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Minister of Mines PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT For the Year Ended 31st December 1958 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1960]

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 Minister of Mines
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year Ended 31st December
1958
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1959 BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES
VICTORIA, B.C.
Hon. W. K. Kiernan, Minister.
P. J. Mulcahy, Deputy Minister.
J. W. Peck, Chief Inspector of Mines.
S. Metcalfe, Chief Analyst and Assayer.
Hartley Sargent, Chief, Mineralogical Branch.
K. B. Blakey, Chief Gold Commissioner and Chief Commissioner,
Petroleum and Natural Gas.
J. D. Lineham, Chief, Petroleum and Natural Gas Conservation Branch. To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Mining Industry of the Province for the year 1958 is
herewith respectfully submitted.
W. K. KIERNAN,
Minister of Mines.
Minister of Mines' Office,
May, 1959. John G. Biggs died on January 23rd, 1958, in his eighty-second year.
He was born in 1877 in County Durham, England. He came to Canada in
1905, at the age of 28, and settled first at Wellington on Vancouver Island,
where he found employment with Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited.
Shortly afterwards he moved to Cumberland, where he was employed by the
same company until 1919, when he joined the Department of Mines as
Inspector of Mines. He was stationed at Merritt from 1919 until 1928, when
he was transferred to Princeton. He remained there until his retirement in
1941.
Harry E. Miard died on December 21st, 1958, in New Westminster. He
was born in Paris, France, in 1879, emigrating to Canada in 1897. His
association with coal-mining in British Columbia began in 1901 at Coal Creek.
In 1914 he left the position of overman at Coal Creek to return to France as
a soldier of the Republic. In 1919, shortly after returning to Coal Creek, he
joined the staff of the Inspection Branch of the Department of Mines at
Fernie. His duties as Inspector of Mines and as a member of the Board of
Examiners took him to many of the mining camps of the Province. He retired
at Fernie in 1946. After his retirement he did consulting work for The
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, and The
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company Limited. He held a life membership in the
Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. CONTENTS
Page
Introduction      A 7
Review of the Mineral Industry    A 8
Statistics—
Method of Computing Production  A 10
Table I.—Total Mineral Production for All Years Up to and Including 1958 A 14
Table II.—Production for Each Year from 1836 to 1958, Inclusive  A 14
Table III.—Quantity and Value of Mineral Products for Years 1949 to 1958 A 15
Table IV (Graph).—Mineral Production Value, 1895-1958  A 17
Table V (Graph).—Principal Lode-metals Production, 1913-1958  A 18
Table VI.—Production of Principal Metals, 1858-1958  A 19
Table VHa.—Production, 1957 and 1958, by Mining Divisions—Summary  A 21
Table VHb.—Production, 1957 and 1958, by Mining Divisions—Principal
Lode Metals  A 22
Table Vila—Production, 1957 and 1958, by Mining Divisions—Miscellaneous Metals  A 23
Table VIId.—Production, 1957 and 1958, by Mining Divisions—Industrial
Minerals   A 24
Table VIIe.—Production, 1957 and 1958, by Mining Divisions—Structural
Materials  A 25
Table VIIIa.—Production to Date by Mining Divisions—Summary  A 26
Table VIIIb.—Production to Date by Mining Divisions—Principal Lode
Metals  A 27
Table VIIIc.—Production  to  Date  by  Mining  Divisions—Miscellaneous
Metals   A 28
Table VIIId.—Production to Date by Mining Divisions—Industrial Minerals A 30
Table VHIe.—Production to Date by Mining Divisions—Structural Materials A 32
Table IXa.—Quantity (Gross) and Value of Coal per Year to Date  A 33
Table IXb.—Coal Production (Gross) by Districts and Mining Divisions  A 33
Table IXc—Quantity and Value of Coal Sold and Used, 1948-58  A 34
Table X.—Coke and By-products Production for Years 1895 to 1925 and
1926 to 1958  A 35
Table XL—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1958  A 36
Table XII.—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for Mining Operations
of All Classes  A 40
Table XIII.—Average Number Employed in the Mining Industry, 1901-58.. A 41
Table XIV.—Lode-metal Mines—Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and Gross
Value of Principal Metals, 1901-58  A 42
Table XV.—Lode-metal Production in 1958  A 43
Table XVI.—Lode-metal Mines Employing an Average of Ten or More Men
during 1958  A 48
Departmental Work  A 49
Deputy Minister  A 49
Administration Branch  A 49
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)   A 50
List of Gold Commissioners  A 50
Gold Commissioners' and Mining Recorders' Office Statistics, 1958  A 51
Coal, Petroleum and Natural Gas  A 52
Mining Laws and Laws Relating to the Mineral Industry  A 53
Analytical and Assay Branch  A 53
Inspection Branch  A 54
A 5 A 6 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1958
Departmental Work—Continued pAgb
Mineralogical Branch  A 55
Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch  A 57
Grub-staking Prospectors  A 58
Museums  A 62
Rock and Mineral Specimens  A 63
Publications  A 63
Maps Showing Mineral Claims, Placer Claims, and Placer-mining Leases  A 63
Joint Offices of the British Columbia Department of Mines and the Department of Mines and Technical Surveys, Canada  A 63
Topographic Mapping and Air Photography^  A 64
Department of Mines and Technical Surveys  A 65
Geological Survey of Canada  A 65
Field Work by the Geological Survey in British Columbia, 1958  A 65
Publications of the Geological Survey  A 66
Mines Branch  A 66
Lode Metals  "  1
Reports on Geological, Geophysical, and Geochemical Work  61
Placer   77
Structural Materials and Industrial Minerals  83
Petroleum and Natural Gas  107
Inspection of Lode Mines, Placer Mines, and Quarries  118
Coal  133
Inspection of Electrical Equipment and Installations _'_  156
Lode-metal Deposits Referred to in the 1958 Annual Report  165
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Photographs
Pocket Inlet, Moresby Island   8
Pillow lava lying above limestone, Louise Island  8
Glacier Gulch, Hudson Bay Mountain  12
Packing to the Glacier Gulch showings  12
Bralorne Mines Limited, mill and part of camp  19
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C. Limited, mill  19
Bethlehem Copper Corporation Ltd., 4600 level adit portal  23
Birkett Creek Mine Operators Ltd., Craigmont 3500 level adit portal  23
Cowichan Copper Co. Ltd., mill  58
Sunro Mines Limited, adit portal  58
Nadu River No. 1 well, Graham Island  110
Well head with pump, Fort St. John oilfield  110
Mine-rescue team, Victoria competition  130
Mine-rescue team, Victoria competition  130
Drawings
Figure
1. Bralorne Mines Limited—part of vein system  16
2. Limestone in the Ashcroft-Clinton area  93
3. Limestone in the Merritt area  95
4. Oliver Silica Quarry  106 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTER
OF MINES, 1958
Introduction
A Report of the Minister of Mines of the Province of British Columbia has been
published each year since 1874.
The Annual Report records the salient facts in the progress of the mineral industry,
also much detail about individual operations, including those undertaken in the search
for, exploration of, and development of mineral deposits, as well as the actual winning
of material from mineral deposits.
The Annual Report of the Minister of Mines now contains introductory sections
dealing with Statistics and Departmental Work, followed by sections dealing with Lode
Metals; Placer; Structural Materials and Industrial Minerals; Petroleum and Natural
Gas; Inspection of Lode Mines, Placer Mines, and Quarries; Coal; and Inspection of
Electrical Equipment and Installations at Mines and Quarries, each with its own table of
contents. A table listing the properties described, in geographic groupings, precedes the
index.
An introductory review of the mineral industry and notes at the first of several of
the main sections deal generally with the industry or its principal subdivisions. Notes in
the various sections deal briefly with exploration or production operations during the
year or describe a property in more complete detail, outlining the history of past work
and the geological setting as well as describing the workings and the mineral deposits
exposed in them.   Some notes deal with areas rather than with a single property.
The work of the branches of the Department is outlined briefly in the section on
Departmental Work. This section is followed by notes dealing briefly with the work of
other British Columbia or Federal Government services of particular interest to the
mineral industry of British Columbia. Information concerning mine operations and
some of the activities of the Inspection Branch of the Department of Mines is contained
in the section on Inspection of Lode Mines, Placer Mines, and Quarries, early in the
section on Coal and in the section on Inspection of Electrical Equipment and Installations
at Mines and Quarries.
The section on Statistics begins with an outline of current and past practice in
arriving at quantities and calculating the value of the various products.
A 7 Review of the Mineral Industry, 1958
Production in 1958, the centennial year, brought the accumulated value of the
mineral output of British Columbia well past the 4-billion-dollar mark. The statistics
of mineral production for 1858 show only coal valued at a few thousand dollars and
placer gold valued at $705,000. For 1958, thirty-eight items are listed—fifteen under
metals, seven under industrial minerals, thirteen under structural materials, and three
under fuels. Their combined value is $146,875,081, placer gold and coal combined
contributing slightly more than 4 per cent of the total.
Lead contributed 23.6 per cent and zinc 29.4 per cent of the value of 1958 mineral
output. Fourteen other products each contributed from 1 to 6 per cent. It is noteworthy
that asbestos contributed 5.2 per cent of the total value, being greater than gold, silver,
and copper, which ranged from 4.6 to 2 per cent of the total value. Although still a
relatively small item, natural-gas output contributed 2.6 per cent of the 1958 total value.
The part of total value contributed by each group of mineral products in 1958 was:
Principal metals, 63.8 per cent; other metals, 7.2 per cent; industrial minerals, 8.0 per
cent; structural materials, 13.6 per cent; fuels, 7.4 per cent. The details of prices,
quantities of minerals produced, and values are found in tables on pages A 13 to A 48.
The value of mineral output for 1958 was materially less than that of recent years
because of reduced prices for copper, lead, and zinc, and reduced output of gold, silver,
copper, coal, and several other products. Increases were recorded for iron ore, petroleum,
and natural gas. Mine closures in 1957 and the closing of six mines in 1958 account for
the reduction in quantity of gold, silver, copper, tungsten, and coal. The values for the
" principal metals " and the " other metals " groups were much below the 1953-57
average and the 1957 figures; consequently the percentages contributed by metals were
also reduced. Industrial minerals and structural materials have been increasing in value,
and their 1958 values, although less than those of 1957, exceeded the 1953-57 averages.
The 1958 value for fuel exceeded the five-year average, increases in natural gas and
petroleum more than offsetting the decline in coal output.
The quantity of lead exceeded the average of the preceding five years by about 2
per cent, and that of zinc exceeded the five-year average by 6 per cent, but the combined
value of the two metals was 12.6 million dollars below the five-year average. Copper
output was reduced sharply compared with recent years. Although there were considerable changes in the output of individual gold mines, their combined output in 1958 was
approximately the same as in 1957. However, in comparison with recent years, little
gold was won from ores yielding one or more of the metals copper, lead, and zinc as the
main product or as principal products. In 1957 such ores yielded about a sixth of the
total gold. Silver output was reduced similarly, although at several mines silver output
increased with lead output. The value of the " principal metals " group declined more
than $18,000,000 from the 1957 figure. Commercial production of nickel was recorded
for the first time; production was started in January and suspended in August. Tungsten
production was suspended in August. Iron-ore production was materially greater than
in 1957, one producer having operated throughout the year and the other for about nine
months. Texada Mines Limited, recovering a copper-gold concentrate as a by-product
in concentrating iron ore, and Cowichan Copper, milling ore for the first time, contributed
more than half the copper output.
In the " structural materials " field a substantial increase in cement-making capacity
was achieved when the plant of Lafarge Cement of North America Ltd. on Lulu Island
began operating in January, but the Provincial output for the year was somewhat less
than in 1957.
Production of coal was much below the 1957 output, but oil production increased
by a half and the 1958 output of natural gas was about eight times that of 1957.
A 8 REVIEW OF THE MINERAL INDUSTRY A 9
The number of lode-mineral claims recorded in 1958, a measure of exploration
activity, was 13, 459, compared with 12,110 in 1957. Lode-mine exploration increasingly
is carried on by large companies doing geological, geophysical, and geochemical work,
stripping with heavy equipment, diamond drilling, and often meeting transportation
problems by using fixed-wing aircraft or helicopters. These procedures contrast with
the traditional ones that were responsible for most lode discoveries in the past. Except
for the Cassiar property, the new mines of the post-war period are old discoveries which
determined and intelligent effort and increased prices have made profitable sources of
mineral wealth.
Interest has been shown in a wide range of minerals, including asbestos, barite,
gypsum, limestone, magnesite, and silica, in addition to the metals that have been the
main contributors of mineral wealth. Exploration in the Merritt-Highland Valley area
indicates large reserves of copper, with substantial quantities of good milling grade and
very large quantities of low-grade material. Copper mineralization on Racing River
and Toad River in the northeastern part of the Province received preliminary exploration.
Further work was done on the Boss Mountain molybdenum property, and low-grade
molybdenum-bearing material at Glacier Gulch received preliminary testing.
Exploration for oil and gas was carried on actively mainly in northeastern British
Columbia, where the area of interest has broadened, as indicated by a considerable
enlargement of the area held under permit. Interest was not confined to northeastern
British Columbia. More than 2,700,000 acres of land on Graham Island and off the
east coast of the Island was taken under permit, and near the end of 1958, 12,700,000
acres in the Skeena Mountains, and a further 445,000 acres lying to the southeast, were
taken under permit. Five wells between 1,800 and 6,000 feet in depth were drilled and
abandoned along the east coast of Graham Island.
More than forty drilling rigs were operated in 1958, and 484,287 feet of drilling
was done on 112 wells, of which, at the end of the year, one was suspended and twenty
were drilling, fifty-one had been abandoned, seventeen had been completed as oil wells,
and twenty-three as gas wells. Two of the oil-well completions and nine gas-well
completions were wildcat wells. These additions and some revisions brought the number
of oil wells to thirty-nine and gas wells to 148. Most of the wells drilled, including sixty
wildcat wells and all wells successfully competed, are in northeastern British Columbia.
The West Coast Transmission Company pipe-line was operated for the full year.
Gas production from sixty-nine wells amounted to 64,051,785,000 cubic feet, and oil
production from twenty-eight wells amounted to 512,359 barrels. At Taylor, on the
Peace River, the McMahon gas scrubbing plant and adjoining refinery and sulphur
recovery plant produce dry sweet gas for transmission, having recovered liquid condensate
and sulphur. Refining the condensate yields propane, butane, finished motor and
aviation fuels, kerosene, and diesel oil.
