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Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the YEAR ENDED MARCH 31ST 1960 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1961

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Annual Report of the
Department of Social Welfare
for the
YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st
1960
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1961
  Victoria, B.C., November 30th, 1960.
To His Honour George Randolph Pearkes, V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the year ended
March 31st, 1960, is herewith respectfully submitted.
W. D. BLACK,
Minister of Social Welfare.
Office of the Minister of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
 Department of Social Welfare,
Victoria, B.C., November 30th, 1960.
The Honourable W. D. Black,
Minister of Social Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Social Welfare for the year ended March 31st, 1960.
E. R. RICKINSON,
Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
Department of Social Welfare,
Victoria, B.C., November 30th, 1960.
E. R. Rickinson, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
Sir,—I submit herewith the Report of the Department of Social Welfare for
the year ended March 31st, 1960.
J. A. SADLER,
Director of Social Welfare.
i
 DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE
April 1st, 1959, to March 31st, 1960
Hon. W. D. Black Minister of Social Welfare.
SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
E. R. Rickinson Deputy Minister.
J. A. Sadler Director of Social Welfare.
Miss Marie Riddell Assistant Director of Social Welfare.
J. McDiarmid Departmental Comptroller.
Mrs. Jean Scott Supervisor, Family Division.
Miss Ruby McKay  Superintendent of Child Welfare.
E. W. Berry Chairman, Old-age Assistance and Blind Per
sons' and Disabled Persons' Allowances
and Supplementary Assistance.
Dr. G. E. Wakefield Director of Medical Services.
A. A. Shipp Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions.
Mrs. M. Titterington Supervisor, Social Service Department, Division of Tuberculosis Control.
F. G. Hassard Superintendent, Brannen Lake School for
Boys.
Miss W. M. Urquhart Superintendent, Willingdon School for Girls.
G. P. Willie Superintendent, Provincial Home.
E. L. Rimmer Administrator, Region I.
H. E. Blanchard Administrator, Region II.
R. I. Stringer Administrator, Region III.
R. J. Burnham Administrator, Region IV.
V. H. Dallamore Administrator, Region V.
A. E. Bingham Administrator, Region VI.
W. H. Crossley Administrator, Region VII.
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Part I.—General Administration—
Director of Social Welfare	
Assistant Director of Social Welfare  11
Part II.—Regional Administration—
Region I  13
Region II  15
Region III  17
Region IV  19
Region V  20
Region VI  22
Region VII  25
Part III.—Divisional Administration—
Family Division—
Social Allowances  28
Family Service  32
Child Welfare Division  36
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowances, Disabled Persons' Allowances, and Supplementary Assistance  48
Medical Services Division  69
Part IV.—Institutions—
Industrial School for Boys  74
Industrial School for Girls  79
Provincial Home, Kamloops  82
Welfare Institutions Board  85
Part V.—Medical Social Work Services—
Division of Tuberculosis Control and Poliomyelitis Pavilion  91
Part VI.—Accounting Division  93
  Report of the Department of Social Welfare
PART I.—GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE
J. A. Sadler
In this Report it will be noted from the information submitted by each divisional head and regional administrator that the demand for welfare services in this
Province continued to increase.
Requests for services from all groups have taken an upward turn throughout
the fiscal year. It has been necessary to place more children in the care of the
Crown and to provide more financial services for the older individuals. A marked
increase has taken place in payments made to persons in receipt of Social Allowance, due to the unemployment situation which has been prevalent throughout
the year.
As at August 1st, 1959, an increase in rates for the care of welfare patients in
boarding and nursing homes was authorized. Also, on the same date, the payments
for the maintenance of children in foster homes were increased. These higher rates
were necessitated by the increase in the cost of maintenance for the persons involved.
In July, 1959, changes were made in the cheque-writing procedures for a portion of the Social Allowance group. The names of persons in receipt of Social
Allowance who would obviously continue to receive assistance for an indefinite
period were transferred to an I.B.M. machine system for the issuance of cheques.
Formerly the cheques had been issued in the local area and were manually typed.
The change to a mechanical system, centralized in Victoria, has resulted in economy
of effort and time.
The Research Consultant continued her survey of case loads in order that the
Department would be aware of the types of individuals requesting services and the
changing circumstances which made it necessary for persons to request aid from
this Department.
Revision of the Departmental manuals was continued by the Office Consultant.
The main Policy Manual has been stream-lined and a Resources Manual developed.
On April 7th, 1959, the School for Girls was moved from Cassiar Street, Vancouver, to Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby. The new facilities of the Willingdon
School for Girls have enhanced the work of rehabilitation of the girls, and the cottage
system allowing proper segregation has proved to be most beneficial.
The Greater Vancouver Health League Joint Study Committee on Nursing
Homes was established, with representatives from this Department and from the
Hospital Insurance Service department as members. The Committee is studying all
phases of the licensing of institutions and care for aged and infirm persons.
The following tables show, on a comparative basis, case loads and changes in
case loads:—
 L 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major
Categories as at March 31st for the Years 1959 and 1960
Category
1959
Number
Per Cent
1960
Number
Per Cent
Family Service  _
Social Allowance 	
Blind Persons' Allowance1-
Old-age Assistances-
Old Age Security supplementary assistance.
Disabled Persons' Allowance1	
Child Welfare  	
Health and Institutional-
1,317
17,578
660
8,544
32,239
1,666
6,379
663
1.9
25.5
1.0
12.4
46.7
2.4
9.2
1.0
1,366
19,503
661
8,512
32,645
1,958
6,775
721
Totals for Province.
69,046
100.0
72,141
1.9
27.0
0.9
11.8
45.3
2.7
9.4
1.0
100.0
1 Includes Old-age Assistance Board figures which are not shown in regional reports.
Table II.—Movement in Case Load during Fiscal Year 1959/60
Major Category of Service
Cases Opened during Year
Cases Closed during Year
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
1,978
2.8
1,915
2.8
40,477
56.1
3'8,212
55.6
378
0.5
388
0.6
1,177
1.6
882
1.3
6,358
8.8
6,399
9.3
14,716
20.4
14,286
20.8
6,633
9.2
6,243
9.1
453
0.6
380
0.5
Family Service	
Social Allowance 	
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Disabled Persons' Allowance..
Old-age Assistance-
Old Age Security supplementary assistance-
Child Welfare-
Health and Institutional-
Totals for Province-
72,170      ;      100.0        |      68,705
100.0
Table III.—Number of Cases by Category and as a Percentage of Population
as at March 31st, for the Years 1959 and 1960
1959
1960
Category
Number
Per Cent of
Population
(1,544,000)
Number
Per Cent of
Population
(1,570,000)
1,317
17,578
660
8,544
32,239
1,666
6,379
663
0.09
1.14
0.04
0.55
2.09
0.11
0.41
0.04
1,366
19,503
661
8,512
32,645
1,958
6,775
721
0.09
1.24
Blind Persons' Allowance1  	
Old-age Assistance1             .    -   -   -	
0.04
0.54
2.08
0.12
Child Welfare                      	
0.43
0.05
69,046
4.47
72,141
4.59
1 Includes Old-age Assistance Board figures which are not shown in regional reports.
The above tables show the increases which have taken place, not only in case
load, but in the activity in the case load. The marked increase in Social Allowance
case load has wider implications than the mere fact that people are drawing financial
assistance from public funds in that worsening economic conditions in families
develop other social problems and in many cases family-unit breakdowns. This,
of course, increases the demands for family and child services.
The co-operation and help extended by all public and private agencies and other
organizations interested in the welfare of the people of British Columbia has
been greatly appreciated, and I would like to extend the thanks of the staff of this
Department to these groups.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 11
REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE
Miss Marie Riddell
The responsibilities of the office of the Assistant Director of Social Welfare are
defined as participating in the administration of the Department, assisting the
Director of Social Welfare in certain delegated duties, and primary responsibility for
maintaining the social work and clerical staff for the field service and divisions of
the Department. This latter function is delegated in part to the Provincial Supervisor of Training and her assistant in Vancouver. An Office Consultant is also a
member of the staff of the Assistant Director of Social Welfare.
The defined function of the Department is " all matters relating to social and
public welfare and social assistance." As provided in legislation, the Department is
required to give a casework service as well as grant financial assistance. The former
responsibility is no less important than the latter because it is with casework skill
and knowledge that a social worker fulfils the basic preventive and rehabilitative
function of the Department in working with people who come to us for help.
This year under review has presented serious demands on the social-work staff
to try to fulfil both responsibilities, in that it has seen an increase in the total caseload from 68,818 as at April, 1959, to 72,514 as at March, 1960—approximately
6 per cent.
The cases active totalled 16,815 in April, 1959, and 18,512 in March, 1960,
an increase of 10 per cent. Cases opened in April, 1959, were 5,482, and in March,
1960, 7,058, an increase of 30 per cent. Cases closed in April, 1959, were 5,710,
and in March, 1960, 6,685, an increase of 14 per cent. The increase in the Social
Allowance caseload alone, however, rose from 17,188 in April, 1959, to 19,281 in
March, 1960, or 12 per cent. Consequently, the increase in the total caseload is
more than equalled by the increase in the Social Allowance caseload.
During this past year, approval was received for an increase in the staff establishment of the field service of three social workers in Novembmer, 1959, and in
February, 1960, eleven social workers and six clerical staff. This offered some
alleviation of pressure to some offices where the demands of caseload had reached
emergency proportions.
The following table shows the total number of casual and permanent staff
(clerical, professional, and technical) that were employed and their location in the
Department as at March 31st, 1960:—
Office of Deputy Minister       2
Director of Social Welfare       4
Field Service  288
Medical Services Division     13
Child Welfare Division     18
Provincial Home     34
Brannen Lake School for Boys     62
Girls' Industrial School     50
Old-age Assistance Board     74
Family Division       5
Total *  550
 L 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The following table gives the total social-work staff employed for the fiscal
years ending March 31st, 1959, and March 31st, 1960:—
University
Trained
In-service
Trained
Total
Total staff, March 31st, 1959 ,	
77
+5
132
—5
209
Staff appointed April 1st, 1959, to March 31st, 1960 :,	
82
14
18
127
55
45
209
69
63
78
137
2151
1 This figure does not reflect the total increase of fourteen social workers as they could not all be recruited
prior to March 31st, 1960.
During the year under review there was a total of 144 separations and an equal
number of replacements to fill them. Of these, sixty-three were social workers who
left the Department for the following reasons: Fifty-nine resigned, three died, and
one retired.
Responsibility for appointments, promotions, reclassifications, and processing
of resignations covered a total of 340 staff members.
During the course of the year eighty-six persons were given in-service training
by the Training Division in seven introductory and five final group sessions.
The Department was represented at six conferences and institutes related to
social welfare, and seventy-one delegates attended, forty-five of whom attended the
regional conference of the Child Welfare League of America, held in Vancouver for
the first time, and thus presenting a unique opportunity for the staff of the Department to participate.
During this fiscal year twenty-eight district supervisors' meetings were held
throughout the seven regions.
The combined staff of Regions V and VII met in Prince Rupert in October,
1959, which the Assistant Director of Social Welfare attended, and later visited
several of the individual district offices of the two northern regions.
During this fiscal year the Office Consultant visited one district office to review
and revise office routines and procedures. All recommendations were then reported
to Senior Administration and the Regional Administrator concerned.
In conclusion, I wish to express my sincerest appreciation for the co-operation
of the staff with the office of the Assistant Director of Social Welfare, and gratitude
to them for their loyalty and supreme effort, for without the field service the Department could not function or try to fulfil its responsibilities.
My personal thanks are expressed to the staff of my own office, both professional and clerical, whose support is given at all times without fail.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
PART IL—REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
L 13
REGION I
E. L. Rimmer, Regional Administrator
The physical boundaries remain the same.   The region comprises Vancouver
Island, the Gulf Islands, and a small section of the Mainland contiguous to the
Johnstone and Queen Charlotte Straits.   According to estimated figures, the population for the region approximates 245,000 persons, with a land area of roughly
13,000 square miles.   About half the population lives in the southerly part.
The social-worker staff, who serve the people in the area for welfare services,
and who operate from seven administrative offices, consists of thirty-three social
workers, with four supervisors, two municipal administrators, and one Regional
Administrator.
Hereunder are shown three tables as at March 31st, 1960, which are of a
statistical nature.
Table I.—Analysis of Case Load and Population in Each Municipality of Region I
as at March 31st, 1960, as Related to the Administrative Plan (Section 6 of
the Regulations under the Social Assistance Act).
Area
Population,
1956 Census
Welfare Services
Per Capita
Plan
Amalgamated
Plan
Welfare
Case Load
3,947
10,373
3,069
2,477
1,039
3,025
3,247
10,384
2,107
12,705
1,949
7,781
726
14,857
38,358
54,584
895
1,151
1,112
1,371
389
520
154
X
X
O)
X
C1)
X
158
403
109
97
X
178
X              \
O)
X
(*)
X           ]
O)
X             !
,              X
                                        V
285
Village of Ladysmith	
900
Village of Lake Cowichan	
281
255
1,119
3,826
C1)
<x)
(*)
C1)
C1)
(?)
l.1)
	
Village of Ucluelet	
Village of Zeballos	
1 Organized villages not liable for welfare costs (subsection (2) of section 639 of the Municipal Act).
Total case load in organized territory 	
Total case load in unorganized territory
7,611
4,615
Total case load for region   12,226
 L  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Administrative Offices with Distribution of Case Load
by Category of Services at March 31st, 1960
Category
Alberni
Courtenay
Duncan
Nanaimo
Saanich
Victoria
City
Victoria
District
Total
Family Service  	
11
276
42
258
38
174
9
92i
469
18
178
19
42
619
13
243
1,003
52
203
25
141
8
107
795
37
3!
5
1,006
41
480
2,137
101
56
67
316
12
161
1,076
54
120
61
205
2,790
Blind Persons' Allowance	
3                7
125             145
93
1,353
Supplementary assistance to
Old Age Security	
Disabled Persons' Allowance
Child Welfare	
Health and Institutional	
340
20
165
9
556
37
213
10
6,376
319
879
211
Totals	
949
1,268
997
2,200
1,119
3,826
1,867
12,226
Table III.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major
Categories in Region I for the Fiscal Years 1958/59 and 1959/60
1958/59
1959/60
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
176
2,838
87
1,327
6,314
260
842
182
1.5
23.6
0.7
11.0
52.5
2.2
7.0
1.5
205
2,790
93
1,353
6,376
319
879
211
1.7
22.8
0.8
Old-age Assistance	
11.1
52.1
2.6
Child Welfare                 	
7.2
1.7
Totals        .              —
12,026
100.0
12,226
100.0
In general the year under review was a disheartening one from a welfare viewpoint, which did reflect the solvency of the regional economy in local areas.
The problem of transient single men has been one of concern, and in order
to maintain a control and avoid duplication of payment of public funds as within the
region where the administrative offices are not too far apart, a system was introduced
which is a daily exchange of information from each administrative office. This was
proposed as a pilot scheme and has worked satisfactorily in that very few cases of
fraud by fraudulent means have been discovered.
One new private hospital was opened during the year, with a capacity of forty-
five persons. This has proven to be a valuable resource within this region in the
placement of welfare patients. Another venture has been mooted, which at the
present is in the nebulous stage, although property has been acquired and plans made
for a building to accommodate 140 persons in the low-income group in various levels
according to the degree of care required. This is an interesting new development
which will be welcomed.
A new departure in procedure was the centralization of the distribution of the
Social Allowance cheques on August 1st, 1959. The cheques are now sent to
recipients of Social Allowance from the Comptroller-General's office direct with
appropriate notification from each district administrative office to headquarters.
The Federal Government incentive winter works programme was put into effect
in December, 1959, but the result of such activity did not reduce our numbers on
Social Allowance to any appreciable degree in this region.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 15
The new dental programme, together with its mechanics, with its increased
benefits and stream-lining of procedure, unquestionably benefited both client and
administrative offices.
To commemorate the visit of Her Majesty the Queen and Prince Philip, the
Government authorized the issuance of $25 to each welfare case, and this region
was honoured in that the first cheque was personally delivered by the Honourable
W. D. Black and his deputy, Mr. E. R. Rickinson, to a centenarian pensioner. Another honour was conferred upon this region many years ago when the first Federal
Old Age Pension cheque was granted to a resident in the Alberni Valley.
In conclusion, may I thank the members of the Department in this region for
their conscientious endeavour to meet the needs in their areas and for their cooperation with myself as their administrator; also I would like to acknowledge the
co-operation given by the other agencies, private and voluntary, who have been
very helpful.
REGION II
H. E. Blanchard, Regional Administrator
There have been no changes in the boundaries of the administrative unit
known as Region II since March 31st, 1959. The municipal administrative units
within the region have likewise remained the same.
The existing offices as of March 31st, 1960, therefore, are again as follows:—
Amalgamated offices (municipal offices under the charge of municipal administrators) :  Burnaby, District of Coquitlam, New Westminster City, City
and District of North Vancouver, Richmond, Vancouver City, and West
Vancouver.
District offices (Department of Social Welfare offices under the charge of district supervisors, serving unorganized areas and per capita municipalities):
New Westminster  district  office,   serving  unorganized  areas   and  the
municipalities of Delta, Fraser Mills, Port Coquitlam, and Port Moody;
Vancouver district office,  serving unorganized areas of University of
British Columbia Endowment Lands, North Arm of Burrard Inlet, Howe
Sound, Cheakamus Valley, Sechelt Peninsula, Ocean Falls, and surrounding coast; Westview district office, serving the District of Powell River
and surrounding area.
The following tables show the distribution of case load in the various categories, Table I for the years 1957/58, 1958/59, and 1959/60 (April 1st to March
31st) for the whole of Region II, while Table II shows the breakdown of cases
carried by district and municipal offices.    It should be pointed out that the City
Social Service Department in Vancouver does not carry child and family welfare
cases, this work being done by children's aid societies.
 L  16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region II for the Fiscal Years 1958/59 and 1959/60
Category
1958/59
1959/60
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Family Service    	
Social Allowance '.; 	
220
7,183
275
3,739
14,697
681
1.472
177
0.8
25.3
1.0
13.1
51.6
2.4
5.2
0.6
237
7,607
260
3,698
14,899
808
1,567
196
0.9
26.0
0.9
12.6
50.9
Disabled Persons' Allowance—	
Child Welfare	
2.7
5.3
0.7
Totals—  	
28,444
100.0
29,272
100.0
Table II.-
-Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region II as at March 31st, 1960
Category
.0
rt
6
n
B
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o
u
u
u
a
c
1
u
c
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z.£a
>
3
_ o
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z>
TJ
C
O
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.c
o
5
u
>
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9 if
«.«
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U   1-
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o
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Total
38
598
35
451
2,244
89
407
54
20
154
6
99
273
32
150
3
66
563
14
215
808
32
138
22
19
225
2
105
416
26
158
9
29
234
11
136
837
31
155
30
14
170
4
151
434
40
134
15
26
136
3
87
394
28
310
32
13
33
4
47
325
14
43
21
12
103
2
39
167
17
72
10
237
5,391
179
2,368
9,001
499
7,607
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Old-age Assistance	
Supplementary assistance to
260
3,698
14,899
Disabled Persons' Allowance
Child Welfare     _	
808
1,567
196
Totals     	
3,916
737
1,858
960
1,463
962
17,438
1,016
500
422
29,272
Emergency Shelter
In Vancouver during the winter of 1959/60 special provision was required
for the sheltering of unemployed single transient men congregated in the City
of Vancouver. In former years the extent of the problem was not clear because
men would go from agency to agency requesting help and the reported total was
much exaggerated. This problem was overcome by the co-operation of all " shelter " agencies in maintaining a simple registration that could be cleared with the
Vancouver City Social Service Department. Such reports showed a shortage of
sleeping accommodation. This was overcome by the provision of temporary shelter
facilities furnished with equipment loaned from the Department of National Defence.
The Salvation Army managed and supervised the project, and costs were absorbed
by the Provincial-municipal welfare departments. The facilities of existing agencies
were used to the full, and the emergency shelter took care of the surplus. The shelter, accommodating eighty-five men, was opened November 30th, 1959, and by
March 31st, 1960, a total of 6,498 bed-nights had been provided to an average of
279 men each month at a total cost of $2,838.73, and an average cost per bed-night
of approximately 44 cents.
The staff-case load situation in Region II for the fiscal year 1959/60 was as
follows:—
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 17
(1) The establishment of social workers, exclusive of clerical, supervisory,
and administrative staff, was seventy-eight. Vancouver City Social Service
Department, which does not handle child welfare cases, has forty-two
social workers.
