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DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST 1960 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1961

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 3 1st
1960
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1961
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual Report of the Department
of Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31st, 1960.
Victoria, B.C.
W. D. BLACK,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
  Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs
Victoria, B.C., January 31st, 1961.
The Honourable W. D. Black,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Annual Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31st, 1960.
The 1960 assessment rolls of cities, districts, towns, and villages within
the Province contained assessed values of land and improvements totalling
$3,569,240,135, which is an increase of $242,121,198 or about 8 per cent over
1959 values.
The municipal tax base continues to grow. The considerable increase over the
last few years can be readily seen from an examination of the following table. The
increase in the values for 1960 may be attributed, to a large degree, to new construction. It is fair to assume that the effect of the assessment equalization programme has, for the most part, been absorbed.
Growth in Combined Assessed Values and Taxes in Municipalities
of British Columbia
Assessed Values
Assessed Values Actually Taxed
Tax
Revenues
Year
All Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
1954.  	
1955 -	
$1,625,968,580
2,108,458,383
2,432,313,912
2,765,873,099
3,047,766,854
3,327,118,937
3,569,240,135
$1,321,811,326
1,742,081,045
2,035,542,999
2,315,295,651
2,569,271,281
2,805,547,214
3,015,844,390
$842,093,330
1,350,856,875
1,586,627,603
1,854,677,597
2,053,934,444
2,248,145,499
2,417,467,198
$842,093,330
1,044,040,275
1,238,390,209
1,415,935,241
1,562,991,738
1,721,746,974
1,843,967,404
$53,784,569
59,112,580
1956 	
1957            	
66,418,657
78,811,653
1958 	
1959 -...
1960
92,429,190
104,819,992
ns.ooo.ooo1
1 Estimated.
A comparison of the values actually taxed for school purposes in unorganized
territory with those in municipalities indicates a continuation of the trend of previous years, with values in municipalities representing about 80 per cent against
approximately 20 per cent in unorganized territory. For the year 1960, values
actually taxed for school purposes within the Province amounted to $3,070,442,101.
Of this total, $2,417,467,198 represented values in municipalities.
During the year the Inspector of Municipalities approved debenture issues in
the total amount of $16,027,788, which is an increase of $2,112,788 compared with
issues approved in 1959. High interest rates were a significant factor in borrowing
during 1960, and probably the increase in borrowing would have been greater had
interest rates been more favourable. Where borrowing was undertaken, contract
prices for the work generally compensated to a certain degree for the high cost of
financing. The amount and purpose for which new debentures were approved are
set out below:—
 AA 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Distribution of Authorized Debenture Debt by Purposes
for the Year 1960
Purpose
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Local
Districts
Total
Bridges	
Electric light and power-
Hospitals.
Local improvements	
Protection to persons and property	
Roads  	
Sewers
Waterworks	
Civic projects	
Totals .
$350,000
1,250,000
685,000
703,263
187,000
22,500
5,320,500
146,000
400,000
$377,195
95,000
2,883,330
2,568,000
259,000
5,000
$432,000
344,000
$9,064,263
$6,182,525
$781,000
$350,000
1,250,000
685,000
1,080,458
287,000
22,500
8,635,830
3,058,000
659,000
$16,027,788
Debentures issued by the City of Vancouver do not require the approval of the
Inspector of Municipalities and are therefore not included in this table.
Total debenture debt as at December 31st, 1959, of the municipalities including the City of Vancouver is summarized below:—
Total Authorized Debenture Debt as at December 31st
, 1959
Issued, Sold,
and Outstanding
Unissued
and Unsold
Total
Cities (excluding Vancouver)	
$42,964,065
47,752,365
2,376,338
7,278,596
$6,195,033
819,065
104,500
15,000
$49,159,098
48,571,430
2,480,838
7,293,596
Totals
$100,371,364
142,922,916
$7,133,598
$107,504,962
142,922,916
$243,294,280
$7,133,598
$250,427,878
The Department has been advised by the Department of Finance of the Federal Government that all semi-annual payments have been made on loans which
were authorized under the provisions of The Municipalities Improvements Assistance Act, 1938. These loans are guaranteed by the Province. As at January 1st,
1961, the total amount outstanding was $239,595.88, comprising one city,
$15,327.31; two district municipalities, $57,088.67; one village, $5,747.73; one
improvement district incorporated under the Water Act, $15,020.77; and the
Greater Vancouver Water District, $146,411.40. The loans under this Act to British Columbia municipalities and other corporations amounted to $2,114,757.70.
