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Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST 1959 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1960

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31st
1959  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31st, 1959.
ROBERT W. BONNER, Q.C.,
Minister of Industrial Development, Trade,
and Commerce. The Honourable Robert W. Bonner, Q.C.,
Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31st,
1959.
THOMAS L. STURGESS,
Deputy Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce. Report of the Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce
For the Year Ended December 31st, 1959
FOREWORD
Business and economic activity in British Columbia during 1959 reflected the
strong recovery from the recession of 1957-58. Provincial economic indicators
showed a marked gain during the spring and early summer, and at the year's end
were still appreciably higher than in the same period of the preceding year. All
the basic industries showed satisfactory production and sales gains in 1959 except
fisheries, which did not come up to the record established in 1958. All phases of
the forestry industry were healthy despite the temporary slow-down caused by a
lengthy labour-management dispute which curtailed coastal logging, sawmill, and
plywood operations during part of the summer. Pulp and paper plants showed a
substantial increase in sales. The mining industry experienced a slight improvement
in the non-ferrous metal products group while the oil and gas industry was very
active.
Expanding markets, both at home and abroad, together with increased production facilities, have resulted in the total selling value of factory shipments in manufacturing reaching an all-time high in 1959. After the set-back during the recession
of 1957 and the slight recovery during 1958, manufacturing activity has surged
ahead to reach an estimated total of $1,925,000,000. This is approximately 7 per
cent greater than 1958.
The value of exports passing through British Columbia customs ports was at a
record level in 1959 as a result of generally favourable trading conditions in the
United States, the United Kingdom, Western Europe, and Japan.
Personal income received by British Columbia residents increased by an estimated 8 per cent over 1958 as a result of more active business conditions and a
higher level of employment.
The volume of retail sales estimated for 1959 is placed at $1,688,000,000,
up from $1,615,997,000 in the previous year. Motor-vehicle dealers with sales
valued at $327,000,000 and department stores with sales estimated at $242,000,000
were leaders in the advance in retail trade.
The labour force of the Province as at June was estimated at 570,000 persons,
a gain of 11,000 people over the corresponding month in 1958.
The construction industry, while not reaching the peak years of 1956 and 1957,
still showed a very active picture in the Province during 1959. The total value of
construction during 1959 was estimated at $830,000,000. Residential construction
showed completions estimated at 17,000 units and starts at approximately 15,000
units. A slow-down in new dwellings became apparent during the latter part of the
year as available mortgage funds became in short supply.
New industrial undertakings continued throughout the Province, including
a start on the construction of a pulp-mill at Castlegar, a start on the first stage of
an integrated iron and steel operation at Kimberley which will cost in excess of
$20,000,000, and a $6,000,000 fine-paper plant on Annacis Industrial Estate U 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
which is the first of its kind in the West. Approval was given to build an oil pipeline to link oil-wells in the north-eastern section of the Province with markets on
the coast via the Trans Mountain pipe-line. Construction is expected to commence
in 1960. Engineering and related studies for huge new power developments on the
Peace and Columbia River basins have reached a much greater state of finalization
during the past year.
The following pages of this Report contain a review of the activities of
the several divisions of the Department—namely, the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics, British Columbia House, London, Industrial and Trade Office, and the
Mechanical Tabulation Division. Also recorded is the board of management and
programme of the British Columbia Research Council. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1959
U 7
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL
The Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce is ex officio
chairman of the board of management of the British Columbia Research Council,
and as such presided at regular meetings of the board throughout the year. The
laboratories and offices of the Council are located on the campus of the University
of British Columbia in Vancouver.
The broad objectives of the British Columbia Research Council are to provide
scientific and technical services not otherwise available to the industry of the Province, and to conduct basic studies leading to the establishment of new industries and
the development of the natural resources of British Columbia. In order to meet
these objectives, the Research Council, through its laboratories, provides a wide
range of services and facilities to industries of all types. The work carried out by
the Council generally falls into a number of categories:—
(1) Fundamental or Basic Research.
(2) Product and Process Research and Development.
(3) Industrial Trouble-shooting.
(4) Specialized Testing.
(5) Approvals Testing.
(6) Economics and Industrial Market Research.
(7) Operations Research.
The demand for the Council's services and the volume of contract work have
continued to grow. The emphasis has again been largely on service-type work of
direct benefit to industrial firms in the Province—product development, product
testing, and industrial trouble-shooting. However, there was a considerable increase
in industrial market research work and in operations research, the latter using people
with a scientific background on certain types of management decision problems.
In fundamental research the achievements of Dr. Khorana and his group
brought world-wide recognition during the year. The Council's fundamental research programme is financed by grants from various organizations in Eastern
Canada and the United States.
The Council served industry in many ways other than through its contract work.
Through its library, its free technical information service, and its programme of
contacts with industry throughout the Province, it brings the fruits of research a
little closer to industry's door.
During 1959 the board of management of the Research Council consisted of
the following: —
The Honourable R. W. Bonner, Minister of Industrial Development, Trade,
and Commerce of the Province of British Columbia, Victoria, B.C. (chairman).
G. S. Allen, Dean, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
F. E. Atkinson, Assistant Director, Canada Agriculture Research Station,
Summerland, B.C.
J.  K. Clarke, Assistant General Manager, Buckerfield's Limited,  foot of
Rogers Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.
P. E. Cooper, Executive Vice-President, Sandwell & Company Limited, 3638
Cypress Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.
M. J. Foley, President, Powell River Co. Ltd., 510 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
S. J. Hammitt, Chairman of the Board, Morrison Steel & Wire Co. Ltd., Granville Island, Vancouver, B.C. U 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
W. C. Koerner, Chairman of the Board, Rayoniers Canada Limited, 1111
West Georgia Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.
D. M. Morrison, President, Trans Mountain Oil Pipe Line Co., 400 East
Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
P. J. Mulcahy, Deputy Minister of Mines, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
R. B. McDonell, President McDonell Metal Manufacturing Co. Ltd., 1250
Boundary Road, Vancouver 6, B.C.
W. MacGillivray, Deputy Minister of Agriculture, Victoria, B.C.
I. McTaggart-Cowan, Head, Department of Zoology, University of British
Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
A. W. H. Needier, Director, Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries Research
Board of Canada, Nanaimo, B.C.
R. D. Perry, Vice-President and General Manager, The Consolidated Mining
and Smelting Company of Canada Limited, Trail, B.C.
