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Annual Report of the Director of Correction for the YEAR ENDED MARCH 31ST 1960 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1961

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Annual Report
of the
Director of Correction
for the
YEAR ENDED MARCH 3 1st
1960
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1961
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Annual Report of the Director
of Correction for the year ended March 31st, 1960.
ROBERT W. BONNER,
A ttorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., January, 1961.
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Director of Correction's Letter to Attorney-General     7
Extracts from Wardens' Annual Reports—
Oakalla Prison Farm  10
Women's Gaol  12
Haney Correctional Institution  12
New Haven  14
Prince George Gaol  14
Kamloops Provincial Gaol  15
Extracts from Annual Reports of Senior Headquarters Personnel—
Senior Medical Officer  17
Senior Protestant Chaplain  18
Senior Roman Catholic Chaplain  19
Senior Librarian  19
Gaol Psychologist  20
Report of the Provincial Probation Branch  21
Statistical Appendix  23
  Report of the Director of Correction, 1959/60
The Honourable Robert Bonner, Q.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—It is my pleasure to submit the Annual Report of the Director of Correction covering the activities of the Provincial Gaols and the Probation Branch for the
year ended March 31st, 1960.
Extracts from reports submitted by the Wardens of our various institutions
indicate continued progress and give grounds for our faith in the efficacy of the rehabilitation work which is being attempted throughout the gaol service generally.
It is interesting to note that there has been a decrease in the actual number of
inmate-days served at Okalla Prison Farm, but a decided increase in the intake and
release rate, resulting in a greater flow of inmates through the institution. There is
every indication at the end of the fiscal year that we will be faced with a decided
increase in population before the end of the calendar year 1960.
During the year the Young Offenders' Unit building was closed as it was felt
that there was little point in carrying this programme as competitive to the new institution at Haney, and that there would be decided advantages in combining the two
in keeping with the recommendation that was made by the Penal Commission Report
of 1950. The decision to convert the Young Offenders' Unit building for use as a
gaol hospital is in line with recommendations in past Annual Reports and is a matter
of great satisfaction to us all.
There have been some improvements made in the Classification Unit at Oakalla
Prison Farm, but it is hoped that before long we will be able to report a decision to
construct a new unit for this purpose exclusively.
The Haney Correctional Institution continues to report favourable progress.
There has been a new development in the Camps Division at that institution in the
activation of the Pre-release Camp, which was under construction at the time of our
last Annual Report. Mention should be made in this connection of the Pre-release
Advisory Committee, which includes representatives of various agencies, including
the National Employment Service, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, British
Columbia Federation of Labour, the legal profession, Magistrates, and police. Activities of the H.C.I. Players, as the institution drama group is known, during the
year has brought considerable favourable publicity to the programme of the institution and has proved a concrete example to the public of the Province of British
Columbia of what can be done with inmates of penal institutions under wise and
experienced leadership. The vocational night-school programme, in co-operation
with the Maple Ridse School Board, is another interesting and productive development which has made a real contribution to the community as a whole.
The Director of New Haven and the Wardens of Prince George and Kamloops
Gaols report on programmes being conducted in their institutions. In this connection I would commend to you once again developments which are taking place at
our Clearwater Camp in the Wells Gray Park. This, too, has been an interesting
experiment and again provides a real service to the community, particularly as it
opens up a most desirable playground area for the residents of the Province.
The Senior Medical Officer, the librarian, the psychologist, and our chaplains
again report on their activities. I am sure that these reports will prove of interest
to all who take the time to read them.
 BB 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Mr. C. D. Davidson, Chief Assistant Probation Officer, reports on the activities
of the Probation Branch. Here again there have been changes in personnel during
the year. The service continues to expand and the number of referrals shows a
decided increase. At the end of the fiscal year there were some 1,800 persons on
probation to the Branch. It is easy to see what the effect would have been on the
resources of our institutions had even half these people been in custody rather than
under supervision in the community. There should be no need for me to mention
again the decided difference in costs between the two methods of treatment. The
statistical appendix which is included in this Report tells its own story. The cost of
operating the Probation Branch for the same period was $284,044.33.
There is no separate report on our staff-training programme for the past year.
However, there were two staff conferences held at the University—one for senior
prison personnel on supervision and one for senior people on staff. Staff attending
these conferences lived in one of the University residences. Four evening extension
courses were offered at the University, with 123 staff enrolled. Half of the expenses
of those attending were defrayed from our staff-training budget. In addition, five
staff members were assisted financially to return to University to study at the School
of Social Work. There was a shop instructors' course held at Oakalla and a social
group work course for programme officers held at the Haney Correctional Institution. Two senior staff were sent to attend conferences—one on training and one
on administration.
It is gratifying to know that Mr. Malcolm Matheson, formerly Deputy Warden
at the Haney Correctional Institution, will be rejoining the corrections staff at headquarters early in the new year. He has been appointed Staff Training and Personnel
Officer for the entire service.
In closing, I would once again extend my thanks and appreciation to all those
who have assisted us in any way during the past year. Thanks are expressed to the
various agencies whose activities extend to after-care work for those released from
our institutions. Thanks also to a sympathetic press and co-operative officials of
other departments of all levels of Government, and to an understanding public who
believe, as we do, that the humane treatment of those who have fallen foul of the
law is the measure of success of our democratic system.
I would once more commend the loyalty and the tireless work of the Wardens
and staff of our institutions, the headquarters staff, the Probation Officers, and clerical assistants.
I would like to make the following recommendations for your consideration:—
(1) It is becoming increasingly apparent that we should have more adequate
facilities for administration, observation, and classification at Oakalla
Prison Farm. The present quarters are entirely unsatisfactory, and if we
are to make continued progress with our diversified programme, which
is dependent entirely upon adequate classification, we must have better
facilities. At the same time, the suggestion made by Mr. McAllister in
his report should be given serious consideration; that is, there should be
a central classification staff directly administered through the Director of
Corrections office whose responsibility is classification affecting all the
institutions. Local classification for placements within the institutions
can be the responsibility of the separate institutional staffs.
(2) As recommended last year, better facilities should be provided for the
work of our chaplains. From the point of view of quality of personnel,
this service cannot be improved. We must, at an early date, however,
provide proper chapels in all of our institutions.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1959/60 BB 9
(3) We are still making use of the old Oakalla Gaol, known as Annex A, for
housing short-term inmates as the pressure of population demands. This
is a cause for real concern to the administration, but is necessitated by
lack of other accommodation. It is urgently recommended that sufficient
funds be allotted to provide for the construction of additional and more
adequate quarters for this type of inmate so that Annex A can be closed
permanently.
(4) There still is need for a separate women's gaol, and it is recommended
that as soon as possible a start should be made on construction of a
modern institution on the new site at Ruskin.
(5) While it is gratifying to know that the uncompleted gate-house at Haney
Correctional Institution will, no doubt, be build before the end of the new
fiscal year, it is discouraging to report that no start has yet been made on
adequate refrigeration, garbage-disposal facilities, and other services
which were left unfinished at the time the main building was activated.
