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REPORT OF THE Department of Commercial Transport containing the reports on RAILWAYS, AERIAL TRAMWAYS,… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1961

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT
Hon. E. C. Westwood, Minister A. J. Bowering, Deputy Minister
REPORT OF THE
Department of
Commercial Transport
containing the reports on
RAILWAYS, AERIAL TRAMWAYS, PIPE-LINES,
INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORTATION,
and COMMERCIAL VEHICLES
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31st
1960
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1961
  Victoria, B.C., lanuary 27th, 1961.
To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Annual Report of the Department of
Commercial Transport for the year ended December 31st, 1960.
EARLE C. WESTWOOD,
Minister of Commercial Transport.
 Victoria, B.C., lanuary 27th, 1961.
The Honourable Earle C. Westwood,
Minister of Commercial Transport.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Commercial Transport for the year ended December 31st, 1960.
A. J. BOWERING,
Deputy Minister of Commercial Transport.
 Report of the
Department of Commercial Transport, 1960
A. J. Bowering, Deputy Minister
INTRODUCTION
This is the first Annual Report of the Department of Commercial Transport
which was created by the Government of British Columbia following the filing of a
report submitted by the Road Users Inquiry Commission in January, 1959.
The new Department was formed by combining the Department of Railways,
with the Commercial Vehicle Section of the motor-vehicle Branch and with the
Weigh Scale and Special Permit Section of the Department of Highways, and
includes the administration of the Pipe-lines Act, the Industrial Transportation Act,
and the Mines Rights-of-way Act. It also provides for certain aspects of the enforcement of the Motor Carrier Act under the Public Utilities Commission.
During 1960 the construction of the first major crude-oil pipe-line in the
Province for the marketing of British Columbia crude oil, the start of construction
of a vast natural-gas gathering system in the Peace River area, and the planning for
the transmission of natural gas from the Lower Mainland to Vancouver Island
highlighted the diverse activities of this Department.
The considerable progress made and efficient operation of this Department
through its formative stages was greatly assisted by the whole-hearted and valuable
co-operation of the Departments of Attorney-General, Finance, and Highways.
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT
Z 7
ENGINEERING BRANCH
(Railways, Aerial Tramways, Pipe-lines, and
Industrial Transportation)
R. E. Swanson, P.Eng., Chief Inspector
RAILWAYS
When the Department of Railways was absorbed by the Department of Commercial Transport in 1959, it was a case of the newest department inheriting one of
the oldest departments of the Provincial Government. The inheritance was a rich
one, for it included the files and records of one of the most colourful periods in
British Columbia's history—the introduction and development of railroading in the
economic life of the Province.
Although the Railway Act was passed in 1890, it wasn't until the appointment
of the first Minister of Railways in 1911 that the Government was able to administer
to the needs of a rapidly expanding railway industry. Following the construction
of the first transcontinental line, and up to and including the First World War, British
Columbia experienced a speculative boom in railways and, although many of these
early railways are still operating to-day, a great number of the companies that were
incorporated in those times planned fantastic schemes that never materialized
beyond the drawing-boards. Not a few were based on visions of wealth and power
generated by the vast resources of the Province that appeared to be there for the
asking.
Railroading in British Columbia had its beginning with the discovery of coal
on Vancouver Island and with the early onslaught of the logging industry on the rich
forests of the Province. There is uncertainty about the exact date when the first
logging-railway was introduced, but it has been established that Robert Dunsmuir
began using a locomotive to haul coal for the Canadian Collieries around 1880, and
in 1883 the Wellington Colliery Railroad was incorporated by an Act of the
Legislature.
Because extensive logging operations were being carried out in many widely
scattered areas both on Vancouver Island and on the Mainland, it has been difficult
for authorities to judge the authenticity of the many claims as to the first use of a
steam-locomotive in the woods. A locomotive is said to have been put to work
hauling logs at Chemainus in 1900, while the legendary "Curly," a diminutive
engine which stands to-day as a relic in Exhibition Park in Vancouver, B.C., is
believed to have been working in the woods as early as 1894. Whatever the claims,
the fact remains that logging-railways virtually ruled the industry for the first half of
the century. The decline of logging-railways came as logging receded farther and
farther into the hills, so that to-day the steam-locomotive is almost a thing of the
past and the more versatile rubber-tired logging-truck is now used almost exclusively.
The last load of Wellington coal was hauled by rail in 1953, to end an era of railroading for Nanaimo. However, there is still hope for the few remaining logging-
railways to continue, but, instead of the steam-locomotive, the less romantic but
more powerful and more economic diesel engine will be at the fore.
The records of the old Department of Railways show that prior to 1911 as
many as 179 railway companies were registered to operate in British Columbia.
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 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT Z 9
Most of these are now operated as part of either the Canadian Pacific or Canadian
National Railway systems; only a few are in operation serving the present economy
of the Province. Included among some of the grandiose plans for development were
at least two companies which planned to construct railways from Prince George
north-east to the British Columbia-Yukon Boundary at Teslin Lake. The earliest
of these proposed railways was filed with the Department in 1910, while the other
was registered in 1942. It is significant that both proposals followed almost exactly
the route of the proposed Pacific Northern Railway.
While it is true that many of the small logging-railways converted to truck
operations, it is a fact that the amount of tonnage moving by rail to-day is greater
than it has ever been before. The extension of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway to
provide a communications link between the Lower Mainland and the Peace River
was an extremely important advancement in the history of British Columbia railroading. The British Columbia Electric Railway Company Limited has also played
an important role in the development of the railway industry in the Province, and it
continues to operate many miles of track in the Lower Fraser Valley. A number
of the larger logging operations still rely on railways for the long transportation of
logs, the most notable of these being the Canadian Forest Products operation at
Englewood, where 75 miles of main line are maintained.
Inspectors from the Engineering Branch of the Department are responsible for
approving all engineering plans and specifications as to construction and operation
of railways. All plans and specifications of locomotives, rolling-stock, boilers,
pressure vessels, bridges, tunnels, structures, communications, telegraph, radio, etc.,
also require approval of the Inspectors. In addition, all operating procedures, such
as dispatching and operation of trains with regard to public safety, must be certified
correct.
In the field, inspections are made with regard to all rail operations within the
Province, including the inspection of right-of-way, ballast, bridges, ground and soil
conditions, drainage, farm crossings, highway crossings, pipe-line crossings, overhead
crossings, wire crossings, track conditions, curvature alignment, super elevation,
switches, road signals, and dispatching.
Operating personnel certified by Inspectors include locomotive engineers, conductors, power-car operators, crane operators, and dispatchers. Certificates of
competency signed by the Chief Inspector and the Minister are issued to each successful examinee.
Principal railways inspected are as follows: Pacific Great Eastern Railway,
British Columbia Electric Railway, Canadian Forest Products Limited, and Comox
Logging & Railway Company.
In addition to the above railways, the engineers inspect all the railways in
British Columbia which are under the Federal Board of Transport with regard to
fire inspection, and each Inspector has been appointed as a Federal Inspector under
the Federal Act in addition to being an Inspector under the Provincial Act.
LOGGING-RAILWAYS
Canadian Forest Products Limited
The logging-railway of Canadian Forest Products Limited in the Nimpkish and
Englewood areas rates as a classic example of how railway and truck logging may
be integrated into a smoothly functioning, highly efficient operation. Three years
ago the railway was extended to Nimpkish Lake from Beaver Cove so that logs
could be railroaded from Vernon Lake, where they are loaded, to Beaver Cove, a
  DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT Z 11
distance of about 60 miles. The railway operation of this integrated system uses a
considerable number of diesel-electric locomotives, as well as rail cars for the transportation of personnel. The dispatch system makes use of both microwave radiotelephone and land telephone. During the year, inspections were made of all phases
of this railway-trucking system in the area, where the company maintains a high
standard of safety.
