6[ 68
78
4S
74
4
7
1
131
Ififi
1
797
Totals  ..
2
—
—
3
1
91     61  69
78
45
74
4
7 132
1661   798
1
The above includes 2 readmissions in the age-group 80-89 (1 male, 1 female).
Table 4.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st,
1961.
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
30-39
40-49
50-59
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Total
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
With Psychosis
2
—-
	
—
2
1
1
4
3
1
4
4
10
21
6
_
2
8
1
18
1
~9
10
7
26
2
3
12
3
19
33
1
1
6
~1
2
15
1
51
2
18
3
Involutional melancholia 	
1
2
34
Presenile psychosis	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis	
1
84
3
Chronic  brain syndrome  with neurotic
reaction	
1
Total with psychosis.	
21—1—1 |    3
1
8
4| 35| 37| 19
33
2|    3| 69
78|   147
Without Psychosis
	
	
	
—-
	
	
1
1
1
23
11
_.._.
22
18
1
17
8
24
17
2
3
1
1
1
42
19
1
50
37
1
Alcoholism	
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural
2
92
Other diseases of central nervous system
not associated with psychosis	
56
Total without psychosis	
._... I-.I--I—1--1--
1|    2| 34| 41| 26
41
2|    4| 63| 88|   151
2
3
1
9
6
69
78
45
74
4
7
132
166
298»
1 Includes 2 readmissions;   1 male (age-group 80-89), psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis;   1 female
(age-group 80-89), chronic brain syndrome with behavioural reaction.
 geriatric division
H 141
Table 5.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Mental
Diagnosis, Marital Status, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st,
1961.
Table 6.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Mental
Diagnosis, Years of Schooling, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March
31st, 1961.
Table 7.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Citizenship, Age-group, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 8.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by
Religion and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 9.—First Admissions to Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Previous Occupation and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
Table 10.—Resident Population of Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by
Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, December 31st, 1960
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
59 and
Under
M.   F.
60-64
65-69
M.   F.   M.
70-74
M.   F.
75-79
80 and
Over
M.   F.   M.   F.
Total
M.   F.
Grand
Total
With Psychosis
Schizophrenic disorders 	
Manic-depressive reaction	
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states _
Senile psychosis 	
Presenile psychosis-
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis _
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology.	
Other and unspecified psychoses  	
Anxiety reaction without mention of somatic
symptoms
Obsessive-compulsive reaction 	
Neurotic-depressive reaction	
Chronic brain syndrome with neurotic reaction.
Syphilis and its sequelae  _
Total with psychosis .
Without Psychosis
Alcoholism  ...	
Mental deficiency  _. 	
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural reaction     _
Chronic brain syndrome, N.O.S..
Epilepsy .
Other diseases of central nervous system not
associated with psychosis	
Total without psychosis.-
Grand totals	
20
11
17
10
17
10
37
29
11
17| 54| 33
69
19
36
8   13
18
22| 25
33   34
76   58
145 103
62
177
99
8
2
4
216
1
176
3
1
1
2
1
2
1
3
364|    520
25
24
58
235
240
489
2
20
71
38
1
77
209
729
 H 142
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table 11.—Live Discharges from Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Mental Diagnosis, Condition on Discharge, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to
March 31st, 1961.
Condition on Discharge
Total
Mental Diagnosis
Improved
Unimproved
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Schizophrenic disorders 	
1
1
2
5
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
i
6
4
1
1
4
2
3
1
1
1
2
1
9
5
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
5
Other diseases of the central nervous system not associated with psychosis 	
2
Totals	
4
5
14
4
18
9
27
Table 12.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Valleyview
Hospital, Essondale, by Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April
1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961.
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
20-29
30-39
40-49
50-59
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
lotai
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.  F.
M.
F.
Live Discharges
Schizophrenic disorders 	
1
1
—
2
2
3
—
1
1
—
4
3
1
1
1
1
1
......
	
	
6
4
1
—
4
2
3
1
1
1
2
1
9
5
Psychosis with cerebral arterio-
2
1
1
—
1
1
1
1
2
Chronic brain syndrome with be-
5
Other   diseases   of   the   central
nervous system not associated
with psychosis   	
2
Totals	
— |   2|    1|_
2|    3|    4|    1
21-	
7|    3
2|.._|......|..-
18|    9
27
Deaths
Schizophrenic disorders	
	
	
—
	
	
	
1
J-
it
1
 1	
1
4
7
4
1
1
9
17
1
10
2
6
6
1
24
19
3
1
5
4
1
13
14
26
18
5
1
1
38
40
1
22
8
5
1
Involutional melancholia —
1
51
Psychosis with cerebral arterio-
54
Psychosis of other demonstrable
1
Chronic brain syndrome with be-
	