Revenue to the Government from petroleum and natural gas amounted to
$9,472,200.74, including fees, rentals, and miscellaneous, $4,326,288.54; tender
bonuses, $4,510,123.14; and royalties on gas, oil, and processed products, $635,809.06.
The average number employed through 1958 in placer, lode, coal, industrial-
minerals and structural-material mining was 11,201. Major expenditures by those
branches of the industry included: Salaries and wages, $45,035,287; fuel and electricity,
$7,922,163; process supplies (inclusive of explosives, chemicals, drill-steel, lubricants,
etc.), $13,215,371; Federal taxes, $6,062,698; Provincial taxes, $1,847,466; municipal and other taxes, $1,925,952; levies for workmen's compensation (including silicosis), unemployment insurance, and other items, $1,782,744. Dividends amounted to
$14,966,123. The lode-mining industry spent $27,614,725 in freight and treatment
charges on ores and concentrates. A 10 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1958
The recorded expenditures of the petroleum and natural-gas industry amounted to
$39,980,479, of which $31,507,890 was for exploration and included $14,897,919 for
exploratory drilling. The expenditures recorded included for salaries and wages,
$3,898,271; for fuel and electricity, $158,876; and for process supplies, $1,837,665.
The total number reported employed on December 31st, 1958, was 846.
Statistics
The statistics of the mineral industry are collected and compiled and the statistical
tables for this Report are prepared by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce.
In the 1951 Report, extensive rearrangements of tables and of their order were
made. The tables in the present Report closely parallel those presented in Reports for
years preceding 1951, but additional details have been incorporated, and the present order
is considered to make more apparent the relationship between summary tables and the
tables giving the details summarized.
In the 1958 Report, adjustments have been made to bring lead and zinc production
figures into line with the best information available. The changes are reflected in Tables
I, II, III, VI, VIIa, VIIb, VIIIa, VIIIb, and in the gross-value figure in Table XIV.
The gross-value figures have also been corrected to include early production of iron,
mercury, and tungsten so that Table XIV now records the tonnage from all lode-mining
operations year by year beginning with 1901 and also records the gross value of the
principal metals; however, it does not record the value of by-product metals antimony,
bismuth, cadmium, indium, and tin, contributing a minor part of value of the output of
any mine.
METHOD OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION
The tables of statistics recording the mineral production of the Province for each
year are compiled from certified returns made by the operators, augmented by some data
obtained from the Royal Canadian Mint and from the operators of customs smelters.
The value of each mineral product, in Canadian funds, is calculated at the average price
for the year {see p. A 13). The quantities of metals are net after making deductions for
losses in smelting and refining.
Metals
Prior to 1925 the average prices for gold and copper are true average prices, but,
as a means of correcting for losses in smelting and refining, the prices of other metals
were taken at the following percentages of the year's average price for the metal: Silver,
95 per cent; lead, 90 per cent; and zinc, 85 per cent. For 1925 and subsequent years
the value has been calculated using the true average price and the net metal contents, in
accordance with the procedures adopted by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and the
co-operating Provincial Departments of Mines.
Beginning with the Annual Report for 1948, production figures for individual lode-
mining operations are the assay contents of the products shipped (ore, concentrates, or
bullion), no deductions being made for losses in smelting and refining. In previous
Annual Reports the production figures given for individual properties are net, after
deductions for smelting and refining losses.
Placer Gold
The data on placer-gold production were very largely obtained from the Gold Commissioners until 1925. The value of placer gold in dollars is now obtained from returns
received annually from the operators.   At the old standard price, $20.67 per ounce of STATISTICS A 11
fine gold, $17 was regarded as a close approximation of the average value per ounce of
crude placer gold produced in British Columbia. Dividing the production reported in
dollars by 17 gave the equivalent in crude ounces. The average value $17 per ounce is
equivalent to a fineness of 822V£. Beginning with 1932 the average value per crude
ounce has been based on the same fineness but has recognized the varying price of gold.
The average price per ounce of crude placer gold for the year is listed on page A 13.
Lode Metals, Gross and Net Contents
The gross contents are the gold and silver contents of bullion and for ores and
concentrates the total assay contents, obtained by multiplying the assay by the weight.
The quantities for gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc in Table XV and in " Notes on
Metal Mines " are gross.
Calculations of the value of production are based on the total assay content for gold
and on net content for the other principal metals. These are: In lead ores and concentrates and zinc concentrates, for silver 98 per cent, lead 95 per cent, and zinc 85 per cent
of the total assay content; and in copper concentrates, 95 per cent of the silver and the
total assay content of copper less 10 pounds per ton of concentrates. Quantities for
silver, lead, zinc, and copper in Tables I to VIII, inclusive, are net.
Average Metal Prices
In the interests of uniformity the Statistical Bureaux of the Provinces and the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics use the same average metal prices in valuing mineral
production. Up to and including the year 1939 the prices used in evaluating metal and
mineral production were:—
Gold and silver:   The average United States price for the year, as quoted in
the Engineering and Mining Journal, converted into Canadian funds at
the average exchange rate.
Copper, lead, and zinc:  For lead and zinc, the average London Metal Market
price for the year converted into Canadian funds at the average exchange
rate;  for copper, until 1932 the New York price for copper was used,
thereafter the average London Metal Market price was used.
Suspension of trading on the London Metal Exchange in September, 1939, and the
controls of metals during the war years necessitated changes from the procedures which
had been followed.
The method of arriving at the price for gold continued unchanged, but the prices for
the metals controlled were those set by the Canadian Metals Controller. In 1945 the
controls were largely removed from sales but not from prices. Control of metal prices
ended on June 6th, 1947. For 1945 and subsequent years the prices are those computed
by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, using information supplied by the principal
Canadian refiners of silver and the base metals.
In the period 1945-47 the prices received for silver, lead, and zinc sold for use in
Canada were substantially less than the prices received for these metals exported to the
United States. The prices for silver in 1945 and 1946 and for copper, lead, and zinc in
1946 and 1947 are weighted averages, taking into consideration sales in Canada at the
ceiling prices and sales abroad at New York prices converted into Canadian funds.
Prices are now arrived at by the methods as given in the footnotes to table of average
prices on page A 13.
Fuel
Coal
In 1926 a change was made in computing coal and coke statistics. The practice in
former years had been to list as coke production only the coke made in bee-hive ovens, A 12 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1958
the coal used in making it not being listed; coke made in by-product ovens was not
listed as coke, but the coal used in making this coke was credited as coal production.
The result was that both the coal and the coke production figures were incomplete.
Starting with the 1926 Annual Report, the standard practice of the Bureau of Statistics,
Ottawa, was adopted. This consists of crediting all coal produced, including that used
in making coke, as primary mine production. Coke-making is considered a manufacturing industry. As the data are of interest to the mining industry, Table X is included
in the Report to show the total coke produced in the Province, together with by-products,
and the values given by the producers. The pre-1926 data have now been reworked and
brought into conformity with current practice. Table IXa lists the full mine output
(gross) produced and its net value, and these figures are incorporated in Table I, in the
total mine production for the Province. Table X gives the complete data for coke, gas,
and by-products manufactured for the period 1895 to 1925, and for each year subsequent
to 1925.
Up to and including the year 1947, production was recorded in long tons (2,240
pounds). Beginning in 1948, production is given in short tons (2,000 pounds). The
quantity of coal produced in the preceding years has been recalculated in short tons.
The average price for coal, listed year by year {see p. A 13), is the total value
divided by the quantity. Up to and including 1945, the quantity is the gross mine output;
for 1946 and subsequent years, the quantity is the quantity sold and used. For 1946 and
subsequent years, the value (Tables I, III, VIIa, IXa, IXb, and IXc) is the amount
realized from sales of coal, at colliery loading points, plus the colliery valuation of coal
used under companies' boilers and in making coke. For 1946 and subsequent years the
quantity sold and used is shown in Table IXc. " Use " includes coal used under company
stationary and locomotive boilers, and used in making coke. Washery loss and changes in
stocks, year by year, are shown in the table " Collieries of British Columbia, Production and Distribution by Collieries and by Districts," page 135 of this Report.
Natural Gas
Commercial production of natural gas began in 1954. The production shown in
Tables I, III, VIIa, and VHIa is the total dry and residue gas sold. The figures are
compiled from the monthly disposition report and Crown royalty statement filed with the
Department of Mines by the producer. The quantity is reported as thousands of cubic
feet at standard conditions (14.4 pounds per square inch pressure, 60° F. temperature).
Petroleum
Commercial production of petroleum began in 1956. The figures shown in Tables
I, III, VIIa, and VIIIa are compiled from the monthly disposition report and Crown
royalty statement filed with the Department of Mines by the producer. The quantity
is reported in barrels (35 imperial gallons=l barrel). STATISTICS
A 13
Average Prices Used in Valuing Provincial Production of Gold,
Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, and Coal
Year
Gold.i
Crude.
Oz.
Gold,
Fine,
Oz.
Silver.
Fine.
Oz.
Copper.
Lb.
Lead,
Lb.
Zinc.
Lb.
Coal,
Short
Ton
1901	
$
17.00
19.30
23.02
28.37
28.94
28.81
28.77
28.93
29.72
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
30.22
28.78
28.78
29.60
31.29
30.30
28.18
28.31
27.52
28.39
28.32
27.89
27.94
$
20.67
	
23.47
28.60
34.50
35.19
35.03
34.99
35.18
36.14
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.80
38.50
36.75
35.00
35.00
36.00
38.05
36.85
34.27
34.42
34.07
34.52
34.44
33.55
33.98
Cents
56.002 N.Y.
49.55  „
50.78 „
53.36 „
51.33  .,
63.45
62.06
50.22  „
48.93
50.812 ,,
80.64 „
57.79 „
56.80 „
52.10  „
47.20  „
62.38
77.35  „
91.93  „
105.57  „
95.80  „
59.52  „
64.14  „
61.63  „
63.442 „
69.065 „
62.107 ..
56.37 „
58.176 „
52.993 „
38.154 „
28.700 „
31.671 „
37.832 „
47.461 „
64.790 „
45.127 ,.
44.881 .,
43.477 ..
40.488 „
38.249 „
38.261 „
41.166 .,
45.254 ..
43.000 „
47.000 „
83.650 „
72.000 „
75.000 Mont.
74.250 U.S.
80.635 „
94.58  „
83.187 „
83.774 „
82.982 ,.
87.881 „
89.373 „
87.087 „
86.448 „
Cents
16.11 N.Y.
11.70  „
13.24
12.82  „
15.59
19.28  „
20.00  „
13.20  „
12.98
12.738 „
12.38
16.341 „
15.27 „
13.60  „
17.28 „
27.202 ,,
27.18
24.63
18.70  ,,
17.45
12.50  „
13.38 „
14.42  .,
13.02  „
14.042 „
13.795 „
12.92
14.570 „
18.107 „
12.982 ,.
8.116 .,
6.380 Lond.
7.454 „
7.419 „
7.795 „
9.477 „
13.078 „
9.972 „
10.092 „
10.086 „
10.086 „
10.086 „
11.75  „
12.000 „
12.550 „
12.80  „
20.39 „
22.35 U.S.
19.973 „
23.428 „
27.70
31.079 „
30.333 „
29.112 „
38.276 „
39.787 „
26.031 „
23.419 „
Cents
2.577 N.Y.
3.66 „
3.81  „
3.88
4.24  „
4.81  „
4.80  „
3.78  „
3.85
4.00  „
3.98  „
4.024 ,,
3.93
3.50  „
4.17  „
6.172 „
7.91
6.67 „
5.19  „
7.16  „
4.09
5.16  „
6.54
7.287 „
7.848 Lond.
6.751 „
5.256 „
4.575 „
5.050 „
3.927 „
2.710 ,,
2.113 ,,
2.391 „
2.436 „
3.133 „
3.913 „
5.110 „
3.344 „
3.169 „
3.362 „
3.362 ,,
3.362 ,.
3.754 „
4.500 „
5.000 „
6.750 ,,
13.670 „
18.040 ,.
15.800 U.S.
14.484 ,.
18.4
16.121 „
13.265 „
13.680 „
14.926 „
15.756 „
14.051 „
11.755 „
Cents
$
2 679
1902	
1903	
1904	
1905	
1906	
1907	
1908	
1909	
1910	
4.60 B. St. L.
4.90  „
5.90  „
4.80  .,
4.40  .,
11.25  .,
10.88  „
7.666 „
6.94 „
6.24  „
6.52  „
3.95 .,
4.86  „
5.62  „
5.39  ..
7.892 Lond.
7.409 „
6.194 „
5.493 „
5.385 „
3.599 „
2.554 „
2.405 ,.
3.210 ,.
3.044 ..
3.099 „
3.315 „
4.902 „
3.073 ..
3.069 „
3.411 „
3.411 „
3.411 „
4.000 „
4.300 „
6.440 ..
7.810 „
11.230 „
13.930 „
13.247 U.S.
15.075 „
19.9
15.874 ..
10.675 ..
10.417 „
12.127 „
13.278 „
11.175 „
10.009 „
1911	
1912	
1913	
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919	
1920	
1921	
1922 „.
1923 „.
1924	
1925	
1926	
1927	
1928	
1929	
1930	
1931	
4.018
3.795
1932	
1933	
1934	
1935	
1936	
1937	
1938	
1939	
1940	
1941	
1942	
1943	
1944	
1945	
1946	
4.68
5.12
6.09
6.51
6.43
6.46
6.94
6.88
1947	
1948	
1949	
1950	
1951	
1952	
1953	
1954	
7 00
1955	
6.74
1956	
6.59
1957  	
6.76
1958	
7.45
1 Unrefined placer gold, average price per ounce, is taken as $17 divided by $20.67 times the price of an ounce of
fine gold.
Prices for fine gold are the Canadian Mint buying prices. Prices for other metals are those of the markets indicated,
converted into Canadian funds. The abbreviations are: Mont.=Montreal; N.Y.=New York; Lond.=London; E. St. L.
=East St. Louis;  and U.S.=United States.
Prior to 1925 the prices for gold and copper are true average prices, but the prices of other metals were taken at
the following percentages of the year's average price for the metal: Silver, 95 per cent; lead, 90 per cent; and zinc,
85 per cent.