The following is the report of the 1960 inspection by the Department's
Inspector:—
Inspecting Engineer's Report
W. F. Thomas, Inspector
During the period November 3rd to 9th, 1960, an inspection was made of the
railway installation and equipment owned and operated by the above company at
the Englewood Division.
Annual hydrostatic tests were applied to steam-locomotives 115 and 117, and
certificates issued with defects noted.
The boiler on locomotive No. 117 is due for internal and external inspections.
The dome cover and stand-pipe were removed in order to gain access to the boiler
to make an inspection above the tubes. It is anticipated the company will request
an extension of the internal and external inspections, and upon receipt of the request
an extension may be granted due to the favourable condition of the boiler at this
time; however, should defects develop which may require another inspection before
the expiration of the extension, the Department must be notified.
Rail-cars 121, 122, 124, 125, 126, 129, and 130 were inspected and reservoirs
tested.
Generally, the equipment is being very well maintained.
One conductor, one diesel-electric engineer, and two truck-drivers were examined and certified according to their qualifications.
The track and bridges between Beaver Cove and Vernon Lake camp were
inspected and found to be in good condition.
The following conditions were noted:—
Nimpkish Yard and Old Lake Dump Track: Renew packing missing from
frogs and guard-rails.
Tsultan Bridge:  Ties moving and some require renewal.
Halfway Island Creek Bridge: Renew broken ties.
Kinman Creek Bridge:  Shim cap No. 1 bent.   Inspected under load.
Woodengle Creek: Grillage sloughing bent No. 14. Renew No. 1 bent and
attention required No. 2 bent. Slow order of 6 miles per hour imposed
until repair completed.   Signs to be installed noting speed restriction.
An extensive inspection is being carried out by the company engineers of all
railway and logging-road bridges.
The Camp "A" siding transfer machine was inspected and found to be in good
operating condition and well maintained. This machine is equipped with a Cat.
D-1700 200-horsepower engine in conjunction with a Skaget BX 200 winch
equipped with a thirty-car-capacity spotting-drum. All controls are air-operated,
supplied from a 25-c.f.m. Curtis compressor at 160 p.s.i. The air-receiver was not
tested at this inspection.
An invitation was accepted to attend the camp safety rally, which was well
represented by members of all phases of the operation. The writer gave a short talk
on railway and truck safety, togeter with a graphic demonstration of braking power
as applied to logging-trucks.
 z 12 british columbia
Comox Logging & Railway Company
The Comox Logging & Railway Company is another example where integration
of railway and truck logging has resulted in a highly efficient operation. Logging-
trucks haul from the woods and unload in the Nanaimo Lakes, where the logs are
sorted and loaded on to specially constructed flat cars. At this operation—until
recently one of the last to employ a steam-locomotive—a number of diesel-electric
locomotives carry out the long-distance hauling. Various inspections of the operation were conducted by the Engineering Branch during the year.
The 1960 inspection report on this railway follows:—
Inspecting Engineer's Report
W. F. Thomas, Inspector
On October 13th, 1960, an inspection was made of the railway and equipment
owned and operated by the above company between Ladysmith and Nanaimo Lakes.
Locomotives 11 and 16 were hydrostatically tested, internally inspected above
tubes, and certificates issued with defects noted.
The boilers of both locomotives are due for internal and external inspections,
and the company intends to apply for extensions. In view of the favourable condition of both the boilers, it will be in order to grant the extensions, providing defects
do not develop before the next annual inspection, in which case the Department is
to be notified.
Rail cars 102, 104, gas switcher 107, and unloader 3 were inspected, reservoirs
tested, and certificates issued.
The track and bridges between Ladysmith and Nanaimo Lakes were inspected
and generally are in good condition. Twelve thousand ties were renewed since the
last inspection.
Ladysmith Yard and Dump:   Renew packing missing from guard-rails and
frogs.
Haslam Creek Bridge:   Redecked in 1960.   Caps require shimming at north
end.
Nanaimo River Bridge: Condition good.   Redecked in 1960.
MacDonald Curve:   Renew rail on outside curve.    Ball of rail getting thin.
Next curve north is in same condition.
Boulder Creek Bridge:   Condition good.
Deadwood Creek Bridge:   Condition good.
Nanaimo Lakes Yard:  Renew packing missing from guard-rails and frogs.
It was noted that locomotives 11 and 16 were being operated with boiler test-
cocks either plugged or frozen, which would indicate that the engine crews are not
testing the water-level in the boiler by use of the test-cocks. This is to be done
frequently—daily during the operation of the boiler—and the crews notified to this
effect.
MacMillan, Bloedel and Powell River Limited
MacMillan, Bloedel and Powell River Limited make use of three railway
systems to haul logs between Nanaimo River and Chemainus. Logs are loaded at
Nanaimo River and transported over the Comox Logging & Railway Company to
Ladysmith, where an interchange takes place with the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway, and the logs are taken to Chemainus, where the company operates its own
terminal railway to handle the sawmill and log-dump. This operation was inspected
a number of times during the year.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT Z  13
MINING-RAILWAYS
Mining-railways inspected each year by Department engineers include the
Sullivan mine at Kimberley and the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company
at Trail, each of which operate narrow-gauge lines. The Sullivan mine maintains
several miles of track between the mouth of the mine and the tipple at Kimberley,
on which electric locomotives perform the work. The railway is in excellent condition, and because the company is very safety-conscious, no serious accidents
have been reported for several years.
The tramming operation at Trail is also in good condition. All motormen
are certified by the Department, which has assisted in the past to promote safety
measures on the line.
KITIMAT
The Aluminum Company of Canada operates a terminal railway at Kitimat, and
this operation was duly checked. Problems of safety that were troublesome several
years ago have now disappeared.
STEEL-MILLS
A number of steel-mills in the Vancouver area which own and operate their
own trackage in and around the plants were inspected during 1960. The boilers
of locomotive cranes were hydrostatically tested, and certificates were issued to
operating engineers following examination.
PULP-MILLS
The railway serving the pulp-mill at Crofton is now well established, with a
fine record of safety behind it. The company operates a diesel-electric locomotive
over a system that serves the mill and barge-slip, and which is interconnected with
the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway.
Inspections were also carried out at MacMillan, Bloedel and Powell River
pulp-mill operations at Port Alberni and at Harmac near Nanaimo. Diesel-electric
locomotives and rolling-stock at both mills were inspected and certified. A similar
inspection took place at Elk Falls Company Limited's mill at Duncan Bay near
Campbell River.
The barge-slip, trackage, and wharfing facilities, as well as a diesel-electric
locomotive, all in operation at the Canadian Industries Limited plant on James
Island, were inspected, and the personnel examined and instructed in railway safety.
EXHIBITION RAILWAYS
Once again it was the Department's pleasure to inspect the antique narrow-
gauge railway operated for the enjoyment of railway enthusiasts by Mr. G. Well-
burn at Deerholme near Duncan. Two 15-ton steam-locomotives, rolling-stock,
speeders, and other historical railway equipment are maintained on the 3-foot line.
The locomotives were given hydrostatic tests and certified, and the whole operation
was checked thoroughly in the interests of public safety.
Also inspected was the miniature railway operated in Stanley Park in Vancouver by the Vancouver Parks Board. The miniature boiler, which carries 150
pounds pressure per square inch, was inspected and certified as a public safety
measure.
 Z 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
SAFETY TROPHY
Since 1952 the Department has awarded a safety trophy to the logging-railway
which has operated during the year with the best record of safety. This award has
been won every year since 1957 by the Comox Logging & Railway Company.
Presentation of the trophy is accompanied by a brief ceremony attended by company and Department representatives.
Annual inspection reports and statistical information relating to railway operations follow.
B.C. ELECTRIC RAILWAY MAIN LINE
Inspecting Engineer's Report
J. H. Carmichael, Inspector
On December 21st, 1960, the general annual inspection was made of the above
company's District 3 main line from Mile 0, New Westminster, to Mile 62.92,
Chilliwack, B.C. The inspection was made by track motor in company with Mr. L.