-—
—
	
	
	
1
12
8
13
10
11
6
1
48
Senility  	
26
Totals	
__    1	
	
.. ..I.
31
45
35! 611    5
10
71
116
187
\
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
H 143
Table 13.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Valleyview
Hospital, Essondale, by Mental Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex,
April 1st, 1960, to March 3 1st, 1961.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
Table 14.—Live Discharges from Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Condition on Discharge, Disposition to, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March
31st, 1961.
Disposition to—
Condition on Discharge
Home
Other
Mental
Hospital
Other
Total
Grand
Total
M.
R
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
.!„._■
13
3
4
1
4
14
5
4
9
18
Totals
5
1
13
7  1
1
18
9
27
Table 15.—Deaths Occurring in Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by Cause
of Death, Age-group, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Age-group (Years)
Cause of Death
70-79
80-89
90-99
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F"
3
3
16
3
6
3
5
1
21
1
1
4
2
2
1
4
"ii
1
4
2
5
1
7
~31
2
7
4
~~3
__
4
1
i
~7
1
1
5
1
7
41
4
1
10
~~2
8
1
13
1
59
2
13
6
1
7
2
1
2
13
1
1
Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
20
1
100
6
14
16
1
7
4
1
2
Totals	
31
45
35
61
5
10
71
116
187
Table 16.—Deaths Occurring in Valleyview Hospital, Essondale, by
Cause of Death, Length of Stay, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March
31st, 1961.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 H 144
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
DELLVIEW HOSPITAL
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Dellview Hospital, Vernon,
April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Male
Female
Total
106
47
3
....
128
25
1
1
234
Admissions—■
72
4
1
Transfers from the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale 	
1
51
27
78
Total under care  	
157
155
312
Separations—
Discharged in full	
Died  	
1
47
1
2
1
-----
30
1
......
1
77
2
Transferred to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.	
2
1
52
31
83
-1
105
-4
124
—5
229
Table 2.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Health
Unit and School District of Residence and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to
March 31st, 1961.
Health Unit
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit
Male   Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
North Okanagan, Vernon—Con.
School District No. 3  	
1
1
School District No. 78	
4
4
„   5	
1
1
South Central, Kamloops—-
„   18 _.
1
1
School District No. 24 ....	
4
3
7
Selkirk, Nelson—
Upper   Fraser   Valley,   Chilli
School District No. 7 _
1
1
2
wack—
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 32 	
1
1
School District No. 9 	
1
1
,,   33
2
2
 11.  _
1
1
 34..	
1
......
1
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
Metropolitan   Health   Commit
School District No. 14	
1
1
tee, Vancouver—
„    .    „         „   15	
9
2
11
School District No. 39	
6
6
„   17......	
1
1
Saanich  and  South  Vancouver
„   23	
4
3
7
Island—
„   77	
2
3
5
School District No. 61 (part1)
1
1
North Okanagan, Vernon—
Central Vancouver Island, Na
School District No. 19.	
1
1
3
naimo—■
 20 	
2
5
7
School District No. 67 -
1
1
, 21	
7
1
3
1
10
Unorganized 	
Totals	
1    |    _.
1
 22—-—
51     1       26
77
1 Includes Victoria and Esquimalt only.
J
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
H 145
Table 3.—First Admissions and Readmissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Method of Admission, Age-group, and Sex, April 1st, 1960,
to March 31st, 1961.
Age-group (Years)
Method of Admission
60-69
70-79
80-89
90-99
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
3
1
18
12
25
13
5
1
51
27
78
The above includes 1 female readmission, age-group 70-79.
Table 4.—First Admissions and Readmissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to
March 31st, 1961.
Age-group (Years)
Mental Diagnosis
60-69
70-79
80-89
90-99
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.'
F.
M.     F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
First Admissions
Schizophrenic disorders    	
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural reaction	
3
1
1
15
2
11
22     12
3 j    1
5
1
1
45
5
25
1
1
70
6
Totals             _~  .
3 |    1
18 | 11
25 |  13
5
1
51 | 26
77
Readmissions
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural reaction	
._.
1
I
....
1
1
Table 5.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental
Diagnosis, Marital Status, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 3 1st,
1961.
Table 6.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental
Diagnosis, Years of Schooling, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March
31st, 1961.
Table 7.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Citizenship,
Age-group, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 3 1st, 1961
•
Table 8.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Religion
and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 9.—First Admissions to Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Previous
Occupation and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 3 1st, 1961
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
10
 H 146
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table 10.—Resident Population of Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, December 31st, 1960
Mental Diagnosis
59 and
Under
60-64
65-69
70-74
•7* to   80 and
n~'v | Over
Total
Grand
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Total
With Psychosis
Schizophrenic disorders _ _ 	
Manic-depressive reaction  _. 	
Senile psychosis .    	
—
5
1
1
—
6
1
1
11
1
1
6
1
2
..-
5
9
8
1
8
1
1
4
24
24
1
10
7
1
~J
1
2
20
32
1
1
1
44
1
42
8
Alcoholic psychosis    	
1
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology. 	
—
1
~t
1
2
1
2
..1    7
..—
8
2
13|    7|    9| 18|  10| 28
47| 55[    102
Without Psychosis
Mental deficiency  	
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural reaction,   	
	
