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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Eighty-eighth Annual Report 1958/59 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1960

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Full Text

 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Eighty-eighth Annual Report
1958/59
By the Superintendent of Education
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
In right of the Province of British Columbia.
1960  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I beg respectfully to present the Eighty-eighth Annual Report of the Public
Schools of the Province.
LESLIE RAYMOND PETERSON,
Minister of Education.
January, 1960.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, 1959
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, LL.B.
Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education:
J. F. K. English, M.A., Ed.D.
Assistant Superintendent (Administration):
G. W. Graham, B.A.
Assistant Superintendent (Instruction):
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.).
Chief Inspector of Schools:
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Paed.
District Superintendents, Superintendents, and Inspectors of Schools:
H. D. Abbott, M.A., Nanaimo.
K. F. Alexander, B.Sc. B.Ed., Prince George.
N. A. Allen, B.A., Nelson.
J. E. Beech, B.A., B.Ed., Creston.
J. N. Burnett, M.A., B.Ed., Richmond.
D. H. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St. John.
D. G. Chamberlain, B.A., B.Ed., Port Alberni.
J. Chell, M.A., Mission.
C. E. Clay, B.A., Penticton.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., West Vancouver.
C. J. Frederickson, B.A., Burnaby.
J. Gough, M.A., Victoria.
S. J. Graham, B.A., Trail.
J. V. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector, Vancouver.
W. H. Grant, B.S.A., B.Ed., Abbotsford.
W. Gurney, M.A., Kitimat.
R. M. Hall, B.A., B.Ed., Williams Lake.
A. E. Henderson, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector,
Vancouver.
H. S. Hurn, B.A., Duncan.
F. L. Irwin, B.A., Vernon.
I. H. R. Jeffery, B.A., Powell River.
G. E. Johnson, B.A., B.Ed., Kelowna.
A. D. Jones, B.A., Duncan.
J. G. Kirk, M.A., Chilliwack.
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.Paed., North Vancouver.
J. I. Macdougall, M.A., M.Ed., D.Paed.,
Kamloops.
D. B. McKenzie, M.A., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
C. S. McKenzie, B.A., Castlegar.
J. J. McKenzie, B.A., New Westminster.
F. A. McLellan, M.A., B.Paed., Victoria.
W. A. Marchbank, A.B., B.Ed., Dawson
Creek.
E. Marriott, B.A., Kamloops.
L. A. Matheson, M.A., B.Ed., Kimberley.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., Salmon Arm.
G. H. Nelson, B.A., B.Ed., Quesnel.
F. J. Orme, B.A., B.Paed., Cranbrook.
J. Phillipson, B.A., B.Ed., Prince Rupert.
R. S. Price, B.A., B.Com., Hope.
P. B. Pullinger, B.A., B.Ed., Victoria.
D. L. Pritchard, M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
W. D. Reid, B.A., M.Ed., Campbell River.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., Courtenay.
C. E. Ritchie, B.A., Oliver.
R. F. Sharp, B.A., D.Paed., Superintendent,
Vancouver.
H. B. Smith, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., Langley.
R. B. Stibbs, B.A., New Westminster.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant, Burnaby.
J. A. Thomas, B.A., Smithers.
B. Thorsteinsson, B.A., B.Ed., M.B.A.,
Ladner.
R. F. Thorstenson, B.A., Ocean Falls.
A. Turnbull, M.C., M.M., B.A., Assistant,
Victoria.
F. M. Wallace, M.A., Inspector. Vancouver
K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Cloverdale.
C. C. Wright, B.A., Smithers. Z 6 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Special Services: W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment: P. J. Kitley, M.A.
Comptroller of Expenditure: S. E. Espley.
Supervisor of School Construction: J. H. Wilson.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education: J. S. White.
Assistant Director of Technical and Vocational Education: T. Quayle.
Inspectors of Technical Classes: C. J. Strong, M.A., and V. E. Rickard.
Registrar: H. M. Evans, B.A.
Assistant Registrars: J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Paed., and P. E. Wilkinson, B.A., B.Ed.
Director of Home Economics: Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.S.
Inspectors of Home Economics:
Miss J. R. Irvine, B.Sc.(H.Ec), and Miss J. Campbell, M.A., B.Sc.(H.Ec), Dip.Ed.
Director of Community Programmes: J. H. Panton, B.A., M.Sc.
Director of Visual Education: J. R. Pollock, B.A.Sc.
Director of School Radio Broadcasts: Miss M. Musselman.
Director of Tests, Standards, and Research: C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed.
Director of High School Correspondence: Miss Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Director of Elementary School Correspondence: A. H. Plows.
Director of Text-book Branch: P. G. Barr.
Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (for the Deaf and the Blind):
C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., LL.D.
Director of Curriculum: J. R. Meredith, B.A., B.Ed. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
11
Report of the Superintendent of Education	
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Administration and School Board
Relations)     3 6
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Instructional Services).
38
Report of the Chief Inspector of Schools  42
Report of the Director of Curriculum  43
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education  46
Report of the Director of Community Programmes Branch— 53
Report of the Director of Night-schools  59
Report of the Director of Home Economics  61
Report of the Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (Deaf and Blind School) 63
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses  65
Elementary Correspondence School  68
Report of the Director of the Text-book Branch  70
Report of the Director of the Division of School Radio Broadcasts  74
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  76
Report of the Director of Visual Education  78
Report of the Commission on Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act 80
Statistical Returns  81
Information re Examination Papers
.Inside back cover Z 8 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Page
Number of Pupils Enrolled by Type of School  11
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  12
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils According to Different Classes of Schools 12
Teachers' Certificates  13
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education   14
Number of School Districts  15
Number of Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  15
Number of Junior-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in
Each District  16
Number of Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  17
Number of Superior Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District 17
Number of Elementary-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils
in Each District  18
Number of Elementary-Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils
in Each District  18
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District ,  19
District Supervisory and Instructional Personnel ;  21
Summary of All Schools Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils 22
Number of Schools, Teachers, Pupils, and Average Daily Attendance in Each
Type of School  23
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  24
Classification of Teachers' Salaries  25
Expenditure for Education for the Calendar Year 1958  26
Costs per Pupil, Various Bases, Calendar Year 1958  26
Expenditure by School Districts for the Calendar Year 1958  27
Revenue for Education for the Calendar Year 1958 by School District   30
Summary of Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance by Schools in the Various School Districts  81
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades  124 The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, LL.B., Minister of Education.
L  Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1958/59
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., January, 1960
To the Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Eighty-eighth Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1959.
ENROLMENT
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from
277,070 to 291,223, and the average daily attendance increased from 252,490 to
267,052.   The percentage of the regular attendance was 91.70.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Type of School
Number of Pupils Enrolled
Municipal
Rural
Total
24,174
45,450
26,283
2,437
10,350
7,219
166,989
1,209
135
2,492
120
24,174
46,659
26,283
2,572
12,842
7.339
4,365                    171,354
Totals	
282,902
8,321
291,223
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:—
In the High School Correspondence classes, regular students
(exclusive of the 6,850 officially registered in other schools)
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular students 	
Under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, pupils receiving
instruction 	
3,782
1,304
45
5,131
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme :  3,633
Night-schools  40,846
Vancouver School of Art  2221
Vancouver Vocational Institute  6,7662
High School Correspondence (adults only)  7,255
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only)  296
Carried forward  64,149
1 This figure includes 60 part-time students.
2 Day, 2,143;  night, 4,623.
11 Z  12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
64,149
204,0003
106
Brought forward 	
Adult education—Continued
Recreational and Physical Education classes	
Industrial and vocational teachers-in-training	
Victoria College, regular credit courses—
Arts, Science, Commerce  469
College of Education  400
Evening   217
       1,0864
University of British Columbia       5,2325
274,573
3 This figure is a total course enrolment rather than a total of the adults in this category.
* This figure does not include an enrolment of 580 in the special evening classes.
5 This figure does not include the following enrolments:   1958 summer session, 3,947;   1958/59 extra sessional
classes, 1,247;  correspondence courses, 853.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade
for the school-year 1958/59:—
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total
1,964
17,411
15,652
15,165
14,808
14,361
14,336
13,094
11,332
10,672
8.967
7,042
5,155
660
1.925
15,485
14,191
14,012
13,740
13,459
13,791
12,293
10,434
10,036
9,039
6,955
4,901
343
3,889
32,896
Grade 11 	
29.843
Grade III	
29,177
Grade IV                 ..                             	
28.548
Grade V        	
27,820
Grade VI            	
28,127
Grade VII        ..
25,387
Grade VIII           	
21,766
Grade IX _	
20,708
Grade X   .              ._                                                                   .   .
18.006
Grade XI.                             ...	
13.997
Grade XII	
10.056
Grade XIII. _ - ..... -   .
1,003
To'tals      .. 	
150,619
140 604
291,223
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO
THE DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number
of pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per
teacher are shown in the following table:—
Number of Teachers
Total
Enrolment
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment
Average
Enrolment
per Grade
Teacher
Type of School
Grade
Teacher
Special
Instructor
Total
777
288
|        1,065
2,074
1,135
98
515
262
5,535
155
24.174
46,659
26,283
2,572
12,842
7,339
171,354
8.40
16.14
9.15
.89
4.41
2.52
58.49
31.11
Junior-senior high schools	
1,516      I           558
814                 321
95      |              3
450                   65
227                   35
5,192      |           343
155
30.77
32.28
Superior schools	
Elementary-senior high schools.
Elementary-junior high schools
27.07
28.53
31.89
33.00
Unclassified -	
Totals -	
9,071               1,768
10,839
291,223
100.00
32.10 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
Z 13
The following table shows the number of teachers employed and also the
number with or without university degrees:—
Type of School
Number of Teachers
With
Degrees
Without
Degrees
Total
839
1,419
644
14
140
81
489
65
226
655
491
84
375
181
5,046
90
1,065
Junior-senior high schools  	
2,074
1,135
98
515
262
5,535
155
Totals                                          .
3,691
7,148
10 839 Z 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE
FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for the various years since
1877/78 and also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
Number
Number
Aggregate
Enrol-
Average
Percent
Government
Total
School-year
of
of
Dally
age of
Expenditure
Expenditure
Teachers
School
Atten
Atten
for
for Public
Employed
Districts
dance
dance
Education
Schools
1877/78	
56
45
2,198
1,395
63.49
$48,411.141
1882/83	
69
59
2,693
1,383
51.36
60.758.751
1R87/RR
128
104
6,372
3,093
48.54
113.679.361
1892/93... 	
267
169
11,496
7,111
61.85
174,775.43
$215,056,222
1897/98	
429
213
17,648
11,055
62.64
290,255.26
425,555.10
1902/03	
607
268
24,499
16,357
66.76
473,802.29
604,357.86
1907/08 	
816
189
33,314
23,195
69.62
544,671.60
1,220,509.85
1912/13	
1,597
359
57,608
43,274
75.12
1,663,003.34
4,658,894.97
1913/14	
1,859
374
62,263
49,377
79.30
1,885,654.11
4,634,877.56
1917/18 	
2,246
575
67,516
54,746
81.09
1,653,796.60
3,519,014.61
1922/23.	
3,118
744
94,888
77,752
81.94
3,176,686.28 =
7,630,009.54s
1927/28 	
3,668
788
108,179
91,760
84.82
3,532,518.95s
9,261,094.98s
1928/29 	
3,784
792
109,588
94,410
86.17
3,765,920.69s
11,149,996.27s
1929/30	
3,854
803
111,017
96,196
86.65
3,743,317.08s
10,008,255.66s
1930/31 	
3,948
811
113,914
99,375
87.23
3,834,727.193
10,061,387.99s
1931/32 	
3,959
830
115,919
103,510
89.29
4,015,074.37s
9,719,333.81s
1932/33....... 	
3,912
821
116,816
104,978
89.86
2,849,972.02»
8,941,497.34s
1933/34     .....
