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Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST 1960 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1961

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31st
1960
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it Please Your Honour:
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31st, 1960.
ROBERT W. BONNER, Q.C.,
Minister of Industrial Development, Trade,
and Commerce.
 The Honourable Robert W. Bonner, Q.C.,
Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31st,
1960.
THOMAS L. STURGESS,
Deputy Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce.
 Report of the Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce
For the Year Ended December 31st, 1960
FOREWORD
Several positive achievements key-noted the advent of the sixties for the British
Columbia economy. Underscoring economic development of the past decade were
the record levels reached during 1960 in personal income and value of manufacturers' shipments, which are approximately double the experience of ten years ago.
On the debit side and in common with the rest of North America, the past year was
marked by a slower rate of economic growth and a reduction in capital investment.
Industrial development in 1960 in many cases represented a continuation of
projects commenced in the previous year. These included further construction on
the integrated iron and steel operation at Kimberley, which will utilize the large
reserves of iron sulphide recovered as tailings of the Sullivan mine. The mill is
expected to commence production during 1961. The newly constructed fine-paper
plant on Annacis Industrial Estate commenced production of high-quality bond and
book paper. As well, a new flake-board plant utilizing cedar waste is now in operation. Another large project which has reached the production stage is the Castlegar
pulp-mill. This plant has a capacity of 500 tons a day. Other significant developments include the construction of large bulk-loading and storage docks at Port
Moody and North Vancouver.
Two of British Columbia's leading industries—forestry and mining—both
fared quite well during the year, with production values of $675,000,000 and
$175,000,000 respectively. In forestry a particularly impressive development was
the growth in output of the pulp and paper mills. Here expanded capacity, coupled
with extensive modernization at some plants, resulted in estimated total production
of nearly 2,000,000 short tons, an increase of 12 per cent over last year.
Lumber and plywood production were both at high levels during the first
three-quarters of the year. Of significance during the year was the gratifying increase
in lumber shipments to the United Kingdom.
Activity in mining during 1960 centred on iron ore, nickel, and copper, where
increased production occurred. As well, better prices for zinc and copper gave
considerable impetus to the industry. The large asbestos mine at Cassiar also continues to expand, and oil and gas prospecting is still very active.
A very poor fishing season severely curtailed fish-processing plants. A large
part of the decline was occasioned by the off-cycle year for two of the principal
species—sockeye and pink salmon.
British Columbia during 1960 exported goods through her customs ports
valued at an estimated $958,900,000. This record export of commodities is in large
part a result of greater shipments of our forest products. Other increases were
shown in sales of zinc, aluminum, copper, and copper tubing. Natural-gas and
crude-petroleum exports were also at much higher levels this year and are expected
to show further increases during 1961.
5
 Q 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Electric-power development continued to hold the spotlight in British Columbia
development in the past year. With the addition of 124,000 kilowatts at Bridge
River and 20,000 kilowatts by B.C. Hydro in 1960, Provincial capacity has grown
to nearly 3,000,000 kilowatts.
The labour force continued to increase during 1960, with a peak of 593,000
persons recorded in July compared to 584,000 a year earlier. Employment has been
maintained at last year's level through much of the year. Unemployment remained
at high levels partly as a result of the decline in construction activity.
Personal income in British Columbia has shown a progressive increase over
the past decade. The estimated value for 1960 of $2,825,000,000 represents a
doubling in personal income over 1950.
Retail sales during the past year increased for consumer necessities such as
food and clothing. However, despite an increase in personal income, consumer purchases slackened in such items as furniture, household appliances, radio and television sets. As well, sales of motor-vehicles were lower than during the previous
year. Prices on the whole showed little change over the previous year.
The following pages of this Report contain a review of the activities of the
several divisions of the Department—namely, the Bureau of Economics and Statistics; British Columbia House, London; Industrial and Trade Office; and the
Mechanical Tabulation Division. Also recorded is the board of management and
programme of the British Columbia Research Council.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1960 Q 7
BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND  STATISTICS
Before proceeding to review the work accomplished by the Bureau of
Economics and Statistics during 1960, it may be useful to explain that the Bureau
is a fact-finding and advisory body. It has two primary functions: the first is to
provide economic counsel and, when necessary, to conduct investigations into
economic questions affecting the Province; the second function is to collect and
compile economic statistics of interest to the Province.
To ensure technical proficiency, the Bureau has endeavoured to follow the
policy of building up a small corps of professionally trained persons who can be
relied upon to perform a variety of difficult economic analyses. It has also been the
policy to make the services of the technical personnel continuously available to all
other departments of the Government.
Since other Government agencies are also concerned with the collection of
statistics, a series of working agreements designed to prevent overlapping or duplication has been arranged in recent years between this Bureau and the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, as well as with the Provincial Departments of Mines
and Petroleum Resources, Labour, Provincial Secretary, Health Services and Hospital Insurance, and Social Welfare. During 1960 the essential statistical services
performed for the other Provincial departments as well as for the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce were maintained. A description
follows of the various services performed during the year.
ECONOMIC RESEARCH
One of the Bureau's functions is to provide economic counsel to the Government. This is done partly through the medium of a weekly report to the Premier
and to the Minister of each department. This report reviews significant events and
developments in the field of economics. As well, from time to time, technical assistance is given to the various branches of the Government as it is requested. There
are many publications prepared to keep government and industry informed on current business conditions. The two most widely distributed are the Monthly Bulletin
of Business Activity, containing a brief description of current changes in monthly
business indicators, plus statistical tables and charts, and the Annual Summary of
Business Activity, recording the past year's performance and including numerous
charts and historical series illustrating the economic position of the Province. In
recent years an executive opinion poll has been conducted at the end of each year
to gauge the outlook of industry for the coming year.
Many requests are received for information dealing with the Provincial economy
from private individuals, corporations, trade-unions, newspapers, business publications, and Boards of Trade. The Bureau's files and library contain much of the
information requested, but often special surveys and considerable research are
necessary.
The annual study of wage rates for selected occupations in the metropolitan
areas of Vancouver and Victoria and centres in northern and southern areas of the
Province was again prepared and published. The Civil Service Commission, as well
as other Government agencies and the public, was provided with these comparative
wage rates.
 Q 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1958, 1959, and 1960
Unit or
Base
Period
1958
1959
1960
Preliminary
Estimates
Mining—
Total value of production .
Gold production	
Silver production 	
Copper production 	
Lead production	
Zinc production.. _.	
Coal production 	
Forestry—
Total value of production .
Timber scaled      	
Lumber production  	
Paper production.  	
Fisheries—•
Total value of production  	
Pack of canned salmon _ 	
Agriculture—
Farm cash income     —
Apples—■
Total production  	
Exports  _	
External trade—
Exports of canned salmon 	
Exports of planks and boards, Douglas fir-
Exports of red-cedar shingles — —
Internal trade—
Total retail sales.  	
Department stores... —	
Motor-vehicle dealers — 	
Gasoline consumed   _ -
Railway freight loaded in British Columbia .
Electric power generated— 	
Sales of life insurance —
Construction—
New residential units completed  	
Building permits issued  	
Finance—Cheques cashed	
Employment—
All employment- _	
Manufacturing..