1
1
—
3
1
__-..
~~1
2
3
3
2
6
9
6
11
8
22
1
7
43
1
19
36
1
16
57
1
35
93
Other diseases of the central nervous system not
associated with psychosis  .,.
1
1- 1    2
4|    1
5|    5|  15|  17
31
50
57| 73|    130
	
9
	
12
3
18
12
24
35
41
78
104
1281     232
Table 11.—Live Discharges from Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental
Diagnosis, Condition on Discharge, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March
31st, 1961.
Condition on
Discharge
Mental Diagnosis
Improved
Unimproved
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1
	
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
Chronic brain syndrome with beha-
3
Tital?
1
	
3
1
4
1
5
 geriatric division
H 147
Table 12.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, April 1st,
1960, to March 31st, 1961.
Age-group (Years)
Total
Mental Diagnosis
60-69
70-79
80-89
90-99
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Live Discharges
1
1
1
1
—
1
......
1
1
2
1
1
1
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural
3
Totals 	
—
...... |      2 |      1
1 | —
1 1 — 1      4
1
5
Deaths
1
1
1
13
1
4
19
6
15
1
6
1
8
1
39
7
2
27
1
2
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis	
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural
reaction  .  	
1
66
8
Totals  	
1
1
14
5
25
16
7
8
47
30
77
Table 13.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Mental Diagnosis, Length of Stay, and Sex, April
1st, 1960, to March 3 1st, 1961.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
Table 14.—Live Discharges from Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Condition on Discharge, Disposition to, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March
3 1st;, 1961.
Disposition to—
Condition on Discharge
Home
Other Mental
Hospital
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.              M.
F.
Improved..   	
Unimproved   _. 	
!
l
1     - -
3
1
1      j          3
1
1
4
Totals 	
i    ,           ;      3   |      i   j      4
1
5
 H 148
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table 15.—Deaths Occurring in Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Cause of
Death, Age-group, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Age-group (Years)
Total
Cause of Death
60-69
70-79
80-89
9fr-99
Grand
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Cerebral haemorrhage  	
1
1
12
2
5
1
22
1
~15
~i
6
1
6
2
1
41
3
1
1
27
3
1
68
Bronchopneumonia _	
Other diseases of the respiratory system
Diseases of the digestive system._	
3
3
1
1
Totals     -           	
1
1
14
5
25
16
7
8
47
30
77
Table 16.—Deaths Occurring in Dellview Hospital, Vernon, by Cause of
Death, Length of Stay, and Sex, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 GERIATRIC division
H 149
SKEENAVIEW HOSPITAL1
Table 1.—Movement of Population, Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace,
April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Number
In residence, April 1st, 1960     288
Admissions—
First admissions
Transfers from other geriatric units
  13
  4
Transfers from Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale  15
Total admissions   32
Total under care  320
Separations—
Discharged in full
Died 	
Transferred to other geriatric units
Total separations 	
Net increase or decrease 	
In residence, March 31st, 1961
1
39
1
41
-9
279
1 This institution cares for male patients only.
Table 2.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Health
Unit and School District of Residence, April 1st, 1960, to March
31st, 1961.
Health Unit
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
School District No. 2	
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 17 	
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 24	
„    30 	
Cariboo, Prince George—
School District No. 55 ....
 56 ....
„    57 ....
Number
  1
  1
   1
    -. 1
  2
Upper Fraser Valley, Chilliwack—
School District No. 32   _.  1
Metropolitan Health Committee, Vancouver—
School District No. 39 ~ _  8
„   41  1
Health Unit
Simon Fraser, New Westminster-
School District No. 40 ~	
„    43  ...	
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 50 	
„    51 . 	
 52 _. _
„    53	
 54 	
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 59 	
Number
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board of Health-
School District No. 61 (part1) 	
Central Vancouver Island, Nanaimo—
School District No. 79 	
Ex-Province 	
Total
32
1 Includes Victoria and Esquimalt only.
 H 150
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table 3.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Method
of Admission and Age-group, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Method of Admission
Age-group (Years)
Total
60-69
70-79
80-89
90-99
11
14
6
1
32
Table 4.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Mental
Diagnosis and Age-group, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
Total
60-69
70-79
80-89
90-99
With Psychosis
6
1
1
1
1
8
2
2
1
1
1
1
8
11
3
1
1
2
9
13        |          3
1
26
Without Psychosis
1
1
1
3
—
1
1
4
2
1
3
—
6
11
14
6
1
32
Table 5.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Mental
Diagnosis and Marital Status, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 6.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Mental
Diagnosis and Years of Schooling, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 7.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Citizenship and Age-group, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 8.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Religion,