H. L. Purdy, Executive Vice-President, British Columbia Electric Company
Limited, 970 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
C. A. Rowles, Professor and Chairman, Department of Soil Science, University
of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
J. Sinclair (the Honourable), President, Fisheries Association of British
Columbia, 325 Howe Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
G. M. Shrum, Director, British Columbia Research Council, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
T. L. Sturgess, Deputy Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, Victoria, B.C.
H. Wright, Commissioner, Workmen's Compensation Board, 707 West Thirty-
seventh Avenue, Vancouver 13, B.C. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1959
U 9
OFFICE OF THE AGENT-GENERAL FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA,
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, LONDON
VISIT OF MINISTERS TO EUROPE
In May of this year a visit was paid by the Honourable P. A. Gaglardi, Minister
of Highways, at the time of the visit by the Vancouver Board of Trade party.
During his visit, trips were arranged to a number of firms who manufacture road-
building equipment and other material for highway construction. Also, Mr. Gaglardi was the guest of John Laing & Son Limited in a helicopter trip throughout the
length of the London-Birmingham Motorway, where he studied the latest methods
in motorway construction.
In June a visit was made by the Honourable L. R. Peterson, Minister of Education, after a trip to Scandinavia. During his visit, numerous appointments were
effected, one with the Right Honourable Geoffrey Lloyd, British Minister of Education, and other officials of his Ministry. In addition, Mr. Peterson visited a large
number of schools in London and in the south of England, obtaining a good insight
into educational methods, types of school buildings, and courses available to students
in all grades in the United Kingdom.
SETTLEMENT
General
Again this year the number of inquiries about settlement in British Columbia
was very reduced because of persistent reports in the British newspapers about the
unemployment position in Canada. Notwithstanding this, the office received some
1,200 letters from inquirers seeking information about settlement. In addition,
verbal information was given over the counter to approximately 400 people, together
with numerous telephone calls requesting similar information. The relaxation of
controls on the amount of capital that an immigrant can now take out on leaving
this country did not have a material effect on inquiries. The office was instrumental
in recruiting nurses, mental nurses, and psysiotherapists where indications were
given by various organizations in the Province that there was a requirement in these
categories.
School-teachers
Again this year, the facilities of the office were put at the disposal of the Department of Education in the recruitment of school-teachers. Some 700 inquiries
resulted from our advertising, and out of this number about 100 appointments to
individual schools were made, in both secondary and elementary grades. With
dependents this resulted in about 170 people of a very good type moving to the
Province.
STAFF
There were no staff changes during the year.
VISITORS
During 1959, 2,891 visitors registered at British Columbia House, and in the
course of the year our staff handled some 20,000 letters for visitors.
FILMS
Distribution of British Columbia films in the United Kingdom through British
Columbia House, for the year ended December, 1959, amounted to 697 showings U  10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
to audiences totalling 52,260, including schools, film societies, clubs, business and
private organizations, etc.
TOURISM
Now that the restriction on money for travel abroad has been virtually lifted by
the British Treasury, there appear signs of some substantial increase in inquiries for
holiday travel to the Province. A plan is being drawn up to exploit this situation
so that attention may be drawn to the attractions of holidays in British Columbia.
The office works very closely with the Greater Vancouver Tourist Association and
is assisting that organization in arranging outlets for its tourist material. There is a
similar opportunity for other tourist organizations in the Province to utilize the services of this office in assisting in the promulgation of information suitable for tourists.
There is a constant need for literature of all kinds, together with maps and posters.
PUBLICITY
Two exhibitions were arranged—one at Ede in The Netherlands during the
celebration there of Canada Week and another at British Columbia House, the
latter being an exhibition of oil and water-colour paintings by Mrs. Mildred Valley
Thornton depicting British Columbia landscapes and Pacific Coast Indian heads.
The newspaper, radio, and television publicity connected with the gift of the
world's tallest flag-pole to the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew, Surrey, was most
valuable in publicizing the Province.
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE INQUIRIES
Although the number of inquiries during 1958 was less than the previous year,
there was still a large number of United Kingdom and European firms who availed
themselves of the services provided by British Columbia House. The numbers
were as follows:—
United Kingdom  385
France        4
Germany      17
Italy        8
Netherlands      15
Switzerland :       8
Scandinavian countries     15
Other countries       8
Total  460
During the year the Agent-General and the Industrial and Trade Secretary
made visits to various industrial centres in Great Britain. The Agent-General made
a point of visiting factories and industries not only in the United Kingdom, but also
in Holland and Germany.
TRADE INQUIRIES FROM BRITISH COLUMBIA
During the year seventy-one British Columbia firms made inquiries through
this office. In most cases these firms were seeking agencies for British or Continental
products, but there was an increasing awareness on the part of British Columbia
firms of the advantages of having their products manufactured under licence in
Europe. This pattern of industrial development is increasing rapidly all over the
world, and it is expected that many more inquiries along these lines will be received
from the Province. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1959 U 11
LICENCE MANUFACTURE
The manufacture of Commonwealth and foreign products in British Columbia
under some form of licence and royalty agreement has great prospects of bringing
to British Columbia more secondary industry. It is of interest to note that British
Columbia firms during 1959 have expressed an interest in manufacturing under
licence.
This office has sent forward for the consideration of these firms thirty-two
definite opportunities for manufacturing under licence or, in some cases, assembly
or partial manufacture. At the time of writing this report, several of these proposals
are under consideration by the principals in Europe and the interested British
Columbia companies or group.
Manufacturing under licence is becoming very much a pattern of trade development throughout the world, and it is recommended that more consideration be given
to this hitherto somewhat neglected side of our Province's industrial development.
British Columbia firms are also recommended to consider the granting of manufacturing rights in Europe, especially as the common market of six European countries and the outer seven (which includes the United Kingdom) have been brought
into being, and one way to take advantage of the opportunities presented by this
new pattern of protected trading zones is by the establishment of branch plants in
one of the countries included in these zones.
INVESTMENT IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
The year 1959 was an outstanding one for the investment of capital from
United Kingdom sources. Twelve British property investment and development
companies sent out representatives to the Province to look over the situation. It is
impossible to estimate what amount of capital this entailed, but it is estimated that
the initial investment of these groups has already amounted to something in excess
of $10,000,000.
