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Minister of Mines PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT for the Year Ended 31st December 1959 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1961

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 Minister of Mines
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
for the Year Ended 31st December
1959
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1960 BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES
VICTORIA, B.C.
Hon. W. K. Kiernan, Minister.
P. J. Mulcahy, Deputy Minister.
J. W. Peck, Chief Inspector of Mines.
S. Metcalfe, Chief Analyst and Assayer.
Hartley Sargent, Chief, Mineralogical Branch.
K. B. Blakey, Chief Gold Commissioner and Chief Commissioner,
Petroleum and Natural Gas.
J. D. Lineham, Chief, Petroleum and Natural Gas Conservation Branch. To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Mining Industry of the Province for the year 1959
is herewith respectfully submitted.
W. K. KIERNAN,
Minister of Mines.
Minister of Mines Office,
March 31st, 1960. Brian Terence O'Grady died at Victoria on luly 12th, 1959, at the
age of 76. He had been in the employ of the Department from 1920
until his retirement in April, 1948. He was very well known in the
mining industry.
Mr. O'Grady was born in Madras, India, and was educated in England at Wellington College and the Royal School of Mines. After three
years in South Africa he came to Canada in 1907. From 1910 to 1913
he was engineer in charge of surveys for the Municipality of Victoria.
He was on active service from 1914 to 1918, winning the Military Cross
and the Serbian White Eagle. He joined the Department as Assistant
Resident Mining Engineer at Revelstoke in 1920, became successively
Resident Mining Engineer at Nelson and Vancouver, and from 1938 was
engaged in special work at Victoria. In 1942 he joined up as a captain
in the Pacific Command and was field supervisor of the Pacific Coast
Militia Rangers. While in Victoria he was adviser to the Superintendent
of Brokers, and for several years after retirement he did consultive
engineering work for the Department of Public Works and the Department of Mines.
Mr. O'Grady is survived by his widow, one son, and one daughter. CONTENTS
Page
Introduction      A 9
Review of the Mineral Industry, 1959  A 10
Statistics—
Methods of Computing Production  A 12
Co-operation with Dominion Bureau of Statistics  A 13
Table I.—Total Mineral Production for All Years Up to and Including
1959  A 15
Table II.—Production for Each Year from 1836 to 1959, Inclusive...... A 15
Table III.—Quantity and Value of Mineral Products for Years 1950 to
1959  A 16
Table IV (Graph).—Mineral Production Value, 1895-1959  A 18
Table V (Graph).—Principal Lode-metals Production, 1913-1959  A 19
Table VI.—Production of Principal Metals, 1858-1959  A 20
Table VIIa.—Production, 1958 and 1959, by Mining Divisions—Summary   A 22
Table VIIb.—Production, 1958 and 1959, by Mining Divisions—Principal Lode Metals  A 23
Table Vile.—Production, 1958 and 1959, by Mining Divisions—Miscellaneous Metals   A 24
Table VIId.—Production, 1958 and 1959, by Mining Divisions—Industrial Minerals   A 25
Table VIIe.—Production,   1958  and  1959, by Mining Divisions—
Structural Materials   A 26
Table VIIIa.—Production to Date by Mining Divisions—Summary  A 27
Table VIIIb.—Production to Date by Mining Divisions—Principal Lode
Metals  A 28
Table VHIc.—Production to Date by Mining Divisions—Miscellaneous
Metals  A 29
Table VIIId.—Production to Date by Mining Divisions—Industrial
Minerals  A 31
Table VIIIe.—Production to Date by Mining Divisions—Structural
Materials  A 3 3
Table IXa.—Quantity (Gross) and Value of Coal per Year to Date __ A 34
Table IXb.—Coal Production (Gross) by Districts and Mining Divisions A 35
Table IXc—Quantity and Value of Coal Sold and Used, 1949-59  A 36
Table X.—Coke and By-products Production for Years 1895 to 1925
and 1926 to 1959  A 37
Table XL—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1959  A 38
Table XII.—Principal Items  of Expenditure,  Reported for Mining
Operations of All Classes  A 42
Table XIII.—Average Number Employed in the Mining Industry, 1901—
59  A 43
Table XIV.—Lode-metal Mines—Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and
Gross Value of Principal Metals, 1901-59  A 44
Table XV.—Lode-metal Production in 1959  A 45
Table XVI.—Lode-metal Mines Employing an Average of Ten or More
Men during 1959  A 50
A 5 A 6 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1959
Pace
Departmental Work   A 51
Administration Branch  A 51
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)  A 51
List of Gold Commissioners  A 52
Gold Commissioners' and Mining Recorders' Office Statistics, 1959 A 53
Coal, Petroleum and Natural Gas  A 54
Analytical and Assay Branch  A 55
Inspection Branch   A 57
Mineralogical Branch  A 58
Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch  A 59
Grub-staking Prospectors  A 60
Museums  A 65
Rock and Mineral Specimens  A 65
Publications  A 65
Maps Showing Mineral Claims, Placer Claims, and Placer-mining Leases A 65
Joint Offices of the British Columbia Department of Mines and the
Department of Mines and Technical Surveys, Canada  A 65
Topographic Mapping and Air Photography  A 66
Department of Mines and Technical Surveys  A 68
Geological Survey of Canada  A 68
Field Work by the Geological Survey in British Columbia, 1959  A 68
Publications of the Geological Survey  A 69
Mines Branch  A 69
Mineral Resources Division  A 69
Lode Metals       1
Reports on Geological, Geophysical, and Geochemical Work  142
Placer  145
Structural Materials and Industrial Minerals  150
Petroleum and Natural Gas  202
Inspection of Lode Mines, Placer Mines, and Quarries  230
Coal  251
Inspection of Electrical Equipment and Installations  275
Lode-metal Deposits Referred to in the 1959 Annual Report  284
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Photographs
Buck Channel, northwest Moresby Island  13
Harriet Harbour, southeast Moresby Island  13
Rose mineral claim, Ikeda Cove, 1907  16
One-man diamond drill, Harriet Harbour  16
Toad River from Fort Reliance Minerals property  20
Looking northward from Fort Reliance Minerals camp  20 CONTENTS A 7
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS—Continued
Photographs—Continued
Page
Snowshoe pit, Phoenix  59
Mother Lode pit, Greenwood  59
Mineral King property, Toby Creek  79
Mineral King glory-hole  79
Mouth of Sullivan River, Kinbasket Lake  93
Mouth of Kinbasket River  93
Mastodon skipway, La Forme Creek  113
Dragfolds in limestone, Mastodon mine  113
Manning Park from Valley View Lookout...  125
Giant Nickel Mines Limited, mill  125
Volcanic ash, Deadman River  183
Wonah quartzite, Moberly Mountain  183
Drawings
Figure
1. Mineral claims near Harriet Harbour, Moresby Island  11
2. Geology of Jessie ore zone, Harriet Harbour Facing 12
3. Part of 3500 level, Craigmont mine  32
4. Last Chance showing, Swakum Mountain  37
5. Lodestone Mountain stock, Tulameen  41
6. Geology of part of Lodestone Mountain Facing 45
7. Geology of part of Tanglewood Hill  47
8. Detail of Figure 7  49
9. Geology of Mineral King area Facing 75
10. Geological cross-sections, Mineral King area  76
11. Plan of part of Mineral King mine  83
12. Isometric diagram of upper part of Mineral King orebodies  86
13. Geology of Columbia River valley, Rocky Mountain Trench Facing 91
14. Geological cross-sections, Columbia River valley  96
15. Geology of part of Mastodon mine, La Forme Creek  108
16. Geological cross-sections, Mastodon mine  110
17. Diagram of plunges of dragfolds, Mastodon mine  115
18. Geology of north showings Facing 116 A 8 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1959
Drawings—Continued
Figure
19. Part of Big Ben group, Similkameen Mining Division  120
20. Geology of part of A.M. group  123
21. Taiga Mines Ltd., Lang Bay, drill-holes and trenches  128
22. Taiga Mines Ltd., Lang Bay, sections through drill-holes   129
23. Mount Washington Copper Co. Ltd., plan of showings  136
24. Cowichan Copper Co. Ltd., Sunnyside adit and vicinity  139
25. Diatomite occurrences in the Quesnel area  157
26. Diatomite on Lots 9973 and 11697  159
27. Diatomite on Lot 906  162
28. Limestone in the Kamloops area  169
29. Limestone in the West Kootenay area  171
30. Magnesite at Perry Creek  177
31. Volcanic ash on Deadman River  182
32. Silica sand on Mount Moberly  200 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTER
OF MINES 1959
Introduction
A Report of the Minister of Mines of the Province of British Columbia has been
published each year since 1874.
The Annual Report records the salient facts in the progress of the mineral
industry, also much detail about individual operations, including those undertaken
in the search for, exploration of, and development of mineral deposits, as well as
the actual winning of material from mineral deposits.
The Annual Report of the Minister of Mines now contains introductory sections dealing with Statistics and Departmental Work, followed by sections dealing
with Lode Metals; Placer; Structural Materials and Industrial Minerals; Petroleum
and Natural Gas; Inspection of Lode Mines, Placer Mines, and Quarries; Coal;
and Inspection of Electrical Equipment and Installations at Mines and Quarries,
each with its own table of contents. A table listing the properties described, in
geographic groupings, precedes the index.
An introductory review of the mineral industry and notes at the first of several
of the main sections deal generally with the industry or its principal subdivisions.
Notes in the various sections deal briefly with exploration or production operations
during the year or describe a property in more complete detail, outlining the history
of past work and the geological setting as well as describing the workings and the
mineral deposits exposed in them. Some notes deal with areas rather than with a
single property.
The work of the branches of the Department is outlined briefly in the section
on Departmental Work. This section is followed by notes dealing briefly with the
work of other British Columbia or Federal Government services of particular interest to the mineral industry of British Columbia. Information concerning mine
operations and some of the activities of the Inspection Branch of the Department
of Mines is contained in the section on Inspection of Lode Mines, Placer Mines,
and Quarries, early in the section on Coal and in the section on Inspection of Electrical Equipment and Installations at Mines and Quarries.
The section on Statistics begins with an outline of current and past practice in
arriving at quantities and calculating the value of the various products.
A 9 Review of the Mineral Industry*
The final figures for 1959 mineral production in British Columbia indicate
that, compared with 1958, the aggregate value increased 2.8 million dollars. However, the 1959 figure, $149,568,162, is 8 per cent below the average for the past
decade.
Compared with 1958, the value for principal metals was virtually unchanged,
gains were recorded for miscellaneous metals, industrial minerals, and fuels, and a
5-per-cent loss was recorded for structural materials.
Average prices for the principal metals year by year are shown on page A 14.
The 1959 price for gold, almost the lowest in ten years, reflects the high discount on
United States funds in Canada. The average discount for 1959 was 4.09 per cent,
compared with 2.91 per cent for 1958. For silver, copper, and zinc, price gains
more than offset the greater discount, and the prices in Canadian funds exceeded
those of 1958.   The lead price was slightly below that of 1958.
The price for copper improved almost 12 per cent compared with the 1958
price and stimulated copper output, which substantially exceeded the 1958 figures
in quantity and value. The improvement in copper production is partly obscured
by the fact that from late August until the last few days of 1959 the Tacoma smelter
was closed because of a strike. During that period most of the copper concentrates
produced in British Columbia and some gold concentrates were stockpiled.
Although the mines operated during the period, the concentrates remaining in the
stockpiles at the end of the year are not credited to 1959 production.
For the other lode metals of the principal metals group, 1959 quantities were
a little below those of 1958 and, except for zinc, values also were below 1958 levels.
The miscellaneous metals group increased, compared with 1958, because of
increases in iron ore and by-product metals. Industrial minerals increased because
of increases in asbestos, sulphur, and gypsum. The decline in the structural materials
group from the 1958 level stems from reduced output of sand, gravel, rubble, riprap,
and crushed stone; the other items of the group—cement, lime and limestone, and
stone—increased. Coal output has been falling since 1956, and the 1959 value was
about half that of 1956; however, increases for oil, natural gas, and natural-gas
liquids more than offset the decrease in coal, giving a combined value for fuels that
is the highest in three decades.
Comparison of 1959 output for any mineral product with that of 1958 or any
year in the period 1950-59 can readily be made in Table III, pages A 16 and A 17.
The percentage of the aggregate value contributed by each group of products in
1959, with the average for the ten-year period in brackets, were: Principal metals,
62.6 (72.7) per cent; miscellaneous metals, 7.6 (6.8) per cent; industrial minerals, 9.4 (4.5) per cent; structural materials, 12.7 (9.8) per cent; fuels, 7.6 (6.0)
per cent.
Comparison with earlier decades would make it apparent that industrial
minerals and structural materials, and some metals of the miscellaneous group have
been gaining in relative importance as well as in dollar value.
The increased output of copper resulted from the resumption of production
at the Britannia and Woodgreen mines and the beginning of production by Phoenix
Copper Company Limited. Nickel production was resumed at the Pride of Emory
property, which had closed in 1958. Iron ore was shipped from four mines, the
Nimpkish and Hualpai companies shipping for the first time. The Torbrit company
closed its operation at Alice Arm, having produced 18,600,000 ounces of silver
since production began in 1949.
*By Hartley Sargent.
A   10 REVIEW OF THE MINERAL INDUSTRY,  1959 A  11
Exploration and development were carried on actively in many parts of the
Province, interest being directed toward the principal metals, toward iron and molybdenum, and also toward siliceous flux and industrial minerals. The number of
lode mineral claims recorded in 1959 was 13,455, just four fewer than in 1958;
the number of certificates of work issued was 13,818, some 3,760 more than in 1958.