Iron and steel products _
Lumber and plywood	
Pulp and paper.-	
Mining  	
Logging	
Construction 	
Communication 	
Transportation .
Services	
Trade  ..	
Labour income —
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
M b.m.
M b.m.
Tons
$000
Cases
$000
Bushels
Bushels
Cwt.
Mft.
Rf. Sq.
$000
$000
$000
Gallons
Tons
000 kwh.
$000
Units
$000
$000
1949 = 100
1949 = 100
1949 = 100
1949 = 100
1949=100
1949=100
1949 = 100
1949=100
1949 = 100
1949 = 100
1949 = 100
1949 = 100
$000
146,758
6,762
6,086
2,965
34,627
43,235
5,938
550,441
5,349,508
4,849,945
809,149
98,458
1,900,025
121,955
6,016,000
2,623,000
614,107
1,612,128
1,814,711
1,631,221
228,147
296,776
305,610,000
11,484,162
11,882,703
400970
16,230
265,000
16,244,000
114.7
117.4
111.5
115.1
143.6
73.6
67.8
110.2
186.0
125.4
123.6
116.2
1,742,000
149,568
6,021
5,421
4,498
33,542
44,169
5,472
635,000
6,177,582
4,646,523
1,045,834
66,377
1,077,097
122,691
3,935,000
1,965,000
341,048
1,512,000
1,765,681
1,691,729
242,258
316,580
321,968,000
12,047,665
12,485,322
403,030
18,240
255,711
17,627,000
115.1
116.9
112.9
107.1
165.4
71.1
74.8
112.9
172.0
123.2
121.8
118.4
1,881,000
175,300
7,000
6,200
9,100
33,500
51,000
6,250
675,000
7,000,000
5,100,000
1,163,000
48,400
635,200
122,000
5,739,000
2,000,000
151,000
1,654,000
2,000,000
1,640,000
247,000
291,000
335,750,000
12,250,000
13,670,540
384,894
13,448
198,000
18,400,000
114.8
117.4
108.1
113.7
175.2
70.6
82.3
107.1
158.4
121.1
125.8
117.7
1,977,000
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1960
Economic Indicators in British Columbia
Q 9
£80
260
240
220
200
ISO
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
BUILDING PERMITS
1944        1-946      1948        1950       1952       1954        1956        1958        I960
YEARS
AVERAGE WEEKLY
WAGES
1944 1946       1948
FREIGHT LOADED
BANK jCLEARINGS
1944       1946      1948        1950       1952      1954       1956
YEARS
160
140
EMPLOYMENT
|  1949 =  100
120
LOO
80
60
40
20
1944        1946      1948 '     1950       1952       1954        1956        1958       1960
YEARS
1946      1948        1950       1952       1954
YEARS
1800
RETAIL TRADE
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1956        1958        i960
1944   1946  19
1950   1952  1954   1956   1958   I960
YEARS
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TRANSPORTATION AND TRADE
Transportation
The transportation section of the Bureau has been very active during 1960 in
the preparation of submissions to both the Royal Commission on Transportation,
headed by M. A. MacPherson, Q.C., of Regina, and the Royal Commission on the
Great Slave Lake Railway, under the chairmanship of Mr. Justice M. E. Manning,
of Edmonton.
The Federal Government has acted on the Report of the Royal Commission
on the Great Slave Lake Railway by ordering a detailed survey of the western
route—the route supported by the Government of British Columbia. The construction of this railway will have very important long-run implications for the industrial
development of North-eastern British Columbia. The Pine Point lead and zinc
mine, located at the northern terminus, will be the major alternative source of
supply for the Trail smelter of the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company.
While the Province of British Columbia can look with some satisfaction on the
results of the Manning Commission, it is still too early to comment on the MacPherson Commission. The Commission's report will not be received until late in
the spring of 1961.
The Bureau has played an active part in the preparation and presentation of
British Columbia's submission to the MacPherson Commission. The submission
was based on the objective of obtaining the cheapest and most efficient transportation. In general, the Province contended that the Canadian railways can be
developed into efficient and profitable businesses providing they are geared for the
work for which they have an economic advantage—the hauling of carloads of
commodities over long distances. The Government of British Columbia stated
that the railways should divest themselves of all unprofitable services whose deficits
are now financed by the freight-shipper. If unprofitable services must be maintained
because of public or national interest, a subsidy should assure that the railways at
least cover their out-of-pocket costs.
The Province's submission also dealt with the subject of railway-rate making.
It was suggested that- as a result of competitive forces- the railways could no longer
rely on a method of rate-making in which the value of the commodity was the
determining factor. The British Columbia brief placed the emphasis on the cost of
performing the service with a minimum rate regulation based on out-of-pocket costs
and a maximum rate related to the total cost of the service. The essence of the
submission was that the nation's freight should be allocated in the most economical
method possible so that the carrier with the lowest costs for any given movement
would get the business.
The decisions of the Commission will vitally affect the Canadian transportation
industry, and the report will be awaited with great interest.
External Trade
The year 1960 proved to be a very busy one for the external-trade function of
the Bureau.
The special problems which have arisen in international trade during 1960
have increased the interest and demand for data on British Columbia's foreign
trade. Examples of this demand for special compilations were the statistics and
information supplied to senior government officials in connection with the Premier's
visit to the United Kingdom this year and the data prepared for departmental representatives taking part in the Deputy Ministers' Conference in Winnipeg during
September.
 Q 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The volume of regular duties continued at a high level throughout the year.
Requests for information were received from a variety of inquirers, including other
Provincial department officials, foreign government departments, foreign business
organizations, Canadian business and institutional organizations, as well as universities and libraries. The statistics used to answer most of these requests were taken
from tables compiled by the Bureau's tabulation division, which uses monthly punch
cards received from the Dominion Bureau of Statistics in Ottawa. In addition,
some forty firms and individuals were supplied with monthly import and export
statistics of specific commodities.
Two major reports were published during the year—the regular annual Statement of External Trade, as well as a report listing imported items which indicate
potential import replacement industries. The latter report, which is prepared every
three years, is designed to encourage feasibility studies (by business firms and other
organizations) of some of the industry possibilities listed.
Other activities included preparation of statistical and written material for the
Bureau's annual and monthly reports.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1960
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The two foregoing tables summarize the external trade of British Columbia
from 1949 to 1959. These figures differ from the regularly published trade statistics
in that they are confined to exports of products of British Columbia origin and to
imports from foreign countries for British Columbia consumption. The regular
figures deal with all items imported and exported through British Columbia customs
ports.
STATISTICS
The Bureau is responsible for the collection, analysis, interpretation, and
publication of statistical information. Also, one of its duties is to assist other
departments in the compilation of statistical information and to assist in establishing
uniform statistical methods throughout the service. In addition, it co-operates with
other statistical bureaux in the elimination of duplication and answers inquiries
relating to statistical data. Following is a brief outline of the Bureau's activities in
this field.
Co-operative Statistical Agreements
Over the years the Bureau of Economics and Statistics has entered into several
co-operative statistical agreements with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics with the
object being to eliminate wasteful duplications of collection and to improve the
over-all efficiency of surveys. Fields of co-operation include practically all branches
of the Bureau's work where regular statistical collection is involved. The latest
agreements concluded are those relating to labour statistics and electric-power
statistics.