3,873
827
115,792
103,389
89.30
2,611,937.80s
8,213,369.04s
1934/35 	
3,942
762
117,233
101,893
86.91
2,835,040.74a
8,458,156.00s
1935/36 _
3,956
773
116,722
101,873
87.27
2,972,385.043
8,775,353.78s
1936/37	
4,025
763
118,431
104,044
87.85
3,277,660.233
9,593,562.64s
1937/38 	
4,092
741
120,360
106,515
88.49
3,524,962.693
10,193,367.08s
1938/39
4,194
721
120,934
107,660
89.02
3,630,670.783
10,640,740.47s
1939/40	
4,220
720
120,459
108,826
90.34
3,585,769.003
10,521,684.92s
1940/41	
4,248
730
119,634
103,192
86.26
3,963,848.24s
10,982,364.49s
1941/42	
4,224
696
118,405
102,085
86.22
4,028,397.88s
11,120,801.94s
1942/43  	
4,055
661
115,447
93,473
80.96
3,924,243.53s
11,502,291.35s
1943/44 	
4,162
654
119,043
102,999
86.52
4,244,898.82s
12,231,029.35s
1944/45 	
4,354
650
125,135
107,599
85.99
5,022,534.59s
13,683,538.18s
1945/46  	
4,512
86
130,605
114,590
87.74
5,765,205.50s
14,818,625.81s
1946/47. -
4,833
89
137,827
121,334
88.03
9,398,473.46s
20,176,930.53s
1947/48	
5,116
93
146,708
129,859
88.51
12,468,653.18s
25,768,392.09s
1948/49     	
5,496
97
155,515
138,941
89.34
17,363,430.94s
35,538,079.88s
1949/50	
5,873
97
164,212
147,583
89.87
22,809,631.23s
47,726,750.37s
1950/51     .
6,272
98
173,354
154,077
88.88
25,830,076.88s
54,195,133.95s
1951/52	
6,598
101
183,112
163,364
89.21
26,885,980.43s
57,881,559.48s
1952/53 	
7,105
100
195,290
176,138
90.19
26,555,080.24s
58,401,121.15s
1953/54
7,574
104
210,174
191,061
90.91
24,060,233.15s
70,791,844.25 s
1954/55.	
8,185
104
223,840
204,239
91.24
34,279,302.27s
80,823,263.71s
1955/56 	
8,690
102
240,674
218,303
90.70
41,067,740.34*
69,314,181.24'
1956/57	
9,474
103
260,069
235,396
90.51
43,989,524.32=
77,653,192.32=
1957/58	
10,171
102
277,070
252,490
91.13
50,861,473.63°
90,483,765.63s
1958/59 	
10,839
101
291,223
267,052
91.70
53,288,028.94''
101,351,107.947
1 The total expenditure for public schools borne by the Government.
3 This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school
districts.
3 This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University.
4 This amount on calendar year 1955, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
5 This amount on calendar year 1956, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
0 This amount on calendar year 1957, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
7 This amount on calendar year 1958, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
Z  15
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1958/59:—
Municipal school districts     73
Rural school districts     28
Total number of districts  101
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in senior high schools during the school-year was 24,174; of
this number, 12,262 were boys and 11,912 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1958/59 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
3. Kimberley-
7. Nelson	
11. Trail....	
22. Vernon	
23. Kelowna	
33. Chilliwack...
34. Abbotsford..
36. Surrey_
38. Richmond 	
39. Vancouver.	
40. New Westminster .
41. Burnaby..
42. Maple Ridge-	
44. North Vancouver...
45. West Vancouver	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South .
61. Greater Victoria	
68. Nanaimo 	
71. Courtenay	
Totals.
33
13
18
32
20
22
31
20
81
24
105
40
97
24
61
33
15
13
89
24
15
777
20
24
41
29
28
39
28
113
33
145
52
126
31
77
43
24
20
131
36
 25
1,065
390
510
822
656
641
921
700
2,717
857
3,529
1,199
2,817
776
1,764
994
453
404
2,745
795
484
24,174 Z  16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior-senior high schools during the school-year was 46,659;
of this number, 23,948 were boys and 22,711 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1958/59 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
10
2
3
2
1
2
2
8
27
9
24
10
13
22
8
18
15
21
38
9
15
24
10
7
25
57
14
15
8
14
48
29
508
57
20
31
11
25
15
10
6
16
22
26
36
40
19
27
35
9
22
32
17
8
23
13
9
35
9
34
13
13
29
8
25
21
28
49
12
20
30
15
11
35
76
19
24
11
17
70
39
728
76
26
45
14
35
20
12
6
23
32
34
48
52
26
36
44
11
30
45
22
13
28
16
184
742
207
5. Creston    	
730
264
275
664
195
11. Trail                   .	
493
12,  firanrf porlfs
459
619
1,199
246
472
701
320
22. Vernon                      _	
201
732
1,706
413
469
31. Merritt                                                                            	
240
382
1,512
833
37, r>Rlta
17,228
1,727
541
46. Sechelt                                     	
941
276
816
53    Terrarp
458
258
164
60. Peace River North 	
515
702
736
991
1,187
545
754
70. Alberni  .....                            _                 	
1,082
71. Courtenay.      . ~
72. Campbell River	
248
684
1,054
455
78. Enderby..	
274
80. Kitimat
487
278
74
1,516
2,074
46,659 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
Z 17
The enrolment in junior high schools during the school-year was 26,283; of
this number, 13,593 were boys and 12,690 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1958/59 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
2
1
1
4
1
2
2
2
1
5
2
1
1
15
21
21
29
26
39
26
39
53
39
44
105
20
52
41
29
16
127
43
18
11
22
29
31
40
35
51
35
51
74
56
60
153
27
74
54
42
23
183
58
24
13
480
625
11. Trail                                                   -	
635
97. Vernon
906
840
33. Chilliwack  	
1,254
34. Abbotsford                                     _    '   	
933
36. Surrey     _  ... .
1,248
1,733
1,240
1,500
3,326
42. Maple Ridge _ 	
646
1,743
1,158
934
59. Peace River South
513
4,436
1,300
70.  Alherni
524
71. Courtenay _	
309
37
814
1,135
26,283
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS
The enrolment in superior schools during the school-year was 2,572; of this
number, 1,327 were boys and 1,245 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1958/59
in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
3
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
10
2
3
16
9
4
2
2
8
8
5
10
4
7
3
2
10
2
3
17
10
4
2
2
8
8
5
11
4
7
3
32
13. Kettle Valley 	
272
43
76. Birch Island
67
27. Williams Lake            	
503
28. Quesnel.	
253
29. Lillooet   	
51. Portland Canal  _.. .
107
56
53. Terrace	
54. Smithers	
55. Bums Lake	
30
241       ,
166
56. Vanderhoof _	
126
57. Prince George  	
58. McBride	
326
116
72. Campbell River  	
166
.. Unattached districts
68
Totals	
24
95
98
2,572 Z If
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-senior high schools during the school-year
was 12,842; of this number, 6,586 were boys and 6,256 were girls. The number
of schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the
school-year 1958/59 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1. Fernie	
4. Windermere-
5. Creston	
6. Kootenay Lake..
10. Arrow Lakes	
13. Kettle Valley ......
17. Princeton 	
18. Golden 	
20. Salmon Arm	
24. Kamloops	
25. Barriere 	
26. Birch Island	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet 	
30. South Cariboo..
32. Fraser Canyon..
39. Vancouver. _
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Ocean Falls	
50. Queen Charlotte..
53. Terrace 	
54. Smithers	
56. Vanderhoof	
58. McBride	
64. Saltspring	
69. Qualicum..
71. Courtenay	
73. Alert Bay 	
74. Quatsino... 	
76. Agassiz   	
79. Ucluelet-Tofino.
81. Fort Nelson	
31
10
5
14
3
10
21
20
12
10
7
8
11
26
30
4
20
7
9
29
12
9
7
15
12
12
17
14
22
12
15
36
11
6
15
3
10
27
21
14
11
13
31
33
4
23
7
10
33
12
10
7
18
14
15
21
17
26
14
19
10
Totals .
939
258
155
371
68
277
684
604
360
277
174
220
325
716
838
138
602
186
160
768
302
284
201
542
347
375
403
438
530
341
508
207
244
~12T842—
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-junior high schools during the school-year was
7,339; of this number, 3,853 were boys and 3,486 were girls. The number of
schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school
year 1958/59 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
11. Trail _
14. Southern Okanagan...
15. Penticton. 	
33. Chilliwack...	
39. Vancouver	
41. Burnaby.	
43. Coquitlam	
50. Queen Charlotte	
69. Qualicum 	
71. Courtenay	
— Unattached districts
Totals	
14
35
16
12
9
40
58
24
3
12
15
3
227
39
18
14
10
48
68
30
3
13
16
3
262
1,137
522
343
292
1,394
1,855
818
91
317
541
29
7,339 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
Z 19
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 171,354; of
this number, 89,050 were boys and 82,304 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1958/59 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere-
Creston	
Kootenay Lake-
Nelson  	
Slocan 	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes..
Trail 	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden 	
Revelstoke 	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen..
Vernon	
Kelowna	
Kamloops  	
Barriere  	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake .	
Quesnel	
Lillooet 	
South Cariboo...
Merritt 	
Fraser Canyon..
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta 	
R'chmond _
Vancouver	
New Westminster..
Burnaby
Maple Ridge 	
Coquitlam     _
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver .
Sechelt 	
Powell River 	
Howe Sound..	
Ocean Falls
Queen Charlotte .
Prince Rupert   ....
Terrace _	
Smithers   	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof 	
Prince George	
McBride  _.
Peace River South
Peace River North.
Greater Victoria   ...
Sooke 	
Saan-ch        	
Saltspring	
Cowichan
Lake Cowichan ...
5
6
7
7
6
2
12
11
12
3
10
1
3
2
7
3
3
2
6
14
1
8
22
28
7
5
25
18
3
6
4
7
16
24
17
42
11
19
52
6
28
13
15
15
10
12
13
11
6
1
7
11
5
11
5
42
8
33
24
33
9
12
4
17
13
41
43
14
31
2
54
24
34
11
73
15
5
20
51
12
3
2
26
41
12
58
99
111
9
7
49
47
6
9
17
25
90
81
71
286
51
140
1,079
84
297
65
107
219
85
32
59
25
12
1
46
35
18
23
7
113
12
96
47
340
43
49
6
62
30
13
43
44
14
33
2
58
25
34
11
78
15
5
21
53
12
3
2
26
44
13
62
102
116
9
7
50
49
6
10
18
26
92
82
79
298
54
147
1,230
90
306
65
108
237
95
36
61
26
12
1
48
35
18
24
8
119
12
98
49
362
46
51
6
64
33
392
1,267
1,324
399
1,015
24
1,838
516
970
351
2,320
568
132
612
1,783
387
35
33
787
1,272
461
2,146
3,065
3,213
173
108
1,384
1,398
85
206
559
788
3,323
2,722
2,395
10,185
1,555
4,937
35,619
3,215
10,815
2,289
3,757
7,897
3,012
918
1,734
558
254
15
1,604
1,108
534
619
212
3,437
207
2,783
1,375
12,766
1,322
1,575
110
1,858 Z 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
District Number and Name
Number of
Number of
Number of
Number of
Schools
Divisions
Teachers
Pupils
6
29
31
1,012
21
104
109
3,189
7
11
12
310
11
79
83
2,824
11
42
44
1,405
14
46
46
1,405
5
6
6
88
7
8
8
144
17
47
47
1,530
3
5
5
122
2
18
19
623
7
14
14
407
4
5
5
90
3
36
39
1,072
2
3
3
75
4
4
4
61
17
60
64
1,788
937
5.192
5,535
171,354
67. Ladysmith	
68. Nanaimo-	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni 	
71. Courtenay..
72. Campbell River..
73. Alert Bay _
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz—	
77. Summerland	
78. Enderby-
79. Ucluelet-Tofino..
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
82. Chilcotin.	
Unattached districts -
Totals	 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
Z 21
DISTRICT SUPERVISORY AND INSTRUCTIONAL PERSONNEL
District Number and Name
2. Cranbrook      _	
Number of
Teachers
1
3. Kimberley 	
2
7. Nelson __ _    ___	
____    ____      1
11. Trail     .    ___
____    __._      2
19. Revelstoke-— :  ..       ■
____        ____      2
20. Salmon Arm    _   _
     -              1
23. Kelowna     	
     ____           2
24. Kamloops	
28. Quesnel 	
3
.         ____    ____      1
30. South Cariboo 	
       1
33. Chilliwack    	
     ____          1
34. Abbotsford	
2
35. Langley ■    	
       4
36. Surrey   	
38. Richmond
       7
- -           3
39. Vancouver    	
          33
40. New Westminster 	
       3
41. Burnaby	
 ...    21
42. Maple Ridge ____ 	
       2
43 Coquitlam     	
     _...          9
44. North Vancouver         	
    '   5
45. West Vancouver _—                          _ -           _ _      1
46. Sechelt        ■ j ■        "                1
47. Powell River  J	
48. Howe Sound                                                                       1
55. Burns Lake             j      _i                                __         _ __                 1
57. Prince George :	
58. McBride     	
       3
____           1
59. Peace River South
_ _     ., '     3
60. Peace River North     ____ . _   	
1
61. Greater Victoria   	
____        22
68. Nanaimo • _        	
           3
70. Alberni____	
       4
71. Courtenay ___  ___    ___ 	
       2
72. Campbell River	
____           2
75. Mission
       2
80. Kitimat ____   	
              1
Total	
  155 Z 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The following table is a summary of all schools, showing number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
Fernie	
Cranbrook-—
Kimberley	
Windermere-
Creston	
Kootenay Lake-
Nelson	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes..