(2) Case load:  March 31st, 1959      March 31st, 1960
Total for Region II  28,444 29,272
Vancouver     17,145 17,438
All other offices in Region II  11,299 11,834
(3) Number of Old Age Security supplementary assistance cases:—
March 31st, 1959      March 31st, 1960
Total for Region II '.  14,697 14,899
Vancouver       8,757 9,001
All other offices in Region II     5,940 5,898
(4) The average case loads were as follows:— March 3ist, 1959 March31st, i960
All of Region II        364 375
Vancouver          408 415
All other offices in Region II        313 328
The above analysis is given to explain weight of work. Old Age Security
supplementary assistance cases constitute approximately 50 per cent of the total
case load. Annual field service reports on these cases are not required, but an
approximate 10 per cent of such is the objective. Somewhat more than 10 per cent
are done due to the opportunity for reporting when applications are received for
ancillary services such as boarding home, nursing home, dentistry, glasses, etc. The
large majority of these cases require little attention in any given year. Average case
loads have to be viewed accordingly. Case loads well weighted with such cases are
less heavy in actual practice. Therefore, generalized case loads of 313 and 328
can be heavier than is consistent with good work if they are weighted with child and
family and social allowance cases.
Once again this is an opportunity to thank private agency and municipal welfare
administrators and their staffs who have co-operated so generously in carrying out
the task we have all undertaken to do. To the staff of the Department of Social
Welfare, clerical persons, social workers, supervisors, and senior administration, I
would like to extend special thanks for their help.
REGION III
R. I. Stringer, Regional Administrator
There have been no changes in the regional boundaries during the past year.
The region is bounded on the south by the International Border, on the north by
Wells Gray Park, on the east by Revelstoke and district; and on the west by Bralorne.
The principal concentrations of population are in and around the cities of Kamloops,
Vernon, Kelowna, and Penticton. The Department of Social Welfare services are
provided from six Provincial offices, one each located at Kamloops, Kelowna, Penticton, Oliver, Salmon Arm, and Vernon, and four amalgamated offices located at
Kamloops, Kelowna, Penticton, and Vernon.
The Department of Social Welfare provides welfare services in the municipalities of Armstrong, Enderby, Revelstoke, Salmon Arm, and Summerland, these services being paid for by the municipalities concerned on a per capita basis.
2
 L li
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The population in this region continues to grow at an estimated 5 per cent per
year. This increase in population has resulted in a greater demand for our services,
which is confirmed in the statistics which follow. As suggested in the last report
and because of the larger population in the outlying areas, consideration should be
given to opening up another office to cover the Lytton-Spences Bridge-Lillooet-
Bralorne-Ashcroft-Clinton area. With an office in that area, possibly located at
Lillooet, travelling time would be cut considerably and a larger proportion of the
social workers' time could be spent with their clients. It would also be possible to
open up badly needed foster homes in the Bralorne and Lytton areas, at the present
time too inaccessible for adequate supervision from the Kamloops office. Lack of
adequate homes has been a continuous problem in the Kamloops area and, to varying degrees, throughout the region.
As noted in last year's report, this region has a mixed economy, which has, in
the past, tended to provide an adequate income for the majority of the residents.
However, in spite of this there has been an increase in unemployed persons requiring
assistance. Persons have come to this region seeking seasonal work picking fruit
and vegetables or in the lumbering industry who previously have been employed
elsewhere in the Province. Although there has been the usual amount of employment, it has not been enough to take care of the large influx of unemployed persons
from other areas. As a result, there has been a greatly increased demand on our
services. This year there was $256,634.89 dispensed to assist employable persons.
This is an amount 58 per cent greater than that dispensed in the year before, which
in turn was almost eight times greater than the previous year.
The foregoing comments on assistance to employable persons are supported by
the fact that the Social Allowance, as a percentage of total case load, increased from
25.6 per cent at March 31st, 1959, to 27.1 per cent at March 31st, 1960. During
the same period total case load increased from 8,133 to 8,459, an increase of 4 per
cent. In addition to this increase in case load, there were 18,204 cases opened and
closed, an increase of 51.3 per cent over the year before, which is, in turn, an
increase of 22.5 per cent over the previous year.
From the above it can be seen that the work load carried by the staff in this
region has increased at a considerable rate, and I would like to take this opportunity
of thanking them for the extra efforts they have been making and for the loyalty
and high ideals and principles that they have maintained under considerable
pressures.
The following tables show the regional case load as of March 31st, 1959, and
March 31st, 1960, by types of assistance and location of servicing offices.
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices of
Region III as at March 31st, 1960
Category
a>
o.
o
0
E
rt
O
a
o
CJ
C
u
a,
u
0
a
o
Ec
s
o
S
CJ
>
a
o
o
£>,
a
o
_CJ
n£
CJ-C-
a
o
o
113
644
27
206
566
32
462
34
42
183
9
98
322
42
151
11
74
237
9
111
311
30
240
15
18
121
3
45
158
14
41
,     3
13
207
11
92
328
17
106
14
15
266
6
130
422
30
212
11
187
2
52
196
20
105
9
79
350
35
5
210
5
62
282
20
131
7
101
343
22
275
2,291
Blind Persons' Allowance _ .	
88
976
Supplementary assistance to Old Age Security 	
3,278
262
Child Welfare                       	
1,212
4
97
Totals                                   .          	
2,084
858
1,027
403
788
1.0921  457
583
583
604
8 479
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
L 19
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major
Categories in Region III for Fiscal Years 1958/59 and 1959/60
Category
1958/59
1959/60
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Family Service 	
Social Allowance - -	
265
2,082
87
972
3,289
232
1,124
82
3.3
25.6
1.1
11.9
40.4
2.8
13.9
1.0
275
2,291
88
976
3,278
262
1,192
97
3.2
27.1
1.1
Old-age Assistance    - 	
11.6
Supplementary assistance to Old Age Security	
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
38.7
3.2
Child Welfare	
14.1
Health and Institutional	
1.0
Totals	
8,133
100.0
8,459
100.0
REGION IV
R. L. Burnham, Regional Administrator
There were no changes in the regional boundaries during the past year. Region
IV forms a rough triangle in the south-eastern corner of the Province, taking in the
East and West Kootenay areas. There were seven Provincial and one municipal
offices providing welfare services to the people in this area, and these were located
at Fernie, Cranbrook, Creston, Nelson, New Denver, Trail, and Grand Forks, with
Trail City providing its own services. These eight administrative offices were staffed
by twenty social workers, three district supervisors, one municipal administrator, and
one regional administrator. The staff was increased by two social workers during
the year to assist in handling the much-increeased volume of work. These two
additional workers were placed in the Cranbrook and Nelson offices.
Once again our figures demonstrate the ever-increasing demands made on staff.
It will be noted in Table II that the total case load in this region increased by 660
cases, or 12 per cent, over the previous year's figures. It will be noted, too, that
the Social Allowance category accounts for the greater part of this increase, and this
has been the situation over the past two years. For example, as at March 31st,
1958, we had 956 Social Allowance cases in this region, constituting 19.7 per cent
of our total case load. On March 31st, 1959, we had 1,296 Social Allowance cases,
or 23.9 per cent of our total case load. As at March 31st, 1960, these figures
climbed to 1,993 cases, or 32.9 per cent of our case load.
It is interesting to note that an especially heavy increase in our Social Allowance
roles was shown in the Cranbrook, Trail, and Trail City offices. Cranbrook experienced an increase in this category of 121 per cent over the previous year's number. The Trail Provincial office recorded a 63 per cent increase, while the City of
Trail figures showed a 134 per cent jump. The increases in the Cranbrook and
Trail districts seem to be related to the fact that two major construction projects
were being undertaken in the immediate vicinities—the pulp-mill at Castlegar and
the steel-mill at Kimberley. Both Trail and Cranbrook had an influx of unemployed
men seeking work at these two projects, and many, not being able to obtain a hoped-
for job, had to apply to our offices for financial assistance.
Boarding- and nursing-home facilities are still in demand in this region. A
small number of the existing homes increased their capacity to a limited extent,
but not sufficient to meet the need that exists.
During this past year seventy-nine Doukhobor children who had been resident at the dormitory at New Denver were discharged from care of the Superin-
 L 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
tendent of Child Welfare. The staff in the district office in Nelson has had heavy
responsibilities in dealing with the parents and children in this difficult situation and
deserve special thanks for their patience and efforts.
To all staff members in Region IV, I should like to express my sincere appreciation for their response to the heavy demands made on them. I should also like
to express my appreciation to those members of the community who assisted us in
so many ways to provide a better service to our clients.
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region IV as at March 31st, 1960
Category
o
o
□
rt
6
c
o
cn
OJ
u
1
u
M
o
■a
a
a
0
c
o
*QJ
z
OJ qj
is
rt
&
0
1
"rt
O
H
41
499
8
97
397
22
171
23
31
132
2
92
229
24
81
6
10
85
3
67
221
18
24
1
5
168
9
116
268
20
31
2
54
449
2
164
505
29
113
13
4
69
4
57
246
6
50
3
15
322
6
114
316
37
86
20
8
269
4
28
127
6
44
5
168
1,993
Blind Persons' Allowance	
38
735
2,309
Disabled Persons' Allowance—	
Child welfare
162
600
Health and Institutional	
73
1,258
597
429
619
1,329
439
916
491
6,078
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories in Region IV as at March 31st for the Fiscal Years 1958/59 and 1959/60
Category
1958/59
1959760
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
174
1,296
30
683
2.361
3.2
23.9
0.6
12.6
43.6
168
1,993
38
735
2,309
162
600
73
2.8
Social Allowance — -   -	
Blind Persons' Allowance	
32.9
0.6
12.1
37.8
142                        2.6
2.7
Child Welfare
654
78
12.1
1.4
9.9
1.2
Totals _     -          	
5,418
100.0
6,078
100.0
REGION V
V. H. Dallamore, Regional Administrator
Regional boundaries remained unchanged during the fiscal year under review,
but the boundary between the Prince George and Quesnel offices was moved northward to include the village of Hixon in the district concerned by the latter office.
This was done to effect a transfer of approximately twenty cases from the Prince
George district to the Quesnel district and thereby ease the pressures on the staff of
the more northerly office.
Municipalities responsible for welfare services are unchanged, but during the
year the residents of these organized communities who are receiving our services
became a greater portion of our total case load, increasing from 34.1 to 36.9 per
cent.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
L 21
Some improvement in the foster-home situation was achieved during the year
in that the number of foster homes in use or available for use increased from 208
to 261. At the same time the number of children in care at March 31st increased
from 291 to 328. A good proportion of the new foster homes were secured in the
Prince George district, where all foster-parents were asked to seek out others and
were prompted in this by a meeting at which Miss Ruby McKay, Superintendent
of Child Welfare, spoke.
Nevertheless, there remains an acute shortage of adequate foster homes,
particularly in view of the fact that we are aware of the considerable number of
children who should really be in care because of inadequacy of their family homes.
The worsening economic situation in the region resulted in a change of pattern
during the summer months of 1959. Usually assistance to unemployed employable
persons decreases sharply during the summer months, but this year the grants to
these persons decreased very little indeed and provided a spring-board from which
grants reached new highs starting in November of 1959. During the month of
March, 1960, the grants amounted to 156 per cent of the grants given in March of
1959. Assistance to the unemployed employables has always been greatest in the
Prince George district, but during the fiscal year under review it was noted that the
need was increasing more rapidly in the other areas. Whereas grants given to
unemployed employable persons in Prince George comprised 66 per cent of the
total grants given in the entire region at the beginning of the fiscal year, they comprised only 54 per cent of those being given at the end.
Total case load showed increases in all offices, and it may be seen from Table
I, which follows, that the greatest increase occurred in Social Allowances. This
category of service now comprises 35.6 per cent of the total case load and is
currently greater than the aged categories of Old-age Assistance, Old Age Security
supplementary assistance, and Blind Persons' Allowances. The latter totalled
1,375, and then comprised 35.4 per cent of the total case load.
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major
Categories in Region V for the Fiscal Years 1958/59 and 1959/60
Category
1958/59
1959/60
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Family Service	
Social Allowance ,	
Blind Persons' Allowance -	
213
1,038
44
379
846
42
700
29
6.5
31.5
1.3
11.5
25.7
1.3
21.3
0.9
212
1,380
47
374
954
49
828
35
5.5
35.6
1.2
9.6
24.6
1.3
Child Welfare              	
21.3
09
Totals	
3,290
100.0
3,879
100 0
Increases in case loads were greatest in the Quesnel and Vanderhoof offices
on a percentage basis, where they were respectively 28.2 and 27.4 per cent.
 L 22
Table II.-
BRITISH COLUMBIA
-Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices of
Region V as at March 31st, 1960
Category
Fort
St. John
Pouce
Coupe
Prince
George
Quesnel
Vanderhoof
Williams
Lake
Total
48
74
2
28
132
3
85
2
47
204
2
64
172
10
122
10
48
691
10
120
266
13
324
15
26
145
2
53
118
9
126
3
4
82
12
53
126
3
68
1
39
184
19
56
140
11
103
4
212
1,380
Blind Persons' Allowance 	
47
374
Supplementary  assistance   to   Old   Age
954
Disabled Persons' Allowance-	
Child Welfare _  	
49
828
35
Totals  	
374
631
1,487
482
349
556
3,879
The average case load per social worker at the end of the fiscal year was 268,
as compared with a figure of 263 twelve months previously. The offices showing
up worst in this respect were Vanderhoof, with 349 cases for its one social worker,
and Prince George, with 297 for each of its five social workers. The staff in the
latter office was increased by one in June of 1959, but is obviously in need of greater
expansion. Half-time social workers were added to the Pouce Coupe and Fort St.
John offices during the year, and the extreme pressure suffered in these offices
previously was somewhat alleviated.
One of the features of case loads in Region V is their inordinate activity. This
is exemplified in the statistics from March of 1960, where the relationship between
" cases active " and " case load " in this region was 42.5 per cent, while the figure
for the next closest region in this respect was 33.6 per cent.
Turnover of social-work staff was considerable during the year and added to
the difficulties of maintaining our standards of service. Two of the three district
supervisors left to take comparable positions elsewhere in the Department. Eight
full-time and one half-time social workers resigned and ten full-time and one half-
time social workers were appointed, increasing the staff from 12V2 to 14Vi. Three
of the resigning social workers did so to go to university, three left because they were
unsatisfactory, one resigned because of poor health, and one full-time and one half-
time social worker left because of family reasons.
Nevertheless, the social-work staff at the end of the fiscal year, although lacking
considerably in experience and training, has good potentiality, and I consider that the
forthcoming year will show a general improvement in their quality. At this time
I wish to express my sincere appreciation for their devotion to duty and their evident
desire to learn.
REGION VI
A. E. Bingham, Regional Administrator
The regional boundaries remained unchanged during the year. Commencing
with the municipality of Surrey, on the south side of the Fraser River and the municipality of Pitt Meadows on the north side of the Fraser River, Region VI extends
east on both sides of the river to Lytton and to the summit of the Hope-Princeton
Highway. It is four years since the 1956 Census, and thus it is increasingly more
difficult to obtain an accurate population figure. Based on information from school
boards and health units within the region, the regional population is estimated at
175,000.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 23
The western part of the region was brought closer to the metropolitan area
of Vancouver this year with the opening of the Deas Island Tunnel. The result is
a further increase in population and a further subdivision of farm land for residential and commercial purposes. The trend of the past thirty years continues in
the Fraser Valley. Farms give way to cities and towns, and the trend is from a rural
agricultural to an urban society.
The responsibility for the administration of social welfare services at the local
level in Region VI is undertaken through two principal systems. These systems are
established by the Social Assistance Act and regulations. In the large municipality
of Surrey the responsibility for the administration of social welfare services rests
with the municipality. They provide these services through a municipal social
welfare department. The social-work staff is shared by the Provincial Government.
Surrey municipal social welfare offices are located at Cloverdale and Whalley.
All other municipalities in the region and the unorganized territory in the
eastern section of the region are served by Provincial district offices.
Provincial district offices are located at White Rock, Langley, Haney, Abbots-
ford, and Chilliwack. During the year under review the following municipalities
held agreements with the Department of Social Welfare for the provision of social
welfare service through Provincial district offices: Cities—White Rock, Langley,
and Chilliwack; district municipalities—Langley, Matsqui, Sumas, Chilliwhack,
Mission, and Maple Ridge;  towns—Mission.
Five municipalities in the region are not responsible for social welfare costs.
The five Provincial and two municipal offices of the region at March 31st, 1960,
were staffed with twenty-eight social workers, one assistant district supervisor, four
district supervisors, one municipal administrator, and one Regional Administrator.
During the year under review the major part of staff time was used to meet
economic need. Our case-load figures in Table I reveal that 8,343 cases, or 85.8
per cent of our regional case load, are cases involving direct financial assistance.
Further, Table I reveals that the regional case load increased by 556 cases during
the year. Social Allowance cases accounted for 438 of this increase; Old-age
Assistance categories, 75; and child welfare, 33.
In seeking answers for the sharp increase in the Social Allowance case load,
we note some of the factors as a down-swing in the economy and a slowly swelling
population. During the past year our offices were the stand-by agency. The
The down-swing in the economy meant that we were called upon to meet the
dependency needs of large numbers of unemployed persons. They lacked the means
for subsistence as their entitlement to unemployment insurance benefits ceased or
were insufficient to keep families together. Our offices proved that they had the
organization to close the gap and supply the essential services in a crisis.
Regional experience through the year shows that many unemployed employable
persons who apply for assistance bring other needs in addition to their economic
need. The loss of satisfying work and the loss of status entailed in being unemployed
creates feelings of inadequacy. In many cases, family relationships are undermined
by the disorganizing effects of unemployment. The ability to grasp opportunities
toward self-help appear to be weakened when a family or individual is dependent
upon public funds over a lengthy period.
Meeting the needs of transients was a problem confronting several district
offices during the past year. Many single men, unemployed, moved from locality to
locality in search of work. In February of the year under review, this region took
part in a Departmental survey to assess some of the special problems of the single-
transient group of Social Allowance applicants.
 L 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table I reveals the number of cases carried in each category within the region,
and Table II shows the breakdown of the case load for each administrative area.
However, these figures do not show the full service requirements of the case load.
As noted above, at the close of the year there were 8,343 cases in the region
which involve direct finacial assistance. The essential procedures of this task are
determination of need, the investigating of eligibility, a continuing eligibility review,
and the provision of money for maintenance. The sheer weight of numbers of cases
made it necessary to stream-line procedures in order that financial need would be
promptly met.
The principal complicating factor in three-quarters of these financial assistance
cases would be old age or dependency because of ill health or unemployment. The
service required by this group is help in formulating a social plan and arrangements
for adequate medical care. The balance of these financial assistance cases are
clients with serious behaviour or emotional disorders, child neglect, and people failing in some major social responsibility. The service required for these cases involves
careful diagnosis of the problems of personality and family relationships, then
skilful treatment. We must assist these people to make the best possible adjustment
within their circumstances and capacities.
In order to understand the service requirements of the 1,113 child welfare
cases, shown in Table I, it is necessary to look at the nature of the case load.
During the year under review, protection of children received priority in the child
welfare services. Much study is needed before a decision is reached that a child
must be cared for outside his home. In the past year, 174 children were admitted
into the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare from broken or seriously upset
families. For some of these children, adoption plans must be made; for some,
continuing care and guidance in carefully selected foster homes; and for others,
a return to their own homes must be planned.
Also included in the child welfare case load are young unmarried mothers,
frightened girls presenting needs for compassion and for shelter and medical care.
Work with the mother continues as long as possible to help her establish herself
in socially acceptable living. Many of the unmarried mothers release their babies
for adoption, and much careful planning is done to protect the child and to find the
right adoption home. There were adoptive couples applying from all walks of life
seeking to complete their families.   Not all could be helped during the year.
During the year, liaison has been maintained with appropriate civil defence
authorities within the region.
In the event of an emergency or a disaster in any community, families will be
disrupted, homes may be destroyed, and relatives or friends separated. The
resources of the Provincial Social Welfare Department would be called upon to
assist in the community rehabilitation plans.
In March a new development took place within the region. Working in close
co-operation with Mental Health Services, arrangements were made for the placement of some patients of the Provincial Mental Hospital in a boarding home in the
region. These are patients ready for discharge but who have no relative or friend
who can plan for them.
In July a three-day casework institute, on " Services in Public Assistance," was
held for regional social workers. The institute leader was Mr. Harold Simmons,
Superintendent of Social Welfare Services, San Mateo County, Calif., U.S.A.