Conferences between the Provincial and Federal statistical bureaux are now
held annually. As a consequence, it is anticipated that continued progress toward
the elimination of duplication will be made.
In addition, conferences are now held periodically with the Federal Department
of Labour, and the elimination of duplication is under way, especially in the fields
of trade-union statistics and working-conditions statistics. Co-operative agreements
have resulted in savings to governments, to union secretaries, and to private industry.
British Columbia Cost-of-food Survey
The regular compilation of the quarterly cost-of-food index for Vancouver,
Victoria, and New Westminster was carried on during 1960. Trade-unions, individuals, and Government departments were supplied with information on food
costs during the year.
Forestry
In the earlier part of the year a visit was made by a Departmental representative
to the major European forestry interests to establish liaison and develop interest in
the possible establishment of new forestry operations in the Province. The success
of this mission may be judged by the numerous visits made to British Columbia by
interested groups and by the volume of requests for additional information. Of considerable aid in this respect has been the Bureau's brochure outlining areas favourable for the establishment of pulp and paper mills.
The usual number of requests were handled from industry and other Government departments, and contributions were made to various reports.
Mining
Preliminary estimates only are available for mineral production in British
Columbia during 1960. The total value of products is estimated at approximately
$175,300,000, up 17 per cent from 1959, and is the highest since 1956, when the
value reached $190,000,000.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1960 Q 19
Final statistics for 1959 are now available and are shown in detail in the following sections.
The value of mineral production in British Columbia in 1959 totalled
$149,568,162. This is an increase of $2,800,000 over the 1958 value, but is 8 per
cent below the average for the past decade. The principal metals, consisting of
placer and lode gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc, accounted for $93,651,572 or
62.6 per cent of the total.   Structural materials had a total value of $19,025,209 or
12.7 per cent; industrial minerals, which includes asbestos and sulphur, had a total
value of $14,028,055 or 9.4 per cent; miscellaneous metals, consisting of antimony,
bismuth, cadmium, iron concentrates, nickel, and tin, had a total value of $11,424,-
134 or 7.6 per cent; while fuels, consisting of coal, natural gas delivered to pipe-line
and liquid by-products, and crude petroleum, had a total value of $11,439,192 or
7.7 per cent.
Compared with 1958, the value for principal metals was virtually unchanged;
gains were recorded for miscellaneous metals, industrial minerals, and fuels; and a
5-per-cent loss was recorded for structural materials.
For gold, silver, and lead the 1959 quantities and values were a little below
those of 1958. For zinc, however, the quantity was below 1958, but the value was
greater, whereas copper prices were 12 per cent higher in 1959, and thus the output
was substantially greater than in 1958.
The miscellaneous-metals group showed gains compared with 1958, because of
increases in iron ore and by-product metals. Industrial-minerals group had increases
in asbestos, sulphur, and gypsum. The decline in the structural-materials group
from the 1958 level was in the main caused by reduced output of sand, gravel,
rubble, riprap, and crushed stone; the other items in the group—cement, lime, and
limestone, and stone—increased. Continued decreases in coal output has been
noted, but increases for crude petroleum, natural gas, and natural-gas liquids more
than offset the decrease in coal value, giving a combined value for fuels that is the
highest in three decades.
The average number employed in 1959 in all branches of the industry was
11,252. Major expenditures were: Salaries and wages, $49,961,996; fuel and
electricity, $7,677,321; process supplies (inclusive of explosives, chemicals, drill-
steel, lubricants, etc.), $17,371,638; Federal taxes, $8,401,819; Provincial taxes,
$2,195,194; municipal and other taxes, $2,059,480; levies for workmen's compensation (including silicosis), unemployment insurance, and other items, $2,140,112.
Dividends amounted to $16,444,281.
 Q 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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Labour
Under the co-operative agreement reached with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics last year the Bureau of Economics and Statistics participated in the first monthly
survey of Provincial employment and payrolls. A review of the findings for the
year 1959 and the first eight months of 1960 are reported under the heading of
" Statistics of Trades and Industries " in the Annual Report of the Department of
Labour for the current year.
Elimination of the annual Provincial labour inquiry and its replacement by a
single joint questionnaire issued in the names of both Dominion and Provincial
authorities has generally met with the approval of all parties concerned. The working arrangement of the plan has proven helpful, not only to the firms reporting, in
the elimination of duplicate inquiries, but also to the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics, in providing current labour statistics on a monthly basis, with detailed
information not previously available from the annual surveys.
Additional projects completed during the year under a revised work schedule
included the British Columbia Salary and Wage Rate Survey, 1960, a study of
salary and wage rates in industry and business, by various areas, prepared for the
Civil Service Commission, Victoria, B.C.; a survey of organized labour in British
Columbia, with a directory of trade-unions and such organizations, completed for
the Department of Labour; a survey of clerical salary rates in the Vancouver area,
prepared for the Vancouver Board of Trade; and various continuing projects and
items of research necessary in order to maintain a constant source of current labour
statistics in use by the Bureau.
Monthly payroll totals relating to a census distribution of British Columbia's
labour income for 1960 are still incomplete, and do not at this time permit a breakdown by regional areas, as noted in previous Annual Reports. As the first
complete year's totals become available under the new plan, however, subsequent
reports may contain a more detailed analysis in this respect.
The following table shows the estimated annual labour income totals in British
Columbia for the years 1947 to 1959:—
Estimated Annual Labour Income in British Columbia
Year Annual Income Vear Annual Income
1947   $641,000,000      1954  $1,302,000,000
1948    794,000,000      1955   1,426,000,000
1949    825,000,000      1956   1,649,000,000
1950    915,000,000      1957   1,761,000,000
1951   1,072,000,000      1958   1,742,000,000
1952   1,214,000,000      1959   1,881,000,000
1953  ; 1,279,000,000
Source: Estimates of Labour Income, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa.
MARKET RESEARCH
Keen interest is being shown by business and industry in the market potential
of the Province, and a large and varied number of requests is received for market
data and assessments of industrial and commercial opportunities.
The Bureau of Economics and Statistics is continually on the alert to detect
products which present a good opportunity for local manufacture, and in this connection has completed studies relating to the following: Glass and glass products,
and biscuits.   Others are aluminum products and products of iron and steel.
 Q 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Another aspect of market research which has received attention relates to the
study of specific areas of the Province. Such studies include those of Hope and
district and Chilliwack and district. Work is now progressing on a survey of the
Kamloops area.
PUBLICATIONS
Monthly Bulletin of Business Activity.—This publication has been continued
and expanded. Special articles of current interest have been included throughout
the year. Issues for the first, second, and third quarters include an economic review
of the preceding quarter.
Summary of Business Activity in British Columbia.—This publication is a
companion of the above publication. It summarizes the current year's economic
picture and presents historical series relating to business activity in the Province.
External Trade.—Summary of monthly statistics covering external trade are
contained in the aforementioned monthly bulletin. A statement of external trade
through British Columbia customs ports and covering commodities with an aggregate value of $50,000 and over is published annually.
British Columbia Trade Index.—This publication lists the manufacturers in
British Columbia together with their products. A new issue was released early in
1960.
British Columbia Directory.—The first issue of this publication was released
in 1957 and lists wholesalers and distributers alphabetically and by products, importers and exporters alphabetically and by products, and an alphabetical list of
manufacturers' agents.