During the year, authority was granted to authorize the Province to guarantee
under the provisions of the Municipalities Assistance Act the principal and interest
payments of debenture issues of municipalities amounting to $21,726,500, as
follows:—
Cities (excluding Vancouver)  $4,500,500
Districts      3,376,000
Towns     	
Villages 	
Local districts
City of Vancouver	
Greater Nanaimo Sewerage and Drainage District 	
724,000
$3,876,000
1,250,000
$8,600,500
Greater Vancouver Water District     8,000,000
Total
13,126,000
$21,726,500
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
AA 7
The principal amount of debentures guaranteed by the Province outstanding
under the Village Municipalities Assistance Act and the Municipalities Assistance
Act as at December 31st, 1960, was $59,561,300, as indicated below:—
Outstanding Debentures Guaranteed by the Province Pursuant to Village Municipalities Assistance Act and Municipalities Assistance
Act as at December 31st, 1960.
Village
Municipalities
Assistance
Act
Municipalities
Assistance
Act
Total
$590,500
370,000
1,676,500
4,133,800
$11,134,500
7,063,000
387,000
2,411,000
59,000
$11,725,000
Districts.   _ 	
7,433,000
2,063,500
6,544,800
Local districts        ' ...
59,000
$6,770,800
$21,054,500
9,393,000
2,729,000
197,000
18,500,000
917,000
$27,825,300
9,393,000
2,729,000
197,000
18,500,000
917,000
Totals        	
$31,736,000
$59,561,300
There were no debenture issues guaranteed under the provisions of the Village
Municipalities Assistance Act during the year under review as this Act has now
been superseded for the most part by the Municipalities Assistance Act, which
applies to all classes of municipalities. The Village Municipalities Assistance Act
empowers the Province to guarantee the principal and interest payments of debenture issues of village municipalities for hospital purposes, which is additional to the
authority granted by the Municipalities Assistance Act. To date no village municipality has applied for a guarantee for hospital purposes.
The liability represented by guaranteed debenture issues is supported by the
revenues of self-liquidating utilities or enterprises amounting to an assessed value
in excess of $100,000,000. In addition these debts are a direct obligation of the
issuing municipality.
The size of the debenture debt load is always a matter of concern both in the
aggregate and in respect of each individual municipality.
Chart 1 reflects the trend of total debenture debt for all municipalities in the
Province during the decade of the fifties against the trend of other significant aspects
of municipal financial ability. It is obvious that all factors have increased faster
than the rate of population growth, so that per capita figures over the period have
likewise increased. However, in relation to assessments or revenues or, for that
matter, total personal income, debenture debt has increased at a slower rate. At
the beginning of this period, total debt was approximately two and one-half times
total revenues. At the end of the period this ratio had declined to one and one-half
times.
The other basic trends of municipal finance have maintained a fair relationship
to total personal income, which is probably as good a measure as any of general
financial ability of the citizens. Assessments appear to have increased at a faster
rate, but when allowance is made for changes in the basis of valuation, there is little
difference in the trends.
Total municipal revenues also have kept in line with total personal income,
except for the last two years of the decade, when the revenues increased more
 AA 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
rapidly. However, the home-owner grant may have had an ameliorating effect in
this regard.
In general, we may conclude that the debenture debt load has not increased
unduly in relation to the ability of the municipalities to carry it, although individual
cases may bear watching.
Short-term capital borrowings in the amount of $91,105 were approved for
seven municipalities during the year. This relatively new borrowing provision has
proved to be a success, and many municipalities have made full use of their borrowing powers in this respect. It has allowed Municipal Councils to finance lesser
capital projects without the necessity of debenture issues. This is of considerable
importance in view of prevailing high interest rates and the present relatively weak
condition of the bond market.
I am pleased to report that for the first time in several years there was no
necessity to hold public inquiries into applications for certificates of approval to
money by-laws. This indicates that municipal officials have a greater awareness
of the need for strictly adhering to statutory requirements.
During 1960 twelve municipalities were granted certificates or provisional certificates of self-liquidation in respect of five utility systems and eight sewer systems.