April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Table 9.—First Admissions to Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Previous
Occupation, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Detailed information for the above tables may be obtained on request.
 GERIATRIC DIVISION
H 151
Table  10.—Resident Population of Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by
Mental Diagnosis, Age-group, and Sex, December 31st, 1960
Age-group (Years
)
Total
59 and
Under
60-64
65-69
70-74
75-79
80 and
Over
With Psychosis
Schizophrenic disorders      .
2
1
8
1
~2
1
2
27
~2
1
2
1
1
1
47
1
14
~5
4
1
37
1
1
1
24
8
1
2
~3
13
35
~8
1
134
3
1
1
75
1
25
3
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology
8
1
Syphilis and its sequela;	
11
3
14
35
76
78
57
263
Without Psychosis
i
2
1
1
1
2
~3
1
2
1
"T
i
4
4
5
Chronic brain syndrome with behavioural re-
1
5
Other diseases of the central nervous system
6
1
2
2
7
3
6
21
Grand totals 	
4
16
37
83
81
63
284
 H 152
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table 11.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Skeenaview
Hospital, Terrace, by Mental Diagnosis and Age-group, April 1st,
1960, to March 31st, 1961.
Mental Diagnosis
Age-group (Years)
60-69
70-79
80-89
90-99
Total
Live Discharges
Senile psychosis-
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis .
Totals	
Deaths
Schizophrenic disorders-
Paranoia and paranoid states..
Senile psychosis-
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis..
Syphilis and its sequelae	
Senility—  	
Totals..
2
1
4
11
1
19
15
2
1
14
19
1
2
39
Table 12.—Live Discharges from and Deaths Occurring in Skeenaview
Hospital, Terrace, by Mental Diagnosis and Length of Stay, April
1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
Table 13.—Deaths Occurring in Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Cause
of Death and Age-group, April 1st, I960, to March 31st, 1961
Cause of Death
Age-group (Years)
Total
60-69
70-79
80-89
90-99
1
1
1
1
3
1
10
3
1
1
1
10
4
1
4
3
22
1
7
1
1
Totals                                  -            	
4
19
15
1
39
Table 14.—Deaths Occurring in Skeenaview Hospital, Terrace, by Cause
of Death and Length of Stay, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE H 153
PART VI.—MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
DIRECTOR'S REPORT
F. E. McNair, Director
The survey of the mental-health needs and resources in British Columbia conducted by the American Psychiatric Association and published after the close of this
fiscal year says concerning the Mental Health Centre, " This Centre should be used
as a model and a training source for the eventual establishment of other similar
centres in all parts of the Province." The Centre is the vanguard of the community
services which are now endorsed as the pattern upon which future mental-health
facilities should be developed. In this year's annual report it seems appropriate,
therefore, to review once again the services offered by the Centre so they may be
generally understood.
Consultation and treatment services are offered to both children and adults.
The Adult Clinic consists of out-patient facilities and a day-hospital, and is designed
to treat emotionally disturbed adults. It offers a complete psychiatric service except
twenty-four-hour care. About half of the treatment service is devoted to patients
requiring follow-up care after hospitalization. The Children's Clinic is a resource
for children with behaviour problems, social or scholastic difficulties, or psychosomatic complaints. During the child's contact at the Clinic, parents are also seen,
since they are a vital part of the child's life and are in turn much affected by his
problems and needs. It is to be expected that for every child under treatment there
would be one or two parents under treatment as well.
All patients coming for treatment come as out-patients attending on a scheduled
basis, either weekly or less frequently, principally for individual interviews, but in
some instances for group psychotherapy. There is a day-hospital programme for
some of the adult patients. The patient in this programme starts his day at 8.30
a.m. at the Centre and leaves at 4 p.m. to return home. He is required to find his
own lodgings in the community while under treatment if his home is in another part
of the Province. The treatment programme is individually planned according to the
need of the patient. His prescribed programme includes any of the following treatments: treatments requiring bed rest for part of the morning in the nursing area,
such as intravenous treatment, somnolent insulin, and electroshock; occupational
therapy with workshop and recreational facilities; interviews with a psychiatrist or
a social worker; physiotherapy with remedial or relaxation exercises, sedative baths,
gymnasium class, etc.; interviews with the psychologist. There is opportunity and
encouragement for patient participation in both large and small groups, as well as
opportunity for the creative use of solitary time. Nurses and occupational therapists,
as well as the patients, plan and work together on group projects and recreational
activities.
There is also a Day Centre programme for children, which provides for children of the pre-school age in the morning and primary-school students in the afternoon. A teacher supplied by the Burnaby School Board assists with the programme