Appreciation is extended to the social workers and stenographers, Provincial
employees and municipal employees, who have devoted their skills and warm
understanding to the enormous task that they have faced during the year.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
L 25
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region VI for the Fiscal Years 1958/59 and 1959/60
Category
1958/59
1959/60
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
168                1.8
2,275              24.8
59                0.7
1,100              12.0
4,141              45.1
255               2.8
1,080              11.8
95                1.0
172
2,713
58
1,114
4,166
292
1.8
27.9
0.6
11.5
42.8
3.0
Child Welfare
1,113              11.4
101                1.0
Totals                                                          	
9.173      !     mo.o
9,729
100.0
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region VI as at March 31st, 1960
Category
Abbots-
ford
Chilliwack
Haney
Langley
Surrey
White
Rock
Total
19
550
12
258
885
69
197
21
49
676
14
217
729
55
225
19
14
262
4
127
392
31
125
11
30
312
8
122
532
34
188
7
53
786
17    I
330
1,331
83
348
24
7
127
3
60
297
20
30
19
172
2,713
Blind Persons' Allowance -	
58
1,114
Supplementary assistance to Old Age Secu-
4,166
Disabled Persons' Allowance - 	
Child Welfare-	
292
1,113
Health and Institutional '._ '	
101
Totals 	
2,011
1,984
966
1,233
2,972
563
9,729
REGION VII
W. H. Crossley, Regional Administrator
The geographic area of the region did not change. The region embraces the
area from Milbanke Sound to the Alaska border along the coast-line, and from
the Queen Charlotte Islands eastward to the settlement of Endako on Highway
No. 16.
The two district supervisors, the key personnel in district offices, are to be
commended for the splendid efforts they have made to keep services quickly available to those in need of them. The staff complement was as follows: Prince
Rupert office, 4 social workers; Smithers office, 1 social worker; Terrace office,
2 social workers; Burns Lake office, 1 social worker. The district supervisor in
Prince Rupert supervised Terrace district office. The assistant district supervisor
in Smithers supervised Burns Lake office in addition, as well as carrying a case
load in Smithers. The clerical complement in the district offices remained the
same, at six full-time and one part-time clerical personnel.
In January, 1960, there was a major change in our arrangements with the
municipalities, when the district of Terrace was incorporated and joined Kitimat
and Prince Rupert, the other municipalities in the region who are served by our
Department on a " per capita payment for services " basis. The municipality thus
became responsible for the administration of financial aid within its enlarged
 L 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
boundaries. This move is an indication of the continuous rapid growth of population in the Terrace area. The change-over was smoothly made, with the full
co-operation of the municipal officials involved.
The economic situation in the region was not expansive this year. The
Terrace-Prince Rupert areas were adversely affected by the long strikes in both the
logging and fishing industries in the summer. This was reflected in increased caseloads. The continued flow of transient unemployed, largely unskilled construction-
workers, was once again a major problem in all offices but Burns Lake. In Prince
Rupert the employment situation amongst the native and part-native people was
grave. This is a partial result of the " population explosion " on the Indian
reserves, increasing the number seeking employment in their traditional way in the
fishing industry.
The case load (see Tables I and II), although increased again this year, did
level off in comparison to the major increases of the two previous years. The
statistical tables below show an increase in the regional total of 285 cases, or a 12.3-
per-cent increase. The two categories that account for the greater part of this
increase were Social Allowance, which increased 203 cases, and Child Welfare,
which increased eighty-five cases. The latter increase was largely the addition of
children in our care as a result of neglect. This increase is tragic. It is in most
instances the result of native or part-native families succumbing at a faster rate
to the temptations and pressures of our society, which lead to social breakdown.
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region VII for the Year 1959/60 as of March 31st, 1960
Category
Burns
Lake
Prince
Rupert
Smithers
Terrace
Total
Family Service—	
Social Allowance 	
Blind Persons' Allowance -
Old-age Assistance-
Supplementary assistance to Old Age Security-
Disabled Persons' Allowance 	
Child Welfare  _ _
Health and Institutional-
Totals	
16
83
14
24
94
4
35
4
45
521
19
72
220
20
236
9
17
154
18
55
139
17
108
1
1,142
509
33
311
2
37
80
1
213
685
111
1,069
53
188
533
42
592
22
2,610
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in Region VII for the
Fiscal Years 1958/59 and 1959/60
Category
1958/59
1959/60
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
101
866
57
198
535
41
507
21
4.3
37.2
2.5
8.5
23.0
1.8
21.8
0.9
111
1,069
53
188
533
42
592
23
4.3
40.8
Blind Persons' Allowance   - 	
2.3
7.2
20.4
Disabled Persons' Allowance -	
Child Welfare       - „                   	
1.6
22.6
0.8
Totals	
2.326    1      100.0
2.611     I      100.0
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 27
The continuation of our local social research projects has given us valuable
information. In June a survey was completed in Smithers and Prince Rupert concerning the number of native families who were not caring adequately for their
children. The Indian Superintendents and the Indian Health Services personnel
assisted in this survey. In October, 1959, a study was completed on the Indian portion of the Prince Rupert Social Allowance case load. This showed that nearly
40 per cent of the case load were people of native extraction. These two projects
produced valuable data for the Federal-Provincial Joint Committee on Indian
Affairs. It was a valuable experience for me to attend its November meeting, representing the region, to present the findings and to comment on the situation with
respect to native people in the region as far as our services are concerned. A Province-wide tabulation of Indian cases registered under the Indian Act who received
services from the Department of Social Welfare in April, May, and June, 1959,
indicated that Region VII, with 649, 819, and 535 cases in the respective months,
carried an average of 36.7 per cent of the total Provincial case load of such cases.
In February, 1960, the Research Consultant spent three weeks in the Prince Rupert
office studying the problems encountered in assisting transient single men. The
findings were valuable to us. This partial catalogue of Region VII research, encouraged by our administration, illustrates the staff's belief in the value of research in
guiding them to intelligent assessments of the need for our varied services.
Staff development was furthered by a joint regional conference in Prince
Rupert in October, attended by staff from Regions V and VII. Miss Riddell, the
Assistant Director of Social Welfare, attended and answered many staff inquiries
concerning personnel practices. Miss McKay, the Superintendent of Child Welfare,
led an institute on child welfare topics, which was most successful and immediately
helpful to staff in their jobs. This conference was an unqualified success. In
February it was possible to hold a one-day meeting of the four clerk-stenographers
in the region with a representative from the Departmental Comptroller's Office in
Victoria, to discuss new chequing procedures and other mutual concerns.
Personnel in the region were once again active in public relations and education.
The two district supervisors in their own districts spoke on our work a total of eleven
times to three P.-T.A. groups, seven ladies' organizations, and once on the local
radio. The Lutheran welfare workshop in Prince George invited me to participate
in its November meeting, as did the Smithers Rotary Club in June. This part of
our job cannot be overdone for the value it produces.
This has been a busy and instructive year for all personnel who served in
Region VII. In closing, may I once again thank municipal officials, school authorities, police, service clubs, lawyers, and the many others who shared our concern for
the well-being of those we serve, and co-operated so fully with us in endeavouring to
help. The staff, clerical and professional, have risen magnificently to the challenge
of increased service.
 L 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PART III.—DIVISIONAL ADMINISTRATION
Miss Marie Riddell, Assistant Director of Social Welfare
FAMILY DIVISION
I wish to present the annual report of the Family Division, covering the services
provided for families and individuals as described in the Social Assistance Act, and
the Family Service programme for the fiscal year April 1st, 1959, to March 31st,
1960.
SOCIAL ALLOWANCES SECTION
For the year under review the case load started at an abnormally high figure,
and, with a slight seasonal decrease in the spring and summer months, it rose again
to an unprecedented high figure, as the following table will show:—
Table I.—Case Load and Total Number of Recipients in Pay on a Monthly Basis
Heads of
Families
Dependents
Single
Recipients
Total
Case Load
April, 1959—	
May, 1959	
June, 1959	
July, 1959	
August, 1959	
September, 1959-
October, 1959	
November, 1959-
December, 1959_.
January, 1960	
February, 1960	
March, 1960	
6,933
6,707
6,636
6,341
6,357
6,474
6,553
7,047
7,609
7,394
7,362
7,514
19,265
18,403
18,174
17,264
17,279
17,833
18,158
19,941
21,934
21,433
21,218
21,427
10,255
10,075
9,785
9,530
9,510
10,074
10,318
11,265
11,355
11,349
11,232
11,767
36,453
35,185
34,595
33,135
33,146
34,381
35,029
38,253
40,898
40,176
39,812
40,708
17,188
16,782
16,421
15,871
15,867
16,548
16,871
18,312
18,964
18,743
18,594
19,281
Of the 11,767 single individuals, 7,874 are men and 3,893 are women.
Case-load figures alone, however, do not show true volume of work, and the
activity of the case load must also be taken into account, as shown in the following
table:—
Table II.—Comparative Figures of Cases Opened and Closed
Opened Closed
March, 1958   1,326 1,302
March, 1959   2,513 2,337
March, 1960   3,867 3,527
The total number of recipients of Social Allowance in the Province in March,
1960 (40,708), shows an increase just under 10 per cent over March, 1959. Comparative totals according to regions are shown in Table III.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
L 29
Table III.—Comparative Regional Totals of Number of Recipients of Social
Allowance in March, 1960,1959, and 1958
PROVINCIAL
Region I—
Alberni 	
Courtenay
Duncan —
Nanaimo _
Victoria _
Mar.,  Mar.,  Mar.,
1960     1959     1958
Region II—
New Westminster .
Vancouver 	
Westview 	
Region III—
Kamloops
Kelowna -
Penticton
Salmon Arm
Vernon 	
201
750
242
768
505
53
397
101
3,699
ion IV—
Cranbrook 	
Creston 	
819
421
80
124
Nelson       	
New Denver
Trail   	
548
133
561
250
804
289
745
472
.1,359 1,183
420 395
812 702
353' 270
755 673
97
480
203
405
282
2,466 2,560 1,467
42   46
300  196
122   54
551  464
296
2,686 2,164 1,489
Region V—
Fort St. John	
152
225
163
Pouce Coupe 	
217
346
258
Prince George -	
792
550
467
Quesnel   	
232
163
107
Vanderhoof  	
139
146
138
Williams Lake _
364
301
178
1,896 1,731 1,311
Alberni   -	
Courtenay -	
Central Saanich _
Duncan  	
Esquimalt -	
Nanaimo -	
North Cowichan
Oak Bay 	
Port Alberni	
Saanich  	
Burnaby  _	
Coquitlam   	
Delta 	
New Westminster	
N. Vancouver City ..
N. Vancouver District
Port Coquitlam 	
Port Moody _	
Powell River 	
Richmond — _
Vancouver _	
West Vancouver 	
MUNICIPAL
Mar.,
Mar.,
Mar.,
1960
1959
1958
122
94
60
70
83
41
33
35
12
65
84
29
98
101
69
549
533
264
123
157
89
30
35
18
266
212
116
374
271
203
1,364
1,601
993
3,094
3,206
1,894
1,522
1,169
708
493
378
277
189
177
181
914
832
412
336
300
171
199
148
155
167
131
94
81
84
43
177
169
117
445
362
351
9,017
8,686
4,873
104
90
95
874
Armstrong	
22
33
18
226
38
376
Enderby —	
39
51
15
174
Glenmore	
12
354
353
303
236
Kelowna	
219
192
109
Peachland   	
13
Penticton 	
551
399
217
Revelstoke 	
58
45
36
Salmon Arm City _
29
Salmon Arm District
171
167
78
Spallumcheen	
	
	
29
Summerland  	
105
94
47
Vernon 	
264
188
175
458
313
Cranbrook	
343
279
131
443
251
Fernie	
60
47
38
98
42
Grand Forks 	
66
66
46
113
79
Greenwood  	
14
11
11
451
530
95
Kaslo  -	
Kimberley -	
2
171
60
49
33
430
179
Nelson  -
282
235
135
Rossland   ,   	
129
67
38
Slocan  	
8
Trail  _	
354
331
132
5,560   5,766    3,361
13,644 12,526   7,477
14,195 12,990   7,773
1,782    1,472    1,002
5,481    4,695    3,006
1,308    1,085       574
3,994    3,249    2,063
Dawson Creek   217 143 134
Prince George   377 366 235
Quesnel      134 65 77
Fort St. John ___  61 46   	
789      620      446
2,685    2,351    1,757
 L 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table III.—Comparative Regional Totals of Number of Recipients of Social
Allowance in March, 1960,1959, and 1958—Continued
PROVINCIAL
MUNICIPAL
Mar.,
Mar.,
Mar.,
Mar.,
Mar.,
Mar.,
1960
1959
1958
1960
1959
1958
Region VI—
Chilliwack City 	
288
284
190
Abbotsford -	
'       195
209
119
ChilliwhackTownship
751
710
364
Chilliwack  	
534
580
284
Kent        -
	
5
Haney 	
56
48
Langley City 	
Langley Tp 	
Maple Ridge	
Matsqui 	
Mission District
90
552
577
731
330
61
67
557
523
670
316
93
62
369
287
302
183
66
49
Pitt Meadows —	
Sumas 	
177
143
74
Surrey   .	
2,230
1,828
1,162
White Rock 	
279
223
187
6,066
5,414
3,300
785
837
403
6,851
6,251
3,703
Region VII—
Burns Lake 	
172
167
138
Kitimat 	
58
565
42
Prince Rupert 	
306
234
155
Prince Rupert     —
610
70
287
351
313
229
395
Terrace 	
50
426
121
879
1,140
643
1,063
635
329
1,942
1,775
972
40,708
37,077
22,635
The distribution of recipients of Social Allowance between organized and
unorganized areas varies little from year to year. As at March, 1960, of the 40,708
recipients, 68 per cent resided in organized territory and 32 per cent in unorganized
territory.
The following table shows the approximate percentages of the total number
of recipients by region:—
March, 1960
(Per Cent)
Region I   13.6
Region II  34.9
Region III   13.5
Region IV   9.8
Region V   6.6
Region VI   16.8
Region VII  4.8
The marked increase in case load is also reflected in the statement of expenditures for the fiscal year under review, as follows:—
March, 1959
(Per Cent)
15.6
March, 1958
(Per Cent)
14.8
35.0
34.3
12.6
13.3
8.8
9.1
6.3
7.8
16.9
16.4
4.8
4.3
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
Table IV.—Expenditures by the Province for Social Allowances,
Medical Services, etc.
L 31
Fiscal Year
1957/58
Fiscal Year
1958/591
Fiscal Year
1959/60
Cases who are the responsibility of a municipality (80 per cent
$2,781,941.03
2,919,033.33
Cases who are the sole responsibility of the Province (100 per
$10,696,506.04
1,831,882.18
59,008.84
348,610.21
2,471.10
6,941.50
$13,146,730.69
Repatriation, transportation within the Province, nursing- and
boarding-home   care   (other   than   tuberculosis),   special
1,640,054.12
47,555.23
298,322.92
3,342.22
6,626.00
2,579,293.56
Emergency payments,  such  as where  a family  may lose its
60,783.84
Municipal and Provincial cases—
(a) Tuberculosis,   boarding-,   nursing-,   and   private-home
363,191.77
(b) Transportation of tuberculosis cases — 	
(c) Comforts allowance for tuberculosis cases 	
2,942.76
7,510.00
30,980.20
25,678.15
$12,971,098.02
843,215.72
9,790.60
$16,170,243.22
1,593,962.31
$7,727,855.05= | $12,127,882.30 j $14,576,280.91
Administration   and   operation   of   project   and   pavilion   for
$36,480.08
2,422,614.32
$38,540.57
2,814,558.80
$22,841.25
3,697,606.19
Totals                      .      -     .                       	
$10,186,949.45
$14,980,981.67
$18,296,728.35
1 Effective September 1st, 1958, the basis of sharing social welfare costs with municipalities was changed
from 85 per cent/J5 per cent to 90 per cent/10 per cent and the municipal share billed on a proportion of population rather than by individual residence responsibility. Consequently, Social Allowance costs for 1958/59 and
1959/60 have been shown in gross with the municipal share deducted in total to arrive at net costs.
■ Reconciliation with Public Accounts:
Gross expenditure for Social Allowances as per Public Accounts.
Less credits (excluding amount chargeable to Government of Canada)
$7,891,944.34
164,089.29
$7,727,855.05
For the fiscal year 1959/60 the Province received from the Federal Government re—
Unemployment Assistance Agreement  $7,191,415.62
Welfare assistance to immigrants  2,745.81
Sundry   3,008.19
Total  $7,197,169.62
Rehabilitation
During this fiscal year under review the Department sponsored twenty-nine
resident trainees in the G. F. Strong Rehabilitation Centre and fifty-three out-ptients,
and fourteen resident patients in the CARS Medical Centre and sixty-six out-patients.
Vocational Training
The Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training Grants, administered by the
Department of Education, continue to be a valuable resource for many recipients of
Social Allowance. Through this resource, vocational training can be obtained to
enable the recipient to become self-supporting. The Department participates financially in some instances and offers help with social planning for the single trainee or
for the family of a trainee.
 L 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
General
In accordance with section 13 of the regulations to the Social Assistance Act,
eleven Boards of Review were established this year. Of these, recommendations in
favour of the recipient occurred in eight appeals, and three appeals were not granted.
FAMILY SERVICE SECTION
" Family Service" is a casework service to families which the Department is
required to give under the terms and definitions of the Social Assistance Act. It is
the basic service in any welfare programme regardless of what other service may be
required. Financial assistance may not be involved, because economic security is
not always the solution to problems of behaviour and personality.
At this point, one can only repeat the comments from the last Annual Report.
Whether or not financial need exists, casework service to an individual or a family
and its children offers us our greatest challenge and scope for preventive and rehabilitative work. In addition to the special skill and knowledge of the social worker,
the most important requirement is precious time for thoughtful, consistent, and
helpful service. Without this, no amount of skill or knowledge can compensate for
the lack.
The following table gives the monthly (categorical) Family Service case load
and activity in that particular case load for the fiscal year under review:—
Table I.—Total of Family Service Cases, April 1st, 1959, to March 31st, 1960
Total at
Beginning
of Month
Opened
Closed
Total at
End of
Month
Last
Year
April, 1959   - -	
1,317
1,375
1,376
1,387
1,403
1,403
1,358
1,351
1,359
1,374
1,358
1,366
186
174
192
178
173
141
136
165
148
137
153
195
128
173
181
162
173
186
143
157
133
153
145
181
1,375
1,376
1,387
1,403
1,403
1,358
1,351
1,359
1,374
1,358
1,366
1,380
1,287
May, 1959 	
June, 1959    - 	
1,274
1,268
July, 1959  — 	
August, 1959- 	
1,252
1,258
September, 1959-  	
October, 1959  -   	
November, 1959   _	
1,248
1,305
1,263
December, 1959                 -              	
1,263
1,268
1,315
March, I960- _  . _ 	
1,317
Othei
Family
I Servici
Allowan
3S
?es
By arrangement with the Department of National Health and Welfare, this
Division acts as the channel for requests from the Family Allowances Division for
British Columbia for inquiries regarding the use of or eligibility for Family Allowances in some instances or for recommendations concerning a suitable payee.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 33
Table II.—Requests Received from Family Allowances Division, April 1st,
1959, to March 31st, 1960
Received during the fiscal year April 1st, 1959, to March 31st,  1960,
by months—
April, 1959 -  4
May, 1959 L  4
June, 1959  4
July, 1959  3
August, 1959  6
September, 1959  2
October, 1959   6
November, 1959  1
December, 1959  4
January, 1960  6
February, 1960  8
March, 1960  6
Total requests received  54
These requests for reports were directed as follows:—
Table III.—Referrals to District Offices and Other Agencies
Referrals pending as at April 1st, 1959 (amended figure)  16
Requests forwarded during fiscal year April 1st, 1959, to March 31st,
1960, by regions—
Region I     7
Region II     4
Region III  10
Region IV     9
Region V  12
Region VI     8
Region VII J     4
54
Total number of requests referred  70
Table IV.—Referrals Completed within Fiscal Year, by Regions
Region I      8
Region II     7
Region III   12
Region IV     8
Region V  12
Region VI     8
Region VII    4
Total  59
Total number of requests referred  70
Referrals pending as at April 1st, 1960  11
 L 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Old Age Security
Requests are also received from the Old Age Security Division in British
Columbia of the Department of National Health and Welfare for assistance to persons who are completing applications for Old Age Security. This assistance usually
comprises help with correspondence, or securing necessary documents, or sometimes
financial assistance in the form of Social Allowance until a decision on the application can be made by the Old Age Security Division.