British Columbia Regional Industrial Index.—This index contains available
statistics on a wide range of subjects covering all areas of the Province. The work
of compiling a new index commenced in lune, 1960, and publication is anticipated
for 1961.
British Columbia Facts and Statistics.—The thirteenth edition was released
in 1960. This publication provides graphic, general, and historical facts and statistics relating to British Columbia under the following headings: Population, Education, Government and Finance, Judiciary, Banking, Transportation, Communication, Retail Trade, Agriculture, Fisheries, Mining, Forestry, Manufacturing, Water
Power, Tourist Statistics, and Economic Activity.
Establishing a Business in British Columbia.—A revised edition of this
brochure was released in 1959. This publication gives to prospective investors
information relating to the establishment of a business in British Columbia.
Salary and Wage Rate Survey, 1960.—This publication provides the salary
and wage rates in selected clerical, professional, and trade occupations in business
and industrial establishments for metropolitan Vancouver, and Victoria, Southern
Interior, and northern centres.
Business Outlook.—This publication was released late in 1960. It reviewed
business conditions during 1960 and indicated the outlook for 1961. It covers the
following economic factors: Sales, prices, employment, wages, earnings, and capital
expenditure. It is based on a survey of 150 of the major companies in British
Columbia.
Consumption of Materials and Supplies in British Columbia Manufacturing
Industries.—This publication lists the materials consumed by the principal industries
in the Province during 1955. It was compiled from material made available during
1958. Work is progressing on a new issue for 1961, which will detail the materials
used during the year 1958.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1960
Q 23
Selected Import Items Which Could Possibly Be Produced in British Columbia.
—A new issue of this publication was released at the end of 1960. Commodities
are classified according to purpose or use, as follows: Producers' materials, producers' equipment, fuel, electricity and lubricants, transportation equipment, and
consumer goods.
The Fabricating and Consumption of Aluminum Products in British Columbia.
—This publication reveals that British Columbia has an expanding aluminum-fabricating industry and suggests that an aluminum rolling-mill, to service the Western
Canada market, may be a possibility in the not too distant future.
Market for Steel Rolling-mill Products in British Columbia.—A study of the
market with a view to establishing pig-iron and steel-ingot manufacturing plants in
the Province.
Potential Pulp and Paper Mills in British Columbia.—This publication presents
an analysis of the pulp and paper industry in British Columbia with regard to available resources, present development, and future markets throughout the world. It
goes on to consider six possible sites in the Province where pulp and paper mills might
be established successfully in view of this analysis.
Glass and Glass-products Industry Study.—This publication was released in
1960. A study of the glass industry, with special reference to present and potential
markets in Western Canada. Information includes details on markets, raw materials,
transportation charges, imports, tariffs, etc.
The Biscuit Industry in British Columbia.—This publication points up the
prospects for an expansion of the local biscuit-manufacturing facilities, not only to
meet the growing demands of a widening market, but also because of favourable
cost factors, permitting successful competition against imports from other Canadian
Provinces.
Area Surveys.—A survey of Chilliwack and district was issued in 1960. Work
is progressing on a survey of Kamloops and district and will be published in 1961.
The Hope and district survey was published in 1959. The surveys are detailed
studies of economic areas of the Province. Special emphasis is placed on the present
state of commercial and industrial development, and on the favorable opportunities
for further expansion in each area.
A Manual of Resources and Development.—This publication contains up-to-
date information about the location and development of British Columbia resources.
It is well documented with maps and diagrams. It is also published in German and
French translations for distribution abroad.
 Q 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
OFFICE OF THE AGENT-GENERAL FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA,
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, LONDON, ENGLAND
GENERAL
The highlights of the year were the visit of the Premier and his party to Great
Britain in the spring, and the visit of the United Kingdom timber delegation to
British Columbia during the summer.
Accompanying the Premier in his official party were Dr. J. V. Fisher, Financial
Adviser and Co-ordinator of Provincial Finance; Mr. G. S. Bryson, Deputy Minister
of Finance; and Mr. G. D. Ekman, Executive Assistant to the Premier. A very
busy programme was arranged for the party, including talks with appropriate government officials, representatives of the Dollar Export Council, Federation of British
Industries, bankers, investment bankers, other financial interests, and commercial
organizations. Visits were also made to the Mansion House, Lloyds of London,
Port of London, and Crawley New Town.
The interests of British Columbia were very well served indeed by this visit.
Better understanding and much goodwill were created by the numerous and varied
contacts made by the party. The reception everywhere was extremely cordial, and
genuine interest in the Province was stimulated by the comprehensive statements
and comments made by the Premier and his colleagues. On the other hand, it was
most valuable to all concerned to have seen first hand how Great Britain is running
her affairs, and to be able to assess the United Kingdom as a continuing market for
British Columbia goods, and a source of capital for further development of the
Province and its industries.
It is suggested that similar visits to Great Britain and Western Europe be made
regularly by the Premier and Ministers of the Government.
A timber delegation from the United Kingdom spent three weeks in British
Columbia commencing June 25th as guests of the British Columbia Government and
British Columbia Lumber Manufacturers' Association and the Plywood Manufacturers' Associations. The thirty-six-man group consisted of timber importers, architects, representatives of associations allied to timber, and the representative of the
British Columbia Lumber Manufacturers' Association in London. The delegation
was led by Mr. William Vesey, president, Timber Trade Federation of the United
Kingdom, and accompanied by the Agent-General. Extensive trips through mills
in various parts of the Province, visits to housing and industrial projects, and a
symposium at Harrison to conclude the tour, all served to create much better understanding and goodwill. There has been a marked improvement in the number of
inquiries and volume of timber and plywood imports into the United Kingdom as a
result.
A reciprocal visit by British Columbia lumber and plywood manufacturers
would serve a useful purpose.
Several trips through Great Britain and Continental Europe were made during
the year by the Agent-General and the Industrial and Trade Secretary for the
purpose of developing trade, encouraging capital investment in the Province, and
promoting the British Columbia International Trade Fair. Following the tour of
the United Kingdom timber delegation, the Agent-General visited various parts of
the Province, including the Peace River power-development site, gas and oil fields
in the north-eastern sector of the Province, and the Okanagan Valley.
SETTLEMENT
Inquiry respecting settlement in the Province has been relatively light compared to previous years because of the adverse publicity in the British press given to
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1960 Q 25
Canada and her unemployment situation. However, the office received some 800
letters regarding immigration, and over the counter and by telephone another 300
inquiries were attended to.
SCHOOL-TEACHERS
Again this year the facilities of the office were placed at the disposal of the
Department of Education in the recruitment of school-teachers. Although the numbers inquiring was less than in previous years, a total of sixty-five teachers was
engaged and, when added to dependents, resulted in some 125 people of a very good
type moving to the Province. From a Commonwealth point of view, this result
should be considered very favourable.
STAFF
Miss V. I. Clarke left in October to be married in Ontario, and her place was
taken by Miss M. B. McCaul, who has had considerable service with the United
Nations and the British Columbia Government.
VISITORS
During 1960 some 2,950 visitors registered at British Columbia House, and in
the course of the year the staff handled 19,000 letters for visitors. Miss L. R. A.