BRANCH PLANTS
There has been little interest by British and Continental firms in establishing
branch plants or setting up their own sales offices in British Columbia. The reason
for this slackening-off in interest is primarily the adverse publicity which has been
given to the state of labour-management relations, high wages, strikes, etc. It is
felt that British Columbia will not be looked upon as a promising sphere for new
industry until this situation is altered. However, despite these conditions three
British firms have established sales offices in British Columbia. Only three branch
factories have been established—one from Scotland, one from Norway, and one
from England.
It is hoped that the results of a recent survey made by the Department among
Chambers of Commerce throughout British Columbia will result in concrete suggestions being put forward of industries and commercial establishments that are
needed, or feasible, in the various areas. The results of this survey were not complete when writing this report, but concrete proposals will be put forward during
the next few months to financial, industrial, and trading groups asking them to
seriously consider establishment as a means of increasing their Western Canadian
trade.
SALES PROMOTION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA PRODUCTS
The rise of production costs in British Columbia is a factor in the sale of its
products which cannot be disregarded, and every opportunity is taken by this office U 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
to bring to the attention of governments, trade associations, and private-enterprise
firms the merits of British Columbia products.
The Agent-General visited British Columbia during May for the purpose of
viewing new developments and interviewing industrialists and exporters engaged or
interested in sales in the United Kingdom and on the Continent.
During his visit the Agent-General attended the Department's Industrial and
Trade Conference, at which he addressed a luncheon meeting. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1959 U 13
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE OFFICE
Activity of this office centres on the promotion of new industrial enterprises
throughout the Province, assistance to established businesses when required, and
promotion of domestic and export trade.
This work is carried out in co-operation with other Provincial Government
departments, Federal Government departments, Boards of Trade, Chambers of Commerce, the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association,
industrial commissions, banks, railway industrial agents, and foreign trade representatives in Canada and overseas.
BRANCH PLANT AND MANUFACTURING UNDER LICENCE INQUIRIES
During the year this office continued to direct letters to selected contacts suggesting the establishment of branch plants in British Columbia or, alternatively,
having their products manufactured under licence.
The response to these contact letters has again been gratifying, with many firms
showing an interest in the potential that our Province has to offer.
Follow-up letters were sent out when no replies were received. In this connection it is interesting to note that a recent reply to a follow-up letter revealed that a
large eastern manufacturer is planning on having a branch plant in Western Canada
and will be calling on our Department for additional information in the near future.
More interest than usual was indicated in manufacturing under licence with the
Department receiving numerous inquiries along these lines. Part of the interest
resulted from further development of the questionnaire sent out last year asking
British Columbia firms if they were interested in manufacturing new products on a
royalty basis. Licence manufacturing proposals received came from England,
Eastern Canada, the United States, West Germany, and France. At the present
time, several patented products are being examined by British Columbia firms on
the possibility of their being manufactured under licence by a local firm.
COMPOSITE INDUSTRIAL MAP OF THE LOWER MAINLAND
The demand for this map, which was printed in 1958, continues to be heavy.
Requests for copies were received from real-estate firms, manufacturers, and businessmen throughout Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom. The map
indicates the zoned and potential industrial areas of twelve municipalities, extending
from North Vancouver to Port Coquitlam, a distance of approximately 14 miles.
The master lithographed map, along with a white print showing the municipalities
of Delta and Surrey in their entirety, can be purchased for $1, which includes the
5-per-cent social services tax.
HANDICRAFT DIRECTORY
Copies of the ninth edition of this directory were distributed through the year
to retail and wholesale firms, resorts, and other outlets. The directory lists producers in British Columbia who are interested in finding a market and who are in
a position to supply reasonable demands. The usual contact was made with Eastern
Canada Provinces interested in handicraft development.
During the tourist season, arrangements were made to have a good number of
British Columbia handicraft items on display in the Government Travel Bureau's
trailer, which was stationed at various border crossings.
3
L U  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
BRITISH COLUMBIA INDUSTRIAL DESIGN COMMITTEE
During the year under review, the British Columbia Industrial Design Committee was active in working with designers and manufacturers in promoting good
design throughout the Province.
The British Columbia Industrial Design Committee includes representation
from the Federal Department of Trade and Commerce; Provincial Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce; Department of Education; University of British Columbia; Canadian Manufacturers' Association; Vancouver
Board of Trade; Vancouver School of Art; British Columbia Research Council;
Association of Professional Engineers of British Columbia; Canadian Association
of Consumers; and Architectural Institute of British Columbia.
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS TRADE AND INDUSTRY COUNCIL
The Council members are official representatives of all the Provincial Government departments concerned with the development of trade and industry in Canada.
The aims of the Council are: To provide interprovincial consultation and cooperation on matters of trade and industrial development; to supply traders and
manufacturers from Canada and abroad with a nationwide Provincial service in
these fields; to promote greater understanding throughout Canada of the economic
conditions affecting the development of each of the Provinces and all of Canada.
The members of the Council work closely with the Federal Government Department of Trade and Commerce and Department of Citizenship and Immigration, the
Canadian banks, railways, and interested associations. Annual conferences provide
the members with an opportunity to further the aims of the Council and promote the
economic development of Canada.
This year the eleventh annual conference was held in Halifax, N.S.
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE CONFERENCE
The Department sponsored the First British Columbia Industrial and Trade
Conference on May 11th and 12th, 1959, at Wesbrook Hall, University of British
Columbia, Vancouver. This conference provided a unique opportunity for leaders
in almost every segment of the Province's industrial and commercial life to exchange
ideas and view-points regarding such vital issues as regional development, the growth
of industry, the promotion of trade, and the investment climate of British Columbia.
Some 250 delegates attended and heard panel discussions by eighteen speakers
who are all recognized experts in their particular fields of endeavour. The speakers
included scientists, economists, community leaders and business executives, engineers, representatives of labour, and representatives of Federal and Provincial Government departments.
Luncheon meetings on the first and second day were addressed respectively by
the Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C., Minister of Industrial Development, Trade,
and Commerce, and by Maj.-Gen. B. M. Hoffmeister, Agent-General for British
Columbia in London, England.
The effectiveness of this conference in stimulating active development of
British Columbia's trade and industry cannot as yet be fully evaluated. However,
replies received to a questionnaire at the conclusion of the conference included many
good suggestions and were unanimous in agreeing that the Department should repeat
the meeting at some future date. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1959
U  15
COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES
In order to cope with inquiries received for investment opportunities in the
Province, the Department undertook to prepare a listing. A survey on these opportunities was made possible through the co-operation of the Boards of Trade and
Chambers of Commerce throughout the Province, who submitted reports for their
respective areas. Many interesting proposals were suggested in the fields of hotel
and motel requirements, housing developments, warehousing, and wholesale and
retail outlets.
