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Annual Report of the Director of Correction for the YEAR ENDED MARCH 31ST 1959 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1960]

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Annual Report
of the
Director of Correction
for the
YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st
1959
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1960  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Annual Report of the Director
of Correction for the year ended March 31st, 1959.
ROBERT W. BONNER,
A ttorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., March, 1960.  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
1. Director of Correction's Letter to Attorney-General  7
2. Statistical Tables  9
3. Extracts from Wardens' Annual Reports—
(a) Oakalla Prison Farm—
Classification Unit  17
West Wing  17
East Wing  18
Westgate Unit  18
Narcotic Drug Treatment Unit (Male)    19
Young Offenders' Unit  20
Forestry Camps  21
Women's Gaol    22
(b) Haney Correctional Institution—
Extracts from Warden's Letter    23
Business Division  24
Custody Division   26
Training Division  26
Camps Division  27
(c) New Haven  27
(d) Prince George Gaol   28
(e) Kamloops Provincial Gaol and Clearwater Camp     29
4. Extracts from Annual Reports of Senior Headquarters Personnel—
(a) Senior Medical Officer    30
(b) Senior Protestant Chaplain   31
(c) Senior Roman Catholic Chaplain   32
(d) Senior Librarian  32
5. Extracts from the Annual Report of the Provincial Probation Branch   33  Report of the Director of Correction, 1958/59
The Honourable Robert W. Bonner, Q.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—It is my pleasure to submit the Annual Report of the Director of Correction covering the activities of the Provincial Gaols and Probation Branch for the year
ended March 31st, 1959.
Reports given by the various Wardens indicate continued progress in all of our
institutions.
There have been some changes in personnel, most noticeable being the loss to
the gaol service of Warden E. K. Nelson and Deputy Warden (Custody) Malcolm
Matheson, both of Haney Correctional Institution, who left this Province for the
United States, where both are now associated with the University of Southern California. These two officers were replaced by Mr. John Braithwaite and Mr. J. W.
Lane, both of whom had previously held positions of responsibility on the Haney
staff.
In last year's Report I made mention of the promotion of Mr. S. Rocksborough
Smith, formerly Director of New Haven, to the position of Deputy Director of Correction. During the past year Mr. Smith has taken over these new duties on a full-
time basis, his former position as Director of New Haven having now been filled by
the appointment of Mr. George Warnock, formerly executive secretary of the John
Howard Society of Vancouver Island. We welcome Mr. Warnock to the gaol service
and commend to the readers of this Report some of the extracts which we have
included from his account of the activities of New Haven during the past year. Of
particular interest is the report of the experiments that we are making in conditional
release of trainees for the purposes of working in the community during the day and
returning to the institution each evening. This same policy is being followed in the
case of a selected number of trainees from the Haney Correctional Institution.
The activities of the Probation Branch are reported by Mr. C. D. Davidson,
Chief Assistant Probation Officer. There have been changes in personnel during the
year, and this time, for the first time in many years, the number of referrals has
shown a slight decrease. This is attributed to the fact that for a considerable period
of time during the fiscal year two branch offices, Abbotsford and Cranbrook, were
unmanned.
The addition of a full-time secretary to the British Columbia Board of Parole,
who is attached to the Probation Branch, has brought about greater uniformity in
the activities of the Board, and has led to a more effective operation of our whole
system of parole supervision for those individuals released at the discretion of the
Provincial Parole Board.
Our camp programme still proves one of the most satisfactory developments
that has taken place in the correctional field for some years. The new pre-release
camp at Haney Correctional Institution is rapidly nearing completion, and will be
activated during the coming fiscal year.
In closing I would once again express my thanks to all who have helped us
during the past year. We have experienced the utmost co-operation from other
branches of the Government services, from staffs of many social agencies, the John
Howard Society, the Salvation Army, clergymen of the various denominations, an
understanding press, and those members of the general public who are appreciative
of the importance of a modern correctional system, and by their support have given
us understanding encouragement.
7 EE 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
I would again commend the loyal, sometimes seemingly tireless work of the
Wardens and staff members of our institutions, staff of the Correction Branch, Probation Officers, and clerical assistants. We realize at all times that our programme
is only as good as the personnel involved in carrying it out, and whatever measure
of success has been attained in the penal system of this Province can be attributed
chiefly to the loyal and conscientious staff members.
I would submit the following recommendations for your consideration:—
(1) As was pointed out in last year's Annual Report, there is a pressing need
for adequate gaol hospital facilities. I would sincerely urge that this need
be met as soon as possible by the renovation of the existing facilities at
Oakalla, or by the construction of more modern quarters to provide
improved accommodation.
(2) There is a need for more parole officers to provide supervision of those
persons released on parole at the discretion of the British Columbia
Parole Board. Our programmes in the institutions are improving steadily,
but much of the effect of these treatment programmes is dependent on
adequate after-care. At the present time the case loads of those Probation Officers who are providing post-release supervision are still too high.
Additional staff should be provided just as soon as possible.
(3) One of the chief characteristics of our correctional services has been the
development of separate training programmes for different types of
inmates. This, of course, depends on adequate classification. To date,
classification has been carried on under very adverse conditions. There
should be better facilities for admission, observation, and classification of
inmates at Oakalla Prison Farm. The present quarters are entirely
unsatisfactory, and must be improved at a very early date.
(4) We take some pride in the development of our chaplain services over the
past few years, but as yet there has been no provision of proper chapels
in any of our institutions. While other facilities have been greatly
improved, I think we are remiss in not paying attention to the provision
of proper facilities for this most important side of our correctional process.
(5) There is still great need for completion of such facilities as adequate refrigeration and storage, proper means of garbage-disposal, and a double
fence at Haney Correctional Institution. These projects should be proceeded with at the earliest opportunity.
(6) The programme at Prince George is still handicapped by inadequate
facilities. Plans which were drawn several months ago for the provision
of this additional space should be implemented as soon as possible.
(7) We should not overlook the need for an early start on an up-to-date
cottage-type women's gaol on the excellent new site which was acquired
months ago at Ruskin.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
E. G. B. STEVENS,
Director of Correction. REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1958/59
EE 9
STATISTICAL TABLES
ANNUAL REPORT OF GAOLS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st,  1959
Oakalla and
Young
Offenders'
Unit
Kamloops
Prince
George
Haney and
Gold Creek
Camp
New
Haven
1. Total number of county gaols in B.C	
2. Total   expenditures   for   gaol   mainte
nance in B.C.—
Year ended March 31st, 1959 _..
i Year ended March 31st, 1958 \	
3. Average total maintenance cost per day
per prisoner—
Year ended March 31st, 1959  	
Year ended March 31st, 1958 	
Average dietary cost per day per prisoner—
Year ended March 31st, 1959. 	
Year ended March 31st, 1958 	
4. Number of prisoners committed—
Year ended March 31st, 1959.	
Year ended March 31st, 1958-	
$2,893,244.17
$3,099,483.07
$6.40301
$6,927
$0,926
$0,975
11,656
13,055
$155,449.54
$51,657.90
$4.65
$3.11
$0.88
$0,646
1,501
1,496
$237,128.30
$200,302.66
$7.42
$5.82
$1.00
$0.94
1,250
1,292
$1,540,979.98
$963,587.28
$10.58
$1.19
$1.19
682
705
$100,690.64
$7.63
$0.73
60
57
I. Movement of Population, Year Ended March 3 1st, 1959
Oakalla
and Young
Offenders'
Unit
Kamloops
Prince
George
Haney
New
Haven
Total
On register, April 1st, 1958—
Received—■
From gaols and lockups
By transfer 	
By recapture .
By revocation of licence ..  ..
By forfeiture of ticket of leave ....
By internal movement	
From bail . J
From breach of recognizance	
Totals.
Discharged—
By internal movements.
By expiry of sentence.....
By ticket of leave 	
By deportation	
By pardon 	
By escape.—  .'....
By death-
By payment of fines 	
By release on Court order including bail
By transfer -...__..   	