Table V.—Requests Received from Old Age Security Division from April 1st,
1959, to March 31st, 1960
Pending as at April 1st, 1959     1
Received during fiscal year April 1st, 1959, to March 31st, 1960,
by months—
April, 1959  2
May, 1959  4
October, 1959   2
December, 1959  3
January, 1960  1
February, 1960  1
March, 1960  3
— 16
Total case load  17
Table VI.—Requests Forwarded during Fiscal Year April 1st, 1959, to
March 31st, 1960, by Regions
Region I  1
Region II  7
Region III  3
Region IV  2
Region V  2
Region VII  1
Total number of requests  16
Pending as at April 1st, 1959     1
Total    17
Table VII.—Reports Completed by Regions
Region I  1
Region II  7
Region III  2
Region IV  1
Region V    3
Total reports completed  14
Total number of requests  17
Requests pending as at April 1st, 1960     3
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
L 35
CONCLUSION
The Family Division wishes to express sincere thanks for the help and cooperation of the clerical staff, social workers, district supervisors, and Regional
Administrators, and grateful appreciation for their loyal service, without which the
common purpose of the Department and Division—namely, service to people—
could not be achieved.
Appreciation is also expressed to municipal welfare departments, other divisions, other departments of Government, and voluntary agencies for their cooperation and help whenever this is sought.
-    '
 L 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
CHILD WELFARE DIVISION
Miss Ruby McKay, Superintendent
During the fiscal year the Superintendent and the three Children's Aid Societies
cared for 6,840 children, and as at March 31st, 1960, 4,942 children remained in
agency care, as follows:—
Table I.—Children in Care
Number as at
During Year Mar. 31, 1960
In care of Vancouver Children's Aid Society  1,765 1,294
In care of Catholic Children's Aid Society      911 672
In care of Victoria Children's Aid Society      453 273
Total in care of three Children's Aid
Societies   3,129 2,239
In care of Superintendent of Child Welfare  3,711 2,703
Totals   6,840 4,942
The significant point in the above table is that 582 more children were in the
care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare during the year than in the care of the
three Children's Aid Societies together. This expansion of child welfare services
within a Government department is as progressive and positive a sign of our times
as is the provision of public health or public educational services. Like these,
the provision of public child welfare services, as well as strong voluntary services,
is proof of a people's regard for its youth.
The cost to the Provincial Government of maintaining children for the fiscal
year was as follows:—
Table II.—Cost of Maintaining Children
Gross cost of maintenance of children in Child Welfare
Division foster homes  $1,241,399.53
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance of
children in care of Children's Aid Societies     1,591,004.14
Gross cost of transportation of children in care of Superintendent   13,454.41
Gross cost of hospitalization of new-born infants being
permanently planned for by Superintendent  23,568.00
Grants to sundry homes  1,100.00
Gross expenditure  $2,870,526.08
Less collections        526,912.10
Net cost to Provincial Government as per Public
Accounts  $2,343,613.98
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
L 37
Table III.—Legal Status and Whereabouts of the 2,703 Children in the Care
of the Superintendent as at March 31st, 1960
P.C.A.
Wards
S.C.W.
Non-
wards
Before
Court
J.D.A.
Wards
Agency
Wards
O.P.
Wards
Immigration
Wards
Total
Region I.... _ 	
Region II   	
Region HI   	
Region IV— _	
Region V- _ -  	
Region VI  _ _	
Region VII    -	
Totals _	
Superintendent of Child Welfare children under other agency supervision
Superintendent of Child Welfare and
agency children supervised by another Province	
Grand totals 	
218
337
398
157
283
329
196
1,918
112
55
!,085
14
25
41
19
36
39
27
20
13
3
4
31
17
16
10
16
3
8
8
17
2
15
17
3
16
6
22
201
42
104
3
64
16
87
40
243
107
23
16
280
412
448
208
369
432
251
2,400
207
96
2,703
TREATMENT NEEDED BY DISTURBED CHILDREN
The Division's efforts to secure more treatment and care from other agencies
and organizations for disturbed boys and girls is reflected to a degree in the decreased number of wards committed to correctional institutions this year as compared with last year, as follows:  B.I.S. or Penal
G.I.S. Institution
1958/59 :  23 19
1959/60  11 13
The St. Euphrasia School for Girls, Vancouver, has accepted a number of
wards who have benefited from the programme and psychiatric treatment available
in that institution. St. Christopher School for Retarded Boys, now in its new quarters in North Vancouver, has also several wards in residence for whom it was not
possible to plan within the ordinary foster home, community, and school. Sevenoaks
Treatment Centre, operated by the Family and Children's Service, Victoria, has
likewise extended its facilities to several wards of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and is to be commended, as are these other agencies, for the success it has
achieved with them. A few wards have responded to placement in private boarding
schools, and some have found a period in the group-living arrangements provided
by other organizations a stabilizing influence. The Woodlands School for the
retarded child has now nineteen wards of the Superintendent in residence, and one
adolescent boy is being treated at the Provincial Mental Hospital.
When the Children's Foundation opens next year in Vancouver, it will mean
increased facilities for fifteen or twenty emotionally disturbed boys and girls under
the age of 12 years. This will be a welcome addition to British Columbia's resources.
There are adolescents, and in particular boys, who have been removed from
deprived home conditions or committed to the Superintendent of Child Welfare or
a Children's Aid Society under the Juvenile Delinquents Act who never are quite
able to become part of another family group. They leave school early and seldom
with sufficient education to make them eligible for established vocational courses,
and as a result they approach adulthood with little or no skill to offer the labour
market.
 L 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ADMINISTRATION OF THE PROTECTION OF CHILDREN ACT
UNDER DECENTRALIZATION
Divisional controls established with respect to the decentralization of administration of the Protection of Children Act appear to be effective, and helpful as well,
to the field. An increased number of Court hearings under the Protection of Children Act have been completed this year, and an increased number of children have
been discharged from care to their own homes. In an impressively high number of
instances also, the Superintendent's guardianship was terminated by the granting
of an adoption order by the Supreme Court.
Table IV.—Children before Court and in Care, 1957-60
Children before Total Children
Court (P.C.A.) in Care at
at End of End of
Year                                                                                                     Fiscal Year Fiscal Year
1957   119 2,050
1958   173 2,287
1959   167 2,586
1960   107 2,703
Of the 1,009 children discharged from care during the year, 258 were wards
of the Superintendent under the Protection of Children Act and were discharged for
the following reasons:—
Table V.—Reasons for Discharge of Wards of Superintendent
Adoption order granted  123
Twenty-one years of age  42
Married   20
Guardianship transferred to a Children's Aid Society  11
P.C.A. order rescinded and returned to own parents  58
Deceased   4
Total   25 8
One hundred and seventy-six children discharged from care had been apprehended under the Protection of Children Act and the case disposed of as follows:—
Table VI.—Disposal of Cases Apprehended under Protection of Children Act
Application withdrawn  75
Never presented  52
Returned to parents under section 8 (5) (a) or (b), Protection of
Children Act  48
Deceased   1
Total  176
The majority of the fifty-two children not presented were boys and girls who
had run away from home. They needed care very temporarily while arrangements
were made for their prompt return to parent or guardian in this or another Province.
The status and circumstances under which the remaining 575 children discharged from care were as follows:—
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
Table VII.—Status of Children Discharged from Care
L 39
J.D.A.
Wards
Wards under
P.C.A. of
Other
Agencies
Wards
of O.P.
Immigrant
Wards
under P.C.A.
Non-wards
Twenty-one years of age.- - -	
4
31
1
12
52
13
7
8
12
3
1
2
4
1
6
1
Returned to other Province ,  „ 	
Deceased 	
2
3
352
60
Totals —	
36
92
18
5
424
The Superintendent regrets to report the death of eight children, which is a
high number despite the increased population of children in care during the year.
The reports with respect to each death bears out the fact that the Department is
caring for an ever-increasing number of grossly handicapped, retarded, and (or)
deeply disturbed children. The family histories of most of these eight children also
substantiate the belief that there is a rising incidence of gross parental physical
neglect of children. It may be coincidence, but it must be noted also that four
of the deceased children who had been removed from deplorable physical and moral
home conditions were of native Indian parentage.
One of the children deceased was the youngest of a large family of Indian
children who were all badly malnourished and neglected when apprehended. He
was sickly from birth and suffered from a congenital physical handicap. After
being in care for a year and a half, during which time he had made as good progress
as could be expected, he was returned to his mother's home by temporary order
under the Protection of Children Act and met his death there by accident five
months later.
A new-born Indian baby, whose mother's home situation precluded her taking
him home, contracted pneumonia when 3 weeks old and failed to respond to medical
care.   This child, too, was not robust physically at birth.
The third deceased Indian child had been abandoned by his mother when
10 months old. He continued to be a sickly undernourished child, was mentally
retarded, and succumbed to infection when aged 3 years.
The fourth deceased Indian child, along with several other children of the
family, had also been deserted by his parents when he was aged 4 years. He suffered many complex medical problems, including a condition which limited his
ability to walk steadily and was as well mentally retarded. He fell at play and,
while no serious hurt was immediately detected, died a few weeks later from the
effects.
One of the four remaining deceased children was aged 14 years, and he had
been in care during most of them. He had suffered brain damage at birth, with
resulting retardation and extensive physical handicap, but he had known throughout
his life the most devoted and kindly care possible from his foster-parents.
Another boy deceased was aged 19 years and had been a ward during nine of
them. His foster-parents and later the staff of a private hospital did all possible
to meet the daily demands of the terminal illness from which this boy had suffered
throughout most of his life.
 L 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The seventh child deceased was a 16-year-old girl who had been admitted to
care a year previously. Despite all medical care, this child did not survive needed
heart surgery.
The eighth child deceased, a boy aged 16 years, had known nothing but unhap-
piness in his own home and had been committed to Brannen Lake School when 14
years old. His decision to isolate himself from others was evident by his lack of
participation in the life at the School. Upon release he was committed to the
Superintendent of Child Welfare under the Juvenile Delinquents Act, but it was too
late to help him. Nine months later he was found dead under tragic and lonely
circumstances.
Table VIII.—Age and Legal Status of Children in the Care of the Superintendent
of Child Welfare as at March 31st, 1960
0-5
Months
6-11
Months
1-2
Years
3-5
Years
6-11
Years
12-13
Years
14-17
Years
18-21
Years
Total
23
19
17
4
36
8
6
-
185
24
17
19
1
341
27
21
12
4
611
67
29
1
23
8
215
25
4
7
6
7
1
455
64
12
54
30
15
6
219
9
1
18
32
4
15
2,085
243
107
Juvenile Delinquents Act  	
Wards and non-wards of Children's
Aid Societies in care of Superintendent of Child Welfare       	
80
127
39
Immigrant wards under Protection
22
Totals  	
63
51
246
405
739
265
636
298
2,703
Two hundred and forty-eight of the total 487 children placed for adoption this
year by the Division were placed with their adopting parents when less than 1 month
old. This practice is reflected in the ages of children in care, as shown in Table VIII
above, as is the emphasis being placed upon the need to finalize permanent planning
for children at the earliest age possible.
There are eight more children under 6 months of age in care than there were
at the end of the last fiscal year, but thirty-two less in the age-group 6-11 months.
The continuing rather high number of children aged 1—2, 3-5, and 6—11 years,
however, gives cause for concern. Many are children of mixed racial origin and
predominantly native Indian. So rapidly are the numbers of these children in care
increasing, and in particular within Regions V and VII, that some special plan of
action is indicated within the Department and in collaboration with the Department
of Indian Affairs and the three Children's Aid Societies.
Present placement resources for adoption and long-term foster-home care
for children of Indian heritage are seriously inadequate, which subjects many of
them to the damaging effects of frequent replacements throughout their growing
years. Their racial origin is often a bar to adoption placement, but presenting an
equally serious barrier is the family religion of many. Thus far the Department has
striven to provide for each child an adopted family of the same faith as his own
parents, but the reality situation to-day, in terms of available adoption homes of all
faiths, precludes such planning for a large number of children.
TO-MORROW'S ADULTS
Among the 636 boys and girls aged 14 to 17 years and the 298 between 18 and
21 years there are many doing well at school or vocational training, and in the
older group a large number are self-supporting.    Helping boys and girls prepare
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 41
themselves for the rapidly changing world in which they are to be the adults is to-day
a major challenge to parents everywhere. The youth growing up in the care of an
agency needs special personal as well as educational help. His painful childhood
experiences can give rise to great bitterness and hostility, or they can be a base on
which to build compassionate understanding of his own and the troubles of others.
It becomes essential that those responsible for the boy or girl without own parents be
professionally competent and increasingly available to guide and advise him if he is
to avoid the costly pitfalls of loneliness and a lack of self-worth.
The increase in foster-home rates this year was a welcomed policy change, and
it has a positive effect upon foster-home finding, and in particular home-finding for
older boys and girls and pre-school children.
IMMIGRANT CHILDREN UNDER THE PROTECTION
OF CHILDREN ACT
There is but one of the original sixty-two children placed in foster homes from
the Fairbridge Farm School in 1950 still in care. This boy is now aged 19 years,
and in general maintains himself but on a marginal level.
As this child immigration scheme nears its end, research as to the results is
indicated. The findings would be basis for decision should future similar projects be
suggested and, in addition, would add much to our knowledge of the effects of separation of children from their parents.
CHILDREN PLACED FOR ADOPTION
Sixty-three children of mixed racial origin, or twenty-six more than ever before,
were found adopting parents. They represented almost all the races. Forty were
native or part-native Indian, thirteen part Chinese or Japanese, five part Negroid,
two part East Indian, one Hawaiian, one Mexican, and one of French and North
African heritage.
For the most part, the adopting parents selected for these sixty-three children
were of the white race, but for the first time a part-East Indian child was placed with
a family of identical racial and national background. A part-Chinese boy was
placed with a full Chinese family who not only had a child of their own but two
previously adopted children and a wish for more. Another Chinese couple, who
had already adopted a part-Chinese little girl, were happy to add to their family
her new-born cousin by blood when he, too, became available for adoption.
Sixty-three children represents a small percentage of the total children of
mixed racial origin in foster-home care. However, even this number proves two
points: that adoption placement of these children is acceptable, and that special
Departmental planning to make possible concerted efforts to bring to the attention
of communities throughout the Province the special needs of these children could
be a highly successful undertaking.
Gains were made again this year in the adoption placement of older children
and children with physical or emotional handicaps. As will be seen in Table IX,
however, outstanding progress was made in the placement of new-born babies
and infants under 6 months of age. One hundred and eighty-six were with their
adopting parents before the age of 15 days, sixty-two before they were 1 month, and
135 before they were 6 months of age. In total, 383, or thirty-three more than last
year, of the children placed were with their adopting parents before they had reached
the age of 6 months.
 L 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IX.—Adoption Placements, April 1st, 1959
to March 31st, 1960
rt
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78
22
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3
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4
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1
1
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27
6
17
10
7
3
1
1
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5
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21
9
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—
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—
186
62
80
55
32
21
8   |     8
10   |     2
8
4
5
2
1
1        1
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1
Male, 258;  female, 229; total placements, 487.
The majority of the 487 children placed will be legally adopted within the
statutory requirement of one year's residence with their adopting parents. Four,
because of the special needs of their situation, however, were placed on an extended
probationary period basis. This device is used in the main when a child must
receive medical services, as rehabilitative surgery, beyond the financial means of an
ordinary family income.
Forty-two children had been placed with their adopting parents first on a foster-
home basis. Many of this group were brought to the Division's attention through
the Adoption Registry. Complicated legal entanglements were resolved, possible
alternative plans were explored, and only after Field and Division were satisfied that
the individual child's best interests were to be served by the foster-parents becoming
his adopting parents was the status of the placement changed. The Registry has
served to initiate earlier permanent planning for a large number of children, as
evident from the source of referral of children for adoption: 282 were referred to
the Division by the Field, the Vancouver Children's Aid Society referred 178, the
Catholic Children's Aid Society 26, and the Family and Children's Service, Victoria,
1 child.
Last year the five families involving twelve children who were placed in adoption homes as family groups were cause for note. This year twelve families involving
twenty-seven children is the figure to be proudly reported.
In the conviction that a home is somewhere to be found for each child needing
one, the Division this year negotiated with a number of public welfare departments
elsewhere and successfully placed seven children outside of British Columbia. One
child of mixed racial origin was placed in a home in Ontario. One child with special
needs is happily located in Manitoba, another is in Alaska, and four are in homes in
the Yukon.
The Superintendent is presently encouraging the Catholic Children's Aid Society to explore resources for some of their children in the State of Oregon, U.S.A.
Citizenship is important, but it is second to a good stable family life. For a long
time now neither the Department nor the Catholic Children's Aid Society has been
able to place the many Roman Catholic children needing adopting parents, and if
there are Roman Catholic families in Oregon wanting a child, it is right and humane
that the two be brought together.
Of particular concern is the continuing shortage of homes for Roman Catholic
children. The sixty-two children of this faith placed during the year is but a small
percentage of the total Roman Catholic children in care needing adopting parents.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 43
In addition to the 487 children placed for adoption by Child Welfare Division,
the three Children's Aid Societies placed 395 children, an increase over last year
of forty-six children placed for adoption throughout the Province.
Table X.—Number of Children Placed for Adoption by Children's Aid
Societies and Child Welfare Division
Victoria Children's Aid Society  104
Catholic Children's Aid Society     54
Vancouver Children's Aid Society  237
395
Child Welfare Department  487
Total  882
ADOPTION ORDERS GRANTED
One thousand three hundred and fifty-eight adoption orders were granted in
the British Columbia Supreme Court during the year, an increase over the number
granted last year of forty-eight. In addition, the Division participated in thirty-eight
proceedings taken in jurisdictions elsewhere but involving children placed in British
Columbia whose adopting parents subsequently moved from the Province.
Table XI again establishes the recognition given by prospective adopting
parents to authorized child-placement agencies. Only 125 of the adoption orders
granted involved a child placed through channels other than a Children's Aid Society
or the Department.
Most adoption proceedings, involving as they do the child of the unwed mother
who stays firm in her decision to relinquish her child, are reasonably straightforward.
If all legal requirements have been met, the preparation of the Superintendent's
report to the Court and the granting of the adoption order by the Court presents no
particular problem. Yearly, however, the number of complex legal and social situations increases as the Superintendent of Child Welfare and the Children's Aid Societies seek to gain the security of adoption for more children whose parents have been
found by Family and Juvenile Courts incapable of caring for them.
This year about 25 to 30 per cent of the 1,358 adoptions which proceeded to
Court in British Columbia were contested by a parent who was withholding consent
to adoption or could not be located to give consent or, as in a few instances, having
given consent wished to revoke it. Under the Adoption Act the Superintendent
must recommend for or against the adoption order, for or against the waiving of
a parental or other consent, and for or against the revocation of a consent given.
It is now a matter of record that the high Court of British Columbia has supported
the Superintendent's recommendations in each instance this year. Several vitally
important Court decisions with respect to parental rights and the rights and interests
of a child were made. These, by reference in the future, will add in a major way to
the impact child welfare knowledge and practice has had and will continue to have
upon the application and interpretation of the law as it pertains to adoption of
children.
 L 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XI.—Legally Completed Adoptions throughout the Province,
According to the Type of Placement, during the Fiscal Year
Completions
Agency        Relative
Private
Total
Withdrawn
Region I	
Region II -	
Region III _
Region TV—
Region V	
Region VI „
Region VII
Totals-
Vancouver Children's Aid Society-
Catholic Children's Aid Society	
Victoria Children's Aid Society	
Totals 	
Grand total completed-
Completed outside of Province —
Grand totals-	
61
164
53
62
35
78
20
42
91
31
15
29
47
23
836
409
10
24
4
4
12
29
1
113
279
88
81
76
154
44
132
1,377
10
35
16
15
8
26
473
278
84
835
118
222
60
69
73
15
43
30
5
6
325
80
118
35
8
14
351
131
41
523
57
824
12
409
125
7
1,358
19
175
1
176
CUSTODY OF CHILDREN
There continues to be about seven to ten requests each month from the Supreme
Court for reports from the Superintendent in custody-of-children disputes. A total
of eighty-four was handled during the year, and twenty-five remain incomplete as at
March 31st, 1960. The Court has repeatedly stressed the value of these reports.
However, there continues to be some question as to their status and right to confidentiality before the Court, and in view of this, further legal interpretation and
clarification is being sought.
There was considerable activity in cases processed by the Division and Field
and (or) a Children's Aid Society pertaining to immigration of children, legitimation
and repatriation of children. A sharp increase also occurred in the cases termed
" sundry." These are referrals received from other agencies, Provinces, or countries,
and they frequently involve complex and time-consuming family problems. As seen
in Table XII, below, including Supreme Court custody reports, a total of 603 new
referrals in these five categories was received during the year, or eighty-two more
than last year.