The reports are still being compiled, and the completed listing by areas will be
most useful in answering the numerous inquiries received on investment opportunities through British Columbia House, London, England, and through other channels.
CHICAGO INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR AND WORLD MARKETING
CONFERENCE
The Chicago International Trade Fair was held at the Navy Pier on Lake
Michigan from July 3rd to July 18th, 1959. Nations from many parts of the world
participated, and approximately 900,000 visitors and buyers attended.
The Department's exhibit (see illustration) was located in the Canadian section
British Columbia exhibit, Chicago International Trade Fair.
along with displays of the Federal Government, Manitoba, and private firms. The
British Columbia exhibit effectively told the story of the industrial expansion taking
place in this Province. The theme " British Columbia—Land Bridge to Alaska,"
which was used throughout the exhibit, created a great deal of interest, especially
with the American visitors.
Large posters inviting manufacturers and businessmen to attend our forthcoming International Trade Fair in 1961 were prominently displayed. Personal
invitation cards were also distributed requesting interested persons to exhibit at the
fair.
Industrial and tourist literature from various Boards of Trade throughout the
Province was also made available to those wanting information on British Columbia. U  16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The interest shown in our exhibit was most gratifying, and numerous inquiries were
received on travel, settlement, investment, and industrial opportunities existing in
British Columbia.
A highlight of the exposition was the Queen's visit to the fair and the interest
shown by Her Majesty in the Canadian section.
The exhibit was in charge of the Industrial Commissioner, who was very ably
assisted by the Department's field representative.
Another feature of the fair was the holding of the first annual Chicago World
Marketing Conference at the Hotel Sherman. Eighty-two speakers and panel members from many countries took part in the deliberations. Approximately 300 manufacturers and businessmen registered as delegates. British Columbia was represented
by the Industrial Commissioner on a panel dealing with patents, manufacturing
under licence, and capital investment opportunities.
BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR,
May 3rd to 13th, 1961
Announcement of the 1961 International Trade Fair was made in the Throne
Speech at the opening of the 1959 legislative session. The Trade Fair is sponsored
by this Department in co-operation with associations interested in trade promotion
in British Columbia.
The Minister appointed Mr. W. J. Borrie, president of Pemberton Securities
Limited and past president of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, as president
and chairman of the board of directors of the 1961 British Columbia International
Trade Fair.
The Minister announced also that Mr. D. H. Mollison, of this Department, had
been loaned to the Trade Fair organization as general manager.
The governments of all countries doing business with Canada have been invited
to participate, and their support has been requested to help in obtaining exhibits of
firms selling their products or wishing to sell their products in Western Canada's
most densely populated and fastest-growing area. It will also afford an opportunity
for Canadian manufacturers and exporters to display their merchandise to the large
group of buyers and visitors attending the fair.
At the year's end, four of the world's major trading nations had agreed to
participate—Czechoslovakia, West Germany, The Netherlands, and the United
Kingdom.
With time to plan and the outstanding success of the last Trade Fair as background, it is expected that the 1961 event will assume international importance and
make another substantial contribution to the trade development of British Columbia.
TRADE AND INDUSTRY BULLETIN
During the year under review, this bulletin celebrated its first decade of continuous publication, and during that time has established itself as a worth-while
contribution to the commercial and industrial development in the Province, listing
trade inquiries, licence manufacture opportunities, and news of commercial interest.
The Department appreciates the co-operation of the Journal of Commerce in
reprinting the Trade and Industry Bulletin as a public service feature.
REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
As in past years, the regional development work of the Department was carried
on extensively during 1959. This office continued to work closely with industrial
establishments, Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce, research organiza- INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1959
U 17
tions, and all other groups interested in, or actively engaged in, the industrial
development of the Province of British Columbia. The close co-operation between
the Department and these groups is a vital factor in the continued expansion of our
existing industries and the promotion of new industries.
Many Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce were visited by members
of the Department and assisted in their efforts to locate new industries and commercial enterprises for their respective areas. Periodic field-trips were made by the
Industrial Commissioner and the field representative, in the course of which they
maintained the close liaison of past years with all regional groups engaged in the
general field of industrial development. Along with the Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce, these groups include transportation and utility companies, bank
branches and departments, and municipal officials.
Many inquiries received from companies and individuals were dealt with by
this office, and a great deal of general and specific information about the industrial
opportunities in British Columbia was forwarded to them. Close contact was maintained with the British Columbia Research Council, and numerous inquiries and
problems were referred to that organization. U  18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND  STATISTICS
Before proceeding to review the work accomplished by the Bureau of
Economics and Statistics during 1959, it may be useful to explain that the Bureau
is a fact-finding and advisory body. It has two primary functions: the first is to
provide economic counsel and, when necessary, to conduct investigations into
economic questions affecting the Province; the second function is to collect and
compile economic statistics of interest to the Province.
To ensure technical proficiency, the Bureau has endeavoured to follow the
policy of building up a small corps of professionally trained persons who can be
relied upon to perform a variety of difficult economic analyses. It has also been the
policy to make the services of the technical personnel continuously available to all
other departments of the Government.
Since other Government agencies are also concerned with the collection of
statistics, a series of working agreements designed to prevent overlapping or duplication has been arranged in recent years between this Bureau and the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, as well as with the Provincial Departments of Mines,
Labour, Provincial Secretary, and Health and Welfare. During 1959 the essential
statistical services performed for the other Provincial departments as well as for the
Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce were maintained. A
description follows of the various services performed during the year.
ECONOMIC RESEARCH
One of the Bureau's functions is to provide economic counsel to the Government. This is done partly through the medium of a weekly report to the Premier
and to the Minister of each department. This report reviews significant events and
developments in the field of economics. As well, from time to time, technical assistance is given to the various branches of the Government as it is requested. There
are many publications prepared to keep government and industry informed on current business conditions. The two most widely distributed are the Monthly Bulletin
of Business Activity, containing a brief description of current changes in monthly
business indicators, plus statistical tables and charts, and the Annual Summary of
Business Activity, recording the past year's performance and including numerous
charts and historical series illustrating the economic position of the Province.
Many requests are received for information dealing with the Provincial economy
from private individuals, corporations, trade-unions, newspapers, business publications, and Boards of Trade. The Bureau's files and library contain much of the
information requested, but often special surveys and considerable research are necessary.