By licence (B.C. Parole Board)	
Totals  —	
On register, March 31st, 1959-
1,215
10,067
114
21
79
4
1,170
201
1,166
7,869
14
219
11
20
6
249
980
1,137
1,200
100
11,656 |  1,501
1,239
100
31
130
11,671  |  1,500
101
89
1,238
12
1,013
1
89
43
102
1,248
91
375
664
15
1
660 |
397
35
1
57
35
1,814
13,458
191
22
79
4
1,170
223
2
682
60
15,149
13
1,179
373
10,494
22
37
1
220
4
15
1
4
25
6
9
447
3
1
1,058
58
6
1,433
176
49
225
60 | 15,139
1,824 EE 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
II. Commitments
1957/58
1958/59
Decrease
Increase
Murder  —
Manslaughter _~.
Crimes—
Against person
Against property..
Against public morals and decency	
Against public order and peace
Other offences not enumerated below..
Insanity
Average number of prisoners per month-
Average number of prisoners per day	
Escapes '..      — 	
Escapes and recaptured  	
Deaths in gaols   _.—
10
5
440
2,776
184
10,786
501
84
43,273
1,423
10
12
5
22
10
422
2,693
194
9,120
369
70
43,057
1,814
24
22
6
18
83
1,666
132
14
216
12
5
10
391
14
10
1
III. Sex
Oakalla
and Young
Offenders'
Unit
Kamloops
Prince
George
Haney
New
Haven
Total
9,066
1,001
1
1,420             1,238
81
664
60
12,448
1,082
10.067       1       1.501       1       1.238
664
60
13,530
IV. Educational Status
V. Nationality (Place of Birth)
488
5,776
3,616
187
150
992
354
5
80
832
321
5
13
326
308
17
24
36
731
7,950
4,635
214
Totals	
10,067
1,501
1,238
664
60
13,530
British-
8,046
349
342
1,447
7
1,043
35
	
596
22
56
11,188
413
342
Totals _ 	
8,737
1,454
1,078
618
56
11,943
Foreign—
264
999
40
27
5
42
20
140
	
9
36
1
4
298
1,221
40
Other foreign countries	
28
Totals _ 	
1,330
47
160
46
4
1,587
Grand totals 	
10,067
1,501
1,238
664
60
13,530
VI. Habits as to Use of Intoxicants REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1958/59
VII. Habits as to Use of Drugs
EE 11
Oakalla
and Young
Offenders'
Unit
Kamloops
Prince
George
Haney
New
Haven
Total
9,489
578
1,501
1,234
4
664
58
2
12,946
Addicts  	
584
10,067
1.501      1      1.238
664
60
13,530
VIII. Occupation
IX. Racial
X. Civil State
XI. Ages
263
704
873
5,058
349
335
1,490
240
219
106
430
198
299
12
560
5
1
404
22
—
....„„
13
8
25
1,030
82
80
9
71
42
101
132
168
79
14
15
17
16
5
14
4
3
23
7
4
483
1,087
966
Labourers __  	
6,753
571
527
Logger—    	
1,980
254
256
Professional  - 	
207
446
10,067
1,501
1,238
664
60
13,530
!
White                                 	
i          i
8,380                927                981
145                     4              	
1,459      |         564               257
50      |              |       	
33      |             6      j       	
591
4
64
3
2
1
58      |    10,937
       |         153
Indian ,.  	
2            2,346
|           53
41
Totals. -	
10,067             1,501      |      1,238
1                     1
664
60      |    13,530
1
Single - — 	
5,915
1,760
392
1.562
438
965
321
59
146
10
895
111
21
171
40
449
169
5
30
11
56
4
8,280
2,365
477
1,909
499
Widowed -	
Separated     	
Divorced  -
10,067
1,501
1,238
664
60
13,530
Under 21 years 	
21-25 years  	
25-30   „ 	
1,239
1.077
1,255
2,475
1,981
1,455
585
104
164
187
433
325
221
67
88
229
122
313
270
172
44
251
167
96
101
37
11
1
52
8
1,734
1,645
1,660
3,322
2,613
1,859
697
30-40   „    	
40-50   „    .   —
50-60   „	
Over 60 years	
Totals       	
10,067
1,501
1,238
664
60
13,530 EE 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
XII. Creeds
XIII. Duration of Sentences
i    r''"'"'
Oakalla
and Young
Offenders'
Unit
Kamloops
Prince
George
Haney
New
Haven
Total
4,198
2,131
817
122
1,124
216
752
94
41
23
8
19
175
11
336
921
140
145
4
120
38
74
1
47
5
3
3
761
88
56
82
51
117
71
12
249
125
23
156
24
30
10
39
1
2
1
4
9
21
3
18
5
1
1
1
1
::::::
6,138
2,505
Presbyterian ... .—.	
1,044
126
1,500
334
974
106
199
29
9
Buddhist                              .
19
Others .                  ...
180
24
None.    	
343
10,067
1,501
1,238
664
60
13,530
5,082
1,868
526
479
453
159
71
256
175
41
310
26
318
5
3
50
17
36
165
7
20
1,049
122
64
96
88
24
9
13
20
7
8
1
918
100
57
59
32
9
6
17
1
1
24
6
8
10
24
117
265
170
77
1
7,049
2,100
1                 672
3 months and under 6 months 	
4                755
42                880
11                373
2                165
Sentenced to Penitentiary	
Probation 	
287
176
42
                 354
Not guilty. : —          :	
1           26
318
Quashed  	
1             5
3
63
Withdrawn.     	
        |             17
1            36
Dismissed —	
1          181
1              7
21
Totals     .   — _ -	
10,067
1,501
1,238
664
60      1    13,530 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1958/59
XIV. Previous Convictions
EE 13
: .:.. .1
Oakalla
and Young
Offenders'
Unit
Kamloops
Prince
George
Haney
New
Haven
Total
2*802
1,294
:776
574
456
344
315
248
244
201
203
191
165
148
141
116
114
98
87
159
70
125
68
98
110
570
104
246
510
199
125
89
60
55
37
47
41
34
31
26
25
16
12
12
11
11
14
18
6
7
3
45
41
26
495
177
99
73
48
30
24
24
10
15
18
11
10
15
16
20
13
14
15
20
11
15
8
9
4
35
9
628
36
15
24
8
5
5
1
1
1
	
4,450
I..  .      ........
1,730
2                                 —
1,008
3  	
741
4.  	
569
5  ...
6
430
377
7 _	
8	
320
295
9     	
10.   ....                   	
250
252
11
228
12
200
13   	
179
14  	
15      	
16 	
169
148
138
17       	
18	
123
116
20  	
197
21	
87
23 	
147
24  	
79
26           	
27    _
159
49                                               	
646
60  	
Over 60                                 	
130
255
Totals           	
10.067
1,501
1,238
664
60
13,530
72.166
66.0
60.2
5.422 EE 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
XV. Offences for Which Persons Were Committed and Sentenced during the Year
Persons Committed
Sentenced
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
(a)   Crimes against the Person
3
172
167
3
1
1
4
10
22
25
13
8
1
3
15
7
1
3
Assault, common    _	
185
175
4
1
1
4
10
22
169
172
5
1
2
4
6
3
184
179
Attempted suicide 	
Cutting and wounding and attempting same _
6
1
2
Stabbing    , ., ' _
4
6
Murder    „,      -     — ... __ 	
Carnal knowledge          _ _	
Rape with assault with intent to rape 	
—
3
25
18
18
Totals  	
408
22
430
383
23
406
(b)   Crimes against Property
Arson and incendiarism   	
Burglary and housebreaking 	
13
586
118
120
57
255
20
1,149
15
172
74
9
10
21
66
7
1
13
595
118
130
57
276
20
1,215
15
179
75
13
877
112
247
70
550
12
1,288
22
223
91
18
10
35
66
7
1
13
895
112
257
70
585
12
Larceny      ._.. -. -.
1,354
22
Receiving stolen goods ._	
Trespass     - -	
230
92
Totals   	
2,579
114
2,693
3,505
137
3,642
(c) Crimes against Public Morals and Decency
3
35
21
2
5
1
114
4
2
2
2
1
1
1
4
35
22
2
5
1
115
4
2
2
2
5
37
23
1
5
1
128
4
2
3
2
1
1
	
6
Indecent assault  —_ 	
Indecent exposure — ._ -	
Gross indecency   	
37
24
1
5
Keeping houses of ill-fame   .	
1
6
—...
134
4
2
3
Habitual criminal  — —	
2
191
3
194
211
8
219
(d)   Crimes against Public Order and Peace
Breaches of Government Liquor Act	
5,436
245
4
811
56
496
106
19
3
1
201
75
19
5,932
351
4
830
59
144
1
11
5,468
247
6
5,721
64
144
6
20
1
1
43
733
516
97
613
3
1
5,984
344
Breaches of by-laws (not including B.L.C.A.)