The acreage held for petroleum and natural gas under lease, permit, or licence
in northeastern British Columbia increased; holdings in other areas decreased
substantially. Exploration was carried on in many areas, but drilling was confined
to northeastern British Columbia. In that area drilling was done on 140 wells—
forty-four were completed as gas wells, twenty as oil wells, forty-six were abandoned,
and at the end of the year two were suspended and twenty-eight drilling. Production
of oil, natural gas, and natural-gas liquids all increased, oil production increasing
more than 50 per cent compared with 1958.
Revenue to the Government from petroleum and natural gas amounted to
$16,575,155.81, including rental fees, penalties, and miscellaneous $4,790,850.90,
tender bonus $10,990,814.32, and royalties $793,453.90.
The average number employed through 1959 in placer, lode, coal, industrial-
mineral, and structural-material mining was 10,779. Major expenditures by all
branches of the industry included: Salaries and wages, $49,961,996; fuel and
electricity, $7,677,321; process supplies (inclusive of explosives, chemicals, drill-
steel, lubricants, etc.), $17,371,638; Federal taxes, $8,401,819; Provincial taxes,
$2,195,194; municipal and other taxes, $2,059,480; levies for workmen's compensation (including silicosis), unemployment insurance, and other items, $2,140,-
113. Dividends amounted to $16,444,281. The lode-mining industry spent
$27,079,911 in freight and treatment charges on ores and concentrates. Returns
from the operators indicate that in addition to the foregoing items the metal-mining
and industrial-mineral sections of the industry spent a further $640,000 for work
done by contract.
Of the expenditures listed in the preceding paragraph, $5,892,000 is expenditure by the petroleum and natural-gas section of the industry. A return from the
Canadian Petroleum Association shows that on December 31st, 1959, the number
employed in petroleum and natural-gas activities in British Columbia was 473, and
the total expenditure in 1959 (including the $5,892,000 already mentioned) was
$57,450,000, made up of: Exploration, $42,942,000; development drilling,
$5,503,000; capital expenditures (mainly field equipment), $3,540,000; operation of wells, $1,138,000; natural-gas plants, $3,440,000; taxes and royalties,
$737,000; and all other expenses, $150,000.
Statistics
The statistics of the mineral industry are collected and compiled and the
statistical tables for this Report are prepared by the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics, Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce.
The tabulated statistics are designed to cover mineral production in quantity
and value, employment, principal expenditures of the mineral industry, and dividends paid. The data are arranged so as to facilitate comparison of the production
records for the various mining divisions, and from year to year (1951, 1958).*
From time to time, revisions have been made to earlier figures as additional
data became available or errors came to light.
* In these notes, references such as (1958) are to this section of the Report of the Minister of Mines for
the year indicated, where additional information will be found. A 12 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1959
METHODS OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION
The tables of statistics recording the mineral production of the Province for
each year are compiled from certified returns made by the operators, augmented by
some data obtained from the Royal Canadian Mint, from the operators of custom
smelters, and from the records of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch of the
Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources.   The values are in Canadian funds.
Metals
Prior to 1925 the average prices for gold and copper are true average prices,
but, as a means of correcting for losses in smelting and refining, the prices of other
metals were taken at the following percentages of the year's average price for the
metal: Silver, 95 per cent; lead, 90 per cent; and zinc, 85 per cent. For 1925
and subsequent years the value has been calculated using the true average price and
the net metal contents, in accordance with the procedures adopted by the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics and the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources.
Placer Gold
The value of placer gold in dollars is obtained from returns received annually
from the operators (1958). A fineness of 822Vi is taken as the average for crude
placer gold (p. A 14).
Lode Metals, Gross and Net Contents, and Calculated Value
The gross contents are compiled from the returns made each year by the producers and for any metal are the total assay contents, obtained by multiplying the
assay by the weight of ore, concentrates, or bullion.
The value for each principal metal is calculated by multiplying the quantity
(gross for gold, net for silver, copper, lead, and zinc) by the average price for the
year. The net contents are calculated by taking a percentage of the gross content:
in lead ores and concentrates and zinc concentrates—silver, 98 per cent; lead, 95
per cent; zinc, 85* per cent of the total assay content; and in copper concentrates,
95 per cent of the silver and the total assay content of copper less 10 pounds per
ton of concentrates.
Average Metal Prices
The methods of computing prices have varied because of changing conditions
(1958). The prices are now arrived at by methods given in footnotes to the table
of average prices on page A 14.
Fuel
Coal
All coal produced, including that used in making coke, is shown as primary
mine production. As the data are of interest to the mining industry, Table X is
included in the Report to show the total coke and by-products made in the Province,
and the values given by the producers. Pre-1926 data have been reworked and
brought into conformity with current practice. Quantities of coal or coke, expressed
as long tons (2,240 pounds) until 1947, have been recalculated as short tons (2,000
pounds) (1958).
* For zinc concentrates shipped to foreign smelters the net contents are calculated as the assay content less
eight units of zinc per ton of concentrate. STATISTICS A 13
The average price for coal, listed year by year (see p. A 14), is the total value
divided by the quantity. Up to and including 1945, the quantity (Table IXa) is the
gross mine output; for 1946 and subsequent years, the quantity is that sold and
used (Tables IXa and IXc). For 1946 and subsequent years, the value (Tables I,
III, VIIa, IXa, IXb, and IXc) is the amount realized from sales of coal, at colliery
loading points, plus the colliery valuation of coal used under companies' boilers
and in making coke. Washery loss and changes in stocks, year by year, are shown
in the table " Collieries of British Columbia, Production and Distribution by Collieries and by Districts " (p. 253).
Natural Gas
Commercial production of natural gas began in 1954. The production* shown
in Tables I, III, VIIa, and VIIIa is the total dry and residue gas sold. The quantity
is reported as thousands of cubic feet at standard conditions (14.4 pounds per
square inch pressure, 60° F. temperature).
Natural-gas Liquid By-products
This heading covers condensate removed from natural gas in preparation for
transmission through the main gas pipe-line. The by-products* consist of butane,
propane, and natural gasoline.
Petroleum
Production of petroleum began in 1955, and is shown* in Tables I, III, VIIa,
and VIIIa.   The quantity is reported in barrels (35 imperial gallons=l barrel).
CO-OPERATION WITH DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS
In the interests of uniformity and to avoid duplication of effort, beginning with
the statistics for 1925, arrangements were made between the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics and the various Provincial Departments for co-operation in the collection
and processing of mineral statistics. Producers of metals, industrial minerals,
structural materials, and coal are requested to submit returns in duplicate on forms
prepared for use by the Province and by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
So far as possible both organizations follow the same practice in processing
the data. The final compilation by the Dominion Bureau is usually published considerably later than the Report of the Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources
for British Columbia. When the publications are compared, some differences
became apparent. Differences in quantities of metals arise primarily from the fact
that the Dominion Bureau bases its quantities mainly on returns made by smelter
operators, whereas the British Columbia Mining Statistician uses the returns from
individual mines covering shipments in the same period. Since the arrangement
was made between the statisticians, the production of copper and zinc, and to a lesser
extent of lead, has increased in other parts of Canada. The Dominion Bureau now
uses prices for those metals that may differ from those applicable to British Columbia
production. The latter continues to be valued mainly on United States prices converted to Canadian funds. Another reason for differences in the total net value of
mineral products for British Columbia arises from the fact that the Dominion Bureau
includes peat under the classification fuel. Peat has not been regarded as mineral
or fuel in British Columbia and accordingly is not included in the Provincial statistics of mineral production.
* The figures are compiled from the monthly disposition report and Crown royalty statement filed with the
Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources by the producer. A 14
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1959
Average Prices Used in Valuing Provincial Production of Gold,
Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, and Coal
Year
Gold,1
Crude,
Oz.
Gold,
Fine,
Oz.
Silver,
Fine,
Oz.
Copper,
Lb.
Lead,
Lb.
Zinc,
Lb.
Coal,
Short
Ton
1901     	
$
17.00
19.30
23.02
28.37
28.94
28.81
28.77
28.93
29.72
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
30.22
28.78
28.78
29.60
31.29
30.30
28.18
28.31
27.52
28.39
28.32
27.59
27.94
27.61
$
20.07
	
	
23.47
28.60
34.50
35.19
35.03
34.99
35.18
36.14
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
36.75
35.00
35.00
36.00
38.05
36.85
34.27
34.42
34.07
34.52
34.44
33.55
33.98
33.57
Cents
56.002 N.Y.
49.55  „
50.78 „
53.36 ,,
51.33  „
63.45
62.06
50.22
48.03
50.812 ,,
50.64 „
57.79 „
56.80 ,,
52.10  ,,
47.20
62.38
77.35
91.93
105.57  ,.
95.80  ,,
59.52  ,,
64.14
61.63
63.442 ,,
69.065 ,,
62.107 „
56.37 ,,
58.176 „
52.993 „
38.154 ,,
28.700 ,,
31.671 „
37.832 „
47.461 „
64.790 „
45.127 „
44.881 „
43.477 ,,
40.488 „
38.249 „
38.261 ,,
41.166 „
45.254 „
43.000 ,,
47.000 „
83.650 „
72.000 ,,
75.000 Mont.
74.250 U.S.
80.635 ,,
94.55
83.157 ,,
83.774 ,,
82.982 „
87.851 „
89.373 „
87.057 „
86.448 ,,
87.469 „
Cents
16.11 N.Y.
11.70  „
13.24  „
12.82
15.59
19.28  ,,
20.00  ,,
13.20
12.98
12.738 „
12.38
16.341 ,,
15.27  „
13.60  ,,
17.28
27.202 ,,
27.18  ,,
24.63
18.70
17.45
12.50  ,,
13.38
14.42
13.02
14.042 „
13.795 „
12.92
14.570 „
18.107 „
12.982 „
8.116 „
6.380 Lond.
7.454 „
7.419 „
7.795 „
9.477 „
13.078 „
9.972 „
10.092 „
10.086 „
10.086 „
10.086 ,,
11.75
12.000 „
12.550 ,,
12.80  „
20.39
22.35 U.S.
19.973 „
23.428 „
27.70  ,,
31.079 „
30.333 „
29.112 „
38.276 „
39.787 „
20.031 ,,
23.419 ,,
27.708 „
Cents
2.577 N.Y.
3.66
3.81
3.88  „
4.24
4.81
4.80  ,,
3.78
3.85
4.00  ,,
3.98
4.024 „
3.93  „
3.50
4.17
6.172 ,,
7.91
0.67
5.19
7.16  „
4.09
5.16  „
6.54
7.287 ,,
7.848 Lond.
6.751 ,,
5.256 ,.
4.575 ,,
5.050 ,.
3.927 „
2.710 „
2.113 ,,
2.391 ,,
2.436 ,,
3.133 ,,
3.913 .,
5.110 „
3.344 ,,
3.169 ,,
3.362 .,
3.362 ,,
3.362 „
3.754 ,,
4.500 „
5.000 „
6.750 „
13.670 „
18.040 „
15.800 U.S.
14.454 „
18.4
16.121 „
13.205 „
13.680 „
14.926 „
15.756 „
14.051 „
11.755 ,,
11.670 „
Cents
$
1902	
1903	
1904	
1905      	
1906  	
1907	
3 125
1908         	
1909
1910         	
4.60 E. St. L.
4.90  „
5.90  „
4.80  „
4.40
11.25  „
10.88  „
7.566 ,,
6.94  „
6.24  „
6.52  „
3.95
4.86  „
5.62
5.39
7.892 Lond.
7.409 „
6.194 „
5.493 „
5.385 „
3.599 ,,
2.554 „
2.405 „
3.210 „
3.044 „
3.099 „
3.315 „
4.902 ,,
3.073 ,,
3.069 „
3.411 „
3.411 „
3.411 ,,
4.000 „
4.300 „
6.440 „
7.S10 „
11.230 „
13.930 „
13.247 U.S.
15.075 ,,
19.9
15.874 „
10.675 ,,
10.417 „
12.127 „
13.278 „
11.175 „
10.009 ,.
10.978 „
1911....       	
1912      	
1913	
1914	
191B 	
1916  	
1917        	
1919	
1921         	
1922        	
1925.....       	
1926	
1927 ..       	
1928         	
1929  	
1930   	
4.018
1932     	
3.795
1933	
1934	
1935..         	
1936          	
1938         	
1939	
1941	
1942 	
1944  	
1945        	
4.68
5.12
1948        	
6.09
6.51
6.43
6.46
1952          	
6.94
1953         	
6.88
1954          	
7.00
1955        	
6.74
1956          	
6.59
6.76
7.45
7.93
1 Unrefined placer gold, average price per ounce, is taken as $17 divided by $20.67 times the price of an
ounce of fine gold.
Prices for fine gold are the Canadian Mint buying prices. Prices for other metals are those of the markets
indicated, converted into Canadian funds. The abbreviations are: Mont.=Montreal; N.Y.=New York;
Lond.=London;   E. St. L.=East St. Louis;   and U.S.=United States.
Prior to 1925 the prices for gold and copper are true average prices, but the prices of other metals were
taken at the following percentages of the year's average price for the metal: Silver, 95 per cent; lead, 90 per
cent;   and zinc, 85 per cent.
For coal see last paragraph under " Fuel," page A 13. Table I.—Total Mineral Production for All Years Up to and
Including 1959
Total Quantity     Total Value
Quantity, 1959
Value, 1959
Gold-
-placer-
iode	
..crude, oz.
 fine, oz.
Silver	
Copper-
Lead	
..lb.
..lb.
Zinc	
Miscellaneous metals1-
Industrial minerals2	
Structural materials3	
Coal*   	
..lb.
Natural gas delivered direct to pipe-line-
Natural-gas liquid by-products5 	
Petroleum, crude  —.
 tons
_M s.c.f.
-bbls.