Table XII.—Services Related to Child Protection
New
Totals
Incomplete
1959
1960
1959
1960
Mar. 31, 1959
Mar. 31, 1960
69
83
65
10
294
59
88
86
11
359
88
96
145
12
399
84
97
107
14
425
1           25
9
21
3
66
25
Repatriation _	
Immigration.	
7
30
4
134
Totals   	
521
603
740
727
124          1          200
ADMINISTRATION OF CHILDREN OF UNMARRIED
PARENTS ACT
A total of $76,401.73 was paid to the Superintendent of Child Welfare on
orders, agreements, or settlements made under the Children of Unmarried Parents
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
L 45
Act. The increase of $377.16 over last year is slight, and collections for the year
reflect the unemployment situation which has prevailed throughout the Province.
The Director of Vital Statistics reports a slight decrease again this year of
registered births of children born out of wedlock. There were, however, twenty-
three unwed mothers under the age of 15 years reported in the non-Indian population, which is an increase of six over last year.
As in the past, it can be said that in by far the majority of instances the tragedy
of these twenty-three young girls, who are but children themselves, is the result of
a lack of parental understanding, guidance, and protection. A number of adult men
involved were found guilty of criminal offences.
When such very young daughters of a family become mothers out of marriage,
it usually indicates that other social ills are to be found in their home life. Early
identification and treatment of families with social, medical, or economic problems
therefore is of extreme importance if further deterioration in the family's stability is
to be averted. Concerted planning on the part of all community agencies and
organizations and a joint aggressively " reaching-out" programme to help such
families is proving effective in many places and commends itself to the Department
for consideration.
One thousand four hundred and nineteen unmarried mothers were provided
services for themselves and children during the year by the three Children's Aid
Societies, and the Department of Social Welfare reports that approximately 600
were known to district offices throughout the Province.
Table XIII.
—Children Born Out of Wedlock
Totals
Under 15
15-19
20-24
25-29
30-39
40 and
Over
Year
J
c
•3
1
•3
1
•a
.1
1
1
Total
B
a
a
c
a
o
a
d
ss
c
m
c
a
c
T3
e
T3
c
TJ
a
•n
c
•a
c
■a
c
•3
c
Z
Z
z
z
z
z
a
z
1957/58	
535
442
460
1,975
2,042
2,012
3
4
4
16
17
23
134
111
129
584
608
610
174
144
147
553
586
581
125
96
83
376
371
337
88
72
87
400
405
404
11
15
10
46
55
2,510
1958/59 	
2,484
1959/60	
"
2,472
FAMILY ALLOWANCES
As will be seen from Table XIII, almost as much money was disbursed from
this account as was received from the Family Allowances Branch during the year.
Workers, foster-parents, and children seem increasingly aware of the usefulness of
these allowances, and the expenditures made show thought and imagination.
Policies with the Family Allowances Branch have remained relatively unchanged since the inception of the plan, and have proved effective and at all times
in the interests of children.
A total of $69,275.97 was received from the Family Allowances Branch this
year on behalf of 1,811 children in care.   Disbursements were as follows:—
 L 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XIII.—Family Allowances Disbursements
Balance on hand as at January 1st, 1959  $60,606.61
Receipts for the period January 1st, 1959, to December 31st,
1959     69,275.97
Expenditures for the above period     63,360.27
Disbursements—
Foster-parents  $34,102.00
Adopting parents       4,478.13
Natural parents       6,138.35
Transferred to Children's Aid Societies       2,777.68
Refunds to Family Allowances Branch  254.00
Recreational equipment, etc.       9,570.80
Paid to children on discharge       2,880.32
Educational   569.99
Gifts   29.85
Special clothing  357.68
Other Provinces  751.59
Miscellaneous        1,449.88
$63,360.27
Balance on hand as at December 31st, 1959  $66,522.31
Number of children involved in the accumulated balance, 1,811.
QUEEN ELIZABETH TRUST FUND
This fund, amounting to $12,140, was established in July, 1959, by the
Government to commemorate the visit of the Queen to British Columbia. It is to
be used for special purchases on behalf of individual children in the care of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare. Already pairs of blankets have been sent to seven
newly married wards, and one boy with interest in orchestra work has been able to
rent snare drums through the Fund. The Queen Elizabeth Trust Fund will be
increasingly used and will prove a valuable resource for boys and girls whose gifts,
talents, and interests are to be expressed in ways ordinary and extraordinary.
Divisional staff participated in a number of interagency and interdepartmental
activities through the year. The Deputy is a member of the Interdepartmental
Committee on Indian Affairs, as well as the Director of Social Welfare's Committee
on Delinquency. Both Committees have far-reaching goals in mind and warrant
the time, in and out of regular work-hours, spent in preparation. The Supervisor
of the Adoption Placement Section acted as Chairman of the Registration Committee for the Child Welfare League of America, which had a most successful first
conference in British Columbia at Vancouver this year. The Association of Children's Aid Societies, of which the Superintendent, as a Children's Aid Society, is a
member, was able to meet but twice this year. This group, which, as yet, is an
informal association, is proving to be a valuable means of communication between
the societies, and between them and the Department. The Institutional Care of
Children Committee, formed under the Welfare Institutions Licensing Act and
chaired by the Superintendent, could become an important means of increasing
placement resources for children. It met eleven times up to December, 1959, but
unfortunately since that time, because of other exigencies, no meeting has been
possible.   The Superintendent has the honour of serving voluntarily on the British
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
L 47
Columbia Committee of the First Canadian Conference on Children, which is to
be held in October, 1960.
CONCLUSION
In concluding this report, my heart-felt thanks go to the Divisional clerical and
social-work staff. Each has participated to the fullest extent in the many administrative changes made this year as a result of the Division's shifting function under
decentralization. Each has carried out his or her duties, with the children to be
served receiving first consideration. My appreciation of district office staffs' efforts
on behalf of child welfare services throughout the Province is no less. Thanks are
extended also to the three Children's Aid Societies and other voluntary and public
departments for their invaluable help and support throughout the year.
Foster-parents have earned special recognition these past twelve months. They
have coped with many trying and emergent situations, and are indeed the folk who
by their acts of love to children " make joy bells ring in Heaven."
 L 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
OLD-AGE ASSISTANCE, BLIND PERSONS' ALLOWANCES,  DISABLED
PERSONS' ALLOWANCES, AND SUPPLEMENTARY ASSISTANCE
E. W. Berry, Chairman
GENERAL
The Old-age Assistance Board is a division of the Department of Social Welfare. The Board consists of three members appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council. These same three members also comprise the Blind Persons' Allowances
Board and the Disabled Persons' Allowances Board. The Boards are charged with
the administration of the respective Federal and Provincial Acts and regulations,
including the consideration of applications and the payment of assistance. The
Boards also consider applications for supplementary assistance and health services,
and grant these additional Provincial benefits where applicable.
In general, the volume of work done by the Division was greater than in
previous years, due partly to the various adjustments necessary as a result of a
greater number of recipients on the payroll, and partly to the additional preparatory
work entailed in the latter months of the year in reviewing and adjusting the total
case load for the 20-per-cent increase in supplementary assistance, which was to
be effective at the beginning of the following year. Although the actual number of
new applications received and the number of applications granted were both down,
many more persons applied for reconsideration of their former applications which
were previously refused because of excess income. The over-all case load increased,
therefore, as a result of these older persons becoming eligible who formerly could
not qualify because of earnings. Part-time jobs appeared to be less plentiful than
in previous years.
No major changes in legislation took place in the three Federal-Provincial programmes or in the Provincial supplementary assistance programme.
The amounts expended during the year in the Federal-Provincial programmes
have levelled off after the sharp increases of the previous year that reflected previous
changes in legislation.
SOCIAL ASPECTS
The Board has its own " intake " section. Persons in the Vancouver area not
in receipt of Social Allowance may apply for assistance direct to the Board office.
Many problems of the aged are encountered, and of them the following appear
to be the most urgent:—
(1) Housing to accommodate the unmarried, particularly those who have
no family ties. The help given by way of the assistance or allowance,
and health benefits, seems to be adequate in most instances if the recipient
is satisfactorily housed.
(2) Adequate accommodation for the chronically ill who have limited financial
resources. The financial burden of such care is, in most cases, prohibitive
and beyond the resources of the individual or his family.
(3) Organized "trained volunteer" visits for our aged in order to assist
them at frequent intervals with their budgeting and daily problems.
GRAPHIC PRESENTATIONS COVERING THE PERIOD FROM
JANUARY 1st, 1952, TO MARCH 31st, 1960
Three graphic presentations on the following pages cover the various aspects
of the administration in this Province of the Old-age Assistance Act since January
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
L 49
1st, 1952, and Disabled Persons Act since April 1st, 1955, when these Acts became
effective.
The first graphic presentation for Old-age Assistance, a fine graph, shows the
relationship for each fiscal year ending March 31st between the total cost and the
total number of applications received and granted. The second, a bar graph, reveals
the relationship for each fiscal year among the totals of the number of cases on the
payroll, the number of applications received, the number granted, and the number
rejected. Details concerning these Old-age Assistance graphs were given in the
previous annual reports, and it will be noted that no significant change has occurred
in the present fiscal year in the number of applications received or in the total number
of cases in pay.
An examination of the third graph, a bar graph for Disabled Persons' Allowance, shows that the total number of applications for allowances received in each
year has levelled off after the large number received in the first year during which
the Act was operative. The total number of allowances in pay shows a consistent
increase of approximately 20 per cent over the previous year. The continued rise
in the case load reflects the accumulation of cases granted the allowance from year
to year. The total is made up of persons granted when they first apply, as well as
persons who later qualify. With the exception of the first year, approximately 37
per cent of the new applications received are refused for various reasons, the main
one being that the applicants are considered not totally and permanently disabled
within the meaning of the regulations.
Of the total applications received since April 1st, 1955, 56 per cent are receiving the allowance. The other 44 per cent are either ineligible, suspended, or
deceased. Of the 1,778 persons receiving the allowance, 65 per cent are disabled
because of mental disorders and diseases of the nervous system.
7,032
4,500
4,200
3,900
--BRITISH   COLUMBIA-
JANUARY 1,   1952 TO MARCH SI,   I960
l
3,300
Cost of Assistance
Number of Applications Received
Number of Applications Granted
Number of Applications Refused
	
50, 000 units per square
300 units per square
100 units per square
300 units per square
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3,000
2,700
2,400
2,100
1,800
1,500
1,200
900
600
\
Number of Old Age Assistance
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 L 50
8,000
7,000
6,000
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Old-age Assistance
HH
Number on the payroll.
Number of applications.
13     Number granted assistance.
Number rejected.
5,000
4,000
3,000
2,000
1,000   J
_y
LKLKJCLk
1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960
Fiscal year ending March 31st of each year.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
L 51
1,750
1,500 -
1,250
1,000
750 -
500
250
I
Disabled Persons' Allowance
Number on payroll.
Number of applications.
Number granted allowance.
Number rejected.
1956
1957
1958
1959
Fiscal year ending March 31st of each year.
1960
STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 3 1st, 1960
Old-age Assistance
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received
Applications granted
Applications not granted (refused, withdrawn, etc.)-
2,554
2,405!
421
1 Includes some left over from previous year.
 L 52 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Returned to British Columbia  28
Reinstated  124
Suspended   331
Deaths  247
Transferred to other Provinces  56
Transferred to Old Age Security  1,798
Total number on payroll at end of fiscal year  7,146
(b) Other-Province recipients—
Transferred to British Columbia  13
Reinstated  1
Suspended  6
Deaths   10
Transferred out of British Columbia  72
Transferred to Old Age Security  68
(c) Total number of British Columbia and other-Province recipi
ents on payroll at end of fiscal year  7,391
Table III.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Number Per Cent
Not of age  76 18.05
Unable to prove age  1 0.24
Not sufficient residence  2 0.48
Income in excess  199 47.27
Unable to prove residence  1 0.24
Transfer of property      	
Receiving War Veterans' Allowance  4 0.95
Information refused  20 4.75
Application withdrawn  73 17.33
Applicants died before grant  18 4.28
Whereabouts unknown  12 2.85
Eligible for Old Age Security  11 2.61
Assistance from private sources  3 0.71
Receiving Old Age Security  1 0.24
Totals       421 100.00
Table IV.—Sex of New Recipients
Male —
Female
Number
Per Cent
1,085
45.11
1,320
54.89
Totals   2,405 100.00
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
Table V.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Number
Married  1,055
Single  333
Widows  487
Widowers  130
Separated  346
Divorced  54
L 53
Totals   2,405
Per Cent
43.87
13.85
20.25
5.40
14.39
2.24
100.00
Table VI.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
British Columbia      250 10.40
Other parts of Canada      506 21.04
British Isles      572 23.78
Other parts of British Commonwealth        10 0.42
United States of America      249 10.35
Other foreign countries      818 34.01
100.00
Totals
2,405
Age 65
Age 66
Age 67
Age 68
Age 69
Table VII.—Ages at Granting of Assistance
Number
Per Cent
1,309
54.43
335
13.93
289
12.02
257
10.68
215
8.94
Totals   2,405
100.00
Table VIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Age 65
Number
22
Per Cent
8.91
Age 66
        39
15.79
Age 67
                           52
21.05
Age 68
59
23.89
Age 69
75
30.36
Totals 	
      247
100.00
 L 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Living alone	
Living with spouse	
Living with spouse and children
Living with children
Living with other relatives
Living with others
Living in public institutions _
Living in private institutions
Totals  ,	
umber
Per Cent
765
31.81
923
38.38
129
5.36
292
12.14
106
4.41
105
4.37
60
2.49
25
1.04
2,405
100.00
Table X.—Where New Recipients Are Living
Number
In own home  1,045
In rented house  322
In children's home  301
  87
  27
  5
  295
  64
  174
  85
In home of other relatives __
Boarding 	
In boarding home	
In housekeeping room	
In single room (eating out)
In rented suite	
In institutions 	
Totals   2,405
Per Cent
43.45
13.39
12.52
3.62
1.12
0.21
12.27
2.66
7.23
3.53
100.00
Table XI.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a) Holding real property of value—
$0 	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500 	
$501 to $750 	
$751 to $1,000       103
$1,001 to $1,500	
$1,501 to $2,000	
$2,001 and up 	
Number
Per Cent
1,277
53.10
70
2.91
61
2.53
74
3.08
103
4.28
231
9.60
252
10.49
337
14.01
Totals
2,405
100.00
J
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
L 55
Table XL—Economic Status of New Recipients—Continued
(b) Holding personal property of value—
$0 	
$1 to $250 	
$251 to $500	
$501 to $750 	
$751 to $1,000 _.
$1,001 to $1,500
$1,501 to $2,000
$2,001 and up .__.
Totals
Number
1,056
635
177
142
115
134
67
79
2,405
Per Cent
43.91
26.40
7.36
5.90
4.78
5.57
2.79
3.29
100.00
Table XII.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31st,
1960, Whose Assistance Is Paid by British Columbia
Alberta 	
Saskatchewan 	
Manitoba 	
Ontario 	
Quebec 	
New Brunswick _
Nova Scotia 	
Yukon Territory
Granted by
British
Columbia
.___ 22
.__    7
7
1
1
2
1
Granted by
Other
Provinces
6
5
3
13
3
Totals
48
30
Table XIII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the
Amount of Assistance Received (Basic Assistance $55)
Amount of Assistance
$55 	
$50 to $54.99 __..
$45 to $49.99 __
$40 to $44.99 _
$35 to $39.99 .1-
$30 to $34.99 _
$25 to $29.99 _
$20 to $24.99 _..
Less than $19.99
Per Cent
80.93
4.70
3.21
2.27
1.87
1.85
1.35
1.25
2.57
Total
100.00
 L 56 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Blind Persons' Allowances
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received  60
Applications granted   531
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc  222
1 Includes some left over from previous year.
2 Number still pending not included.
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended     20
Reinstated     10
Transferred to other Provinces  5
Returned to British Columbia  2
Transferred to Old Age Security  22
Deaths     11
(b) Other-Province recipients—
Transferred to British Columbia  5
Reinstated     3
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended  5
Deaths    1
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia   516
Other Province  25
541
Table 111.—Reasons Why Api
Not blind within the meaning of the Act-
tlications Not Granted
Number
       9
Per Cent
40.92
Income in excess      	
     5
22.73
Applications withdrawn	
     5
22.73
Died before grant      	
     1
4.54
Information refused _                        _
     1
4.54
Whereabouts unknown   	
     1
4.54
  22
Totals       _   	
100.00
Table IV.—Sex of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Male    31 54.49
Female  22 45.51
Totals     53 100.00
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
Table V.—Marital Status of New Recipients
L 57
Married 	
Number
  18
Per Cent
33.96
Single     	
  20
37.74
Widows     	
     9
16.98
Separated	
     4
7.55
Divorced     	
     2
3.77
          53
Totals            	
100.00
Table VI.-
British Columbia
—Birthplace
of New Recipients
Number
20
Per Cent
37.74
Other parts of Canada	
  17
32.08
British Isles  	
     6
11.32
United States of American-
     5
9.43
Other foreign countries	
     5
9.43
  53
Totals    	
100.00
Table VII.—Ages at Granting of Allowance
Ages 18 to 2 L              	
Number
4
Per Cent
7.55
Ages 22 to 30     	
                        4
7.55
Ages 31 to 40	
       6
11.32
Ages 41 to 50._             	
11
20.75
Ages 51 to 60        	
          ___       13
34.53
Ages 61 to 69  __    	
       _____    15
28.30
  53
Totals   	
100.00
Ages 21 to 30
Ages 31 to 40
Ages 41 to 50
Ages 51 to 60
Ages 61 to 69
Table VIII.-
—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number
Per Cent
                                1
9.09
       1
9.09
       2
18.18
     7
63.64
  11
ils   	
100.00
 L 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Number Per Cent
Living with parents     5 9.43
Living alone  13 24.53
Living with spouse  11 20.76
Living with spouse and children     7 13.21
Living with children     9 16.98
Living with other relatives     2 3.77
Living with others     2 3.77
Living in public institutions     1 1.89
Living in private institutions     3 5.66
Table X.—Where New Recipients Are Living
Totals     53 100.00
In parents' home _     _ ____
Number
                   6
Per Cent
11.32
In own home	
        17
32.08
In rented house	
       7
13.21
In rented suite _ .            _
6
11.32
Tn children's home     	
____             2
3.77
In home of other relatives    ___
         2
3.77
In housekeeping room    __
     7
13.21
In institutions   ____    .              _    	
___               4
7.55
In single room (eating out)	
     2
3.77
  53
Totals   	
100.00
Table XI.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a)  Holding real property of value—                           Number Percent
$0   35 66.04
$1 to $250     4 7.55
$251 to $500     2 3.77
$501 to $750     1 1.89
$751 to $1,000     1 1.89
$1,001 to $1,500     2 3.77
$1,501 to $2,000     2 3.77
$2,001 and up     6 11.32
Totals   53 100.00
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
L 59
Table XI.—Economic Status of New Recipients—Continued
CM
Holding personal property of value—
$0          —        	
Number
  28
  12
     3
Per Cent
52.83
$1 to $250__._   	
22.65
$251 to $500       	
5.66
$501 to $750          	
     2
3.77
$751 to $1,000
     2
3.77
$1,001 to $1,500
     3
5.66
$1,501 to $2,000
$2,001 and up	
     3
___ 53
5.66
Totals 	
100.00
Table XII.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31st,
1960, Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Granted by
British
Columbia
Alberta 	
Saskatchewan _
Manitoba	
Ontario 	
New Brunswick
1
2
1
Granted by
Other
Provinces
Totals
Table XIII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the
Amount of Allowances Received (Basic Allowance, $55)
$55
$50 to $54.99 _
$45 to $49.99 _
$40 to $44.99 _
$35 to $39.99 _
$30 to $34.99 _
$25 to $29.99 .
$20 to $24.99 _
$19.99 and less
Total
Per Cent
92.14
2.02
1.41
0.40
1.01
0.61
0.40
2.01
100.00
 L 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Disabled Persons' Allowances
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received	
Applications granted	
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc.
1 Includes some left over from previous year.
469
3581
139
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended 	
Reinstated 	
Transferred to other Provinces _
Returned to British Columbia	
Transferred to Old Age Security
Deaths 	
(b) Other-Province recipients—
Transferred to British Columbia
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended-.