Breaches of Motor-vehicle Act 	
6
6,334
67
Cruelty to animals     „ 	
Drunk and disorderly (not including B.L.C.A)
Escaping from constable _  	
144
1
11
144
7
20
1
203
76
37
1
46
700
423
233
1
Obstructing an officer     — —
Selling or giving liquor to Indians (not including B.L.C.A.) —- -  -	
47
901
44
936
498
252
443
266
519
Causing disturbance    	
303
Totals   -	
8,110
920
9,030
13,163
1,547
14,710
(e)  Other Offences Not Enumerated Above
436
23
459
563
21
5S4
Grand totals of (a), (6), (c), (d),
11,724
1,082
12,806
13,198
1,173
14,371 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1958/59
EE 15
XVI. Employment of Prisoners
(Per cent of population.)
Oakalla and
Young Offenders'
Unit
Kamloops
Prince George
Haney
5.687
24.279
3.127
9.691
1.475
7.062
18.008
30.671
20
2
43
24
11
32
3
10
13
12
30
9.425
Sick         	
1.018
12.685
Farm and garden	
Not employed _  	
22.765
1.332
Vocational shops.. „ ,	
28.979
13.607
0.096
	
4.710
4.824
0.392
	
0.030
At Court     —   ...   .
0.137
XVII. Number of Officers and Employees on March 31st, 1959
Oakalla
Warden    	
Deputy Warden, Treatment 	
Deputy Warden, Custody 	
Business Manager .
Assistant Deputy Wardens ..
Senior Correctional Officers
Chief Engineer	
Foreman of Works	
Warden's Secretary 	
Chief Steward 	
Senior Prison Guards 	
Licence-plate Shop Foreman	
Social Worker (Psychologist) 	
Chaplain (part time) 	
Guards, Disciplinary, etc. — _
Guards, temporary — 	
Stenographers—Grade 2, female
Stenographer—Grade 1, female
Dentists   ~   	
Clerk—Grade 2   _.
Resident Physician 	
25
243
5'
Total
357
Matron in Charge
Matrons 	
Women's Gaol
Temporary Matrons
Total
1
42
13
56
Young Offenders' Unit
Director     _	
Classification Officer	
Education and Vocational Officer .
Chief Custodial Officer	
Supervisor Cook 	
Supervisors    	
Night  Guard   _	
Stenographer—Grade 2, female
Temporary Supervisors  __
Total  	
35
Social Worker
Drug Huts
1
Senior Correctional Officer        1
Guards         4
Psychiatrist        1
Matrons  ....       4
Temporary Matrons         3
Total          14
Chilliwack Camps
Senior Prison Guards	
Senior Correctional Officer
Temporary Guard  	
Guards  	
Total
Grand total
Haney and Gold Creek Camp
Haney
Warden  	
Deputy Warden 	
Assistant Deputy Warden
Business Manager 	
Personnel Officer 	
Chief Engineer 	
Training Supervisors
Medical-Dental (part time)
Chaplains  .	
Librarian  	
Laundry Manager  	
Grounds Officer   	
Physical Education Instructor
Arts and Crafts Instructor	
Vocational Instructors 	
Academic Teachers 	
Hospital Officers 	
Counsellors        	
Programme Officers  	
Maintenance staff  	
Kitchen staff  	
Tool Control Officers .
Clerks, male 	
Guard-Clerks  	
Guards  	
4
1
1
20
26
488
  1
  2
  1
  1
  1
  1
  5
  5
  2
  1
  1
  1
  1
  1
  14
  3
  8
  4
.._ _ 24
  17
   8
   2
  9
 __ 10
 - 122
Camps Administration staff   ~    3
Clerks, female     13
Total 	
Senior
Senior
Go
Correctional
Guards —
Id Creek Camp
Officer 	
      1
2
Guards
9
Total 	
Grand total
261
12
273 EE 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
XVII. Number of Officers and Employees on March 3 1st, 1959—Continued
New Haven
Prince George
Director     	
Stenographer (part time)
Chief Supervisor 	
Housemaster 	
Social Worker 	
Vocational Instructors .
Supervisors 	
Total
Kamloops
Warden  	
Deputy Warden, Custody
Chief Engineer .
Senior Prison Guards   	
Guards, Disciplinary, etc 	
Stenographer—Grade 2, female
Total 	
1
1
1
1
1
3
10
18
1
1
1
2
19
1
25
Warden  	
Deputy Warden, Custody ..
Assistant Deputy Warden
Chief Engineer	
Assistant Engineers 	
Chief Steward 	
Senior Prison Guards	
Guards, Industrial Shops
Guard-Clerks  	
Guards, Farm
Guards, Disciplinary, etc.
Guards, temporary -	
Total
1
1
1
1
5
1
5
2
2
1
21
2
43
XVIII. Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for Year Ended March 3 1st, 1959
Oakalla
Kamloops
Prince
George
Haney and
Gold Creek
Camp
New
Haven
Total
Salaries ..
Office expense..
Expenditure
Travelling expense — 	
Office furniture and equipment.
Heat, light, power, and water	
Advertising —   	
Medical services  	
Clothing and uniforms 	
Provisions and catering 	
Laundry and dry-goods 	
Earnings   .       	
Printing and publications	
Equipment and machinery —
Medical supplies  	
Library —  	
Maintenance  of  buildings  and
grounds
Maintenance   and operation  of
equipment
Transportation of prisoners.
School supplies _
Supplies for training	
Motor-vehicles and accessories..
Incidentals and contingencies.—
Farm operations 	
Sheet-metal plant.
Group work programme-
Vocational shop	
Recreation supplies	
Acquisition and construction of
buildings and grounds	
Totals 	
Public Works expenditure—
Repairs and maintenance-
Other votes   	
Gross expenditure..
Revenue
Miscellaneous refunds. -
Keep of prisoners 	
Total refunds	
Total cost	
$1,807,317.86
22,139.08
11,217.88
1,589.23
116,791.51
29,195.93
123,713.98
410,853.50
12,555.19
61,931.85
684.27
50,994.23
18,625.41
2,509.75
32,405.59
5,927.92
15,479.67
1,905.95
9,052.47
10,167.27
1,211.19
39,702.38
55,743.80
95.12
2,570.59
25,000.00
612.201
$96,165.00
565.06
1,411.73
304.87
770.89
1,909.50
7,435.15
30,673.57
692.86
15,108.80
943.98
99.46
1,931.81
2,854.75
374.36
250.99
$168,940.34
1,168.66
3,781.12
12,125.88
7,126.28
33,210.19
1,617.20
1,897.20
689.21
1,250.65
468.37
4,403.33
1,765.42
1,386.79
57.44
$2,869,993,821 $161,492.78
91,789.331            63.51
88,941.69   	
$239,888.08
5,902.22
$3,050,724.84| $161,556.29| $245,790.30
$157,480.67
$6,106.75
$270.00
8,392.00
$157,480.67|     $6,106.75|     $8,662.00
$2,893,244.17| $155,449.54| $237,128.30
$1,022,112.44
19,764.34
8,782.19
2,019.03
68,134.21
813.65
3,118.35
50,129.44
186,299.79
2,909.10
34,692.00
23.40
14,002.54
9,233.55
2,407.58
19,252.44
14,241.62
2,302.66
5,062.49
24,092.94
8,284.50
1,745.93
1,106.15
$69,228.33
2,003.41
304.12
5,773.68
807.80
2,626.93
7,548.92
598.82
1,928.98
14.15
146.14
131.53
196.95
588.42
1,811.87
213.19
1,091.38
3,425.04
3,720.93
9,032.85
655.05
7,988.15
$3,163,763.97
45,640.55
25,497.04
3,913.13
203,596.17
813.65
35,031.58
191,031.78
668,585.97
18,373.17
115,558.83
721.82
66,776.10
29,241.14
5,682.11
58,581.59
24,836.16
20,135.30
8,059.82
37,957.24
18,451.77
3,265.55
44,529.46
55,743.80
9,783.02
2,570.59
25,000.00
8,600.35
$1,517,551.34
29,890.64
$102,815.64| $4,891,741.66
127,645.70
88,941.69
$1,547,441.98] $102,815.64| $5,108,329.05
$6,462.00
$2,125.00
$166,337.67
14,498.75
$6,462.00|     $2,125.00]    $180,836.42
$1,540,979.98| $100,690.64| $4,927,492.63
XIX. Average Cost of Each Prisoner and Miscellaneous
Dietary   cost
per diem
of each prisoner
Keep of prisoners (including
salaries and all expenses) per
diem  	
$0,926
6.40301
$0.88
4.65
$1.00
7.42
$1.19
10.58
$0.73
7.63 REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1958/59 EE 17
EXTRACTS FROM WARDENS' ANNUAL REPORTS
OAKALLA PRISON FARM
The population remained high and the lack of desirable physical facilities in
certain units remains a pressing problem, but, thanks to the steady increase in staff
performance as professional people, there was a maximum of good work done and
a minimum of the difficulties which might be expected to plague such a physical
setting.