For coal see last paragraph under " Fuel," page A 12.
The bases for the prices listed are discussed in detail on pages A 11 and A 12. A 14 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1958
Table I.—Total Mineral Production for All Years Up to and Including 1958
Total Quantity        Total Value     Quantity, 1958    Value, 1958
lh,
        lb.
1h.
Coal4   .                 _         	
Petroleum, crude5—	
  bbls.
Totals.
5.
15.
410
2,929.
12,577.
10,259,
205,946
330,565
144,046
310,734
660,683
550,396
141
72
1
382,685
.744,107
002,340
$96,113,030
441,792,116
246,148,046
479,655,119
911,051,022
816,745,894
140,475,311
88,054,493
268,696,444
546,146,500
4,326,924
2,071,418
| $4^)41 ;276,317~
5.650
194,354
7,040,416
12,658,649
294,573,159
432,002,790
796,413
64,051,785
512,359
$157,871
6,604,149
6,086,299
2,964,529
34,627,075
43,234,839
10,575,795
11,763,473
19,999,576
5,937,860
3,915,239
1,008,376
|$146,875,081
1 For individual miscellaneous metals, see Tables HI and VIIIc, pages A15 and A 28.
2 For individual industrial minerals, including sulphur, see Tables III and VIIId, pages A 15 and A 30.
3 For individual structural materials, see Tables III and VIIlE, pages A 15 and A 32.
4 Total quantity is gross mine output;  it includes material discarded in picking and washing.   The quantity shown
for 1958 is that sold and used (see also Table IXc.)
5 Includes 582 barrels produced for test purposes in 1955, no value assigned.
Table II.—Production for Each Year from 1836 to 1958, Inclusive
1836-95 (incl.)
1896	
1897	
1898	
1899	
1900	
1901	
1902	
1903	
1904	
1905	
1906	
1907	
1908	
1909	
1910	
1911	
1912	
1913	
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919	
1920	
1921	
1922	
1923	
1924 :__-_
1925	
1926	
1927	
$95,355,010
7,507,956
10,455,268
10,906,861
12,429,707
16,344,751
19,671,572
17,486,550
17,495,954
18,977,359
22,600,525
24,997,646
25,928,660
23,950,573
24,443,025
26,377,066
23,499,072
32,440,800
30,296,398
26,388,825
29,447,508
42,290,462
37,010,392
41,782,474
33,296,313
35,543,084
28,066,641
35,162,843
41,304,320
48,704,604
61,492,242
67,188,842
60,729,358
1928   $65,372,583
68,791,020
55,769,578
35,247,837
28,803,214
32,652,542
42,481,319
48,886,303
54,179,442
74,475,902
64,485,551
65,707,398
75,121,424
77,514,446
76,699,878
67,204,417
54,740,844
62,070,548
72,453,745
1947   112,582,204
1948   145,517,874
1949   132,956,254
1950   139,837,689
1951   176,330,205
1952   171,309,429
1953   153,193,544
1954   153,383,860
1955   174,710,606
1956   190,084,302
1957   172,264,617
1958   146,875,081
1929-
1930-
193L
1932-
1933
1934-
1935
1936
1937-
1938-
1939.
1940.
194L
1942-
1943-
1944-
1945-
1946
Total—$4,041,276,317
Note.—For revisions to lead and zinc production see footnote 3, Table VI. STATISTICS
A 15
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>z STATISTICS
A 33
Table IXa.—Quantity (Gross1) and Value of Coal per Year to Date
Year
Tons
(2,000 Lb.)
Value
Year
Tons
(2,000 Lb.)
Value
1836-59
41,871
15,956
15,427
20,292
23,906
32,068
36,757
28,129
34,988
49,286
40,098
33,424
55,4582
55,4582
55,4592
91,334
123,362
155,895
172,540
191,348
270,257
299,708
255,760
315,997
238,895
441,358
409,468
365,832
462,964
548.017
649,411
759,518
1,152,590
925,495
1,095,690
1,134,509
1,052,412
1,002,268
999,372
1,263,272
1,435,314
1,781,000
1,894,544
1,838,621
1,624,742
1,887,981
2,044,931
2,126,965
2,485,961
2,362,514
2,688,672
$149,548
56,988
55,096
72,472
85,380
115,528
131,276
100,460
124,956
176,020
143,208
119,372
164,612
164,612
164,612
244,641
330,435
417,576
462,156
522,538
723,903
802,785
685,171
846,417
639,897
1,182,210
1,096,788
979,908
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,824,687
2,693,961
2,734,522
3,582,595
4,126,803
4,744,530
5,016,398
4,832,257
4,332,297
4,953,024
5,511,861
5,548,044
7,637,713
7,356,866
8,574,884
1Q10
3,515,944
2,573,444
3,388,795
2,879,251
2,426,399
2,209,290
2,783,849
2,686,561
2,888,170
2,698,022
3,020,387
2,877,995
2,890,625
2,848,146
2.226.037
2,737,607
2,609,640
2,748,286
2,829,906
2,521,402
,  2,113,586
1,912,501
1,719,172
1,416,516
1,508,741
1,330,524
1,508,048
1,618,051
1,466,559
1,655.217
1,867,966
2,018,635
2,170,737
2,040,253
2.165.676
1,700,914
1,639,277
1.923.573
1,809,018
1,917,296
1,756,667
1,824,384
1,650,619
1,576,105
1,447.608
1,484,066
1,589,398
1,221,766
882,962
$11,108,335
1860       	
1861             	
1911 	
1912 -	
1913      	
1914	
1915	
1916.. 	
8,071,747
10,786,812
1862
1863 _ 	
9,197,460
7,745,847
1864	
7,114,178
1865
8,900,675
1866  	
1917 --
1918	
1919 __._	
8,484,343
1867
12,833,994
1868
11,975,671
1869  	
1920--	
1921- -
1922   	
13,450,169
1870. .
1871
12,836,013
12,880,060
1872
1923  _ .
12,678,548
1873
1924                      -   .
9,911,935
1874
1925	
12,168,905
1875 .-.   	
1926 	
1927 ~~
1928— 	
1929 -
1930 -	
1931  -	
1932 	
11,650,180
1876
12,269,135
1877	
12,633,510
1878  	
11,256,260
1879 _	
9,435,650
1880  _
7,684,155
1881
6,523,644
1882	
1933 	
1934	
1935	
1936 - -	
1937	
1938  -	
1939 .......
1940-  - —
1941	
5,375,171
1883..	
5,725,133
1884	
5,048,864
1885- -	
5,722,502
1886  	
1887-.	
6,139,920
5,565,069
1888 	
1889 	
6,280,956
7,088,265
1890
7,660,000
1891
1942...
1943  -
8,237,172
1892
7,742,030
1893             	
1944	
1945- —
1946  	
8,217,966
1894   	
6,454,360
1895
6,732,470
1896 -	
1897
1947—	
1948  -
8,680,440
9,765,395
1898
1949 -	
10,549,924
1899
1950 -	
10,119 303
1900	
1951	
1952 	
1953  	
1954 _	
1955 	
10,169,617
1901         	
9,729,739
1902             	
9,528,279
9 154 544
1903
1904 	
8,986,501
1905
1956
9,346,518
7 340 339
1906      	
1957    -	
1958  —
Totals  	
1907
5,937,860
1909	
141,382,685
$546,146,500
Table IXb.—Coal Production (Gross1) by Districts and Mining Divisions
District and Mining Division
Vancouver Island District
Nanaimo Mining Division 	
Nicola-Princeton District
Kamloops Mining Division	
Nicola Mining Division	
Osoyoos Mining Division	
Similkameen Mining Division -
District totals	
Northern District
Cariboo Mining Division	
Liard Mining Division	
Omineca Mining Division—
District totals	
East Kootenay District
Fort Steele Mining Division...
Provincial totals   ...
Total to Date
Period
1836-1958
1893-1945
1907-1958
1926-1927
1909-1958
Quantity
Value
Tons
79,867,359
14,995
2,928,915
1,122
4,652,979
295,835,663
59,765
11,071,191
5,008
19,532,872
1893-1958 |      7,598,011 |    30,668,836
1942-1944
1923-1958
1918-1958
290
89,837
411,757
1,100
606,290
2,535,143
1918-1958 I 501,884 | 3,142,533
1898-1958
53,415,431
216,499,468
1836-1958 I 141,382,685 I 546,146,500
1957
Quantity        Value
1958
Tons
200,205
1,081
17,696
18,777
3,158
4,991
1,849,306
11,615
' 92,748
104,363
28,421
47,414
8,149 I      75,835
994,635
5,310,835
Quantity
Value
Tons
182,304
$
1,615,490
543
5,919
146
1,122
689 I
7,041
1,221,766 I 7,340,339
3,094 I       28.738
 5,233 | 44,972
8,327 I 73,7KT
I
691.642 | 4,241,619
882,962 I 5,937,860"
1 Gross mine output, including washery loss and coal used in making coke (see Table X and discussion under
"Fuel," page A 12).
2 A combined total for 1871, 1872, and 1873 has previously been noted in Annual Reports and the above breakdown
is estimated.
B Table IXc—Quantity1 and Value of Coal Sole
and Used,2 1948
-58
Year
District and Mining
Division
Total
Sales2*
Used
under
Companies'
Boilers2t
Used in
Making
Coke2t
Total Sold
and Used2
District Totals,
1958
Tons
Tons
Tons
Tons
$
Tons
154,296
689
7,871
633,557
S
1,615,490
1948
Nan
365,328
451,074
472,690
391,687
267,346
204.931
181,534
173,861
172,140
163,574
153,892
"TV'tV
1,672
1,125
899
1,139
1,040
1,256
1,259
1,170
1,081
543
49,859
49,906
16,784
3,941
6,306
7,047
29,713
73,475
72,102
17,696
146
2,801
3,925
4,329
3,425
2,986
1,798
536
463
389
439
404
368,129
454,999
477,019
395,112
270.332
206.729
182,070
174,326
172,529
164,013
154,296
3,219.868
4;055,572
4.060,337
3,486,615
2,749,206
2,059,828
2,029,099
1,769,682
1,629,168
1,849,306
1,615,490
1949
1950
*
1951
'
1952
'
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
Nicola
Nice
Sim
North!
'
1958
-Princeton	
7,041
1948
1,777
1,672
1,125
899
1,139
1,040
1,256
1,259
1,170
1,081
543
49,859
49,906
16,784
3,941
6,306
7,047
29,713
73,475
72,102
17,096
146
15,281
14,809
9,926
8,640
11,493
10,400
12,769
12,904
12,092
11,615
5,919
299,387
298,293
87,483
28,094
48,760
51,012
138,080
379,511
366,820
92,748
1,122
1950
1951
1953
	
1954
1955
*
1956
'
	
1957
'
1958
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
lkameen	
'
	
*
	
*
'
73,710
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
A
8,570
12,364
12,250
3,199
3,854
4,815
4,359
3,650
4,642
2,758
3,194
10.920
11,468
13,037
27,904
37,270
42,079
36,572
30.015
8,553
4,991
4,677
60
8,030
12,364
12,250
3,199
3,854
4,835
4.359
3,650
4,642
2,758
3,194
10,986
11,531
13,099
27,904
37,270
42,079
36,572
30,015
8,553
4,991
4,677
52,721
76,697
82,258
26,095
42,606
50,895
33.079
32,850
38,211
28,421
28,738
85,981
92,865
104,790
206,799
285,732
324,986
292,862
227,010
71,234
47,414
44,972
Om
EastK
Fort
Proviri
■
•
•
•
20
•
*
*
66
63
62
,    	
'
*
1957
*
4,241,619
990,530
842,979
825,315
889,669
822,071
878,865
820.081
803,125
890,100
677,534
401,875
20,227
19,025
15,196
15,977
15,813
12,729
15,310
16,560
19,518
17,830
7,274
154,342
228,792
213,218
236,871
245,528
230,814
218.923
230,464
248,595
199,754
224,408
1,165,099
1,090,796
1,053,729
1,142,517
1,083,412
1,122.408
1,054,314
1,050,149
1,158,213
895,118
633,557
6,092,157
6,011,688
5,774,509
6,413,374
6,591,942
7,031,158
6,648,655
6,564,544
7,228,993
5,310,835
4,241,619
*
1951
1952
*
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
t
1948
cial totals	
1,426,984
1,369,463
1,341,201
1,317,299
1,137,986
1,138,777
1,073,515
1,085,385
1,148,707
867,634
564,327
23,154
23,013
19,587
19,402
18,799
14,547
15,846
17,025
19,907
18,269
7,878
154,342
228,792
213,218
236,871
245,528
230.814
218,923
230,464
248,595
199,754
224,408
1,604,480
1,621,268
1,574,006
1,573,572
1,402,313
1,384,138
1,308,284
1,332,874
1,417,209
1,085,657
796,413
9,765,395
10,549,924
10,119,303
10,169.617
9,729,739
9,528,279
9,154.544
8,986,501
9,346,518
7,340,339
5,937,860
796,413
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
*
1957
19B8
,      	
5,937,860
1 For differences between gross mine output and coal sold refer to table " Production and Distribution by Collieries
and by Districts" in section headed "Coal" or "Coal-mining" in Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines.
2 The totals " sold and used " include:—
• Sales to retail and wholesale dealers, industrial users, and company employees.
t Coal used in company boilers, including steam locomotives.
t Coal used in making coke.
See also discussion under " Fuel," page A 12.
A 34 STATISTICS
A 35
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S.S A 36
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1958
Table XI.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1958
Dividends Paid during 1957 and 1958
1957
$374,100
176,666
Bralorne Mines Ltd	
Canadian Collieries Resources Ltd.	
Cassiar Asbestos Corporation Ltd.	
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co.
of Canada, Ltd.	
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. Ltd	
Highland-Bell Ltd	
Pioneer Gold Mines of B. C. Ltd	
Reeves MacDonald Mines Ltd.	