McLeod, Roadmaster.
In general, the line is in excellent condition and well maintained.    Between
Huntingdon and New Westminster this line serves as a transfer between the Northern
Pacific and Milwaukee Road terminals in Huntingdon and the Canadian Pacific
Railway, Canadian National Railway, and Pacific Great Eastern Railway in Vancouver.   This traffic is handled by seven diesel-electric locomotives, maintained and
serviced at the B.C. Electric maintenance shops in New Westminster.
The following items were noted during the inspection:—
All passing tracks and spurs were found in good order.
Sidings are protected by locked derails where down grade to main line.
The main fine has been laid with 85-pound rail throughout.
Level crossings are in good order with well-maintained crossing signs.
Automatic signals installed at King George Highway, Scott Road, and the new
Trans-Canada Highway near Chilliwack were found in good operating
condition.
It was noted that the signal lights on the new Trans-Canada Highway crossing
on the west approach were not aligned properly toward approaching
highway vehicles.   This is being attended to immediately.
The steel bridge over the Vedder River and all wooden trestles are in good
condition.
Track-oilers installed to reduce flange and rail wear are showing good results.
Fractured rock above the right-of-way at mileage 54 has been blasted clear.
All overpass trestles have been raised to give the track standard clearance over
the roads concerned.
The repair-shops at New Westminster were inspected, and safety regulations
were up to standard and good housekeeping was very evident.
PACIFIC GREAT EASTERN RAILWAY
Inspecting Engineer's Report
R. E. Swanson, P.Eng., Inspecting Engineer
During 1960 various operational phases of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway
from North Vancouver to Fort St. John and to Dawson Creek were inspected. These
inspections included road-bed, train operation, dispatch and communications, sta-
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT Z 15
tion facilities, rolling-stock, shop facilities, and locomotives. With respect to the
maintenance-of-way operation of the company, certain data were supplied by the
office of the chief engineer of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company.
On November 26th, 27th, 28th, and 29th, 1960, the final annual inspection of
the road-bed and railway maintenance was made. The chief engineer and other
company officials were in attendance during the inspection. The trip was made from
Squamish to Dawson Creek and to Fort St. John.
New Rail Re-lay Programme—Inspection
During the inspection it was noted that in 1959 25 miles of old 60-pound rail
was replaced by new 85-pound rail between Mile 320.15 and Mile 344.90 on the
Prince George Subdivision.
It is also noted that approximately 41 miles of 60-pound rail requires to be
renewed between the Two Mile Flat, Quesnel, Mile 386.9 and Mile 344.7.
The rail re-lay programme, replacing 60-pound rail with 80-pound rail, which
was inaugurated in 1948, is now complete with the exception of the above-noted
mileages. It is also noted that considerable rail on the branch line between Chet-
wynd and Dawson Creek is of the old 60-pound re-lay quality; however, traffic on
this branch line at present does not warrant the installation of heavier rail.
Rail wear is noticeable on Cheakamus Hill north of Squamish. In this regard
some of the rail on the curves requires to be either turned or renewed in the near
future. With regard to rail renewal on the Squamish Hill, it is recommended that
a programme should be set up whereby 100-pound rail or heavier will replace the
present 85-pound rail on the Pavilion Hill and the Squamish Subdivision.
Tie Renewals—Inspection
Inspection revealed that a total of 58,000 untreated and 36,000 treated track
ties were renewed during 1959, with 67,000 treated and 27,000 untreated ties in
1960, between North Vancouver and Prince George. The tie programme provided
for the major portion of replacements to be of treated ties; however, it was pointed
out to the Inspectors that it was not possible to obtain treated ties and the number
of treated ties was substantially reduced.
Ballast Programme—Inspection
A total of 126 miles of main-line track was ballasted with pit-run gravel during
1959, with 56.5 miles in 1960.
Eleven sidings were ballasted on the Squamish and Lillooet Subdivisions during
1959 and 1960.
New Bridges—Inspection
1. The replacement of the trestles at Cuisson Creek, Mile 356.3, and Australian Creek, Mile 364.3, was completed during 1960. During the year both trestles
were constructed on new alignments parallel to and approximtaely 35 feet away
from the existing old trestles, and creosoted timber was used.
2. Two minor timber trestles were rebuilt in kind by railway company forces
at Mile 95.0 and Mile 95.4.
3. The pile-and-timber trestle partially destroyed by fire at Mile 185.3 was
replaced with a fill-and-timber crib.
4. The highway deck on the Peace River Bridge was removed and the railway
bridge deck rehabilitated by Defence Construction Ltd. after opening of the new
highway bridge over the Peace River to vehicular traffic.
 Z 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
5. Final painting of the steel superstructure of the Peace River Bridge was carried out by contract to West Coast Painting Co. Ltd., of Vancouver, after removal
of the highway deck.
Bridge and Building Maintenance
Bridge and building maintenance work was carried out over the entire fine by
seven B. and B. gangs, a water-service gang, and a paint gang. The following is
a summary of the various projects completed by the end of 1960 and inspected:
Seventy-eight bridges repaired and maintained; five small bridges on Squamish
Subdivision rebuilt; six trestles north of Prince George extended one or two bents
each and protection piling driven; two stockyards constructed (Dawson Creek and
Fort St. John); three timber end- and side-unloading ramps constructed; one industrial side-loading ramp at Prince George.
Maintenance was carried out on section-houses, bunk-houses, stations, mechanical department buildings, and freight-sheds at various locations.
Painting of approximately fifty-five individual buildings along the line between
North Vancouver and Prince George was completed by the end of 1960.
Fencing
Nine miles of new fencing was constructed during 1959 and 31 miles during
1960 in areas where it was most urgently required to eliminate the hazard of live
stock on the right-of-way. Most of the fencing was carried out in the Graham and
Wright areas, where there is the largest incidence of accidents to cattle on the
right-of-way.
Construction of Sidings and Inspection of Same
The following sidings and tracks were constructed and inspected during
I960:—
(1) Railway company trackage:
45-car capacity yard track, North Vancouver.
No. 1 siding, Lillooet, extended from 41-car to 119-car capacity.
No. 1 siding, Prince George, extended and cross-overs installed to
provide two tracks of 116-car and 127-car capacity.
Connection of east end of interchange track to C.N.R. main fine at
Prince George.
No. 2 track at Septimus—60-car capacity.
(2) Private-trader trackage:
McKeen & Wilson, North Vancouver.
Vancouver Wharves, North Vancouver.
Commonwealth Forest Industries Limited, Mile 65.7.
L. E. Talbot, Pemberton.
Richmond Plywoods Company Limited, Pemberton.
Le Blanc & Pierce & Son Limited, Birken.
Blackwater Timber Company, Devine.
Imperial Oil, Lillooet.
Storm Logging, Mile 312.9, Williams Lake.
Dominion Tar & Chemical, Mile 461.0, Prince George.
Pas Lumber Company, Mile 539.7, Anzac.
Fort St. John Lumber Company, Chetwynd.
Trans-Prairie Pipeline Company, Taylor.
Phillips Petroleum, Taylor.
Milwhite Mud & Chemical Limited, Fort St. John.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT Z  17
Inspection of Rock Cuts, Concrete Walls, Drainage, etc.
The programme of widening and daylighting cuts to improve drainage, visibility, and to facilitate snow-clearing, as well as to enable the railway to handle
larger loads between North Vancouver and the north, Was continued through the
year, mainly along Howe Sound and between Cheakamus and Lillooet.
"Permanent concrete retaining-walls were constructed along Howe Sound between Mile 19.5 and Mile 24.5. This work was carried out during January and
February, as well as in December of 1959.
Drainage was greatly improved over the entire line, with track boxes being
installed where suitable and a considerable number of culverts installed and extended, particularly between Mile 482 and Mile 496.5, as well as on the Fort St.