Totals-
5,213,516
15,509,443
416,319,732
2,945,608,237
12,844,584,437
10,661,832,830
142,072,696
143,058,018
1,872,915
$96.
447.
251,
484,
943,
860.
151.
102.
287.
551,
7,
,322,003
785,413
,574,189
,580,078
,571,720
,903,024
,442,183
484,431
,753,534
618,564
775,815
893,359
,646,389
7,570
173,146
6,197,159
16,233,546
287,423,357
402,342,850
690,011
69,959,566
866,109
$208,973
5,812,511
5,420,593
4,497,991
33,542,306
44,169,198
11,424,134
14,028,055
19,025,209
5,472,064
3,928,839
465,062
1,573,227
$4,190,350,702
$149,568,162
1 For individual miscellaneous metals, see Table III and VIIIc, pages A 16 and A 29.
2 For individual industrial minerals, including sulphur, see Tables III and VIIId, pages A 16 and A 31.
3 For individual structural materials, see Tables III and VIIIe, pages A 16 and A 33.
i Total quantity is gross mine output;   it includes material discarded in picking and washing.   The quantity
shown for 1959 is that sold and used (see also Table IXc).
5 Includes value of propane, butane, and natural-gasoline shipments.
Table II.—Production for Each Year from 1836 to 1959, Inclusive
1836-95 (incl.)._. $95,027,608
1896  7,507,956
1897  10,455,268
1898  10,906,861
1899  12,429,707
1900  16,344,751
1901  19,671,572
1902  17,486,550
1903  17,495,954
1904  18,977,359
1905  22,600,525
1906  24,997,646
1907  25,928,660
1908  23,950,573
1909  24,443,025
1910  26,377,066
1911  23,499,072
1912  32,440,800
1913  30,296,398
1914  26,388,825
1915  29,447,508
1916  42,290,462
1917  37,010,392
1918  41,782,474
1919  33,296,313
1920  35,543,084
1921  28,066,641
1922  35,162,843
1923  41,304,320
1924  48,704,604
1925  61,492,242
1926  67,188,842
1927  60,729,358
1928  65,372,583
1929   $68,791,020
1930-
1931_-
1932-
1933—
1934—
1935—
1936-
1937—
1938-
1939-
1940-
1941-
1942-
1943-
1944—
1945-
1946-
  55,769,578
  35,247,837
  28,803,214
  32,652,542
  42,481,319
  48,886,303
  54,179,442
  74,475,902
  64,485,551
  65,707,398
  75,121,424
  77,514,446
  76,699,878
  67,204,417
54,740,844
62,070,548
  72,453,745
1947-   112,582,204
1948  145,517,874
1949  132,956,254
1950  139,837,689
1951  176,330,205
1952  171,309,429
1953  153,193,544
1954  153,267,393
1955  174,711,086
1956  190,084,303
1957  172,331,610
1958  146,757,699
1959  149,568,162
Total $4,190,350,702
Note.—For revisions to lead and zinc production see footnote 3, Table VI.
A  15 A  16
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1959
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REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1959
Table IXa.—Quantity (Gross1) and Value of Coal per Year to Date
Year
Tons
(2,000 Lb.)
Value
Year
Tons
(2,000 Lb.)
Value
Hnfi-59
41,871
15,956
15,427
20,292
23,906
32,068
36,757
28,129
34,988
49,286
40,098
33,424
55,458*
55,4582
55,4592
91,334
123,362
155,895
172,540
191,348
270,257
299,708
255,760
315,997
238,895
441,358
409,468
365,832
462,964
548,017
649,411
759,518
1,152,590
925,495
1,095,690
1,134,509
1,052,412
1,002,268
999,372
1,263,272
1,435,314
1,781,000
1,894,544
1,838,621
1,624,742
1,887,981
2,044,931
2,126,965
2,485,961
2,362,514
2,688,672
3,515,944
$149,548
56,988
55,096
72,472
85,380
115,528
131,276
100,460
124,956
176,020
143,208
119,372
164,612
164,612
164,612
244,641
330,435
417,576
462,156
522,538
723,903
802,785
685,171
846,417
639,897
1,182,210
1,096,788
979,908
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,824,687
2,693,961
2,734,522
3,582,595
4,126,803
4,744,530
5,016,398
4,832,257
4,332,297
4,953,024
5,511,861
5,548,044
7,637,713
7,356,866
8,574,884
11,108,335
1911	
2,573,444
3,388,795
2,879,251
2,426,399
2,209,290
2,783,849
2,686,561
2,888,170
2,698,022
3,020,387
2,877,995
2,890,625
2,848,146
2,226,037
2,737,607
2,609,640
2,748,286
2,829,906
2,521,402
2,113,586
1,912,501
1,719,172
1,416,516
1,508,741
1,330,524
1,508,048
1,618,051
1,466,559
1,655,217
1,867,966
2,018,635
2,170,737
2,040,253
2,165,676
1,700,914
1,639,277
1,923,573
1,809,018
1,917,296
1,756,667
1,824,384
1,650,619
1,576,105
1,447,608
1,484,066
1,589,398
1,221,766
882,962
757,628
$8,071,747
1860
1912	
10,786,812
1861
1913...	
9,197,460
1862.   . . .
1914	
7,745,847
1863	
1915	
7,114,178
1864. -
1916 	
8,900,675
1865
1917  ....
8,484,343
1866
1918 	
12,833,994
1867
1919	
11,975,671
1868
1970
13,450,169
1869
1971
12,836,013
1870	
1922.  . .
1923	
12,880.060
1R71
12,678,548
1872
19?4
9,911,935
1873  _.
1874
1925	
12,168,905
11,650,180
1875	
1927	
1928.  	
12,269,135
1876
12,633,510
1877	
1929	
1930     -
11,256,260
1878
9 435,650
1879
1931. 	
7,684,155
1880
1932
6,523 644
1881
1933     .     . .
5 375 171
1882
1934 	
5,725,133
1883
1935  	
5,048,864
1884
1936  -	
5,722,502
1885
1937 _
6,139,920
1886
1938..	
5,565,069
1887
1939  - - .
6,280,956
1888
1940 —
7,088,265
1941
7,660 000
1942.	
8,237,172
1891
1943.. .-       	
7,742,030
1892
1944     - .
8,217,966
1893
1945     	
6,454,360
1894
1946  -- -	
6,732,470
1895
1947 -
8,680,440
1896
1948. 	
9,765,395
1949    	
10 549 924
1950        	
10,119,303
10,169,617
9,729,739
9,528,279
9,154,544
1951        	
1900	
1901
1952   	
1953  . ..	
1902
1954   	
1903
1955
8,986,501
9,346,518
7,340,339
1904
1956
1905
1957
1906
195R
5 937 860
1959   .    	
1908
Totals	
IQfW
142,140,313
551,618,564
1910
1 Gross mine output, including washery loss and coal used in making coke  {see Table X and discussion
under " Fuel," page A 12).
2 A combined total for 1871, 1872, and 1873 has previously been noted in Annual Reports and the above
breakdown is estimated. STATISTICS A 35
Table IXb.—Coal Production (Gross1) by Districts and Mining Divisions
District and Mining Division
Total to Date
1958
1959
Period
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Vancouver Island District
Nanaimo Mining Division	
Nicola-Princeton District
1836-1959
1893-1945
1907-1959
1926-1927
1909-1959
Tons
80,017,027
14,995
2,929,331
1,122
4,654,140
$
297,251,634
59,765
11,074,901
5,008
19,541,399
Tons
182,304
$
1,615,490
Tons
137,240
$
1,415,971
Nicola Mining Division	
543
5,919
416
1,161
3,710
Similkameen Mining Division-
146
1,122
8,527
District totals	
1893-1959
7,599,588
30,681,073
689
7,041
1,577
12,237
Northern District
1942-1944
1923-1959
1918-1959
290
93,156
417,281
1,100
637,330
2,590,461
Liard Mining Division	
Omineca Mining Division	
3,094
5,233
28,738
44,972
3,319
5,453
31,040
55,318
District totals 	
1918-1959
510,727
3,228,891
8,327
73,710
8,772
86,358
East Kootenay District
Fort Steele Mining Division
1898-1959
54,012,971
220,456,966
691,642 |
4,241,619
542,422
3,957,498
Provincial totals 	
1836-1959
142,140,313
551,618,564
882,962
5,937,860
690,011
5,472,064
1 Gross mine output, including washery loss and coal used in making coke (see Table X and discussion
under " Fuel," page A 12). Table IXc.—Quantity1 and Value of Coal Sold and Used,2 1949-59
Year
District and
Mining Division
Total
Sales2*
Used
under
Companies'
Boilers2t
Used in
Making
Coke2*  '
Total Sold
and Used2
District Totals,
1959  '
Tons
Tons
Tons
Tons
$
Tons
137,240
1,577
8,772
542,422
690,011
$
1,415,971
1949
Nar
451,074
472,690
391,687
267,346
204,931
181,534
173,861
172,140
163,574
153,892
136,879
3,925
4,329
3,425
2,986
1,798
536
465
389
439
404
361
454,999
477,019
395,112
270,332
206,729
182,070
174,326
172,529
164,013
154,296
137,240
4,055,572
4,060,337
3,486,615
2,749,206
2,059,828
2,029,099
1,769,682
1,629,168
1,849,306
1,615,470
1,415,971
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954   I
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
Nicola
Nic
-Princeton...
12,237
1,672
1,125
899
1,139
1,040
1,256
1,259
1,170
1,081
543
416
49.90G
16,784
3,941
6,306
7,047
29,713
73,475
72,102
17,696
146
1,161
1,672
1,125
899
1,139
1,040
1,256
1,259
1,170
1,081
543
416
49,906
16,784
3,941
6,306
7,047
29,713
73,475
72,102
17,696
146
1,181
14,809
9,926
8,640
11.493
10,400
12,769
12,904
12,092
11,615
5,919
3,710
298,293
87,483
28,094
48,760
51,012
138,080
379,511
366,820
92,748
1,122
8,527
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956 1
1957 1
1958
1959   |
1949   1      Sim
ilkameen—
1950
North
Lia
Om
East I
For
Provir
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
19S9
86,358
1949
rd	
12,364
12,250
3,199
3,854
4,815
4,359
3,650
4,642
2,758
3,194
3,319
11,468
13,037
27,904
37.270
42,079
36,572
30,015
8,553
4,9<U
4,677
5,453
12,364
12,250
3,199
3,854
4,835
4,359
3,650
4,642
2,758
3,194
3,319
11,531
13.099
27,904
37,270
42,079
36,572
30,015
8,553
4,9!U
4.677
5,453
76,697
82,258
26,095
42,606
50,895
33,079
32,850
38,211
28,421
28,738
31,040
92,865
104,790
206,799
285,732
324,986
292,862
227,010
71,234
47,414
44,972
55,318
1950
1951
1952
1953
20
1954
1955
....
1956
1957
1958
1959
1949
63
62
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
	
1956
I
1957
1958
            |
1959
    I    	
Lootenay
t Steele	
1949
1950
842,979
825,315
889,669
822.071
878,865
820,081
803,125
890,100
677,534
401,875
358,682
1,369,463
1,341,201
1,317,299
1,137,986
1,138,777
1,073,515
1,085,385
1,148.707
867,634
564,327
505.910
	
19.025
15,196
15,977
15,813
12,729
15,310
16,560
19,518
17,830
7,274
10,813
23,013
19,587
19,402
18,799
14,547
15,846
17,025
19,907
18,269
7,678
11,174
228,792
213,218
236,871
245,528
230,814
218,923
230,464
248,595
199,754
224.408
172,927
228,792
213,218
236,871
245,528
230.814
218,923
230,464
248,595
199.754
224,408
172,927
1,090,796
1,053,729
1,142,517
1,083,412
1,122,408
1,054,314
1,050,149
1,158,213
895.118
633,557
542,422
1,021,268
1,574,006
1,573.572
1,402,313
1,384,138
1,308,284
1,332,874
1,417,209
1,085,657
796,413
690,011
6,011,688
5,774,509
6,413,374
6,591,942
7,031,158
6,648,655
6,564,544
7,228,993
5,310,835
4,241,619
3,957,498
10,549,924
10,119,303
10,169,617
9,729,739
9,528,279
9,154,544
8,986,501
9,346,518
7,340.339
5,937,860
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1949
1950
cial totals...
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
195 7
1958   |
1959
5,472,064
1 For differences between gross mine output and coal sold refer to table " Production and Distribution by
Collieries and by Districts " in section headed " Coal " or " Coal-mining " in Annual Reports of the Minister
of Mines.
2 The totals " sold and used " include:—
* Sales to retail and wholesale dealers, industrial users, and company employees.
t Coal used in company boilers, including steam locomotives.
t Coal used in making coke.
See also discussion under " Fuel," page A 12.
A 36 STATISTICS
A 37
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6?. A 38
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1959
Table XI.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1959
Dividends Paid during 1958 and 1959
Bralorne Mines Ltd	
Bralorne Pioneer Mines Ltd.
1958
$374,100
1959
Cassiar Asbestos Corporation Ltd  760,000
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of
of Canada, Ltd  13,104,257
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. Ltd  372,708
Highland-Bell Ltd.    78,293
Reeves MacDonald Mines Ltd.   292,250
Others    14,515
$603,905
1,980,000
13,104,262
372,708
78,293
292,250
12,863
Totals    $14,996,123      $16,444,281
Dividends Paid Yearly, 1917 to 1959, Inclusive
Year Amount Paid
1917  $3,269,494
1918  2,704,469
1919  2,494,28 3
1920  1,870,296
1921  736,629
1922  3,174,756
1923  2,983,570
1924  2,977,276
1925  5,853,419
1926  8,011,137
1927  8,816,681
1928  9,572,536
1929  11,263,118
1930  10,543,500
1931  4,650,857
1932  2,786,958
1933  2,471,735
1934  4,745,905
1935  7,386,070
1936  10,513,705
1937  15,085,293
1938  12,068,875
1939  11,865,698
Year
1940.