Extracts from the reports of the individual units follow, but the small yet most
significant achievement of the year was probably the elimination of bread and
water punishment—the last of the traditional harsh penalties. Although strict discipline, a day's work for every man, and a full and active programme were maintained,
we have finally reached the point in our professional development where careful
classification and segregation, foresight in the handling of problems, and the use of
intelligent techniques in dealing with inmates' problems when they do erupt have
eliminated the necessity of harsh, brutal, or inhumane methods of control. A prisoner's liberties are controlled in direct relationship to his ability to use them wisely,
but he can no longer say that in beins controlled he was abused or hurt or handled
in a way which might suggest that staff were not concerned for him as an individual
or convinced of his real worth. This does not eliminate all hostility or solve the
problem of treatment, but it does, we feel, represent an important milestone and,
we hope, entitles us, in spite of the unattractiveness of the setting, to say that we
are ready for the more active support and help of the medical, legal, and other
related professional disciplines necessary to move from the era of leeching and
punishing the devil in people to the era of considering prisoners as ill and unfit
people, requiring our unending effort in making it possible for them to assume their
fullest possible responsibility as useful members of their community, at whichever
level it may be.
i'r-i Classification Unit
Central Classification continued to operate under the handicap of inadequate
facilities.
The following classifications and transfers were made during the past year:—
New Haven ...  50
Haney Correctional Institution  636
Young Offenders' Unit .__.._  107
Westgate —.. 2,921
East Wing .._  783
■ '■'     Annex "A" . _  3,013
Hospital   ___._  273
South Wing  100
West Wing _ ,__ _._:__ 319
Total :____ 8,202
West Wing (Remand and Awaiting Trial Prisoners)
The past year in the West Wing has been completed with a minimum of trouble,
considering that our count has been constantly high, and we have had a large number of people facing serious charges and lengthy and severe punishments. The
turnover of staff in the West Wing has been very small, and consequently we have EE 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
enjoyed a fairly long period of having all trained staff, all having been through the
staff-training school, as well as having had considerable on-the-job instruction.
The average daily count for the year was 175. Prisoners' days for the year
was 63,875. An average of 1,300 prisoners per month went to and from Court.
Another 120 per month were discharged to bail, released at Court, or released on
recognizance. There was a total of 313 prisoners sent to the British Columbia
Penitentiary from the West Wing.
East Wing
The East Wing unit is attempting to work as closely as possible with the drug
research unit to assist in the work on drug addiction. The East Wing receives the
drug addicts, the supposedly incorrigibles, the misfits from other units. This is a
challenge, and is, we feel, being met very ljopefully by the staff, who have worked
well as a team this year.
The present programme is strenuous, as it calls for good hard work and good
physical training, but is well complemented by the warm interest of staff and, as
mentioned before, by the academic work and hobbycraft.
The new gymnasium now plays one of the major parts in the unit programme.
Here inmates are instructed in hobbycrafts, such as leatherwork, copper-tooling,
woodworking, barbering, and plastics. There is also very active use of correspondence courses supplied by the Department of Education in Victoria. The time
spent in this building is divided. One half of the unit is taking hobbies, while the
other half is taking compulsory physical training, for those medically fit, as well as
various games in which they wish to participate. To date this programme has been
very successful in fostering harmonious relationship and good discipline in the
East Wing. Recreation periods are considered to be a privilege and are seldom
abused. Although some choice of activity is provided, all inmates medically capable of participating are required to take part in this aspect of programme. All
activity is under supervision of staff instructors.
Progress is also being made in the use of interviews to attempt to more suitably place and direct inmates toward rehabilitation. If placement in another institution or unit seems appropriate or requested, the case is reviewed by the Classification Unit. ,
Westgate Unit
Our population in the past year has been made up principally by short-term
recidivists and youthful offenders on definite and indefinite sentences who had violated paroles or were not considered suitable for placement elsewhere. The remainder of the population were younger adults who also were not considered suitable
for other units, although they had longer sentences up to the two-years-less-one-day
limit, plus some returned from Haney Correctional Institution as unsuitable to the
programme there. As a result, there has been a marked shortage of inmates serving
lengthy enough sentences to maintain the maintenance and work gangs with relatively trained people. In spite of this handicap, however, the general work programme has been sustained through more intensive supervision by our staff, and
has shown over-all improvement both in the shops and on the farm.
On the whole, there has been ample opportunity, within the work programme,
for the teaching of healthy work habits and attitudes. Outside work gangs have
operated on an all-weather basis, with the provision of weather-proof clothing, and
there have been only minor individual instances of resistance.
The need to maintain family and community contacts is always critical with
incarcerated men.   In the past year private and public agencies have met our need REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1958/59 EE 19
for family contacts. Representations of the National Employment Service, John
Howard Society, and Salvation Army have helped with familial problems and community contacts. The Alcoholics Anonymous and the Alcoholism Foundation
have found an increasing number of people who maintain contacts initiated in the
institution on the outside.
Bi-monthly table visits for relatives and friends were continued until January,
1959, at which time the table visits were conducted every Sunday rather than first
and third Sundays. This increased opportunity has shown a definite tendency for
an increase in the number of inmates who receive visits.
The emphasis on work with families, where selected inmates whose conduct
and need for reinforced family contacts warranted extra effort, proved quite effective. Several inmates whose family situations had been strained were able to resolve
these conflicts in the freer atmosphere of the more open family visits. The atmosphere was remarkably like that of a family social gathering at any community centre
in the community. This remarkable transformation can be almost entirely attributed to the presence of the children in the family group, enjoying the brief reunion
of father with the family, and spreading their infectious joy and enthusiasm to all
present.
Narcotic Drug Treatment Unit (Male)
Programme has been maintained on a somewhat less permissive basis than it
was previous to February 10th, 1958, and has been mandatory for all inmates.
This phase of the Pan-Abode experiment has resulted in a heightened level of inmate
morale. This emotional tone was without doubt a result of a feeling of accomplishment. While the inmate group on the one hand was more comfortable in its
adjustment to the more elementary level of behaviour, where self-determination in
participation in some activities was more limited than in previous phases of the
experiment, the group on the other hand was placed under pressure of a demanding
programme of mandatory group participation in scheduled constructive work, correspondence courses, religious instruction, hobby instruction, group discussions,
special programme, physical and recreational activity. Those inmates who were
able to maintain the required pace were provided with an experience in achievement,
and in this manner received assistance in the development of behavioural patterns
which allow socially acceptable functioning in the community.
This year has shown the greatest over-all improvement in work programme
and general programme, the benefits of which are apparent in the improved outlook
and positive approach to programme on the part of the inmates. Previous to this
past year, the unit suffered from a lack of facilities to carry out an inmate programme of full activity during the day shift.
New programme ventures were a public speaking course, a reading course, and
an outside visitor programme. The visitors were scheduled on a weekly basis and
provided the inmate group with an opportunity to identify themselves with wholesome members of the community. A family visit during the Christmas season
allowed inmates' parents, wives, and children to visit at the unit with a minimum
of necessary control.
The inmate group prepared a delightful buffet supper and entertained the
Professional Advisory Committee of the Narcotic Foundation staff of British Columbia.
Liaison with the Narcotic Foundation was strengthened by regular meetings
of the members of the foundation staff for group discussions and individual interviews. The Narcotic Foundation provided some of the service that was otherwise
not available due to the lack of a follow-up officer.   Further assistance was obtained EE 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
from the Probation Branch, as sentencing authorities are testing the feasibility of
definite plus indefinite sentences for addicts.