John and Dawson Creek Subdivisions.
Inspection of Grade Stabilization
An extensive programme of stabilization of slopes, etc., was under way north
of Prince George, being a continuation of the original construction, and south of
Prince George, which was mainly concerned with the elimination of sink-holes and
slides which have given considerable trouble over the past years.
Weed-control Inspection
Two hundred miles of road-bed, 16 feet wide, were sprayed with a soil sterilant
and weed-killer. Those sections of the road-bed between Mile 11.5 and Mile 424,
most subject to heavy weed growth, were found to have been sprayed.
Track Maintenance
From the foregoing it is evident that inspection revealed that track conditions
continued to be generally improved throughout the line, with the installation of
heavier rail, ballasting, tie renewals, weed-control, and ditching of wet cuts and
improved drainage.
Railway Crossings
Two sets of automatic protection apparatus with gates were installed at the
Alaska Highway rail crossings at Taylor and Dawson Creek. These were in operation by June, 1960, and inspection revealed them to be in order.
Four sets of automatic protection apparatus are ordered for the following
crossings: Mile 465.9 and Highway No. 2-97, Mile 253.8 and Cariboo Highway,
Mile 38.97 and Squamish Arterial (Cleveland Avenue), and Mile 344.8 and old
Cariboo Trail (now Cariboo Highway).
An overpass has been discussed at Mile 253.9 to eliminate the level crossing,
but until the overpass is built the installation of automatic protection is necessary in
the interest of safety to the travelling public, both on the highway and on the railway.
Where overpasses supersede automatic signals, the equipment can be relocated at
other dangerous crossings.
Inspection of P.G.E. Communications Department
The southern extension of the microwave system from Clinton to Vancouver
was completed for operational use during 1959. The southern system was then
connected to the northern system so that the Pacific'Great Eastern now has fully
operational a system just over 700 miles long involving over sixty voice channels
and thirty-five teletype channels.
 Z 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Train Dispatch—Inspection
The flexibility of operation by the microwave system makes it feasible for train
dispatching to be carried out from the head office in Vancouver, and for this purpose
the P.G.E. communications department built a dispatch centre in Vancouver.
Operation of the dispatch centre puts the dispatchers and the chief dispatcher in one
room and provides instant and close contact between all train dispatchers and the
executive staff in the head office.
Inspection of Teletype Service
A telegraph system on the Pacific Great Eastern was approved in 1959 by
Order in Council, and, as a result, a microwave teletype control centre was established at Vancouver, giving all agents a direct teletype link to head office in Vancouver and, through the head office, to all other agents throughout the P.G.E. line.
The equipment necessary to achieve this operation was not available commercially,
and a special teletype exchange was designed and built in company shops to provide
the facilities required.
Commercial Telegrams.—The design of the new exchange increased the potential capacity of the teletype system by a very large amount, and made possible the
commencement of a commercial telegraph service handling telegrams, telegraph
money-orders, etc. This service was approved by the Department by Order in
Council, Certificate No. 990, which established the tariff. Interchange arrangements were made with Canadian National Telegraphs and a tie-line between the
Canadian National exchange in Vancouver and Pacific Great Eastern was installed
to speed up handling of interchange traffic. Inspection reveals the service to be
satisfactory.
Land Line Obsolete.—Inspection revealed that by the end of October, 1959,
the land line had ceased to be used for P.G.E. service, and the number of linemen
was reduced.
Inspection of Equipment Communications
During the year all speeders on the line have been equipped with radio.
Speeders were not equipped with electric power, but suitable power-supply layouts
for this purpose were made available. This is considered a move paramount to
safety.
Inspection of Reflector and Relay Stations
In connection with the construction of the microwave system, a total of seven
passive reflector-sites has been established on strategic mountain-tops along the
route, thereby cutting down the number of active stations by ten and placing existing
actives at more favourable locations. The sites chosen have proved efficient and
practical, with the exception of that on the Murray Range, where adverse weather
conditions were found to exist. A redesign of the path system and transmitter gain
to overcome this problem was completed and necessary equipment installed during
1960.  Checks by our Inspectors at various points prove the system to be satisfactory.
Inspection of Traffic Department
Revenue car loadings on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway have increased
steadily over the past ten years.  The increase in 1959 over 1958 is as follows:—
Revenue car loadings, 1959  55,913
Revenue car loadings, 1958  42,690
Increase, 1959 over 1958  13,223
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT Z 19
A similar increase is reflected in actual gross ton-miles, as follows:—
Actual gross ton-miles, 1959  966,191,538
Actual gross ton-miles, 1958  823,361,791
Increase, 1959 over 1958  142,829,747
Inspection of Passenger Department (Passengers Carried)
The number of revenue passengers dropped from 166,296 in 1958 to 131,319
in 1959; however, the average passenger journey increased from 88 miles in 1958
to 125 miles in 1959. The decrease in number of passengers is partially attributable
to a decline in construction work between Lillooet and Squamish. The increase in
both revenue and average journey indicates numerous passengers using through service to the Peace River area. This service was to be augmented by bus service late
in 1960.
Conclusion
The over-all condition of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway has improved and
facilities have been increased to cope with increasing traffic.
The northern and southern extensions of the railway are now in full operation.
The microwave dispatch and communication system is working efficiently.
The betterment programmes are continuing and will continue through 1961,
so that the railway generally is up to the required standards.
Grade level crossings on the railway require study to eliminate, as far as possible, the inherent dangers involved where highways cross railways at grade level.
Railway Crossings on Pacific Great Eastern Railway, North Vancouver to
Fort St. John and Dawson Creek, Year Ended December 31st, 1960
Public crossings  131
Private crossings  40
Industrial crossings  68
Farm crossings  83
Pipe-line crossings  12
Pedestrian crossings —  9
Others (power-lines, pipe, etc.)  48
Total  391
EQUIPMENT INSPECTIONS DURING 1960
Following is a list of individual inspections carried out by Department engineers:—
Hydrostatic tests applied to boilers  64
Internal and external inspections of boilers  5
Internal-combustion locomotives inspected and certified  31
Air-locomotives hydrostatically tested  9
Electric locomotives inspected and certified  5
Self-powered rail cars inspected and certified  20
Diesel-electric locomotives inspected  91
Air-receivers tested and inspected  10
Railway cars inspected on industrial railways  350
Railway cars inspected on common-carrier railways  150
 Z 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Miles of railway track inspected  1,980
New diesel-electric locomotives inspected and put in service  4
Second-hand diesel-electric locomotives imported and put in service 3
Aerial tramways inspected and certified  8
Railway conductors examined and certified  6
Power-car operators examined and certified  3
Internal-combustion locomotive engineers examined and certified 11
Locomotive-crane engineers examined and certified  5
Diesel-electric  locomotive   engineers   examined   and   certificates
issued, P.G.E. Railway  6
Diesel-electric  locomotive  engineers   examined   and  certificates
issued, B.C. Electric Railway  4
Motormen   examined   and   certified,   Consolidated  Mining   and
Smelting Company of Canada  2
Locomotive engineers examined and certified (total)  28
Accidents reported on P.G.E. Railway  113
Fatal accidents on P.G.E. Railway      	
Accidents reported on B.C. Electric Railway  7
Fatal accidents on B.C. Electric Railway      	
Number of pipe-lines constructed  57
Miles of new pipe-line inspected  654
Accidents investigated on logging and industrial railways  3
SUMMARY OF ACCIDENTS REPORTED, YEAR ENDED
DECEMBER 3 1st,  1960
Fatal
Injured
Major
Minor
Pacific Great Eastern Railway—
1
2
3
1
101
Other  	
6
B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd.—
6
Other    ...                      	
3
Industrial railways—
2
Other                                -                         	
Locomotive cranes—Employees   	
4
1
5
129
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT
Z 21
LIST OF RAILWAYS AND SUMMARY OF MILEAGE
Industrial Railways
Head Office
Operating
Mileage
No. and Owners/Name of Railway
Main
Track
Sidings,
etc.