194L
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.
Amount Paid
  $14,595,530
  16,598,110
  13,627,104
  11,860,159
  11,367,732
  10,487,395
  15,566,047
1947  27,940,213
1948  37,672,319
1949  33,651,096
1950  34,399,330
1951  40.921,238
1952  32,603,956
1953  22,323,089
1954  25,368,262
1955  35,071,583
1956  36,262,682
1957  24,247,420
1958  14,996,123
1959  16,444,281
TotaL
$621,849,929 STATISTICS
A 39
Table XI.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1959—Continued
Lode-gold Mines1
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Erie	
Gold 	
$94,872
Nelson 	
Tye Siding	
Gold  	
25,000
Gold     	
25,000
Gold 	
17,760,125
Bridge River  	
Gold..... 	
Gold -	
Gold--- -.
Gold 	
Gold 	
Gold-copper	
Gold	
Gold...	
Gold 	
Gold 	
Gold	
Gold	
603,905
Princess Royal Island.	
Wells 	
1,437,500
1,679,976
565,588
Canadian Pacific Exploration (Porto Rico)	
37,500
472,255
5,254
Fern Gold Mining & Milling Co. Ltd....
9,375
Gold Belt Mining Co. Ltd.
668,595 ■'
Ymir	
13,731
Hedley  	
Wells......  	
1,290,553
2,491,236=
I.X.L.      	
Rossland „ 	
Gold 	
Gold  	
Gold
134,025
11,751
Kelowna Exploration Co. Ltd. (Nickel Plate)
2,040,000
Gold	
780,0004
Sheep Creek 	
Gold 	
Gold-copper	
Gold-copper	
Gold	
357,856
Rossland  	
Rossland	
Bridge River -
Sheep Creek 	
Zeballos. 	
Hedley —- 	
Bridge River 	
1,475,000
Le Roi No. 2 Ltd	
1,574,640
20,450
Motherlode —      	
Gold - -	
Gold	
163,500
165,000
Nickel Plate (Hedley Gold Mining Co. Ltd.)
Gold
3,423,191
Gold     ...
Gold 	
Gold...  ...
Gold 	
Gold —  .-..
Gold	
10,048,914
25,000
18,858,075s
Zeballos—   —
Sheep Creek 	
Erie -	
1,914,183
Queen (prior to Sheep Creek Gold Mines Ltd.)..
Relief Arlington Mines Ltd. (Second Relief)	
98,674
308,0003
Gold- 	
Gold	
1,433,640 s
Sheep Creek Gold Mines Ltd.'    .
Sheep Creek _ 	
Premier -   —
Zeballos  	
Rossland —
Surf Inlet   	
Rossland.—	
Ymir    	
Ymir  	
3,609,375°
Gold	
Gold... 	
Gold-copper.-	
Gold  	
2,425,0006
Spud Valley Gold Mines Ltd —   	
168,000
Sunset No. 2	
115,007
120,279
War Eagle	
Ymir Gold  	
Gold-copper	
Gold 	
Gold	
Gold	
1,245,250
300,000
Ymir Yankee Girl 	
415,0023
108,623
Total, lode-gold mines  	
$78,278,902
1 The gold-copper properties of Rossland are included in this table.
2 Early in 1959 Bralorne Mines Ltd. and Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C. Ltd. were merged under the name of
Bralorne Pioneer Mines Ltd., and dividend payments for 1959 are entered under the new company listing.
3 Includes " return of capital " and " liquidating " payments.
* Former Kelowna Exploration Company Limited;  changed in January, 1951.
6 Up to and including 1936, dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company Limited were derived from
operations of the company in British Columbia. Subsequent dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company
Limited have been derived from the operations of subsidiary companies in British Columbia and elsewhere and
are not included in the figure given. In 1936, Silbak Premier, a subsidiary of Premier Gold Mining Company,
took over the former gold operations of that company in British Columbia. Dividends paid by Silbak Premier
are given above.
8 In several years, preceding 1953, company revenue has included profits from operations of the Lucky Jim
zinc-lead mine.
7 Since March, 1956, company name is Sheep Creek Mines Ltd. A 40 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1959
Table XI.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1959—Continued
Silver-Lead-Zinc Mines
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc.
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc.
Silver-iead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc.
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
$10,000
Base Metals Mining Corporation Ltd.  (Mon-
Field	
586,1431
97,200
48,000
Beaverdell-Wellington   _ 	
Beaverdell	
Bell  	
Beaverdell 	
388,297
25,000
11,175,400
5,500
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Can-
Trail       	
481,900,6412
Cniiverapep
Field 	
5,203
50,000
35,393
179,263
45,668
8,904
Giant Mascot Mines Ltd   	
Goodenough 	
H.B. Mining Co.    .
Spillimacheen.	
Cody 	
Hall Creek	
Beaverdell -	
132,464
Highland-Bell Ltd  	
1,632,904
6,000
Similkameen.	
Sandon	
400,000
Salmo	
20,000
Retallack 	
20.000
Three Forks 	
213,000
50,000
Lucky Jim 	
80,000
Sandon.	
6,000
10.257
Three Forks.	
70,500
Cody  	
71,387
Three Forks 	
45,088
Cody	
72,859
North Star  —              	
Kimberley. —  	
Sandon — 	
Slocan City 	
497.901
6,754
110,429
Payne   	
1,438,000
Greenwood	
Alamo —   .
142,238s
25,000
467,250
Reeves MacDonald Mines Ltd.. -	
Remac -	
Cody .   .   .   -	
Sandon.. — 	
Moyie	
2,630.250
334,992
Ruth Mines Ltd  	
125.490
566,000
Sheep Creek Mines Ltd -	
Silversmith and Slocan Star4	
93,750
Sandon 	
Hazelton 	
Ainsworth  	
1,267,600
1,715,333
10,365
2,734,688
Retallack	
Beaton  	
88,000
Sunshine Lardeau Mines Ltd _
164,000
390,000
Utica     	
Violamac Mines (B.C.) Ltd  	
Wallace Mines Ltd. (Sally)       .  ..         	
Kaslo  	
64,000
850,000
Beaverdell -	
Rambler Station.—	
135,000
20,000
Silverton 	
Retallack- 	
Ainsworth- 	
30.F67
Whitewater  —  -	
Yale Lead and Zinc Mines Ltd	
592,515
278,620
70,239
$512,240,442
1 Includes $466,143 " return of capital " distribution prior to 1949.
2 Earnings of several company mines, and custom smelter at Trail.
3 Includes $10,504 paid in 1944 but not included in the yearly figure.
4 These two properties were amalgamated as Silversmith Mines Limited in August, 1939. STATISTICS
A 41
Table XI.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1959—Continued
Copper Mines
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Britannia M. & S. Co.1.	
Canada Copper Corporation-
Cornell	
Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co.2..
Marble Bay	
Hall Mines	
Britannia Beach—
Greenwood	
Texada Island	
Copper Mountain..
Texada Island	
Nelson 	
Miscellaneous mines..
Copper-
Copper..
Copper..
Copper..
Copper..
Copper..
Copper-
$18,803,772
615,399
8,500
29,873,226
175,000
233,280
261,470
Total, copper mines..
$49,970,647
1 The Britannia Mining and Smelting Co. Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Howe Sound Company
(Maine), paid the dividends shown to its parent company. On June 30th, 1958, consolidation between the Howe
Sound Company (Maine) and Haile Mines Inc. became effective, bringing into existence Howe Sound Company
(Delaware). The Britannia mine became a division of the new Howe Sound Company, and in August Britannia
Mining and Smelting Co. was liquidated voluntarily.
2 The Granby Consolidated Mining Smelting and Power Company dividends commenced in 1904 and cover
all company activities in British Columbia to date. The figure includes all dividends, capital distributions,
and interim liquidating payments, the latter being $4,500,000, paid, in 1936, prior to reorganization.
Coal Mines
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Wellington Collieries Ltd , 	
Bulkley Valley Collieries Ltd    ,,,	
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. Ltd 	
Canadian Collieries Resources Ltd	
Nanaimo	
Telkwa -	
Fernie 	
Nanaimo 	
Coal 	
Coal 	
Coal 	
Coal- 	
$16,000,000
24,000
17,091,906
828,271
$33,944,177
Aggregate of All Classes
Lode-gold mining   $78,278,902
Silver-lead-zinc mining and smelting  512,240,442
Copper-mining   49,970,647
Coal-mining   33,944,177
Miscellaneous, structural, and placer gold  9,668,533
Total
$684,102,701
Note.—The term " miscellaneous " noted in each class of dividend covers all payments of $5,000 and under,
together with payments made by companies or individuals requesting that the item be not disclosed.
In compiling the foregoing table of dividends paid, the Department wishes to acknowledge the kind assistance given by companies, individuals, and trade journals in giving information on the subject. A 42
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1959
Table XII.—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for Operations
of All Classes
Class
Salaries and
Wages
Fuel and
Electricity
Process
Supplies
$32,885,537
21,714
3,448,394
3,119,246
4,992,308
5,494,797
$3,638,714
837
446,206
245,4301
1,045,688
2,300,446
$11,927,348
5,545
Fuel—coal, coke and gas plants 	
383,096
2,527,3441
1,393,881
1,134,424
Totals, 1959        	
$49,961,996
$48,933,560
56,409,056
57,266,026
51,890,246
48,702,746
55,543,490
62,250,631
52,607,171
42,738,035
41,023,786
38,813,506
32,160.338
26,190,200
22,620,075
23,131,874
26,051,467
26,913,160
26,050,491
23,391,330
22,357,035
22,765,711
21,349,690
17,887,619
16,753,367
$7,677,321
8,080,989
8,937,567
9,762,777
9,144,034
7,128,669
8,668,099
8,557,845
7,283,051
6,775,998
7,206,637
6,139,470
5,319,470
5,427,458
7,239,726
5,788,671
7,432,585
7,066,109
3,776,747
3,474,721
3,266,000
3,396,106
3,066,311
2,724,144
2,619,639
$17,371,638
Totals, 1958                           -             	
15,053,036
1957                                            	
24,257,177
1956                       -
22,036,839
1955 	
21,131,572
1954
19,654,724
1953 	
1952	
20,979,411
27,024,500
1951                       .   —    	
24,724,101
1950
17,500,663
1949                    	
17,884,408
1948 - - -
11,532,121
1947  	
13,068,948
1946 — -..	
1945    --	
8,367,705
5,756,628
1944      ..
1943       	
1942 -	
6,138,084
6,572,317
6,863,398
1941  	
1940	
7,260,441
6,962,162
1939  	
1938	
6,714,347
6,544,500
1937 -       	
1936      . .
1935	
6,845,330
4,434,501
4,552,730
Grand totals, 1Q35/5Q
$913,769,506
$155,959,848
$329,231,281
1 These figures are incomplete as they represent only twenty-eight reports received out of a total of forty-
three listings.
Note.—" Process Supplies " include explosives, chemicals, drill-steel, lubricants, etc. STATISTICS A 43
Table XIII.—Average Number Employed in the Mining Industry, 1901-59
M
a
'3
1
u
o
s
Lode-mining
in
O
C
u
s
o
0
a
s
a
Coal-mining
Structural
Materials
M
s
o
V
e
tt
u
1
Year
3
>
O
<
73
o
H
u
•o
c
>
O
<
O
H
S>2
"BS
h
59
1
73
0
h
1901	
299
415
355
341
425
688
874
1,134
1,122
1,291
1,124
1,371
1,303
1,252
1.004
939
489
212
255
209
347
360
348
303
327
205
230
132
199
103
105
67
75
99
2,730
2,219
1,662
2,143
2,470
2,080
2,704
2,567
2,184
2,472
2,435
2,472
2,773
2,741
2,709
3,357
3,290
2,626
2,513
2,074
1,355
1,510
2,102
2,353
2,298
2,606
2,671
2,707
2,926
2,316
1,463
1,355
1,786
2,796
2,740
2,95ft
3,603
3,849
3,005
3,923
3,901
2,020
2,394
1,806
1,933
1,918
3,024
3,143
3,034
3,3ftft
3.785
4.171
3,145
2.644
2,564
2,637
2.393
1.919
1,212
1,126
1,088
1,163
1,240
1,303
1,239
1,127
1,070
1,237
1,159
1,364
1,505
1,433
1,435
2,036
2,198
1,764
1,746
1,605
975
1,239
1,516
1,080
2,840
1,735
1,916
2,469
2,052
1,200
834
900
1,335
1,729
1,497
1,840
1,818
2.266
2,050
2,104
1,823
1,504
1,699
1,825
1,750
1.817
2,238
2,429
2,724
2,415
8,698
3.A23
2,58ft
2,520
2,553
2,827
2,447
1.80ft
3,948
1   1
 |  |3,041
 1  13,101
931
910
1,127
1,175
1,280
1,390
907
1,641
1,705
1,855
1,661
1,855
1,721
1,465
1,283
1,366
1,410
3,974
493
647
412
492
843
460
536
376
377
536
931
724
900
652
827
766
842
073
690
921
827
977
1,591
2,120
1,916
1,783
1,530
1,909
1,801
1,646
1,598
1,705
1,483
1,357
324
138
368
544
344
526
329
269
187
270
288
327
295
311
334
413
378
326
351
335
555
585
656
542
616
628
557
559
638
641
770
625
677
484
124
122
120
268
170
380
7,922
1902      	
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
r,
5
4
4
3
2
2
3
4
5
4
4
5
4
3
o
2
3
4
4
4
5
6
5
6
5
4
4
3
3
3
5
5
5
5
7
8
5
5
5
5
4
3
3
345
750
306
710
983
943
694
254
709
594
837
278
174
144
393
488
390
259
679
330
749
618
033
138
341
587
176
978
576
297
255
121
525
237
799
421
115
955
027
724
424
093
721
083
735
262
572
758
814
480
094
734
164
117
464
840
728
698
4
4
4
4
4
3
6
6
7
6
7
6
5
4
5
5
5
5
6
6
011
264
453
407
805
769
073
418
758
873
130
671
732
991
060
170
247
960
349
885
644
14ft
418
443
322
225
334
028
645
082
608
094
893
971
814
153
962
976
874
723
300
851
830
430
305
425
466
306
261
925
681
550
434
478
366
380
086
056
7,356
1903	
 1 	
 i 	
3,137
3,278
3,127
3,415
2,862
4,432
4,713
5,903
5,212
5,275
4,950
4,267
3,708
3,094
7,014
1904       	
7,759
1905 	
8,117
1906 	
8,788
1907	
1908 	
7,712
9,767
1909	
9,672
1910	
11,467
1911	
10,467
1912       	
 1 	
1
10,967
1913....