Young Offenders' Unit
The past year has again shown a trend, which began two years ago, toward the
unit receiving younger, more immature and disturbed inmates. This has placed
increased burdens on staff in developing skills to deal effectively with this group in
order to give them the training necessary toward their successful rehabilitation.
On admittance to the Young Offenders' Unit, the ages of the inmates ranged
from 14 to 21.   The age-groups were as follows:—
Percentage
Age of Population
14  .  1.95
15  8.00
16  28.53
17 .  28.52
18  24.60
19  5.80
20 : -__.-.__-___  1.30
21 .  1.30
100.00
The number of boys involved in programme at the beginning of the fiscal year,
plus those who were classified to the Young Offenders' Unit during the twelve
months' period, totalled 164. This would indicate a considerable turnover of population during the year.
Percentage
Sentence of Population
3 months or less ._     8.0
4 months      5.0
6 months  23.5
9 months  21.0
12 months  •  30.5
18 months or more   12.0
The above table indicates that 58 per cent had sentences of nine months or
less.
Before making a vocational placement, many factors, such as custodial hazards,
physical and mental condition of the inmates, and the shop vacancies, have to be
considered. This often means that boys have to be placed in shops which are contrary to their vocational interests for at least part of their period of incarceration.
The lack of work experience and the limited concept of what was involved in the
numerous industrial occupations further complicates the placement process. The
boys generally were not prepared to make a rational selection of a vocation.
It is a pleasure to report that 72 per cent of the population at the Young
Offenders' Unit attended school on the full-time basis for at least part of their period
of incarceration. Approximately one-third of this number worked close to capacity
and made considerable progress, and approximately one-third worked below capacity but obtained sufficient benefit from training to justify remaining in school long
enough to obtain a working knowledge of arithmetic and English to help them with
their trade.
In August of 1958 a woman was employed as supervisor to a group of inmates
in the socialization programme at the Young Offenders' Unit.    This event repre- REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1958/59 EE 21
sented not only a precedent, but also an experiment, which so far has been amply
justified in terms of its success. At present, out of a normal complement of nine
group work staff, there are four women, and this ratio perhaps can be regarded as a
means of the administrative endorsement of their value to programme. In this connection, it is not sufficient simply to mention the salutary effect on the entire inmate
population in matters such as good grooming, courtesy, and the propriety of language
that their presence alone contributes, as it is evident that certain emotional psychological and social problems and needs of the inmate are met quite uniquely by
women, and that many inmates have responded to treatment where progress was not
noted previously.
A highlight of social programme during the winter was the series of visits over
a period of eight weeks of a class of students in criminology from the University of
British Columbia. Numerous meaningful relationships were cultivated during these
visits. Contact with a responsible and flexible group representing the values of the
outside community, as in the case of these students, is of highest significance in the
social development of the inmate, and the inmates as a whole not only benefited from
but truly enjoyed this experience.
While the unit has achieved a measure of success during the past year, in the
last analysis it is recidivism that indicates the need for much more to be accomplished. Recently our rate of persons released who completed parole without getting
into further difficulties was in the neighbourhood of 75 per cent; during the last fiscal
year the percentage dropped to around 65. There have been many factors which
contributed to the increase, such as our inability to " reach " problem youngsters
in some cases and the difficulties of finding employment. Furthermore, while we
have kept boys under close supervision for considerable periods, we are releasing
them under conditions of very little supervision due to the lack of adequate numbers
of Probation Officers. In some instances, most difficult boys were supervised by
mail. We feel that lack of adequate supervision during parole is a very serious
gap in our total rehabilitation efforts.
Forestry Camps (Chilliwack)
The count has been held at very near the maximum of 120. Camp No. 3 has
been occupied by a construction crew for the last two months of the year, increasing
the total count to a figure as high as 140. There has been a total of 917 discharged
from the three camps-—623 for discharge from Oakalla Prison Farm, 165 returned
to Oakalla Prison Farm for medical or dental treatment, 73 returned as unsatisfactory, 45 parole and miscellaneous interviews, 1 death, and 1 escape.
Fortunately there have been no serious injuries in the camps, and the medical
welfare of the inmates has been closely supervised.
Discipline and morale in the camps have been maintained at a high standard.
The majority of inmates take an active interest in the work being done, and the
results of their work are apparent in the progress on the road project.
Means are supplied for recreation after work hours. Sports equipment, games,
library, etc., are made available, and an active part is taken by the staff in the supervision of this activity.
The camps are visited each week by the Reverend Scott, of the United Church,
and by Father McKinnon, of the Roman Catholic Church, for religious service and
counselling, and also for the showing of religious films.
Road construction has continued to receive priority, and there have been
approximately eighty inmates per day under supervision on this project, subject to
the direction of Mr. H. Miles-Pickup, the project engineer, and his assistants. EE 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
For the latter seven months of the year, there has been a gang of approximately
twelve inmates and an officer working for the reforestation branch of the Forestry
Service. In that time we have planted 61,000 seedlings, and have also cleared,
thinned, and pruned 7 acres for a future seed-plot, as well as cleared approximately
12 acres for replanting purposes.
I would like to emphasize again that the value of the camps is becoming more
and more apparent as the programme is expanded. For the inmate, camp life has
great rehabilitative value in placing him in an environment comparable to civilian
life, and assisting him physically, mentally, and financially to take a useful part in
society upon his return to the community. As the camps are developed further,
they would be of even greater value if instruction in education and training programme were provided.
Women's Gaol
The average daily population for the year ended March 31st was 120. The
actual count fluctuated rapidly between 92 and 140. Admissions totalling 1,001
were spasmodic, at certain periods straining all facilities, especially the inadequate
admitting area, and at other times failing to provide a desirable degree of continuity
in programme. It is always necessary to maintain an extremely flexible programme
to meet the challenge of the varied needs of our inmate population.
Much effort has been spent developing separate programmes for the various
units. With the addition of the new cottages, almost half our population are living
in cottage units outside the main building. In order to meet the needs of those
persons whom we have considered will benefit from such segregation, it is necessary to carry through the policy in their work and group activities. The actual land
area of the institution does not permit complete separation for the different groups,
but we have tried, particularly with the younger inmates and the first offenders, to
involve them in training programmes sufficiently intense and absorbing that little
time is allowed for undesirable contacts. During the socialization period, group
and intergroup activities have also been functioning with this principle in mind.
During the past year we have opened two new cottage units. These allow for
variation of programme and are an additional means of segregation to meet the very
diversified needs of our population. We also have the services of four vocational
training programmes—hairdressing, power-sewing, home nursing, and school. The
cottages, which are medium-security units, and vocational training programmes are
often used for the teen-agers and the younger groups, who can benefit from the
training and from the more homelike atmosphere of the units.
The group work programme is designed to facilitate the growth of the individual
in the art of living constructively with people. The increased segregation of the
groups, made possible by the addition of the new wing and most recently by the
opening of the cottage, has greatly facilitated this process as it has enabled the group
members to live, play, and work together much as an ordinary family unit would.
It has been possible to undertake many group projects, to develop and pursue
various group interests and activities, to stimulate social and personal development
among the individual group members, and to keep negative influences by older
inmates on the younger ones to a minimum.
There is a high morale built up within the Women's Gaol by the many wholesome outlets for energy and by the influence of interested supervisors. The pattern
of the inmate's daily life is interesting, active, and sometimes rewarding. The contrast met in the outside world is frequently demoralizing. The aloneness, the lack of
decent vocation, the absence of an interested counsellor, and the drag of the only
familiar habitat often destroy the measure of development experienced in gaol. REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1958/59 EE 23
There is an obvious lack of facilities in the communities for assisting in the very
difficult work of after-care.
HANEY CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION
Warden Braithwaite, commenting on the year's activity, reports the following:—
The Camps Division has, with limited budget but a great deal of ingenuity
and the full support of all other divisions of the Institution, been successful in the
near completion of a new pre-release camp, designed to create a bridge for the
trainee between this Institution and the community. In addition, the Camps Division has expanded and intensified the programme existing within the Gold Creek
Camp. Over the past twelve months, counselling services, religious services, medical services, recreational services, and other programme have been extended to
Gold Creek for the enrichment of their total programme.