The annual study of wage rates for selected occupations in the metropolitan
areas of Vancouver and Victoria and centres in northern and southern areas of the
Province was again prepared and published. The Civil Service Commission, as
well as other Government agencies and the public, was provided with these comparative wage rates. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1959 U 19
Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1957, 1958, and 1959
Unit or
Base
Period
1957
1958
1959
Preliminary
Estimates
Mining—
Total value of production-
Gold production  	
Silver production	
Copper production _.	
Lead production 	
Zinc production  —
Coal production.—	
Forestry—
Total value of production-
Timber scaled — —
Lumber production 	
Paper production 	
Fisheries—
Total value of production ..
Pack of canned salmon	
Agriculture—
Farm cash income -	
Apples—
Total production	
Exports - -	
External trade—
Exports of canned salmon
Exports of planks and boards, Douglas fir-
Exports of red-cedar shingles	
Internal-trade—
Total retail sales - _ —	
Department stores ...
Motor-vehicle dealers .
Gasoline consumed	
Railway freight loaded in British Columbia..
Electric power generated.  	
Sales of life insurance  	
Construction—
New residential units completed 	
Building permits issued 	
Finance—Bank debits 	
Tourist-trade—Auto entries on sixty-day permit-
Employment—
All employment    	
Manufacturing.
Iron and steel products .
Lumber and plywood	
Pulp and paper 	
Mining 	
Logging 	
Construction	
Communication	
Transportation	
Services. -	
Trade   	
Labour income _
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
Mb.m.
M b.m.
Tons
$000
Cases
$000
Bushels
Bushels
Cwt.
Mft.
Sq.
$000
$000
$000
Gals.
Tons
000 kwh.
$000
Units
$000
$000
Number
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
$000
172,265
7,546
7,078
7,631
39,568
50,226
7,340
591,193
5,661,781
4,412,387
741,722
63,650
1,424,265
113,490
6,981,000
1,863,537
240,307
1,364,743
1,718,203
1,616,143
220,022
322,862
296,430,000
11,942,334
10,724,037
376,440
14,120
246,621
16,621,000
284,790
124.5
124.6
147.0
116.1
141.9
91.8
82.2
155.2
175.7
127.1
127.4
119.0
1,761,000
146,875
6,762
6,086
2,965
34,627
43,235
5,938
621.000
5,349,508
4,991,252
809,149
98,224
1,900,025
119,238
7,446,262
2,623,000
614,107
1,612,128
1,814,711
1,615,997
227,168
299,948
305,610,000
11,484,162
11,800,000
401,900
16,230
265,000
16,224,000
292,768
114.7
117.4
111.5
115.1
143.6
73.6
67.8
110.2
186.0
125.4
123.6
116.1
1,742,000
154,400
6,200
7,300
3,800
34,800
43,800
5,200
672,000
6,000,000
5,100,000
850,000
66,500
1,102,625
120,000
4,000,800
1,875,000
380,000
1,532,500
1,670,416
1,688,000
242,000
327,000
321,000,000
12,200,000
12,350,000
402,900
17,129
255,000
17,300,000
287,000
115.0
117.0
110.4
109.0
169.4
70.0
71.0
116.0
173.3
122.9
120.2
118.0
1,850,000 U 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Economic Indicators in British Columbia
280
260
220
200
BUILDING PERMITS
/
1943       1945
1947       1949       1951
YEARS
1953        1955      1957       1959
AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGES
1943       1945       1947      1949       1951       1953       1955      1957       1959
YEARS
15.0
13.5
12.0
10.5
9.0
7.5
6.0
4.5
3.0
1.5
FREIGHT LOADED
^
/
v
/
\
/
S
s
/
s
/
SANK DEBITS
/
/
1943  1945  1947  1949  1951  1953  1955  1957  1959
YEARS
Ifcfl
EMPLOYMENl
140
1"
49   =  100 j
0
1943  1945   1947
1949  1951
YEARS
1953   1955  1957   1959
1S0O
RETAIL
TRADE
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1400
/
/
1200
--
/
/
1000
/
/
y
/
bOO
200
1953  1955  1957  1959
1943  1945  1947  1949  1951   1953  1955  1957   1959
YEARS INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1959
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s-vmoa do SNomiw U 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TRANSPORTATION AND TRADE
TRANSPORTATION
During 1959 the transportation function of the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics has involved the preparation of submissions to the Royal Commission on
Transportation and the Royal Commission on the Great Slave Lake Railway (better
known as the " Manning Commission ").
Following the appeal of eight Provincial Governments to the Governor in
Council in November, 1958, the Federal Government suspended the 17-per-cent
increase granted by the Board of Transport Commissioners and replaced it with a
10-per-cent increase plus a $20,000,000 subsidy to the railways. The Province of
British Columbia urged that the subsidy should be so applied that the long-haul
shippers would obtain a proportionately higher subsidy than the short-haul shippers.
This would have tended to overcome the pyramiding effect of horizontal percentage
increases.
The Bureau is playing an active part in the preparation of the Provincial submissions and the proceedings of the Commission. It is hoped that British Columbia
shippers will receive some relief as a result of the study being made of the freight-
rate structures by the Royal Commission.
Strong representations were made both to the Federal Government and to the
Manning Commission, which was appointed to evaluate the route of the projected
railway to Pine Point, Northwest Territories. The advantages of a western route
through Grimshaw compared to an eastern route through Waterways were emphasized.
The usual service to the other Government departments, business, and industry
was continued, and the Bureau is grateful for the co-operation received from all
parties concerned.
External Trade
The year 1959 was a very active one for the Bureau's external-trade section.
Numerous requests for import and export data were received from business organizations, other Government departments, universities, foreign trade commissioners,
foreign government departments, and from foreign business organizations. Most
of the data supplied in answer to these requests were obtained from monthly tabulations of punch-cards received from the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. The monthly
tabulations give detailed quantity and value figures for the commodities imported
and exported through British Columbia customs ports. In addition, a number of
articles and analytical tables were prepared for the Bureau's regular, annual, weekly,
and monthly economic reports. Also prepared and released in co-operation with
the Tabulation Division was the Bureau's statement of external trade for the calendar
year 1958. Regular monthly import and export statistics were also sent to forty
organizations and individuals.
During the year a considerable amount of material was prepared for departmental representatives taking part in such conferences as the British Columbia
Industrial and Trade Conference, held in May on the University of British Columbia
campus, and the recent British Columbia Natural Resources Conference, which met
at Harrison Hot Springs Hotel late in November.