10,949
1914	
808
854
911
966
832
581
542
531
631
907
720
1,168
919
996
1,048
1,025
960
891
849
822
672
960
1,126
1,203
1,25ft
1,307
1,516
1,371
1,129
1,091
1,043
838
625
618
9,906
1916	
9,135
10,453
1917	
 13,760
10,658
1919	
 !3,658|1,769
 |4,145|1,821
 |4,191|2,158
 14,72212,163
9,637
10,225
1920	
1921	
10,028
9,215
1922	
2,461
2,842
2,748
2,948
3,197
3,157
2,036
2,436
2,890
2,771
2,678
3,027
3,158
3,187
2,944
3,072
3,555
2,835
2,981
2,834
2,813
3,461
3,884
3,763
3,759
4,044
4,120
3,001
3,119
3,304
3,339
3,328
3,081
3,008
4,71211,93216
9,393
1924	
4,342|1,807
3,894|1,524
3,828|1,615
3,757|1,565
3,646|1,579
3,814|1,520
3,675 1,353
6
5
5
5
5
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
2
3
2
o
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
9,707
9,451
1925	
1926	
10,581
14,172
1927	
14,830
1928	
15,424
1929	
15,565
1930	
1931	
3,389
2,957
2,628
2,241
2,050
2,145
2,015
2,286
2,088
2,167
2,175
2.229
1,256
1,125
980
853
843
826
799
867
874
809
699
494
14,032
12,171
1932	
344
10,524
1933	
1934	
1935	
1936	
1937	
1938	
1939	
1940	
1941	
408
360
754
825
938
369
501
647
422
262
567
628
586
679
869
754
626
660
491
529
634
584
722
854
474
446
459
11,369
12,985
13,737
14,179
16,129
16,021
15,890
15,705
15,084
1942	
1,802| 468
2,240| 611
2,150 689
1,927| 503
1.773| 532
1,694| 731
1,594| 872
l,76lj 545
1,745| 516
1.462J 463
1,280[ 401
1,154| 396
1,076| 358
1,100| 378
968| 398
1,020| 360
826| 260
7651 291
13,270
1943 	
12,448
1944 .      	
12,314
1945	
11,820
194C	
11,933
1947 .      	
14,899
1948 	
16,397
1949         	
16,621
1950	
16,612
1951	
17,863
1952	
1953	
1954       	
18,257
15,790
14,128
1955     	
14,102
1956        	
14,539
1957	
13,257
1958	
11,201
1959	
1.93711.761
10,779
i The average number employed in the industry is the sum of the averages for individual companies. The
average for each company is obtained by taking the sum of the numbers employed each month and dividing by
12, regardless of the number of months worked. A 44
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1959
Table XIV.—Lode-metal Mines—Tonnage, Number of Mines,
Net and Gross Value of Principal Metals,4 1901-59
Year
Tonnagei
Number
of
Shipping
Mines
Number
of Mines
Shipping
over 100
Tons
Gross Value
as Reported
by Shipper2
Freight
and
Treatment2
Net Value
to
Shipper3
Gross
Value of
Lode
Metals
Produced*
926,162
1,009,016
1.288,466
1,461,609
1,706,679
1,963,872
1,805,614
2,083,606
2,057,713
2,216,428
1,770,755
2,688,532
2,663,809
2,175,971
2,720,669
3,229,942
2,797,368
2,912,518
2,146,920
2,215,445
1,586,428
1,592,163
2,447,672
3,413,912
3,849,269
4.775,327
5,416,411
6,241,672
6,977,903
6,804,276
5,549,622
4,354,904
4,063,775
5,141,744
4,927,204
4,381,173
6,145,244
7,377,117
7,212,171
7,949,736
8,007,937
6,894,844
5,786,864
4,879,851
4,377,722
3,705,594
5,011,271
5,762,321
6,125,460
6,802,482
6,972,400
9,174,617
9,660,281
8.513,865
9,126,902
8,827,037
7,282,436
6,402,198
6,990,985
119
124
125
142
146
154
147
108
89
83
80
86
110
98
132
169
193
175
144
121
80
98
77
86
102
138
132
110
106
68
44
75
109
145
177
168
185
211
217
216
200
126
48
51
36
50
75
97
118
112
119
95
80
63
53
70
59
57
60
78
75
74
76
79
77
72
59
52
50
45
51
58
56
59
81
87
80
74
60
35
33
28
37
40
55
52
49
48
32
22
29
47
69
72
70
113
92
99
92
96
76
32
31
27
32
33
51
54
58
64
5 8
48
40
34
40
40
28
44
11 136 162
11,579,382
15,180,164
17 484 102
16,222,097
14,477,411
14,191,141
13,228,731
11,454,063
17,662,766
17,190,838
15,225,061
19,992,149
31,483,014
26,788,474
27,595,278
19,756,648
19,451,725
12,925,448
19,228,257
25,348,399
35,538,247
46,200,135
$38,558,613
27,750,364
29,070,075
34,713,887
21,977,688
10,513,931
7,075,393
13,976,358
20,243,278
25,407,914
30,051,207
43,954,077
35,278,483
40,716,869
43,670,298
46,681,822
45,199,404
33,293,703
26,449,408
31,383,025
46,016,841
76.311,087
100,128.727
79.814,604
86,751,361
117,4(13,084
106,601,451
66,739,892
77,088,160
88,343,241
93,110,262
65,370,185
54,955,069
65,208,728
51,508,031
44,977,082
48,281,825
51,720,436
41,292,980
	
22,900,229
19,705,043
25,057,007
34,071,955
40,662,633
43,813,898
$48,617,920
40,222,237
45,133,788
50,004,909
52,354,870
50,494,041
37,234,070
29,327,114
34,154,917
48,920,971
81,033,093
118,713,859
99,426,678
108,864,792
142,590,427
140,070,389
94,555,069
106,223,833
119,039,285
125,043,590
95,644,930
83,023,111
92,287,277
$4,663,843
4,943,754
4,416,919
6,334,611
5,673,048
5,294,637
3,940,367
2,877,706
2,771,292
2,904,130
4,722,010
18,585,183
19,613,185
22,113,431
25,096,743
30,444,575
27,815,152
29,135,673
30,696,044
31,933,681
30,273,900
28,068,396
27,079,911
62,950,536
53,878,093
53,554.092
61,735,604
62,607,882
59,694,192
52,651,868
39,369,738
48,724,001
56,653,485
93,124,847
121,696,891
107,775,413
113,464,619
147,646,989
144,151,515
123,619,837
120.829,789
138,145,095
143.546,586
119,409,764
100,591,049
100,549,519
i Includes ores of iron, mercury, nickel, tungsten, and silica (flux).
2 Data not collected before 1937.
3 Previous to 1937 the shipper reported " Net Value at Shipping Point," no indication being given as to
how the net value was computed. From 1937 on, the shipper has reported " Gross Value," from which deduction of freight and treatment gives " Net Value."
4 Gross value calculated by valuing gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, mercury (1938-44, 1955), and nickel
(1936-37, 1958-59) at yearly average prices, and iron (1901-03, 1907, 1918-23, 1928, 1948-59) and tungsten
(1939-45, 1947-58) at values given by operators. Of
a
N
ri m
CO rH
&
a
o
U
3
Os
ON
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A 49 A 50
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1959
Table XVI.—Lode-metal Mines Employing an Average of Ten
or More Men during 19591
Name of Mine or Operator
Days
Operating
Mine      Mill
Tons
Mined
Milled
Average Number
Employed
Mine
Mill
Shipping Mines
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Co. Ltd..
Torbrit Silver Mines Ltd	
Howe Sound Co. (Britannia Division)	
Highland-Bell Ltd..
Mother Lode (Consolidated Woodgreen Mines Ltd.).
Phoenix Copper Co. Ltd-
Bralorne Pioneer Mines Ltd. (Bralorne Division)..
Bralorne Pioneer Mines Ltd. (Pioneer Division)....
French Mines Ltd	
Bluebell (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada Ltd.)..
Victor (Violamac Mines Ltd.)	
H.B. (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada Ltd.)-	
Jersey (Canadian Exploration Ltd.)	
Reeves MacDonald Mines Ltd. 	
Sullivan (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada Ltd.) 	
Mineral King (Sheep Creek Mines Ltd.). 	
Velvet (Mid-West Copper & Uranium Mines Ltd.)..
Blue Grouse (Cowichan Copper Co. Ltd.)	
Giant Nickel Mines Ltd	
Empire Development Co. Ltd.  (Mannix Co. Ltd.,
Iron Production Division)  	
Hualpai Enterprises Ltd.   	
Nimpkish Iron Mines Ltd 	
Texada Mines Ltd...   _	
Non-shipping Mines
Silver Standard Mines Ltd. (Moresby Island Iron)..
Birkett Creek Mining Operations	
Noranda Exploration Co. Ltd   _
Torwest Resources Ltd 	
Double Ed (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada Ltd.)	
Kennco Explorations Ltd..
Duncan Group (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada Ltd.) ..
218
270
263
245
264
274
365
260
290
254
365
365
324
252
249
307
131
255
204
239
(2)
45
300
365
270
246
245
168
260
365
365
365
352
365
324
356
253
359
68
250
168
214
(2)
21
350
I
46,586
93,577
300,946
18,029
135,116
175,945
140,972
80,428
15,952
251,366
6,028
463,504
325,564
421,593
2,440,396
181,495
1,750
86,103
124,500
863,176
62,5003
19,000
742,100
46,586
93,577
300,946
18,029
78,781
175,945
140,972
79,652
15,952
251,366
463,504
325,564
421,593
2,440,396
181,495
1,750
86,103
124,500
863,176
62,500s
12,800
752,660
91
8
75
17
337
27
42
6
23
7
32
11
344
23
236
21
13
7
265
19
22
104
13
145
10
94
25
1,071
333
81
12
17
1
79
13
52
12
92
183
30
135
10
60
26
17
10
29
13
3
26
1 The average number employed includes wage-earners and salaried employees.    The average is obtained by
adding the monthly figures and dividing by 12, irrespective of the number of months worked.
2 Not available.
3 Estimated. Departmental Work
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
The Administration Branch is responsible for the administration of the Provincial laws regarding the acquisition of rights to mineral and to coal, petroleum and
natural gas, and deals with other departments of the Provincial service for the
Department or for any branch.
Amendments made to the Mineral Act in 1957 introduced a system of leasing
of mineral rights with the object of abolishing the right of a mineral-claim holder
to obtain a Crown-grant of his mineral rights. Further amendments were made
in 1958 and 1959 to allow those persons who, at the time of the 1957 amendments,
were proceeding through the necessary stages leading up to an application being
made for a grant, to continue with the application provided all things necessary to
the application were completed on or before December 31st, 1959. It is recorded
here, therefore, that the right to acquire title to a mineral deposit by obtaining a
Crown grant was extinguished on December 31st, 1959, by virtue of amendments to
the Mineral Act first introduced in 1957 and amended further in the years 1958
and 1959.
Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-Mining Recorders, whose
duties are laid down in the Mineral Act and the Placer-mining Act, administer these
Acts and other Acts relating to mining. Mining Recorders, in addition to their
own functions, may also exercise the powers conferred upon Gold Commissioners
with regard to mineral claims within the mining division for which they have been
appointed. Similar duties may be performed by Mining Recorders with regard to
placer claims but not in respect of placer-mining leases. Recording of location and
of work upon a mineral claim as required by the Mineral Act and upon a placer
claim or a placer-mining lease as required by the Placer-mining Act must be made at
the office of the Mining Recorder for the mining division in which the claim or lease
is located. Information concerning claims and leases and concerning the ownership
and standing of claims and leases in any mining division may be obtained from the
Mining Recorder for the mining division in which the property is situated or from
the Department's offices at Victoria, and Room 104, 739 West Hastings Street, Vancouver. Officials in the offices of the Gold Commissioner at Victoria and the Gold
Commissioner at Vancouver act as Sub-mining Recorders for all mining divisions.
Sub-Mining Recorders, who act as forwarding agents, are appointed at various places
throughout the Province. They are authorized to accept documents and fees, and
forward them to the office of the Mining Recorder for the correct mining division.
Officials and their offices in various parts of the Province are listed in the table on
page A 52.
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)
The transcripts of all recordings made in Mining Recorders' offices throughout
the Province are sent to the office of the Chief Gold Commissioner in Victoria twice
each month, and include the names of lessees of reverted surveyed mineral claims.