Reinstated 	
Deaths 	
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia   1,815
Other Province         51
84
37
9
2
44
11
10
15
1,866
Table III.—Reason Why Applications Not Granted
Number Per Cent
Not 18 years of age       1 0.72
Too much income     11 7.91
Refused information       4 2.88
Whereabouts unknown        2 1.44
Unable to meet medical test     98 70.50
Mental hospital        3 2.16
Hospital        1 0.72
Nursing home       4 2.88
Application withdrawn       6 4.32
Died before grant       9 6.47
100.00
Totals
139
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
L 61
Table IV.—Primary Causes of Disability on Accepted Cases
Infective and parasitic diseases
Neoplasms
Number Per Cent
     11 3.16
       4 1.14
Allergic, endocrine system, metabolic, and nutritional diseases      12 3.45
Diseases of blood and blood-forming organs       1 0.28
Mental, psychoneurotic, and personality disorders.. _ 125 35.91
Diseases of the nervous system and sense organs  103 29.60
Diseases of the circulatory system     35 10.06
Diseases of the respiratory system       7 2.02
Diseases of the digestive system       3 0.87
Diseases of the genito-urinary system       2 0.58
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissues    	
Diseases of the bones and organs of movement     33 9.49
Congenital malformations        6 1.72
Symptoms, senility, and ill-defined conditions  	
Accidents, poisoning, and violence (nature of injury)      6 1.72
Totals   348 100.00
Table V.—Sex of New Recipients
Male  —
Number
  201
Per Cent
56.15
Female
  157
43.85
Totals     ___
     _ ___          358
100.00
Table VI.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Married   	
Number
     72
Per Cent
20.11
Single    _ 	
    _____             235
65.63
Widow 	
       _          14
3.91
Widower
3
0.83
Separated 	
19
5.31
Divorced 	
       15
4.21
                     358
Totals     	
100.00
 L 62 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VII.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
British Columbia  141 39.38
Other parts of Canada  135 37.71
British Isles      33 9.22
Other parts of British Empire       2 0.56
United States of America     12 3.35
Other foreign countries      35 9.78
Table VIII.—Ages at Granting of Allowance
Totals   358 100.00
Ages 18 to 19	
Number
          56
Per Cent
15.64
Ages 20 to 24	
     29
8.10
Ages 25 to 29   	
33
9.22
Ages 30 to 34         	
     18
5.03
Ages 35 to 39	
     27
7.54
Ages 40 to 44   	
            35
9.78
Ages 45 to 49    _ _
              30
8.38
Ages 50 to 54	
     34
9.50
Ages 55 to 59               	
                    55
15.36
Ages 60 to 64         	
     40
11.17
Ages 65 to 69             	
       1
0.28
Ages over 70                     _. 	
  358
Totals 	
100.00
Table IX.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number Per Cent
Ages 18 to 19  	
Ages 20 to 24       1 2.27
Ages 25 to 29       3 6.83
Ages 30 to 34       1 2.27
Ages 35 to 39       2 4.54
Ages 40 to 44       4 9.09
Ages 45 to 49       2 4.54
Ages 50 to 54       2 4.54
Ages 55 to 59     14 31.82
Ages 60 to 64     10 22.73
Ages 65 to 69       5 11.37
Ages over 70  	
Totals      44 100.00
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
L 63
Table X.—With Whom Recipients Live
Number
167
42
56
Living with parents	
Living alone 	
Living with spouse	
Living with spouse and children      15
Living with children     12
Living with other relatives     42
Living with others     18
Living in private institutions       6
Totals
358
Per Cent
46.65
11.73
15.64
4.19
3.35
11.73
5.03
1.68
100.00
Table XI.—Where New Recipients Are Living
In parents' home 	
In own house	
In rented house	
In rented suite	
In children's home	
In home of other relatives       36
In housekeeping room	
In boarding home	
In institutions	
In single room (eating out)          6
Totals   358
Number
Per Cent
168
46.92
59
16.48
21
5.86
29
8.10
8
2.23
36
10.06
19
5.31
6
1.68
6
1.68
6
1.68
100.00
Table XII.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a) Holding real property of value
$0 	
$1 to $250	
Number
  294
       6
$251 to $500        4
$501 to $750 ____..
$751 to $1,000 __..
$1,001 to $1,500
$1,501 to $2,000
$2,001 and up ___
Totals
1
5
10
9
29
358
Per Cent
82.12
1.68
1.12
0.28
1.40
2.79
2.51
8.10
100.00
 L 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XII.—Economic Status of New Recipients—Continued
(b) Holding personal property of value—                 Number Percent
$0   254 70.95
$1 to $250      58 16.20
$251 to $500      11 3.07
$501 to $750      12 3.35
$751 to $1,000       8 2.23
$1,001 to $1,500        7 1.96
$1,501 to $2,000        3 0.84
$2,001 and up       5 1.40
Totals
358
100.00
Table XIII.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31st,
1960, Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Granted by    Granted by
Alberta
British
Columbia
__    5
Other
Provinces
1
Saskatchewan                     _   _ _
         2
6
Manitoba
           1
Ontario                              _   _
     2
5
Quebec
          1
New Brunswick                        -
1
Totals 	
  11
13
Table XIV.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the
Amount of Allowance Received (Basic Allowance, $55)
Per Cent
     92.41
$55  	
$50 to $54.99 _.
$45 to $49.99 ..
$40 to $44.99 _.
$35 to $39.99 __
$30 to $34.99 __
$25 to $29.99 _
$20 to $24.99 __
$19.99 and less
Total
2.59
1.40
1.07
0.79
0.56
0.39
0.34
0.45
100.00
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 65
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
The Old-age Assistance Act, Year Ended March 3 1st, 1960
Supplementary
Assistance Assistance Total
Total   amount  paid   recipients   in
British Columbia  $4,740,802.49 $1,370,697.11  $6,111,499.60
Less amount of refunds from
recipients—
Overpayments  ___.       $17,863.55 $3,161.84       $21,025.39
Miscellaneous   715.00 230.00 945.00
Total refunds        $18,578.55 $3,391.84       $21,970.39
Net amount paid to recipients in
British Columbia  $4,722,223.94 $1,367,305.27 $6,089,529.21
A dd amount paid other Provinces on
account of recipients for whom
British Columbia is responsible __ 30,798.47 4,432.21 35,230.68
Less amount received by British
Columbia on account of recipients
for whom other Provinces are responsible   73,597.15 9,940.69 83,537.84
Less amount refunded by the Federal Government     2,368,932.02          2,368,932.02
Total   amount   paid   by
British Columbia  $2,310,493.24 $1,361,796.79 $3,672,290.03
 L 66 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Blind Persons Act, Year Ended March 3 1st, 1960
Supplementary
Allowances Assistance Total
Total amount paid recipients in British
Columbia   $351,540.91 $117,605.56 $469,146.47
Less amount of refunds from recipients—
Overpayments  $614.35 $226.45 $840.80
Miscellaneous  55.00 20.00 75.00
Total refunds   $669.35 $246.45 $915.80
Net amount paid to recipients in British
Columbia   $350,871.56 $117,359.11 $468,230.67
Add amount paid other Provinces on account of recipients for whom British
Columbia is responsible         1,056.17 440.00        1,496.17
Less amount received by British Columbia
on account of recipients for whom other
Provinces are responsible         5,887.54        2,673.50        8,561.04
Less amount refunded by the  Federal
Government      263,162.18         263,162.18
Total amount paid by British
Columbia     $82,878.01 $115,125.61 $198,003.62
The Disabled Persons Act, Year Ended March 3 1st, 1960
Supplementary
Allowances Assistance Total
Total amount paid recipients in British Columbia   $1,150,268.82 $406,629.87 $1,556,898.69
Less amount of refunds from
recipients—
Overpayments   $843.59 $110.00 $953.59
Miscellaneous   52.93 40.00 92.93
Total refunds   $896.52 $150.00 $1,046.52
Net amount paid to recipients in British Columbia   $1,149,372.30 $406,479.87 $1,555,852.17
Add amount paid other Provinces on
account of recipients for whom
British Columbia is responsible ____ 7,184.78        1,060.00 8,244.78
Less amount received by British Columbia on account of recipients for
whom other Provinces are responsible   25,250.32      25,250.32
Less amount refunded by the Federal
Government         574,686.13            574,686.13
Total amount paid by British Columbia       $556,620.63 $407,539.87     $964,160.50
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 67
Old Age Security Recipients, Supplementary Assistance,
Year Ended March 3 1st, 1960
Total amount paid recipients in British Columbia  $5,948,464.65
Less amount of refunds from recipients—
Overpayments        $ 18,599.93
Miscellaneous   846.60
Total refunds        $19,446.53
Net amount paid to recipients in British Columbia  $5,929,018.12
Add amount paid other Provinces on account of recipients
for whom British Columbia is responsible  46,548.77
Less amount received by British Columbia on account of
recipients for whom other Provinces are responsible       163,974.49
Total paid by British Columbia  $5,811,592.40
The Old-age Pension Act, Year Ended March 3 1st, 1960
Supplementary
Pensions       Assistance Total
Amount of refunds received from pensioners'estates $2,076.01   $2,076.01
Less amount refunded to the Federal Governments    1,456.35      1,456.35
Total net refunds received by British
Columbia         $619.66       $619.66
Administration Expense
Salaries and special services  $212,593.70
Office expense  52,974.82
Travelling expense  552.66
Incidentals and contingencies  806.00
Furniture and equipment  543.70
Medical examinations  201.93
Total  $267,672.81
Summary
Administration and Assistance
Administration   $267,672.81
Old-age Assistance Act  2,310,493.24
Blind Persons' Allowances Act  82,878.01
Disabled Persons' Allowances Act  581,870.95
Old-age Pension Act (Credit) 619.66
As per Public Accounts $3,242,295.35
 L 68 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Summary—Continued
Supplementary Assistance
Old-age Assistance Act  $1,361,796.79
Blind Persons' Allowances Act  115,125.61
Disabled Persons' Allowances Act  382,289.55
Universal Old Age Security  5,811,592.40
As per Public Accounts  $7,670,804.35
Supplementary Assistance and Health Services to the Aged,
Blind, and Disabled
New Applications
Number received  1,810
Number granted supplementary assistance and health services  1,159
Number granted supplementary assistance only  8
Number granted health services only  102
Number who died before application was granted  23
Number of applications withdrawn  68
Number of applicants ineligible  236
Number of applications pending  214
Total  _. 1,810
General Information
Former old-age pensioners still receiving supplementary assistance
on March 31st, 1960     8,716
Old-age Assistance recipients transferred to Old Age Security
receiving supplementary assistance on March 31st, 1960  10,171
New Old Age Security pensioners receiving supplementary assistance on March 31st, 1960     7,343
Blind persons in receipt of Old Age Security receiving supplementary assistance on March 31st, 1960        202
Disability pensioners over 70 receiving supplementary assistance
on March 31st, 1960  2
Other-Province cases     1,172
Total number in receipt of B.C. Supplementary Social Allowance
as at March 31st, 1960  35,493
MEMBERS OF THE BOARD
The following are the members of the Old-age Assistance Board of the Province of British Columbia:—
Chairman: Mr. E. W. Berry.
Members: Mr. J. A. Sadler, Director of Social Welfare; Mr. H. E. Blanchard,
Administrator, Region II, Department of Social Welfare.
CONCLUSION
In concluding this report the Board wishes to express its sincere appreciation
for the loyal and efficient work of the office and field staffs throughout the year,
and for the continued co-operation of other departments of Government and many
outside agencies.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
L 69
MEDICAL SERVICES DIVISION
G. Wakefield, M.D., Director
The attached tables will readily indicate a further increase in the costs of providing health services to those persons in receipt of social assistance. One might
ask if such data also show the benefits these persons have received from such services.
Perhaps we cannot keep records of each service as it pertains to each of the
literally thousands of our clients. However, I am certain that all those in the Provincial and municipal welfare offices have, at the very least, an inkling of what
benefits, both medical and social, have accrued to the individuals concerned. We
have a responsibility to control expenditures in so far as limiting them to the providing of necessary services, but this is the difficult core of the problem. Certainly,
every prepaid health plan, whether it be public or private in nature, faces this
problem, and as yet none has found a mutually acceptable solution. One can only
hope for a greater acceptance by all concerned of their responsibilities as citizens to
consider the essential need of a service. It is so easy to make the extra the usual if
one does not have to pay for the service directly.
I do think that, in line with acceptance of responsibility, we should be giving
further thought to the question of client participation in the cost as well as the
receiving of the service. We do have a certain number of persons in receipt of
public assistance who are more or less completely and permanently dependent
individuals. Despite them, is it not consistent with good social casework practice
to have the client accept some financial responsibility in all matters including
health as well as those pertaining to food, lodging, and clothing? This presents
certain problems regarding current eligibility regulations, but I do believe our staff
in general would accept such a challenge.
Before commenting further on some of the tables, I should like to once again
express appreciation to the many professional associations, hospitals, and other
institutions who have so ably provided their services to our clients. Despite certain
areas of differences of opinion and at times almost frank disagreement, we always
find them ready to assist us in helping those who are unable to help themselves.
I sincerely hope that this fact will never be forgotten when problems arise.
Table I.—Gross Costs for Fiscal Years 1955/56 to 1959/60
Year
Medical
Drugs1
Dental
Optical
Transportation
Other
Total
1955/56
1956/57.
1957/58.
1958/59
1959/60.
$1,523,658.40 $893,356.88
'1,486.400.99 961,405.50
1,503.964.91 |1,106,153.01
1,587,997.03 11,281.107.27
1,766,536.60 11,492,138.17
$119,512.74
129,267.56
148,223.72
$48,341.91
50,565.61
55,440.66
168,051.06 | 57,050.37
279,550.08     79,632.04
$22,504.83
23.359.27
25,763.04
41.329.60
57,297.87
I
$12,733.72 |$2,620,108.48
14,421.86 | 2,665,420.79
16.983.77 I 2,856.529.11
21.374.78 | 3.156 910.11
22,451.43 | 3,697,606.19
 I
1 Not included in these figures is the cost of drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare institutions.
There was a definite increase (some 8.5 per cent) in the total average monthly
coverage, and this was mainly attributable to the increase in the Social Allowance
case load. In December of 1958 the unemployed employables were included in
those receiving Social Allowance who were given medical coverage after the three-
month waiting period.   By the next fiscal year this group was increasing even more,
 L 70
BRITISH COLUMBIA
as its numbers vary directly with current economic conditions in the Province.
There were increases in most of the other categories of assistance, and, of course,
all such increases automatically affect the costs of the Medical Services Division.
Table II
—Payments to British Columbia Doctors (Gross Costs)
Fiscal Year
Medical
Agreement
Immigrant
Other
Total
1955/56          - 	
$1,518,274.51
1,479,661.21
1,492,741.27
1,580,815.44
1,759,646.67
$701.89
1,836.78
6,951.51
1,330.62
565.00
$4,682.00
4,903.00
4,272.13
$1,523,658.40
1956/57 _	
1957/58           -	
1,486,400.99
1,503,964.91
1958/59      	
1959/60..  	
5,850.97
6,324.93
1,587,997.03
1,766,536.60
An increase in all items is shown, with an over-all one of some 17 per cent.
The various types of services will be commented on individually.
Table III.—Categorical Breakdown of Medical Coverage
with Average Numbers of Recipients
Fiscal Year
Social
Allowance1
Child
Welfare
Division
Old Age
Security Bonus
and Blind
Old-age
Assistance
Disabled
Persons'
Allowance
Total Average
Monthly
Coverage
1955/56	
1956/57	
1957/58..-	
1958/59	
1959/60	
$19,273
18,165
18,363
19,914
25,362
$3,208
3,303
3,546
3,814
3,998
$36,731
36,240
36,440
36,191
3'5,860
$8,448
7,739
7,195
7,150
7,410
$453
974
1,221
1,516
1,785
$68,113
66,421
66,765
68,585
74,415
1 Until August 31st, 1958, there was a Mothers' Allowance case load, but effective September 1st, 1958, these
cases became Social Allowance cases. So that figures from 1958/59 will be comparable with previous years,
Mothers' Allowance and Social Allowance recipients have been combined in this statement under the heading
" Social Allowance."
These tables are related, and it is to be noted there was no significant change
in the relative percentage received of the assessed accounts despite a greater number
of accounts received from relatively the same number of doctors. The total number
of accounts was slightly higher than for the preceding year (11.3 per cent) than
was the corresponding increase (8.5 per cent) in total average monthly coverage
(see Table I).
The per capita fee to S.A.M.S. was unchanged in the past fiscal year, although
the Medical Association was advised that it would be increased from $22.50 to $24
as of April 1st, 1960.
The accounts paid for services to immigrants have dropped with the decrease
in immigration, but there has been a definite increase in other doctors' accounts.
This latter group includes payments for initial medical reports of persons in receipt
of social assistance who apply for the Disabled Persons' Allowance and also for the
use of Medical Examination Report Form M.S.D. 11.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
Table IV.—Drug Costs
L 71
Number of Prescriptions
Costs of Medicines
Fiscal Year
Provincial
Pharmacy
Drug-stores
Total
Provincial
Pharmacy1
Drug-stores
Total
1955/56	
15,931
19,572
23,487
30,140
41,585
393,367
398,355
458,002
534,352
409,298
417,927
481,489
564,492
$70,353.98
88,259.99
113,841.90
137,255.34
184,437.87
$823,002.90
873,145.51
992,311.11
1,143,851.93
1,307,700.30
$893,356.88
1956/57 _	
1957/58	
1958/59	
1959/60	
961,405.50
1,106,153.01
1,281,107.27
1,492,138.17
1 Not included in these figures is the cost of drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare institutions.
The number of prescriptions filled by local drug-stores was not available at
this time. However, comparing the relative increases in prescriptions and costs of
same for the Provincial pharmacy, 37.9 and 34.3 per cent respectively, with the
increase in costs for drug-stores, 14.3 per cent, one would expect a concomitant
lesser increase for the latter's total prescriptions. Another factor in the total drug
cost increase was a 5-per-cent rise in drug list prices as of July 1st, 1959.
The marked increase in prescriptions filled by our pharmacy is most likely a
reflection of current policy on having all special requests supplied through this
outlet. The staff there has worked under considerable pressure, but with the addition
of a clerk-typist some of the load has been eased. The separation of that part of the
Division from the main office continues to create difficulties.
Further to the problem of revisions in drug policy, little progress was made
during the first half of the year despite high hopes at the end of the previous fiscal
year. Nevertheless, in December, 1959, the Medical Association president, Dr.
E. C. McCoy, gave active support to further discussions, and definite progress was
evident by the end of the past fiscal year. One must admit that there is no magic
solution to providing drugs to welfare patients. The question of control immediately raises the cry of interference with the patient-doctor relationship. We can
but hope for mutual acceptance of responsibilities.
Table V.—Dental Expenses
Fiscal Year
Prophylaxis
Extractions
Dentures
Total
1955/56 ■•?	
$15,385,80
24,996.66
28,430.52
34,115.73
76,740.07
$8,570.90
7,596.04
9,589.80
12,138.92
26,115.00
$95,556.04
96,674.86
110,203.40
121,796.41
176,695.01
$119,512.74
129,267.56
148,223.72
168,051.06
279,550.08
1956/57	
1957/58 _ ___	
1958/59-  _	
1959/60-	
Much of the very marked increase in such expenditures is, of course, due to
the revision of the dental fee schedule which went into effect July 1st, 1959. This
resulted in almost doubling the pre-existing fees for restorations and extractions,
with no change in full-denture fees or major repairs. We had been faced with an
increasing reluctance of dentists to accept welfare cases, and this was threatening to
call a halt to most of such services, except those for the immediate relief of pain or
infection.
We had three main systems for providing dental services, with the Child Welfare Division paying regular rates in many instances, the combined programme of
the Health Branch and the Dental Association for many of the children under 13
 L 72                                                    BRITISH COLUMBIA
years of age on an hourly basis, and finally our own fee schedule for the vast majority
of clients, if they could get it. With the institution of the new Dental Authority Form
M.S.D. 12 on February 1st, 1960, we combined the first and last groups and also
gave further authority to the Field to approve of basic dental care.  This latter will
be watched to see that there is some discretion shown in the issuing of the form, as
the latter allows the dentist very considerable freedom in doing restorations as well
as extractions.
Commencing in 1958, this Division was fortunate in being provided with the
consultative assistance of Dr. C. W. B. McPhail, of the Division of Preventive Dentistry of the Public Health Branch. To him must be attributed much of the effort in
evolving the dental form, and we much regretted seeing him leave for Alberta, where
he is now on the University staff as well as being employed by that Province's
Department of Public Health.    Nevertheless, we have also been fortunate in his
successor, Dr. J. Conchie, who provides your Medical Services Director with much-
needed advice.    We are both giving considerable thought to ways and means of
lessening the numbers of special dental-care requests and firmly believe that client
contribution is necessary.   In fact, we recommend that it apply especially to dentures
of all kinds.    It is too early to be certain if the swing from such a marked predominance of denture costs to the prophylactic measures is to be permanent.  This
is a target we have in mind to reduce future needs by earlier preventive work.