Trail 	
Grand Forks 	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton	
Keremeos 	
Princeton	
Golden 	
Revelstoke	
. Salmon Arm	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen..
Vernon	
Kelowna	
Kamloops	
Barriere 	
Birch Island  	
Williams Lake	
Quesnel	
Lillooet 	
South Cariboo.-
Merritt —
8. Slocan.-
9.
10
11
12
13
14
15
16.
17,
18.
19
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58,
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65
66,
67,
68.
Fraser Canyon..
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta 	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster..
Burnaby   __
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt   	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls 	
Queen Charlotte-
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert	
Terrace	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George	
McBride -	
Peace River South...
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Saanich	
Saltspring	
Cowichan 	
Lake Cowichan..
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo 	
7
9
10
8
5
15
14
13
6
15
2
7
4
9
4
4
5
7
17
2
12
26
31
8
7
29
22
6
9
5
9
20
27
19
50
13
22
70
8
37
15
18
19
13
14
16
14
8
4
1
8
14
8
14
7
47
10
35
25
43
11
15
5
19
9
8
24
52
68
71
33
60
18
103
37
56
22
179
30
25
57
101
21
24
22
41
77
22
116
172
178
16
18
79
82
36
39
25
43
169
127
119
406
80
217
1,791
168
557
109
188
332
159
52
97
45
41
16
2
71
61
43
37
27
167
28
125
63
578
69
85
18
102
49
56
171
58
79
88
34
73
19
125
38
63
22
216
36
25
67
116
24
30
23
48
89
28
144
202
206
17
18
86
97
41
44
29
47
193
147
153
469
93
257
2,263
205
674
125
223
393
193
63
114
51
45
16
2
83
67
45
39
31
199
31
144
73
730
80
99
21
116
59
67
206
1,515
2,009
2,194
864
1,900
427
3,237
791
1,634
614
5,407
1,027
681
1,753
3,325
633
719
637
1,259
2,333
781
3,952
5,278
5,196
347
395
2,300
2,445
908
1,044
799
1,308
5,790
4,355
3,907
14,150
2,388
7,527
59,612
5,914
18,813
3,711
6,302
11,404
5,164
1,459
2,861
994
1,022
408
56
2,420
1,880
1,234
949
880
5,150
670
3,700
1,890
20,649
2,058
2,566
485
3,045
1,433
1,766
5,284 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
Z 23
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
69. Qualicum-
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River~
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission 	
76. Agassiz..
77. Summerland-
78. Enderby...
79. Ucluelet-Tofino..
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
82. Chilcotin	
Unattached districts-
Totals	
9
13
16
17
9
9
18
4
3
8
5
4
3
4
21
40
132
106
75
28
20
79
20
35
22
13
59
11
4
79
1,168
9,071
46
155
128
85
32
22
94
24
41
27
15
68
11
4
86
10.8391
1,030
4,430
3,425
2,255
618
485
2,584
630
1,078
681
297
1,559
319
61
2,163
291,223
1 Includes 155 district supervisory and instructional personnel.
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, PUPILS, AND AVERAGE DAILY
ATTENDANCE IN EACH TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number
of teachers employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily
attendance in each type of school for the school-year 1958/59:—■
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Number
of
Teachers
Number of Pupils
Total
Male
Female
Average
Daily
Attendance
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools-
Junior high schools	
Superior schools..
Elementary-senior high schools	
Elementary-junior high schools	
Elementary schools 	
Unclassified   	
33
74
37
24
49
14
937
Totals.
1,168
1,065
2,074
1,135
98
515
262
5,535
155
24,174
46,659
26,283
2,572
12,842
7,339
171,354
10,839
12,262
23,948
13,593
1,327
6,586
3,853
89,050
11,912
22,711
12,690
1,245
6,256
3,486
82,304
150,619
140,604
21,662.28
42,528.35
24,172.92
2,315.05
11,451.51
6,766.37
158,155.07
267,051.55 Z 24 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars
only) paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals, and special instructors. Teachers earning less than $1,100 are
excluded.
Grade Teachers
Type of School
Teachers
Low
Salary
High
Salary
Average
Salary
777
1,516
814
95
450
227
5,192
$1,320
1,100
1,200
1,940
1,100
1,166
1,100
$8,642
8,950
9,268
8,166
9,205
8,838
9,310
$6,171
5,741
5,157
Superior schools      ...             .„ 	
4,213
4,664
4,616
4,320
Supervising Principals
33
64
36
1
21
11
12
$8,275
7,842
5,977
5,987
4,790
8,288
5,977
$11,502
11,860
10,700
5,987
10,240
10,802
10,028
$9,795
9,475
9,313
5,987
8,403
9,078
8,646
Special Instructors
255
494
285
2
44
24
214
155
$1,680
1,458
2,430
1,100
1,100
2,922
1,100
1,122
$9,923
9,958
9,486
5,470
8,600
9,470
8,953
15,528
$6,530
6,138
5,672
Superior schools  -	
3,015
5,159
5,524
3,798
6,863 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
Z 25
SALARY CLASSIFICATION
Distribution of teachers by $100 salary-groups, excluding teachers earning less
than $2,100 per annum:—
Number of
Salary Range Teachers
$2,100-$2,199     16
2,200- 2,299     20
2,300- 2,399 __:     25
Number of
Teachers
2,400-
2,500-
2,600-
2,700-
2,800-
2,900-
3,000-
3,100-
3,200-
3,300-
3,400-
3,500-
3,600-
3,700-
3,800-
3,900-
4,000-
4,100-
4,200-
4,300-
4,400-
4,500-
4,600-
4,700-
4,800-
4,900-
2,499     35
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2,699
2,799
2,899
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38
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106
144
132
143
159
242
211
242
260
259
281
235
236
4,099  214
4,199  256
4,299  279
4,399  272
4,499  261
4,599  248
4,699 274
4,799  207
4,899  294
4,999  295
5,000- 5,099  285
5,100- 5,199  433
5,200- 5,299  278
5,300- 5,399  215
5,400- 5,499  172
5,500- 5,599  318
5,600- 5,699 :  163
Salary Range
$5,700-$5,799  _ 185
5,800- 5,899  158
5,900- 5,999  138
6,000- 6,099  122
6,100- 6,199  121
6,200- 6,299  87
6,300- 6,399  161
6,400- 6,499  114
6,500- 6,599  115
6,600- 6,699  137
6,700- 6,799  124
6,800- 6,899  106
6,900- 6,999  113
7,000- 7,099  100
7,100- 7,199  157
7,200- 7,299  208
7,300- 7,399  168
7,400- 7,499  119
7,500- 7,599  183
7,600- 7,699 _: 81
7,700- 7,799  32
7,800- 7,899  84
7,900- 7,999 - 28
8,000- 8,099  27
8,100- 8,199  28
8,200- 8,299  23
8,300- 8,399  24
8,400- 8,499  28
8,500- 8,599  11
8,600- 8,699 - 22
8,700- 8,799  30
8,800- 8,899  29
8,900- 8,999  18
9,000- 9,099  25
9,100- 9,199  15
9,200 and over  201 Z 26 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1958
(Exclusive of Capital Expenditures from By-law Funds)
Total expenditure by school districts     $91,279,662.00
Add Department of Education expenditures for—
Administration,   grants   to   University   of
British Columbia, services, etc  $6,693,323.99
Teachers, Pension Fund 6%      2,827,238.99
Free text-books, maps, etc.        550,882.96
       10,071,445.94
Grand total expenditure  $101,351,107.94
COST PER PUPIL, VARIOUS BASES, CALENDAR YEAR 1958
Grand total cost of education  $101,351,107.94
Deduct—
Capital expenditure from current revenue _     $780,793.00
Debt charges on school district debt  11,002,361.00
Grant to University of British Columbia     4,069,426.03
Grant to Victoria College        204,792.00
High Correspondence School        185,710.89
Elementary Correspondence School  77,435.58
Night-schools   55,849.12
Adult education        687,263.38
       17,063,631.00
Net total operating costs     $84,287,476.94
Net operating cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance
of 267,052  315.62
Net operating cost per pupil per school-day on average daily
attendance of 267,052  1.62
Net operating cost per pupil to Provincial Government for year
on average daily attendance of 267,052  161.25 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
Z 27
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EXAMINATION SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS, 1959
University Entrance
The fifteen General Proficiency Scholarships, each of $500, awarded jointly by
the University of British Columbia and the Chris Spencer Foundation, were won by
the following:—
Place
Name
School
Per Cent
1st in B.C..
2nd in B.C
Area 1	
Area 2	
Area 3	
Area 4	
Area 5	
Area 6	
Area 7	
Area 8	
Area 9	
Area 10	
Area 11	
Area 12	
Area 13	
Donald Murry Duggan..
Muriel Joyce Watney—
Carol Dawn Beattie	
Miriam Ann Roberts—
Julie Anne Helene Lapeyre..
Dennis Charles Healey	
Sidney Sylvester Medley	
Stephen Peter Beaton	
Marlene Rose Austrup	
Diane Harlow 	
J. L. Jackson Junior-Senior High	
University Hill Junior-Senior High-
L. V. Rogers Junior-Senior High	
J. Lloyd Crowe High... _ 	
Rutland Junior-Senior High	
Abbotsford Senior High..
Richmond Junior-Senior High—
John Oliver Junior-Senior High-
St. Patrick's Private School	
Muriel Kathleen Croker..
Louise Alice Compton.—
Verna Beatrice Langan.—
Carol Anita Harold	
Linda Diane Clouston—
University Hill Junior-Senior High-
Lester Pearson Senior High	
Delbrook Senior High	
High School Correspondence	
Mount View Senior High..
Alberni District Junior-Senior High..
94.25
93.75
88.25
88.50
88.375
93.625
88.50
92.25
91.25
91.75
90.375
92.25
86.625
92.625
91.375
The Governor-General's Silver Medal for the highest standing in the University
Entrance Examinations was won by Donald Murry Duggan. The Governor-
General's Bronze Meadal for the second highest standing in the University Entrance
Examinations was won by Muriel Joyce Watney.
Grade XIII
The six Royal Institution Scholarships, each of $200, awarded by the University of British Columbia for general proficiency, were won by the following:—
Name
School
Per Cent
Kurt Frederic Gerhard Paulus..
Eileen Lois Goresky  	
Patricia Anne Wilkinson._ 	
Garry Ronald Jenkins 	
Gerald Duane Palsson	
Sonja Edith Hansen 	
Como Lake High-
Stanley Humphries Junior-Senior High-
J. Lloyd Crowe High	
J. Lloyd Crowe High	
Stanley Humphries Junior-Senior High-
J. L. Jackson Junior-Senior High	
93.6
91.4
88.0
87.4
86.1
84.4
GENERAL REVIEW
Many attempts have been made over the years to define what education really
is, but most authorities agree that education does not lend itself to any precise
definition. This is largely so because educational theory and practice are constantly
changing and being adapted to meet new demands and new circumstances. " Education is never finite." It changes with the years and from place to place in any
country. The schools reflect these changes through revised curricula and by a
periodic restatement of aims.