Total
Gauge
Montreal
Revelstoke
Vancouver
Montreal
Montreal
Vancouver
Vancouver
Montreal
Montreal
Vancouver
Trail	
Trail	
Fernie  -
North Vancouver
MesachieLake
Vancouver    .
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver....
Vancouver.—.
Vancouver
Vancouver
MesachieLake
New Westminster
Calgary. 	
Vancouver
Vancouver
Honeymoon
Bay
2.9
0.92
1.50
3.19
6.09
0.92
4.00
0.75
6.00
126.00
6.00
10.00
7.01
28.45
19.00
42.01
1.53
2.00
7.50
1.00
3.00
5.39
4.10
1.80
1.00
1.50
0.33
5.20
3.68
2.00
1.25
7.60
0.95
Standard.
Revelstoke	
Crofton    	
North Vancouver
New Westminster
Nimpkish Valley
Union Bay	
James Island
Watson Island,
Shames, and
Kalum
Ladysmith	
Trail 	
3. B.C. Forest Products Ltd	
2.50
0.75
3.00
13.80
4.00
1.75
7.01
5.05
4. Canada Creosoting Co. Ltd	
5. Canada Creosoting Co. Ltd.	
6. Canadian Forest Products Ltd. .
7. Canadian    Collieries    Resources
Ltd.
8. Canadian Industries Ltd.	
3.00
112.20
2.00
8.25
30" and
standard.
Standard.
36" and
standard.
Standard.
10. Comox Logging & Railway Co.
11. Consolidated Mining & Smelting
Co. of Canada Ltd.
12. Consolidated Mining & Smelting
Co. of Canada Ltd.
23.40
19.00
9.00
1.53
0.10
6.00
1.00
1.58
1.00
1.80
18".'
Kimberley	
33.01
18", 36".
30".
North Vancouver
Mesachie Lake ....
Port Mellon	
Duncan Bay	
Chemainus	
Dunsmuir District
Harmac Pulp
Division
Port Alberni. —
Powell River
1.90
1.50
Standard.
15. Hillcrest Lumber Co. Ltd.	
16. Howe Sound Transportation Co.
Ltd.
17. Elk Falls Co. Ltd.   .
18. MacMillan,  Bloedel  and   Powell
River Ltd.
19. MacMillan,   Bloedel   and   Powell
River Ltd.
>■
3,00
3.81
3.10
"
River Ltd.
1.00
River Ltd.
1.50
0.33
5.20
3.05
2.00
1.25
7.00
0.95
River Ltd.
23. Osborn Bay Wharf Co. Ltd.
New Westminster-
25. Phillips Petroleum Co.    —	
0.63
North Vancouver..
Twigg Island	
Honeymoon Bay—
Quesnel.	
"
28. Western Forest Industries Ltd. —
29. Western Plywood (Cariboo) Ltd.
0.60
»
Common-carrier Railways
30. Pacific Great Eastern Railway..
31. B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd.
Vancouver.
Vancouver to Fort
St. John and
Dawson Creek
New Westminster-
Huntingdon-
Chilliwack
788.60
76.58
146.10
25.29
934.70
101.87
Standard.
AERIAL TRAMWAYS
The use of aerial tramways in industry and in the field of recreation as a
means of transportation places these facilities under the jurisdiction of the Engineering Branch of the Department.    This mode of transportation, which includes
 5  »
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1-9
H
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT
Z 23
ski lifts, such as are in use at various winter resorts throughout the Province, and
the industrial aerial tramway at Kemano, is regularly inspected by engineers of
the Branch. Safety standards required by the Department of Commercial Transport
are such that regulations for aerial-tramway construction in British Columbia have
served as a model for many countries in the world. Inquiries regarding specifications have been received from as far afield as New Zealand, and one of the American States has adopted British Columbia standards as a guide in drafting its own
regulations.
New tramways constructed and placed in operation in British Columbia since
1958 include the Silver King Tramway at Nelson and the Star Hill Tramway at
Kimberley.
The factors involved in the construction of aerial tramways, which must receive
prior approval of Department engineers, include the location, the design of the
tramway, and all mechanical appurtenances. The type of wire rope to be used is
given careful consideration by the inspecting engineer. Field inspection of tramways may be made periodically, but an annual inspection is always carried out.
The annual inspection involves the engineer riding the tramway to inspect all parts,
including towers, anchors, and fittings. A certificate is then issued, which permits
the tramway to continue operations.
Among the tramways regularly inspected are the Aluminum Company of
Canada tramway at Kemano, the Dog Mountain Aerial Tramways, Grouse Mountain Resorts Limited, Lifts Limited, Hollyburn Aerial Trams Limited, the Royal
Canadian Navy Aerial Tramway at Kamloops, and the Red Mountain Ski Club lift
at Rossland. The Red Mountain Ski Club lift, one of the highest ski lifts on the
continent, which was approved by Department Inspectors in 1953, is typical of the
class of lift found at resorts. It is 1,400 feet in vertical height, 3,800 feet long, and
carries seventy skiers at a time, from the lodge to the summit, in about ten minutes
at a rate of over 200 passengers per hour. Unless such means of transportation
are subject to Government inspection so that safety standards are enforced and
mechanical efficiency maintained, it can be readily seen where the travelling public
could be exposed to danger.
No serious accidents were reported on aerial tramways during 1960, and it
appears that this type of uphill transportation is gaining wide public acceptance.
It is understood that several large aerial-tramway installations are planned for future
development in conjunction with the creation of parks and recreational playgrounds
that are being made available for public use.
INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORTATION
In the administration of the Industrial Transportation Act, the air-brake systems of a total of 648 heavy-duty logging-trucks were checked by the Engineering
Branch in 1960, and 105 new and reconditioned trucks were certified before being
put into service.
The Department's administration of the regulations governing the installation
and maintenance of air-brake systems in logging-trucks and other vehicles which
operate on industrial roads has been credited with saving not only the equipment,
but the lives of operators as well, when partial failures of braking systems have
occurred.
Because they are safer and more efficient, air-brakes are compulsory on industrial roads, replacing vacuum and hydraulic brakes, which cannot cope safely with
the heavy loads transported by logging-trucks.
  DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT Z 25
Department Inspectors conduct classes in all parts of the Province teaching
safety and training drivers in the proper use of air-brakes and other safety devices
used in transportation. In co-operation with the Department of Education, classes
are held at the Vocational Training School in Nanaimo and at Vancouver, and,
following examinations, successful operators receive a certificate of competency
signed by the Minister. Three mobile units, equipped with complete braking systems mounted on panels, are maintained by the Department so that drivers in the
Interior of the Province may receive the benefit of the air-brake training classes.
Classes are also conducted for the benefit of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
so that its officers may be kept up to date on air-brake requirements for heavy-duty
trucks. Many trucking companies who operate equipment on public highways only
have come to recognize the value of these classes and require their drivers to attend
air-brake schools in order to obtain a certificate.
During the year a total of 482 truck-drivers was certified in the proper use of
air-brakes, bringing the total number examined since the classes were instituted to
well over 5,000.
The Engineering Branch is also responsible for inspecting industrial roads to
ensure that they can safely accommodate heavy-duty trucking. This involves the
inspection of bridges and other structures.