Others 	
22,113,425
372,708
78,293
218,968
292,250
621,010
1958
$374,100
760,000
13,104,257
372,708
78,293
292,250
14,515
Totals
$24,247,420     $14,996,123
Dividends Paid Yearly, 1917 to 1958, Inclusive
Year Amount Paid
1917  $3,269,494
1918  2,704,469
1919  2,494,283
1920  1,870,296
1921  736,629
1922  3,174,756
1923  2,983,570
1924  2,977,276
1925._
1926-
1927-
1928„
1929
  5,853,419
  8,011,137
  8,816,681
  9,572,536
  11,263,118
1930  10,543,500
1931  4,650,857
1932  2,786,958
1933  2,471,735
1934  4,745,905
1935  7,386,070
1936  10,513,705
1937  15,085,293
1938  12,068,875
Year Amount Paid
1939  $11,865,698
___ 14,595,530
_ 16,598,110
___ 13,627,104
_ 11,860,159
11,367,732
_ 10,487,395
___ 15,566,047
___ 27,940,213
_ 37,672,319
___ 33,651,096
___ 34,399,330
1951_   40,921,238
1952  32,603,956
1953  22,323,089
1954  25,368,262
1955  35,071,583
1956  36,262,682
1957  24,247,420
1958  14,996,123
1940_
1941____
1942—
1943™
1944___.
1945—
1946_
1947___.
1948_.
1949_.
1950__
Total.  $605,405,648 STATISTICS                                                                  A 37
Table XI.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1958—Continued
Lode-gold Mines1
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Gold	
$94,872
Gold ..	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
25,000
25,000
17,760,125
Princess Royal Island	
Wells  	
1,437,500
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Co. Ltd - - -	
Gold	
Gold 	
Gold	
Gold-copper
Gold..	
1,679,976
565,588
37,500
Rossland-  	
Oliver - -	
Nelson ____	
472,255
5,254
Fern Gold Mining & Milling Co. Ltd	
Gold-	
9,375
Gold Belt Mining Co. Ltd.
Gold	
668,595s
Ymir 	
Gold	
Gold	
13,731
1,290,553
Wells..   	
Rossland——	
Greenwood	
Gold-	
Gold	
2,491,236s
I.X.L.   .                                                       	
134,025
Gold	
11,751
Hedley. — 	
Gold. 	
2,040,000
Gold-	
Gold	
780,000s
Sheep Creek    ,	
Rossland  '	
357,856
Gold-copper	
Gold-copper	
Gold	
Gold     -
Gold	
Gold	
1,475,000
Le Roi No. 2 Ltd.
Rossland   	
Bridge River—. _	
Sheep Creek. _	
1,574,640
20,450
163,500
Mount Zeballos Gold Mines Ltd      ■	
Zeballos. _	
Hedley.	
165,000
3,423,191
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C. Ltd 	
Bridge River -	
Gold	
10,048,914
25,000
Gold- -	
Gold	
Gold 	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold...
18,858,075*
Zeballos	
1,914,183
98,674
Relief Arlington Mines Ltd. (Second Relief) ....	
Erie	
Sheep Creek....	
Sheep Creek _ 	
308,000s
1,433,640s
Sheep Creek Gold Mines Ltd.6   .
3,609,375B
Gold-
2,425,000*
Gold	
Gold-copper
Gold.
168,000
Sunset No. 2             	
115,007
120,279
1,245,250
Ymir Gold                        	
Ymir	
Ymir    	
300,000
Ymir Yankee Girl _. — _ ,
415,002s
Miscellaneous mines  	
Gold	
108,623
Total, lode-gold mines.-  	
$77,674,997
1 The gold-copper properties of Rossland are included in this table.
2 Includes " return of capital " and " liquidating " payments.
3 Former Kelowna Exploration Company Limited;  changed in January, 1951.
4 Up to and Including 1936, dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company Limited were derived from operations
of the company in British Columbia. Subsequent dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company Limited have been
derived from the operations of subsidiary companies in British Columbia and elsewhere and are not included in the
figure given. In 1936, Silbak Premier, a subsidiary of Premier Gold Mining Company, took over the former gold
operations of that company in British Columbia.    Dividends paid by Silbak Premier are given above.
5 In several years, preceding 1953, company revenue has included profits from operations of the Lucky Jim zinc-
lead mine.
0 Since March, 1956, company name is Sheep Creek Mines Ltd. A 38 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1958
Table XI.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1958—Continued
Silver-Lead-Zinc Mines
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Antoine   	
Base Metals Mining Corporation Ltd.  (Monarch and
Kicking Horse)   	
Beaverdell-Wellington     	
Beaver Silver Mines Ltd    	
Bell 	
Bosun (Rosebery-Surprise)-
Canadian Exploration Ltd—
Capella-
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd.
Couverapee..
Duthie Mines Ltd-
Florence Silver	
Giant Mascot Mines Ltd...
Goodenough  _.
H.B. Mining Co.-	
Highland Lass Ltd	
Highland-Bell Ltd	
Horn Silver... 	
Idaho-Alamo  	
Iron Mountain (Emerald)..
Jackson	
Last Chance	
Lone B achelor.   _
Lucky Jim. 	
Mercury  	
Meteor  	
Monitor and Ajax..
Mountain Con	
McAllister...	
Noble Five. _
North Star	
No. One  	
Ottawa	
Payne ..
Providence _ 	
Queen Bess  	
Rambler-Cariboo 	
Reeves MacDonald Mines Ltd..
Reco    	
Ruth Mines Ltd...
St. Eugene	
Sheep Creek Mines Ltd 	
Silversmith and Slocan Star4..
Silver Standard Mines Ltd	
Spokane-Trinket..
Standard Silver Lead	
Sunset and Trade Dollar..
Sunshine Lardeau Mines Ltd...
Torbrit Silver Mines Ltd	
Utica-   	
Violamac Mines (B.C.) Ltd..
Wallace Mines Ltd. (Sally)-.
Washington-
Western Exploration Co. Ltd..
Whitewater 	
Yale Lead and Zinc Mines Ltd-
Miscellaneous mines	
Rambler..
Field	
Beaverdell	
Greenwood—
Beaverdell	
New Denver.-
Salmo -	
New Denver.	
Trail	
Field	
Smithers	
Ainsworth	
Spillimacheen..
Cody.
Hall Creek	
Beaverdell	
Beaverdell	
Similkameen..
Sandon	
Salmo	
Retallack	
Three Forks...
Sandon	
Three Forks ...
Sandon	
Slocan City.....
Three Forks ..
Cody..
Three Forks..
Cody. 	
Kimberley	
Sandon	
Slocan City....
Sandon	
Greenwood-
Alamo	
Rambler	
Remac	
Cody	
Sandon	
Moyie	
Invermere	
Sandon	
Hazelton	
Ainsworth	
Silverton	
Retallack	
Beaton	
Alice Arm	
Kaslo 	
New Denver	
B eaverdell	
Rambler Station.
Silverton	
Retallack...
Ainsworth-
Silver-lead-zinc.-
Silverlead-zinc.
Silver lead-zinc-
Silver lead-zinc-
Silver-lead-zinc-
Silver-lead-zinc-
Silver-lead-zinc.
Silver lead-zinc-
Silver lead-zinc.-
Silver-lead-zinc_
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc-
Silver-lead-zinc...
Silver-lead-zinc...
Silver-lead-zlnc-
Silver lead-zinc-
SilverTe.ad-zinc...
Silver lead-zinc-
Silver-lead-zinc-
Silver lead-zinc.
Silver lead-zinc...
SilverTead-zinc.
Silver-lead-zinc-
Silver-lead-zinc.
Silver-lead-zinc.-
Silver-lead-zinc...
Silver-lead-zinc...
Silver-lead-zinc...
Silver lead-zinc...
Silver-Iead-zinc.-
Silver-lead-zinc-
Silver lead-zinc.
Silver lead-zinc-
Silver lead-zinc-
Silver-lead-zinc.
Silver-Iead-zinc.
Silver-lead-zinc.
Silver lead-zinc-
Silver lead-zinc..
Silver-lead-zinc.
Silver-lead-zinc-
Silver-lead-zinc.-
Silver-lead-zinc-
Silver-lead-zinc.
Silver-lead-zinc..
Silver-lead-zinc-
Silver-lead-zinc-
Silver-lead-zinc-
SilverTead-zinc-
Silver-lead-zinc-
Silver-lead-zinc.
Silver-lead-zinc-
Silver-lead-zinc-
Silver-lead-zinc-
Silver-lead-zinc-
Silver-lead-zinc-
$10,000
586,1431
97,200
48,000
388,297
25,000
11,175,400
5,500
468,796,379s
5,203
50,000
35,393
179,263
45,668
8,904
132,464
1,554,611
6,000
400,000
20,000
20,000
213,000
50,000
80,000
6,000
10,257
70,500
71,387
45,088
72,859
497,901
6,754
110,429
1,438,000
142,238s
25,000
467,250
2,338,000
334,992
125,490
566,000
93,750
1,267,600
1,715,333
10,365
2,734,688
88,000
164,000
390,000
64,000
850,000
135,000
20,000
30,867
592,515
278,620
70,239
Total, silver-lead-zinc mines..
$498,765,637
1 Includes $466,143 " return of capital " distribution prior to 1949.
2 Earnings of several company mines, and customs smelter at Trail.
3 Includes $10,504 paid in 1944 but not included in the yearly figure.
4 These two properties were amalgamated as Silversmith Mines Limited in August, 1939. STATISTICS
A 39
Table XI.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1958—Continued
Copper Mines
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Britannia M. & S. Co.1	
Copper	
Copper	
Copper  ...
Copper	
Copper 	
Copper	
Copper. 	
$18,803,772
615,399
Texada Island	
Copper Mountain	
8,500
Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co.2       .
29,873,226
175,000
Nelson	
233,280
Miscellaneous mines	
261,470
$49,970,647
1 The Britannia Mining and Smelting Co. Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Howe Sound Company
(Maine), paid the dividends shown to its parent company. On June 30th, 1958, consolidation between the Howe
Sound Company (Maine) and Haile Mines Inc. became effective, bringing into existence Howe Sound Company
(Delaware). The Britannia mine became a division of the new Howe Sound Company, and in August Britannia
Mining and Smelting Co. was liquidated voluntarily.
2 The Granby Consolidated Mining Smelting and Power Company dividends commenced in 1904 and cover all
company activities in British Columbia to date. The figure includes all dividends, capital distributions, and interim
liquidating payments, the latter being $4,500,000, paid, in 1936, prior to reorganization.
Coal Mines
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Coal..	
$16,000,000
Bulkley Valley Collieries Ltd.    -             .-	
Telkwa  - —
Fernie   	
Nanaimo..  	
Coal...	
24,000
Coal	
16,719,198
Coal
828,271
$33,571,469
Aggregate of All Classes
Lode-gold mining	
Silver-lead-zinc mining and smelting
Copper-mining	
Coal-mining
Miscellaneous, structural, and placer gold
$77,674,997
498,765,637
49,970,647
33,571,469
7,675,670
Total
_ $667,658,420
Note.—The term " miscellaneous '* noted in each class of dividend covers all payments of $5,000 and under,
together with payments made by companies or individuals requesting that the item be not disclosed.
In compiling the foregoing table of dividends paid, the Department wishes to acknowledge the kind assistance given
by companies, individuals, and trade journals in giving information on the subject. A 40
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1958
Table XII.—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for
Operations of All Classes
Class
Salaries and
Wages
Fuel and
Electricity
Process
Supplies
$32,284,917
9,887
7,592,307
4,276,071
4,770,378
$4,485,205
554
623,826
851,638
2,119,766
$10,553,781
Placer-mining-  	
2,100
2,414,734
934,417
1,148,004
Totals, 19B8               	
$48,933,560
56,409,056
57,266,020
51,890,246
48,702,746
55,543,490
62,256,631
52,607,171
42,738,035
41,023,786
38,813,506
32,160,338
26,190,200
22,620,975
23,131,874
26,051,467
26,913,160
26,050,491
23,391,330
22,357,035
22,765,711
21,349,690
17,887,619
16,753,367
$8,080,989
8,937,567
9,762,777
9,144,034
7,128,669
8,668,099
8,557,845
7,283,051
6,775,998
7,206,637
6,139,470
5,319,470
5,427,458
7,239,726
5,788,671
7,432,585
7,066,109
3,776,747
3,474,721
3,266,000
3,396,106
3,066,311
2,724,144
2,619,639
$15,053,036
24,257,177
Totals, 1957     -	
1956   	
1955   -
1954       	
1953                          -
22,036,839
21,131,572
19,654,724
20,979,411
1952                                              	
27,024,500
1951     	
1950	
1949     	
1948                   	
24,724,101
17,500,663
17,884,408
11,532,121
1947    -	
1946    ,.    	
1945  	
1944             	
13,068,948
8,867,705
5,756,628
6,138,084
1943	
1942	
1941  	
1940      -
1939          -	
6,572,317
6,863,398
7,260,441
6,962,162
6,714,347
1938	
1937           	
1936    ~  -
1935   :  -._ -	
6,544,500
6,845,330
4,434,501
4,562,730
$863,807,510
$148,282,527
$311,859,643
Note.—" Process Supplies " include explosives, chemicals, drill-steel, lubricants, etc. STATISTICS A 41
Table XIII.—Average Number Employed in the Mining Industry, 1901-58
Year
Lode-mining
B
jo
<
5
B
Coal-mining
I
Structural
Materials
OS
1901...
1902...
1903...
1904...
1905...
1906...
1907...
1908...
1909...
1910..
1911...
1912...
1913...
1914...
1915...
1916...
1917...
1918..
1919..
1920...
1921...
1922...
1923...
1924..
1925..
1926..
1927..
1928..
1929..
1930..
1931..
1932..
1933..
1934..
1935...
1936..
1937...
1938...
1939..
1940...
1941..
1942..
1943..
1944..
1945..
1946..
1947..
1948..
1949..
1950..
1951..
1952..
1953..
1954..
1955..
1956..
1957..
1958..