In this country the school is looked upon as a unit of society where boys and
girls learn the art of living in the fellowship of the school. In addition to acquiring
certain basic skills, they have experience in leadership and service which will be
carried over to adulthood. The purpose of the school is training for citizenship
and all our educational resources are directed to this end.
3 z 34 public schools report, 1958/59
Amendments to the Public Schools Act
At the 1959 Session of the Legislature about a dozen amendments to the
Public Schools Act were made. These changes had become necessary in the light
of experience by the School Boards and by the Department of Education during the
relatively short period since the Act had been rewritten in toto. On the whole,
however, the new Act has functioned smoothly and effectively. Time and events
will again determine whether or not further amendments are necessary.
The Culmination of Centennial Activities
During the summer and autumn of 1958 the concluding celebrations of the
Centennial Year took place, and Douglas Day, November 19th, was suitably commemorated by all the schools. British Columbia's centenary undoubtedly left a
lasting impression upon the present generation of students, resulting in deep appreciation for the history and resources of their native province.
Canadian Education Association Convention
The Thirty-fifth Convention of the Canadian Education Association was held
in Victoria, September 16th to 18th, 1958. Approximately 700 delegates,from all
Provinces were present and six Ministers of Education were in attendance. During
the convention the Government of British Columbia was host at a dinner in honour
of the visitors, at which time the Honourable the Premier delivered an address on
" British Columbia—To-day and To-morrow."
The staff of the Department of Education and their wives were in charge of
convention arrangements, while the Greater Victoria School Board, the Naval
establishments at Esquimalt, and a local Army unit in a sunset and retreat ceremony
generously contributed to the entertainment of our guests from other parts of
Canada.
OBITUARY
The Department of Education and the Burnaby School District suffered a
severe loss on July 10th in the death of Mr. Ray C. Grant, District Superintendent
of Schools for Burnaby. Before his appointment to Burnaby in July, 1954, Mr.
Grant had served as Administrative Assistant for eight years in the Department following his discharge from the Army in 1946. Mr. Grant was well and favourably
known by educators and by School Boards throughout the Province. His friendliness and interest in people won him a host of friends during his career. We shall
miss him greatly.
RETIREMENTS
At the close of the school-year Mr. Claude L. Campbell and Mr. Grove
Carter, District Superintendents of Schools, along with Miss Bertha Rogers, Director
of Home Economics, retired from active service in the Department of Education.
Both Mr. Campbell and Mr. Carter had been with the Department for many
years in various parts of the Province and had given outstanding service first as
Inspectors of Schools and latterly as District Superintendents. Miss Rogers, during
a period of great expansion, provided fine leadership in Home Economics as an
Inspector of Home Economics classes and as Director of the Branch. To these
three persons the Department extends best wishes for a long and happy period of
retirement. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT Z 35
APPOINTMENTS
The following school principals have been appointed as District Superintendents
of Schools as from August 1st: Mr. W. H. Gurney, Kamloops Junior-Senior High
School; Mr. P. B. Pullinger, Fort St. John Junior-Senior High School; Mr. C. C.
Wright, Armstrong Junior-Senior High School; and, Dr. J. I. MacDougall, Cambie
Junior High School.
A number of other appointments to staff, as replacements, were made during
the year, as follows: Mr. J. Panton, formerly District Consultant, Community Programmes, Kelowna, succeeded Mr. L. J. Wallace in January as Provincial Director
of Community Programmes; Mr. Philip Kitley, Director of School Broadcasts
since 1945, was appointed to the position of Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment
as of April 1st; Miss Margaret Musselman was promoted to the position of Director
of School Broadcasts, while Mr. Ian Hay, a teacher from North Vancouver, was
appointed Assistant Director; Miss Mildred Orr, Inspector of Home Economics
classes, was promoted to be Director of the Branch as from August 1st, while Miss
Jean Campbell, formerly of Lansdowne Junior High School, Victoria, was appointed
an Inspector of Home Economics classes; Mr. V. E. Rickard, formerly in charge
of the Industrial Arts teacher-training programme and more recently Director of
the Vocational Training Development Division, Vancouver, was appointed Inspector
of Industrial Arts classes.
A TRIBUTE
Mr. L. J. Wallace, who since 1954 had been Director of the Community
Programmes Branch in this Department, was appointed on January 1st of this year
as Deputy Provincial Secretary. It was he who laid the foundation of the Community Programmes Branch and organized the general pattern of the programme.
His work in the Department and the inspiration he gave to his staff throughout the
Province will long be remembered.
Mr. Wallace while Director of Community Programmes was also Chairman of
the British Columbia Centennial Committee since its inception in 1956. British
Columbia's centenary is now history. Under the guidance of Mr. Wallace the
Centennial Year was an outstanding success in every respect. Two other members
of the Department who served on the executive committee were Mr. Willard Ireland
(honorary secretary) and Mr. Edwin Espley (honorary treasurer), both of whom
made very significant contributions to the Provincial centennial celebrations.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
In concluding this report may I take this opportunity to thank all members of
the Department of Education, including the District Superintendents of Schools in
the field, for their unfailing assistance during my first year as Deputy Minister and
Superintendent of Education.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. F. K. ENGLISH,
Superintendent of Education. Z 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1958/59
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
REPORT OF G. W. GRAHAM, B.A, ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT
OF EDUCATION (ADMINISTRATION AND SCHOOL BOARD RELATIONS).
School Districts
During the year a new rural school district was created at Good Hope Lake,
located about 20 miles north of McDame. The boundaries of School Districts No.
60 (Peace River North), No. 79 (Ucluelet-Tofino), and No. 81 (Fort Nelson) were
extended. The rural school districts of Sydney Inlet, Tofino Airport, and Camp
Mile 163, Camp Mile 201, Camp Mile 392, and Camp Mile 456 along the Alaska
Highway were abolished. Under the present Public Schools Act the villages of the
Province are classed as municipalities, and representation was assigned to them, and
the election of trustees has been carried out in the regular manner. There are 549
school trustees in the school districts of the Province, while eleven districts are served
by official trustees.
Assistance to Isolated Areas
Pupils in isolated areas have been served by nine classes authorized under
section 20 of the Public Schools Act.   The enrolment was forty-five pupils.
Boarding allowance payments have been made to pupils in fifty-three school
districts to an amount of $80,000, while transportation assistance payments approached $192,000.
Transportation
Transportation costs continue to rise in direct relation to the number of
pupils being carried. Approximately 60 per cent of the pupils being carried are
secondary pupils; five years ago more elementary than secondary pupils were
being transported. The construction of smaller elementary schools in local areas
is decreasing elementary transportation. Seventy-five of the eighty-two large school
districts and two of the nineteen small districts provide transportation service. This
involves the operation of 392 district-owned vehicles, 132 contract vehicles, and 10
water taxis. These vehicles travel 29,000 miles on 1,200 trips, carrying 46,000
pupils daily, at an annual cost of approximately $1,800,000. The average number
of pupils carried per vehicle operating is 39.7, and the average cost per pupil-mile
is 6 cents.
School Construction
One hundred and fifteen school-construction projects have been let to tender
this school-year. These projects represent an expenditure of approximately
$15,200,000. While these vary greatly in size, in total they produce over 600
classrooms with the auxiliary areas for administration offices and activity-gymnasium
space.
Over this same period the demand for accommodation continues, and referenda
amounting to $18,850,000 were passed by the electors of twenty-two school districts.
A survey submission of May, 1959, shows that approximately 90 per cent of
the schools of the Province have the accommodation required under Provincial
standards to meet enrolment needs of that date. Less than 100 schools showed
need for additional accommodation at Provincial standards.
The Department's School Planning Division has provided plans and specifications to twenty-one school districts. Eight per cent of the expenditure for new
buildings has been for Department-planned schools.   One hundred and twenty-nine ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
Z 37
sketch-plans and ninety sets of working drawings and specifications submitted by the
architects for School Boards have been checked by the Division this year.
There has been a trend toward assigning a larger proportion of referenda funds
to school-site purchase and development. The percentage amount has trebled in the
past six years. No doubt much of this may be accounted for by the rapid increase
in property value, but the trend toward larger sites and greater grounds development
has had its impact. Z 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION (INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES)
Under the general heading of " Instructional Services " appear the following
divisions: High School Correspondence; Tests, Standards, and Research; Curriculum; Text-book Branch; Elementary Correspondence; Visual Education; School
Radio Broadcasts; Home Economics. The director of each of these divisions submits his own report, but there are a number of activities lying outside the scope of
any special division which should receive attention.
Departmental Conference
For the first time in over two years a conference of all officials of the Department was held under the general chairmanship of the Deputy Minister in the week
of March 31st to April 4th. The business of the conference was largely the discussion of changes in policies and procedures necessitated by the revised Public Schools
Act of 1958. The Department was honoured by having as its guests throughout
the conference Dean Chant and Mr. Walrod, Chairman and member of the Royal
Commission on Education, as well as representatives of the College of Education
from both Vancouver and Victoria.
Accrediting of Schools Offering Grade XII
The Accrediting Committee welcomed a new member in the person of Mr.
E. E. Hyndman, Chief Inspector of Schools, thereby raising its complement to
three. During the year, 113 applications for accrediting were considered, and
sixty-four of them accepted for accreditation. Of these, twenty-eight were accredited for three years, eleven for two years, and twenty-five for one year. Three
schools were accredited for the first time. One was returned and two were removed
from the accredited list. Schools previously accredited for 1958/59 numbered
thirty-one.
Organization of Secondary Schools
The number of secondary schools increases each year, now being 14 per cent
greater than in 1955. More significant perhaps is the tendency for high schools to
become larger. In 1955/56, 31 per cent of the secondary schools enrolled 100
pupils or less.   In 1958/59 this percentage had dropped to 25 per cent.
The most common secondary school is still the junior-senior high school,
although the number of separate junior and senior high schools is increasing.
A comparison by percentages of schools of various types and enrolment categories
in the last four years is given on next page:— GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
Z 39
Type
1955
1958
Secondary Enrolment
1955
1958
Per Cent
14
14
30
25
3
14
Per Cent
14
15
32
22
7
10
Over 2.000  	
Per Cent
2
6
23
21
17
20
Per Cent
2
1,001 to 2,000       	
7
501 to 1,000   _ _  	
29
251 to 500	
19
101 to 250  .
18
Under 51         .  _.  . .   ..
16
Electives Most Frequently Chosen
Advanced electives most frequently chosen by pupils have changed very little
since 1953. In order of choice, the first ten are Chemistry 91, Biology 91, Mathematics 91, English 91, Physics 91, Geography 91, History 91, Home Economics
91, English 93, and Industrial Arts 91. About three out of five Grade XII students
take a fourth year of mathematics and a third or fourth year of science in the form
of chemistry or biology. Better than one out of three takes four years of science,
including physics. Of the non-scientific courses, English 91, an advanced course in
literature given in addition to the compulsory four years of English, is the most
popular and is taken by almost two students out of five. The so-called " practical "
courses lag in popularity, with Home Economics most in demand but ranking only
eighth. The most marked increases in percentage enrolments have been in Art 91,
Industrial Arts 92, Physics 91, and Geography 91, while enrolments in History 91,
the foreign languages, and commercial subjects, although increasing, have not kept
pace with the general growth.
Special Classes in Public Schools
The total number of teachers under entitlement engaged in special-class work
remained the same as in the previous year. Fall-off in immigration decreased the
number of special classes for New Canadians. There was also a drop in the number
of " remedial" classes. The number of classes for slow learners increased proportionally.    Statistics follow:  Number of
Type of Class Teachers
Slow learners   114
Remedial training   13
Home instruction  4
New Canadians   19
Rehabilitation centres   4
Hospitals   12
Sight-saving   2
Preventorium  2
Detention home  2
Number of
Pupils
1,753
219
O)
252
39
240
21
11
18
1 Varied.
Totals, 1958/59   172
Totals, 1957/58   172
Schools for Retarded Children
2,553
2,664
Legislation passed at the 1959 Session marked a great advance in the provisions for training of retarded children. Grants payable on behalf of eligible children in schools operated by local chapters of the Association for Retarded Children
were increased by 50 per cent.   School Boards were empowered to provide accom- Z 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
modation for association schools.   Under certain conditions, Boards were permitted
to operate special classes for mentally retarded children.