The Custody Division has been able to relax a great many of the more obvious
and onerous controls, and has been able to replace these with controls based more
on relationship and skill in handling trainees. It should be kept in mind that approximately 60 per cent of our Correctional Officer staff had worked in the field of
corrections for less than one year, as of March 31st, 1958. Correctional Officers
have been used more and more in recreational and counselling roles. It is hoped
that in the forthcoming fiscal year the use of Correctional Officers in other than
their traditional custodial role will be increased.
The Business Division has, despite the lack of qualified tradesmen, been able
to achieve a high standard of maintenance throughout the Institution and Gold
Creek Camp. In addition, they have completed many projects required to obtain
the optimum use of our present facilities. The Business Division is primarily a
service division in the type of administrative organizaton in evidence at this Institution. As such it is safe to say it has rendered to all other divisions a very high
standard of service throughout the past year.
Under the new Deputy Warden (Training), the Training Division has expanded its role considerably. The counselling staff has been bolstered and, with
a full staff, it was possible to appoint a counsellor to each living unit. The social
training programme was enlarged so that two Programme Officers were assigned
to each living unit. These Programme Officers became responsible not only for
programme, but also for security and custody within the living unit. Moreover, it
was possible on this basis to have the same officers responsible for the units during
the leisure hours throughout the total year. The result in terms of therapeutic
relationship value was enormous. The past year saw the activation of each vocational shop within the Institution. The Educational Section as a whole has developed to the point where the service available to trainees is equal to that available
within the public school system.
The Personnel Officer has, over the past year, been responsible for the completion of numerous staff training programmes. The complexity of staff training
required in an institution of employees with varying responsibilities and disciplines
is tremendous. Nevertheless, staff training courses of one form or another were
made available to almost every employee. In addition to staff training, the Personnel Officer is responsible for the Institution's public relations programme. Numerous press releases and radio and television interviews were completed. We are
happy to report that all of these were favourable, both to the Institution and to the
Department as a whole. Moreover, a unique system of regular weekly tours was
made available to responsible citizens in the community. EE 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
In general, it can be said that the major characteristic of the past year could
be defined as a growing consciousness of community responsibility. The staff of
this Institution are aware of their responsibility to the community at large to return
men to that community as responsible, productive citizens. We are at the same
time attempting, through various means, to make the community aware of its role
in the field of corrections. We believe that our responsibility is not to train men
to live in a correctional institution, but to live in a community. With this in mind,
our contacts with the community have increased to a very great extent over our
first seven months of operation.
Business Division
For the period April 1st, 1958, to March 31st, 1959, there were 664 transferred from Oakalla Prison Farm to Haney Correctional Institution following classification. During the same period 660 were discharged. The following graphs give
an indication of the duration of their sentences, their ages, their employment while
at the institution, and their general level of education.
Duration of Sentences of Trainees
300
275
250
225
200
175
150
125
75
50
fits
5 !-
o u
_8<g
« B
~ 3
o <_>
2|
<M 3
S-2
O u
so 3
A'TJ
oo Q 300
275
250
225
200
175
150
125
100
75
50
25
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1958/59
Ages of Trainees
EE 25
,2«
Percentage of Trainee Employment EE 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Education of Trainees
Custody Division
A great advance was made in bridging the gulf between the Correctional Officer
and the trainee. The resultant improved relationship is gratifying to observe and
of valuable assistance in the promotion of the Institutional programme.
Experience and constant training are developing a Correctional Officer who
understands his charges better and one who knows how to guide and lead them.
These talents are generally appreciated by the trainee.
The Haney Correctional Institution receives and expects to receive a number
of trainees who are emotionally unstable and hostile to authority. Discipline has
not been a serious problem. Violation of Institutional rules has not been excessive,
and the violations that did occur were of a minor nature. It is reasonably safe to
say that 80 per cent of all violations were committed by less than 10 per cent of
our population.
Training Division
The general approach in all shops is to make teaching as meaningful as possible. Therefore, every task which is assigned to a trainee is usually one whereby
he can see the usefulness of a finished job. Trainees are assigned to the educational
area after classification. As there are such variables as degrees of intelligence,
achievement, and length of sentence, it is only feasible to give instruction on an
individual basis. Some of the trainees go out directly to work as a helper at the
trade which they learned at the Institution, others are assigned to employers as
apprentices, some finish training at vocational schools in the community, and some
are discharged and never practise their learned trade but are better citizens because
of processes, such as the value of a job well done, the ability to take instruction,
and the ability to put in a regular working-day, which they have learned.
Social training means training in social living. Based on the principles of
social group work, a varied programme of physical activities, club groups, arts and
crafts, and other group activities has been established to further this training in REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1958/59 EE 27
social living.   It is felt that an individual cannot help but benefit from his participation in a healthy activity which is led by a skilled and interested adult.
Within the social training programme an attempt is made to develop some
sense of responsibility. The trainee is allowed to choose his activities and groups
as he desires on a voluntary basis. His responsibility to select his activities is the
same responsibility he must develop and use wisely in his future social life in the
community.
Camps Division
Gold Creek Camp is a minimum-security training camp located in Garibaldi
Park, approximately 15 miles from Haney. It is serviced from the Haney Correctional Institution and has benefited in many areas of programme as a result of the
opening of the aforementioned Institution.
During the past fiscal year, ninety-two men were selected through the classification process and were subsequently transferred to the camp. Of this number,
seven men were returned to the Institution as it was felt that they were not responding to the programme.
The daytime programme of the camp is determined by consultation with officials of the Department of Recreation and Conservation, and mainly centres around
the development of the southern end of Garibaldi Park as a recreational area for
citizens of the Lower Mainland.
Because there is such a great amount of work to be completed in Garibaldi
Park, the work programme does not vary too much from year to year. As in past
years, the projects were road construction, picnic-site and camp-site construction,
and general improvement of the park as a recreational area.
NEW HAVEN
During the fiscal year the maximum number of trainees at New Haven was
held at forty to give personal and intense attention to the specialized problem of the
more deeply disturbed youth. This means that the average number tends to be
about thirty-five at any given time. The policy is a good one, yet it makes the unit
appear to be uneconomical when comparisons are made on a man-day cost basis.
However, if we consider the hidden profits of the savings to the taxpayer and to
the community by virtue of the many successes of the product, then there is no
logical debate.
Within our findings to date there appears to be little relationship between the
time of release as governed by the definite portion of the sentence imposed by the
Court and the time when the inmate is sufficiently stable to meet the impact of his
return to society. Too frequently the Courts do not give us sufficient time to guide
this transformation toward release readiness.
It is not the policy of New Haven to teach vocational training toward certification for a given trade, but rather to use the tools, pressures imposed, and training
environment as a motivation toward character building, stability of work habits,
and general social ethics. It is felt that without these the trade certification is of
little use. We find that our employer resources prefer that they can be assured a
man will remain on the job, will get along with his fellow employees, and will live
up to a standard of trade ethics. These employers state that if we can give the
man a good foundation at a trade, he will be further trained on the job to suit the
needs of the company. It is interesting to note that within this philosophy by
teaching the various stabilities first, the man almost automatically becomes a good
tradesman. It is also interesting to note that to emphasize trade training over working habits brings a corresponding depreciation in high tolerance skills. EE 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Some serious thought should be given to correlating our instruction with local
Department of Education resources. It is believed that a very suitable arrangement
could be made whereby local teachers would come to the institution in the evening
to take formal classes. This would not only help the trainee, but would be of
benefit to the Department of Education and to the teacher concerned.
We have found community resources willing and available to assist in many
ways. All that was required was guidance. Industrial and business management
with their personnel officers were invited in related groups to study our programme
and to determine how they can best help the trainee following his discharge. The
result of these meetings proved valuable beyond expectation. We now have employers from Marpole to New Westminster anxious to assist with the placement of
trainees on release. A quota was worked out with each firm to take a given number into its plant. We are fast reaching the happy situation where industry and
business have become an integral part of the rehabilitation team. No longer do we
consider employment as a problem to the ex-inmate.
In co-operation with business and industry, an experiment has been in progress since early in 1958 to permit a selected number of men with senior status to
five in the institution and work out with a local firm. A liaison was set up with the
personnel officers and the counsellors, and jobs were arranged at first close by and
later farther afield. The object was to allow the man time to become thoroughly
secure in his new job and form a good social relationship with his fellow employees
and his union. To do so the man lived at the institution and travelled to and from
work. The results to date have justified the continuation of the experiment as a
very useful tool toward more permanent community placements.