There have now been issued seventy-three certificates of self-liquidation to forty-
nine municipalities, some having been granted more than one certificate. There
is an ever-increasing trend on the part of municipalities to set up their utilities and
enterprises on a self-liquidating basis and thereby relieve the general mill rate, not
only for the provision for debt charges, but also for the operating, maintenance,
and replacement costs.
At the end of the year reserve funds for various purposes amounted to
$11,400,705, which is an increase over the previous year of $1,114,623. Subject
to Governmental approval, these funds are available for capital expenditures.
1960 marked the first year of your annual shield awards to the municipalities
having the highest percentage turnout of electors at the annual municipal elections.
The winning municipalities for the December, 1959, elections in the three categories
were: Cities and towns—Prince Rupert, with a turnout of 72.26 per cent; districts—Powell River, with a turnout of 74.38 per cent; and villages—Stewart, with
a turnout of 89.54 per cent. The prompt return of the percentage vote to the
Department indicated a keen interest in this competition. It is hoped that the
awards will encourage a greater interest in civic affairs and thereby raise the over-all
percentage of voters exercising their franchise at the annual elections.
The extension course in municipal administration, being offered by the Faculty
of Commerce and Business Administration of the University of British Columbia
under the sponsorship of the Department, continues to grow in popularity. Since
the inception of the course in 1952, eighty-six students have completed the four-
year course in either municipal administration or municipal finance, or both. The
enrolment for the 1960/61 course year is made up of forty-seven first-year students,
twenty-nine second-year students, twenty-eight third-year students, and twenty-four
fourth-year students.
As in past years, the annual institute was held at the University at the end of
the course-year, and the results of the 1960 examinations were as follows: Twenty-
eight completed first year, thirty-two completed second year, twenty-two completed
third year, and eighteen completed fourth year.
The Board of Examiners granted twenty-nine certificates of proficiency, bringing to 103 the number now issued to municipal officials.    Of this total, twenty-four
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
AA 9
are junior certificates, forty-one are senior certificates in administration, and thirty-
eight are senior certificates in finance. Two members of the staff of the Department
received senior certificates during the year.
The Pollution-control Board held eight meetings during 1960 and granted five
permits for the discharge of sewerage or industrial waste materials into waters coming under the jurisdiction of the Board. To date a total of forty-two such permits
has been issued.
The Twenty-first Annual Conference of the Municipal Officers' Association was
held in Victoria on May 30th and 31st and June 1st, 1960. The conference was
highlighted by your presentation of a twenty-first birthday memento in the form
of a key to the association's president. Several important addresses were given
at the conference and panel discussions on a wide range of subjects were heard.
Mr. R. N. Chester, of the District of Surrey, presented a very interesting and comprehensive history of the Municipal Officers' Association.
The Union of British Columbia Municipalities held its Fifty-seventh Annual
Convention at New Westminster on September 21st, 22nd, and 23rd. Some 100
resolutions dealing with all phases of local government were submitted, of which
more than half were endorsed.
One new municipality was incorporated during the year. This was the East
Kootenay mining community of Natal, which was incorporated as a village municipality. Natal has a population of about 700 persons. A large number of communities showed interest in incorporation, and the staff made visits to a number of
these to address meetings and to advise on the procedures leading to incorporation.
The Village of Terrace changed status to a district municipality, effective
January 1st, 1960. Letters Patent were issued in December, 1959. No other
changes of status occurred during the year, although one or two municipalities
showed interest in such a move. It appears that, for the most part, those municipalities which intend to change their status have now already done so.
Supplementary Letters Patent were granted to the City of Port Moody and the
District of Powell River authorizing a revision in Council membership. These were
undertaken upon petition of the Councils concerned.
The District of Glenmore, one of the long-established municipalities of the
Province, amalgamated with the City of Kelowna in the fall of the year. The amalgamation appears to have been accomplished with little or no interruption of services
and should be of benefit to the residents of the combined area. In addition to this,
the northern portion of what had been the District of Glenmore reverted to unorganized territory because of the rural nature of the area. This was accomplished
after a petition and vote.