for the school-age children. Their day provides for periods of creative play, learning,
rest, and individual play therapy. Parents also have regular interviews, and sometimes family gatherings are planned.
A social club provides an intermediate step between the Adult Clinic and the
community, offering a social and recreational programme, both of general interest
n
 H 154 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
and also designed to meet special needs, on alternate Tuesday evenings. An executive committee of the members plans the programme for each meeting. Assistance
is provided by Clinic staff and Canadian Mental Health Association volunteers.
An adequate modern programme to provide for the mental health of the
community provides treatment resources with trained professional and technical
personnel, and beyond that it provides a considerable preventive programme through
the application of mental-health principles by family physicians and social agencies,
both of whom require a considerable consultative service available to them in order
to understand and meet the emotional needs of persons coming to them for help.
Both the consultation resource and the treatment facility provided by a mental-
health centre require skilled personnel with a variety of professional training. The
psychiatrist, psychologist, and social worker can serve together or separately in the
consultative function according to the problem presented. The professions of nurse
and occupational therapist must be added to this group when a comprehensive
treatment programme is provided.
Because of its location, the Mental Health Centre has served principally the
metropolitan area of Greater Vancouver, but during the year it has endeavoured to
give leadership to the anticipated regional development of mental-health services in
other parts of the Province.
Highlights of the Year
1. Travelling Clinic Service
In addition to the previous semi-annual service, a consultative clinic service
was developed for seven cities of the Province—namely, Penticton, Kelowna,
Vernon, Salmon Arm, Kamloops, Trail, and Chilliwack—every two months. The
development of a local mental-health treatment group in each of these areas, consisting of the Medical Health Officer, the public health nurse, the family doctor, and
the social worker, was encouraged. A consultative team, consisting of a psychiatrist
and social worker with the periodic addition of a psychologist, acted as consultant
to this group to discuss problems local personnel were having in case management,
to see certain cases for diagnostic study, and to provide follow-up assistance and
advice in cases being given treatment by local professional people. The cities were
grouped so that the cities of the Okanagan were visited on consecutive days for one
week every second month. In the alternate month, a comparable service was
given Trail and Chilliwack. At the start of this service, the emphasis was on the
child presenting problems within his family or within his school. However, there
has been an increasing number of adult cases referred for either assessment or
consultative services. Altogether, this new service has provided an assessment for
twenty-two adults and fifty-one children and a consultative service for twelve adults
and ninety-six children. There are active Mental Health Associations in several of
these areas which have given expression to the need for further services. In Chilliwack a lay and professional advisory board has actively reviewed the work of the
local mental-health committee, including the consultative assistance offered. As
soon as it is known that a regular psychiatric service is available in the area, the
demand for service grows very rapidly. Five cases which were referred for assessment to the new travelling service have in turn been referred to the Mental Health
Centre or the Crease Clinic for appropriate treatment. Of course, local service will
be better when full-time mental-health personnel are stationed in some regions, but
for some time to come additional demands will be made on existing resources. It
should not be forgotten, however, that there is need for additional training in the
field of mental health for all persons engaged in the work of both health and welfare.
 MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE H 155
In particular there is a need for caseworkers skilled in personal and family counselling to be available as a resource in every community where preventive and therapeutic mental-health work is undertaken.
2. Diagnostic and Consultative Service
A considerable diagnostic and consultative service is offered physicians, agencies, and other health resources. This agency diagnostic service was extended to
627 children and their families, and subsequent conferences were held with the
referring community resource in each case. Three hundred and thirty-one adults
were seen for diagnostic service, and reports sent to the referring physicians. Our
diagnostic and consultative service goes out to the premises of seven health and
welfare organizations in order to serve better the patients enrolled there and the
professional workers attending them. When cases are identified that require more
comprehensive study, they are given appointments at the Mental Health Centre,
Burnaby, for full investigation. The service offered at the Children's Aid Society,
Vancouver, by one of our psychiatrists was continued. There was an interruption