The number of children of school age in schools for the retarded has increased
steadily since the first legislation was passed in 1956. In December, 1958, there
were 402 eligible children in thirty-six schools, as compared with 309 in thirty-four
schools the previous year.
Local Supervisory Personnel
As at December, 1958, the following teachers were employed in a supervisory
capacity by local school districts: Three directors of instruction, forty-four supervisors of instruction, and thirty-six teacher consultants. During the year, certain
other supervisors became, with the approval of the Council of Public Instruction,
directors of instruction with power to report on classroom situations.
Qualifications of Teaching Staff
The proportion of secondary-school teachers in the total teaching force continued to increase, to 44.0 per cent in 1958 from 43.3 per cent in 1957.
The supply of elementary teachers showed further improvement, with a drop
from 3.1 to 2.9 per cent in the percentage of unqualified teachers and an increase to
23.6 from 19.0 per cent of teachers with superior qualifications.
The supply of secondary teachers with full qualifications still fell short of the
increased demand. Teachers with less than full qualifications made up 23.9 per
cent of secondary-school staffs in 1958, even although the number of fully qualified
secondary teachers had significantly increased and the number of those with at least
six years of university training or its equivalent had reached 29.8 per cent of the
total secondary-school staff.
The over-all quality and training of the teaching force showed steady improvement. The number of trained teachers with university degrees or equivalent
training had increased to 39.3 per cent of all teachers employed. Even more
remarkable, the number of those whose certification showed training of at least one
more year than what was required for the position held increased to 26.4 per cent
of the total teaching-body. The highest grade of valid teaching certificate, requiring
six years of training, was held by 14.7 per cent of the total staff; the lowest grade,
requiring only one year, by 10.6 per cent. This last type of certificate is conditional
and interim, so that it should disappear from the scene almost entirely within the
next few years.
Departmental Circulars
A routine function of this office is the preparation and distribution of all
Departmental circulars except that of the Chief Inspector. These include the
Administrative Circular, the Announcements Circular, the Curriculum Circular,
and the Teaching Aids Circular.
The importance of these circulars lies in the fact that they are the only means
of direct communication between the Department and individual Boards, schools,
and field officers on matters of general policy. As their names imply, they offer
information on such varied matters as legislation, regulations, curriculum changes,
scholarships, and instructional aids.
The work involved in collecting, preparing, mimeographing, and distributing
these materials to a mailing-list of approximately 1,800 persons and institutions
occupies the complete time of all available office staff for approximately a week each
quarter of the school-year. GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
Z 41
Last year the approximate distribution was: Administrative Circulars, 11,202;
Announcement Circulars, 11,834; Curriculum Circulars, 8,690; Teaching Aids
Circulars, 8,460, for a total of 40,186 circulars: This involved 97,359 sheets of
mimeographed material.
Other Regular Duties
1. Each October the actual teaching staff of each school district in the Province must be checked against the provisions of the Public Schools Act and of the
rules of the Council of Public Instruction in order to ensure that it is within entitlement. The local districts may, of course, employ additional teachers at district
expense should they so wish.
2. Early in the fall term each principal of a school enrolling pupils in Grade
VII or above submits a sheet showing the organization of the school. The detailed
information is essential to such divisions as Curriculum, the Text-book Branch, and
Tests, Standards, and Research. In addition, studies of the returns offer data which
have been useful in improving both general school organization and that of individual schools.
3. Throughout the year, information on many aspects of instruction and
instructional administration are sent to schools through the District Superintendents.
These cover such recurring items as retention, qualifications of teachers, placement
of pupils, and analysis of examination results, as well as non-recurring items of
importance as they may be significant.
4. The Instructional Services may and do carry out special studies for the
Deputy Minister at his request. These generally involve the co-operation of several
divisions and of personnel or school staffs. Z 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
REPORT OF E. E. HYNDMAN, B.A., B.Pjed.,
CHIEF INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
In reporting for the year 1958/59, it should be noted that the reorganization
within the Department has made possible a different emphasis from this office. My
predecessor, Mr. Levirs, has taken with him to his new position, as Assistant Superintendent (Instruction), the responsibilities for teacher entitlement, secondary-school
organization, accreditation, and instructional surveys. As a result, it has been possible to maintain closer relationships with Superintendents, principals, and instruction procedures within the classroom.
As one method of maintaining this closer relationship with Superintendents,
zone meetings were organized to meet twice yearly in six parts of the Province.
These meetings provide for in-service training as well as opportunities for the group
study of instructional problems. They are also an answer to the of ten-heard request
for closer liaison with Department officials. As a product of these zone conferences,
papers were prepared on " Dormitories " and the " Secondary Schools Acceleration
Programme." In addition, there was a conference of Superintendents in Victoria
during the month of April. Meetings of administrators, fall conventions, staff
meetings, and the British Columbia Teachers' Federation workshop were attended
for the purpose of co-ordinating instructional and supervisory practices.
During this year there were forty-seven Provincial Superintendents with seven
others of this rank in School District No. 39 (Vancouver). They were responsible
for the supervision of 10,920 teachers in public and Indian day-schools. The total
number of written reports outside the City of Vancouver was 3,304, with more
than 7,000 visits to classrooms for supervision purposes. Follow-up procedures
were instituted for the supervision of teachers who were not considered satisfactory
in the previous school-year.
In advancing the liaison duties of this Branch, a total of sixty-one school districts were visited during the year. Whenever it was feasible, School Board offices
as well as the schools were visited for the purpose of discussing instructional matters.
On occasion, staff meetings or meetings of district principals were held. In some
instances, joint inspections were made with the local District Superintendent in both
elementary and secondary schools. In every visit the opportunities to explain the
purpose of Provincial regulations were utilized to advantage and, on the other hand,
the district problems were described to Branch heads on the headquarters staff.
Monthly reports from Superintendents on district affairs provided another means of
maintaining contacts between field and headquarters staff.
Among the duties undertaken during the year 1958/59 are included membership on the Accreditation Committee, the Board of Examiners, the Curriculum
Advisory Board, Promotional Policy Committee, Kindergarten Committee, the
Advisory Board for the Retarded Children's Association, and the Planning Committee for the British Columbia Conference on Education. Bulletins were distributed
among the District Superintendents on subjects of supervision and administrative
importance. Special investgiations were made by request in School Districts No. 4
(Windermere), No. 1 (Cranbrook), No. 9 (Castlegar), No. 23 (Kelowna), No. 26
(Birch Island), No. 27 (Williams Lake), No. 47 (Powell River), and No. 76
(Agassiz). In addition, kindergarten classes in Vancouver and Victoria were visited
and reported upon. As in previous years, this Branch inspected and wrote reports
on teachers in the Jericho Hill School. DIVISION OF CURRICULUM Z 43
DIVISION OF CURRICULUM
REPORT OF J. R. MEREDITH, B.A., B.Ed., DIRECTOR
Curriculum development during the past year has been concerned with three
types of work. The first of these is the appraisal or evaluative studies begun last
year in the fields of arithmetic, secondary mathematics, and reading. The results
or findings from these studies have established both the need and the direction of
a major revision in the arithmetic-mathematics curriculum and have indicated specific
aspects of reading in which curriculum improvement can be made. It may be noted
that in all three cases these programmes have certain excellent features. The need
for change results largely from developments which have occurred since they were
last revised some ten or more years ago.
The second type of study is the actual course revisions carried on in the fields
of English, history, health and personal development, and physical education. The
first two of these, which were primarily designed to increase the scope and significance of the senior elective courses, were completed for September, 1959. The
last two present more complex problems, and it is expected that the revisions will
take some time to complete.
The third type of study concerns experimental work. The Division of Curriculum has continued the experimental project in beginning the teaching of French at
the elementary-school level in selected schools. This is now in its third year.
A programme has been developed which, for the majority of pupils, has proved
satisfactory for the purposes of teaching an elementary knowledge of speaking,
reading, and writing the French language. The question of whether or not it is
desirable to provide this teaching for all pupils in all schools has not yet been decided.
The Division has also been concerned with developing an experimental course
in advanced mathematics for senior high-school students. In recent years, major
developments have been taking place in the field of mathematics, and it is felt that
some immediate steps should be taken to incorporate certain modern mathematical
theories and concepts into a course specifically for those intending to proceed to
further work in mathematics and the sciences.
Finally, mention should be made of the experimental work in curriculum being
initiated by local schools and school districts. Reports of many of these projects
indicate that local education authorities are pioneering significant developments in
curriculum improvement. There are reports of special courses for gifted pupils,
such as those in Burnaby, Vancouver, Trail, Penticton, and West Vancouver;
courses to meet community needs, such as those at Alberni and Prince George;
modified courses and special programmes in reading, handwriting, and science, such
as those in Dawson Creek, the Fraser Valley, and Victoria. These are but a few
examples of local initiative in action. They serve to show that curriculum is not
so rigidly centralized as some have assumed it to be.
Reports of these developments also serve to emphasize that curriculum improvement is a complex and technical process. It cannot be accomplished merely through
changing text-books, courses, and regulations by a central authority. Such procedures may have the appeal to those who attach great importance to standardization, to uniformity and ease of administration, but they lead to stereotyped teaching
and learning and they place significant limitations on future progress. On the other
hand, curriculum improvement cannot be entirely decentralized to become a
" spare time " activity of local groups. This may have the appeal to those who feel
that the individual teacher should be completely free to determine his own curricu- Z 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
lum, but it can lead to serious inefficiency, inequalities, and confusion of standards,
all of which have unfortunate consequences for the public and pupil alike. Fundamentally, curriculum improvement is a continuing process of determining educational values and devising ways and means of securing these for all pupils in every
classroom. As such, it needs the best advice obtainable, both centrally and locally,
and it requires the people, the facilities, and the resources necessary to put this
advice into practice. Thus conceived, curriculum development becomes increasingly important as a shared responsibility, the concern of everyone interested in the
improvement of education throughout the Province.
Acknowledgment
As has been noted, curriculum development work in this Province could be
regarded as a shared responsibility. During the year under review there were fourteen Curriculum Committees actively engaged in specific curriculum development
work. They had a combined total membership of 126 people. These included
lay members, University and College of Education personnel, principals, supervisors, and classroom teachers. Curriculum Division staff work with these Committees, attending as many meetings as possible. Travelling expenses and a token
honorarium are paid by the Department. A typical Committee works through a
series of two- or three-hour meetings held at least once a month or more frequently
if the work requires it. It is common practice for these Committees to invite
opinions and suggestions from other groups and individuals throughout the Province.
Results of their work are prepared in the Department for approval and distribution
to all schools.    Rarely has this approval been withheld.
Grateful acknowledgment is given herewith to all those who have contributed
their time and professional advice to the improvement of the curriculum.
Provincial Curriculum Advisory Board
This Board held four regular meetings during the year to consider reports on
curriculum developments and advise on curriculum policy. Acknowledgment is
made herewith of the very helpful advice and significant recommendations given by
the members of this Board during the year.
Curriculum Development
Specific curriculum development work was undertaken throughout the year as
follows:—
A. Elementary Schools
1. Arithmetic.—An appraisal of the programme and text-books for Grades III
to VI was completed.
2. Reading.—An appraisal of the reading programme for elementary schools
was completed.
3. Science.—A total of ten text-books were studied and a new text was selected
and prescribed for Grade VI.
4. Social Studies.—A study of suitable texts for Grades IV to VI was begun.
5. Elementary French.—This experimental project was continued for the third
year and expanded to include classes in Grades V to VII in selected schools.
A course for Grade VII was developed, tried out, and revised.
6. Library.—A total of 269 books submitted during the year were reviewed,
and 185 were recommended, classified, and included in the quarterly lists of
approved books for school libraries. DIVISION OF CURRICULUM
Z 45
B. Secondary Schools
1. English.—Revision of the Grade XIII literature course was completed.
A total of thirty-nine books were studied, and four were selected as prescribed texts
for this course.