Denbigh, the receptionist, spent two months in the Province on holiday and in
acquainting herself with the functions of various Government departments.
FILMS
Distribution of British Columbia films in the United Kingdom through British
Columbia House for the year ended December, 1960, amounted to 726 showings
to audiences totalling 51,000. There is a continuing need of good films from firms
in the Province to assist our efforts to publicize the industrial opportunities of
British Columbia.
TOURISM
The releasing of funds for overseas travel to dollar countries by the British
Treasury has resulted in an entirely new form of inquiry since the war. Many
parents of war brides and immigrants have shown a desire to visit daughters in the
Province. A general desire for travel to the Province has been evinced by the
inquiries, all new, about tourism generally, sport fishing and hunting in particular.
A new tourist folder has been produced interpreting the British Columbia scene to
the British tourist. This will be placed in the hands of travel agents, who are being
encouraged to include British Columbia in their itineraries.
PUBLICITY
The principal means of publicizing the Province is through the medium of the
News Letter, the circulation of which is expanding steadily. A very attractive
window display featuring industry, tourism, and apple merchandising was arranged
in the Canadian National Railways window on Cockspur Street. This has drawn
favourable comment and some inquiry as to where British Columbia apples may be
purchased. Early in the new year, film projectors will be installed on front of
British Columbia House to present continuous showings of British Columbia scenes,
industry, and tourist attractions. Because of the strategic location of the machines,
much publicity will result.
 Q 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ADMINISTRATION
Certain renovations were carried out in respect to British Columbia House.
The building is now in good repair. Some of the plumbing, which has been in use
for forty years, has been replaced. The fabric of the building was washed down and
flood-lighting installed. This, especially during the winter months, attracts a lot of
attention. The name British Columbia House is displayed in large letters and serves
as a valuable advertising medium.
Certain leases have been renewed during the year at very favourable rentals,
which has meant a substantial increase in income.
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE INQUIRIES
Inquiries received at British Columbia House and the contacts made by visits
to industrial areas and commercial houses continue to be the major portion of the
work of this department. Inquiries are of every type and are broken down under
the following headings: Agencies; Commodities or Machinery Requiring Special
Service; Retail Outlets; Wholesale Distribution; Mill, Factory, Branch Plant Establishment; Licence Manufacture; Partial Manufacture or Assembly; Professional
Services; Investment; Personal Emigration (where it concerns establishment of a
business).
The number of inquiries received from various countries was as follows:—
United Kingdom     295
France            9
Germany       42
Netherlands        17
Scandinavian countries        21
Italy         8
Switzerland        12
Belgium           3
Other countries         7
Total     414
TRADE INQUIRIES FROM BRITISH COLUMBIA
During 1960 eighty-nine British Columbia firms made inquiries through this
office. Even though this type of inquiry has shown an increase over the last few
years, it is hoped that more British Columbia companies or individuals will avail
themselves of this service, especially as it is now generally recognized by businessmen that more determined efforts must be made to sell. As a result of these
inquiries, many useful contacts were initiated.
SALES PROMOTION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA PRODUCTS
Europe is dividing itself up into combinations of countries banded together for
mutual trading. The E.C.M. (Inner Six), E.F.T.A. (Outer Seven), O.E.E.C, etc.,
all testify to the fact that the sale of British Columbia goods within these areas must
be planned with perhaps a different approach.
Every opportunity is taken to publicize British Columbia products in the
United Kingdom and throughout Europe, but it is recommended that more British
Columbia businessmen come over and see for themselves and make their own contacts. This is becoming the more usual procedure, and this office was able to assist
in providing suitable introductions.    Canned- and frozen-salmon producers, the
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1960 Q 27
forest industries, B.C. Tree Fruits, Alcan, CM. & S., are some of the groups in the
Province who already have their own sales offices or well-established agents in the
United Kingdom. It is suggested that more British Columbia companies make
efforts to become as firmly established in the markets of the continent of Europe.
It is felt that, in general, Canadian firms are not making sufficient efforts along these
lines. For example, since 1947 a good many foreign firms have established branches
in the Netherlands or have gone into partnership with Dutch firms. These moves
were taken in order to increase their sales in the E.C.M. countries. The figures
issued by the Dutch Government are startling: United States firms, 131; United
Kingdom firms, 48; Canadian firms, 3.
This office is ready to advise any British Columbia firms wishing to establish
their own sales offices, to go into partnership with or to appoint existing firms as
agents-distributers in the United Kingdom or European countries.
LICENCE MANUFACTURE
This office has sent forward to British Columbia the details of forty-one opportunities for manufacturing under licence.
This pattern of trade is becoming more important throughout the world.
Indeed, a good many of the firms mentioned above from the United States and the
United Kingdom are, in fact, carrying out their own complete or partial manufacture
through their recently formed European branches.
Representatives of several British Columbia firms came to Europe this year to
arrange for their goods to be manufactured under licence in British or European
factories. This is of benefit to the economy of the Province as the royalities so paid
are returned to the parent firm in British Columbia.
It is felt that more attention should be given to exploiting opportunities for
licence manufacture; contacts can be arranged for this purpose.
INVESTMENT IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
Investment of sterling funds slowed up considerably during 1960 as compared
with 1959 because of the restrictions imposed by the British Treasury. There are
also some restrictions on the flow of capital from most European countries. Despite
this, however, inquiries were received from twenty-two firms wishing to invest
capital, which will either be used for the establishment of new industry or business
or the acquisition and development of property in the Province.
BRANCH PLANT AND NEW BUSINESS ESTABLISHMENT
During 1960 thirty-two firms made inquiries along these lines.
A good deal of the work of this office is of an introductory or public relations
nature, and, therefore, tangible results cannot be always assessed. However, as a
result of the year's activities the following projects, in which this office played some
part, came to fruition:—
From the United Kingdom there were established during the year eight new
businesses involving the transfer of varying amounts of capital. From German
sources two new businesses came into being, one of which necessitated the transfer
of substantial capital.
The total number of agency-distribution agreements which have been concluded during the year is difficult to assess, since after the initial introductions have
been effected the final arrangements are made directly between the parties concerned.
 Q 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
During 1960 there was an increase in the number of British Columbia firms
who have either concluded agreements or started negotiations for the sale of British
Columbia manufactures in the United Kingdom or European markets.
British and Continental firms have also been active in arranging for the sale
and distribution and, where necessary, the servicing of their consumer goods and
machinery. By such means many agency houses and wholesale and retail outlets
in the Province have benefited.
BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR, 1961
A good deal of the work of this office during 1960 was concerned with the
selling of space and securing the interest of possible exhibitors from the United
Kingdom and European countries.
In this connection, correspondence was initiated and brochures and newsletters circulated. The Industrial and Trade Secretary paid visits on behalf of the
Trade Fair Committee to the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and Denmark, and the
Agent-General paid visits to Switzerland and Germany in order to interest governments and industrialists in the fair.
Definite commitments for space have been secured from a good number of contacts, so that the international flavour of the fair will be enhanced by their participation.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1960 Q 29
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE OFFICE
Activity of this office centres on the promotion of new industrial enterprises
throughout the Province, assistance to established businesses when required, and
promotion of domestic and export trade.