in the service to the Catholic Children's Aid Society, Vancouver, due to the absence
from the Clinic of Dr. Gordon Kirkpatrick, senior psychiatrist in the Children's
Clinic, who was taking further studies in Montreal.
Our consultative service has been improved by a psychiatrist attending the
Vancouver Juvenile Court regularly and a psychiatrist and social worker going one
day each week to the several stations within the Boundary Health Unit.
3. The Out-patient Service
Treatment by regular out-patient appointments at the Mental Health Centre,
Burnaby, over a period of weeks or months was given 486 adult patients, 204 of
whom were on treatment strength at the end of last year. Two hundred and eighty-
two commenced treatment during the year. Treatment was completed in 242 cases,
leaving 244 persons under treatment at the end of the fiscal year. Treatment service
was given 486 children at the Mental Health Centre, Burnaby, and the Children's
Clinic in Victoria, 157 of whom were in treatment at the end of last year; 329
cases were opened for treatment. Treatment was completed in 270 cases, leaving
at the end of the year 216 children continuing in treatment, 147 of whom were in
the Burnaby clinic and sixty-nine in the Victoria clinic. For each child patient, at
least one parent was involved in the treatment programme. The duration of outpatient treatment at the Burnaby clinic averages six months for both the children's
and adult service; the average treatment time is much shorter in the Victoria clinic.
About one-half of the 242 patients currently under treatment in the Adult
Clinic have been discharged within the year from the Crease Clinic and Provincial
Mental Hospital, Essondale, and the majority of these are given an after-care service by monthly contact with the Clinic for interview, review of their medication,
and participation in social club. Progress in rehabilitation is not always smooth,
however, and about 10 per cent at any one time require an intensification of service,
including more regular interviews and use of Day Hospital.
4. The Day Hospital and Day Centre
As the case load has risen, the usage of Day Hospital has risen from an average
of about twenty-one to about twenty-six persons daily. The Day Hospital programme has been modified in two respects. A more structured programme has
been offered in the early morning to stimulate patient initiative. The programme
for this purpose has included gymnasium and exercise groups, demonstration of
crafts, and topical discussion sessions.    In the afternoons twice a week, group
 H 156 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
therapy has been offered to all patients wishing to participate. These sessions have
enabled patients to feel a part of the group more quickly, to understand what is expected of them to promote their recovery, and to provide better morale through
stronger group cohesion and intellectual stimulation. One hundred and sixty-eight
patients attended Day Hospital during the year. The 151 who completed their Day
Hospital treatment had 4,582 days' care for an average of 30.3 days.
The Day Centre programme for children was commenced this year. Very
satisfactory building alterations were provided by the Public Works Department
in the group therapy area of the Children's Clinic. It had been recognized that a
number of children who were coming for service were getting nowhere in their first
year of school, or were pre-schoolers whose behaviour was manifestly unsuitable
to a school setting. Twenty-two children attended the Day Centre during the year,
thirteen altogether coming in the morning to the pre-school group and nine in the
afternoon to the primary-school group. The capacity at any one time is for eight
children in the morning and eight in the afternoon, the average usage being thirteen
for the day. Ten children attended for six to twelve months. The Day Centre has
provided a much better opportunity to observe the child's behaviour as the family
sees him; it also provides opportunity for planned and supervised group experience
and is an excellent field for staff-training.
5. The Question of the Waiting-list
This is the second year when no waiting-list has been kept. It has been felt
that a waiting-list either for diagnostic assessment or for treatment is a source of
much ill will and frustration. A study was made during the latter six months of the
fiscal year of the applications for service in the Children's Clinic. A total of 255
applications for service was made during this period. In 136 cases, a senior social
worker reviewed the problem with the applicant on the telephone or by interview
and referred the applicant to another resource for help. One hundred and nineteen
cases were brought in for diagnostic study, eighty-eight of whom were accepted for
treatment and thirteen were told we could not provide them with a treatment service.
The prospect of a development of further psychiatric clinical services is a very
heartening one as the demand for service far exceeds the clinical facilities in all parts
of the Province, including the Lower Mainland. It is altogether likely that with the
development of regional consultative clinics in the Province additional cases will
be found who require intensive out-patient care, day-centre-type care, and residential care.
6. Staff Development
Persistent efforts have been made to make educational opportunities available
to staff and to thereby improve service. During the year four staff members were