The British Columbia Borstal Association continues to provide a very well
organized individual and effective after-care coverage. The practical approach by
the layman, businessman, or industrialist who is used to handling personnel problems is something we need and should use. It is a measure which has proved itself
at New Haven.
PRINCE GEORGE GAOL
The average daily population for the year was 90.67, a decrease of 3.64 from
the average for the fiscal year 1957/58. Overcrowding at certain times during the
year resulted in the transfer of a total of eighty-one inmates to Oakalla Prison Farm
and to the Kamloops Provincial Gaol's Clearwater Camp. Inmates held at the
institution who were sentenced to the British Columbia Penitentiary numbered
twenty-one. These prisoners were transferred to Oakalla Prison Farm pending
their removal to the Federal institution.
The laundry and tailor shop was expanded to almost twice its previous size
during the year by the removal of a cement wall and the installation of chain-link
security screens. An additional occupational shop is needed to employ inmates,
especially during the severe winter months.
All convicted inmates who were physically able to do so took part in the occupational programme, and recreation and hobbies were available to those who wished
to take part. Limited hobby and recreational activities were made available to
inmates who were not sentenced and proved to be most valuable in relaxing tensions and maintaining good discipline in the " waiting " block. An active inmate
Alcoholics Anonymous group has held regular meetings during most of the year.
A basic training programme for the staff at Prince George Gaol was instituted
and carried out during the latter months of the year. The programme consisted of
sixteen hours of lectures for each class. Lectures were given by members of the
senior staff and the Assistant Provincial Probation Officer on twenty-seven subjects, REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1958/59 EE 29
including methods of custody and supervision, dealing with inmate problems, and
modern correctional practices.
KAMLOOPS PROVINCIAL GAOL AND CLEARWATER CAMP
Annual statistics show a continued increase in population over the fiscal year
1957/58. The first full year of operation of the Clearwater Camp enabled us to
cut sharply the transfer of inmates to Oakalla Prison Farm, and also draw thirty
inmates from Prince George, relieving both of these institutions and at the same
time utilizing this man-power to great advantage in this area.
Again, as in the past, we supplied all manual labour for the grounds in the
Kamloops area, assisting the gardener in the greenhouses, flower-beds, lawns, rockeries, and roads. Crews cleared any debris that accumulated in the area, and in the
winter season cleared all walks, roads, fire-escapes, porches, and steps of ice and
snow.
Further clearing and levelling were carried out in the camp area to admit more
light, air, and for better parking facilities and movement of vehicles, also for better
protection in case of forest fires in the area.
New construction included a root-cellar 20 feet square, cribbed with logs, and
a washroom built in the basement under the dining-room. Full facilities are provided—concrete floor, hot and cold showers, wash-basins and flush-toilets complete
with sewage-disposal unit and drainage field. Basements are also installed under
several other huts, using logs salvaged from the slashing project on the road for
cribbing. Central heating for the huts is installed in these basements, and the space
provided used for storage and workshops. Inmates under staff supervision supplied
all the labour on these projects.
An area for a softball diamond was cleared, roots dug out and levelled ready
for use.   This is not in the camp compound but is about 200 yards away.
During the hot summer of 1958 numerous fires broke out in the Wells Gray
Park, and camp personnel and inmates were called to render assistance. The camp
proved especially beneficial, with a body of men available at all times for fast initial
action, very important in combating fires. The inmates acquitted themselves very
well, their work being commended by supervisors and all who came in contact with
them. A total of 793 days by inmates and 101 days by staff were spent at this
work. EE 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
EXTRACTS FROM ANNUAL REPORTS OF SENIOR
HEADQUARTERS PERSONNEL
SENIOR MEDICAL OFFICER
The general health of the male inmates on the whole has been good. There
were no epidemics during the year. Three hundred and fifty-two inmates were admitted to Vancouver General Hospital for treatment. There were six deaths, of
which two occurred in the prison hospital, one in Chilliwack Hospital, and three in
the Vancouver General Hospital.
There is pressing need for a psychiatrist to work mainly at Oakalla to assist
in classification, to assist the Probation Officers, and to report on referrals, and he
should have an assistant who would be able to visit other institutions, Haney Correctional Institution in particular.
We have greatly appreciated the addition of female resident nurses on the
Oakalla hospital staff. We shall shortly have two on duty, and we hope for a third.
It is the intention to have one registered nurse on each shift, taking the place of a
male hospital officer. There has been no problem whatever so far arising of any
significance. It is a particular exacting challenge to any nurse, owing to the improvised hospital setting with standards below any medical organization which they
have known. It requires patience, persistence, and understanding of a prison's
peculiar setting with the demands of custody and executive administration. It is
greatly to the credit of the nurse who has pioneered the nursing service here that
she has become so welcome and such a progressive addition to the staff.
We have welcomed medical students from the University of British Columbia
as temporary hospital officers during their summer vacation, and two students have
utilized the prison's resources for their thesis. One has written on prison medical
services as a whole, and one on research into a small group of inmates who are or
have been wards of the Superintendent of Child Welfare.
The Tuberculosis Wing has been kept fully occupied during the year. When
possible patients have been granted a temporary ticket of leave for treatment in
tuberculosis hospitals in the general community, but many have had to be retained
in the prison hospital because of their behaviour problems in other hospitals. Those
sentenced to over two years who are actively tubercular cannot be transferred to a
penitentiary, and there are two men at present destined to spend seven years in the
very limited environment of the Oakalla Tuberculosis Wing unless, of course, their
condition becomes inactive. This is unlikely in the case of one of these inmates.
The fact that they have to live at such close quarters with others serving sentences
for only a few days to a few months presents them with almost intolerable conditions.
The year has seen a marked increase in activity in the East Wing. The narcotic addicts contained therein have been actively engaged in the fields and bush
areas of the Gaol estate in addition, of course, to those employed in the laundry
and in other domestic jobs. The raising of morale and general health has been
remarkable. Sick parades out of a wing accommodating 190 men have averaged
about six inmates twice a week. Withdrawal routine has remained unaltered and
unchallenged. There has been a significant decrease in acts of morbidities, such as
self-injury during withdrawal, and there have been even fewer incidents of serious
developments during withdrawal requiring hospitalization. One hundred and fifty-
five inmates were withdrawn from narcotics during the year. The number of
juvenile addicts has shown an increase. Closer segregation of non-addicts in this
wing would be beneficial. REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION,  1958/59 EE 31
During the year 1959 inmates were transferred to the Provincial Mental Hospital, and the great majority of these were more psychopathic than psychotic. The
sociopath admitted to the Provincial Mental Hospital by Order in Council is an
especial problem owing to requirements of custody in the face of less and less emphasis on custody in the treatment of psychotic patients in mental hospitals. This
is being fully appreciated in England, and the section dealing with psychopaths in
the new Mental Health Bill is rewarding to read.
The bathroom and the whole of the Admission Unit of the Main Gaol at
Oakalla remains very inadequate and out of date, also the clothing storage-rooms
and the ventilation. The complete alteration of this unit is planned, and in medical
opinion this should be regarded as a most urgent and necessary scheme to carry
out. We have viewed with apprehension the number of inmates admitted in a
verminous condition and also those becoming verminous later.
There is an increasing number of women released who are psychologically ill
equipped to be at liberty, and, as in the case of the men, additional psychiatric
services are urgently needed either in the prison itself or with additional resources
at the Provincial mental-health institution. Six women were committed to mental
hospital during the year.
Medically speaking, the general health of the camps is excellent, and only a
few men are returned to Oakalla by reason of injury or ill health. Hygiene on the
whole is satisfactory and more than ever important in these camps. We have had
no repetition of the gastro-enteritis of earlier years; food, water-supply, and sewage-
disposal are satisfactory, though there has been some difficulty arising from breakage of the toilets. Minor deficiencies in housekeeping are pointed out and rectified.
All candidates for camp are medically examined prior to transfer. No serious accidents have occurred, pointing to the care exercised by the staff and inmates.
A summary of the recommendations and needs for the coming years would
stress the outstanding medical requirements of psychiatric services linked with the
Provincial Mental Health Services and the University of British Columbia, and the
construction of a unit for those inmates requiring psychiatric treatment under a
maximum custodial setting fully staffed by specialized personnel. I would also
repeat the recommendation for a new hospital at Oakalla, and the construction of
a unit for the treatment of cases of active tuberculosis.