During the year, extensions of boundaries by way of supplementary Letters
Patent were granted to six municipalities. The following table shows the increase
in area as well as the increase in population, if any, resulting from these extensions:—
 AA  10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Adjustments in Area and Increases in Population, 1960
Municipality
Area (in Acres)
Population
Before
Extension
of Area
Contained
in Area
Added
After
Extension
of Area
Before
Extension
of Area
Contained
in Area
Added
After
Extension
of Area
Cities
1,525.0
887.7
547.0
106.0
1,157.0
1,080.0
2,178.0
133.3
9.0
36.2
22.952
187.0
3,703.0
1,021.0
556.0
142.2
1,179.952
1,267.0
9,181
325
695
1,039
1,305
4,398
2,183
16
305
11,364
Districts
325
Villages
711
1,344
Kinnaird   	
1,305
4,398
Note.—District of Glenmore amalgamated with City of Kelowna, September 15th, 1960.
The boundaries of four municipalities were redefined during the year. The
municipalities involved were the Cities of Nanaimo, Port Moody, and Trail and the
District of Oak Bay. The adjustments were made, for the most part, to clear up
doubt as to the location of boundaries or to include water areas which previously
had been under the jurisdiction of the Province. The inclusion of water areas
within a municipality enables the Council to provide administrative control and
the regulation of building standards over foreshore areas.
It is with regret I report that it was necessary to reinstitute the Commissioner
regime in 1960. The local district municipality of Cache Creek, incorporated in
1959, was placed under a Commissionership after experiencing difficulty in the
administration of its municipal waterworks utility. According to latest reports, the
Commissioner has been able to improve appreciably the financial operation of the
waterworks.
Several municipalities requested the Department to investigate and advise on
various phases of administration and finance. These municipalities were visited by
members of the staff and recommendations made to the Councils.
Under the provisions of the Local Services Act, a large number of local areas
were established for the provision of home-nursing care. The service is provided
by local health units and the cost levied against properties on the basis of a per
capita charge. One local area was established to provide fire-protection and ambulance service. Several community planning areas were also established during the
course of the year.
The most significant changes or additions enacted by the 1960 Session of the
Legislature which affected municipalities are as follows:—
The Fire Marshal Act was amended to include villages as a municipality within
the meaning of that Act.
Amendments were made to the Gas Act placing specific responsibilities upon
municipalities for the inspection of certain gas-mains.
The Water Act had two amendments of importance. Ground-water is now
authorized to be controlled by that Act, and any municipality using or intending to
use ground-water as a source of supply comes within the scope of this legislation.
It is now possible to create an improvement district for any purpose, even though
its boundaries may encompass a municipality or a part of a municipality. The
reason for this amendment is to facilitate the inclusion of municipalities in hospital
improvement districts.   This allows a fair and equitable sharing of costs commen-
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
AA  11
surate with assessed values of real property in the various components of the
improvement district.
The Municipal Act was amended during the 1960 Session of the Legislature.
One of the more important amendments was the alteration of the annual nomination
and election dates in order to avoid complication with the Christmas holiday season.
In certain cycle-years the annual elections under the previous legislation tended to
fall too close to Christmas; 1959 was such a year. A further amendment of major
importance allows communities of a population of less than 500 to be incorporated
as village municipalities, if circumstances so warrant. Many small communities
showed considerable interest in this amendment, notably Valemount, Bella Coola,
Queen Charlotte City, and Masset. Other amendments to the Municipal Act were,
for the most part, of a housekeeping nature and need not be mentioned in detail.
Certain specific municipalities were affected by the amendments to the Municipalities
Enabling and Validating Act. These municipalities were Burnaby, Houston, Port
Moody, Powell River, Victoria, and West Vancouver.
In addition to the above, amendments were made to a number of the special-
purpose local Acts.
It is with regret that I have to report the death of a faithful and valuable staff
member, Gordon William Agnew, who passed away at the age of 39 following a
long illness. He worked up to the last in his usual meticulous and conscientious
way. His service, interrupted with an enlistment in the Royal Canadian Air Force
during the war, spanned a period of twenty years.
The past year has been very busy. The volume of work passing through the
Department has been steadily increasing, and 1960 bore out this trend. The very
great expansion of the Municipal Winter Works Incentive Programme, both in scope
and usage, has placed additional demands upon the staff. Complications in borrowing by municipalities have also added materially to the work of the Department. In
spite of this, we have endeavoured to ensure that no municipal business has been
delayed solely as a result of this extra work load.