Table VI.—Optical Costs
Fiscal Year
Optometric
Examinations
Glasses
Total
1955/56  _	
1956/57    	
1957/58  	
1958/59 , _	
$9,096.05
9,213.65
9,896.45
9,735.50
15,589.00
$39,245.86
41,351.96
45,544.21
47,314.87
64 043 04
$48,341.91
50,565.61
55,440.66
57,050.37
79 63? 04
1959/60                                     	
|
The elimination of prior medical referral to an optometrist went into effect the
first of this fiscal year under consideration, and it is quite evident that such has made
a difference in payments to the optometrists.    The total costs for glasses have
increased, and this could be considered suggestive regarding the aforementioned
change in policy.   Whether this has increased the numbers of refractions and also
glasses supplied by them is impossible to state, as we have not recorded the numbers
of optometrical examinations if glasses have been supplied, nor of the numbers of
glasses prescribed by oculists.
Other aspects of the Division's work have continued to occupy the Director's
time, and we believe that more consultative assistance is being provided to the Field.
I had the great pleasure of attending a meeting of Regions III and IV, which was
held in Nelson last September.   Also continued was general supervision of the provision of medical care to the residents of the Provincial Home, the Brannen Lake
School, and the Willingdon School for Girls.    In the latter two, there was a change
of persons providing such care, the former due to the death of Dr. Chataway.
As of October 1st, 1959,1 succeeded Dr. J. Leroux as Provincial representative
on the Medical Advisory Committee of the Disabled Persons' Allowance Board,
and believe this will facilitate certain aspects of my duties in the Medical Services
Division as they pertain to rehabilitation problems.   We have continued to work
closely with the office of the Rehabilitation Co-ordinator of the Health Branch, and
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 73
We continue to be involved in the bringing of clients to Vancouver for special
or further medical care, and this requires the able assistance of Miss Aileen Mann,
the Medical Social Work Consultant attached to the Division. The usual range
of ages of clients in all decades from the first to the ninth obtains. Most of them
come from Regions IV and V. About one-sixth of them can be classified as medical
indigents for whom we provide transportation only. The medical conditions are as
diversified as usual, while the preponderance of females to males is slightly less than
two to one. The costs of transportation have increased, as they had in the previous
year, and I cannot see any lessening of this trend, at least for the time being. If
regional hospitals were to provide out-patient services and were there more of certain
medical and surgical specialists in such areas, then there would be much less reason
for the sending of patients outside the local area.
In conclusion, I should like to express my appreciation of the work of the other
members of the Division's staff. Their duties have not lessened during the past
year, and, in fact, have increased. Despite this, they have been willing to do any
extra work that I might request of them.
 L 74
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PART IV.—INSTITUTIONS
INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS   (BRANNEN LAKE SCHOOL)
F. G. Hassard, Superintendent
The following table shows the statistics for the Brannen Lake School for the
fiscal years 1950/51 to 1959/60:—
Fiscal Year
o
in
Ov
v.
o.
in
0\
*->
oo
r-
o\
O,
CO
O*
o
so
^>
Ov
OS
79
13
104
15
1
121
31
152
20.4
146
19
3
104
19
3
101
4
1
2
4
105
17
122
13.9
119
15
2
2
96
15
2
2
171
32
203
15.8
126
9
19
33
131
9
19
33
143
24
167
14.4
212
1
17
129
1
152
2
3
1
14
210
75
285
26.3
265
1
164
"-
27
240
52
292
17.8
283
5
Number A.W.O.L., April 1st   	
5
	
17
	
118
23
141
16.3
155
4
1
4
2
34
130
26
156
16.7
128
15
1
222
40
262
15.3
237
2
3
1
284
82
366
Percentage of recidivism          	
22.4
342
Number A.W.O.L., March 31st— _
	
z:
104
84.3
30,865
I1)
C1)
-
96
102.4
37,383
9.5
432
129
137.6
50,371
8.3
124
1
14
152
144
52,576
7.7
156
27
164
152
55,516
6
122
34
162
159
58,079
6
105
49
104
82
30,011
(l)
C1)
101
100.6
36,721
9
281
131
101.9
37,198
C1)
239
175
173
Total inmate-days — — - —	
Average length of stay in months .
Total A.W.O.L. during the fiscal year-.
63,233
5.8
61=
1 Not recorded.
3 Involving forty-seven boys.
During the fiscal year there were 284 admissions and 82 recidivists, making
a total of 366 admitted to the School. There was a 22.4-per-cent rate of recidivism.
Ten of the recidivists were committed for the third time and 2 for the fourth time.
Two hundred and seventy-two of the boys admitted were Protestant, 93 Roman
Catholic, and 1 of other religion. Forty-nine of the total number of boys admitted
during the year were of native Indian status.
Range of Age Upon Admission
Number
Age of Boys
10 years      3
11 „      9
12 „   10
13 „   31
14 „   61
Age
16
17
18
Number
of Boys
15 years   111
93
47
1
The average age on admission was 15 years.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
L 75
Supervising Agencies of Boys Admitted
Provincial Probation Branch.
Department of Social Welfare
Number
of Boys
_ 181
_    53
Children's Aid Society, Vancouver       3
Children's Aid Society, Victoria       3
Catholic Children's Aid Society       3
Vancouver Juvenile Court     61
Victoria Juvenile Court       9
Saanich Juvenile Court       4
Indian Department     30
Children's Aid Society and Vancouver Juvenile Court       3
Department of Social Welfare and Provincial Probation Branch       5
Indian Department and Provincial Probation Branch       8
Indian Department and Department of Social Welfare       2
Catholic Children's Aid Society and Vancouver Juvenile Court       1
Of this number, sixteen were wards of the Superintendent of Child Welfare,
four of the Children's Aid Society, Vancouver, two of the Children's Aid Society,
Victoria, four of the Catholic Children's Aid Society, and one of the Province of
Saskatchewan.
The 366 boys admitted were committed from the following Juvenile Courts:—
Abbotsford      2 Kimberley     4
Agassiz      2 Kitimat _
Alberni 	
Alert Bay _.
Armstrong      1 Langley l.
Ashcroft 	
Bella Coola	
Boston Bar	
Burnaby 	
Campbell River
Castlegar	
Chase 	
Chilliwack 	
Cloverdale	
Colwood 	
Coquitlam	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook 	
Cumberland	
Dawson Creek ___
Duncan 	
Fort St. John	
Gibsons 	
Golden	
Grand Forks	
Haney	
Hazelton 	
Hope	
Kamloops 	
Kelowna 	
2
2
3
16
1
2
1
1
14
2
1
2
8
16
3
1
6
2
1
12
4
4
1
4
4
3
2
5
6
6
Ladysmith     2
Lake Cowichan      1
Langley	
Lytton  	
McBride 	
Matsqui	
Merritt	
Mission 	
Nanaimo 	
Nelson	
  1
  5
  1
  9
  5
  1
New Westminster   10
North Vancouver  5
Ocean Falls  1
Oliver  1
Penticton  5
Port Coquitlam  1
Port Alberni   2
Port Edward  1
Port Hardy  1
Powell River  4
Prince George  6
Prince Rupert  5
Princeton  1
Quesnel  4
Revelstoke   1
Richmond   16
Rossland   1
 Trail 	
     3
Ucluelet : '   	
1
Vancouver                                67
Vernon    __
1
Victoria      	
12
Wells _   	
1
White Rock	
      3
Williams Lake	
     6
L 76 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Royal Oak  5
Saanichton  1
Sechelt  10
Smithers  1
Squamish   2
Terrace   7
Tofino  1
Township of Chilliwhack____ 1
Boys were not in all cases residents of the area served by the Juvenile Court
which committed them to the School.
Of the 366 boys committed to the School during the year, 297 were for offences
against property, 7 against persons, and 62 for other offences which included incorrigibility.
Of the 284 new admissions during the year, 51 of the boys were never tried
on probation but were committed to the School on their first appearance before
the Court.
There were 342 boys released from the School during the year. The average
length of stay of boys in the School was 5.8 months. Thirty-five boys were recalled
by the Courts during the year. When you subtract this figure from the 342 boys
released during the year, there were 307 who spent a total of 1,937 months, or an
average of 6.14 months, in the School.
Forty-seven boys accounted for the 61 A.W.O.L.'s. The difference between
these two figures is due to the fact that some of the same boys went A.W.O.L. two
or more times during the year. The majority of the boys who went A.W.O.L. were
picked up within a few hours of going absent either by members of the School staff
or R.C.M.P. officers.
Five hundred and sixty-seven boys were under instruction in the School during
the fiscal year.    The population reached a high of 193 at one time.
MEDICAL AND DENTAL TREATMENT
Three hundred and fifty-three boys were given dental care, as follows: 697
fillings, 25 X-rays, 368 extractions, 27 new partial upper dentures, 3 new partial
lower dentures, 10 new complete upper dentures, 2 new complete lower dentures,
7 denture repairs, and 6 prophylaxis.
The condition of the boys' teeth on admission to the School is very poor. The
majority of the boys need dental care to some extent. This is another area of
neglect before the boy was admitted to the School.
The incidence of accidents was somewhat higher. Influenza and tonsilitis
accounted for the majority of sick boys. Three hundred and forty-three boys were
tuberculin-tested, 32 of whom had a positive reaction. X-ray of those with positive
reactions proved to be negative.
In addition to the medical attention given to boys by our School doctor and
nurse, necessary operations were performed by the School doctor at the Nanaimo
General Hospital.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 77
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1959/60
Salaries   $270,252.82
Office expense  6,060.69
Travelling expense  1,738.72
Office furniture and equipment  118.14
Heat, light, power, and water  24,440.43
Medical services  12,353.25
Clothing and uniforms  9,855.18
Provisions and catering  63,603.40
Laundry and dry-goods  15,715.79
Equipment and machinery  3,369.25
Medical supplies  1,874.31
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  6,180.85
Maintenance and operation of equipment  1,903.66
Transportation  3,538.85
Repairs to furnishings and equipment  1,044.78
Training programme expense  5,190.14
Incidentals and contingencies  4,138.45
Less—
Board  $2,547.00
Rentals   3,249.00
Transportation  381.85
Sundry  135.96
$431,378.71
6,313.81
,,,, , $425,064.90
Add decrease m inventory— '
Inventory at March 31st, 1959  $18,920.69
Inventory at March 31st, 1960     17,325.78
         1,594.91
$426,659.81
Add Public Works expenditure  $53,504.59
Less rental  912.00
       52,592.59
$479,252.40
Per capita cost per diem:  $479,252.40-f-63,233=$7.58
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts  $398,342.30
Add—
Decrease in inventory     $1,594.91
Salary revision     23,628.00
Maintenance receipts       3,094.60
Public Works expenditure   $53,504.59
Less rental  912.00
     52,592.59
       80,910.10
$479,252.40
 L 78 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The committals to the School have been increasing yearly; the result has been
that we had an average daily population of 173 during the fiscal year. This is more
than double the average number of boys in the School ten years ago.
During the year, arrangements were made with Professor J. V. Fornataro, of
the Social Science Department of the University of British Columbia, to give a
series of lectures here at the School to all staff members. His series of lectures was
tailored toward benefiting supervisors and all persons working in a correctional
institution. The lectures extended over a period of four months and were attended
by all staff members with keen interest. Professor Fornataro was most generous,
as he gave the same lecture twice each day. This enabled all staff members to
participate, and his generosity was much appreciated by the administration and the
staff as a whole, for they benefited considerably from his lectures.
We continued working on community projects with the various service clubs
as we have done in past years. One of the largest projects this year was the landscaping of the grounds of the old people's housing project in Nanaimo, which work
was done under the sponsorship of the Nanaimo Kiwanis Club.
We instituted for the first time last winter in our programme a concentrated Dale
Carnegie course, which was conducted by the mid-Island chapter. Sixteen boys
graduated in the first class, and a further twenty-two boys were enrolled in the second
class. The School feels much indebted to the Dale Carnegie group for the many
hours their instructors gave to the boys, who, it is felt, benefited considerably from
this concentrated course.
Prior to the present fiscal year, boys of the Roman Catholic faith were taken
out to mass at Wellington each Sunday, and a representative minister of the Nanaimo
Ministerial Association held services each Sunday morning at the School for all
Protestant boys. During the year this procedure was changed, and all boys were
taken out to their respective Protestant churches in Nanaimo each Sunday, where
they joined the regular congregations.
I wish to thank all staff members, clergymen, service clubs, and other organizations, including other departments of government, both municipal and Provincial,
private agencies, and individuals who have shown an interest in the boys of the
School by helping the School with its programme of rehabilitation. The School
is greatly indebted to all these persons, and their assistance has been appreciated
by the administration of the School.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 79
INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS   (WILLINGDON SCHOOL)
Miss Winnifred M. Urquhart, Superintendent
The Girls' Industrial School on March 31st, 1960, marked the completion of
the first year in the new Willingdon School for Girls. April 7th, 1959, was moving
day, and by 8 o'clock sixty-two excited girls were busy unpacking and settling into
their new home.
This has been a year of exploring and experimenting for all of us. There is no
doubt that for the majority of girls committed to our care the new facilities bring a
greater opportunity to think through their many problems and discover new ways
of living a better life when they return to the community. Unfortunately, however,
there is still a small group unable to function in a semi-open setting, and, if they are
to be helped at all, need the greater security of an entirely closed institution.
We have operated at capacity throughout the year. On April 1st, 1959, there
were seventy-eight girls on the roll. During the year 106 were admitted, including
ten recidivists, as against eighty-one, including fifteen recidivists, admitted the previous year. Our Indian population has jumped from a quarter to a third of the total
population, and while these girls respond well to the programme, the majority soon
revert to their former life when they are released. There has been an increase in the
number of wards of the Superintendent of Child Welfare and Children's Aid Societies committed to the School.   They account for approximately one-fifth of the
population.
Range of Age on Admission
Age on Number Age on Number
Admission Admitted Admission Admitted
12 years  1      15 years  40
13 „   1      16 „   26
14 „   18      17 „   20
This means that a fraction over 80 per cent have passed the school-leaving age
before committal, and while over half this group continue their academic studies in
the training-school, the majority have no intention of continuing at school when
they return to the community.
Charges
Incorrigibility   51
Broken probation  18
Intoxication   14
Theft  11
Sexual immorality     4
Other charges     8
Total 106
The 106 girls were committed from the following regions:—
Region I  22
Region II  10
Plus Vancouver City  20
Region III     7
Region IV     8
Region V  15
Region VI     9
Region VII  15
This means that only 28.3 per cent of the School population comes from the
Province's largest urban area.    However, within this group we find girls whose
 L 80 BRITISH COLUMBIA
delinquent behaviour pattern is so well estatblished that they seldom benefit from a
term in the School and unfortunately tend to teach other girls their bad habits.
Seventy-nine girls were released during the year. On March 31st, 1960, there
were in addition nine girls out on special leave with the consent of the committing
Judges, working toward final release. The average length of stay was 10.4 months
this year.
Our new modern institution has brought a change in outlook for both girls and
staff. Tensions are kept low and a comfortable atmosphere is felt throughout the
School. Cottage living with the privacy of individual bedrooms means much, and
we are pleased to record a good standard of housekeeping and no wilful damage in
the cottages. Parents, once across the threshold, drop any hostility and fear they
felt toward the authorities and become co-operative members of the team helping
their girls back to a happier life in the community.
It has been possible to expand and develop a programme to include everyone.
We have been particularly fortunate in the volunteers, especially individuals, who
have helped materially in broadening the outlook of every girl. To mention only a
few—the Olympic swimmer who teaches everyone to swim; the Roman Catholic
priest who, besides caring for the Catholics in our group, coaches all in basketball;
the W.C.T.U. Provincial secretary, who showed films and had interesting discussions
on the use of alcohol and then, because the girls asked her to, came back to show
them her picture of a holiday in Mexico; the faithful groups who came week after
week for religious services and to visit lonely girls and return again for social
evenings. To one and all we offer our sincere and grateful thanks.
The health of the girls has remained high. The new medical plan, placing the
school in the care of a clinic of doctors, while only inaugurated two months ago,
would appear to be an improvement. The Venereal Disease Clinic continues weekly
clinics, and the Burnaby Public Health Unit has held clinics for tuberculosis skin
testing and polio shots.
It is with satisfaction I report that all staff members have done a splendid job
establishing the new programme and a high standard of performance in an entirely
new situation. The course of lectures given by Professor Fornataro, of the School
of Social Work of the University of British Columbia, was attended by the total staff
and for many in their own time. This is a new venture in training-school programmes, and we are grateful to the Administration for making such a valuable
course available.
I wish to thank all the organizations and individuals in the community who
have taken part in making this first year in Willingdon School a brighter, happier,
and more worth-while one for our girls, the staff for their co-operation and loyalty
and hard work, and senior administration and my fellow-workers in the Department
for their assistance and encouragement during the year.
STATISTICAL INFORMATION
Population of the School, March 31st, 1960
On the roll, April 1st, 1959     78
Girls admitted during April 1st, 1959, to March 31st, 1960 ___._. 106
  184
Officially released     77
Transferred to other institutions with subsequent official release
from Willingdon School       2
     79
Total unreleased, March 31st, 1960  105
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 81
Financial Statement, 1959/60
Salaries   $170,805.56
Office expense  6,767.78
Travelling expense   2,444.09
Heat, light, power, and water  19,698.44
Medical services  2,646.00
Clothing and uniforms   4,257.58
Provisions and catering  28,508.91
Laundry and dry-goods  358.63
Good Conduct Fund  1,963.15
Equipment and machinery  2,404.80
Medical supplies  1,549.39
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  3,214.47
Maintenance and operation of equipment  837.08
Transportation   1,483.98
Vocational and recreational supplies, etc.  2,466.60
Incidentals and contingencies  287.91
$249,694.37
Less—
Rentals   $1,065.00
Board      1,293.00
Sundry receipts        767.04
Increase in inventory—
March 31st, 1960 ___. $4,797.60
March 31st, 1959 _-    4,350.14
447.46
3,572.50
$246,121.87
Add Public Works expenditure       32,301.93
$278,423.80
Per capita cost per diem: $278,423.80-^-28,010=$9.94.
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts  $230,249.33
Less increase in inventory  447.46
$229,801.87
Add—
Salary revision   $16,320.00
Public Works expenditure     32,301.93
       48,621.93
$278,423.80
 L 82 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PROVINCIAL HOME, KAMLOOPS
G. P. Willie, Superintendent
The caring for the aged is a problem, and the residents of the Provincial Home
are no exception. Problems include a wide variety, relating to health, family relationships, dependent on relative or friend, antagonistic, misunderstanding in relation
to administration, and numerous emergencies. Many of the men arrive at the Home
with bad habits, and nothing short of a miracle will change their aim in life. Social
trends are away from the idea of old people living with younger relatives, and this
increases the demand for this institution.
Modern sanitation, improved medical care, and wonder drugs are keeping
Canadians alive much longer. The majority of the residents do not need care as
provided in a hospital, but rather they require supervision in comfortable surroundings by persons who understand them, with no rigid rules or regulations, and where
the old person comes first. At the Home the residents are encouraged to lead
active lives as long as possible, although it is not easy for old people to make new
friends. There are still some mining prospectors and others who spend their winters
in the Home and their summers on the trail.
The Provincial Home is ever alert that the aged are the forgotten group, and
entertainment and forms of occupation must be provided.
In our entertainment programme we were fortunate in having many enjoyable
evenings provided by church choirs, Elks Lodge concert party, Kamloops High
School band and glee club, R.M.R. military band, convent, and Indian residential
school. The weekly movie show is ever popular, along with television, and phonograph music is enjoyed at intervals. Bingo games have a large following. Some
residents enjoy baseball and hockey and are admitted free of charge to the games.
Many of the men have had very little religious training, and in some cases are
unable to state any church affiliation. Protestant services are held each Sunday
afternoon. The Salvation Army has services every Thursday evening, and the
Roman Catholics are represented regularly. All denominations are thanked for
their continued interest and inspiration.
The east wing of the Home received a renovation of the heating, and the radiators were replaced. The main upper hallway was panelled and decorated, making
this very attractive.
Some equipment has been added and replaced. Lockers for the rooms have
been installed, a phonograph and records, a television set presented by the Canadian
Legion for the sick ward, and a washer and drier for the laundry. Drapes were
installed in the rooms of the west wing and sick ward and are greatly appreciated.