The following is a list of the inspections carried out by the inspecting engineers under the Industrial Transportation Act:—
Logging-trucks inspected  648
Number of new logging-trucks put into service  105
Air-brake examinations conducted  520
Logging-truck operators certified  482
Royal Canadian Mounted Police examined and certified in air-brake
operation        3
Air-brake lecture classes held in Vancouver for students of Vocational Curriculum Development Division, Burnaby       3
Students examined      27
Air-brake lecture classes held for students of Dominion-Provincial
Vocational School, Nanaimo       4
Students examined      59
Lecture class held at Haney Correctional Institution on air-brakes ...       1
Students examined      11
Lecture classes held for mechanics for Department of Education ___ 32
Mechanics examined and certified for Department of Education ... 41
Air-brake lecture class held for Mining Inspectors, B.C. Government      1
Accidents investigated on logging-truck roads       5
Fatal accidents on logging-truck roads        1
Air-brake Lectures and Examinations Held in the Field
Number Number
Attending Examined
Port Alberni  48 29
Texada Island  26 14
Colwood  36 26
Duncan   52 31
Englewood     18
Golden   46 28
Cranbrook     8
  DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT Z 27
Air-brake Lectures and Examinations Held in the Field—Continued
Number Number
Attending Examined
Fernie — — 7
Creston  21 12
Port McNeill  _ 10
Nakusp  26 13
Lumby  38 18
Englewood   _ 6
Sechelt ____  41 20
Dominion-Provincial Vocational School, Nanaimo 52 52
Haney Correctional Institution, Haney  11 11
Totals   397 303
PIPE-LINES
A major function of the Department of Commercial Transport is the administration of the Pipe-lines Act, which provides the Provincial Government with
broad measures of authority over the construction and operation of oil and natural-
gas pipe-lines.
Broadly speaking, the Department exercises control over all pipe-lines wholly
within the Province used for the transmission of oil or gas, with control commencing
at a point adjacent to the outside limits of the well-head to a point of distribution
where the working-pressure is decreased to less than 100 pounds per square inch.
Before leave may be granted for construction of such a pipe-line, a certificate must
be obtained from the Minister approving all plans and specifications as to location,
size and capacity, toll charges, and other matters pertaining to the operation of a
pipe-line.
During the year the Department has been active processing and approving,
the pipe-lines contained in gathering systems within the approved petroleum and
natural-gas leases. These gathering systems play a major role in the development
of crude oil and natural gas in the known producing areas throughout the Province,
and also provide a means for the movement of these products to the major transmission-lines for ultimate delivery to the established marketing facilities within the
Province.
During the year three major pipe-line companies were granted certificates for
construction of pipe-lines. They include the Magna Pipeline Company Limited,
Gas Trunk Line of British Columbia Limited, and Trans-Prairie Pipelines Limited.
Magna Pipeline Company was granted a certificate in June, 1960, for the construction of a natural-gas pipe-line on Vancouver Island connected by a flexible
pipe-line to be strung across the floor of the Strait of Georgia for the transmission
of natural gas from the Lower Mainland to Vancouver Island. The pipe-line will
cost approximately $13,000,000 and will be the largest project of its kind in the
world where flexible pipe is used for the transmission of natural gas under the sea.
Samples of the pipe, manufactured by British Insulated Calender's Cables Limited,
the world's largest producer of submarine cable, were subjected to a series of exhaustive tests by the Department's Chief Inspector. Although the Magna pipe-line
will operate at a working-pressure of 1,500 pounds per square inch, the Department's engineering tests proved that the flexible pipe is capable of withstanding
pressures of up to 3,200 pounds per square inch. The pipe will be laid by cable
ship for a distance of 21 miles and into depths of water of up to 800 feet across the
 Important discoveries of vast reserves of natural gas in the north-eastern sector of the
Province have been the spur to the construction of Gas Trunk Line of British Columbia
Ltd. pipe-line. Here the pipe-line is laid across the Beatton River, a short distance east of
Fort St. lohn.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT Z 29
Strait of Georgia from a point near Ladner to within the vicinity of Crofton on
Vancouver Island. It will transport natural gas for distribution among consumers
in the major centres on Lower Vancouver Island. A contract to supply the flexible
pipe-line has already been let to British Insulated Callender's Cables Limited.
Some of the major oil companies in the world are associated with Gas Trunk
Line of British Columbia Limited, a newly formed company which was granted a
certificate on September 15th for the construction of a $93,000,000 natural-gas
gathering system in North-eastern British Columbia. Sponsored by Pacific Petroleums Limited, the company is owned by producers in the Fort Nelson area, including Westcoast Transmission, Imperial Oil, Home Oil, Shell, Texaco, Phillips Petroleum, British American, El Paso Natural Gas, and others. When completed, Gas
Trunk Line will extend approximately 250 miles, transporting gas from the Fort
Nelson area to join the present Westcoast Transmission system at Chetwynd. The
first phase of the project was completed last November at a cost of approximately
$6,000,000. Initial capacity of the completed system will be 350,000,000 cubic
feet a day when the transmission pressure is increased. Under long-term planning,
it is estimated that Gas Trunk Line's system will be capable of reachins a maximum
daily output of approximately 250,000,000 cubic feet a day by the winter season
of 1961/62, increasing to approximately 450,000,000 cubic feet a day in the winter
of 1962/63. This will be a big factor in the marketing of British Columbia's
natural-gas reserves.
A significant advance in the development of British Columbia's oil reserves
is the construction of the Trans-Prairie Pipeline Company's transmission-line in
the north-eastern area. Trans-Prairie's pipe-line is the first major crude-oil line
to be built in the Province, and it marks a major step toward the marketing of
British Columbia crude. A certificate for this $6,000,000 project was granted on
August 15th, 1960, and completion of the first phase, a line from the Boundary
Lake area to Taylor Flats and from Taylor to refineries at Dawson Creek, was
achieved in December. The major portion of the project will consist of a line
direct from the oilfield in the Milligan-Doig-Beatton River area, which the company
expects to complete early in 1961. Approval of the Trans-Prairie Pipeline project
is indicative of the Government's policy to encourage the development of the Province's oil resources.
All engineering plans and specifications covering the construction of all pipeline projects under the Pipe-lines Act are submitted to the Department, and if in
order are approved. One copy is returned to the pipe-line company so that it may
proceed with the construction of the pipe-line concerned. This involves pipe-line
pressure-stations, tank-farms, oil installations adjacent to railways, loading-racks,
and river crossings.
Inspectors check all pipe-lines during construction and supervise and witness
the final acceptance pressure test in the field. A complete record of the final test
is maintained in Department files. Particular attention is paid to the inspection
of highway crossings, river crossings, and compressor-stations.
Subject to field inspection and when the pipe-line is completed and has passed
a satisfactory test, a certificate is prepared by the Department and signed by the
inspecting engineer prior to approval by the Minister. This is necessary in accordance with the Act before a pipe-line can be placed in service.
In addition to the above, Inspectors make periodic field inspections to see that
pipe-lines are being maintained in the interest of public safety.
 Z 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT
Z 31
CRUDE OIL
TRANSMISSION
PIPE-LINES
TRANS-MOUNTAIN OIL
PIPE-LINE
TRANS-PRAIRIE PIPE-LINE
 Z 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Following is a list of pipe-lines approved, installed, and tested during 1959
and I960:—
Name of Company
Oil or
Gas
Project
No.
Pipe-line Location
British Columbia Electric Co. Ltd.	
Gas
1034
Ti-bury-Ladner.
1041
Roebuck Road-Tilbury.
„
1042
Tilbury-Fraserview.
1043
LaFarge Co. lateral.
1044
B.A. Oil Co. lateral.
,,
1045
Coquitlam-Vancouver.
1047
Roebuck Road-Port Mann.
1052
Delta-Richmond.
..
1054
North Vancouver.
1055
Coquitlam-Burrard Plant.
M
1058
North Vancouver.
„
1064
Huntingdon-Langley.
1079
Richmond.
1083
Huntingdon.
British Columbia Power Commission 	
1068
1056
Fort Nelson.
Dome Petroleums Ltd.                       	
"
Dome Basco Bubbles Field.
))
1070
Laprise Field.
Fargo Oils Ltd.                                	
1032
Blueberry Field.
Alaska Highway.
"
1033
Gas Trunk Line of B.C. Ltd	
1075
Boundary Lake-Taylor.