in receipt of Mental Health Grants for postgraduate education. Thus two recruits
for social work and two for psychology were provided. Three of the four residents
in psychiatry attached to the clinics have been in their final year of training prior
to certification in the specialty, and one of these was in the University of British
Columbia postgraduate training programme. Four students from the University of
British Columbia School of Social Work in the M.S.W. programme took their field
placement in the Mental Health Centre, and four registered nurses from the new
postgraduate training course of the Mental Health Services had a field placement
here. A tenure of one year has now been assigned one of our male psychiatric
nursing positions, so that graduate male psychiatric nurses desiring further preparation for the position of charge nurse can come here on a transfer basis for in-service
education. One postgraduate occupational-therapy student from McGill University
had a three-month internship at the Centre.
 MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE H 157
Thirteen staff members have attended conferences both locally and at distant
points throughout the year. There has been a gratifying increase in the number of
workshop-type conferences, which offer greater benefits to participants because they
require weeks of prior preparation. There have been increasing demands from
various professional groups, such as the British Columbia Medical Association,
public health nurses and Victorian Order of Nurses, social workers, University of
British Columbia Extension Department, and special interest groups, for our staff
to take part in seminars and discussions relative to mental health in general or for
specific aspects of mental-health care. We have fulfilled as many of these demands
as we could, as community education is part of our job as is the education of professional personnel.
 H 158
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
STATISTICAL TABLES
Table 1.—Summary of Operations, Mental Health Centre, Adult Clinic,
April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Male
Female
Total
Total number pending at April 1st, 1960	
Plus assessments—
Provincial Mental Health Services hospital services-
Children's Clinic, Mental Health Centre	
Municipal health services-
Community health services_
Other institutions	
From in-town general practitioners and other specialists _
From out-of-town general practitioners  	
From in-town psychiatrists—  	
Totals.
Disposition of assessments—
Hospitalization recommended
Social agency recommended-
Other medical care recommended..
No case made—
Advice, assessment only	
Patient withdrew	
Cases opened for treatment-
Total pending at March 31st, 1961..
Patient load—
Brought forward at April 1st, 1960	
Total out-patient department cases opened .
Less out-patient department cases closed—
Total under treatment, March 31st, 1961-
18
2
2
10
11
128
24
40
235
243
16
1
14
98
11
93
233
10
65
93
158
89
69
13
42
~~1
23
9
221
47
33
376
389
30
5
16
125
15
189
380
139
189
328
153
175
21
60
2
3
33
20
349
71
73
611
632
46
6
30
223
26
282
613
19
204
282
486
242
244
Family members under treatment at March 31st, 1961:  Parents, 2; spouses, 17;  other, 1; total, 20.
Table 2.—Movement of Population, Out-patient Department, Mental
Health Centre, Adult Clinic, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Male
Female
Total
Case load as at March 31st, 1960..
Total admissions	
First admissions	
Readmissions	
Cases closed	
Case load as at March 31st, 1961..
65
93
80
13
89
69
139
189
142
47
153
175
204
282
222
60
242
244
Table 3.—First Admissions to Mental Health Centre, Adult Clinic, by
Health Unit and School District of Residence, April 1st, 1960, to
March 31st, 1961.
Detailed information for the above table may be obtained on request.
 MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
H 159
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 H 164
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table 8.—Movement of Population, Day-hospital Unit, Mental Health
Centre, Adult Clinic, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Male
Female
Total
April 1st, 1
J60 _ _	
4
42
7
12
86
17
16
128
24
Totals.
53
47
115
104
168
Less discharges
151
In day-hospital,
March 31st,
1961 _  . 	
6
11
17
Total patient-days of those discharged
Total discharges 	
Average stay in day-hospital  	
4,582
151
30.3
Table 9.—Movement of Population, Children's Clinics, Burnaby
and Victoria, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
B
urnaby
Victoria
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4
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5
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5
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1
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16
7
1
3
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1
1
901  189
Private physicians. 	
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1|    291    34
1|    17|    29
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51
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189
114
46
23
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6
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1
2       4
27
18
140
5
109
5
37
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26
2
9
46
23
18
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(6) Continuing service  	
1
11| 189
329
91
51
28j    15
185
114
46
23
111  194| 379
3
1
	