This work is carried out in co-operation with other Provincial Government
departments, Federal Government departments, Boards of Trade, Chambers of
Commerce, the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, industrial commissions, banks, railway industrial agents, and foreign trade
representatives in Canada and overseas.
BRANCH PLANT AND MANUFACTURING UNDER
LICENCE INQUIRIES
The number of branch plant and manufacturing under licence inquiries received
during the year has been gratifying. Many inquiries received were the result of our
direct mailing campaign to selected firms. Through this medium it was found that
many firms were interested in testing the market for their products with the idea of
ultimately constructing a branch plant in the Province. Some of the firms contacted
showed an interest in opening an office in British Columbia, while others indicated
that a branch plant was feasible as soon as their sales volume was sufficient. Companies showing interest include manufacturers of crayons, extracts, fittings and
couplings, chemicals, power-saws, radio and television sets.
Licence manufacturing proposals from England, the United States, and Eastern
Canada were numerous, and several items are being examined at the present time by
British Columbia firms. One of the most promising is a collapsible trailer which
sleeps four people when fully set up. The Department has compiled a listing of
British Columbia firms having available plant capacity for manufacturing additional
lines on a licence or royalty basis. The listing provides information on plant facilities, types of products now manufactured, and products that could be produced
under a licence agreement.
COMPOSITE INDUSTRIAL MAP OF THE LOWER MAINLAND
Continued requests for this map from real-estate and other business firms will
necessitate a reprinting in the near future. The map indicates the zoned and potential industrial areas of twelve municipalities, extending from North Vancouver to
Port Coquitlam, a distance of approximately 14 miles. The master lithographed
map, along with a white print showing the Municipalities of Delta and Surrey in their
entirety, can be purchased for $1, which includes the 5-per-cent social services tax.
It is helpful to anyone contemplating establishing a business or industry in the metropolitan Vancouver area.
HANDICRAFT DIRECTORY
The tenth Directory of Handicraft Products and Producers in British Columbia
was published in 1960 and was distributed to retail and wholesale firms, resorts, and
other outlets. The directory lists producers in British Columbia who are interested
in finding a market and who are in a position to supply reasonable demands. The
usual contact was made with Eastern Canadian Provinces interested in handicraft
development.
For the first time the Department sponsored a handicraft exhibit which was on
display in the rotunda of the Parliament buildings and later in a building owned by
the B.C. Electric located at the corner of Belleville and Government Streets in Vic-
 Q 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
toria. The latter location was excellent inasmuch as it is the headquarters for scenic
bus tours and thousands of tourists frequent the area. The exhibit, comprising four
show-cases, was then moved to the Empress Hotel, where it is currently on display.
The Department would like to thank officials of the B.C. Electric and also the
management of the hotel for their kindness in permitting us to use their facilities for
exhibition purposes. The exhibit attracted a great deal of interest, which was evidenced by the numerous orders received by the exhibitors. Orders for British
Columbia handicrafts were received from many sections of the Province, Eastern
Canada, and the United States.
Some native Indian handicrafts were also sent to British Columbia House
during the year, where they are on exhibit at the present time. In addition, arrangements were made to have three of our local Indians attend the Seattle Boat Show,
where they appeared in an activated booth knitting sweaters and making other Indian
items. The Director of Indian Advisory Act, Miss Joanna Wright, was instrumental
in making the necessary arrangements, for which this Department is most grateful.
Through the co-operation of Mrs. E. Marshall, of the Community Arts Council,
Vancouver, the Department was able to send to New York an exhibit of British
Columbia crafts, where they were on display in the Trans-Canada Air Lines office on
Fifth Avenue. The following items, valued at $800, were exhibited: One silver
brooch (" Seascape "), one pair of salt and pepper shakers, one enamel dish in fish
shape, one enamel vase, one silver pendant, one white and yellow gold brooch, one
pair of ceramic birds, one box of Haida design.
At this time we would like to thank officials of Trans-Canada Air Lines who
provided the facilities to make this exhibit possible.
COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES
The survey on investment opportunities started last year was completed, and
many excellent suggestions in the fields of hotel and motel requirements, housing
developments, warehousing, and wholesale and retail outlets were submitted by
various Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce throughout the Province.
The requests for this survey from potential investors have been heavy, and it is
most unfortunate that reports were not submitted by many important areas.
Numerous copies of this survey were sent to Eastern Canada, the United States, and
England.
CHICAGO INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR
For the third consecutive year, British Columbia was represented by an
exhibit at the Chicago International Trade Fair, held at the Navy Pier on Lake
Michigan from June 20th to July 5th, 1960. Approximately 400,000 visitors and
buyers attended. The exhibit (see illustration), which was similar to last year's,
occupied 300 square feet and depicted pictorially and statistically the Province's
industrial progress. Departmental literature, together with industrial and tourist
literature from various Boards of Trade throughout the Province, was distributed to
interested persons. The interest shown in our exhibit was most gratifying. Hundreds
of inquiries were received for information on travel, settlement, investment, and
industrial opportunities existing in British Columbia.
This trade fair again offered an excellent opportunity for advertising the British
Columbia Trade Fair to be held in Vancouver, May 3rd to 13th, 1961. A large
poster to this effect was located in the exhibit.
The exhibit was manned by the Industrial Commissioner, assisted by a representative from the Department of Recreation and Conservation.    Representatives
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1960
Q 31
from the Canadian Consul's office in Chicago were also most helpful in providing
assistance.   This co-operation was very much appreciated.
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS TRADE AND INDUSTRY COUNCIL
The Council's membership comprises representatives of trade and industrial
promotion departments of all the Canadian Provinces. It also includes, on an
associated basis, representatives of the industrial departments of transportation
companies, banks, and other associations having as their objective industrial and
trade promotion in Canada. The Council meets once a year in conference. The
twelfth annual conference was held this year in Winnipeg, Man., and had as its
theme the rapidly developing interest of Council members in national problems such
as unemployment and in Provincial programmes designed to assist present industry.
Each year the Council presents the Canadian Industrial Development Award to a
nominee who has contributed a national influence on Canada through his activities
in industrialization.   This year the award went to Mr. Armand Viau, Quebec.
BRITISH COLUMBIA INDUSTRIAL DESIGN COMMITTEE
Membership of this Committee includes representation from the Federal
Department of Trade and Commerce, Provincial Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, Department of Education, University of British
Columbia, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, Vancouver Board of Trade, Vancouver School of Art, British Columbia Research Council, Association of Professional Engineers of British Columbia, Canadian Association of Consumers, and
Architectural Institute of British Columbia. The Committee had an active year in
encouraging attraction of industrial design and its importance as a factor in production and marketing of British Columbia products. Some of the projects under way
at the end of the year included the following:—
(1) School design award programme. This programme was undertaken to
create an awareness of good industrial design in the industrial classes of
British Columbia schools.
(2) Photographic exhibition of well-designed products made in Britain.
(3) Development of an industrial design course directed to interested persons
to encourage appreciation of good industrial design through education.
 Q 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(4) Plastic exhibition.    This was a major project, with the details being
finalized at the end of the year.
(5) A listing of library reference books on industrial design to be prepared and
circulated to all industrial arts teachers.
REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
During 1960 the regional development work of the Department was carried on
extensively. The office continued to work closely with industrial establishments,
Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce, research organizations, and all other
groups interested in, or actively engaged in, the industrial expansion of the Province
of British Columbia. The close co-operation between these groups and the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce is a vital factor in the continued growth of our existing industries and the development of new industries.
Representatives of the Department visited many Boards of Trade and Chambers
of Commerce during the year, assisting them in their efforts to assess the industrial
potential of their area and to locate new industries and commercial enterprises
within their communities. Field trips were undertaken by the Industrial Commissioner and the field representative, in the course of which they maintained the close
liaison of past years with all regional groups interested in the general field of industrial development. Visits were made to many operating plants for discussion of
production and marketing problems.
Many inquiries from companies and individuals were received and dealt with
by this office, and a great deal of general and specific information about the industrial
opportunities in British Columbia was forwarded to them. Close contact was
maintained with the British Columbia Research Council, and numerous inquiries of
a technical nature were referred to that organization.
UNITED KINGDOM TIMBER DELEGATION
A delegation, consisting of thirty-four members of the United Kingdom timber
trade, visited British Columbia during the last week of June and the first two weeks
of July, 1960, as guests of the British Columbia Government. The delegation was
headed jointly by Mr. W. E. Vesey, M.B.E., F.C.A., president of the Timber Trades
Federation of the United Kingdom, and Maj.-Gen. B. M. Hoffmeister, British
Columbia's Agent-General in London, England. The details for their tour of
British Columbia's forest industry were arranged by the Department in co-operation
with the British Columbia Lumber Manufacturers' Association and the Plywood
Manufacturers' Association of British Columbia. The delegation included timber
merchants, architects, contractors, joinery representatives, box and packing-case
manufacturers, farm building designers and consultants, and building society representatives.
The purpose of the tour was to enable the delegates to meet with local lumber
operators for an exchange of ideas with a view to improving the sale of British
Columbia lumber in the traditional United Kingdom market.
During the first week of the tour, the delegation was divided into eight working
groups, each group touring a large integrated lumber operation on Vancouver Island.
The second week of the tour was devoted to first-hand study of the lumber-processing operations in the Vancouver-New Westminster area. The delegation then
visited Interior British Columbia lumber operations in the Williams Lake area, and
ended their tour with a three-day symposium at Harrison Hot Springs. Subjects
discussed at length at the symposium included lumber-grading, Douglas fir plywood,
western red cedar, engineered timber, lumber packaging and handling, timber frame
construction, timber farm buildings, and general trade promotion.   Frank discus-
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1960 Q 33
sions were held on all these subjects, with many misunderstandings being clarified
and useful suggestions arising from both sides.
As a result of this tour, British Columbia operators and exporters are much
more conscious of the potential timber market in the United Kingdom, and the
United Kingdom timber buyers and users are much better informed on the species,
supplies, and uses of British Columbia lumber products.
BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR, 1961
Firm contracts, options, and negotiations for the 66,000 square feet of prime
exhibit space in the British Columbia International Trade Fair to be held at Exhibition Park, Vancouver, May 3rd to 13th, 1961, indicate the wide interest of the world
of trade and commerce in the present and future potential of this Province.
It is expected twenty nations will have government exhibits and a further
twenty countries will be represented by one or more private exhibits from their
industries and services. It is significant to note that all members of the Common
Market area of Europe are represented, along with several members of the Outer
Seven market area.
The success of the 1958 British Columbia International Trade Fair is attested
to by the fact that the vast majority of exhibitors of that year have returned for 1961
and a great many have increased their space requirements.
The British Columbia International Trade Fair is sponsored by the Department
of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce. It is administered by a highly
representative and capable group of volunteer public-service-minded citizens who
are leaders in British Columbia industry and commerce. President and chairman of
the board is Mr. W. J. Borrie, president of Pemberton Securities Ltd. and a past
president of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce and the Vancouver Board of
Trade. Mr. Don H. Mollison, of this Department, is on loan to the British Columbia
International Trade Fair as general manager.
The British Columbia industries exhibit, arranged jointly by the B.C. Products
Bureau of the Vancouver Board of Trade, the British Columbia Division of the
Canadian Manufacturers' Association, and the trade fair management, will occupy
a space of some 2,800 square feet. It will display a massive and effective presentation of the resources, goods, and services which British Columbia itself can offer to
the several thousand purchasing agents being formally organized to attend from
Canada, the United States, and elsewhere, as well as many hundreds of buyers
representing large and small firms.
Trade fairs do not guarantee a market for their exhibitors. By centuries of
tradition they simply offer a media of display and, as such, are conducted by official
and quasi-governmental action regardless of national tariff policies or economics.
It is significant that the great majority of offshore exhibits feature goods not available
on a basis of domestic manufacture or origin. It is also proven that foreign exhibitors at trade fairs are also purchasers. Further, exhibitors and visitors are also
impressed with the opportunities for establishing new secondary industries here,
bringing capital investment and employment opportunity for our population.
Our appreciation is sincerely given to those working so diligently and effectively
through the B.C.I.T.F. service to increase the stature and share of British Columbia
in international trade, upon which we are so dependent as a high-export area.
The appreciation of the Department is also extended to our own Provincial
trade representatives and those serving Canada in foreign nations.
With the British Columbia International Trade Fair of 1961 already assured of
success, its effect will be highly beneficial to all sections of our economy, our labour
force, and our people generally.
 Q 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MECHANICAL TABULATION DIVISION
The Mechanical Tabulation Division has been operating for the past thirty
years as a data-processing centre for those departments of the Government requiring
the services of mechanical or electronic equipment to handle computing and large-
scale statistical or accounting procedures.
The equipment is rented on a monthly basis, and, although no charge is made,
job costs are maintained through a time-card system, enabling the Division to assess
the value of work done for each department. Machine utilization studies and a
check of machine operating efficiency are also available from these records.
The Division is divided into six sections for operating purposes. These sections
are headed by five senior machine operators and one senior key-punch operator,
and each section is responsible for a unit of work, which is determined by the
volume and nature of work to be done. At present the following sections are in
operation: Health and Welfare Section, Liquor Control Section, Forestry Section,
Annual Report Section, General Statistical Section, and Key-punch Section.
In addition to these sections, the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service
and the British Columbia Forest Service maintain key-punch sections whose work
is tabulated on our equipment.
Similarly, a large volume of punched cards is received from the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, and the Scaling and Royalty Division of the British
Columbia Forst Service in Vancouver for the preparation of special reports on trade,
employment, and timber cut.
To operate the equipment, a well-trained staff has to be maintained and at
present consists of a chief supervisor, assistant supervisor, five senior machine
operators, eight machine operators, one senior key-punch operator, sixteen keypunch operators, and a senior clerk-stenographer. In addition, three members of
the Liquor Control Board staff are attached to the Division to maintain liason and
perform necessary clerical functions in conjunction with their work.
Comparative figures showing the value of work done for each department
during the past five years are shown in the accompanying table. A distribution of
the percentage of work done for the various departments is shown in chart form
in Fig. I. Fig. II shows a similar distribution of work done in the Key-punch Section. To establish the percentage distribution of the work by the five sections of
the Division, key-punching has been excluded and the results shown in Fig. III.
While this distribution does not appear entirely equitable, the work has been established mainly on nature of work and is balanced where necessary by employing more
experienced operators in the larger sections.