299
415
355
341
425
688
874
1.134
1,122
1,291
1,124
1,371
1,303
1,252
1,004
939
489
212
255
209
347
360
348
303
327
205
230
132
199
103
105
07
75
2,736
2,219
1,662
2,143
2,470
2,680
2,704
2,567
2,184
2,472
2,435
2,472
2,773
2,741
2,709
3,357
3,290
2,626
2,513
2,074
1,355
1,510
2,102
2,353
2,298
2,606
2,671
2,707
2,926
2,316
1,463
1,355
1,786
2,796
2,740
2,959
3,603
3,849
3,905
3.923
3,901
j 2,920
| 2,394
| 1,896
| 1,933
| 1,918
j 3,024
| 3,143
| 3,034
j 3,399
| 3,785
| 4,171
| 3,145
| 2,644
| 2,564
| 2,637
| 2,393
| 1,919
1,212
1,126
1,088
1,163
1,240
1,303
1,239
1,127
1,070
1,237
1,159
1,364
1,505
1,433
1,435
2,036
2,198
1,764
1,746
1,605
975
1,239
1,516
1,680
2,840
1,735
1,916
2,469
2,052
1,260
834
900
1,335
1,729
1,497
1,840
1,818
2,266
2,050
2,104
1,823
1.504
1,699
1,825
1,750
1,817
2,238
2,429
2,724
2,415
3.695
3,923
2,589
2,520
2,553
2,827
2,447
| 1,809
3,948
3,345
2,750
3,306
3,710
3,983
3,943
3,694
3,254
3,709
3,594
3,837
4,278
4,174
4,144
5,393
5,488
4,390
4,259
3,679
2,330
2,749
3,618
4,033
5,138
4,341
4,587
5,178
4,978
3,576
2,297
2,255
3,121
4,525
4,237
4,799
5,421
6,115
5,955
6,027
5,724
4,424
4,093
3,721
3,683
3,735
5,262
5,572
5,758
5,814
7,480
8.094
5,734
5,164
5,117
5,464
4,840
3,728
808
854
911
966
832
581
542
531
631
907
720
1,168
919
996
1,048
1,025
960
891
849
822
672
960
1,126
1,203
1,259
1,307
1.516
1,371
1,129
1,091
1,043
838
625
2,461
2,842
2,748
2,948
3,197
3,157
2,036
2,436
2,890
2,771
2,678
3,027
3,158
3.187
2,944
3,072
3,555
2,835
2,981
2,834
2,813
3,461
3,884
3,763
3,759
4,044
4,120
3,901
3,119
3,304
3,339
3,328
3,081
3,041
3,101
3,137
3,278
3,127
3,415
2,862
4,432
4,713
5,903
5,212
5,275
4,950
4,267
3,708
3,694
3,760
3,658
4,145
4.191
4,722
4,712
4,342
3.894
3,828
3,757
3,646
3.814
3.675
3,389
2,957
2,628
2,241
2,050
2,145
2,015
2,286
2,088
2,167
2,175
2,229
1,892
2,240
2,150
1,927
1,773
1,694
1,594
1,761
1,745
1,462
1,280
1,154
1,076
1,100
968
1,020
826
931
910
1,127
1,175
1,280
1,390
907
1.641
1,705
1,855
1,661
1,855
1,721
1,465
1,283
1,366
1,410
1,769
1,821
2,158
2,163
1,932
1,807
1,524
1,616
1,565
1,579
1,520
1,353
1,256
1,126
980
853
843
826
799
867
874
809
699
494
468
611
689
503
532
731
872
545
616
463
401
396
358
378
398
360
260
3,974
4/011
4,264
4,453
4,407
4,805
3,769
6,073
6,418
7,758
6,873
7,130
6,671
5,732
4,991
5,060
5,170
5,247
5,966
6,349
6,885
6,644
6,149
5,418
5,443
5,322
5,225
5,334
5,028
4.645
4,082
3,608
3.094
2,893
2,971
2,814
3,153
2,962
2,976
2,874
2,723
2,360
2,851
2,839
2,430
2,305
2,425
2,466
2,306
2,261
1,925
1,681
] 1,550
1,434
1,478
1.366
1,380
1,086
493
647
412
492
843
460
536
376
377
536
931
724
900
652
827
766
842
673
690
921
827
977
1,591
2,120
1,916
1,783
1,530
1,909 I
1,861
1,646
t,598
1,705
1,483
324
138
368
544
344
526
329
269
187
270
288
327
295
311
334
413
378
326
351
335
555
586
656
542
616
628
657
559 |
638
641
770
625
677
124
122
120
268
170
380
344
408
360
754
825
938
369
561
647
422
262
567
628
586
679
869
754
626
660
491
529
634
584 j
722 I
854 I
474
446 1
7,922
7,356
7,014
7,759
8,117
8,788
7,712
9.767
9,672
11,467
10,467
10,967
10,949
9,906
9,135
10,453
10,658
9,637
10,225
10,028
9,215
9,393
9,767
9,451
10,581
14,172
14,830
15,424
15,565
14,032
12,171
10,524
11,369
12,985
13,737
14,179
16,129
16,021
15,890
15,705
15,084
13,270
12,448
12,314
11,820
11,933
14.899
16,397
16,621
16,612
17,863
18,257
15,790
14,128
14,102
14,539
13,257
11,201
1 The average number employed in the industry is the sum of the averages for individual companies. The average
for each company is obtained by taking the sum of the numbers employed each month and dividing by 12, regardless of
the number of months worked. A 42
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1958
Table XIV.—Lode-metal Mines—Tonnage, Number of Mines,
Net and Gross Value of Principal Metals,4 1901-58
Year
Tonnage1
Number
of
Shipping
Mines
Number
of Mines
Shipping
over 100
Tons
Gross Value
as Reported
by Shipper2
Freight
and
Treatment2
Net Value
to Shipper3
Gross Value
of Lode
Metals
Produced*
1901	
926,162
1,009,016
1,288,466
1,461,609
1,706,679
1,963,872
1,805,614
2,083,606
2,057,713
2,216,428
1,770,755
2,688,532
2,663,809
2,175,971
2,720,669
3,229,942
2,797,368
2,912,516
2,146,920
2,215,445
1,586,428
1,592.163
2,447,672
3,413,912
3,849,269
4,775,327
5,416,411
6,241,672
6,977,903
6,804,276
5,549,622
4,354,904
4,063,775
5,141,744
4,927,204
4,381,173
6,145,244
7,377,117
7,212,171
7,949,736
8,007,937
6,894,844
5,786,864
4,879,851
4,377,722
3,705,594
5,011.271
5,762,321
6,125,460
0,802,482
6,972,400
9,174,617
9,660,281
8,513,S65
9,126,902
8,827,037
7,282,436
6,402,198
119
124
125
142
146
154
147
108
89
83
80
86
110
98
132
169
193
175
144
121
80
98
77
86
102
138
132
110
106
68
44
75
109
145
177
168
185
211
217
216
200
126
48
51
36
50
75
97
118
112
119
95
80
63
53
70
59
47
78
75
74
76
79
77
72
59
52
50
45
51
68
56
59
81
87
80
74
60
35
33
28
37
40
55
52
49
48
32
22
29
47
69
72
70
113
92
99
92
96
76
32
31
27
32
33
61
54
58
64
58
48
40
34
40
40
28
$13,287,947
1902 	
11,136,162
1903	
11,579,382
1904 	
12,309,035
1905 	
15,180 164
1900 	
17,484,102
1907 	
16,222,097
1908	
14,477,411
1909	
14,191,141
1910 ...
13,228,731
1911	
11,454,063
1912	
17,662,766
1913	
17,190,838
1914	
15,225,061
19,992,149
1916 	
31,483,014
1917 	
26,788,474
1918	
27,595,278
1919	
..
19,756,648
1920	
19,451,725
1921	
12,925,448
1922	
19,228,257
1923	
25,348,399
1924	
35,538,247
1925	
46,200,135
1926	
$38,558,613
27,750,364
20,070,075
34,713,887
21,977,688
10,513,931
7,075,393
13,976,358
20,243,278
25,407,914
30,051,207
43,954,077
35,278,483
40,716,869
43,670,298
46,681,822
45,199,404
33,293,703
26,449,408
31,383,625
46,016,841
76,311,087
100,128,727
79,814,604
86,751,361
117,493,684
106,601,451
66,739,892
77,088,160
88,343,241
93,110,262
65,370,185
54,955,069
51,508,031
1927 	
44,977,082
48,281,825
51,720,436
41,292,980
22,900,229
19,705,043
25,057,007
3934 	
34,071,955
40,662.633
43,813,898
$48,617,920
40,222,237
45,133,788
50,004,909
52,354,870
50,494,041
37,234,070
29,327,114
34,154,917
48,920,971
81,033,093
118,713,859
09,426,678
108,864,792
142,590,427
140,070,389
94,555,069
106,223,833
119,039,285
125,043,590
95,644,930
83,023,111
$4,663,843
4,943,754
4,416,919
6,334,611
5,673,048
5,294,637
3,940,367
2,877,706
2,771,292
2,904,130
4,722,010
18,585,183
19,613,185
22,113,431
25,096,743
30,444,575
27,815,152
29,135,673
30,696,044
31,933,681
30,273,900
28,068,396
62,950,536
1938	
1939	
53,878,093
53,554,092
61,735,604
62,607,882
59,694,192
52,651,868
39,369,738
1945 	
48,724,001
56,653,485
93,124,847
121,696,891
107,775,413
113,464,619
1951 	
147,646,989
1952 	
144,151,515
1953 	
123,619,837
1954 	
120,829,789
1955	
138,145,095
1956 	
143,546,586
1957 	
119,409,764
1958 	
100,591,049
i Includes ores of iron, mercury, nickel, tungsten, and silica (flux).
2 Data not collected before 1937.
2 Previous to 1937 the shipper reported " Net Value at Shipping Point," no indication being given as to how the net
value was computed. From 1937 on, the shipper has reported "Gross Value," from which deduction of freight and
treatment gives " Net Value."
4 Gross value calculated by valuing gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, mercury (1938-44, 1955), and nickel (1936-37,
1958) at yearly average prices, and iron (1901-03, 1907, 1918-23, 1928, 1948-58) and tungsten (1939-45, 1947-58) at
values given by operators. CO
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A 47 A 48
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1958
Table XVI.—Lode-metal Mines Employing an Average of Ten
or More Men during 19581
Name of Mine or Operator
Days
Operating
Tons
Average
Number
Employed
Mine
Mill
Mined
Milled
Mine
Mill
Shipping Mines
280
105
365
66
259
365
365
284
253
250
(3)
365
365
365
204
252
254
307
101
253
213
266
266
365
89
365
57
259
365
365
364
t   348
250
(3)
	
365
365
212
352
254
358
135
268
213
266
366
66,880
5,044
135,892
66,863
18,729
146,358
105,442
13,820
(2)
255,859
51,460
13,326
9,037
458,213
383,458
64,114
417,076
2,443,884
192,426
11,889
96,029
131,133
572,404
715,182
66,880
5,044
135,892
66,863
18,729
146,358
105,442
13,820
(2)
255,859
51,460
13,326
175
24
98
107
34
358
235
14
462
268
36
2
21
106
118
82
103
1,123
83
20
89
125
(3)
112
10
19
21
25
12
10
14
18
31
13
5
TVirrrit Silver Mines T td
22
Britannia Mining and Smelting Co. Ltd	
HigVilanrl-ReJl T td,
5
6
27
Pioneer finlrl Mines of P. 0. I t<1.
18
8
Copper Mountain (Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co. Ltd.)	
Bluebell (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada, Ltd.)
19
8
Western Exploration Co. Ltd , —	
7
H.B. (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada, Ltd.)	
458,213
383,458
64,114
417,076
2,443,884
192,426
11,419
96,029
131,133
572,404
709,731
13
11
8
25
Sullivan C>ns M fr, S. Co. of Cmmls, T,t<5,
333
11
5
12
19
(3)
34
Non-shipping Mines
	
Sunro (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada, Ltd.)   	
Birkett Creek Mine Operators Ltd.
	
	
—
1 The average number employed includes wage-earners and salaried employees.   The average is obtained by adding
the monthly figures and dividing by 12, irrespective of the number of months worked.
2 One hundred and eight tons of clean-up material shipped to Tacoma smelter, and employment represents all
clean-up operations, including salvage of equipment and machinery.
3 Not available. Departmental Work
DEPUTY MINISTER
John Fortune Walker, who had been Deputy Minister of Mines for twenty-two
years, retired on September 30th, 1958. He was born in Binbrook, Ont., on September
17th, 1893, and is a veteran of World War I, a graduate of the University of British
Columbia in geological engineering, and a Ph.D. from Princeton University in geology.
He had served as an officer of the Geological Survey of Canada for ten years, working
in various areas in British Columbia, when he left that service to become Provincial
Mineralogist in the British Columbia Department of Miffes in 1934 and continued in
that position until he was appointed Deputy Minister in 1937.
Patrick Joseph Mulcahy, who had been in the service of the Government of British
Columbia for thirty-nine years, was appointed Deputy Minister of Mines, effective
October 1st, 1958. He was born in Victoria in 1901. He entered the service of the
Government of British Columbia in the Department of the Attorney-General in 1919,
and transferred to the Department of Mines in 1924. Since then he has served continuously in Victoria, except when he was Mining Recorder at Barkerville in 1931 and
at Hope in 1932 and set up the central records office in Vancouver in 1942. Until his
appointment as Deputy Minister he had been Chief Gold Commissioner since 1942 and
Chief Petroleum and Natural Gas Commissioner since 1952.
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
The Administration Branch is responsible for the administration of the Provincial
laws regarding the acquisition of rights to mineral and to coal, petroleum and natural
gas, and deals with other departments of the Provincial service for the Department or
for any branch.
Upon the retirement of John F. Walker, P. J. Mulcahy was appointed to the position
of Deputy Minister. K. B. Blakey, who had been acting in the capacity of Deputy Chief
Gold Commissioner and Deputy Chief Commissioner, Petroleum and Natural Gas, was
appointed as Chief Gold Commissioner and Chief Commissioner, Petroleum and Natural
Gas. R. H. McCrimmon and R. E. Moss were appointed to the positions of Deputy
Chief Gold Commissioner and Deputy Chief Commissioner, Petroleum and Natural Gas,
respectively, effective October 1st, 1958.
Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-Mining Recorders, whose duties
are laid down in the " Mineral Act" and the " Placer-mining Act," administer these Acts
and other Acts relating to mining. Mining Recorders, in addition to their own functions,
may also exercise the powers conferred upon Gold Commissioners with regard to mineral
claims within the mining division for which they have been appointed. Similar duties
may be performed by Mining Recorders with regard to placer claims but not in respect
of placer-mining leases. Recording of location and of work upon a mineral claim as
required by the " Mineral Act" and upon a placer claim or a placer-mining lease as
required by the " Placer-mining Act" must be made at the office of the Mining Recorder
for the mining division in which the claim or lease is located. Information concerning
claims and. leases and concerning the ownership and standing of claims and leases in any
mining division may be obtained from the Mining Recorder for the mining division in
which the property is situated or from the Department's offices at Victoria, and Room
104, 739 West Hastings Street, Vancouver. Officials in the offices of the Gold Commissioner at Victoria and the Gold Commissioner at Vancouver act as Sub-Mining
Recorders for all mining divisions.    Sub-Mining Recorders, who act as forwarding
A 49 A 50
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1958
agents, are appointed at various places throughout the Province. They are authorized
to accept documents and fees, and forward them to the office of the Mining Recorder for
the correct mining division. Officials and their offices in various parts of the Province
are listed in the table on page A 50.
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)
The transcripts of all recordings made in Mining Recorders' offices throughout the
Province are sent to the office of the Chief Gold Commissioner in Victoria twice each
month, and include the names of lessees of reverted Crown-granted mineral claims.
These records and maps showing the approximate positions of mineral claims held by
record and of placer-mining leases may be consulted by the public during office hours
at Victoria and at the office of the Gold Commissioner at Vancouver, Room 104, 739
West Hastings Street. The maps conform in geographical detail, size, and number to
the reference and mineral reference maps issued by the Legal Surveys Branch of the
Department of Lands and Forests, and the approximate positions of mineral claims held
by record and of placer-mining leases are plotted from details supplied by the locators.
Provision has been made to supply the general public, on request to the office of the
Chief Gold Commissioner, with copies of the maps. The charge for these maps is $1
plus 5 per cent tax for each sheet.
List of Gold Commissioners and
Mining Recorders in the Province
Mining Division
Location of Office
Gold Commissioner
Mining Recorder
T. G. O'Neill                  	
T. G. O'Neill.
Atlin  	
Atlin	
L. P. Lean _	
F. E. P. Hughes	
W. E. McLean  ■    	
F. E. P. Hughes.
Clinton .  __	
Fort Steele
E. L. Hedley
E. L. Hedley.
R. E. Manson ___ 	
Kamloops  —	
D. Dalgle'sh                   '■
D. Dalgleish.
R. H. McCrimmon.
E. B. Offin  	
E. B. Offin.
W. H. Cochrane	
K. D. McRae                 	
W. H. Cochrane.
Nelson  	
New Westminster 	
Merritt   	
K. D. McRae.
G. C. Kimberley.
T. S. Dobson	
G. H. Beley       ..          	
T. S. Dobson.
G. H. Beley.
T. S. Dalby 	
W. T. McGruder-	
B. Kennelly 	
T. H. W. Harding	
T. S. Dalby.
Revelstoke   .     	
Similkameen 	
Revelstoke 	
Princeton _	
Prince Rupert 	
Kaslo  _„
Rossland 	
Vancouver 	
Vernon	
Victoria _. 	
W. T. McGruder.
B. Kennelly.
T. H. W. Harding.
J. Egdell                         	
Miss S. Hyham (Deputy).
G. F. Forbes.
G. F. Forbes -	
R. H. McCrimmon	 DEPARTMENTAL WORK
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».Sy5S«»- a 52 report of the minister of mines, 1958
Coal, Petroleum, and Natural Gas
The Administration Branch is responsible for the administration of the " Petroleum
and Natural Gas Act" and for the " Coal Act." Information concerning applications
for permits and leases issued under the " Petroleum and Natural Gas Act" and concerning the ownership and standing of them may be obtained upon application to the
office of the Chief Commissioner, Department of Mines, Victoria, B.C. Similar information may be obtained respecting licences and leases issued under the " Coal Act." Maps
showing the locations of permits and leases under the " Petroleum and Natural Gas Act "
are available, and copies may be obtained upon application to the office of the Department of Mines, Victoria, B.C. Monthly reports listing additions and revisions to permit-
location maps and listing changes in title to permits, licences, and leases and related
matters are available from the office of the Chief Commissioner upon application and
payment of the required fee.
Petroleum and Natural-gas Statistics, 1958
Permits—
Issued     87
In good standing  442
Assigned   122
Natural-gas licences—Issued     12
Drilling reservations—Issued       4
Leases—
Issued   539
In good standing  842
Assigned      73
Petroleum and Natural-gas Revenue, 1958
Permits—
Fees     $146,250.00
Rental   3,135,141.48
Penalties and cash in lieu of work      26,590.47
  $3,307,981.95
Drilling reservations—
Fees   $750.00
Rental   4,146.80
Licences—
Fees   $400.00
Rental          9,757.29
4,896.80
10,157.29
Leases—
Fees       $13,125.00
Rental       977,257.50
        990,382.50
Tender bonus     4,510,123.14
Royalties—
Gas   _   $433,545.81
Oil       140,158.48
Processed products         62,104.77
        635,809.06 DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 53
Operators' licences
Assignment fees	
Miscellaneous 	
$10,520.00
1,800.00
550.00
$9,472,220.74
$4,119.50
Coal Revenue, 1958
Licences—
Fees   $450.00
Rental   3,669.50
Leases—
Fees   $400.00
Rental   535.95
Cash in lieu of work  400.00
  1,335.95
$5,455.45
Mining Laws and Laws Related to the Mineral Industry
Synopses of mining laws and of laws related to mining, and the titles of the various
Acts and the prices charged for each are available on application.
ANALYTICAL AND ASSAY BRANCH
By S. W. Metcalfe, Chief Analyst and Assayer
Rock Samples
During 1958 the chemical laboratory in Victoria issued reports on 3,929 samples
from prospectors* and Departmental engineers. A laboratory examination of a prospector's sample generally consists of the following: (1) A spectrographic analysis to
determine if any base metals are present in interesting percentages; (2) assays for
precious metals and for base metals shown by the spectrographic analysis to be present
in interesting percentages. The degree of radioactivity is measured on all samples submitted by prospectors and Departmental engineers; these radiometric assays are not
listed in the table below.
The laboratory reports were distributed in the following manner among prospectors
who were not grantees, prospectors who were grantees under the " Prospectors' Grubstake Act," and Departmental engineers:—
Samples
Spectro-
graohic
Analyses
Assays
973
275
213
26
2,692
1
27
660
Departmental engineers    ___ __
577
Totals    	
1,461
54
3,929
Mineralogical specimens submitted for identificatic
are examined by the Mineralogical Branch of the Depart!
>n and ro
Tient.
cks for ck
issification
* A reasonable number of samples are assayed, without charge, for a prospector who makes application for free
assays and who satisfies the Chief Analyst that prospecting is his principal occupation during the summer months.
A form for use in applying for free assays may be obtained from the office of any Mining Recorder. a 54 report of the minister of mines, 1958
Coal, Petroleum, and Gas Samples
Forty-three samples were analysed. Of these, fourteen were samples of formation
water from wells being drilled for oil and gas in the Province; seventeen were samples of
coal for proximate analysis and calorific value; two were waters tested for oil seepage;
three were natural gases; and seven were samples of condensates from oil and gas wells
in the Province.
Police and Coroners' Exhibits
Ninety-one cases of a chemical-legal nature were completed for the Attorney-
General's Department. Twenty-eight cases involved analyses for poisons generally.
Eighteen were for alcohol in blood and body fluids, and six were for carbon monoxide and
alcohol in blood. Six cases involved narcotics, and six cases analyses of animal organs
for poison. Eleven cases were analyses for liquor under the " Government Liquor Act "
and the " Indian Act." In four cases, analyses were made in connection with charges of
murder. In addition, there were four analyses of gasoline for colouring matter added in
accordance with the regulations in the " Coloured Gasoline Tax Act." The remaining
cases involved drugs and food for suspected poisoning, possession of explosives, breaking
and entering, and wilful damage.   On ten occasions, evidence was presented in Court.
Analytical work of this nature was discontinued by the laboratory at the end of
the year.
Miscellaneous Samples
For the Purchasing Commission, specification tests were made on eight samples of
anti-freeze, and two blankets were examined.
For the Taxation Branch of the Department of Finance, two gasolines and one
gasoline marker dyestuff were examined.
For the Department of Agriculture, four marls were analysed for lime and magnesia,
one soil was examined for boron, two samples of hay and two of soil were analysed for
molybdenum, and two samples of gypsum were examined.
For the Department of Highways, one water sample was examined.
For the British Columbia Power Commission, two partly decomposed wooden pegs
from power-poles were examined for nitrates.
For the Department of Mining and Metallurgy at the University of British Columbia,
one sand was analysed for titanium and iron, and one sample of sponge iron for total
iron and free iron.
For the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, sixteen samples consisting of placer gold
and gravel were assayed for their gold contents.   Evidence was given in Court.
For residents of the Province, two water samples were examined.
Examinations for Assayers
Provincial Government examinations for certificates of competency and licence to
practise assaying in British Columbia were held at Victoria in April and May, and at
Trail in December. In April and May. two candidates were examined and both passed.
In December, ten candidates were examined; three passed, three were granted supple-
mentals, and four failed.
INSPECTION BRANCH
Organization and Staff
Inspectors and Resident Engineers
J. W. Peck, Chief Inspector Victoria
Robert B. Bonar, Deputy Chief Inspector of Mines Victoria
L. Wardman, Senior Electrical Inspector of Mines   Victoria DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 55
E. R. Hughes, Senior Inspector of Mines Victoria
Robert B. King, Inspector and Resident Engineer__...    ___Vancouver
A. R. C. lames, Inspector and Resident Engineer Vancouver
J. E. Merrett, Inspector and Resident Engineer Nelson
D. R. Morgan, Inspector and Resident Engineer Fernie
David Smith, Inspector and Resident Engineer Prince Rupert
The Inspectors are stationed at the places listed and inspect coal mines, metalliferous
mines, and quarries in their respective districts. They also examine prospects, mining
properties, and roads and trails.
E. R. Hughes supervised the Department's roads and trails programme and prospectors' grub-stakes.
Instructors, Mine-rescue Stations
Arthur Williams Cumberland Station
T. H. Robertson Princeton Station
loseph J. Haile Fernie Station
W. H. Childress Nelson Station
Staff Changes
H. C. Hughes, Chief Inspector of Mines, retired on January 31st, 1958, after
twenty years of service with the Department. He joined the staff on January 15th, 1938,
as Inspector of Mines at Nelson.
J. W. Peck, Inspector and Resident Engineer at Nelson, was appointed Chief Inspector of Mines on February 15th, 1958.
Board of Examiners for Coal-mine Officials
Robert B. Bonar, Chairman and Secretary Victoria
A. R. C. James, Member Vancouver
D. R. Morgan, Member Fernie
R. B. Bonar, A. R. C. James, D. R. Morgan, and the mine-rescue instructors for
the district in which an examination is being held form the Board for granting certificates
of competency to coal-miners.
An Inspector is empowered to grant provisional certificates to coal-miners for a
period not exceeding sixty days between regular examinations.
MINERALOGICAL BRANCH
Field work by officers of the Mineralogical Branch includes geological mapping and
examination of mineral deposits, and studies related to ground-water and engineering
geology. The results are published partly in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines
and partly in a series of bulletins. The Mineralogical Branch supplies information
regarding mineral deposits and the mineral industry, in response to inquiries received in
great number. The activities of the Branch also include identification of rock and
mineral specimens submitted directly by prospectors and others, or through the Analytical
Branch.
Professional Staff
On December 31st, 1958, the professional staff included the following engineers
classified as geologists or mineral engineers: H. Sargent, Chief of the Mineralogical
Branch; M. S. Hedley, S. S. Holland, J. W. McCammon, N. D. McKechnie, G. E. P.
Eastwood, J. T. Fyles, A. Sutherland Brown, J. M. Carr,' H. W. Nasmith, A. F. Shepherd,
and J. E. Hughes. H. W. Nasmith resigned at the end of December. J. E. Hughes was
granted leave in October to continue postgraduate studies at McGill University. A 56 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1958
Technical editing of the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and of other publications was directed by M. S. Hedley. Copy for printing was prepared by and under
the direction of the editor for English, which post was occupied until August by Mrs.
C. C. Savage and from October by Mrs. Rosalyn J. Moir. Messrs. Hedley and Holland
assisted in directing and supervising field work. Most of the other members of the
professional staff are assigned to mapping the geology of selected areas and of mineral
deposits. Mr. McCammon is responsible for studies of industrial minerals and structural
materials and Mr. Shepherd for records and library.
Field Work
Systematic field work was done by nine members of the permanent staff, and by
one geologist retained for the field season. They were assisted by thirteen temporary
field assistants.
A. Sutherland Brown began the geological mapping of Moresby Island in the Queen
Charlotte Group.
J. M. Carr continued geological mapping in the Highland Valley area, including
detailed mapping of workings at several properties, and made a preliminary study of a
small area that contains the Craigmont property northwest of Merritt.
J. T. Fyles devoted the first part of the field season to reconnaissance mapping
along the Columbia River from a point near Donald to Nagle Creek near Mica Creek in
the western side of the Big Bend.
J. T. Fyles devoted the latter part of the field season and G. E. P. Eastwood devoted
most of the season to finalizing mapping in the part of the Lardeau area between the
head of Gainer Creek and the heads of Trout and Beaton Creeks.
J. E. Hughes completed field studies along the John Hart Highway between the
West Pine bridge and Commotion Creek.
S. S. Holland examined operating mines and prospects in Bridge River and Wells
areas, the area between Prince George and Smithers, the North Thompson River, and
the Revelstoke area, and devoted two weeks to problems of engineering geology on the
Fraser and Peace Rivers.
J. W. McCammon made studies of industrial-mineral occurrences, including limestone in the Cache Creek and Merritt areas, silica at Sicamous, Oliver, and Golden,
barite in the Columbia-Windermere Valley, and pegmatites in part of the North
Thompson area. He also assisted in setting up a geological display in " Nature House "
at Manning Park.
N. D. McKechnie examined properties on Vancouver Island, near Hope, and near
Merritt, and began a study of ultrabasic rocks in the Kamloops-Princeton-Grand Forks
area.
H. W. Nasmith made a ground-water study in the Bulkley Valley and a preliminary
investigation in the Prince George area. His work in the field of engineering geology
included a study of water seepage at the Whatshan Dam, landslides at Golden and Prince
Rupert, seepage pressures at a highway tunnel near Yale, a study of bridge foundations
near Quesnel, and studies of Pleistocene sediments near Peachland and Naramata and
on the Big Bend of the Columbia River.