Other activities included considerable analysis of import statistics in relation to
studies of possible import replacement industries. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1959 U 27
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5 -a S U 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The two foregoing tables summarize the external trade of British Columbia
from 1948 to 1958. These figures differ from the regularly published trade statistics
in that they are confined to exports of products of British Columbia origin and to
imports from foreign countries for British Columbia consumption. The regular
figures deal with all items imported and exported through British Columbia customs
ports.
STATISTICS
The Bureau is responsible for the collection, analysis, interpretation, and publication of statistical information. Also, one of its duties is to assist other departments in the compilation of statistical information and to assist in establishing
uniform statistical methods throughout the service. In addition, it co-operates with
other statistical bureaux in the elimination of duplication and answers inquiries
relating to statistical data. Following is a brief outline of the Bureau's activities
in this field.
Co-operative Statistical Agreements
The co-operative statistical agreements with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics
and other Federal offices continued during 1959. The fields of co-operation and
dates of the original agreements are as follows: (1) Mining Statistics, 1926; (2)
External Trade Statistics, 1938; (3) Cost of Foods Statistics, 1939; (4) Provincial Government Payroll Statistics, 1949; (5) Forecast of Capital and Repair and
Maintenance Expenditures for Provincial, Municipal, and Other Local Authorities,
1950; (6) Census of Construction Statistics—Building Permits, 1951; (7) Census
of Industry Statistics, 1954; (8) Nature of Business Statistics, 1955; (9) Trade-
union Statistics, 1955. In addition, copies of Dominion Bureau of Statistics monthly
reports on production, shipments, and stocks on hand in British Columbia sawmills
have been received since 1948. Commencing in 1953, the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics agreed to supply this office with duplicates of its " Operations in the
Woods " forms. In return the Bureau assists the Dominion Bureau of Statistics by
checking mailing-lists, estimating production of delinquent firms, and other services.
Conferences between the Provincial and Federal statistical bureaux are now
held annually. As a consequence, it is anticipated that continued progress toward
the elimination of duplication will be made. The latest agreement concluded between the Province and the Dominion Bureau is in the field of employment and
payrolls.
In addition, conferences are now held periodically with the Federal Department
of Labour, and the elimination of duplication is under way, especially in the fields
of trade-union statistics and working-conditions statistics.   Co-operative agreements
have resulted in savings to governments, to union secretaries, and to private
industry.
Trade-union Statistics
In conjunction with the Federal Department of Labour and the Provincial Department of Labour, the annual survey of organized-labour membership in British
Columbia was completed.
Data collected from each local include the following: Names and addresses
of officers, affiliation, membership, and jurisdiction of the local organization. A
directory of trade-union locals operating in British Columbia is compiled from the
returns and is published in the Department of Labour's Annual Report.
British Columbia Cost-of-food Survey
The regular compilation of the quarterly Cost-of-food index for Vancouver,
Victoria, and New Westminster was carried on during 1959.   Trade-unions, indi- INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1959 U 29
viduals, and Government departments were supplied with information on food costs
during the year.
Forestry
The usual number of requests were handled from industry and other Government departments, and contributions were made to various reports. Notable
amongst the latter were the representations to the Manning Commission—evaluation
of forest resources along the proposed routes to Pine Point, Northwest Territories—
and the Bureau publication " Potential Pulp and Paper Mills in British Columbia."
Mining
Preliminary estimates only are available for mineral production in British
Columbia during 1959. These statistics place the total value at approximately
$154,400,000, up 5 per cent from the 1958 total of $146,875,081.
Final statistics for 1958 are now available and are shown in detail in the
following sections.
The principal metals in 1958, consisting of placer and lode gold, silver, copper,
lead, and zinc, accounted for $93,516,891 or 63.8 per cent of the total. Structural
materials had a total value of $19,999,576 or 13.6 per cent; industrial minerals,
which include asbestos and sulphur, had a total value of $11,763,473 or 8.0 per
cent; miscellaneous metals, consisting of antimony, bismuth, cadmium, indium, iron
ore, nickel, platinum, tin, and tungsten, had a total value of $10,575,795 or 7.2
per cent; while fuels, consisting of coal, natural gas, and crude petroleum, had a
total value of $10,861,475 or 7.4 per cent. The accumulated value of the mineral
output of British Columbia reached $4,041,276,317 at the end of 1958.
The reduced prices for copper, lead, and zinc and the lower output of gold,
silver, copper, coal, and several other products resulted in the 1958 value of mineral
production being materially less than that for recent years. However, increases were
recorded for iron ore, petroleum, and natural gas, while the 1958 values for industrial minerals and structural materials, though not greater than 1957, did exceed the
1953-57 averages. The output of coal continued to decline, while that for natural
gas and petroleum showed continued increases.
Revenue to the Government from petroleum and natural gas amounted to
$9,472,200, including fees, rentals, and miscellaneous, $4,326,289; tender bonuses,
$4,510,123; and royalties on gas, oil, and processed products, $635,809.
The average number employed in all branches of the industry during 1958 was
11,201. Major expenditures were salaries and wages, $45,035,287; fuel and electricity, $7,922,163; process supplies (inclusive of explosives, chemicals, drill-steel,
lubricants, etc.), $13,215,371; Federal taxes, $6,062,698; Provincial taxes, $1,-
847,466; municipal and other taxes, $1,925,952; levies for workmen's compensation (including silicosis), unemployment insurance, and other items, $1,782,744.
Dividends amounted to $14,966,123. The lode-mining industry spent $27,614,725
in freight and treatment charges on ores and concentrates. U 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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0  J) INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1959 U 31
Labour
The year 1959 marked the completion of arrangements in respect to joint participation of Provincial and Federal authorities in the collection and compilation of
British Columbia industrial-labour statistics.
Resulting from the many discussions and conferences between responsible
parties of both Governments, an agreement was completed late in the year, under
the terms of which statistical data collected by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics
within this Province would be shared with the Bureau of Economics and Statistics,
Victoria, B.C.
In this further progress toward a common plan for the standardization of statistical material, it is felt that elimination of the Provincial inquiry in favour of a single
joint questionnaire, returnable to the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, but
issued in the names of both Dominion and Provincial agencies, will prove helpful to
the firms reporting and generally meet with the approval of all concerned.