4
......
1 -
4
Treatment Section
35
66
22
79
13
39
21
31
11
26
13
24
10
9
6
13
69
140
62
147
43
109
103
44
24
46
63
10
12
23
28
6
1         1
1         1
9|    88|  157
11| 189| 329
141 2081 270
Cases carried in treatment at end of year.	
9
69
216
 MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
H 165
Table 10.—Summary of Diagnostic Service Given to Agencies by Burnaby,
Victoria, and Travelling Clinics, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Place of Examination
New
M.
Repeat
M.
Total
Burnaby Clinic	
Victoria Clinic	
Burnaby travelling clinics—
Cerebral Palsy Association-
Children's Hospital-
Health Centre for Children..
G. F. Strong Rehabilitation Centre-
Children's Aid Society..
Catholic Children's Aid Society
Jericho Hill School
Vancouver Island travelling clinics
Mainland travelling clinics	
Grand total	
75
27
9
6
15
2
5
3
2
21
137
58
7
5
3
13
2
6
2
1
5
67
19
3
13
1
6
" 6
2
9
29
16
2
20
168
37
30
13
37
5
37
7
3
37
253
627
 H 166                       MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
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c
 MENTAL HEALTH CENTRE
H 167
Table 12.—Summary of Services Given by the Chaldren's Clinics,
April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Stationary Clinics
Mainland
Travelling
Clinics
Vancouver
Island
Travelling
Clinics
Totals
Vancouver
Victoria
383
353
168
135
30
141
44
315
231
37
194
84
160
34
544
385
385
159
37
37
37
1,279
Total number of children given full examination —
Other agency diagnostic given full examination
Clinic direct-service cases given full examination.—
Other agency consultative cases 	
Clinic direct-service cases referred (private)—•
1,006
627
379
273
301
78
Table 13 .—Sources of All Cases Referred to Children's Clinics and
Service Given, April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Agency or Source
Number
of Cases
Type of Service Given
Agency
Diagnostic
Study
Clinic
Direct
Service
1. Social Agencies—
Children's Aid Society-
Catholic Children's Aid Society-
Jericho Hill School	
Family and Children's Service-
Department of Indian Affairs—
Catholic Family Services-
Alexander Neighbourhood House-
Social Welfare branches	
2. Institutions—■
Willingdon School for Girls	
Brannen Lake School for Boys ~
3. Medical and Health agencies—
Public health nurses 	
Cerebral Palsy Association-
Cerebral Palsy Clinic	
Children's Hospital-
Health Centre for Children	
G. F. Strong Rehabilitation Centre.	
Canadian National Institute for the Blind-
Speech and Hearing Association-
Central Vancouver Island Health Unit-
Upper Island Health Unit	
Skeena Health Unit  	
Cariboo Health Unit-
Local public health services-
Peace River Health Unit	
West Kootenay Health Unit-
Upper Fraser Valley Health Unit_
North Fraser Health Unit	
Selkirk Health Unit	
North Okanagan Health Unit-
South Central Health Unit	
South Okanagan Health Unit-
East Kootenay Health Unit	
Miller Bay Hospital-
Upper Island Health Unit-
Cariboo Health Unit	
4. Schools—
St. Christopher's School.	
Kindergartens  	
Others  	
5. Juvenile Court 	
Probation Officers	
6. Adult Court... 	
7. Private physicians .
8. Parents, relatives, self, friends..
9. Other. 	
Totals.
37
7
3
18
2
1
1
52
34
19
91
34
2
13
45
6
1
1
9
9
27
6
11
11
24
37
18
22
16
12
26
9
4
9
6
32
1
3
36
3
1
116
189
2
1.006
37
7
3
16
2
1
1
43
34
19
79
30
2
13
37
5
1
9
9
27
6
11
11
24
37
18
22
16
12
26
9
4
9
6
1
1
36
3
627
12
4
31
3
1
116
189
2
379
 H 168
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1960/61
Table 14.—Diagnoses of All Cases Assessed by the Children's Clinic,
April 1st, 1960, to March 31st, 1961
Male
Female
Total
Psychotic disorders—Schizophrenic reaction, catatonic type  	
1
1
4
12
5
3
1
1
1
60
1
4
1
8
2
1
8
39
27
21
7
9
137
10
15
22
14
2
1
2
2
20
6
3
7
2
3
2
1
1
69
161
1
1
9
2
3
4
2
3
23
1
1
1
2
2
10
22
17
10
7
4
43
6
11
16
16
1
	
3
1
3
2
4
1
2
1
35
39
1
Acute brain disorders—
1
1
5
Psychoneurotic disorders—
21
2
8
7
3
4
1
83
1
Disorder of character, behaviour, and intelligence—
5
1
2
10
4
1
18
61
44
31
Other                                                            	
14
Personality trait disturbance, other 	
13
180
16
Mental deficiency—
26
38
Mild...   	
30
Severity not specified    	
Mental deficiency (X4)—
3
1
5
Mild
3
23
6
5
11
1
Chronic  brain  syndrome  associated with  trauma  with  behavioural
2
Chronic brain  syndrome  of unknown  cause  associated  with beha-
3
Other—
Multiple sclerosis without qualifying phrase —	
Chronic brain syndrome associated with disturbance of metabolism
2
2
Chronic brain syndrome associated with convulsive disorder without
1
Chronic  brain  syndrome   associated  with   convulsive  disorder  with
2
104
Incomplete diagnosis — 	
200
Totals.      .        .                               	
697
309
1,006
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1962
660-1061-5022

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