From our experience during the past two years, it is obvious that some
changes should be made in the dormitory accommodation, and it is hoped
that before long sufficient funds will be provided for this purpose.
(6) In spite of handicaps, the Warden of Prince George Gaol is making a
valiant effort to conduct some type of vocational programme. The plans
which were drawn up several months ago for additional space for this use
have not been implemented. It is hoped that there will not be too much
delay before some steps can be taken in this direction. Once again I
would draw attention to the inadequacy of facilities of Kamloops Gaol
and the desirability of construction of a modern institution to serve the
needs of the Interior of the Province.
(7) I have no hesitation in urging the expansion of the Probation Branch and
the appointment of additional Parole Officers for supervision of those who
are conditionally released from our institutions.
(8) It is recommended that the number of staff supervisors in the Probation
Branch be increased. Staff morale in branch offices is suffering from the
lack of contact with the head office. It is suggested that two additional
supervisors be appointed, one stationed in the Interior of the Province and
one on Vancouver Island.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
E. G. B. STEVENS,
Director of Correction.
 BB  10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
EXTRACTS FROM THE WARDENS' ANNUAL REPORTS
OAKALLA PRISON FARM
Population trends indicate a decrease of 0.02 per cent in the actual number of
inmate-days in the year. While this decrease exists, there is an increase over the
previous year in the intake and release rate, which results in a greater flow of inmates
through the institution. The last six months of the year had more inmates sentenced,
but to shorter sentences than was the previous average. There has been a marked
decrease in the number of persons in the immigrant group, while increases are more
apparent in the group under 21 years of age and the group between 51 and 60 years
of age. These increases are based on actual case numbers rather than total inmate
days.   The latter indicates a general decrease over the previous year only.
There has been a marked increase of 7.4 per cent in the number of crimes
against property. This is, in the main, categorized under " breaking and entering "
and " petty theft." The increase is again in the age-group under 21, which falls in
the group referred to as " war-time children."
It was hoped in the past year that the 1957/58 recession would have levelled
out a more stable economic pattern, and for this reason the number of permanent
employees carried on the establishment was kept to a minimum, with the overload
being carried by the hiring of temporary staff as needed to meet the increases in
prison population. This has now proven wrong, as the population has not decreased
and only increases can be expected. The number of temporary staff varied during
the year to a maximum of eighty, with an average of fifty-six over all. With this in
mind, we must take steps to raise the staff complement to a point where we have
at least sufficient trained permanent staff to maintain continuity and control in the
operation.
Per diem costs reflect an increase of 20 cents per inmate. This figure is somewhat inflated as costs of some of the materials required in our prison industries are
included, as well as some of the costs of expansion. The forestry camps reflect an
increase of only 4 cents per inmate. While these figures are not truly representative
of what could be considered normal increases in costs, they are sufficient to support
the repeated argument for a more extensive investment in preventive and probation
services to avoid the initial necessity of incarceration.
With the additions of the Haney Correctional Institution and forestry camps,
the flow of inmates through this institution has increased tremendously, with no
increase in the facilities to cope with the situation. The Records Section, responsible
for the admitting and releasing of inmates, has proven totally inadequate and has
been the subject of much study. Surveys have been made and are now in the hands
of the Department of Public Works with a view to correcting the situation. This
would be done either through the expansion of existing facilities or, preferably, a new
unit to be constructed where most effective. This is of paramount importance, and
I would recommend that every effort be made to have capital funds provided for this
project in the coming year.
The East Wing continues to house the more difficult inmate group, and the
problem associated with their control and treatment is intensified as more positive
efforts elsewhere in the Corrections Branch continue to absorb the more reformable
offender. Admittedly, our best efforts should be expended on those who will respond best. Nevertheless, we cannot ignore our responsibility, not only for the care,
but also for the treatment of the least reformable, and in this regard it is recommended that the training of staff and an expansion of programme be directed toward
the reformation of this numerically significant group of inmates.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1959/60 BB  11
The West Wing presents a problem which is by no means of recent origin, and
which has been described in detail in previous Reports. The lack of sufficient segregation, the unavoidable limitation of positive programming due to inadequate facilities, the worn outdated locking system, and overcrowding in general, all add to the
pressure which has become synonymous with the administration and control of this
particular unit. It is recommended that consideration be given to the establishment
of an entirely separate holding unit for all prisoners waiting trial, waiting appeal,
and waiting transfer to the Penitentiary. This would help to relieve the situation
described above and the congestion throughout the institution generally.
The decision to discontinue the operation of the Young Offenders' Unit, which
offered a unique opportunity for experimentation in the treatment of a seriously
disturbed element of our younger inmate group, is of questionable merit in the face
of the trend described above, but some consolation can be found in the decision to
renovate the building for use as a central hospital for the gaol service as a whole.
The Classification Unit has continued to function in a creditable manner,
despite the increasing pressure of numbers and the limited facilities assigned to it.
The new quarters now nearing completion as an addition to the South Wing of the
main cell block will be a welcome improvement. The unit's chief function has continued to be one of rapid initial screening of all inmates under sentence who are
admitted to the institution, and not serving penitentiary sentences, in order to place
them into active programmes without undue loss of time.
The population of the Westgate Unit in the past year has been comprised of
short-term recidivists and youthful offenders on definite and indefinite sentences
who had violated paroles, or who were not considered suitable for placement elsewhere, and the remainder were younger adults who also were not considered suitable
for other units, although they had sentences of up to the two-years-less-one-day
limit, as well as some returned from Haney Correctional Institution as unsuitable
to the programme there. The Westgate socialization programme continues to operate primarily on an interest rather than group-work basis due to staff limitations, but
there has been an expansion in the production programme, as evidenced by the new
sock-shop in operation and by the start on the manufacturing of highway signs.
The pre-release forestry camps at Chilliwack have been expanded to include
a third camp some 20 miles up the Chilliwack River valley from the Vedder Highway. A total of 1,080 passed through the camps during the year. The combined
camps now have a population capacity of 180 inmates. They have been engaged,
in the main, in projects under the direction of the British Columbia Forest Service.
Nursery beds for reforestation requirements have been established, with a capacity in
excess of 10,000,000 seedlings. Assistance has also been rendered to the Forest Service in road and bridge building, construction, and land-clearing. All the above has
represented thousands of dollars in savings to the taxpayers. In all, the productivity of these camps has been such that if charges were made for the service provided, it would be proven that they are actually operating on a profit-making basis.
Obviously consideration should be given to further expansion of this type of programme.
In the Narcotic Addiction Treatment Unit the appointment of an after-care
officer has resulted in considerable improvement in follow-up efforts. As the post
has been vacant since 1957, it has been necessary to re-establish the contacts made
by the previous officer with unions, employment agencies, and other community
resources. Many of these resources had undergone some changes in the interval,
but efforts to assist the discharged inmate in finding employment and making a
positive settlement in the community have been intensified.