These records and maps showing the approximate positions of mineral claims held
by record and of placer-mining leases may be consulted by the public during office
hours at Victoria and at the office of the Gold Commissioner at Vancouver, Room
104, 739 West Hastings Street. The maps conform in geographical detail, size,
and number to the reference and mineral reference maps issued by the Legal Surveys Branch of the Department of Lands and Forests, and the approximate positions
A 51 A 52
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1959
of mineral claims held by record and of placer-mining leases are plotted from details
supplied by the locators. Provision has been made to supply the general public,
on request to the office of the Chief Gold Commissioner, with copies of the maps.
The charge for these maps is $ 1 plus 5 per cent tax for each sheet.
List of Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders in the Province
Mining Division
Location of Office
Gold Commissioner
Mining Recorder
T. G. O'NeiU	
L. P. Lean  .....	
F. E. P. Hughes 	
W. E. McLean 	
E. L. Hedley...	
R. E. Manson 	
R. Macgregor -	
D. Dalgleish 	
R. H. McCrimmon.
E. B. Offin	
W. H. Cochrane.	
K. D. McRae	
T. G. O'Neill.
Atlin  .
Atlin. 	
Quesnel	
L. P. Lean.
F. E. P. Hughes.
Fort Steele	
Cranbrook —      . .
E. L. Hedley.
Grand Forks..—	
Kamloops	
Kamloops  	
D. Dalgleish.
Lillooet-... _
Nanaimo	
Lillooet  -
Nanaimo 	
E. B. Offin.
W. H. Cochrane.
K. D. McRae.
J. F. McDonald	
G. C. Kimberley.
T. S. Dobson	
T. S. Dobson.
G. H. Beley..	
T. S. Dalby     ....
W. T. McGruder	
G. H. Beley.
Osoyoos	
Revelstoke 	
Penticton..	
Revelstoke	
T. S. Dalby.
W. T. McGruder.
Prince Rupert	
T. H. W. Harding
T. H. W. Harding.
F. R. Carmichael.
Trail Creek 	
Rossland	
Vancouver	
W. L. Draper	
J. Egdell -	
W. L. Draper.
Miss S. Hyham (Deputy).
G. F. Forbes     _	
R. H. McCrimmon	
G. F. Forbes.
Victoria	
Victoria  - 	
E. J. Bowles. DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 53
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> A 54 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1959
Coal, Petroleum, and Natural Gas
The Administration Branch is responsible for the administration of the
Petroleum and Natural Gas Act and for the Coal Act. Information concerning
applications for permits and leases issued under the Petroleum and Natural Gas Act
and concerning the ownership and standing of them may be obtained upon application to the office of the Chief Commissioner, Department of Mines, Victoria, B.C.
Similar information may be obtained respecting licences and leases issued under the
Coal Act. Maps showing the locations of permits and leases under the Petroleum
and Natural Gas Act are available, and copies may be obtained upon application to
the office of the Department of Mines, Victoria, B.C. Monthly reports fisting
additions and revisions to permit-location maps and listing changes in title to
permits, licences, and leases and related matters are available from the office of the
Chief Commissioner upon application and payment of the required fee.
Petroleum and Natural-gas Statistics, 1959
Permits—
Issued   252
In good standing  636
Assigned  30
Natural-gas licences—Issued   4
Drilling reservations—Issued  17
Leases—
Issued   243
In good standing  1,088
Assigned  116
Petroleum and Natural-gas Revenue, 1959
Permits—
Fees        $ 124,250.00
Rent      2,862,778.23
Penalties and cash in lieu  13,308.31
     $3,000,336.54
Drilling reservations—•
Fees  $4,250.00
Rent   71,865.10
Licences—
Fees  $75.00
Rent   4,446.08
Leases—
Fees -  $5,675.00
Rent   1,687,007.94
Penalties   2,469.93
Tender bonus—
Permits   $3,486,337.15
Drilling reservations     1,004,710.69
Leases      6,499,766.48
76,115.10
4,521.08
1,695,152.87
10,990,814.32 DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 55
Royalties—
Gas _
Oil _
Processed products
Operators' licences
Assignment fees __.
Miscellaneous 	
$492,053.56
231,402.63
69,997.71
$793,453.90
11,940.00
2,065.00
717.00
$16,575,115.81
Coal Revenue, 1959
Licences—
Fees _
  $ 1,025.00
Rental   10,578.30
$11,603.30
Leases—
Fees
$100.00
Rental      1,195.35
Cash in lieu of work        400.00
1,695.35
$13,298.65
ANALYTICAL AND ASSAY BRANCH
By S. W. Metcalfe, Chief Analyst and Assayer
Rock Samples
During 1959 the chemical laboratory in Victoria issued reports on 1,688
samples from prospectors* and Departmental engineers. A laboratory examination
of a prospector's sample generally consists of the following: (1) A spectrographic
analysis to determine if any base metals are present in interesting percentages; (2)
assays for precious metals and for base metals shown by the spectrographic analysis
to be present in interesting percentages. The degree of radioactivity is measured
on all samples submitted by prospectors and Departmental engineers; these radiometric assays are not listed in the table below.
The laboratory reports were distributed in the following manner among prospectors who were not grantees, prospectors who were grantees under the Prospectors' Grub-stake Act, and Departmental engineers:
Samples
Spectrographic
Analyses
Assays
1,104
191
393
1,130
202
234
2,759
474
Departmental engineers
1,010
Totals  	
1,688
1,566
4,243
* A reasonable number of samples are assayed, without charge, for a prospector who makes application for
free assays and who satisfies the Chief Analyst that prospecting is his principal occupation during the summer
months.   A form for use in applying for free assays may be obtained from the office of any Mining Recorder. A 56 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1959
Spectrographic analyses, numbering 1,415, were conducted upon samples
which had accumulated in the period between the destruction of the old spectrograph by fire in 1957 and the installation of the new instrument in 1958.
Mineralogical specimens submitted for identification and rocks for classification are examined by the Mineralogical Branch of the Department.
Petroleum and Natural-gas Samples
Thirty-eight samples were received but only thirty-seven were examined.
Of these, thirty-one were samples of formation water from wells being drilled for
gas and oil in the Province; five were samples of material tested for oil seepage;
and one was a sample consisting of pebbles coated with a black material suspected
of being petroleum but found to be an oxide of manganese.
Coal Samples
Reports were issued on thirty-two samples of coal submitted for proximate
analysis and calorific value. Of this number, twenty-seven were analysed for the
Purchasing Commission, two for the Indian Commissioner for British Columbia,
one for the Inspection Branch of the Department of Mines, and two for prospectors
in the Province.
Miscellaneous Samples
Reports on fifty samples of a miscellaneous nature were issued.
For the British Columbia Research Council, two samples of teredo shells were
submitted to a semi-quantitative spectrographic analysis.
For the Purchasing Commission, two plastic cups and two brands of galvanized
steel wire were examined for flaws.
For the Department of Agriculture (Field Crops Branch), four samples of hay
were analysed for phosphorus, copper, manganese, and molybdenum; three samples
of marl for calcium and magnesium oxides; and one sample of water for iron,
calcium, and magnesium. Three samples of waste products from a pulp-mill were
analysed for calcium and magnesium oxides, and one of them for sulphate, in addition. A semi-quantitative spectrographic analysis was conducted on a sample of
calcareous material.
For the Department of Highways, a white material obtained from a marine
engine was spectrographed and found to be an oxide of aluminum. The white
coating on a sample of pebbles was found to be mainly calcium carbonate, and the
percentage of water-soluble salts in a sample of beach sand was determined. A
sample of silt was submitted to a semi-quantitative analysis, and the free quartz in
a sample of pebbles was determined.
For the Department of Mines (Mineralogical Branch), one sample of water
from a hot spring was analysed.
For the Provincial Museum, a semi-quantitative spectrographic analysis was
conducted upon an alluvium lick sample.
For the Department of Lands and Forests (Forest Research), thirteen soil
samples were spectrographed and analysed for sulphur.
For the Public Works Department, a spectrographic analysis was performed
on three samples of slate for comparison purposes.
For the Municipality of Oak Bay, one sample of water was examined.
For the Victoria and Esquimalt Health Department (Sanitation Division), six
samples of water were examined.
For Bralorne Pioneer Mines Limited, one sample of ore was spectrographed. DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 57
Research
For the Department of Lands and Forests (Assistant Chief Forester), a marker
was investigated and recommended for addition to tree blaze paints used by that
Department.
Examination for Assayers
Provincial Government examinations for certificates of competency and licence
to practise assaying in British Columbia were held at Trail in May and December.
In May, nine candidates were examined; five passed, two were granted supple-
mentals, and two failed. In December, nine candidates were examined; seven
passed and two were granted supplementals.
INSPECTION BRANCH
Organization and Staff
Inspectors and Resident Engineers
J. W. Peck, Chief Inspector Victoria
Robert B. Bonar, Deputy Chief Inspector of Mines Victoria
L. Wardman, Senior Electrical Inspector of Mines Victoria
E. R. Hughes, Senior Inspector of Mines Victoria
J. E. Merrett, Inspector and Resident Engineer Vancouver
A. R. C. James, Inspector and Resident Engineer Vancouver
J. D. McDonald, Inspector and Resident Engineer Nelson
D. R. Morgan, Inspector and Resident Engineer Fernie
David Smith, Inspector and Resident Engineer Kamloops
W. C. Robinson, Inspector and Resident Engineer Prince Rupert
The Inspectors are stationed at the places listed and inspect coal mines, metalliferous mines, and quarries in their respective districts. They also examine prospects, mining properties, and roads and trails.
E. R. Hughes supervised the Department's roads and trails programme and
prospectors' grub-stakes.
Arthur Williams _
T. H. Robertson
Joseph J. Haile _
W. H. Childress _
Instructors, Mine-rescue Stations
Cumberland Station
 Princeton Station
 Fernie Station
 Nelson Station
Staff Changes
Robert B. King resigned in June, 1959, to take up a position as Safety Director
with the Mining Association of British Columbia. J. E. Merrett was transferred
from Nelson to Vancouver. J. D. McDonald was appointed to replace Mr. Merrett
at Nelson. David Smith was transferred from Prince Rupert to a new office
at Kamloops. W. C. Robinson was appointed to replace Mr. Smith at Prince
Rupert.
Board of Examiners for Coal-mine Officials
Robert B. Bonar, Chairman and Secretary.
A. R. C. James, Member	
D. R. Morgan, Member	
 Victoria
.Vancouver
 Fernie A 58 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1959
R. B. Bonar, A. R. C. James, D. R. Morgan, and the mine-rescue instructors
for the district in which an examination is being held form the Board for granting
certificates of competency to coal-miners.
An Inspector is empowered to grant provisional certificates to coal-miners for
a period not exceeding sixty days between regular examinations.
MINERALOGICAL BRANCH
Field work by officers of the Mineralogical Branch includes geological mapping and examination of mineral deposits, and studies related to ground-water and
engineering geology. The results are published partly in the Annual Report of the
Minister of Mines and partly in a series of bulletins. The Mineralogical Branch
supplies information regarding mineral deposits and the mineral industry, in response
to inquiries received in great number. The activities of the Branch also include
identification of rock and mineral specimens submitted directly by prospectors and
others, or through the Analytical Branch.
Professional Staff
On December 31st, 1959, the professional staff included the following engineers classified as geologists or mineral engineers: H. Sargent, Chief of the Mineralogical Branch; M. S. Hedley, S. S. Holland, J. W. McCammon, N. D. McKech-
nie, G. E. P. Eastwood, J. T. Fyles, A. Sutherland Brown, J. M. Carr, W. G. Jeffery,
W. C. Jones, A. F. Shepherd, and J. E. Hughes. W. G. Jeffery and W. C. Jones
joined the staff at the beginning of the field season.
Technical editing of the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and of other
publications was directed by M. S. Hedley. Copy for printing was prepared by
and under the direction of the editor for English, Mrs. Rosalyn J. Moir. Messrs.
Hedley and Holland assisted in directing and supervising field work. Most of the
other members of the professional staff are assigned to mapping the geology of
selected areas and of mineral deposits. Mr. McCammon is responsible for studies
of industrial minerals and structural materials and Mr. Shepherd for records and
library.
Field Work
A. Sutherland Brown, assisted by W. G. Jeffery, continued the geological
mapping of Morseby Island in the Queen Charlotte Group.
J. M. Carr continued mapping in the Highland Valley area and began mapping
in the Craigmont-Promontory Hills area.
G. E. P. Eastwood mapped the Lodestone Mountain stock in the Tulameen
area. The mapping was mainly reconnaissance but included detailed studies of
magnetite mineralization in selected areas.
J. T. Fyles mapped the Mastodon mine and the Mineral King mine area. The
Mineral King project was started in 1957 by the late C. G. Hewlett.
S. S. Holland examined mines and prospects at Wells, in areas reached from
the Alaska Highway, and at Owen Lake, Telkwa, Smithers, Pitman, Terrace, and
Stewart.
J. E. Hughes logged cores from wells drilled to test the proposed dam-site at
Peace River Canyon, and made surface studies in that area, including studying the
burned shales resulting from underground combustion of coal seams.
W. C. Jones made ground-water studies in the Cowichan River and B.X. Creek
(Vernon) areas, and studies in engineering geology related to mud-flows (Cheekye
River), a slide at Drynoch, dam-sites on the Skeena River, Upper Fraser River,
and Hansard Lake-Eaglet Lake, and water-supply in the North Okanagan area. DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 59
J. W. McCammon examined industrial-mineral deposits, including silica sand
on Mount Moberly (Golden), magnesite on Perry Creek (Marysville), pyrophyllite
on Granite Creek (Coalmont), diatomite in the Quesnel area, volcanic ash " poz-
zolan" on Deadman Creek (north of Kamloops), " pozzolan" shale at Port
Alberni, and limestone in the Kamloops and Nelson areas.