I would again like to express my thanks to all municipal officials of this Province, both elected and appointed, for their courtesy and assistance, and to the
executive and staff of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities, to all other
Government offices, and to you, Sir, for your support and encouragement.
J. E.  BROWN, F.C.I.S.,
Deputy Minister.
 AA  12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Chart 1.—Trends in Financial Aspects of Municipal Government
Compared to Population and Income
 o
 i>
34 55
YEAR
LEGEND
 POPULATION -In   millions
-O 0 TOTAL REVENUE
-O oDEBENTURE    DEBT   } In millions of dollars
 BUILDING   PERMITS
O O OMAXIMUM   VALUES TAXABLE \ In hundreds  of
 PERSONAL INCOME J millions of  dollars
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
AA  13
REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF MUNICIPALITIES
Victoria, B.C., January 24th, 1961.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—The year gone by has again been one of continued co-operation with
and from the Councils and municipal officials as well as others interested in the
advancement of local government.
The following is a compilation of some of the major activities of the Department during 1960:—
(1) One hundred and fifty-seven visits were made to municipalities. The
number of municipalities actually visited was 121, some receiving more
than one visit.
Two hundred and eight Minutes of Council were prepared and subsequently approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
Fifty-nine certificates of approval for municipal loan by-laws were issued.
A few of these were cancelled during the year due to the subsequent
amendment of the by-law concerned. A new certificate to the by-law as
amended was issued in each of these cases.
Fifty-seven debenture issues were examined and subsequently certified
by the Inspector of Municipalities, consisting of 11,340 debentures of a
total par value of $10,687,541.
Six hundred and seventy-three by-laws were examined and registered.
Of this amount, forty-nine were town by-laws, 617 were village by-laws,
and seven were local district by-laws.    Many of these by-laws required
advice and correspondence, resulting in resubmission in revised form.
Several hundred draft by-laws and similar documents were submitted for
review and comment, involving a considerable amount of correspondence.
Publication of the Annual Report of Municipal Statistics.
Editing the financial and statistical returns of the municipalities to ensure
conformity with statutory and other requirements.
By correspondence and by personal visits to the various municipalities,
encouraging the adoption of good financial, accounting, and administrative procedures.
The annual edition of Municipal Statistics was again published in July, and
numerous letters have been received expressing the value of receiving this publication at an earlier date than in previous years.    We thank the municipal officials
who assisted us in making this possible.
The Government of Canada has again provided an incentive to municipalities
for providing winter work to relieve unemployment for the 1960/61 winter season.
The incentive is the offer to pay one-half of the direct labour costs of approved
projects.
In addition, the Government of the Province has agreed to pay to municipalities 25 per cent of approved direct payroll costs.
This year the Municipal Winter Works Programme was advanced to October
15th, 1960, instead of December 1st as in previous years. The end of the programme is set for April 30th, 1961.
A very important change in the programme from last year is the inclusion of
municipal buildings as acceptable projects (exclusive of hospitals and schools).
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
(9)
I
 AA  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
A possible comparison of programmes is as follows:-
Cost of Projects
Man-days
Work
Payroll
1959/60 as at January 15th, 1960           	
$7,000,000
20,000,000
183,000
392,000
$3,000,000
1960/61 as at January 15th, 1961 -	
7,000,000
These are estimated figures of the municipalities for the programme period.
As of December 30th, 1960, approvals had been given to 532 projects, whereas
the total for last year's programme as completed was 319 projects. It is anticipated that additional applications will be received following the consideration of
municipal budgets by the Councils in 1961.
The programme has added a considerable administrative load on the Department, which has to some extent been alleviated by the care taken by the municipal
officials in the preparation of applications and claims.
I wish to record my appreciation to the other members of the staff who have
cheerfully and efficiently adjusted to this extra work load.