 BB  12 . , BRITISH COLUMBIA
Women's Gaol
The programme at the Women's Gaol was consolidated into a meaningful plan
for effectual activity in the area of work, vocational training, education, and socialization. Classification, medical, and health services were intensified to serve the
needs of a variety of unusual and special types of inmates.
There were 793 admissions during the year. The women came from widely
scattered areas, were of all ages, and presented many difficult problems. The
charges against them ranged from murder to vagrancy, with a marked increase in
the more serious charges and the length of the sentences. The majority of those
admitted were either addicts or chronic alcoholics. Many were juveniles, expectant
mothers, sex deviates, epileptics, psychotics, or subnormal individuals.
Eighteen offenders were transferred to Kingston Penitentiary for women, and
242 were returned to their homes in various parts of the Province.
The average daily count dwindled from a high of 140 to as low as eighty-six.
An increased number were transferred to the Penitentiary. Others became successful probationers or did not return to gaol. As the inmate population decreased, the
more interesting and responsive types did not remain to go beyond classification or
the orientation group. This left each team or group with a residue of the more hopeless chronic offenders.
Although we feel it is a desirable thing that the count is lower, and that the
more promising offenders are no longer returning to gaol, it is becoming more
difficult to supply a keen staff with interesting groups who give a positive reaction
to the Supervisor's leadership. Staff morale drops in accordance with the visible
results of their efforts. Group and team workers are impatient with the long, tedious
course that treatment requires, and they feel their talents are wasted on unresponsive
people whose anti-social behaviour is so deeply rooted. Staff require positive leadership in this area, if they are to acquire sympathy with the over-all aim of Corrections,
which is to leave the offender in the community whenever possible.
HANEY CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION
A few of the highlights of the total programme over the past year follow.
The Camps Division, under the leadership of Mr. Norman Baker, activated the
Pre-release Camp and continued the development of the Gold Creek Camp. Our
camps programme, while relatively modest, is nevertheless unique. Gold Creek
Camp is the only camp in the Service that accommodates men serving their complete
sentences, and the Pre-release Camp has developed, in its short existence, the most
detailed and effective pre-release programme within the Service.
One of the most interesting developments at Gold Creek Camp in the past year
has been the placement in the camp of men serving both definite and indefinite
sentences. In order to obtain the optimum benefit to programme from the staff
establishment at Gold Creek Camp, we have assigned to specific individuals the
responsibility for counselling, recreation, and work. This has resulted in more
clear-cut responsibilities and a greater incentive for these individual staff members
to develop their own particular functional area.
The biggest development in the Camps Division has been the activation of the
Pre-release Camp. Placement in this camp enables the man to live in a more
normal setting where he has the opportunity to exercise self-responsibility and, at
the same time, take full advantage of the total institutional programme, including
vocational training and professional counselling.
We are grateful for the assistance given by a Pre-release Advisory Committee
in helping to establish the programme in the camp and in guiding its continued
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1959/60 BB 13
development. This Advisory Committee includes representatives from the John
Howard Society, the Salvation Army, the Catholic Charities Organization, the
National Employment Service, the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, the British
Columbia Federation of Labour, the legal profession, Magistrates, and the police.
The Committee has been guided by its able Chairman, Inspector Dan Brown of the
Vancouver City Police Department. Part of the accomplishment of this Committee
has been the provision of a panel of speakers to discuss many of the problems that
will face inmates of our Institution on their ultimate discharge.
The Business Division has continued to provide efficiently the services necessary for the adequate functioning of the other three divisions. One of the most satisfactory developments was the appointment of an Overseer Foreman to assume
responsibility for the total maintenance and construction programmes. Some of the
major projects accomplished during the past year were the construction of the
second perimeter fence, the creation of necessary new offices in various areas of the
building, the development of an increased network of roads to enhance both communication and fire protection, and the landscaping of our extensive grounds.
Over and above all this, the Business Division has rendered to all other divisions a continued high standard of service.
The Custodial Division has gradually assumed more and more responsibility
for total programme over the past year. This is a result of the additional experience
of the staff and the gradual evolution of a more relaxed programme, based more on
co-operation and less on coercion. The custodial programme is no longer geared,
especially in its security aspects, to the lowest common denominator. Therefore,
we have gradually relaxed restrictions on movement to the point where, for example,
the majority of our work gangs work beyond the limits of the fence.
Correctional Officers have played an increasing role in the area of lay counselling and recreation. All of this has helped to develop a more therapeutic and healthy
atmosphere.
The Training Division has continued to serve as a stimulus for the over-all
development of institutional programme. This Division is responsible for leadership
in the rehabilitative facets of the Institution. One challenge which the Training
Division and, indeed, the whole Institution faced during the last year was the change
in the composition of population served. As the Young Offenders' Unit at Oakalla
Prison Farm closed, we had to deal with an increasingly younger and more disturbed
group of offenders. At the present time, 63 per cent of our total population is
between the ages of 16 and 23. This has necessitated certain changes, and as this
proportion grows, which it undoubtedly will, further changes will be required. While
this is an extremely challenging group to work with, it is also an extremely interesting and productive one.
The Training Division, in particular, has contributed to the over-all focus on
community participation in our programme. Two of the most interesting developments in this regard over the past year have been the work of our drama group and
our vocational night-school programme.
The drama group presented the plays " Harvey " and " You Can't Take It
with You." To date our plays have been presented before a cumulative public
audience of 10,000.
The second very interesting development has been the establishment of a vocational night-school programme, in which fourteen different courses, ranging from
home baking to welding, were offered to citizens from the community, using institutional instructors and shops.
 BB  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
NEW HAVEN
The fiscal year of 1959/60 might be considered as a period of curtailment
where it was necessary to " hold the fine " in order to operate within a budget too
small for comfort. It was a year of difficulties, each anticipated and each overcome.
Much of what we hoped for could not come about because of the necessity to cancel
out progressive programmes, such as the very successful conditional release experiment, the public and industrial relations activities, and the clerical class. It was
found that the pressure on a small staff, not accustomed to the flexibility required
to control such a programme, was too great, and it was necessary to go back to the
original staff roster under which these experiments could not safely function.
Attention could be drawn to much of the content of the last annual report
submitted to suggest that conditions and recommendations relative to several factors,
including the farm, business management, and supply, remain somewhat the same
and that the same recommendations and predictions still hold.
This fiscal year we have operated within the same framework as outlined in
previous annual reports. There is one difference which we must face: we no longer
receive the grade of trainees who gave to New Haven its very excellent success
statistics. Now we receive a trainee who normally would be housed in the Young
Offenders' Unit of other years. It is not anticipated that we will be able to continue
attaining the previous salvage ratio, but it is firmly believed that by adhering to
the philosophy and training techniques used by New Haven we will come very close.
To do so, however, it will be necessary that we spend more time in treatment planning and less time in administrative details. Such can be accomplished by allotting
a budget sufficiently realistic to permit administration with a minimum of clerical
tension.