Under the arrangement previously in effect, the regular annual British Columbia
industrial survey was again conducted by the Labour Section during the year. A
review of the findings based on 1958 returns were reported under the heading of
" Statistics of Trades and Industries " in the Annual Report of the Department of
Labour for the current year.
Also included in the work programme were such continuing projects as the
preparation of industrial payroll and employment information on the basis of regional segregations, an alphabetical index of firms reporting, arranged by industrial
classification and geographical location, a new edition of the list of British Columbia
industrial firms in size groups, and other supplementary items.
The comparative distribution of British Columbia's industrial payroll throughout the ten census areas during the last four years is again presented in the following
table, together with a census map for reference concerning geographical location of
the areas.
Industrial payroll totals for the metropolitan areas of Vancouver and Victoria
are also shown under separate heading for the years 1957 and 1958.
British Columbia Industrial Payrolls by Statistical Areas for the
Comparative Years 1955 to 1958
Regional Area
Total Payrolls (Salaries and Wages)
1955
1956
1957
1958
No. 1   - - - 	
$18,197,303
35,044,981
25,599,069
417,102,635
127,543,124
15,313,185
26,336,337
23,336,723
36,329,470
4,591,602
2,421,348
$20,519,964
39,484,744
25,595,831
489,455,851
142,538,408
19,244,778
31.397,256
27,477,359
47,205,898
5,286,187
2,128,123
$19,351,672
41,231,542
24,471,475
541,413,422
144,072,303
16,560,167
35,770,167
23,406,971
41,978,977
13,504,050
1,475,248
$17,656,582
No. 2  	
No. 3   	
38,230,695
25,017,232
No. 4         -    	
520,483,732
No. 5   . — .. - - -	
135,732,576
No. 6               ....    	
21,822,730
No. 7_  :    -	
No. 8         . -    	
26,093,376
24,862,858
No. 9               	
32,931,401
No. 10  	
8,064,328
970,593
Totals              	
$731,815,777
$850,334,399
$903,235,994
$851,866,103 U 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Industrial Payroll Totals Reported for the Census Metropolitan Areas of
Vancouver and Victoria, 1957 and 1958
Area
Payroll (Salaries and Wages)
1957
1958
Census metropolitan area of Vancouver, including Vancouver City, North
Vancouver City  and  District,  West Vancouver,  Burnaby, New Westminster, Fraser Mills,  Richmond,  Surrey, Port Coquitlam, Coquitlam,
$485,783,691
61,269,565
$471,357,942
Census metropolitan area of Victoria, including Victoria City, Esquimalt,
56,839,965
CENSUS
Dl VISION
BRITISH COLUMBIA
fob statistical out/pases *Ht p&ovim:£ is
DlV/oeO /A"T3
rn£ FiGUfl£S W/rw/AS  TH£ DAttH aOUf*OARI£S.
MARKET RESEARCH
Growing interest is being shown by business and industry in the market potential of the Province. A large and varied number of requests have been received
during the year for market data and assessment of industrial and commercial opportunities.
Specific studies completed during the year included market assessments of iron
and steel, aluminum, biscuits, and paper products. Such studies are undertaken
to indicate the possibilities of industrial expansion. At the year's end the usual
survey of executive opinions was conducted, from which a forecast was prepared
of business conditions anticipated in 1960. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1959
U 33
Publications
Monthy Bulletin of Business Activity.—This publication has been continued
and expanded. Special articles of current interest have been included throughout
the year. Issues for the first, second, and third quarters include an economic review
of the preceding quarter.
Summary of Business Activity in British Columbia.—This publication is a
companion of the above publication. It summarizes the current year's economic
picture and presents historical series relating to business activity in the Province.
External Trade.—Summary of monthly statistics covering external trade are
contained in the aforementioned monthly bulletin. A statement of external trade
through British Columbia customs ports and covering commodities with an aggregate value of $50,000 and over is published annually.
British Columbia Trade Index.—This publication lists the manufacturers in
British Columbia together with their products. A new issue will be released early
in 1960.
British Columbia Directory.—The first issue of this publication was released in
1957 and lists wholesalers and distributers alphabetically and by products, importers
and exporters alphabetically and by products, and an alphabetical list of manufacturers' agents.
British Columbia Regional Industrial Index.—This index contains available
statistics on a wide range of subjects covering all areas of the Province. This publication was last released in 1957.
British Columbia Facts and Statistics.—The thirteenth edition will be released
in 1960. This publication provides graphic, general, and historical facts and
statistics relating to British Columbia under the following headings: Population,
Education, Government and Finance, Judiciary, Banking, Transportation, Communication, Retail Trade, Agriculture, Fisheries, Mining, Forestry, Manufacturing,
Water Power, Tourist Statistics, and Economic Activity.
Establishing a Business in British Columbia.—A revised edition of this brochure was released in 1959. This publication gives to prospective investors information relating to the establishment of a business in British Columbia.
Salary and Wage Rate Survey, 1959.—This publication provides the salary and
wage rates in selected clerical, professional, and trade occupations in business and
industrial establishments for metropolitan Vancouver, and Victoria, Southern Interior, and northern centres.
Business Outlook for 1960.—This publication indicates business conditions in
1959 and the outlook for 1960. It covers the following economic factors: Sales,
prices, employment, wages, earnings, and capital expenditure. It is based on a
survey of 150 of the major companies in British Columbia.
Consumption of Materials and Supplies in British Columbia Manufacturing
Industries.—This publication lists the materials consumed by the principal industries
in the Province during 1955. It was compiled from material made available during
1958.
The Fabricating and Consumption of Aluminum Products in British Columbia.
—This publication reveals that British Columbia has an expanding aluminum-
fabricating industry and suggests that an aluminum rolling-mill, to service the
Western Canada market, may be a possibility in the not too distant future.
Market for Steel Rolling-mill Products in British Columbia.—A study of the
market with a view to establishing pig-iron and steel-ingot manufacturing plants in
the Province. U 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Potential Pulp and Paper Mills in British Columbia.—This publication presents
an analysis of the pulp and paper industry in British Columbia with regard to available resources, present development, and future markets throughout the world.
It goes on to consider six possible sites in the Province where pulp and paper mills
might be established successfully in view of this analysis.
The Biscuit Industry in British Columbia.—This publication points up the
prospects for an expansion of the local biscuit-manufacturing facilities, not only
to meet the growing demands of a widening market, but also because of favourable
cost factors, permitting successful competition against imports from other Canadian
Provinces.