The following tabulation gives a summary of our municipalities' participation
on an over-all basis as at January 20th, 1961, according to the records of this
office:—■
Number of men  7,000
Man-days work  407,000
Total cost of projects  $37,413,000
Federal share      $3,617,000
Provincial share      $1,765,000
Municipal share      $1,956,000
Total payroll under offer     $7,338,000
Nature and Total Cost of Projects
Waterworks   $5,486,000
Sewers   9,935,000
Drainage   732,000
Roads   1,852,000
Sidewalks   1,304,000
Buildings   13,250,000
Other    4,854,000
Municipalities Participating
Cities  30
Districts   27
Towns  2
Villages  36
Other   15
Number of Accepted Projects
Cities
248
Total
110
Districts   175
Towns   12
Villages   103
Other   37
Total  575
Table 1 shows the final summary of the Municipal Winter Works Incentive
Programme for the 1959/60 period as issued by the Department of Labour, Ottawa,
and Table 2 indicates the same information for the current programme as at January 20th, 1961.
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
AA 15
The year 1960 witnessed a considerable increase in debenture borrowing by
municipalities in spite of continued high interest rates. A considerable part of this
increase can be attributed directly to the assistance afforded by the Municipalities
Assistance Act. This legislation has allowed municipalities to borrow for sewer
and water projects, which represent the main borrowing projects of municipalities,
at considerably lower rates of interest than the rates prevailing for debentures not
subject to guarantee by the Province. The Municipal Winter Works Incentive
Programme has also contributed to some extent to the increase in borrowing by
municipalities. This programme has encouraged Municipal Councils to borrow
for projects which otherwise may have been left in abeyance for many years.
The recent amendments to the National Housing Act should have a considerable influence, although it is still too early to assess the effects of this legislation in
respect of municipal borrowings for sewerage projects.
We have continued our practice of keeping a very close watch on the tax-
collection picture in the municipalities. A review of the figures which are published in Table 3 indicates that collections in all categories are down slightly from
1959. The percentage is so slight that I do not feel there is any cause for immediate alarm. It might be mentioned, however, that the foregoing remarks apply
to all classes of municipalities. We have taken particular note of the situation and
will maintain our watch for any sign which might indicate the inability of any
municipality to effect a high rate of collection of the tax levy.
Chart 1 portrays in graph form the percentage of current levy collected, total
collections as a percentage of the current levy, and outstanding taxes as a percentage
of the current levy of the various classes of municipalities over the past decade.
I have omitted the classification of towns in the graph as they have only been in
existence in this Province for a few years.
Table 4 shows for 1959 an improvement in the movement in all classes except
towns from the 10-20-per-cent to the 0-10-per-cent figure for arrears. Generally,
tax collections in villages are not as good as in other classes of municipalities.
However, experience in the past has shown that the properties involved seldom go
to tax sale.
J. D. Baird, F.C.I.S.,
Supervisor of Municipalities.
 AA 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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AA 19
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 Chart 1.—Percentage Tax Collections
CITIES
10
9
7
R
DISTRICTS
II
10
9
8
7
6
5
VILLAGES
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IS
14
13
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YEAR
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LEGEND
-PERCENTAGE    OF   CURRENT   LEVY   COLLECTED
>T0TAL   COLLECTIONS   AS    A   PERCENTAGE   OF   CURRENT   LEVY.
•OUTSTANDING    TAXES   AS  A   PERCENTAGE   OF   CURRENT    LEVY
Ain
tens
 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
AA 21
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR, REGIONAL
PLANNING DIVISION
Victoria, B.C., January 31st, 1961.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—The Division has completed a year which has seen expanded community
planning services throughout the Province. Requests for planning advice to those
municipalities not within the jurisdiction of the Lower Mainland Regional Planning
Board or the Capital Region Planning Board have been frequent, and I am happy to
report that we have been able to increase our output in both quality and quantity.
We have widened our scope with our enlarged staff and can now send out a team of
two or three qualified planners who can give more attention to studying the municipality in its regional setting. In addition to the usual zoning, subdivision, and building by-laws, more attention is being given to the design side of community planning
and advice is extended to include plans for projected roads, parks, school-sites, and
problems in the central business district such as parking.
The staff has made a careful re-examination of basic residential siting requirements. Many of them are too restrictive, and the need for the protection they once
gave no longer exists. Siting provisions are for light, air, access, and open space.
They should not be used for future street-widening, and they should not hamper
private development once the basic requirements protect the public adequately.
With these points in mind, new regulations are being drafted which allow greater
flexibility and prevent waste of land.
COMMUNITY PLANNING AREAS
There are now twenty community planning areas in operation in the Province
which contain roughly 20 per cent of the population in unorganized territory.