PRINCE GEORGE GAOL
Average daily population for the year was 87.25, a decrease of 3.42 from the
average for the fiscal year 1958/59. A total of ninety-nine inmates was transferred
for various reasons, including overcrowding at certain times.
A new scale of earnings for inmates was put into effect in the latter part of
the last fiscal year. Under the new scheme, inmates are allowed to earn from 10
to 30 cents a day. Length of service, work habits, ability, attitude, and conduct of
inmates are taken into consideration in determining eligibility for increases. The
scheme has proved to be interesting and effective, most inmates making a positive
response to this incentive to develop better work habits. Weekly reports submitted
by officers supervising inmate occupational groups have been valuable, not only in
assessing general progress or lack of it, but also in the compilation of general proficiency records covering the period of each inmate's complete service.
We are still in need of at least one more indoor occupational shop. During
long severe winter and spring break-up months, only very limited outside work
projects can be continued, and additional indoor facilities are required during this
period.
Certain changes in the institutional programme, which were in the planning
stages for some time, were put into effect in February. Changes included reorganization of working-hours, serving of meals, and afternoon and evening socialization
and recreational programmes. Since February 2nd inmates have been awakened
at 7 a.m. rather than 6 a.m. Staff members are on hand to immediately start giving
continuous supervision to the programme of the day. Certain members of the staff
partake of meals with the inmates in the cell blocks at common tables, giving direct
continuous supervision. As a result, the use of tablecloths and knives and forks
(something new for this institution) are now being enjoyed at all cell-block dining-
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1959/60 BB 15
tables. After considerable study, staff duties have also been reorganized to provide
closer supervision and attention by staff during the afternoon and evening programmes.
To date the new programme seems to be quite successful. Most of the convicted inmates are occupied with work, recreation, and hobbies during their waking
hours. A closer contact and relationship between staff and inmates is provided.
Time spent out of cells by the inmates has been shortened, but these hours are
busier and more interesting as a result of closer staff attention. Tensions seem to
be noticeably reduced, and fewer disciplinary problems have been reported.
Senior Guard Pink and a few other members of the staff have studied lay
counselling practices and techniques during a good part of the past year, and, at
this writing, inmate discussion groups have been meeting regularly for some time
under the supervision of Mr. Pink and his assistants.
A basic training programme was again carried out through the winter months,
fourteen line officers participating. Development of a staff section to the gaol library
is in progress. A number of volumes have already been obtained on various correctional subjects. Selected material and staff-training information from other
institutions has also been made available to staff.
KAMLOOPS PROVINCIAL GAOL
Summaries of annual statistics show a decline in the number of new admissions
during the fiscal year 1959/60; however, the Gaol population has remained almost
the same. The transfers of inmates to Oakalla Prison Farm were up slightly, but
we were able to draw forty inmates from Prince George Gaol to the Clearwater
Forest Camp. The above figures show a continued trend toward a larger percentage
of indictable offences with subsequent longer sentences in the area, resulting in a
lower number of admissions during the year, but with an almost equal number of
prisoner-days.
No major construction projects were carried out by inmate crews during the
past year, but assistance was rendered to all departments, and maintenance-men were
assisted on a number of minor projects. As in the past years, the Gaol supplied the
manual labour for the maintenance of the grounds in this area, assisting the staff
gardener in the greenhouses, lawns, flower-beds, and rockeries.
Work carried out in the main Clearwater Camp was more limited than in past
years as the bulk of the construction is now complete. However, there were several
small projects along with maintenance and wood-cutting for heating and cooking in
the kitchen. A work party of sixteen inmates was employed at the Clearwater Community Park clearing debris, slashing brush, and levelling the area for use by the
people of the community.
A mobile camp was stationed during the summer at Clearwater Lake. This
camp was made up of two trailers, one sleeping unit, and one combination kitchen
and dining unit. The trailers were built by inmates with staff supervision and direction at the Clearwater Camp. They provide accommodation for nine inmates and
one staff member.
These units were set up at Clearwater Lake, 35 miles from the main Clearwater
Camp; a staff member and the inmates (nine) made up the crew and were rotated
one week at a time in this camp. In spite of inclement weather that restricted operations, the crews were able to complete the first phase of the project, so the operation
was reasonably successful in the first season of operation.
 BB  16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The unit was put into operation on June 22nd, 1959, and operation ceased on
October 31st, 1959. The project to be carried out by these crews was the building
of a public camp-site. The first phase, which was completed during the season, was
the clearing, grading, and ditching for drainage of 1 mile of roadway to a width of
16 feet in the camp area. These roadways were slashed, any material suitable for
bridge timbers or wood was salvaged, and the remainder burned. All roots were
dug out and hauled to a disposal area for burning. The roads were ditched for
drainage, and cross-ditches to the Clearwater River were dug to drain these roadside
ditches and surface-water draining into the area from the hills behind the camp-site.
The summer season was very wet and cold in the Wells Gray Park area during
1959. As a result, there were no calls at any time during the year to the Clearwater
Camp to furnish suppression crews to combat fires in the area.
I have, in the past several annual reports, pointed out the conditions that exist
and will continue to grow more acute as the area we service grows and better transportation facilities are provided; these bring an ever-increasing inmate population
charged with indictable offences. This trend will continue to place my officers in
a more vulnerable position in the execution of the duties assigned, working in an
institution that is obsolete in every way. I would therefore submit that the Department take a long-range view regarding the planning of a new institution in the
central south portion of the Province, and that a survey be made in the near future
as to the location of a site proven up suitable for an institution that could be utilized
for the next fifty years.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1959/60 BB 17
EXTRACTS FROM ANNUAL REPORTS OF SENIOR
HEADQUARTERS PERSONNEL
SENIOR MEDICAL OFFICER
The year under review has been generally satisfactory so far as the health of
the inmates is concerned.
You will find that an increased number of inmates were treated both as in- and
out-patients at the Vancouver General Hospital. We are most grateful for the excellent attention given. We are fully aware of the drain on prison staff resources for
escort duty, and I understand that there is hope of a portion of a ward at the Vancouver General Hospital being set aside for Oakalla Prison inmates.
This year has terminated the policy of part-time dentistry at Oakalla Prison
Farm and Haney Correctional Institution. Dr. W. Johnson has been appointed as
full-time dentist. He apportions his time between Oakalla and Haney Correctional
Institution.
The appointment of four female nurses—two registered nurses and two graduate psychiatric nurses—has proved the most outstanding event of the year. As you
are aware, for about twenty-five years each prison for male offenders in England
has had at least one registered female nurse. Given suitable women, and they can be
old or young, invaluable contributions are made to medical treatment and rehabilitation in prisons. We have indeed been fortunate in the presence of four such
competent and conscientious staff members so willing to face and overcome the
peculiar difficulties involved in nursing in a male correctional institution. We are
indeed looking forward to more appointments of this nature in the new hospital.
Experience has shown that female nurses in a male prison very greatly raises the
standards of medical care and nursing. Their presence improves the deportment of
their patients, more especially in the control of obscene language and manners
generally. Also, in the cases of disturbed patients they have an incalculable amount
to offer in the way of therapeutic relationships.