2. Social Studies.—The senior elective course in modern world history was
revised. A total of over fifteen books were reviewed, and two were selected as
prescribed texts for this course. A study of suitable atlases was begun for the senior
elective geography course.
3. Mathematics.—An appraisal of the courses and texts in mathematics for
Grades IX to XII was completed. Plans were made for undertaking some experimental work in the senior elective course with selected classes of students.
4. Health and Personal Development.—Revisions in these programmes were
continued.
5. Home Economics.—A total of twenty-eight books were studied, and two
were selected as prescribed texts for the basic Grade XI-XII course.
6. Library.—A total of 229 books were reviewed, and 162 were recommended,
classified, and included in the quarterly lists of approved library books for secondary-
school libraries.
7. Commerce.—A study of basic equipment facilities required for commerce
courses was begun.
8. Bible Readings and Bible Literature.—A revision of the prescribed Bible
readings and Bible literature courses was begun.
C. Selection of New Text-books
The following new text-books were authorized for use in the public schools:
1. Science, Grade VI: Experimenting in Science (Ginn).
2. Commerce 33, 43:  Retail Marketing and Merchandising (Gage).
3. English 100:
Antigone (Nelson).
St. Joan (Longmans).
A Little Treasury of Modern Poetry (Scribners).
Masters of the Modern Short Story (Gage).
4. Home Economics 30:
Nutrition for Today (McClelland & Stewart).
Experiences with Foods (Ginn).
5. History 91:
The Later Modern World (Clarke, Irwin).
The Twentieth Century and the Contemporary World (Clarke, Irwin). Z 46 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. S. WHITE, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL
EDUCATION, AND REGIONAL DIRECTOR FOR CANADIAN VOCATIONAL TRAINING.
Due to the constantly and rapidly increasing need for the many types of vocational training, this Branch experienced its busiest year to date.
The growth in this field of education has necessitated the appointment of an
Assistant Director, Mr. T. A. Quayle, and all offices, office procedures, and related
work have now been integrated under the direction of a chief clerk.
During the year the Provincial Government authorized a survey over the
whole of the Province to " determine the needs of vocational and advanced technological training in British Columbia." This was arranged in conjunction with the
Federal Government, which appointed Mr. D. E. Bridge to undertake such a survey
in co-operation with Mr. J. S. White, the Provincial Director. The results are now
being prepared prior to being submitted to the Royal Commission on Education.
For the first time since Provincial vocational schools were established, a
system of payment of fees was introduced for those trainees able to meet such costs.
During the period April 1st, 1958, to June 30th, 1959, a total of $28,441 was
received from this source.
Almost all of our training is provided under the Vocational Technical Training
Agreement No. 2, together with a new agreement entitled " Special Vocational
Training Projects Agreement," effective for a period commencing April 1st, 1959,
to March 31st, 1964, and which replaces the Vocational Training Agreement
previously in effect from April 1st, 1954. The following details briefly outline
the type of training provided under this new agreement with the Federal participation
shown as percentages: — per cent
Schedule C—Vocational Correspondence Courses     50
Schedule G—Training for Federal Government Departments  100
Schedule H—Assistance to Students     50
Schedule K—Training of Service Tradesmen  100
Schedule M—Training of Unemployed      50
Schedule P—Training in Primary Industries      50
Schedule Q—Training of Foremen and Supervisors     50
Schedule R—Training of Disabled Persons     50
Schedule H refers to students at universities, institutes of technology, and
nurses-in-training, whilst Schedule P embraces agriculture, forestry, fishing, mining,
and homemaking.
This year under the Vocational Technical Training Agreement No. 2, the
Federal Government shared 50 per cent of operational costs up to a total Federal
contribution of $190,600 plus an amount of approximately $360,000 as its share
of capital costs. Contracts were awarded for the completion of the first eight buildings of the new Trades and Technical Institute at Burnaby, and it is expected that
the school will be operational by the end of 1959. On completion of the first stage,
this school will have cost some $1,400,000, with $500,000 additional for equipment, financed equally by both Governments. In spite of these facilities and even
before they are completed, it will be necessary to rent space to meet present needs.
During the current year all classes continued to operate in temporary quarters in INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
Z 47
the Pacific National Exhibition grounds at Hastings Park, and considerable impro-
vization was necessary to avoid loss of training time, and it is hoped that such
arrangements will not have to be repeated.
Both the Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training School at Nanaimo and
the Vancouver Vocational Institute continued to operate at full capacity, and
details of training at these two schools, together with the Federal-Provincial Trades
and Technical Institute, and various other courses are provided later in this report.
The bulldozer operators' course at Nanaimo completed eleven different community
projects and deservedly earned the appreciation of the severally interested groups
within that area.
The Vancouver Vocational Institute, operated by the Vancouver School Board
and strongly supported financially by the Provincial Government, works in close
co-operation with the Technical Branch, and manv students undergoing training are
sponsored through Schedules M and R. In addition to this, courses in practical
nursing and power sewing are provided by the institute on behalf of the Department.
Vocational Curriculum Development
This section of the Branch has had an unusually busy year and has produced
much-needed and excellent courses of study.
Apprentice programmes have been prepared for courses in bricklaying, electricity, painting and decorating, plastering, plumbing, and steel erection, whilst
revisions were made in carpentry, metal lathing, and sheet metal. For pre-appren-
ticeship and pre-employment training, courses of study in boat-building, electronics,
electricity, and plastering were set up, in addition to tentative courses in welding,
industrial refrigeration, and aeronautics mechanics.
This division has produced many thousands of copies of prospectuses for the
three vocational schools and a series of examination papers in automotive mechanics which, with the exception of the Province of Quebec, were accepted across
Canada. The purchase of books for all our vocational training has been centralized
within the Curriculum Development Division, and libraries are in the process of
being established.
Private Schools (Vocational)
An important feature of vocational training is the use made of private schools
throughout the Province. There is a constant demand for entry into varying types of
vocational training offered in certain approved schools, and the Selection Committee
on Training directs suitable applicants for different periods of training up to a maximum of one year and provides financial assistance for such trainees.
Advisory Committees
The provision of the correct type of training necessitates advisory committee
work on a wide scale so as to ensure that all interested and closely connected sources
are given an opportunity to contribute toward efficient programmes by the use of
their specialized knowledge.
Vocational Training in Senior High Schools
This aspect of vocational training for Grades X, XI, and XII students is included in the Federal-Provincial Training Agreement, and during this year no less
than fifty high schools were involved in such training. Z 48
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
Supervisory Training
This division was widely used by public and private companies, associations,
institutions, and government departments. Training is conducted at the Department's Vancouver premises and in some instances in the establishments of private
concerns.   Enrolment data are included later in this report.
Vocational Night-schools
Some sixty separate schools were approved as centres of night-school vocational training throughout the Province {see student enrolments for further details).
Vocational-teacher Training
The training of vocational industrial teachers is the responsibility of the Technical Branch of the Department of Education, with the Federal and Provincial
Governments sharing the costs equally.
With the exception of a six-week summer session for the training of vocational
teachers at the University of Toronto, all vocational-teacher training is in-service
training. During the past year thirteen instructors attended the University of
Toronto, and thirteen in-service courses were offered in the Lower Mainland area.
A total of fifty-six vocational instructors participated in one or more of the in-
service courses.
Excluding those teachers engaged in vocational work in the senior high schools
of the Province, approximately 100 vocational teachers were engaged on a temporary basis to accommodate short-term day classes for apprentices.
Student Enrolments
Federal-Provincial Trades and Technical Institute
day-school
Course
Enrolment
Pre-
employment
Pre-
apprentlce
Apprentice
Total
Aeronautics.—
Boat-building-
Bricklaying	
Carpentry	
Electrical	
Electronics	
Lathing	
Painting	
Plastering.-
Plumbing and steam-fitting..
Sheet metal	
Steel erection 	
Welding and testing... 	
Blue-print reading	
Steel layout  	
Totals	
33
1
16
3
6
454
13
17
547
14
12
14
15
26
14
19
16
26
8
164
18
57
110
8
16
37
53
37
36
25
20
417
33
15
18
72
125
23
42
37
67
72
55
57
482
13
17
1,128 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION Z 49
Student Enrolments—Continued
Federal-Provincial Trades and Technical Institute—Continued
night-school
Course
Enrolment
Apprentices
Trade
Extension
Technicians
Total
Boat-building._
Carpentry	
Mathematics ..
Plumbing..
Sheet metal	
Sprinkler fitting..
Steam-fitting..
Transit and leveL.
Welding	
Rigging
Telecommunication..
Totals-
30
430
56
349
252
26
199
66
5
1,413
16
86
15
128
117
128
46
430
56
349
252
26
199
66
91
15
128
1,658
Federal-Provincial Vocational Training School, Nanaimo
Course
Automotive—
Pre-apprentice (ten months)	
Pre-employment (ten months) 	
Apprentice (one month)	
Heavy-duty mechanics, diesel—
Pre-apprentice (ten months)	
Pre-employment (ten months) 	
Bulldozing—Pre-employment (two months) 	
Welding—
General	
Up-grading
Enrolment
._ 18
_ 7
._    68
  46
  20
  43
  12
  49
Pipe-line (trained and certificated) _   83
Total.
346
Vancouver Vocational Institute
Day-school—
Number of courses 	
Number enrolled	
Completed training
        23
  2,143
  1,102
Still on course      610
Night-school—
Number of courses      203
Number enrolled  4,623 Z 50
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
Student Enrolments—Continued
High Schools
1957/58
1958/59
Day
Night
Day
Night
4,527
2,607
55
4,061
6,987
70
5,880
2,966
101
4,304
Industrial  _ _	
Agriculture           . ~ ~
6,344
89
Schedule O
Sub-schedule   D — Rural   Occupational   Training,   University   of   British
Columbia:— Enrolment
Agriculture  18
Fisheries  10
Forestry    15
Homemaking  12
Total  5 5
Sub-schedule C—Urban Occupational Training  (at Vancouver Vocational
Institute in co-operation with Vancouver School Board):  Enrolment, 60.
Private Schools
Number of students sponsored through Schedules M and R for vocational
training, 178.
Schedules M and R
Approved for vocational training under Schedule M—
Male	
Female 	
451
289
Approved for vocational training under Schedule R—
Male     45
Female      22
Total
740
67
807
Schedule Q—Supervisory Training in Industry
10-hr.
Programme
J.I.T. (job instruction training)   451
J.R.T. (job relation training)   89
J.M.T. (job method training)   63
J.S.T. (job safety training)   27
Totals	
Appreciation and follow-up sessions, 20.
630
40-hr.
Programme
201
35
33
269 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
Student Enrolments—Continued
Sundry Courses
Classes
Automotive air brake1     6
Appraisal2      3
Transit and level     1
Z 51
1 In co-operation with the Railway Department.
2 In co-operation with the Civil Service Commission.
Graduates
117
78
25
Industrial Arts
During the year new accommodation and expanded facilities to teach Industrial
Arts were provided in Burnaby, Cowichan, Mission, Prince George, Peace River
North, Powell River, Penticton, Quesnel, Revelstoke, Richmond, Surrey, Vancouver, and West Vancouver.
Forty-five new Industrial Arts teachers were required to staff the new accommodation and to replace teachers leaving the profession. Since the Industrial Arts
teacher training programme was not able to train sufficient teachers to meet the need,
six untrained teachers were employed during the year. Indications are that this
trend will continue unless expanded accommodation and facilities are provided to
train more Industrial Arts teachers.
The total number of Industrial Arts teachers, now 417, continues to show a
steady growth. The total number of pupils participating in the Industrial Arts programme in the schools of British Columbia is as follows: Junior high schools,
29,199; senior high schools, 14,043.
Industral Arts Teacher Training
The Technical Branch of the Department of Education continues to operate
a day emergency Industrial Arts teacher training programme for the College of
Education of the University of British Columbia. The technical portion of this
programme is conducted at the Vancouver Vocational Institute, while the professional courses are given on the University campus in the evenings. Students admitted to the emergency programme September 1st, 1958, numbered thirty-seven,
and students completing the emergency programme June 30th, 1959, thirty-two.