Hope and District, an Economic Survey.—This is a well-documented and
detailed study of the industrial and commercial potential of the Village of Hope
and surrounding district.
A Manual of Resources and Development.—This publication contains up-to-
date information about the location and development of British Columbia resources.
It is well documented with maps and diagrams and also is published in German and
French translations for distribution abroad. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1959
U 35
MECHANICAL TABULATION DIVISION
The Mechanical Tabulation Division operates as a data-processing centre for
those departments of the Government requiring the service of mechanical or electronic equipment to handle large-scale statistical or accounting procedures.
To meet the diversified needs of the Government service, a fairly complete
installation of punched-card equipment is rented on a monthly basis. Although
no charge is made for this work, accurate job costs are maintained through a time-
card system, enabling the Division to assess the value of work done for each department, study machine utilization, and check the operating efficiency of the equipment.
Details as to the value of work done for each department are listed in the accompanying table, which shows comparative figures for the past five years.
The Division is equipped with eight alphabetic printers, nine sorters, two gang
summary punches, two end-printing document punches, one alphabetic interpreter,
two collators, two multiplying punches, one accumulating reproducer, one facsimile
poster, nine punches, and eight verifiers.
As the result of efficiency studies, steps have been taken to replace two obsolete alphabetic printers with up-to-date units and the nine sorters with 400-card-
per-minute capacity are being replaced by five sorters each capable of handling
1,000 cards per minute.
To operate the equipment, a well-trained staff has to be maintained and at
present consists of a senior supervisor, assistant supervisor, five senior machine
operators, eight machine operators, two senior key-punch operators, sixteen keypunch operators, and a senior clerk-stenographer. In addition, three members of the
Liquor Control Board staff are attached to the Division to maintain liaison and
perform necessary clerical functions in conjunction with their work.
Early in January the Chief Supervisor of the Division was loaned to the
Federal Government for five months to serve as a data-processing expert to the
Government of Pakistan under a Colombo Plan assi .nment. During this period
the administration of the Division was most capably handled by the Assistant
Supervisor.
For operating purposes, the Division is divided into seven sections headed by
five senior machine operators and two senior key-punch operators, each responsible
for a unit of work, the unit of work being determined by the volume and nature of
work to be done. At present the following sections are in operation: Health and
Welfare Section, Liquor Control Section, Forestry Section, General Statistical Section, Annual Report Section, Forestry Key-punch Section, and General Key-punch
Section.
In addition, the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service maintains a
Key-punch Section, whose work is tabulated in our Health and Welfare Section.
Similarly, a large volume of punched cards is received from the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, and the Scaling and Royalty Division of the British
Columbia Forest Service in Vancouver for the preparation of material for special
studies on trade and timber cut.
A distribution of the percentage of work done for the various departments is
shown in chart form in Fig. I.
Fig. II shows a similar distribution of work done by our key-punch sections;
the natural division between forestry and all other jobs determines the area of
responsibility of the two senior key-punch operators.
To establish the percentage of work done by the five sections of the Division,
key-punching has been excluded and the results shown in Fig. III. While this distribution does not appear entirely equable, the Division has been established mainly U 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
on nature of work and is balanced by employing more experienced personnel in
the larger sections.
The work level for the Division has reached a peak for the equipment and staff
employed, so that without a major increase in expenditure we are unable to undertake any new large-scale operations. A constant effort is directed toward work
simplification and cost reduction so that the best possible use is made of the
equipment.
The demand of the departments for equipment capable of processing data
faster and solving more complex computations continues to increase, making the
need for an electronic computer more significant. Interdepartmental committees
comprised of representatives of departments requiring data processing have been
active in the year under review in studying the necessity and application of electronic
data processing. A report on their investigations was made to the Minister of this
Department. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1959
U 37
p_
3
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
Comparative Cost Statement
Department and Branch
1954/55
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
$1,010.26
$1,681.48
$5,709.61
$4,641.61
$6,007.51
Attorney General—
$187.16
$430.07
1.227.01        $1,184.86
$5,165.46
38,295.26
$7,355.49
27,721.24
132.24
8,628.48
28,857.43
105.86
7,592.25
25,089.79
174.34
7,338.24
26,748.51
Official Committee.  	
183.66
Totals —- - ,.  	
$43,460.72
$35,208.97
$37,778.93
$34,513.46  i $35,455.27
Education—
$1,388.84
714.80
$1,386.24
$1,549.56
$1,703.73
1,620.81
$1,349.43
5,035.64
High School Vocational Correspondence. 	
	
	
1,393.93
Totals	
$2,103.64
$1,386.24
$1,549.56
$3,324.54 |    $7,779.00
Health and Welfare—
$14,525.24
$11,967.42
7,732.71
$10,760.17
30.15
6,692.22
$12,121.14
$14,576.99
17,867.14
13,476.98
23,364.74
Totals      	
$32,392.38
$19,700.13
$17,482.54
$25,598.12 | $37,941.73
Highways—Traffic Branch  	
$946.73
   1          -          1
Industrial Development, Trade,  and Commerce—
Bureau of Economics and Statistics -	
$14,849.50
$15,706.12
$11,121.94
$12,188.18
$14,869.98
Labour—Annual Statistical Report	
$3,621.80
$3,954.83
$3,251.04
$3,384.33  |    $4,016.77
Lands and Forests—
$718.83
8,722.76
39,754.31
1,881.64
$462.07
9,767.21
49,763.56
$164.77
10,478.65
49,243.21
3.79
$7,235.38
31,130.98
1,220.12
$7,983.75
30,804.47
Forest Engineering Division 	
162.10
15.05
117.90
Totals	
$39,586.48
$51,077.54
$60,007.89
$59,890.42  j $39,068.22
Municipal Affairs—Regional Planning	
$222.36
$236.49
$433.98  |  	
Provincial Secretary—
$6,918.86
$7,191.02
10,068.90
$6,567.77
1
$5,834.41       $5,797.66
186.19
9,100.04
3,049.54
Queen's Printer 	
11,701.68
12,895.97
10,593.36
Totals - _         	
$18,62,0.54
$17,259.92
$19,463.74
$15,120.64 |  $19,440.56
Recreation and Conservation—
$202.91
$442.46
$32.78
$549.00
$549.00
$202.91
$442.46
$32.78
Department of Commercial Transport 	
1
 .„.,.   [   ..       |        $181.96
$156,194.32
$147,347.23
$157,044.20
-159.128.06  1*164.761.00
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1960
660-160-2350  

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