N. D. McKechnie examined mines and prospects on Vancouver Island and the
southwestern mainland, including Cowichan Lake, Nimpkish Lake, Mount Washington, Jordan River, Lang Bay, and Swakum Mountain, and collected specimens
of ultrabasic rocks near Jessica, Kamloops, and Clinton for laboratory study.
Aeromagnetic Mapping
An area of about 500 square miles, including a considerable part of Moresby
Island and most of Louise Island, was mapped by Canadian Aero Services Ltd. for
the Department of Mines, using a light fixed-wing aircraft.
PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS BRANCH
Staff
J. D. Lineham, Chief Petroleum Engineer Victoria
R. R. McLeod, Senior Petroleum Engineer and member of the
Board of Arbitration Victoria
A. N. Lucie-Smith, Senior Petroleum Engineer and Chairman
of the Conservation Committee Victoria
W. L. Ingram, Petroleum Engineer Victoria
K. C. Gilbart, Petroleum Engineer Victoria
S. S. Cosburn, Mineral Engineer (Geology) Victoria
D. L. Griffin, Mineral Engineer (Geology) Victoria
D. M. Callan, Assistant Geologist Victoria
T. A. Mackenzie, Engineering Assistant Victoria
P. K. Huus, Engineering Assistant Victoria
G. E. Blue, Petroleum Engineer in Charge Dawson Creek
1 R. N. Thompson, Petroleum Engineer Dawson Creek
G. V. Rehwald, Petroleum Engineer Dawson Creek
H. B. Fulton, Mineral Engineer (Geology) Dawson Creek
H. A. Sharp, Engineering Assistant Dawson Creek
M. A. Churchill, Engineering Assistant Dawson Creek
1 E. N. Jernslet, Field Survey Assistant Dawson Creek
The main sections of the Branch and those in charge are as follows: Reservoir,
R. R. McLeod; Reserves, A. N. Lucie-Smith; Development, W. L. Ingram;
Geology, S. S. Cosburn; Records and Statistics, T. A. Mackenzie; Field Office,
G. E. Blue.
Staff Changes
R. N. Thompson resigned on March 31st and E. N. Jernslet on August 31st.
G. V. Rehwald joined the field staff as petroleum engineer on April 20th and
M. A. Churchill as engineering assistant on October 9th.
The Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch is responsible for the administration
of the " Regulation Governing the Drilling of Wells and the Production and Conservation of Oil and Natural Gas " made pursuant to the Petroleum and Natural
Gas Act, 1954.
1 Resigned in 1959. A 60 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1959
The regulation provides for the use of efficient and safe practices in the drilling, completion, and abandonment of wells; for the orderly development of fields
discovered within the Province; and for the conservation and prevention of waste
of oil and natural gas within the reservoir and during production operations.
Board of Arbitration
Chairman: A. W. Hobbs, solicitor, Department of the Attorney-General.
Members: R. R. McLeod, engineer, Department of Mines; S. G. Preston, agrolo-
gist, Department of Agriculture.
The Board of Arbitration, responsible to the Minister of Mines, held hearings
in 1959 at Fort St. John and Pouce Coupe.
Eight applications concerning right of entry came before the Board. Of these,
seven were settled by award orders of the Board and one was pending at the end of
the year.
Conservation Committee
Chairman, A. N. Lucie-Smith, engineer. Members: N. D. McKechnie,
geologist; M. H. A. Glover, economist.
Although no major problems were referred to the Committee by the Minister
of Mines during 1959, it acted on several routine matters during the course of the
year.
GRUB-STAKING PROSPECTORS
Under authority of the Prospectors' Grub-stake Act the Department of Mines
has provided grub-stakes each year since 1943 to a limited number of applicants able
to qualify. An amendment to the Act in 1958 authorized an increase in the maximum allowable grub-stake to $400, with an additional amount up to $300 for
travelling expenses.
To qualify at the present time the Department requires that the applicant shall
be a physically fit male British subject, holder of a valid free miner's certificate, who
has been resident in the Province during the year preceding his application for a
grub-stake, or who has been honourably discharged from Her Majesty's services,
who is between the ages of 18 and 70, and who can identify common rocks and
minerals.
It is required that in order to obtain the maximum grub-stake he agree to spend
at least sixty days actually prospecting in the area of his choice in British Columbia
considered favourably by officers of the Department of Mines. If he prospects a
lesser time, the grant will be reduced proportionately. In the past, rebates have been
recovered from grantees to whom payments have exceeded the proper amount for
the time and effort devoted to prospecting.
The grantee must not accept pay from any other source for services rendered
during the period credited to the grub-stake. At the end of the season he shall
provide the Department with a diary and maps outlining his activities while working
under the grub-stake. Any discoveries made, staked, and recorded are exclusively
his own property.
Statistical information covering the grub-stake programme since its inception
is given in the following table:— DEPARTMENTAL WORK
Grub-stake Statistics
a 61
Field Season
Approximate
Expenditure
Men
Grub-staked
Samples and
Specimens
Received at
Department
Laboratory
Mineral
Claims
Recorded
1943    	
1944                                              	
$18,500
27,215
27,310
35,200
36,230
35,975
31,175
26,800
19,385
19,083
17,850
19,989
21,169
20,270
22,000
24,850
21,575
90
105
84
95
91
92
98
78
63
50
41
48
47
47
46
47
38
773
606
448
419
469
443
567
226
255
251
201
336
288
163
174
287
195
87
135
1945   • ..
1946             	
181
162
1947 ..   	
1948  	
142
138
1949             	
103
1950 	
95
1951    	
137
1952	
95
1953.  	
141
1954
123
1955   	
183
1956	
1957	
217
101
1958	
211
1959..	
202
Samples and specimens received from grup-staked prospectors are spectrographed, assayed, and tested for radioactivity. Mineralogical identifications are
made on request.
Fifty-six applications were received in 1959, and to forty-one of the applicants
grub-stakes were authorized. For various reasons three did not go out, and of
the remaining thirty-eight grantees seven were unable to fulfil the terms and conditions of the grant and received only partial payment. Eleven prospectors were
given grants for the first time, and four of these proved unsatisfactory. Prospecting
was done in seventeen of the twenty-four mining divisions. Nine grantees used
aircraft for transportation to their prospecting areas.
D. H. Rae again gave able service in interviewing applicants and supervising
grantees in the field. The following notes have been largely compiled from
Mr. Rae's observations while in the field and from information provided in the
diaries of the grantees.
Atlin Mining Division.—Close to Tulsequah prospecting was carried on up
Canyon Creek and in the Wilms Creek valley. Quartz veins carrying some pyrites
and minor amounts of chalcopyrite were found cutting volcanics near a granite
contact. Limestone containing minor amounts of sphalerite was encountered near
Mount Strong.
About 30 air miles east of Atlin the waterway from Eva Lake to the north
end of Gladys Lake supplied canoe transportation for the establishment of a number
of base camps from which the terrain for 6 miles east and west of the waterway was
carefully prospected. Considerable heavy brush and overburden were encountered
for some distance on either side of the waterway. Good prospecting ground was
found at a higher elevation, although no important finds were reported. In Hirsch-
feld Creek valley much overburden was reported, but some milky quartz stringers
were found in rocks of the Cache Creek series. Near Mount Farnsworth some iron
pyrite was found in limestone, along with minor amounts of copper carbonates, and
at Mount Snowdon some rusty-coloured argillite and chert. Near Sheep Mountain
rusty-coloured granite was found to contain finely disseminated molybdenite and
small crystals of tourmaline. Along the Marble Dome Range some serpentinized
peridotite was observed. Near Black Mountain, west of Gladys Lake, a silicified
zone containing some chalcopyrite and arsenopyrite was prospected. A 62 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1959
Some excellent work was done from a main base camp established at Nome
Lake. The lake lies at the centre of an extensive area underlain by granite. Northeast of Nome Lake a wide oxidized zone containing much disseminated pyrite was
given considerable attention. Values were low. Working toward the McNaughton
basin, a granite-limestone contact was investigated and a wide zone containing much
pyrrhotite and limonite was discovered. Work was done on the continuation of
a heavily oxidized fault zone.    Some prospecting was done in Redfish Creek valley.
This area merits more prospecting.
Cariboo Mining Division.—Ten miles west of McLeod Lake, on the Hart
Highway, some inconclusive work was done. Some intensive prospecting was done
at Tudyah Lake near the Hart Highway.
Clinton Mining Division.—Some work was done in the area between McLean
Lake and Upper Hat Creek. The area is mainly underlain by volcanic rocks and
is not encouraging for prospecting.
Kamloops Mining Division.—On Sicamous Creek, near Salmon Arm, along
the Mara Lake road, and near Blind Bay some prospecting was done in a discouraging schist formation. Work was also done near White Lake, in the Wallensteen
Lake area, at Blanc Creek, and on Charcoal Creek. Nothing of interest was
reported.    Some inconclusive work was also done near Pement Lake.
Some excellent work was done from Eagle Lake northwesterly past the eastern
section of the Jim Creek watershed, to Monticola Lake, to the northwest portion of
Jim Creek, on past Shale Mountain, and on to Windy Mountain between Needa
Lake and Taweel Lake. This generally northwesterly section was prospected across
an east-west width of about 6 miles. Several exposed mineral outcrops were found,
as well as some interesting float. More work will be done in parts of this area.
The northwesterly end of this section extends into the Clinton mining division.
Liard Mining Division.—An exploratory trip was taken in an easterly direction
from the Wilms camp at Mile 60 on the Cassiar road, but the weather was very bad
and little effective prospecting was possible.   This area will receive further attention.
Prospecting was continued in the area between the Toad and the Racing Rivers,
and in the Dunedin River valley. Some small pipes of quartz containing chalcopyrite were investigated. Further prospecting was also done on both sides of the
Alaska Highway between Mile 398 and Mile 415. Some interesting geology was
mapped and considerable scattered barite and fluorite were reported, but nothing
of commercial importance was found.
At Sheep Mountain some highly altered limestone was found to contain galena,
sphalerite, and pyrite, but sampling did not indicate commercial values. Close to
the Major Hart River some scattered mineralization was exposed in schist and slate.
In a serpentine-peridotite zone 7 miles west of Sheep Mountain some brittle fibre
chrysotile was prospected. Further inconclusive work was done near Blackfox
Mountain and on Juniper Mountain.
Nanaimo Mining Division.—Some prospecting was done near the old O.K.
property close to Nanoose Bay and at Leech River. Nothing of interest was
reported.
Nelson Mining Division.—Work was continued in the area close to the Bayonne
mine on the west side of Kootenay Lake. Low-grade copper values associated
with several shear zones were investigated.
Some work was done near the headwaters of Goat River, but nothing of importance was reported.
New Westminster Mining Division.—Some prospecting was done high up on
the east side of Pitt Lake about 20 miles from the south end. Nothing important
was reported. DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 63
Considerable work was done near the headwaters of Five Mile Creek, which
flows into the Fraser from the west side a short distance from Yale. The valleys of
Gordon and Urquhart Creeks were prospected, and traces of molybdenite and copper
carbonate and fairly large amounts of pyrite were found in a wide dyke in coarse
granite.
Some work was done on Ladner Creek in the vicinity of the old Home Gold
property.    Nothing important was found.
Nicola Mining Division.—A base camp was established close to Mamit Lake
on the east side of Guichon Creek. This area is heavily covered with overburden,
and shows very few outcrops. A systematic soil-testing programme was initiated,
and the results thereof incorporated on a large-scale map. To date the results
obtained are somewhat inconclusive, although some interesting information was
obtained.
Omineca Mining Division.—Manson Creek was used as a base camp for one
party. Skeleton Gulch, the lower part of the Germansen River valley, and Plughat
Creek received some attention. Between Kildare and Slate Creeks considerable
prospecting was done in search of the source of mineralized float found in the
vicinity. In the Wolverine Range some gold-bearing pyrite was found along a
granite contact and some work was done around aplite dykes associated with a
shear zone.
The area close to Goat Mountain, Blackjack Mountain, and the valley associated with Mill Creek, Josephine Creek, and Discovery Creek also received some
attention. Up Lost Creek a narrow quartz vein containing heavy sulphides was
prospected.
Some work was done in an area about 75 air miles northwest of Germansen
Landing, but no information is at present available.
Considerable work was done in the Nation Lakes area, both east and west of
the Fort St. James-Manson Creek road. Scattered low-grade chalcopyrite was
found 3 miles north of the west end of Chuchi Lake. Further work was done on the
north side of Tchentlo Lake, 3 miles from the outlet, on low-grade copper showings.
On Rottacker Creek, 6 miles east of Indata Lake, considerable work was done, and
some near-commercial showings of copper were investigated and sampled.
In the Chuchi Lake area, copper stain was observed along a porphyry-
volcanic contact. On Klawdetelle Creek some malachite was found in quartz, and
heavy pyrite mineralization was observed close to an anomaly mapped from an
aerial survey. Near Milligan Lake heavy iron stain was found on altered intrusives.
Rock outcrops here were mainly medium fine-grained intrusives, but a few quartz-
carbonate-mariposite outcrops were also observed.
Prospecting was continued in the area adjacent to the end of the northwest
arm of Stuart Lake, and more narrow stringers carrying low values in manganese
were uncovered.
Quesnel Mining Division.—Some inconclusive work was done near Charlotte
Lake.
Eight miles west of Williams Lake a base camp was established close to the
main Chilcotin road, and some prospecting was done south of the road. The area
proved to be badly covered with overburden, and apparently mainly underlain by
recent volcanics.
Revelstoke Mining Division.—Near the mouth of Goldstream River considerable work was done on a large area underlain by fairly soft schist in which
zones of pyrrhotite and pyrite parallel the schistosity. Sample values were low.