In the medical field, Oakalla Prison Farm, by nature of its function as the
central unit through which most varieties of delinquency pass in large numbers, the
medical aspects offer a unique focus for classification treatment and research. Our
approaching move to a hospital situated in the building previously known as the
Young Offenders' Unit will greatly enhance the resources for clinical treatment,
medical and surgical, and to some extent for the specialized care of the more disturbed offender. Increased staffing will be required, including graduate technicians.
There will be no consulting services available on the spot, and patients will continue
to attend the out-patient and in-patient departments at Vancouver General Hospital.
However, it will be a marked and welcome addition to our present facilities, but we
still remain in urgent need of treatment for the psychologically disturbed and more
psychopathic offender. This would entail the appointment of psychiatrists and
personnel supplying the necessary services, together, of course, with the necessary
accommodation. Not only would this provide an essential treatment resource in the
correctional field, but it would provide teaching material in the tutelage of forensic
psychiatry by a psychiatrist attached to the staff of the Department of Psychiatry,
Medical Faculty, University of British Columbia. Similarly, we would welcome
a link with the Medical Faculty of the University of British Columbia in all branches
of medicine and surgery. There is a wealth of experience available for medical
students in our large prison population.
 BB  18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Medical Statistics
Total number of admissions  1,180
Total number of inmate-days  18,421
Days per inmate  15.61
Total number of treatments (medicinal)   5,987
Number of withdrawal treatments given  333
Number of operations, minor and major  451
Electrocardiographs  70
Laboratory determinations and analyses  1,254
Examinations by optometrist  251
Interviews by Dr. Thomas  143
Number of accident reports filed  102
Committals to Provincial Mental Hospital  89
Hangings  1
Deaths—at Vancouver General Hospital  1
E.E.G.'s  26
Patients to Vancouver General Hospital  728
Cancer Clinic  2 8
TB. Control  10
V.D. Control  25
Total number of dental patients  1,367
Total number of dental operations  1,963
Total general X-rays  782
Positives  114
Total miniature TB. X-ray films  6,696
Total diagnostic X-ray films  360
Total TB. cases handled in Oakalla  88
SENIOR PROTESTANT CHAPLAIN
The chaplain is, or should be, a full-time leader of the religious programme of
every correctional institution. This programme is an integral part of the total programme of the institution, and includes such specific arrangements as pastoral
counselling, religious education, sacraments, and worship services. While worship
services supply a basic need in the inmate's moral and ethical regeneration, nevertheless the chaplain must also be prepared to offer what is known as " pastoral care,"
which includes spiritual counselling and guidance and basic religious instruction.
These are all necessary adjuncts in a complete well-rounded religious programme.
As far as possible, the chaplains have endeavoured to fulfil the role expected, if not
always, assigned to them.
Several staff changes occurred during the year under review. Rev. Frank
Humphreys, part-time chaplain at Oakalla Prison Farm, died after a short illness in
August, 1959. In November Rev. T. T. Oliver and Rev. Reg Brown, both ministers
in the Vancouver area of the United Church of Canada, were appointed to assist
the senior chaplain at Oakalla Prison Farm. Rev. Martin K. Brown, of Central
Baptist Church, Prince George, was appointed on a part-time basis at Prince George
Gaol on October 1st.
The church advisory council at the Haney Correctional Institution, made up of
representatives from each of the living units and the Pre-release Camp, continues to
be of great assistance to the chaplain and an asset to the religious programme as a
whole. The Haney chaplain reports there are many reasons for having such a group,
only one of which I will mention here, and it is this, that the chaplain in having a
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1959/60 BB  19
council of this type suggests that he is sharing the planning of the religious programme with the trainees, and that they themselves have the responsibility in successfully putting the programme into operation.
The need for the provision of chapels for public worship at the earliest possible
opportunity must once again be stressed. New Haven and Gold Creek Camp are
the only institutions where chapels exist at present. It is a decided handicap to the
religious programme when the chaplain is forced to use an auditorium or any other
kind of substitute arrangement for religious services.
SENIOR ROMAN CATHOLIC CHAPLAIN
The spiritual needs of institutions outside Oakalla are fulfilled by dedicated
priests, namely, Rev. J. A. Carroll, O.M.I., Prince George; Rev. J. P. Maclntyre,
Kamloops, who occasionally visits the Clearwater Camp; Rev. Lawrence Dal Bon,
R.S.S.C, who also services Gold Creek Forestry Camp; Rev. Gordon McKinnon,
Chilliwack Forestry Camp. During the past year all these have been visited except
the Prince George Gaol. Haney Correctional Institution and Camp and the Chilliwack Camp have been visited many times during the year. The fathers are to be
complimented on the great job they are doing under difficult circumstances. Prison
work is always under difficult circumstances without a chapel setting, and this
could be greatly eased with a chapel.
On February 14th, 1960, the Sancta Maria House, of which I am the director,
operated by the Legion of Mary, for street girls, was opened, where many homeless
girls released from Oakalla are placed temporarily. To date we have been successful with one who is working and now living a respectable life in her own apartment.
SENIOR LIBRARIAN
The new system of handling the widespread library services of the Corrections
Branch which was set up last year has worked well, and this year has been one of
consolidation and improvement. A number of experiments have been made, and a
new library has been opened in the main building of Oakalla Prison Farm for the use
of inmates in the East and West wings.
The appointment in December, 1959, of a male assistant to the librarian has
made concentration on one particular library or unit possible, and the librarian can
now plan ahead with the knowledge that time will be available to complete the necessary work. This appointment also means that the librarian is able to spend more
time on book selection; personal contacts with inmates, staff, and agencies, both
in and outside the institutions; and staff library provision in co-operation with
personnel and training officers.
A recent article in the Library Journal showed that the average cost of 3,194
general books selected at random was $4.51. This figure is slightly higher in
Canada. By careful purchasing and by taking advantage of seasonal price reductions and the sale of booksellers' samples, books can be obtained below this figure,
but, even so, the price of books is high, and a budget of two or three hundred dollars
can provide very little in the way of varied reading over a period of one year. Our
knowledge of what has already been done depends on the written word—on the
magazine article, the journal, and the book. In order to make the collected experience of the past available to us to-day, we must have the funds to purchase the books
in which that experience is written, particularly as we are working in a profession
which covers all the ramifications of human behaviour.
 BB 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
GAOL PSYCHOLOGIST
The psychological testing programmes in Oakalla Prison Farm, Haney Correctional Institution, and New Haven have been conducted in the same manner as in
previous years; that is, tests have been used as course screening instruments in
Central Classification in Oakalla Prison Farm and more refined measures have been
taken in Haney Correctional Institution and New Haven.
Central Classification in Oakalla Prison Farm had a number of changes of
personnel over the year and, as a consequence, it did not function as smoothly as it
ordinarily should. The new classification section which has been built on to the
east side of the South Wing of the Oakalla Prison Farm main building will be ready
for occupancy early in the coming year—probably in April of 1960.