Those students completing the emergency programme attend subsequent summer sessions to complete Bachelor of Education degree requirements.
The Technical Branch also continues to supervise the operation of the summer
sessions for the technical training of Industrial Arts teachers for the College of
Education.
A total of 167 Industrial Arts teachers participated in the 1958 summer session conducted at the Vancouver Technical School through the kind co-operation of
the Vancouver Board of School Trustees. In addition to those Industrial Arts
teachers attending the Vancouver Technical School, many participated in the professional and academic courses on the University campus.
High School Correspondence
(Report prepared by Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L., Director.)
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Division during the
year 1958/59 was 17,887. This figure shows an increase of 3,460 or 24.0 per cent
over 1957/58. Of this enrolment, 10,632 were of school age (under 19 years)
and 7,255 were adults.    Thus 40.5 per cent of our students can be classified as Z 52 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
adults. (This figure is lower than that of 1957/58 because at that time 18-year-
olds were classed as adults, whereas they are now classed as school age.)
Of the adult students, approximately 80 per cent or 5,800 were employed.
Those not employed were mainly in correctional institutions, in hospitals or ill at
home, on social assistance, or registered in schools.
Many adult students were completing their University Entrance requirements
on the interrupted programme (928 students) or on the ex-service programme (165
students). COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
Z 53
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
REPORT OF J. H. PANTON, B.A., M.Sc, DIRECTOR
The Community Programmes Branch has gone through a period of continued
expansion during the past year. Increased requests for services, new staff appointments, and a Province-wide increase in community recreation interest have presented the Branch with a greater challenge than ever before.
Although the intense interest in Centennial activities resulted in many communities devoting most of their time to this work, the number of Commissions
continued to rise, and numbered 266 at the end of March, 1959. The steady
increase in Commissions is indicated as follows: 1954,86; 1955,140; 1956,183;
1957,216; 1958,250; 1959,266.
The termination of Centennial activities has opened the door to increased
development of community recreation; this is due to some extent because of the
large number of recreation facilities built in British Columbia as Centennial projects.
The use of these facilities will ensure future expansion of recreation programmes in
British Columbia.
Services extended to Recreation Commissions by the Community Programmes
Branch are:—
(1) Advice to public agencies and individuals on recreational matters by a
staff of regional Recreation Consultants.
(2) Aid in recreation to the blind through White Cane Clubs organized by
staff member Mr. Joseph Lewis.
(3) Large and comprehensive library of books, booklets, films, and filmstrips
on innumerable recreation topics.
(4) Drama library and materials.
(5) Leadership training through workshops, conferences, clinics, regional
schools, and an annual recreation summer school.
(6) Night-school grants for regularly organized night-school classes.
(7) Regular grants to Recreation Commissions to assist communities with
paid recreation help and expenses.
(8) Special grants to those Recreation Commissions who conduct summer
swimming and playground programmes.
The following is a list of the Recreation Commissions in British Columbia with
the amount each one is receiving as a grant-in-aid:—
* Receiving grants for directors' salaries.
t Receiving grants for recreation expenses.
Recreation Commission
tAbbotsford 	
Annual
Grant
    $300.00
Recreation Commission
tBoswell          	
Annual
Grant
$300.00
tAinsworth  ________ ___.
      180.00
tBouchie Lake  	
180.00
*Alert Bay	
      600.00
tBowen Island 	
      240.00
tAlexandria     300.00
tArgenta-Johnsons Landing   300.00
tArmstrong  300.00
tArrowhead-Sidmouth  180.00
tArrow Park   240.00
Barnston Island  No grant
tBear Creek   240.00
tBeaver Creek   300.00
tBlack Creek   240.00
tBlue River  144.00
tBonnington-Corra Linn  240.00
tBoston Bar   300.00
*Bralorne    600.00
tBridesville   240.00
tBritannia Beach   240.00
tBrocklehurst   300.00
*Burnaby Parks  1,500.00
tBurton   240.00
♦Campbell River   600.00
tCanal Flats  300.00
fCanoe   240.00
tCanyon   240.00
tCawston   240.00
tCedar  300.00 Z 54
Recreation Commission
Celista	
Annual
Grant
.. - No grant
fCentral Saanich ...     __
     $300.00
tChase   _ _  _.
      300.00
tChehalis Crossing _   	
300.00
tChehalis Reserve  	
      240.00
tCherry Creek ... 	
300.00
tChristina Lake .__ _ _
300.00
tConnaught Heights	
tCoombs -  - 	
*Coquitlam      _     	
      240.00
      240.00
      600.00
* Courtenay	
*Cranbrook 	
tCrawford Bay __ _ _ .
      900.00
      600.00
..    .        300.00
tCrescent Valley _.. 	
      240.00
* Creston	
tDecker Lake  __ _   .
_     780.00
180.00
tDeep Cove 	
tDelta 	
      300.00
      300.00
tDeroche ..   .. __ 	
      240.00
tDewdney _.__   _. ...    _. ... __
      300.00
tDistrict of Matsqui    ■ ....
      300.00
tDistrict of Mission  ..
      300.00
tDragon Lake  	
      300.00
tEagle Valley   	
      240.00
tEast Kelowna   _— _
      240.00
tEdgewater         _ - 	
300.00
tElko 	
      180.00
tEmerald Mines _—     . _
      180.00
tFerndale _             _
      300.00
tField    . .    	
      300.00
tForest Grove .    __ 	
      240.00
      300.00
Fort St. John	
 No grant
tFrancois Lake     _.
      240.00
tFranklin River     _
      240.00
tFraser Lake	
      240.00
tFruitvale     • 	
      240.00
tGabriola Island        	
240.00
tGalloway       	
      300.00
      240.00
tGibsons 	
      300.00
*Giscome	
tGlenmore  	
tGlenora      _ _ _.
      300.00
      240.00
      240.00
tGolden        	
      300.00
tGrand Forks     - _
.     300.00
tGray Creek         _
      240.00
tGreat Central 	
      300.00
tGreenwood       _
      300.00
tGrindrod    .     __   _.
      300.00
tGroundbirch 	
tHa'da-Masset _—      _
      240.00
      240.00
tHalfmoon Bay    .   -
300.00
tHarrison Hot Springs	
tHarrop and District	
      300.00
      240.00
tHatzic Prairie    .   _
180.00
tHazelton	
tHedley   	
      300.00
      240.00
tHixon	
tHope „  	
tHorsefly _         .
      240.00
      300.00
      300.00
t Houston 	
tlnonoaklin 	
flnvermere                _.
      300.00
240 no
.      300.00
tloco               -  -  _-   - -  - -
. ..     300.00
tlordan River .   	
300.00
tKaleden .      	
300.00
tKaslo    .
3nn.no
tKelowna   ... _ _ __	
      300.00
tKeremeos ...    ..
      240.00
tKersley	
      180.00
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
Recreation Commission
tKettle Valley
*Kimberley ...
t Kingfisher .
tKitwanga Valley
tKootenay Bay __.
tKyuquot	
tLac la Hache .	
tLa France	
Laidlaw 	
tLakeview Heights
tLangford 	
tLangley 	
tLantzville	
tLardeau District .
tLavington	
tLillooet   	
tLister	
tLittle Fort	
tLone Butte	
tLumby	
tLund 	
tLytton
tMcConnell Creek
tMahood Falls	
tMalaspina 	
tMara 	
f Marysville 	
tMerritt	
tMetchosin —
tMidway 	
tMinto	
t Moose Heights
tMud River...
tNakusp
*Nanaimo Civic Properties
tNanoose	
tNaramata 	
tNarcosli Creek	
tNatal 	
*Nelson 	
tNew Hazelton	
tNew Masset 	
*New Westminster ...
tNicomen Island	
tNoralee - Clemretta ■
tNorth Bend	
*North Cowichan	
tNorthfield	
tNorth Kamloops	
tNorth Shore (Nelson)
*North Vancouver _
tOak Bay
t Okanagan Centre _
tOkanagan Falls —
tOkanagan Mission
tOliver	
tlOO Mile House ...
tl50 Mile House ...
tOsoyoos	
tOyama	
tPallmg	
tParksville _.
tPeachland
tPemberton and District
tPendleton Bay	
tPender Harbour	
*Pent-'cton 	
Pitt Meadows 	
tPopkum 	
tPort Clements	
tPort Coquitlam	
Annual
Grant
  $240.00
  900.00
..... 240.00
  240.00
  240.00
  240.00
  180.00
  240.00
  No grant
  240.00
  300.00
..... 300.00
  240.00
  240.00
  300.00
-- 240.00
  240.00
.-- 240.00
  180.00
_.. 300.00
..... 240.00
  240.00
  240.00
  180.00
  300.00
  240.00
  300.00
  300.00
--. 300.00
  300.00
..... 240.00
  180.00
..... 180.00
  300.00
  900.00
  300.00
  180.00
  180.00
  300.00
  900.00
  180.00
  180.00
  1,200.00
  300.00
Colleymount 240.00
  240.00
  696.00
  240.00
  300.00
.  240.00
..... 600.00
—- 300.00
  120.00
..... 240.00
.  240.00
.  300.00
  180.00
..- 240.00
..... 300.00
..... 240.00
...... 240 00
...... 300.00
  180.00
...... 300.00
..... 180.00
..... 300.00
._-_ 300.00
 No grant
.  300.00
...... 216.00
..... 300.00 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
Z 55
Annual
Recreation Commission Grant
tPort McNeill  $240.00
tPort Mellon  300.00
tPort Moody  300.00
tPouce Coupe  300.00
Powell River No grant
*Prince George  600.00
*Prince Rupert  900.00
tProcter  240.00
tProgress  240.00
tQuadra   300.00
tQualicum Beach  300.00
tQueen Charlotte  180.00
tQuesnel  300.00
tRed Bluff  240.00
tRedwell   240.00
tRevelstoke  300.00
♦Richmond  1,200.00
tRiondel   300.00
tRiske Creek  180.00
tRiverside   240.00
tRoberts Creek  300.00
tRobson   240.00
tRock Creek  240.00
tRoe Lake    300.00
tRose Lake   240.00
tRound Lake  240.00
tRutland   240.00
tSalmo   300.00
tSalmon Arm     300.00
fSandspit  180.00
tSavona District  300.00
tSayward  300.00
tSechelt  300.00
t70 Mile and Watch Lake  180.00
tShalalth   180.00
tShawnigan Lake  300.00
tSidney   300.00
Silverton No grant
tSkidegate Mission  240.00
tSlocan    300.00
tSmithers  300.00
tSoda Creek  240.00
tSooke  300.00
tSouthbank   300.00
tSouthern Cortes  300.00
tSouth Hazelton   240.00
tSouth Kelowna  180.00
Annual
Recreation Commission Grant
tSouth Saltspring Island   $300.00
tSouth Slocan  180.00
tSouth Taylor  180.00
tSpences Bridge  180.00
tSquamish  300.00
Squamish Indian Band  No grant
tStraiton   300.00
tSumas Municipality   300.00
tSummerland   300.00
tSunnybrae   180.00
tSunrise-Two Rivers  180.00
tTahsis   300.00
tTappen  180.00
tTarrys and District  300.00
tTatla Lake  300.00
tTatlayoko Lake  120.00
tTchesinkut Lake  300.00
  240.00
  300.00
  240.00
 No grant
  900.00
  300.00
  No grant
  240.00
tTelkwa
t Terrace	
tTopley	
Tofino	
*Trail-Tadanac
tUcluelet.
University Area	
tValemount 	
♦Vancouver Board of Parks  2,700.00
tVernon  300.00
tVillage of Mission   240.00
tWardner   300.00
tWarfleld  300.00
tWestbank   240.00
tWest Bench  240.00
tWestbridge   240.00
tWest Creston   180.00
tWhaletown Community  240.00
tWhite Lake   180.00
tWillow Point   300.00
tWillow River  240.00
tWilson Creek   300.00
tWindermere   300.00
tWinfield  216.00
tWinlaw  240.00
tWistaria
tWynndel
tYale	
tYmir ,_.
tZeballos _
180.00
300.00
180.00
300.00
300.00
Three hundred and forty-four projects were completed to commemorate the
British Columbia Centennial in 1958. It is most significant to note that 249 of these
projects were undertaken to provide better facilities for recreation. This is indicative
of the growing interest in community recreation in British Columbia to-day.