1076
Buick Creek-Laprise.
Inland Natural Gas Co. Ltd.                   	
1031
1035
Trail—Tadanac lateral.
"
Savona lateral.
,,
1059
Castlegar-Celgar.
,,
1065
Prince George.
„
1066
Prince George.
,,
1078
Merritt-Craigmont.
,,
1084
Prince George.
Pacific Petroleums Ltd.                  	
1037
Bubbles Field.
1038
Bubbles Field.
)t
1039
Jedney Field.
1051
Buick Creek.
n
1057
Bubbles Field.
1060
Fort St. John.
..
1061
Pacific-Bubbles Field.
,,
1062
Jedney Field.
1067
Fort St. John.
,,
1069
Boundary Lake Field.
,,
1077
East Laprise Field.
Sinclair Canada Oil Co	
1053
Jedney Field.
Trans-Prairie Pipeline Co. Ltd _	
Oil
1071
Taylor-Beatton River.
„
1072
Taylor-Dawson Creek.
,,
1073
Boundary Lake-Taylor.
1085
Boundary Lake Field.
»
1086
Taylor tank-farm, loading-racks and refinery.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT
Z 33
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE BRANCH
George Lindsay, Superintendent of Motor-vehicles
J. G. M. Lock, Director of Operations
The licensing of commercial vehicles in British Columbia is carried out by
motor-vehicle offices under the supervision of the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles
and through the co-operation of Government Agents' offices of the Department of
Finance. Licensing of commercial vehicles comprises registration, annual licensing
or quarterly licensing, and includes the issuance of trailer licences, temporary operation and non-resident permits. Many of the latter are issued by weigh-station personnel, and funds from this source are accounted for through motor-vehicle offices
and through Government Agents, a procedure which requires the assistance and
co-operation of employees of the Finance Department.
The main function of the Operations Branch is the protection of highways and
bridges throughout the Province by checking commercial vehicles to ensure that they
comply with size and weight regulations.
Under the Director of Operations, the Department maintains twenty-seven
weigh-stations and six mobile scales, employing a supervisor, six regional weigh-
masters, and sixty-nine weighmasters. Weigh-stations are now recognized as centres
where truckers may obtain operating permits, advice, and information, and it is
encouraging to report that in this regard the Department enjoys the co-operation
and support of the trucking industry.
The Director of Operations maintains a continuing record of bridge and road
restrictions within the Province through information supplied by the Department of
Highways, and by means of this information is able to provide a service to out-of-
Province and long-distance commercial operators who wish advice on routes and
allowable weights before starting their trips. Many calls are received at his office
for assistance of this nature, and this service has proven to be of tremendous value
to the trucking industry.
During the course of the year the Road Users Inquiry Commission, which was
appointed in 1958 and submitted a report in 1959, was reconvened by the Government to re-examine the Department of Commercial Transport Act and ancillary
legislation, and also to provide some sections of the trucking industry with the
opportunity to express views which had not been heard during the hearings of 1958.
Some changes in regulations resulted from recommendations brought down
by this Commission in 1960. Chief among these, and one which was of vital concern to the logging industry, was the relaxation of load limitations and the introduction of restricted-route permits authorizing the transportation of heavier loads
of logs or poles, saw-timber cants, and rough green lumber. Another important
change provided for a flat fee to be charged for oversize permits for all types of
trucks. The introduction of quarterly licensing, the provision of a ninety-day
permit for non-resident vehicles operating strictly on an interprovincial or international basis, provisions allowing for axle tolerances for all trucks, the reduction of
highway-crossing charges to a flat nominal annual fee, and the exemption of farm
implements from conforming to size and weight requirements were other concessions which have benefited the trucking industry. In addition, on some main highways, trucks have since been permitted to license for heavier loads as a result of
improved standards in highway construction. These and other revisions implemented in 1960 have contributed materially to the benefit of the trucking industry.
  DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT Z 35
Among the weigh-stations which are located at strategic points throughout the
Province, from the United States border to the Yukon boundary, some key scales
are kept open on a twenty-four-hour basis to provide truckers with a degree of service that was not possible in the past. The versatile portable scale is a proven
success, providing an invaluable measure of control in the remote areas of the Province. With the co-operation of motor-vehicle offices and Government Agents, the
number of locations where truckers may obtain assistance and operating permits has
increased from thirty-five to eighty-five.
During the latter part of 1959 and 1960, fifteen new weigh-scales were built in
the Province at control points and six portable scale units were placed in operation.
Because of their mobility, portable scales are used to patrol areas between the permanent scales and are operated from headquarters located at Victoria, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nelson, Prince George, and Dawson Creek. Frequently these
units are made available to commercial-vehicle operators who wish to determine the
correct weight of their equipment and loads before starting out on a trip. Quite
often this service saves the operator a great deal of time and inconvenience and
eliminates the necessity of a heavy load being moved over the highway before the
correct weight of the vehicle and load can be determined. This reduces damage to
highways, lessens the danger of accidents, and is a part of the over-all programme
to control movements of overweight and oversize loads for the protection of highways and the general public.
Special surveys initiated during the year by the Director of Operations, with
the assistance of the Supervisor of Weigh Scales, have provided valuable information
for improving the efficiency of weigh-station operations, reducing the time required
to render service to the industry and relieving truckers of some of the " paper work "
involved in certain aspects of reporting.
It is interesting to note that the establishment of weigh-stations at chief points
of entry into the Province has accounted for the collection of revenues under the
Motive-fuel Use Tax Act and for non-resident permits, which would likely have been
lost otherwise.
During the twelve-month period from January 1st to December 31st, 1960,
Department weigh-station personnel were responsible for checking a total of
1,328,300 vehicles to ensure that they were properly licensed and were complying
with oversize or overweight regulations.
Throughout the year, weigh-stations were also actively engaged in the performance of a number of duties relative to the operation of the Department of Agriculture, the British Columbia Forest Service, the Finance Department, the Department
of Highways, and the Motor Carrier Branch of the Public Utilities Commission.
Checks were made and records filed on the number of cattle and hay shipments
for the Department of Agriculture. For the Forest Service, checks on forest-product
shipments, including Christmas trees, were kept, and weighmasters were authorized
to issue fire permits. The issuance of motive-fuel use permits and the checking of
machinery shipments were carried out for the Finance Department, while traffic and
other special surveys were conducted for the Highways Department. In addition,
inspections of vehicles for operating authority were instigated to assist the Motor
Carrier Branch of the Public Utilities Commission. This is a service which was not
formerly provided, and one which was requested by the trucking industry and
approved by the Government.
 Z 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL COMMERCIAL-VEHICLE LICENCE FEES,
CANADIAN PROVINCES
Gross Vehicle Weight
in Pounds
B.C.
Alta.
Sask.
Man.
Ont.
N.B.
N.S.
P.E.I.
Nfld.
Average
4,000..
6,000..
8,000.
10,000.
12,000.
14,000.
16,000..
18,000..
20,000.
22,000..
24,000.
26,000-
28,000-
30,000.
32,000..
34,000..
36,000.
38,000.
40,000..
$20
30
50
75
95
115
135
155
175
195
215
235
255
280
305
330
355
380
405
$40
50
65
75
85
100
120
140
160
180
200
230
260
290
320
350
390
430
470
$25
67
110
110
150
175
200
225
250
275
300
325
350
375
405
435
465
495
525
$30
30
60
90
120
150
180
210
240
270
300
330
360
390
420
450
480
510
540
$20
25
50
68
88
103
118
151
179
208
239
273
309
356
391
427
463
502
542
$18
29
46
67
86
107
130
155
192
222
266
301
324
347
370
393
416
439
462
$16
23
43
64
89
117
150
187
208
229
250
271
292
313
334
355
376
$18
29
46
67
86
100
122
146
182
211
242
275
310
347
370
393
416
439
462
$20
30
45
65
85
105
140
175
210
230
250
270
290
315
345
375
405
450
450
$23
35
57
76
98
119
144
172
200
224
251
279
306
335
362
390
418
456
482
Note.—Above this weight, trailer combinations make it difficult for direct comparison.