It is recommended that the classification work which affects all the institutions
should be done by a staff, designated as Central Classification staff, who would be
directly administered through the Director of Correction's office, and that local
classification for placements within the institutions should be the responsibility of
the separate institutions.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1959/60 BB 21
REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL PROBATION BRANCH
Mr. E. G. B. Stevens, Director of Correction,
Room 205, 1075 Melville Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.
Sir,—I am pleased to submit the annual report for the Provincial Probation
Branch covering the fiscal year ended 31st March, 1960.
Several staff changes were made throughout the year, and it is felt it would be
best to enumerate these. In April, 1959, Mr. Lloyd Pisapio and Mr. Peter Bone
joined the staff. Mr. Pisapio came to us from the welfare department of the City
of Trail and was employed immediately in the new probation office set up in Trail
at that time. This move was necessary to cut down the case load handled by Mr.
Brandon in the Nelson office. After a period of orientation in the Vancouver office,
Mr. Bone was transferred to Williams Lake, where a new office was opened.
In May Mr. B. Barton and Mr. M. Armstrong joined the staff. Mr. Barton
was employed as summer relief officer and subsequently was placed in the North
Vancouver office, while Mr. Armstrong assumed responsibility for pre-release planning for trainees released from Haney Correctional Institution under the authority
of the British Columbia Board of Parole.
In June Mr. Richard Boyce joined the staff and has been employed as a Parole
Officer for trainees released from Oakalla Prison Farm. In September Mr. A.
Thorvaldson joined the staff and has been employed in the Vancouver office serving
the Vancouver Magistrates' Courts. Mr. A. L. Langdale, who commenced duties
as a Probation Officer on June 5th, 1951, tendered his resignation to return to the
University of British Columbia to qualify himself for employment in the teaching
profession, believing this profession has a greater future than employment with the
Probation Branch. Mr. Langdale's resignation was accepted with regret, and it
is feared that as time goes on, because of the lack of advancement opportunities
within the Probation Branch, we will lose an increasing number of our senior staff.
In October, 1959, Mr. J. A. H. Kirkpatrick came to the Branch from the Provincial Industrial School for Boys. Since his appointment as a Probation Officer,
Mr. Kirkpatrick has assumed responsibility for pre-release planning for trainees of
the Haney Correctional Institution. In March, 1960, Mr. Raye Cutler joined the
staff and, after a period of orientation in the Vancouver office, was transferred to
Cranbrook to take over from Mr. Evans, who had submitted his resignation.
As at March 31st, 1960, the staff of the Probation Branch was as follows:—
Vancouver office: E. G. B. Stevens, Chief Probation Officer; C. D. Davidson,
Assistant Chief Probation Officer; R. J. Clark, Staff Supervisor; H. W.
Jackson, J. M. Putnam, Miss E. Goodacre, W. J. C. Haines, C. Farmer,
B. McLean, A. Byman, J. A. H. Kirkpatrick, A. Thorvaldson, R. Boyce,
and G. G. Woodhams, Probation Officers; M. G. Stade, Secretary to
British Columbia Board of Parole.
North Vancouver office: B. Barton, Probation Officer.
Burnaby office:  O. J. Walling, Probation Officer.
New Westminster office: O. E. Hollands, K. A. Holt, and B. E. McLean, Probation Officers.
Abbotsford office: N. Fages, Probation Officer.
Chilliwack office:  H. Ziegler, Probation Officer.
Penticton office:  J. Wiebe, Probation Officer.
Vernon office:  D. Guest, Probation Officer.
Nelson office: M. Brandon, Probation Officer.
Cranbrook office: R. Evans, Probation Officer.
 BB 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Kamloops office:   J. Selkirk, Probation Officer.
Prince George office:  R. G. McKellar, Probation Officer.
Prince Rupert office:   St. John Madeley, Probation Officer.
Victoria office:  A. E. Jones and T. A. Blackwood, Probation Officers.
Trail office:  L. Pisapio, Probation Officer.
Nanaimo office:  E. McGougan and B. Savory, Probation Officers.
Courtenay office:  L. Penegar, Probation Officer.
Port Alberni office:   K. Richardson, Probation Officer.
Williams Lake office:  P. Bone, Probation Officer.
The appended statistical report indicates substantial increases in the number
of new probation cases, the number of pre-sentence reports prepared, and the total
number of cases handled by the Branch during the year. A part of this increase may
be attributed to the opening of new Branch offices and the rendering of services to
areas which had not received such services in the past. It is believed, however, that
generally the services of the Branch have been more extensively used by the Magistrates and Juvenile Court Judges during the year.
It must again be noted that case loads in certain areas have become too high
to be adequately handled by one officer, and in the future certain areas, particularly
the Vernon area, will have to be subdivided to provide effective working case loads.
In the report of 1958/59 it was pointed out that certain increases in the supervisory and administrative personnel must be made. Unfortunately, it has not been
possible to make these appointments, and the need for such increases because of the
large staff is more acute than it was a year ago.
Close co-operation has been maintained through the year with the British
Columbia Board of Parole, and as at March 31st, 1960, three officers were employed
in the Vancouver office on a full-time basis doing parole supervision and assisting
in the preparation of release plans for trainees at Oakalla Prison Farm and Haney
Correctional Institution released under the authority of the British Columbia Board
of Parole.
These officers are in attendance at all Parole Board meetings at Oakalla Prison
Farm and Haney Correctional Institution, and it is felt that a high standard of supervision has been given to all parolees responsible to the Branch.
The year under review has been one of increased activity on the part of the
Branch as a whole and, it is felt, effectively demonstrates that the services provided
by the Branch will be used increasingly when the services are available.
In closing, on behalf of the staff of the Branch, I wish to thank the social
agencies, institutions, and Courts for the help and co-operation they have afforded
to the staff of the Branch during the year.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1959/60
Provincial Probation Branch Statistics
BB 23
New
Probation
Cases
New
Follow-up
Cases
Presentence
Reports
Total
Cases
Miscellaneous
1942/43                                	
63
60
46
105
142
158
276
350
455
591
598
688
831
962
1,306
1,431
1,249
1,593
24
56
57
50
61
35
36
28
14
33
46
92
151
186
313
395
468
489
49
54
31
84
117
122
262
349
461
472
638
736
892
965
1,250
1,602
1,468
1,896
136
170
134
239
320
315
574
727
930
1,096
1,282
1,516
1,874
2,113
2,869
3,428
3,203
3,978
1943/44                 	
1944/45 	
1945/46                                                   	
1946/47                                         	
1947/48                                   -	
1948/49- - - 	
1949/50       -                             —	
1950/51 _  - 	
1951/52    	
74
1952/53 _	
178
1953/54                                -
151
1954/55 	
1955/56                          	
238
263
1956/57    _	
206
1957/58- — —
1958/59   _	
1959/60 - _	
80
101
95
10,904
2,534
11,466
24,904
1,406
New Probation Cases
Under
20 Years
20-25
Years
Over 25
Years
Probationers
Married       Single
Total
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952.