H. P. Trettin was employed for the field season to complete mapping begun in 1957
of the area along the Fraser River from Lillooet to Big Bar ferry. This work was under
the general direction of Professor K. C. McTaggart, retained as consultant. DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 57
PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS BRANCH
Staff
J. D. Lineham, Chief of the Petroleum and
Natural Gas Branch Victoria
R. R. McLeod, Senior Petroleum Engineer and
Chairman of the Board of Arbitration Victoria
A. N. Lucie-Smith, Senior Petroleum Engineer
and Chairman of the Conservation Committee Victoria
W. L. Ingram, Petroleum Engineer Victoria
K. C. Gilbart, Petroleum Engineer Victoria
S. S. Cosburn, Mineral Engineer (Geology)  Victoria
D. L. Griffin, Mineral Engineer (Geology)  Victoria
T. A. Mackenzie, Engineering Assistant Victoria
P. K. Huus, Engineering Assistant Victoria
G. E. Blue, Petroleum Engineer Dawson Creek
R. N. Thompson, Petroleum Engineer Dawson Creek
H. B. Fulton, Assistant Geologist Dawson Creek
H. A. Sharp, Engineering Assistant Dawson Creek
E. N. Jernslet, Field Survey Assistant Dawson Creek
The following are in charge of certain sections within the Branch: R. R. McLeod,
reservoir engineering; A. N. Lucie-Smith, reserves; W. L. Ingram, development
engineering; S. S. Cosburn, geology; T. A. Mackenzie, well information and statistics;
G. E. Blue, field office.
Staff Changes
H. A. Sharp joined the field staff as an engineering assistant on March 31st and
R. N. Thompson as a petroleum engineer on May 1st.
D. L. Griffin joined headquarters staff as a geologist on June 11th.
W. L. Ingram was transferred to Victoria from Dawson Creek on July 28th, and
E. N. Jernslet was transferred from Victoria to the field staff on November 24th.
The Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch is responsible for the administration of the
" Regulation Governing the Drilling of Wells and the Production and Conservation of
Oil and Natural Gas " made pursuant to the " Petroleum and Natural Gas Act, 1954."
The regulation provides for the use of efficient and safe practices in the drilling,
completion, and abandonment of wells; for the orderly development of fields discovered
within the Province; and for the conservation and prevention of waste of oil and natural
gas within the reservoir and during production operations.
The Branch, in addition to continuous field inspection of drilling and producing
operations, makes studies relative to conservation.
Board of Arbitration
Chairman: R. R. McLeod, engineer. Members: A. W. Hobbs, solicitor; S. G.
Preston, agrologist.
The Board of Arbitration, responsible to the Minister of Mines, held hearings in
1958 at Fort St. John and Pouce Coupe.
Seventeen applications, concerning right of entry came before the Board. Of these,
one application was not processed because the operator did not effect entry; three were
settled by private agreement; one was adjourned at the request of the land-owner; one
was settled by a Board award order with the agreement and consent of both parties; six
were settled by award orders of the Board; and five award orders were pending at the
end of the year. - A 58 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1958
R. R. McLeod, of the Department of Mines, was, at his request, replaced as Chairman of the Board on November 28th by A. W. Hobbs, of the Department of the Attorney-
General.   Mr. McLeod remained as a member of the Board.
Conservation Committee
Chairman: A. N. Lucie-Smith, engineer. Members: N. D. McKechnie, geologist;
M. H. A. Glover, economist.
During 1958 the Conservation Committee considered two major matters which had
been referred to it by the Minister:—
(1) Whether production of gas from the Buick Creek sandstone at West Buick
Creek should be allowed while there was apparently an accumulation of
commercial oil in the same horizon down dip on the northeast flank; and
(2) Whether the allowable production of a gas well may, in certain instances,
be increased over the limit in force of 25 per cent of its open-flow
potential by the application of the so-called "Alberta formula."
With regard to the first problem, conditional permission had been given on November
13th, 1957, to start producing gas from the crestal wells at West Buick Creek so that
static bottom hole pressures could be taken continually in the oil wells, which had been
shut in for that purpose. Gas production commenced on November 30th, 1957, and,
with the co-operation of the operator, Pacific Petroleums Ltd., it was established at the
beginning of March, 1958, that there was definite communication between the oil wells
on the northeast flank and the gas wells on the crest of the structure; also, by this time,
a well on the upper part of the southwest flank had started producing some oil with the
gas and condensate. The Minister, acting on the advice of the Committee, ordered, on
May 29th, all Buick Creek sandstone gas wells in the West Buick Creek field to be shut
in, pending further information which might become available from further drilling. A
well subsequently drilled between two of the oil wells on the northeast flank showed the
formation to lack porosity, and by this time the production of the oil weUs, which had
been put back on the pump after the gas wells had been shut in, had declined considerably, both of which facts cast some doubt as to the extent of the oil accumulation. In
view of this the operator was allowed to reopen the gas wells on September 5th on
condition that two additional wells were drilled on the southwest flank at locations to be
selected by the Committee to investigate the reservoir conditions there. The results of
this additional drilling showed that the oil probably occurs in small patches around the
perimeter of the structure with impermeable areas between, and that the reserve would
probably be negligible compared with that of the gas. The Committee recommended that
West Buick Creek, as far as the Buick Creek sandstone was concerned, should be
produced as a gasfield and not an oilfield.
With regard to the second matter, the Committee recommended that the 25-per-cent
rule should continue to apply to all gas wells, as there was still insufficient reservoir data
available to allow the application of a formula, and no formula had yet been unreservedly
accepted by any regulatory body.
GRUB-STAKING PROSPECTORS
Under authority of the " Prospectors' Grub-stake Act" the Department of Mines
has provided grub-stakes each year since 1943 to a limited number of applicants able to
qualify. An amendment to the Act in 1958 authorized an increase in the maximum
allowable grub-stake to $400, with an additional amount up to $300 for travelling
expenses.
To qualify at the present time the Department requires that the applicant shall be
a physically fit male British subject, holder of a valid free miner's certificate, who has DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 59
been resident in the Province during the year preceding his application for a grub-stake,
or who has been honourably discharged from Her Majesty's services, who is between the
ages of 18 and 70, and who can identify common rocks and minerals.
It is required that in order to obtain the maximum grub-stake, he agree to spend at
least sixty days actually prospecting in the area of his choice in British Columbia considered favourably by officers of the Department of Mines. If he prospects a lesser time,
the grant will be reduced proportionately. In the past, rebates have been recovered from
grantees to whom payments have exceeded the proper amount for the time and effort
devoted to prospecting.
The grantee must not accept pay from any other source for services rendered during
the period credited to the grub-stake. At the end of the season he shall provide the
Department with a diary and maps outlining his activities while working under the grubstake.    Any discoveries made, staked, and recorded are exclusively his own property.
Statistical information covering the grub-stake programme since its inception is
given in the following table:—
Grub-stake Statistics
Field Season
Approximate
Expenditure
Men
Grub-staked
Samples and
Specimens
Received at
Department
Laboratory
Mineral
Claims
Recorded
1943       	
1944                                     	
$18,500
27,215
27,310
35,200
36,230
35,975
31.175
26,800
19.385
19,083
17,850
19,989
21,169
20,270
22,000
24,850
90
105
84
95
91
92
98
78
63
50
41
48
47
47
46
47
773
606
448
419
469
443
567
226
255
251
201
336
288
163
174
287
87
135
1945               	
1946	
1947 .  _	
1948  __   ..
181
162
142
138
1949   	
1950
1951 	
1952 •   .
103
95
137
95
1953	
1954 	
1955... 	
183
1956	
1957
217
101
211
1958	
Samples and specimens received from grub-staked prospectors are spectrographed,
assayed, and tested for radioactivity.    Mineralogical identifications are made on request.
Of the forty-seven grantees in 1958, twenty-four were given grants for the first time
and eight of these proved unsatisfactory. Two grantees who had received previous grubstakes were also struck from the list for unsatisfactory work. Five grantees, who for
various reasons were unable to fulfil the terms and conditions of the grant, received only
partial payment. Grub-staked prospectors worked in seventeen out of the twenty-four
mining divisions.
D. H. Rae again gave able service in interviewing applicants and supervising grantees
in the field. The following notes have been largely compiled from Mr. Rae's own observations while in the field and from information provided in the diaries of the grantees.
Atlin Mining Division.—Some work was done near Ash Mountain west of Tuya
Lake, where the surface was found to be heavily drift covered. Some of this work
extended into the Liard Mining Division. On both sides of Edasp Lake, outcrops of
granite were encountered. Nothing of interest was reported in the Tuya and Stikine
Ranges. Some small pegmatite dykes were found along the westerly contact of the
Cassiar Batholith. More work will be done here. Work was also done in the Eaglehead
Lake area, where barren quartz veins were found in limestone intruded by granodiorite.
A large exposure of serpentine was found, but no asbestos was observed. South of the
lake narrow stringers of asbestos were found in a peridotite zone. A 60 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1958
Cariboo Mining Division.—West of Kleena Kleene some prospecting was done in
the vicinity of Perkins Peak. In a wide exposure of argillite some rusty sulphides were
found in cracks and fissures, along with some green and blue copper stain. Samples
taken failed to show commercial values. About 20 miles southwest of McLeod Lake
some prospecting was done but nothing of interest was reported.
Clinton Mining Division.—Some work was done in several areas between Tatla and
Tatlayoko Lakes. A diorite-greenstone contact was prospected between Potato and
Skinner Mountains. Nothing of interest was found. Some work was also done around
the headwaters of Churn Creek. Nothing important was found. At the headwaters of
Ruby, Bear, and Garnet Creeks more work was done. Scattered exposures of diorite
showing considerable feldspar and hornblende and several large outcrops of serpentine
were reported.
Golden Mining Division.—Work was continued in the Brewer Creek-Dutch Creek
areas west of Canal Flats. At Thorald Creek narrow quartz veins cutting altered sedimentary rocks were prospected and sampled but no values were found. Nothing of
interest was reported from work done in the Ben Abel Lake area.
Kamloops Mining Division.—Considerable work was done in the area between
Lakeview and Eagle Creeks and some valuable gold-bearing quartz was found. Several
heavily oxidized outcrops were investigated and found to be worth further prospecting.
On Shuswap Lake some prospecting was done close to both Blind and Eagle Bays. The
exposed rock is mainly andesite, chlorite schist, and limestone showing some scattered
pyrite, but having no economic value. Some work was also done between Blind Bay,
White Lake, Charcoal Creek, Blanc Creek, and around Pement and Wallensteen Lakes,
but nothing of interest was reported.
Liard Mining Division.—Some work was done around Tuchodi Lakes and in the
Tetsa River valley, where some copper float was found. Prospecting was carried on as
far as 5 miles north and northeast of Tuya Lake, and in the Mount McGavin area.
Considerable lava, coarse granodiorite, mica schist, and serpentine was encountered,
but nothing of economic importance was reported. Some more work was also done near
the headwaters of Blue River, near Jennings Lakes, and near Tootsee Lake. In the
Rosella Creek area, outcrops of limestone, schist, and barite were investigated, and at
Poorman Lake some green copper stain was found, and fine colours of gold panned in a
small creek. Nothing of geological importance was found in ground explored at the
head of Moody Creek, near Snow Creek, or on the Horseranch Range of mountains. The
ground between McDonald Creek and Racing River received some further attention.
This area is all the more interesting since Magnum mines started work in the district.
Adjacent to the Tetsa Range, quartz, hematite, and magnetite along with small amounts
of copper were found, although nothing proved to be of commercial importance. At
Nine Mile Creek northeast of Telegraph Creek some inconclusive work was done, and
from a base camp established near Adsit Lake a large area was prospected, and some
basic rocks, narrow dykes, and granitic rocks were noted.
Lillooet Mining Division.—Some prospecting was done in the Bridge River area,
extending from Pearson Pond to Spruce Lake, and continuing on to Cardtable Mountain.
Some attention was paid to an exposure of limestone and altered sediments, but nothing
of importance was reported.
Nanaimo Mining Division.—Prospecting was continued in the Menzies Bay area
north of Campbell River. Small outcrops of copper-bearing quartz were explored, but
nothing of commercial value was reported. Inconclusive work was carried on around
Wolf Mountain, Bonell Creek, and the old O.K. mine. Several samples were turned in
containing good values in gold.
Nelson Mining Division.—At the south end of Kootenay Lake, prospecting was
continued northwest of the old Bayonne mine, up the west fork of Goat River, and at the DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 61
headwaters of Cameron Creek. Interesting geological conditions were reported, but
nothing of importance was found.
New Westminster Mining Division.—In the high, logged-off area adjacent to the
northeast side of Weaver Lake numerous narrow mineralized veins containing copper,
lead, and zinc minerals were found scattered through the exposed granite. These were
thoroughly prospected, but no continuity or increase in width was found to exist. Several
good exposures of copper ore were prospected on Agassiz Mountain, and further work
is warranted in this area. Near the Alexandra Bridge in the Fraser Canyon an exposure
of micaceous schist showing scattered mineralization of molybdenite received some
attention. The values were too low to be of importance. A small amount of work was
done several miles west of the Fraser River between Spuzzum and Clear Creeks. The
area is very rugged, and no mineralization of interest was reported. East of Boston
Bar, on the Anderson River, some inconclusive work was done. Exposures of slate,
diorite, limestone, and serpentine were reported. Between Harrison Lake and the head
of Spuzzum Creek much scattered molybdenite was found, but there was not enough
concentration to make the area interesting.
Nicola Mining Division.—Some good .work was done over an extensive area
extending from Juliet westerly to the headwaters of Anderson River. Narrow pegmatites,
gneissic granite, and considerable faulting were observed in the Murray Lake area. A
feldspathetic dyke containing pyrites and some manganese minerals was observed near
Alexander Lake, and at the headwaters of Anderson River many fine-grained andesitic
and rhyolitic dykes were reported. No important mineral occurrences were found, but
excellent prospecting was done. Some work was done on rusty outcrops between Stump
and Napier Lakes, near Brookmere, east of Aspen Grove, and at the north end of Mamit
Lake.   Nothing of interest was reported.