SENIOR PROTESTANT CHAPLAIN
The inmates whom the chaplain reaches by way of chapel services are naturally
only a fraction of the prison's population. The ministry to those adults who come
to the services has to be more understanding than critical, more persuading and
encouraging than pushing. In a word, the type of church service and sermon is in
reality a very elementary spiritual programme, an elementary stage of religious work.
It is generally true that the majority of inmates have had little or no church
background. They may have been baptized in infancy, and may have attended
Sunday school in childhood, but what religious interest there may have been lapsed
in the early teens.
The importance of religious education, therefore, cannot be overemphasized.
Thus the chaplains are occupied with religious discussion groups, Bible classes, and
the providing of Bible study correspondence courses, Bibles, and other specifically
religious literature.
In this field the ministry of pastoral care to the individual offers the greatest
opportunity that the chaplain can find in all his work in prisons. By first offering
through himself a right relationship to the inmate, the chaplain hopes also to prepare EE 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
a better relationship of the prisoner to his neighbours, and to society itself, and
finally to open a new channel for the soul's movement toward God. Thus there may
be restored to the inmate a feeling of being included and accepted, a sense of spiritual worth and security.
SENIOR ROMAN CATHOLIC CHAPLAIN
The spiritual needs of inmates in a penal institution are frequently much greater
than those not incarcerated. The moral code of such an inmate has collapsed or has
been shaken at its foundation. This foundation is the spiritual life of an inmate,
and without it none has any hope of rehabilitation. With this in mind the Catholic
chaplain attempted to care for this need of the inmates of our penal institutions.
The holy sacrifice of the mass is offered every Sunday morning and in the
evenings on special holy days in the gymnasium. Confession of sins for the inmate
is available before every mass. Here is a true sign if the inmate wishes to rehabilitate
himself.
The chaplain made visits to estranged families and frequently united them to
the inmate and followed up many inmates after release. These and many duties too
numerous to mention, the chaplain performed to aid the inmate to find himself or
moral support to follow through with his good intentions. Many more Catholic
inmates could receive the benefits of rebuilding their shattered moral code if the
chaplain could spend more time with each inmate. However, it is becoming
increasingly more difficult to cover all sections of the institution and the essential
follow-up work within the institutions.
SENIOR LIBRARIAN
The library exists to get books and information to readers, and technical tasks
must be simplified to this end. Recent meetings which I have had with the senior
staff of all the Provincial Gaol Service institutions have been toward making this a
reality, and although there remains much to be planned and much to be done, many
of our previous problems have been removed.
Work is still in progress on the library in what was the chapel at Oakalla Prison
Farm, and though a number of fruitful exploratory meetings have been held with the
Warden, no definite plan can be made until the library is completed. A good job
has been done in planning, designing, and setting up the bookbindery, and I would
like to see it functioning as a centre to which books can be sent for rebinding from all
of the Provicial Gaol Service institutions.
The past six months have been used more in finding my footing within the
Provincial Gaol Service institutions and in meetings with interested staff than in
creating new programmes. I am now in a position to understand the individual
requirements of the institutions and look forward to the coming year as one of progress and expansion. REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF CORRECTION, 1958/59 EE 33
EXTRACTS FROM THE ANNUAL REPORT OF THE
PROVINCIAL PROBATION BRANCH
As at March 31st, 1959, the staff of the Provincial Probation Branch was distributed as follows:—
Vancouver Office: E. G. B. Stevens, Chief Probation Officer; C.D.Davidson,
Assistant Chief Probation Officer; R. J. Clark, Staff Supervisor; H. W.
Jackson, J. M. Putnam, E. Goodacre, W. J. C. Haines, N. Fages, C.
Farmer, B. McLean, A. Byman, R. Evans, and K. Richardson, Probation
Officers; M. G. Stade, Secretary to British Columbia Board of Parole.
North Vancouver office:  G. G. Woodhams.
Burnaby office:  O. J. Walling.
New Westminster office:  O. E. Hollands and K. A. Holt.
Abbotsford office:  A. L. Langdale and H. Ziegler.
Penticton office:   J. Wiebe.
Vernon office:  D. Guest.
Nelson office:   M. Brandon.
Cranbrook office:   Unmanned.
Kamloops office:   J. Selkirk.
Prince George office:  R. G McKellar.
Prince Rupert office:  St. John Madeley.
Victoria office: A. E. Jones and T. A. Blackwood.
Nanaimo office:  E. McGougan and B. Savory.
Courtenay office:  L. E. Penegar.
You will note a decrease in the number of cases handled by the Branch during
the year, as shown in the appended statistical report. This decrease could be
attributed to the fact that two branch offices were unmanned for an extended period
during the year. The number of parole cases dealt with increased considerably over
the previous year, and with the added staff doing parole work exclusively, more
intensive supervision was available to parolees generally. As in the previous year,
a larger number of pre-sentence reports were prepared on offenders where a Court
disposition of other than probation was made than the number placed on probation.
It is felt this comparison is indicative of the desire on the part of the Courts to have
complete background information on a greater number of offenders prior to the
imposition of sentence. As in previous years, these pre-sentence reports were passed
on to Central Classification at Oakalla Prison Farm to aid them in the classification
of inmates.
Throughout the year, case loads have remained too high in some instances, and
there are still areas in the Province which do not have the services of our Branch.
In some cases, representations for services have been made, and these areas will
receive first consideration when the personnel are available.
In general, the year under review has been one of consolidation, with emphasis
on the expanding parole work being carried out by the Branch. It is hoped that in
the year ahead further personnel may be assigned to parole work, and that new
branch offices can be established. The new branch offices would in some instances
reduce case loads and time spent in travelling, and would also open up new areas
for service. EE 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Provincial Probation Branch Statistics
New
Probation
Cases
New
Follow-up
Cases
Presentence
Reports
Total
Cases
Miscellaneous
1942/43 	
1943/44—	
1944/45	
1945/46..	
1946/47
63
60
46
105
142
158
276
350
455
591
598
688
831
962
1,306
1,431
1,249
24
56
57
50
61
35
36
28
14
33
46
92
151
186
313
395
468
49
54
31
84
117
122
262
349
461
472
638
736
892
965
1,250
1,602
1,468
136
170
134
239
320
315
574
727
930
1,096
1,282
1,516
1,874
2,113
2,869
3,428
3,203
	
1947/48	
1948/49	
1949/50	
1950/51 _	
1951/52.         	
74
1952/53	
1953/54
178
151
1954/55	
1955/56                                                ...    	
1956/57                             .           	
238
263
206
1957/58                                                   	
80
1958/59                                       	
101
9,311
2,045
9,570
20,026
1,311
New Probation Cases
Under
20 Years
20-25
Years
Over 25
Years
Probationers
Married
Single
Total
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952	
April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953 .—	
April 1st  1953, to March 31st, 1954	
496
481
527
710
785
1,102
1,193
1.065
49
66
79
65
99
109
124
89
46
51
82
56
78
95
114
95
40
54
83
58
73
99
120
98
551
544
605
773
889
1,207
1,311
1,151
591
598
688
April 1st, 1954, to March 31st, 1955  	
April 1st, 1955, to March 31st, 1956	
831
962
April 1st, 1956, to March 31st, 1957	
April 1st, 1957, to March 31st, 1958	
April 1st, 1958, to March 31st, 1959     ....
1,306
1,431
1,249
Totals .
7,533
1,030
748
793
8,518
9,311
New Follow-up Cases
Under
20 Years
20-25
Years
Over 25
Years
Follow-up Cases
Married
Parolees
Single
Parolees
Total
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952 „	
April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953	
22
37
70
107
151
215
234
293
11
9
22
41
33
90
159
169
3
2
8
2
6
3
1
2
8
5
19
14
13
30
45
90
143
181
294
381
455
33
46
April 1st, 1953, to March 31st, 1954	
April 1st, 1954, to March 31st, 1955. .....
April 1st, 1955, t.    larch 31st, 1956 	
92
151
186
April 1st, 1956, to March 31st, 1957.	
April 1st, 1957, to M-rch 31st, 1958	
April 1st, 1958, to M 1   * 31st, 1959	
313
395
468
Totals                    	
1,394
616
35
83
1,962
2,045
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1960
360460-3872    

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