Province of Quebec not listed as it is the only Province now licensing by tare (unladen) weight.
GENERAL OFFICE, ACCOUNTS, PERSONNEL RECORDS
D. I. Ewan, Senior Clerk
Close liaison with the Motor-vehicle Branch and with the Finance Department
is maintained by the Department's accounting office in Victoria regarding the depositing of fees collected by weighmasters. In this respect, weigh-stations were responsible for the collection of over $500,000 during the year.
In addition to regular administrative duties, a comparatively small accounting
staff of four is responsible for auditing all oversize and overweight permits issued
in the field, and during the past year this involved the checking of upwards of 2,000
permits a month. It is also responsible for the establishment and monthly invoicing
of charge accounts where operators have obtained term, overweight, and oversize
permits, which allows them to operate in a specified area without obtaining single-
trip permits for each trip.
The decline in motor-vehicle registrations as indicated in Chart No. 3 is largely
attributable to the transfer of privately owned station wagons from the commercial-
vehicle class to passenger-car class. The marked reduction shown in trailer fees in
Chart No. 1 is the result of licensing the complete vehicle for its gross vehicle weight
by a licence on the tractor unit and placing a nominal annual licence fee of $10 on
commercial trailers. Chart No. 2 shows that commercial-vehicle revenue from
licences and permits continues to increase substantially. In addition to this revenue,
commercial vehicles contribute almost twice that amount in fuel taxes. The revenue
from fuel taxes contributed by both passenger-cars and commercial vehicles is shown
in Table No. 1.
The establishment of the Department was increased by the addition of a Public
Information Officer, this position representing the only increase of staff during
the year.
Turnover of staff was normal during the first full year of operation. The position of Supervisor of Weigh Scales, which became vacant, was filled by means of an
open competition. To arrange for suitable supervision of field staff in the six regions
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT
Z 37
of the Province, weighmaster supervisors were appointed.   Replacements in other
categories were obtained by the recruitment of personnel at the starting level.
The newly implemented group insurance programme was favourably received
by all personnel, with the result that all but two of the eligible members availed
themselves of this added protection.
Chart No. 1
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 Z 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Chart No. 2
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COMMERCIAL    VEHICLE    REVENUE
lir.FNir.F   AND PFRMIT FFFS
2
FOR  THE   PERIOD
|QfS
fi  iqfin
1
1956
1957
1958
1959
I960
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT                          Z 39
Char
tNo. 3
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S310IH3A    JO    SdNVSnOHl
 Z 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table No. 1.—Revenue from Gasoline and Motive-fuel Use Taxes for
Passenger-cars and Commercial Vehicles
Fiscal
Year Amount
1950/51  $12,079,000
1951/52  13,079,000
1952/53  14,574,000
1953/54  15,963,000
1954/55  17,455,000
Fiscal
Year Amount
1955/56  $19,820,000
1956/57  22,593,000
1957/58  24,500,000
1958/59  26,100,000
1959/60  28,582,000
Table No. 2.—Summary of Commercial Vehicle Licences and
Permits Issued, 1960
Number of
Commercial
Vehicles Registered and
Licensed
Vehicles
Checked
at Weigh-
stations
Number of
Oversize and
Overweight
Permits
Issued
Number of
Non-resident
Permits
Issued
Number of
Temporary
Operation
Permits
Issued
January....
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July 	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
Totals-
12,698
61,190
15,133
5,571
4,134
3,499
2,364
2,039
2,036
1,532
1,340
1,035
112,571
70,030
88,035
97,508
108,929
96,860
143,732
109,089
107,593
141,048
135,297
105,399
124,780
1,328,300
1,536
1,672
1,895
1,486
2,002
2,295
1,951
1,810
1,884
2,219
2,009
1,213
21,972
1,040
1,145
1,996
1,238
1,345
1,623
1,523
1,337
1,601
1,258
1,160
1,480
16,746
996
1,106
1,814
1,816
1,846
1,820
1,386
1,434
1,343
1,184
1,117
840
16,702
Table No. 3.—Comparison of Revenue Collections from Licence and
Permit Fees for Five-year Period 1956 to 1960, Inclusive
Source
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
Commercial motor-vehicle licences..
Non-resident commercial permits—
Trailer fees	
Temporary operation permits	
Oversize and overweight permits-
Totals.- 	
$4,314,313.81
91,559.41
169,696.62
$4,359,750.33
106,882.19
185,866.41
$4,470,162.49 $6,804,101.57
133,716.34       189,374.66s
201,547.95      239,374.46
21,176.00
$4,575,569.84 $4,652,498.93
$4,826,602.78
159,796.56*
$7,534,836.28!
365,971.90
59,096.50s
36,744.05
356,128.68
$7,392,647.25
1,352,777.41
1 Commenced issuing licences on gross vehicle weight January 1st, 1960.
•   2 Department of Commercial Transport commenced issuing permits June 15th, 1959.
3 Licence fees now collected on gross-vehicle-weight basis are charged to tractor unit and $10 nominal fee
collected on trailer.   This has reduced trailer fees and transferred it to commercial motor-vehicle licences.
4 Department of Commercial Transport commenced issuing permits July 15th, 1959.
 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL TRANSPORT
Z 41
LOCATION  OF  OFFICES
AND  WEIGH-SCALES  THROUGHOUT
THE
PROVINCE WHERE
OPERATING PERMITS
ARE ISSUED
AND
TRUCKS MAY BE WEIGHED.
Headquarters, Department of Commercial Transport, Victoria, B.C.
Motor-vehicle Branch, 1730 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Engineering Branch, Department of Commercial Transport,
636 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.
WEIGH-SCALES
Hours
]
Hours
Location
Open                      Location
Open
Abbotsford	
  16                Lower Post	
 Intermittent
Cache Creek	
     8               Parksville 	
8
24
Dawson Creek 	
  24                Pattullo Bridge
Deas Island Tunnel North
    4               Prince George .
24
Deas Island Tunnel South
     4                Quesnel	
16
16
8
8
Douglas 	
  24                Rossland	
Duncan	
     8               Ruskin 	
Fernie 	
  24               Rutland	
Flood	
  24               Saanich	
8
Fort St. John 	
  24               Tupper 	
24
Golden     	
  16                Vernon	
8
16
Kaleden 	
  16               Williams Lake
Kamloops 	
  16               Yahk	
16
PORTABLE SCALES
Dawson Creek.
Lower Mainland.
Prince George.
Kamloops.
Nelson.
Victoria.
GOVERNMENT AGENTS' OFFICES
Alberni.
Kamloops.
Princeton.
Ashcroft.
Kaslo.
Quesnel.
Atlin.
Kelowna.
Revelstoke.
Burns Lake.
Kitimat.
Rossland.
Clinton.
Lillooet.
Salmon Arm.
Courtenay.
Merritt.
Sechelt.
Cranbrook.
Nelson.
Smithers.
Creston.
Nanaimo.
Squamish.
Duncan.
New Westminster.
Terrace.
Fernie.
Oliver.
Vancouver.
Fort Nelson.
Penticton.
Vanderhoof.
Fort St. John.
Pouce Coupe.
Vernon.
Golden.
Powell River.
Victoria.
Grand Forks.
Prince George.
Williams Lake.
Gulf Islands (Ganges).
Prince Rupert.
MOTOR-VEHICLE BRANCH OFFICES
Abbotsford.
Mission.
Trail.
Chilliwack.
New Westminster.
Vancouver.
Cloverdale.
North Vancouver.
Vancouver East.
Dawson Creek.
Point Grey (Vancouver).
Victoria.
Kamloops.
Printed by A. Sun
t Majesty
on, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellen
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1961
560-261-9926
   

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