Some quartz veins cutting across the schist carried medium to low values in gold,
silver, and copper. A 64 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1959
Some prospecting was carried on at the head of McCulloch Creek and on the
south fork of La Forme Creek.
From a camp at Mile 64 on the Big Bend Highway some prospecting was done
on high ground on the east side of the river, and in the many east-west stream
valleys on that side. Much of the area is covered with deep overburden and
pyritized schist appears to underlie much of the terrain. Some limestone was
reported, and some volcanic rocks showing traces of copper stain.
Some work was done 15 miles west of Revelstoke on scattered showings of
pyrite and chalcopyrite in quartz. Some work was done near Mount Begbie, and
in the Albert Canyon area.
Similkameen Mining Division.—A large area in the vicinity of Princeton
was prospected during the past season. This included copper showings on Rabbitt
Mountain and on the south slopes of Holmes Mountain. More work was done
on the Friday Creek copper showings and on copper and molybdenite showings
near Hayes Creek and near Jura station. The Missezula Lake and Dry Creek
areas also received some attention. Some work was also done near Apex, Kathleen,
and Pike Mountains, as well as on Copper Creek.
Skeena Mining Division.—Some of the near-by islands and parts of the coastline in reach of Prince Rupert received considerable attention during the past
season. Some interesting geological features were reported and several commercial-
grade deposits were worked on.   The area merits further attention.
Southerly from Terrace some work was done near the north end of Lakelse
Lake and in the mountainous country at the headwaters of Williams Creek. One
small mineral deposit was reported.
Some work was also done up two of the long creek valleys extending westerly
from near the south end of Kitsumkallum Lake. No report is available on the
results of this work.
Near the Coast Range, west from Williams Lake, a base camp was established
on Young Creek, about 20 miles west of Anahim Lake, and most of the area
prospected around Young Creek, Green River extending northwesterly to the
Rainbow Range of mountains, and embracing the area around Octopus Lake.
Much overburden was encountered, and many outcroppings of volcanic rocks
observed. It proved to be a poor area. Geological indications about 5 miles due
west of Young Creek in what is known locally as Burned Bridge Creek valley are
more promising and further work should be done in this area.
Another base camp was established at Middle Lake, not far east from Bella
Coola. Traces of chalcopyrite were found at a number of places in this area, but
nothing of commercial importance was reported. Areas contiguous to lower
reaches of Dean River, Takia River, Pyramid Peak, and Talcheazoone Lake were
all prospected. Some interesting geological conditions and minor mineralization
were reported.
Slocan Mining Division.—Much prospecting was done on ground surrounding
and between the old Millie Mack and Black Bear properties on Caribou Creek not
far from Burton. The general geology in this area is good and some interesting
mineral zones may be uncovered.
Vancouver Mining Division.—On the coast near Sullivan Bay, and extending
from the bay to Lee Lake, a small amount of prospecting was done. One quartz
lead was reported on the south side of the lake, but no samples were taken.
Vernon Mining Division.—Much of the high ground between Enderby and
Lumby has been made more accessible by numerous logging-roads during the past
few years.   This area received some attention.   Some inconclusive work was also DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 65
done in the Silver Hills east of Vernon, south of Bouleau, and at the headwaters of
Whiteman Creek.
MUSEUMS
The Department has a large exhibit of mineral rock specimens in the Douglas
Building, Victoria; collections are also displayed in the joint office in Vancouver
and in the offices of the Inspectors of Mines in Nelson and Prince Rupert.
Specimens from the collection in Victoria, accumulated in a period of more
than sixty years, are displayed in cases on the fourth floor of the Douglas Building.
The collection includes specimens from many of the mines and prospects in the
Province, and also specimens of type rocks and special minerals from British
Columbia and elsewhere.
British Columbia material includes specimens collected by officers of the
Department of Mines and specimens donated by property-owners. The collection
also includes type specimens purchased from distributors. Other valued specimens
or groups of specimens have been donated or loaned to the museum.
ROCK AND MINERAL SPECIMENS
Information regarding collections of specimens of rocks and minerals available
to prospectors and schools in British Columbia may be obtained from the Chief of
the Mineralogical Branch.
PUBLICATIONS
Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines, bulletins, and other publications of
the Department, with prices charged for them, are listed in the Department of
Mines List of Publications available from the Chief of the Mineralogical Branch.
Publications may be obtained from the offices of the Department in Victoria
and elsewhere in the Province. They are also available for reference use in the
Department's library (Mineralogical Branch) at Victoria, in the joint office in Vancouver, and in the offices of the Inspectors of Mines in Nelson and Prince Rupert,
as well as in public libraries.
MAPS SHOWING MINERAL CLAIMS, PLACER CLAIMS, AND
PLACER-MINING LEASES
From the details supplied by the locators, the approximate positions of mineral
claims held by record and of placer-mining leases are shown on maps that may be
inspected in the central records offices of the Department of Mines in Victoria and
in Vancouver. Copies of these maps may be obtained on request. The boundaries
of surveyed claims and leases are shown on the reference maps and other maps of
the British Columbia Department of Lands and Forests.
JOINT OFFICES OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES
AND THE DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND TECHNICAL SURVEYS,
CANADA.
The Provincial Department's Inspector and Resident Engineer, the Gold
Commissioner and Mining Recorder for the Vancouver Mining Division, and the
officers of the Federal Geological Survey occupy one suite of offices. All official
information relating to mining is now available to the public in the one suite of
offices in Vancouver.
The services offered to the public include technical information on mining, the
identification of mineral specimens, distribution of Federal and Provincial mining
publications, a reference library, a display of rocks and minerals, and a central
records office. Topographic Mapping and Air Photography
During 1959 the Surveys and Mapping Branch of the Department of Lands and
Forests continued to expand the framework of maps and surveys which are necessary for the orderly development of the Province.
Legal Surveys Division of the Surveys and Mapping Branch issued 597 sets of
instructions to surveyors. Field assignments included seventeen subdivision surveys
for the Lands Service in widely separated areas of. the Province. Two projects were
for the re-establishment of 152 corner posts at Beaverdell and Coalmont. In conjunction with other surveys, another 185 corner posts of sections and district lots
were replaced by standard bronze-capped monuments. Highway survey was undertaken in the vicinity of Cranbrook (12 miles), Peachland (6.1 miles), Canoe (13
miles), Savona (8.3 miles), Dougan Lake (3 miles), Hixon (22.5 miles), and
Engen (5.9 miles).
The latest " General Survey Instructions to British Columbia Land Surveyors "
appeared in printed form in The British Columbia Gazette, Part II, Vol. 2, No. 20
(November 12th, 1959). Among certain modifications incorporated into the new
instructions were several relating to surveys made under authority of the Mineral
Act. Standard bar posts shall now be used in place of angle-iron posts. Clarification was given to land surveyors in the interpretation of a corner of a mineral claim
where several location posts for adjoining claims lie in close proximity. Also, it is
now possible for surveyors to include up to four mineral claims in one field book.
Except for the northern one-third of the Province, Air Division's programme
of l-inch-to-40-chain interim mapping was essentially completed in 1959, and the
major effort is now concentrated on l-inch-to-20-chain photography. A total of
13,220 aerial photographs embracing 12,215 square miles were obtained for forest-
inventory purposes, and an additional 1,379 lineal miles were photographed for
other Branches of the Government. As the result of aerial operations, 15,123 photo
negatives were filed in the Air Photo Library, bringing the total number of air photographs (Federal and Provincial) now on hand to 468,676.
A new Wild A-7 precision autograph plotter acquired by Topographic Division
will enable mapping to be " bridged " across the most rugged areas between existing
networks of ground control. Field survey parties established mapping control for
17Vi Standard National Topographic map-sheets, the bulk of which extended from
Clinton northeast into Wells Gray Provincial Park and the remainder west from
Anahim Lake. Draughting was completed for 18 Topographic manuscripts at a
scale of 2 inches to 1 mile.
Geographic Division released seven new maps during 1959. Three variations
of Map 1g (East Central British Columbia), at a scale of 1 inch to 10 miles, were
produced. Maps of the National Topographic series, at l-inch-to-2-miles scale,
included Victoria 92 B/NW & SW (parts of), Grand Forks 82 E/SE, and Trail
82 F/SW. Another National Topographic map which appeared in 1959 was
Anahim Lake (92c) at 1:250,000 scale.
Federal Government agencies at Ottawa produced thirty-one full-colour National Topographic sheets at 1:50,000 scale. The Army Survey Establishment continued to make its manuscript mapping available to the public in provisional form.
During 1959, five provisional sheets at 1:250,000 scale and 41 sheets at 1:50,000
scale became available.   The Federal Departments of Mines and Technical Surveys
A 66 TOPOGRAPHIC MAPPING AND AIR PHOTOGRAPHY
A 67
and National Defence also completed field work for forty-one half-sheets of the
National Topographic 1:50,000 series in this Province.
Indexes of air-photo cover and of topographic, interim, and lithographed maps
may be found in the 1959 Annual Report of the British Columbia Lands Service.
Further information concerning Provincial and Federal mapping may be obtained
from the Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch, Department of Lands and Forests,
Victoria, B.C. Department of Mines and Technical Surveys
The Canadian Government Department of Mines and Technical Surveys,
created by an Act of Parliament introduced in November, 1949, took over most
of the branches and functions related to mining of the former Department of Mines
and Resources. The Mines Branch, Geological Survey of Canada, and Surveys and
Mapping Branch are the three branches of the Department of the most direct interest
to the mining industry. Brief reference to the work of the Surveys and Mapping
Branch in British Columbia is made in the preceding note headed " Topographic
Mapping and Air Photography." A note on the Geological Survey of Canada follows this paragraph and is followed by a note on the Mines Branch.
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA
By an arrangement made at the time the Province of British Columbia entered
Confederation, geological investigations and mapping in the Province are carried
on by the Geological Survey of Canada. Several geological parties are in the field
each year. Many excellent reports and maps covering areas of British Columbia
have been issued by the Geological Survey of Canada, and they have made available
a great amount of information that has been of much benefit to the mining and prospecting activities in British Columbia.
A branch office of the Geological Survey of Canada is maintained in Vancouver. Maps and reports on British Columbia can be obtained there. J. E. Armstrong is in charge of this office.
Field Work by Geological Survey of Canada in British Columbia, 1959
H. H. Bostock continued, with a small party, the geological study and mapping
of Squamish (92 G, W. Vi) map-area.
R. B. Campbell commenced mapping Quesnel Lake West Half (93 A, W. Vi)
map-area, and completed field work within most of the south half.
H. Frebold made stratigraphic and palaeontological studies of Jurassic strata
within Nelson West Half (82 F, W. Vi) and Salmo (82 F/3) map-areas.
H. Gabrielse continued, from 1957 and 1958, the geological study and mapping of Kechika (94 L) and Rabbit River (94 M) map-areas for publication on the
scale of 1 inch to 4 miles.
E. C. Halstead commenced a ground-water survey of the eastern coastal lowlands of Vancouver Island between Nanaimo and Campbell River, and completed
field work between Nanaimo and Courtenay, including Denman and Hornby Islands.
E. J. W. Irish commenced an investigation of Halfway River (94 B) map-area.
G. B. Leech continued, from 1956 and 1957, field work within Fernie West
Half (82 G, W. Vi) map-area.
H. W. Little divided the field season between completing the revision of the
geology of Kettle River West Half (82 E, W. Vi ) map-area; examination of properties within, and the revision of the geology of, Kettle River East Half (82 E, E. Vi )
map-area; and, with the collaboration of Hans Frebold, the revision of the geology
of Salmo (82 F/3) map-area and vicinity.
J. E. Muller commenced the geological study and mapping of Pine Pass West
Half (93 O, W. Vi) map-area.
A 68 DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND TECHNICAL SURVEYS A 69
B. R. Pelletier outlined and studied Triassic rocks in the Foothills of northeastern British Columbia between Toad River and Gathto Creek.
R. A. Price continued, from 1958, the geological investigation of Fernie East
Half (82 G, E. Vi) map-area.
J. E. Reesor continued, from 1958, his detailed studies within and adjacent to
Burton (82F/13) and Passmore (82F/12) map-areas as part of his continuing
research into the mode of emplacement, origin, and other features of granitic and
associated rocks.
J. G. Souther continued, from 1958, his geological investigation of Sumdum
(104 F) andTulsequah (104 K) map-areas.
D. F. Stott extended the study of Cretaceous rocks, begun in 1958, from Red
Willow River to Bullmoose Creek.
H. W. Tipper completed field work within Quesnel (93 B) map-area.
J. O. Wheeler commenced the geological study and mapping of Illecillewaet
(82N, W. Vi) map-area.
Publications of the Geological Survey
A total of twenty-four publications of the Geological Survey of Canada relating
to British Columbia was received by the British Columbia Department of Mines
in 1959.   A list of the twenty-four publications will be supplied on request.
MINES BRANCH
The Mines Branch has branches dealing with mineral resources, mineral dressing and process metallurgy, physical metallurgy, radioactivity, and fuels and explosives. A total of twelve publications of the Mines Branch pertaining to British
Columbia was received in 1959 by the British Columbia Department of Mines.
A list of these publications will be supplied on request. They included tabular
pamphlets dealing with coal mines, gold mines, stone quarries, petroleum refineries,
and milling plants in Canada.
MINERAL RESOURCES DIVISION
The Mineral Resources Division, which was a division of the Mines Branch,
has now been transferred from the Mines Branch to the office of the Deputy Minister
of Mines and Technical Surveys.
The Mineral Resources Division publishes studies on mineral resources, mineral economics, mineral legislation, mineral taxation, mining technology, and other
miscellaneous mineral-industry subjects. A total of eight publications published by
this Division was received by the library. A list of these publications will be supplied
on request. 

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