To meet the demands for a more rapid handling of data and the solution of
more complex computing problems, a card-operated magnetic-drum computer has
been added to the punched-card equipment in the Division. The addition of the
computer, which was installed in the latter part of December, will greatly increase
the scope of service that can be performed, and many new jobs are already being
programmed to take advantage of the features of the machine.
Some staff reorganization is anticipated early in the new year to provide for
programming and operation of the computer. These changes should be minor, as
it is planned to have the major portion of the programmes written by the departments concerned.
 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1960 Q 35
Comparative Cost Statement
Department and Branch
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
Agriculture—
$1,681.48
$1,662.62
$5,709.61
$4,641.61
$6,007.51
8,078.91
Totals — —-	
$1,681.48  |    $5,709.61
$4,641.61  |    $6,007.51 |    $9,741.53
Attorney-General—
$187.16
$553.94
$430.07
1,227.01
174.34
7,592.25
25,089.79
$1,184.86
183.66
7,338.24
26,748.51
851.66
$132.24
7.355.49
105.86
8.628.48
327.42
9,740.77
27,721.24 [    28,857.43
30,269.84
$35,208.97 | $37,778.93
$34,513.46 | $35,455.27 | $41,743.63
Education—
$1,386.24 |    $1,549.56
$1,703.73
1,620.81
$1,349.43
5,035.64
1,393.93
$3,672.38
7,378.33
1,123.76
Totals -	
$1,386.24 |    $1,549.56
$3,324.54 |    $7,779.00 | $12,174.47
Forest Service—
$15.05
49,763.56
$3.79
49,243.21
$117.90
30.8(14 47
$3,102.63
$39,754.31
1,881.64
78 637 44
162.10   |
Totals ■	
$41,635.95 | $49,778.61
$49,247.00 | $31,084.47 | $31,735.07
Health Services and Hospital Insurance—
$30.15
$13,476.98
$601.96
21,780.58
$22,382.54
<t.7.7^-> 71
$23,364.74
Totals _  	
$7,732.71 ]    $6,722.37
$13,476.98 | $23,364.74
Highways—
$946.73
1                      1
Research and Development	
	
  _
$275.03
Totals 	
   1   1       $275.03
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce—■
$15,706.12 | $11,121.94
$12,188.18
$14,869.98 |    $8,153.18
$3,954.83 |    $3,251.04
$3,384.33 |    $4,016.77 [       $654.55
Lands—
Surveys and Mapping, Legal Surveys Divi-
$164.77
10,478.65
$7,983.75
$25.22
$718.83 1       $462.07
8,722.76 |      9,767.21
13,062.73
$9,441.59 | $10,229.28
$10,643.42 |    $7,983.75 | $13,087.95
Provincial Secretary—
<C1ft ftfiS Qft   1   <C1? RO'v Q7
$9,100.04     $10,593.36
186.19          3,049.54
5,834.41  |      5,797.66
$12,050.62
1,649.42
'
6,567.77
Civil Service Commission	
7,191.02
5,634.42
Totals. 	
$17,259.92 | $19,463.74
$15,120.64 | $19,440.56
$19,334.46
$202.91 |       $442,46
$32.78
$464.67
Social Welfare—Accounts Division	
$11,967.42 | $10,760.17
$12,121.14 | $14,576.99
$19,057.94
*-~—'-
$181.96
	
 	
$40.03
Grand totals.	
$147,347.23 [$157,044.20
$159,128.06
$164,761.00
$178,845.05
  INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1960 Q 37
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL
The Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce is ex officio
chairman of the board of management of the British Columbia Research Council,
and as such presided at regular meetings of the board throughout the year. The
laboratories and offices of the Council are located on the campus of the University
of British Columbia in Vancouver.
The broad objectives of the British Columbia Research Council are to provide
scientific and technical services not otherwise available to the industry of the
Province, and to conduct basic studies leading to the establishment of new industries
and the development of the natural resources of British Columbia. In order to
meet these objectives, the Research Council, through its laboratories, provides a
wide range of services and facilities to industries of all types. The work carried
out by the Council generally falls into a number of categories:—
(1) Fundamental or Basic Research.
(2) Product and Process Research and Development.
(3) Industrial Trouble-shooting.
(4) Specialized Testing.
(5) Approvals Testing.
(6) Economics and Industrial Market Research.
(7) Operations Research.
The Council was established in 1944. The first annual report, issued in May,
1945, showed a staff of fifteen working in provisional quarters in University buildings. A measure of industry's demand for Council's services may be seen by comparing the situation then with that attained after sixteen years of activity. During
1960 the 4,000th project for industry was initiated in the Council's laboratories, and
total revenue to date from this source has exceeded 1 Va million dollars. Revenue
for 1960 was approximately $300,000. The staff now numbers over seventy,
working in a modern well-equipped three-story laboratory building.
In addition to its contract work, the Research Council receives a substantial
portion of its annual budget, $250,000 in 1960, from the Government of British
Columbia through the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce. It also receives a limited amount of financial assistance from the National
Research Council and other organizations. It is thereby possible for it to extend
to Provincial industry many additional services, such as free technical information,
and to carry out some investigations of importance to the Provincial economy.
Through the programme of contacts with industry throughout the Province, it brings
the fruits of research a little closer to industry's door.
During 1960 the board of management of the Research Council consisted of
the following:—
The Honourable R. W. Bonner, Minister of Industrial Development, Trade,
and Commerce of the Province of British Columbia, Victoria, B.C. (chairman).
G. S. Allen, Dean, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
F. E. Atkinson, Assistant Director, Canada Agricultural Research Station,
Summerland, B.C.
E. W. Bassett, Deputy Minister of Lands, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
M. J. Foley, President, MacMillan, Bloedel and Powell River Limited, 1199
West Pender Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
R. M. Hungerford, Vice-President, Evans, Coleman & Evans Limited, foot of
Columbia Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.
 Q 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
W. C. Koerner, Chairman of Board, Rayonier Canada Limited, 1111 West
Georgia Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.
R. B. McDonell, President, McDonell Metal Manufacturing Company Limited,
1250 Boundary Road, Vancouver 6, B.C.
C. McLean, President, British Columbia Telephone Company, 768 Seymour
Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
D. M. Morrison, 3666 Marine Drive, West Vancouver, B.C.
P. J. Mulcahy, Deputy Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
A. W. H. Needier, Director, Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries Research
Board of Canada, Nanaimo, B.C.
R. D. Perry, Vice-President and General Manager, The Consolidated Mining
and Smelting Company of Canada Limited, Trail, B.C.
G. L. Pickard, Director, Institute of Oceanography, Vancouver 8, B.C.
H. L. Purdy, President, British Columbia Electric Company Limited, 970
Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
C. A. Rowles, Professor and Chairman, Department of Soil Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
H. B. Simpson, President, S. M. Simpson Limited, Kelowna, B.C.
J. Sinclair (the Honourable), President, Fisheries Association of British
Columbia, 325 Howe Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
T. L. Sturgess, Deputy Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
H. Wright, Commissioner, Workmen's Compensation Board, 707 West Thirty-
seventh Avenue, Vancouver 13, B.C.
G. M. Shrum, Director, British Columbia Research Council, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1961
660-161-9558
  

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