Four new areas were established in 1960, as follows:—
Fort Nelson:  Until recently was a hamlet of two or three hundred people.
Now it is a busy community of about 2,500 because of gas and oil exploration and increasing traffic on the Alaska Highway.   The community
planning area here will help guide development into an orderly community.
West Bench: At the request of the residents of this area just west of Penticton,
a community planning area was established to ensure minimum building
and subdivision standards.
Hudson Hope: A community planning area was established here in anticipation
of the projected Peace River power project.
Crooked River:  This community planning area is about 60 miles north of
Prince George in the Crooked River Public Working Circle. Crown land
is being subdivided with a concern for the layout of the future community,
and to this end land is being set aside for future public purposes such as
parks and school-sites.   The area is being developed with the full cooperation with other departments whose functions affect land use.
The boundaries of Community Planning Area Number 1, around Kelowna,
have been expanded because development was extending beyond the boundaries
established in 1947.    Similarly, Community Planning Area Number 7, around
Prince George, has been extended because the city has absorbed a great deal of the
old area and, with improved roads, development has gone far beyond the city
boundaries.
 AA 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Advisory Planning Commissions have been appointed by the Minister of
Municipal Affairs for Community Planning Areas Numbers 2, 5, and 6. Their
function is to advise the Minister on general planning policy and specific rezoning
cases. I believe their efforts will give a worth-while service to the community.
Advisory Planning Commissions are being formed in other community planning
areas.
Generally there has been a strong demand for our services in unorganized
territory.
Most of the community planning areas which were converted from regulated
areas have had their zoning, building, and subdivision regulations revised. I am
glad to say that these are easier to administer and more acceptable to the public
although their effectiveness has not been weakened.
Although the total value of construction was about 12 per cent less than 1959
(excluding Community Planning Area Number 17, established in 1960), the decrease was smaller than in more settled areas of the Province.
The ratio of owner-built construction to contractor-built construction continues
to be about 4:1, showing the nature of administration necessary where stress is laid
on giving structural building advice rather than inspection in the common meaning
of the word.
While the minimum house size allowable in the regulations is 500 square feet,
less than 5 per cent of all the 517 dwelling units were built at this minimum, and the
most common size was around 1,000 square feet, with most of the other houses
grouped around this size.
It was possible to visit the building inspectors more frequently and examine at
first hand the various problems confronting them. Technical study material was
sent out as it became available and has improved the building service provided to
the public.
Place
Dwelling
Units
Built, 1960
Dwelling Units
Built since
Areas
Established
Total Value of
Construction,
Community Planning Area Number 1 (around Kelowna) 	
Community Planning Area Number 2 (around Vernon)	
Community Planning Area Number 3 (View Royal)  	
Community Planning Area Number 4 (Thetis, near Victoria)	
Community Planning Area Number 5 (North Saanich) 	
Community Planning Area Number 6 (around Nanaimo)	
Community Planning Area Number 7 (around Prince George)	
Community Planning Area Number 8 (around Kamloops)	
Community Planning Area Number 9 (around Quesnel). 	
Community Planning Area Number 10 (Connaught Heights, D.L.
172, next to New Westminster)  	
Community Planning Area Number 11 (around Alberni)	
Community Planning Area Number 12 (around Dawson Creek)	
Community Planning Area Number 13 (Woodhaven, near loco)	
Community Planning Area Number 14 (small area south of Campbell River)      —
Community Planning Area Number 15 (around Fort St. John)- 	
Community Planning Area Number  16   (industrial reserve near
Victoria)    —   _.
Community Planning Area Number 17 (Fort Nelson)	
Community Planning Area Number 18 (West Bench, near Penticton).
Community Planning Area Number 19 (Hudson Hope)— —
Community Planning Area Number 20 (Crooked River, 60 miles
north of Prince George)  _    	
Others 	
Totals  	
77
50
21
5
43
149
19
68
9
52
19
1,050
362
300
11
451
1,479
631
679
167
70
4
216
18
2
71
19
62
517
5,592
$1,382,208
619,338
310,368
57,470
868,510
2,010,147
179,761
1,402,250
253,900
58,125
36,320
10,598
26,926
554,808
622,952
1,393,681
Total value of construction to date, $64,879,909.
Don South, M.T.P.I.C.
Director, Regional Planning Division.
 Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1961
1,010-261-266
 

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