Omineca Mining Division.—A great deal of prospecting was done in this mining
division. In the Fraser Lake area, outcrops of granite and volcanics were prospected,
and a small deposit of kaolin was reported to have been discovered. Some time was spent
in the Dog Creek valley near Germansen Lake, in the Tarnezell Creek area, at the north
end of Trembleur Lake, and adjacent to the portage on Stuart Lake, but nothing of
interest was reported. At the end of the northwesterly arm of Stuart Lake some cinnabar
float was found. Several narrow veins containing manganese were uncovered on
McKelvey Island and on the adjacent mainland, but these were not of commercial value.
On the north shore of Pinchi Lake, east of the old Pinchi Lake mercury mine, a large
heavily faulted zone was given considerable attention. Some work was also done on and
adjacent to the south shore, near the centre of Trembleur Lake.
Several other areas around Manson Creek and Old Hogem received considerable
attention. These included Jackfish Creek, Twenty Mile Creek at the road crossing,
Osilinka River to Steele Creek, Groundhog Creek valley, Wolverine Lake area, headwaters of Granite Creek, and southeast end of Manson Lakes. Some interesting float
was found, and several areas showing interesting geological conditions were mapped for
further attention. Some prospecting was done in the Cheztainya Lake and Humphrey
Lake areas, which are mainly underlain by altered conglomerates with some surface
exposures of volcanics and granite.   Nothing of interest was found in the whole area.
From a base camp on the north side of Nation Lake, 6 miles from Nation River
outlet, an extensive area was prospected. This work was finally concentrated on an
exposure of low-grade copper mineralization close to the lake. Assays of samples taken
here were not commercial. Some work was also done near the centre of the south shore
of Tchentlo Lake, where outcrops of agglomerate, argillite, and serpentine were reported.
From the north end of Uslika Lake, extending northwesterly for 20 miles, a great
deal of prospecting was done, and several new discoveries of copper mineralization were
explored. A 62 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1958
Similkameen Mining Division.—East of the Hope-Princeton Highway, in the
Friday Creek area, a great deal of work was done prospecting successfully around some
old workings. Narrow but high-grade exposures of bornite occur over a large area.
More work will be done here. Some work was also done in the Railroad Creek valley
and in the Coquihalla River area, including the valleys of Divide and Podunk Creeks,
and much of the Sowaqua River valley. Rhyolite, argillite, iron-stained schist, some
granodiorite, and dark-coloured serpentine were observed, and some stringers of brittle
fibre asbestos up to 2 inches long were found in the serpentine. More work is warranted
in this area.
Skeena Mining Division.—Some attention was paid to areas close to Diana Lake,
Prudhomme Lake, and Rainbow Lake, where considerable magnetite was found. At
Diana Lake some float carrying high values in silver and lead was picked up, but nothing
was found in place. Sims Harbour on Porcher Island was investigated, and some narrow
veins containing pyrite and chalcopyrite were found in granite but proved to be noncommercial. Close to Claxton some work was done along a granite-sedimentary contact,
where a quartz vein containing iron pyrites was uncovered. On Kumealon Inlet a large
area underlain by a pure variety of limestone was prospected extensively, and this is
being investigated for use in the pulp industry.
Some work was also done on the Queen Charlotte Islands (Lyell Island), where
the source of placer gold in a stream was under investigation. On Pitt Island one man
continued his 1957 prospecting and turned in an excellent report of his findings over a
large area. The area reported on included Elbow Point area, McCauley Island, Mink
Trap Bay, Curtis Inlet, Union Passage, and Fin Island. This area shows a large variation
in the nature of the underlying rock, viz.: Quartz-diorite, granodiorite, coarse limestone,
biotite schist, gabbro, basalt, and monzonite. Nothing of commercial interest was
reported.
Some work was also done around Alice Arm, Roundy Creek, Larcom Island, head
of Hastings Arm, Donahue Creek, Lime Creek, and the south end of Porcher Island.
Nothing of interest was reported.
Slocan Mining Division.—Work was continued in the vicinity of Burton, including
Shannon Creek, Wilson Creek, Rodd Creek, Cariboo Creek, Bonanza Creek, Mosquito
Creek, Rossland Creek, Scalping Knife Mountain, and Snow Creek. Some small showings of molybdenite in granite were reported from the Snow Creek area. Nothing of
further interest was found.
Vancouver Mining Division.—Some work was done on the Toba River 8 miles from
the head of Toba Inlet. Several high assays were obtained from float material, but no
definite geological information is available. On Redonda Island further prospecting was
done in the vicinity of a discovery of molybdenite made last year. Small exposures were
found to be of commercial value, but no continuity was maintained in the deposit. In
the steep mountainous country behind Woodfibre a great deal of work was done in trying
to trace the Britannia shear zone.   No important zones were found.
Victoria Mining Division.—Some work was done around Brow Creek, near Port
Renfrew, and Harris Creek.   The result of this work was inconclusive.
MUSEUMS
The Department has a large exhibit of mineral rock specimens in the Douglas Building, Victoria; collections are also displayed in the joint office in Vancouver and in the
offices of the Inspectors of Mines in Nelson and Prince Rupert.
Specimens from the collection in Victoria, accumulated in a period of more than
sixty years, are displayed in cases on the fourth floor of the Douglas Building. The
collection includes specimens from many of the mines and prospects in the Province, and
also specimens of type rocks and special minerals from British Columbia and elsewhere. DEPARTMENTAL work
A 63
British Columbia material includes specimens collected by officers of the Department
of Mines and specimens donated by property-owners. The collection also includes type
specimens purchased from distributors. Other valued specimens or groups of specimens
have been donated or loaned to the museum.
ROCK AND MINERAL SPECIMENS
Information regarding collections of specimens of rocks and minerals available to
prospectors and schools in British Columbia may be obtained from the Chief of the
Mineralogical Branch.
PUBLICATIONS
Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines, bulletins, and other publications of the
Department, with prices charged for them, are listed in the Department of Mines List of
Publications available from the Chief of the Mineralogical Branch.
Publications may be obtained from the offices of the Department in Victoria and
elsewhere in the Province. They are also available for reference use in the Department's
library (Mineralogical Branch) at Victoria, in the joint office in Vancouver, and in the
offices of the Inspectors of Mines in Nelson and Prince Rupert, as well as in public
libraries.
MAPS SHOWING MINERAL CLAIMS, PLACER CLAIMS, AND
PLACER-MINING LEASES
From the details supplied by the locators, the approximate positions of mineral
claims held by record and of placer-mining leases are shown on maps that may be
inspected in the central records offices of the Department of Mines in Victoria and in
Vancouver. Copies of these maps may be obtained on request. The boundaries of
surveyed claims and leases are shown on the reference maps and other maps of the British
Columbia Department of Lands and Forests.
JOINT OFFICES OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES
AND THE DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND TECHNICAL SURVEYS,
CANADA.
The Provincial Department's Inspector and Resident Engineer, the Gold Commissioner and Mining Recorder for the Vancouver Mining Division, and the officers of the
Federal Geological Survey occupy one suite of offices. All official information relating
to mining is now available to the public in the one suite of offices in Vancouver.
The services offered to the public include technical information on mining, the
identification of mineral specimens, distribution of Federal and Provincial mining publications, a reference library, a display of rocks and minerals, and a central records office. Topographic Mapping and Air Photography
A satisfactory year of accomplishment in surveys and mapping was had by the
Surveys and Mapping Branch of the British Columbia Department of Lands and Forests,
and by the Departments of Mines and Technical Surveys and of National Defence of the
Canadian Government.
The British Columbia Government surveys for the final demarcation of the northern
boundary of the Province were successfully concluded in 1958.
The Legal Surveys Division of the Surveys and Mapping Branch is responsible
for cadastral surveys of all Crown lands in the Province and issued 608 sets of instructions
for surveys spread over the populated area. Notable amongst these is an area of 4,170
acres in the Peace River district from Hudson Hope east to the Beatton River road.
Forty-nine and one-half miles were surveyed for rights-of-way for new highways in the
vicinity of Yahk to Kingsgate, West Summerland to Peachland, Burns Lake, Allison
Lake, and Arras to Dawson Creek. In the course of such surveys, 251 old lot corners
were replaced by permanent monuments.
The Air Division of the Surveys and Mapping Branch, experiencing ideal flying
weather during the season, covered 20,000 square miles with narrow-angle l-inch-to-20-
chains scale vertical photography for the British Columbia Forest Service, and an additional 2,500 lineal miles of various types of photography for other Government branches.
These record operations added 26,000 photographs to the Air Photo Library, bringing
the total number of air photographs (Federal and Provincial) now on file at Victoria to
453,553.
The Interim Mapping Section of the Air Division completed approximately 30,000
square miles of l-inch-to-40-.chains scale mapping showing planimetry, watershed
boundaries, and cadastral surveys, bringing the total area of the Province covered by
this series to 224,000 square miles.
In the 1958 programme of operations the Topographic Division of the Surveys and
Mapping Branch nearly doubled its 1957 programme by completing field control for
twenty standard National Topographic map-sheets covering 7,600 square miles located
in the following areas: Mabel Lake, Clinton, Tatlayoko, Taseko and Chilco Lakes, and
an area east of Bella Coola.
Control was established for 1,315 square miles by sixty-one multiplex extensions
for l-inch-to-500-feet mapping with 10-foot contours in the vicinity of Vernon, and
forty-eight extensions for l-inch-to-l,000-feet mapping with 20-foot contours in the
Chemainus and Nanaimo River areas.
The Multiplex Section of the Topographic Division completed eleven projects
covering 3,042 square miles.
Map compilation and reproduction by the Geographic Division of the Surveys and
Mapping Branch resulted in the publishing of thirteen maps, seven of which are new
editions. Prominently featured during the year was the much requested two-sheet wall
map of the Province—No. 1a—scale 1:1,000,000 (approximately 1 inch to 16 miles).
Other new editions included four of the popular National Topographic series at 1-inch-
to-2-miles scale, i.e., 82 E/NE—Upper Kettle River, 92 G/SE—Langley, 92 I/NW—
Ashcroft, and 92 I/SW—Lytton, also two regional maps, i.e., 2c—Northerly Vancouver
Island—scale 1 inch to 4 miles and 3h—Tete Jaune—scale 1 inch to 3 miles.
The Canadian Government Departments of Mines and Technical Surveys and of
National Defence at Ottawa, working in close co-operation with Provincial agencies
during 1958, completed the field work for sixty-two half-sheets of the National Topographic 1:50,000 series in the Province.
The 1958 Annual Report of the Deputy Minister of Lands contains key maps
indicating coverage by air photographs and by topographic, interim, and lithographed
maps. Further information concerning these and the corresponding Federal mapping
may be obtained from the Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch, Department of Lands
and Forests, Victoria.
A 64 Department of Mines and Technical Surveys
The Canadian Government Department of Mines and Technical Surveys, created
by an Act of Parliament introduced in November, 1949, took over most of the branches
and functions related to mining of the former Department of Mines and Resources. The
Mines Branch, Geological Survey of Canada, and Surveys and Mapping Branch are the
three branches of the Department of the most direct interest to the mining industry.
Brief reference to the work of the Surveys and Mapping Branch in British Columbia is
made in the preceding note headed " Topographic Mapping and Air Photography."
A note on the Geological Survey of Canada follows this paragraph and is followed by
a note on the Mines Branch.
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA
By an arrangement made at the time the Province of British Columbia entered
Confederation, geological investigations and mapping in the Province are carried on by
the Geological Survey of Canada. Several geological parties are in the field each year.
Many excellent reports and maps covering areas of British Columbia have been issued
by the Geological Survey of Canada, and they have made available a great amount of
information that has been of much benefit to the mining and prospecting activities in
British Columbia.
A branch office of the Geological Survey of Canada is maintained in Vancouver.
Maps and reports on British Columbia can be obtained there. J. E. Armstrong is in
charge of this office.
Field Work by Geological Survey of Canada in British Columbia, 1958
H. H. Bostock began the geological mapping of Squamish (92 G, W. Vi) map-area.
H. Frebold studied Jurassic fauna and stratigraphy in the Tyaughton Lake area and
south of Nelson.
J. G. Fyles completed the field study and mapping of the surficial deposits on the
east coast of Vancouver Island between Cumberland and Campbell River (lowland parts
of 92 F/10, 11, 13, and 14 and K/3 and 4).
H. Gabrielse conducted stratigraphic studies and geological reconnaissance of
Kechika (94 L) and Rabbit River (94 M) map-areas.
H. W. Little began the revision of geological mapping in the Kettle River West Half
(82 E, W. V2) map-area.
D. C. McGregor collected flora from Lower Cretaceous and adjacent strata in the
foothills of Alberta and British Columbia.
B. R. Pelletier and W. B. Brady began and completed field work in the Tetsa River
(94 K/9) map-area.
R. A. Price began geological mapping of the Fernie East Half (82 G, E. V2) map-
area.   This map-area extends into Alberta.
J. E. Reesor continued his study of granitic rocks, making detailed field studies
within the Burton (82 F/13) and Passmore (82 F/12) map-areas.
E. F. Roots completed field work required to fill in gaps from Operation Stikine
within Bowser Lake (104 A), Spatsizi (104 H), and Dease Lake (104 J) map-areas.
J. G. Souther completed similar work in Iskut River (104 B) map-area and in
addition made a geological reconnaissance of Sumdum (104 F) map-area and the
southern half of Tulsequah (104 K) map-area.
D. F. Stott completed stratigraphic studies of Cretaceous strata in the foothills of
Alberta and British Columbia.
H. W. Tipper completed all but the northeast corner of Quesnel (93 B) map-area.
A 65 A 66 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1958
Publications of the Geological Survey
A total of fifteen publications of the Geological Survey of Canada relating to British
Columbia was received by the British Columbia Department of Mines in 1958. A list
of the fifteen publications will be supplied on request.
MINES BRANCH
The Mines Branch has branches dealing with mineral resources, mineral dressing
and process metallurgy, physical metallurgy, radioactivity, and fuels and explosives. A
total of six publications of the Mines Branch pertaining to British Columbia were
received in 1958 by the British Columbia Department of Mines. A list of these publications will be supplied on request. They included tabular pamphlets dealing with coal
mines, gold mines, stone quarries, petroleum refineries, and milling plants in Canada.

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