Health services at the Home remain on a high standard. Medical and surgical
services were again provided by the Irving Clinic. The diet has held its former level
with more variety added.
I wish to thank all staff members, co-workers, and senior administration for
their assistance during the year.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 83
EXPENDITURE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 3 1st, 1960
Salaries   $104,235.88
Expenses-
Office expense  766.49
Travelling expense  86.52
Heat, light, power, and water  1,663.00
Medical services   2,947.01
Clothing and uniforms  2,867.01
Provisions and catering  31,008.84
Laundry and dry-goods  6,417.32
Equipment and machinery  1,925.98
Medical supplies  3,618.24
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  1,341.79
Maintenance and operation of equipment  422.67
Transportation   448.63
Incidentals and contingencies  1,650.05
Burials   2,375.00
$161,774.43
Less—
Board   $900.00
Rent      485.00
         1,385.00
$160,389.43
Inmate-days
Inmates in the Home, April 1st, 1959  129
Inmates admitted during the year     61
  190
Inmates discharged     34
Inmates deceased     24
     58
Total number of inmates, March 31st, 1960  132
Total number of inmate-days  45,657
Summary
Provincial Home expenditure  $160,389.43
Public Works expenditure         9,336.12
Total expenditure  $169,725.55
Per capita cost per diem: $ 169,725.55-=-45,657=$3.72.
Pensions paid to Government Agent, Kamloops, $89,425.29.
 L 84 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts     $30,836.45
Add salary revision         8,484.00
$39,320.45
Add maintenance receipts—
Pensions   $89,425.29
Municipalities        2,417.11
Transfers   from   Provincial   Home
Trust Account       1,987.28
Receipts from Government of Canada under Unemployment Assistance Agreement     38,084.43
Other collections       1,275.97
     133,190.08
$172,510.53
Add Public Works expenditure         9,336.12
$181,846.65
Less—
Pensioners' comforts     $7,493.56
Proportion of excess of disbursements over receipts for Tranquille Farm       4,627.54
       12,121.10
Total expenditure  $169,725.55
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 85
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS BOARD
A. A. Shipp, Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions
The annual report of the administration of the Welfare Institutions Licensing
Act for the year 1959 is herewith submitted. As licences are issued on the basis
of the calendar year, this report covers the period from January 1st, 1959, to
December 31st, 1959.
It is with deep regret that we have to advise of the death on July 15th, 1959,
of Mrs. Edna L. Page, Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions.
Mrs. Page was a graduate of Queen's University and was a teacher before
entering the field of social work. She entered the Government service in the fall
of 1939, and for a period was the social worker at Penticton, later transferring
to Child Welfare Division.
In 1942 she was appointed Deputy Inspector of Welfare Institutions, and in
April, 1950, was appointed Chief Inspector. Her untiring efforts have been largely
responsible for the present high standards of care in all types of welfare institutions
throughout the Province.
LICENCES
The total number of cases presented to the Board during the year was 241,
consisting of 63 licensed welfare institutions and 178 pending applications. During
the year, 93 active files of licensed institutions were closed and 273 pending applications were withdrawn or cancelled. Case load at December 31st, 1959, totalled
821, made up of 598 licensed welfare institutions and 223 pending applications.
The total number of persons of all ages receiving service in licensed institutions
during the year was 44,108.
BOARD MEETINGS
Eight Board meetings were held during the year, and it was decided that
meetings in future should generally be held in the office of the Chairman, since the
majority of the Board are now located in Victoria. The members of the Board
for 1959 were:—
Chairman:  Mr. J. A. Sadler, Director of Welfare.
Members: Mr. F. P. Levirs, Assistant Superintendent (Instruction), Department of Education; Miss Ruby McKay, Superintendent, Child Welfare
Division; Mr. James Mainguy, Manager, Hospital Consultation and Inspection, British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service; and Dr. J. L. M.
Whitbread, Director, Occupational Health Division, Department of
Health Services.
Chief Inspector:  Mr. A. A. Shipp.
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS FOR CHILDREN
A. Full-time Care of Children
Institutions for Child-care
Two types of welfare institutions are licensed in British Columbia to give full-
time care to children: (1) Institutions organized under the Societies Act and
administered by a board of directors, which give care to a relatively large number
of children; (2) privately operated boarding homes, in family dwellings, where
a maximum of five children are cared for.
 L 86 BRITISH COLUMBIA
With the exception of two large institutions which have been operating for
many years, and which give long-term care to children, the larger institutions have
a specialized function, and children are generally cared for only on a short-term
basis. Only children who are in need of the service of the agency are admitted,
thus preventing parents from using these agencies for the purpose of evading their
responsibilities.
The amendment to the Societies Act which was passed by the Legislature in
1951, and which makes it obligatory for any group to have the approval of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare before they can be incorporated for the purpose
of caring for children, was found to be a most useful piece of legislation during
this year.
Number of institutions licensed in 1959  7
Number of children cared for        312
Total days' care  70,762
Private Boarding Homes
The majority of private boarding homes for children are in the metropolitan
areas of Vancouver and Victoria. The licensing of these homes is done with the
co-operation of the municipal authorities, the health services, and the Children's
Aid Societies in Vancouver and the Family and Children's Service in Victoria. In
the urban areas the three children's services do the social studies and make the
recommendations for licensing, which are then passed on by the Welfare Institutions Board.
In other parts of the Province, these functions are assumed by the field staff
of the Department of Social Welfare.
Number of children's boarding homes licensed in 1959  39
Number of children cared for        107
Total days' care  24,914
B. Day Care of Children
Foster Day Care
The principal agency offering foster day care for children in the Province is the
Child Care Centre, an amalgamation of the Strathcona Day Nursery, Camp Alexandra, and the Vancouver Foster Day Care Association. This agency investigates
those homes in the Vancouver area which are offered for the day care of children
of working mothers and makes the necessary financial arrangements between the
mother and the foster-mother. The majority of homes of this type are in the City
of Vancouver, but there are a few in the other areas of the Province which are supervised by the field staff of the Department of Social Welfare.
Number of foster day-care homes licensed in 1959  36
Number of children cared for        358
Total days' care  30,820
Kindergartens, Play-schools, etc.
There is a continuing increase of this type of centre for the care of pre-school
children throughout the whole Province. Both privately operated and co-operative
kindergartens are increasing in number, and a great many churches are also establishing their own kindergartens.
Specialized training of teachers for these pre-school centres is now accepted as
necessary by all concerned, and this concept has doubtless been helped in great
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 87
measure by the three groups in the Lower Mainland which have done much to help
improve standards. These groups are the British Columbia Pre-school Education
Association, the Vancouver Kindergarten Teachers' Association, and the Association of Co-operative Play Groups of Greater Vancouver.
Number of pre-school centres licensed in 1959  251
Number of children registered        12,182
Total days' care  1,055,073
Schools for Retarded Children
The British Columbia Association for Retarded Children has continued to
make great strides in its organization of local branches throughout the Province,
and many of these in conjunction with the Department of Education have started
their own schools. In a few areas, facilities of the local School Board have been
made available to these groups, while others are still using rented quarters. At
least one group has built its own school, with every convenience of a public day-
school modified for the use of this special type of student.
Number of schools licensed in 1959  27
Number of children registered        501
Total days' care  63,547
MATERNITY HOMES
During the year the new Salvation Army Home, " Maywood Home," was
opened, giving added facilities for this type of care. These homes continue to give
an excellent and much-needed service and work in close co-operation with the Children's Aid Societies and other interested agencies.
Number of homes licensed in 1959  2
Number of mothers cared for        373
Number of infants cared for        282
Total days' care (mothers and children)  29,796
AGED-CARE
Care of the aged can be divided into three groups—-low-cost housing for
elderly citizens who are still capable of taking care of their own needs; boarding-
home care on a non-profit basis in homes provided by the various ethnic, fraternal,
and church groups or by municipal authorities; and those boarding homes provided
by private operators.
The first group are independent of care by others, except that they require
housing which they can afford, and which is provided by various agencies. The
Provincial Government, through the Elderly Citizens' Housing Aid Act, administered by the Department of the Provincial Secretary, assists in the building costs
of such housing up to 33.^ per cent of the cost of construction.
Of those persons requiring boarding-home care, roughly 50 per cent are cared
for by the non-profit organizations, which are also assisted by the Elderly Citizens'
Housing Aid Act, and the other 50 per cent by the commercial operators. There
are two organizations of private operators—one on Vancouver Island and the other
on the Lower Mainland. These were formed for the purpose of mutual help and
the solving of problems, and also serve the purpose of helping maintain and improve
standards.
A new development this year has been the offering by the Adult Education
Division of the Vancouver School Board of a series of ten lectures for boarding-
 L 88 BRITISH COLUMBIA
home operators. This course covers such areas as chronic illnesses, simple nursing
procedures and first aid, catering and nutrition, safety and sanitation, and leisure-
time activities and recreation. The course was well received by about thirty-five
persons, the majority of whom were operating their own establishments or were
employed in boarding homes.
Number of homes licensed during 1959  174
Number of persons cared for       3,862
Total days' care  867,864
UNEMPLOYED ADULTS
There was no change in the number or function of these institutions during the
year.
Number of homes licensed during 1959  5
Number of persons cared for        396
Total days' care L 16,754
SUMMER CAMPS
The Welfare Institutions Office works closely with the British Columbia Camping Association in an effort to improve both the physical standards of summer camps
and the camp programmes. For a number of years the Department of Health
Services and the Provincial Fire Marshal's Office have given invaluable assistance by
way of annual inspections, which have shown dividends in the form of better kitchen
facilities and food-handling and in better housekeeping around camp-sites.
Number of summer camps licensed in 1959  77
Number of persons cared for     25,735
Total days' care  235,846
CONCLUSION
Sincere thanks and appreciation are extended to all who helped with the
administration of this Act.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
STATISTICAL INFORMATION
Table I.—Showing a Comparative Summary of Information
Regarding Licensed Welfare Institutions
L 89
1956
1957
1958
1959
Children—Total Care (Excluding Summer Camps)
Number licensed—
Institutions _	
Boarding homes	
Capacity—
Institutions -	
Boarding homes	
Number of children under care-
Institutions   	
Boarding homes	
Number of days' care—
Institutions... „	
Boarding homes..
Number licensed.
Capacity  _ —
Number of persons attending..
Number of attendance days —.
Summer Camps
Children—Day Care
Number licensed—
Kindergartens _	
Schools for retarded children	
Foster day care  	
Capacity—
Kindergartens..
Schools for retarded children _
Foster day care .
Number of children enrolled-
Kindergartens..
Schools for retarded children-
Foster day care-
Number of attendance days-
Kindergartens .
Schools for retarded children-
Foster day care 	
Adults—Infirm and Unemployable
Number licensed  	
Capacity    	
Number of persons under care	
Number of days' care   _ _
Number licensed-
Capacity-
Adults—Employable
Number of persons under care-
Number of days' care 	
Number licensed-
Women—Maternity
Capacity (mothers and infants)	
Number of persons under care—
Mothers	
Infants	
Number of days' care_
10
59
452
142
516
171
89,678
38,058
67
4,214
16,736
165,867
221
8
33
5,637
180
104
9,636
162
237
781,558
21,374
19,628
163
2,510
3,645
761,642
5
75
504
17,338
3
115
278
209
26,307
9
54
385
120
468
155
91,446
33,089
73
4,891
21,578
200,516
243
13
35
6,310
227
140
11,022
227
277
883,865
27,017
23,879
170
2,671
3,775
803,705
5
75
557
19,809
3
115
319
235
29,309
9
46
357
105
397
126
82,788
30,557
74
5,280
22,695
233,565
260
25
50
6,724
358
172
11,392
340
320
940,628
42,917
27,754
184
2,805
3,851
859,962
5
72
473
16,208
3
115
327
259
28,795
7
39
242
92
312
107
70,762
24,914
77
5,283
25,735
235,846
251
27
36
7,034
542
170
12,182
501
358
1,055,073
63,547
30,820
174
2,824
3,862
867,864
5
64
396
16,754
2
116
373
282
29,796
 L 90
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II,
-Case Load Showing the Total Number of Licensed Institutions
and Pending Applications, 1959
LICENSED
Jan. 1, 1959
New Licences
Closed
Carried Forward
Dec. 31, 1959
Children—total care—
40
9
72
224
20
40
126
34
4
3
1
5
45
8
23
31
1
1
6
2
2
40
4
9
25
1
35
2. Institutions 	
3. Camps...	
Children—day care—
7
75
229
24
3. Foster day care	
Aged—
54
132
2. Institutions	
35
5
2
Totals
572
115
89
598
PENDING
Jan. 1, 1959
New Cases
Closed
Carried Forward
Dec. 31, 1959
Children—total care—
10
18
37
8
20
42
6
2
28
3
11
104
17
84
99
5
1
1
28
9
84
13
62
74
2
1
10
2. Institutions	
3
20
Children—day care—
57
12
42
Aged—
67
9
Adults—employable	
Homes—maternity  	
2
1
Totals	
143
353
273
223
.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH L 91
PART V.—MEDICAL SOCIAL WORK SERVICES
DIVISION OF TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL AND
POLIOMYELITIS PAVILION
Mrs. M. Titterington, Casework Supervisor
In a report of this Department it is important to give a few highlights from Dr.
Kincade's report of the work of the Division of Tuberculosis Control for the calendar
year 1959 so that changing trends may be noted.
There has been no relaxing in the tuberculosis programme. The supervision
and treatment of known cases of tuberculosis and the search for unkonwn cases
through the case-finding programme go on relentlessly. At the beginning of 1959
there were 22,604 known cases of tuberculosis in British Columbia, including 4,649
Indians, who are the responsibility of the Indian Health Service. Approximately
two-thirds of the total known cases are inactive, but tuberculosis tends to become
reactivated, and last year 283 of these (138 of which were Indian) became reactivated and required treatment. The number of new cases was 1,200 (968 white
and 232 Indian) in 1959. Of these, 719 (581 white and 138 Indian) were active
and required treatment.
There is a continuous daily service at the three stationary clinics—Vancouver,
Victoria, and New Westminster—and there has been no slackening-off in their
functions of following up known cases, giving ambulatory treatment, and discovering
new cases. There have been changes of policy, particularly in regard to X-ray.
Persons under 21 years of age and pregnant women do not have a survey X-ray
unless they have a positive skin test, and children under 7 years of age who have a
positive skin test have a large plate rather than a miniature X-ray.
The Mainland travelling diagnostic clinics have been centralized in the Vancouver unit, and this is working out satisfactorily and permits interchangeability of
staff and greater efficiency. This clinics visit fifty-four centres in British Columbia
on a regularly scheduled basis.   Kitimat was added to the regular schedule this year.
The tuberculosis survey units have been operating for about fifteen years, and
until recently the goal was to have chest X-rays of the total population, but now it
is more practical to combine turberculin testing with the chest X-ray as a tuberculosis
survey method, and the goal is to tuberculin-test the total population. It used to
be accepted that all adults would have a positive skin test, but it has been demonstrated that only about one-third of the total population are infected now, or about
half of the older age-groups. This will mean a changed emphasis in the control
programmes, with efforts directed toward following the people with positive skin
reactions.
The hospital treatment has also changed, and the number of beds have been
further reduced during the past year from 367 to 352 beds—98 at Willow Chest
Centre and 254 at Pearson Hospital (excluding Poliomyelitis Pavilion). Minimum-
care wards have been set up so that patients may graduate from maximum care on
admission to minimum care as their condition improves and discharge looms in
sight. The rehabilitative process, therefore, starts earlier, and the transition to
taking full responsibility for self-care on discharge is more gradual.
An examination of the population within the institutions reveals that while the
percentage of persons over 50 years had increased from 32.9 per cent in 1952 to
56.9 per cent in 1958, there was a decrease in this group in 1959 to 48.6 per cent,
 L 92 BRITISH COLUMBIA
a reduction of 15 per cent, with the same percentage of increase in persons under
50 years. As at November, 1959, three-quarters of the total sanitoria population
were male, and of these, 56.7 per cent were over 50 years of age and 25 per cent
over 60 years. Of the one-quarter of the sanitoria population that was female, 22.8
per cent were over 50 years of age and about 15 per cent over 65 years. With the
large proportion of patients in the older age-group, increased nursing services are
required for them, as they often have other health problems that accompany old age.
During 1959 there were 636 patients admitted to sanitoria, of which 446 were
male patients and 190 were female patients. There were 655 discharges (including
41 deaths). There is a tuberculosis ward at the Provincial Mental Hospital (North
Lawn), but figures for that unit are not included.
When patients who are a proven public health menace refuse hospitalization,
they may be committed if all forms of pursuasion fail, and in 1959 this action was
taken in three cases, compared with a total of 26 in the years 1957 and 1958.
During the fiscal year April 1st, 1959, to March 31st, 1960, there were thirty-
six admissions to the Poliomyelitis Pavilion and twenty-eight discharges. Twenty-
four of the admissions and eight of the discharges were in connection with a few
patients who returned for odd nights or short periods of time. Most of the year
the population in the Poliomyelitis Pavilion consisted of about nineteen male adult
patients, eleven female adult patients, four boys and one girl. The majority of the
patients are young adults.
There were over 100 cases active each month, involving some 1,700 interviews
with patients and their families and about 2,800 collateral interviews or conferences
with other professional personnel.
Many referrals are in regard to financial problems of the patient and (or) his
family, but other problems are often revealed in the course of the interviews, and
we assist with the wide range of difficulties common to a generalized social-case load.
However, illness aggravates social problems that were present before the diagnosis
and admission to hospital. There is a high incidence of alcoholism in the male
tuberculosis population. There are usually about 100 patients requiring Comforts
Allowance each month.
Problems of the aged were time-consuming. These patients resist change,
and any change in policy affecting their care or income produces symptoms of
anxiety, ranging from passive resistance to belligerency. With the shortage of
nursing-home and boarding-home beds, completion of discharge plans is often protracted.
The Social Service Department relies on community resources to help with
problems of patients and their families, and there is continual communication with
the Greater Vancouver public and private social and health agencies as well as with
the Social Welfare offices throughout the Province.
The Social Service Department wishes to acknowledge with thanks the continued contributions of the British Columbia Tuberculosis Society and of the Mount
Garibaldi and Municipal Chapters of the I.O.D.E. These contributions make it
possible to meet special needs for which there are no other resources.
The staff of the Social Service Department continued to participate in the
educational programmes of the nursing department of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control and in the in-service training programme of the Social Welfare Department.
 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
L 93
PART VI.—ACCOUNTING DIVISION
J. McDiarmid, Departmental Comptroller
The functions of the Accounting Division are to control expenditures, process
accounts for payment, account for revenue, forecast expenditures, and prepare the
Departmental estimates of revenue and expenditures in their final form.
The gross expenditure increased from $35,264,700 in 1958/59 to $39,817,800
in 1959/60, or slightly less than 13 per cent. The previous year's increase was
$6,376,500, making a total increase over the past two years of $10,929,600. Most
of this increase came in direct payments to the recipients of the various forms of
assistance, particularly Social Allowance. In the two-year period from April 1st,
1958, to March 31st, 1960, the gross cost of Social Allowances has increased from
$7,891,444 to $16,170,243, or approximately 105 per cent. The increase is a
result of a greater number of recipients, due mainly to the increase in unemployed
employables.
Minor procedural changes were again made in order to provide greater efficiency. The preparation of certain allowance cheques was centralized in Victoria,
and more extensive use of mechanical systems instituted to stream-line this operation.
Quarterly inspections of motor-vehicles continued to be made throughout the
Province by the mechanical inspection staff. No serious accidents occurred throughout the Division, and at no time has an accident occurred due to a mechanical failure.
All accidents were referred to the Safety Committee for review. Safe driving
methods were continually stressed by the mechanical inspectors.
In addition to the Government-owned vehicles, there were a number of privately owned vehicles which were used for Government business. The owner-
operators of these vehicles were reimbursed on a mileage basis.
Proport
on of Total Welfare Expenditure
Main Service
1958/59
1959/60
Value
Per Cent
Value
Per Cent
$495,700
771,800
1,255,000
2,444,900
3,156,800
13,177,000
13,963,500
1.4
2.2
3.5
6.9
9.0
37.4
39.6
$499,000
899,300
1,411,800
2,870,500
3,697,600
16,306,000
14,133,600
1 3
2 3
3 5
7.2
9.3
Social Allowances, etc..	
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowance, Disabled Persoons' Allowance, and supplementary
social assistance for the aged and handicapped	
40.9
35.5
Totals	
$35,264,700
100.0
$39,817,800
100.0
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1960
1,060-1260-9015
   

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