1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953.
1st, 1953, to March 31st, 1954.
1st, 1954, to March 31st, 1955.
1st, 1955, to March 31st, 1956
1st, 1956, to March 31st, 1957.
1st, 1957, to March 31st, 1958.
1st, 1958, to March 31st, 1959.
1st, 1959, to March 31st, 1960
Totals  — 	
496
481
527
710
785
1,102
1,193
1,065
1,302
8,835
49
66
79
65
99
109
124
89
131
1,161
46
51
82
56
78
95
114
95
160
908
40
54
83
58
73
99
120
98
168
551
544
605
773
889
1,207
1,311
1,151
1,425
961
9,943
591
598
688
831
962
1,306
1,431
1,249
1,593
10,904
New Follow-up Cases
Under
20 Years
20-25
Years
Over 25
Years
Follow-up Cases
Married
Parolees
Single
Parolees
Total
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
April
1st, 1951,
1st, 1952,
1st, 1953,
1st, 1954,
1st, 1955,
1st, 1956,
1st, 1957,
1st, 1958,
1st, 1959,
Totals
to March 31st,
to March 31st,
to March 31st,
to March 31st,
to March 31st,
to March 31st,
to March 31st,
to March 31st,
to March 31st,
1952-
1953-
1954-
1955-
1956.
1957-
1958-
1959-
1960-
22
37
70
107
151
215
234
293
267
11
9
22
41
33
90
159
169
206
3
2
8
2
6
16
1,661
822
51
109
3
30
1
45
2
90
8
143
5
181
19
294
14
381
13
455
26
463
2,425
33
46
92
151
186
313
395
468
489
2,534
Respectfully submitted.
C D. Davidson,
Assistant Chief Probation Officer.
 BB 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICAL APPENDIX
TOTAL ANNUAL RECEPTIONS (MALE AND FEMALE) AND ANNUAL DAILY POPULATION AVERAGES FOR THE GAOLS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR THE LAST
TEN YEARS.
1,900
1,800
^             1,700
1,600
■
1,500
•
1,400
•
1,300
1,200
c
o
:::;:;::"i:::;:::
1, 100
4_
"I
1,000
o
ft.
900
J~
800
700
_Q
:;
600
■III
■
500
111
400
300
i           200
100
1950-51     1951-52      1952-53      1953-54     1954-55      1955-56       1956-57     1957-58      1958-59     1959-60
Number of receptions:       6,953       7,159
Daily average population:    914 893
8,615 9,184       8,197 8,358
1,052 1,118        1,113 1,143
12,795      14,693      12,806       11,715
1,341 1,423        1,814 1,714
Key.—The number of receptions per year is represented by the bar graph.    The daily population average
for each fiscal year is represented by the line graph.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1959/60
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 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1959/60
2. Accommodation and Population of Correctional Institutions
BB 27
Accommodation
Establishment
Cells
Other
Total
Men
Women
Men
Women
Men
Women
Oakalla Prison Farm—
621
100
16
94
10
360
180
11
288
114
40
29
60
3
113
11
10
4
981
180
11
388
114
40
45
60
97
123
11
N.D.T. units                         	
10
Haney Corectional Institution—
Camps  	
Kamloops—■
4
Forestry Camp.    	
Population
Establishment
Daily
Average
Population
Greatest
Number
Least
Number
Men
Women
Men
Women
Men
Women
Oakalla Prison Farm—
854
144
10
308
94
35
41.6
52.8
87.25
93
2
8
1.9
1,005
187
11
379
112
52
60
110
103
11
10
4
739
117
7
240
41
24
42
54
Women's Gaol  _ ....
53
N.D.T. units
5
Haney Corectional Institution—
Kamloops—
Main building -    	
—
3. Sex
1958/59
1959/60
Increase or
Decrease
11,784
1,082
10,901
874
—883
—208
12,866
11,775
— 1,091
4. Educational Status
Illiterate	
Elementary-
High school-
College or university.
Totals	
718
7,609
4,342
197
12,866
607
7,191
3,814
163
11,775
— 111
—418
-528
—34
-1,091
 BB 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
5. Nationality (Place of Birth)
1958/59
1959/60
Increase or
Decrease
British—
10,592
391
342
9,863
357
354
—729
— 34
+ 12
Totals    	
11,325
289
1,185
40
27
10,574
234
924
20
21
—751
Foreign—
United States— 	
55
261
Orientals  _ 	
Others  _	
-20
6
Totals  — _	
1,541
1,199
-342
6. Racial
White     s 	
10.346
149
2,282
50
39
9,348
111
2,247
41
28
—998
— 38
—35
—9
— 11
12,866
11,775
— 1,091
7. Civil State
Single	
Married —
Widowed—
Separated..
Divorced—
Totals..
7,831
2,196
472
1,879
488
12,866
7,254
1,958
383
1,773
407
11,775
—577
—238
—89
— 106
-81
-1,091
8. Ages
53
1,429
1,478
1,564
3,221
2,577
1,848
696
578
1,065
1,283
1,545
2,886
2,261
1,565
592
+525
19-21 years            . ~ _ _ -   	
—364
21-25    „     _ _   -
— 195
76-30     „
— 19
31-40    „
—335
41-50    „        ..   -      	
—316
51-60   „    _ _ 	
—283
Over 60 years.. „_   _	
— 104
Totals   —	
12,866
11,775
— 1,091
9. Habits as to Use of Alcohol
613
2,612
9,641
495
2,590
8,690
— 118
Temperate    	
—22
-951
12,866
11,775
— 1,091
10. Habits as to Use of Narcotics
12,282
2
582
11,164
56
555
— 1,118
+54
—27
12,866
11,775
— 1,091
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1959/60
BB 29
11. Creeds (on Admission)
--,
1958/59
1959/60
Increase or
Decrease
5,889
2,380
1,021
1,466
310
944
96
160
29
8
19
182
11
351
5,393
2,419
926
1,270
279
756
98
105
13
7
4
176
21
308
—496
+39
-95
— 196
—31
— 188
+2
—55
-16
— 1
Buddhist       _ 1  ..   .  	
—15
Others _.            	
—6
+ 10
—43
Totals	
12,866
11,775
— 1,091
12. Duration of Sentence
7,049
2,090
648
638
615
203
88
361
286
176
3
63
21
404
221
6,098
1,866
594
689
685
278
112
361
302
170
1
43
26
324
226
—951
—224
—54
+51
+70
+75
+24
Sentenced to Penitentiary.. _     	
+ 16
—6
—2
—20
+5
—80
+5
12,866
11,775
— 1,091
13. Previous Convictions
None.
1	
2	
3	
4	
5	
6—	
7	
8	
9	
10	
11	
12 	
13	
14- ...
15	
16	
17 —	
18	
20—	
21-30	
31-40 —
41-50 -
51-60- .
Over 60
Totals .
3,822
1,694
1,008
741
569
430
377
320
295
250
252
228
200
179
169
148
138
123
116
193
524
370
335
106
279
12,866
3,393
1,503
918
608
483
402
345
297
265
201
205
190
173
158
137
127
124
115
114
212
568
421
284
189
343
11,775
—429
-191
-90
-133
—86
-28
—32
-23
-30
—49
—47
—38
—27
—21
—32
—21
— 14
—8
—2
+ 19
+44
+51
—51
+83
+64
1,091~
 BB 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
14. Offences for Which Prisoners Were Committed and Sentenced during the Year
Committed
I
Sentenced
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
(a) Crimes against the Person
4
3
141
138
1
26
2
5
9
19
29
24
3
3
7
4
6
144
145
1
26
2
5
9
19
29
24
4
1
148
136
2
25
1
4
4
13
11
23
3
2
6
4
Abortion         .          .
Assault, common 	
Assault, felonious.- -	
4
150
142
2
25
Shooting with intent    -	
Manslaughter—    	
1
4
4
13
Rape and assault with intent to rape	
11
23
Totals  	
401
13
414
372
11
383
(b) Crimes against Property
6
728
108
115
65
279
12
20
13
18
198
33
36
509
732
13
3
10
14
1
17
3
"I
22
38
6
731
118
129
66
296
12
20
13
18
201
33
37
531
770
13
5
1,000
115
280
113
638
12
32
13
20
268
39
32
578
792
15
3
8
20
1
10
5
1
25
38
5
1,003
Robbery—  —	
123
300
114
648
Conspiracy-    	
Possessing housebreaking instruments         —
12
32
13
20
268
44
33
Theft—
603
Under $50                                  	
830
15
Totals  — —	
2,885
109
2,994
3,952
111
4,063
(c) Crimes against Public Morals and Decency
5
32
8
2
3
1
4
91
7
4
6
19
5
2
1
34
5
32
8
2
3
6
4
93
8
34
4
6
19
11
24
8
3
3
4
3
90
8
4
42
10
1
11
24
8
3
3
Inmates and frequenters of houses of ill-fame
8
3
90
8
42
3
3
18
13
4
18
Totals  	
182
42
224
178
57
235
(d) Crimes against Public Order and Peace
4,794
252
34
366
52
7
14
380
88
1
5
1
5
2
164
23
21
5,174
340
35
371
52
7
15
6
404
67
830
1
289
203
4,858
252
91
612
63
7
22
381
76
1
6
2
4
2
173
17
24
5,239
328
Breaches of by-laws (not including B.L.C.A.)..
92
618
63
Breach of recognizance. _	
7
24
Failing to stop at scene of accident _ 	
6
399
65
666
1
266
182
17
402
69
702
2
279
219
17
406
Obstructing an officer 	
Selling or giving liquor to Indians (not including B.L.C.A.)   .' 	
71
875
2
296
243
Totals.   „	
7,104
690
7,794
7,595
686
8,281
. e) Other Offences Not Enumerated Above
443
20
463
533
28
561
Grand totals of (a), (_>), (e), (d),
and (b)             ■'■'	
11,015
874
11,889
12,630
893
13,523
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1959/60                    BB 31
15. Employment of Prisoners—Daily Average Population
Oakalla Prison Farm
Haney
Correctional
Institution
New
Haven
Kamloops
Prince
George
Main
Prison
Women's
Prison
Camps
Drug
Huts
Main
Inst.
Camps
Main
Bldg.
Camp
1. Manufacturing	
2. Building trades ._.	
3. Vocational training
4. Mechanical services..
5. Farming  —	
6. Forestry _	
7. Domestic services—
Cleaners	
Labourers- 	
Gardeners —. -	
Culinary-workers
Clerks	
Hospital orderlies
Stokers...	
Laundry-workers
8. Unemployable —
9. Unemployed 	
59
32
40
19
35
106
93
14
58
7
2
9
37
158
200
16
2
15
25
10
11
14
13
6
6
96
18
18
id
2
2
4
135
21
94
19
50
40
6
22
4
11
15
14
39
13
1
11
1
31
12
5
10
2
20
6
18
39
12
—
2
1
29
32
14
1
1
1
16
16.  N
UMBER
of Offk
:ers AN
d Employees on March 31st, 1960
Oakalla Pri
son Farm
Haney
Correctional
Institution
New
Haven
Kamloops
Prince
George
Main
Prison
Women's
Prison
Camps
Drug
Huts
Main
Inst.
Camps
Main
Bldg.
Camp
1
1
1
1
1
1
—
1
1
—
Wardens '-
Secretaries  	
Directors	
Chief Matrons	
1
Custodial
Deputy Wardens	
Assistant Deputy Wardens	
Senior Correctional Officers   -	
Senior Prison Guards	
1
5
14
1
1
70
1
11
1
5
32
1
1
6
14
89
20
1
2
4
22
1
i
9
1
9
1
1
11
1
1
1
5
Chief Supervisors	
Supervisors   -	
Matrons ... 	
Guards   	
Temporary Guards
20
Training
Deputy Wardens .. 	
Assistant Deputy Wardens -	
Chaplains  	
1
2
21
1
1
21
1
22
1
1
1
1
—
21
1
—
::::
2i
Housemasters	
Classification Officer
Director of Education ..
Supervisor of Academic
Education 	
Supervisor of Social Ed-
—
Supervisor of Vocational Education
Part time.
2 One part time.
 BB 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
16. Number of Officers and Employees on March 31st, 1960—Continued
- >■•; ..■  1
Oakalla Prison Farm
Haney
Correctional
Institution
New
Haven
Kamloops
Prince
George
Main
Prison
Women's
Prison
Camps
Drug
Huts
Main
Inst.
Camps
Main
Bldg.
Camp
Training—Continued
Supervisor of Classification and Counselling..
Educational Officers	
Vocational Officers
Instructors, Academic
Instructors, Vocational
4
5
3
18
1
1
4
11
6
2
38
2
2
4
6
1
1
1
13
4
—
1
3
4
1
2
15
7
25
1
1
1
1
1
'
3
1
1
'-7   .,
Rehabilitation Officers...
Librarians	
Programme Officers	
-
Supervisors—	
—
Maintenance
Business Managers, Bur-
Foreman of Works	
Chief Engineers—.	
Assistant Chief Engine-
4
2
6
8
4
34
5
31
21
1
3
15
4
1
l1
; —
t
Assistant Chief Stew-
Chief of Mechanical
Maintenance—	
Foreman of Plate-shop.
Foreman Electrician	
Laundry Managers	
Accountants  	
Clerks              	
1
1
1
1
14
7
2
10
9
1
3
6
l1
l1
l1
1
1
7
1
1
Storekeepers  	
Tool Control Officers
Tradesmen 	
Senior Prison Guards.—
Stenographers-     —
Medical
Doctors —
Dentists  	
Psychiatrists — 	
Psychologists —	
Optometrists	
Senior Prison Hospital
Officers _     	
—
Technicians 	
Hospital Officers.	
Matrons.	
1
1 Part time.
 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1959/60
BB 33
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