Recreation facilities built as Centennial projects were:—
Type Number
Community halls  94
Park development  57
Sports grounds  23
Playground equipment  9
Swimming and wading pools  13
Bleachers and grandstands  7
Improvements to arenas  8
Senior citizens' homes  5
Curling-rinks   5 Z 56
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
Type Number
Ice and roller rinks  5
Tennis-courts   3
Ski lift  1
Bowling-green  .  1
Purchase of land for playgrounds  18
Total   249
Many of these projects were built as the result of advice and suggestions by the
Community Programmes Branch staff of Recreation Consultants.
Staff
In August, reorganization in the Department of Education placed the Community Programmes Branch under the jurisdiction of Mr. Wallace with a new Director in charge of the Branch work. The appointment of Mr. Wallace to the post of
Deputy Provincial Secretary resulted in the Community Programmes Branch becoming directly responsible to the Deputy Minister of Education and Night-schools
became part of Community Programmes. The death of Mr. J. Mathisen, the resignation of Mr. R. Stangroom, and the appointment of Mr. J. H. Panton to the position
of Director necessitated three appointments to the Consultant staff. Mr. D. M.
McCooey, Mr. J. R. McKeen, and Mr. W. C. Patrick were placed in the North,
West Kootenay, and Vancouver regions respectively. Mr. K. K. Maltman transferred to the Okanagan. The Victoria office staff underwent a complete change of
personnel through the year.
Mr. G. Pynn was granted leave of absence from January 1st, 1959, to June
15th, 1959. During this time he completed his Bachelor of Science degree in education at Oregon State College.
The consultative staff and their regions are as follows:—
Consultant
G. J. Pynn	
J. B. Ostrom	
W. C. Patricks	
D. M. McCooey	
K. K. Maltman. 	
W. Mayers.	
T. Ruben 	
J. R. McKeen	
J. Lewis  	
Miss Anne Adamson..
Headquarters
Victoria	
Cranbrook...
Vancouver...
Quesnel.—	
Kelowna	
Kamloops —
Abbotsford.
Nelson 	
Vancouver..
Victoria	
Region
Vancouver Island.
East Kootenay.
Greater Vancouver and District.
Northern British Columbia.
Okanagan.
Central British Columbia.
Fraser Valley.
West Kootenay.
Instructor of Handicapped.
Drama Adviser.
Leadership
The Summer Leadership Training School was discontinued because of Centennial work.
Nine regional conferences were held during the past year; total attendance
was 260. These conferences are for community leaders in recreation and are
organized on an annual basis throughout the Province.
Two annual playground clinics in the Okanagan and Kootenays serve all the
Kootenays and the Okanagan-Central British Columbia area. A total of sixty-five
playground leaders attended.
Forty-one regional clinics, workshops, and institutes held throughout the
Province were attended by 2,420 people. The clinics are on the request basis and
touch all phases of recreation work. COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH Z 57
One annual leadership school was held at Kitimat, with an attendance of thirty.
Regional leadership schools are a new development, designed to make training
programmes available to more people without loss of time from work. Three of
these are scheduled for 1959/60, and indications are that they will become very
important in the future.
Special aid for swimming and playground activities was as follows: Number of
communities, 53; total cost, $3,285; number attending, 529,001. (One individual
is marked for attendance several times; for instance, total attendances in Nanaimo
programme were 40,548.)
The demands for leadership aids are increasing faster than the Community
Programmes Branch is able to meet them. This is an extremely important phase
of recreation service to communities.
British Columbia Recreation Association
The second annual convention of the British Columbia Recreation Association
was held on May 8th and 9th, 1959, in Vancouver. The sessions discussed many
aspects of recreation and provided invaluable information for the 110 delegates in
attendance.
A feature of this convention was the interest evidenced in recreation by many
communities; this resulted in the submission of many resolutions designed to
improve public recreation in British Columbia.
Mr. R. Gould, of Trail, was elected new president, and the third annual
convention will be held in Trail in 1960.
Requests for Library Services
Films sent to communities amounted to 701, and books and booklets, 11,000.
Communities received free pamphlets and mimeographed material, for which
no record is kept. Besides the above there are innumerable requests for information
concerning many aspects of recreation.
Trail Survey
Under the direction of Mr. J. B. Ostrom, Recreation Consultant for East
Kootenay, Mr. R. McKeen, West Kootenay Consultant, and Mr. Ostrom conducted
a recreation survey of the City of Trail. This project took some four months of
work and was undertaken by the Community Programmes Branch as an experiment
in cost and procedure. When completed, the City of Trail will study the recommendations and be guided by them in the organization of the future recreation
structure in the community.
The experience of the survey will provide the Community Programmes Branch
with a knowledge of procedure and costs, which will be invaluable as a guide for
future work in this field.
Regional Changes
The Central British Columbia region has been extended northward to Williams
Lake and west from Williams Lake to Bella Coola, which includes all the Chilcotin
area. This has been done to make it easier for the Northern Consultant to provide
sendee to the communities in that area.
Drama
This division of Community Programmes, under the direction of Miss Anne
Adamson, continues at an almost unprecedented growth.   Excluding school drama Z 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
clubs, there were 250 active community drama groups, comprising approximately
7,500 individuals.   Twenty-eight drama festivals were held throughout the Province.
The British Columbia one-act drama festival finals, held in Trail, terminated
a series of festivals throughout the Province which were of better than average
standard, and in most communities where the festivals were held they played to
capacity houses.
The finals in Trail were very successful. Top honours were won by the Lake
Cowichan Drama Club with " The Disguises of Arlecchino."
At the annual meeting of the British Columbia Drama Association, held in
Trail, May 30th, Mr. Franklin Johnson, of White Rock, was installed as president
for 1959/60. Mr. Johnson is an outstanding personality in this work in British
Columbia and will bring great understanding and enthusiasm to this office.
The Community Programmes Branch is fortunate in having highly qualified
and enthusiastic persons co-operating with it to further dramatic activities in the
Province. These individuals act as adjudicators at the many festivals and conduct
clinics, classes, and workshops throughout the Province to further drama. The
Extension Department of the University of British Columbia co-operates with this
Branch in this most important aspect of drama development.
Drama services available from the Community Programmes Branch include:—
(1) Advisory services are made available to communities on all aspects of
drama development.
(2) Assistance is provided in training local leaders in the skills and techniques
of the theatre.
(3) A drama library service is maintained to lend technical books or plays
to persons or community drama groups. These materials are listed in
the drama catalogue, which is available to all groups.
(4) A limited supply of stage equipment is available for loan.
(5) Grants are provided to assist local and school groups in the staging of
various festivals. NIGHT-SCHOOLS
Z 59
NIGHT-SCHOOLS
REPORT OF J. H. PANTON, B.A., M.Sc, DIRECTOR
The night-school programme operated by local School Boards continued to
grow in course content and participation. The programme now reaches into many
communities in British Columbia and offers such an interesting and varied list of
activities that it appeals to a very representative cross-section of society.
Courses offered are of two types, namely:—
(1) Vocational, technical, or industrial courses operating under Dominion-
Provincial agreements. These courses include such subjects as Typing,
Book-keeping, Engineering, Mechanics, Commercial Art, Carpentry, or
any subject an individual takes to increase his ability in this vocation.
(2) Cultural, recreational, or academic courses which fall into the general
field of adult education. Courses in this category include almost all
academic subjects, and all sports, hobbies, crafts, arts, and other leisure-
time pursuits.
All night-school classes which are approved by the Department of Education
receive grants on behalf of instructors' salaries. Grants are also provided for the
salaries of night-school directors or principals. Under the Dominion-Provincial
agreement additional grants are provided for instructors' salaries and equipment for
vocational courses only.
The following local School Boards conducted night-school programmes, either
vocational or non-vocational, during the academic year 1958/59:—
Alberni. Kelowna. Princeton.
Abbotsford. Keremeos. Qualicum.
Agassiz. Kimberley. Quesnel.
Alert Bay. Kitimat. Revelstoke.
Arrow Lake. Kootenay Lake. Richmond.
Burnaby. Kettle Valley. Salmon Arm.
Belmont Park. Lake Cowichan. Saanich.
Campbell River. Langley. Sechelt.
Castlegar. Lillooet. Southern Okanagan.
Chilliwack. Maple Ridge. Smithers.
Coquitlam. Mission. South Cariboo.
Courtenay. Nanaimo. Summerland.
Cowichan. Nelson. Surrey.
Cranbrook. New Westminster. Tahsis.
Creston. North Vancouver. Trail.
Delta. Ocean Falls. Vancouver.
Fernie. Peace River North. Vanderhoof.
Fraser Canyon. Peace River South. Vernon.
Grand Forks. Penticton. Victoria.
Greenwood. Powell River. West Vancouver.
Howe Sound. Prince George. Windermere.
Kamloops. Prince Rupert.
Growth in Night-school Programme
Number of Number of Number of
Year School Districts Enrollees Instructors
1953/54  49 19,969 842
1954/55  55 22,280 948
1955/56  57 29,335 1,186
1956/57  60 33,565 1,328
1957/58  62 36,611 1,401
1958/59  64 39,188 2,259
_ Z 60
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1958/59
Year
1955/56	
Vocational
Number of
Instructors
.__.     357
Number of
Enrollees
9,040
1956/57	
_ _     440
11,582
1957/58	
.___     477
11,118
1958/59	
.__.     454
12,419
Year
1955/56	
Non-vocational
Number of
Instructors
829
Number of
Enrollees
20,291
1956/57	
.___     888
21,983
1957/58	
924
25,493
28,427
1958/59	
_ 1,805
Approximately 140 different subjects were offered in the night-school programme in British Columbia. Most popular classes—that is, those which attract
the largest enrolment—are:—
Vocational—
1. Typing.
2. Carpentry.
Non-vocational—
1. Physical and Social Recreation.
2. Craft courses.
3. Homemaking.
4. Academic courses.
English for New Canadians had the highest attendance of all night-school
classes. Approximately 2,708 students attended classes in English for New Canadians.
During the year a questionnaire was forwarded to all night-school directors
asking for opinions concerning conferences of night-school directors. The replies
indicated a keen interest in both Provincial and regional meetings of this nature,
with a large majority favouring regional meetings. It was felt a Provincial conference would be helpful every three or four years.
In April of 1959 a regional conference of night-school directors was held in
Kelowna and proved very helpful to those in attendance.
Seventeen people attended the Kelowna conference, as follows: Directors, 8;
School Boards, 3; and School Superintendents, 2.
Dr. B. E. Wales, Director of Vancouver Night School, and Mr. J. S. White,
Director of Technical and Vocational Education, were guest speakers. The Community Programmes Branch was represented by Mr. J. H. Panton, Director, and
Mr. K. K. Maltman, Recreation Consultant for the Okanagan.
As a result of the Kelowna meeting, suggestions were mailed to all night-school
directors and plans are being formulated to establish more regional meetings and to
consider a Provincial meeting for the spring of 1960.
The night-school programme conducted by the various School Boards is an
ever-expanding one, intending to meet the needs and wishes of the general adult
population. The growth that is evident is a reflection on the desire of the general
adult population to either advance themselves academically and vocationally or an
awareness of the value in leisure-time and recreational pursuits. Night-school classes
serve all these functions, and the popularity of the night-school programme is because it continues to offer and expand training in vocational, academic, and recreational activities, which are essential aspects of our modern society. HOME ECONOMICS
HOME ECONOMICS
., D
344
481
Z 61
IRECTOR
25,425
31
12,025
36
49
329
REPORT OF MISS BERTHA ROGERS, B.Sc. (H.Ec.), M.A
Total number of students taking Home Economics:—
Elementary schools                     .            _..___            1,
Junior high schools                  .           .         ......   23,
In Grade VII                       11,288
In Grade VIII            .-    ...                9,645
In Grade IX                                                4,480
Boys          12
25,425
Jericho Hill School 	
Senior high schools _      __    ____     .   	
Technical students .. _   	
High-school boys	
Indian schools  _ 	
173
In elementary grades (Grades VII and VIII)    	
26
23
49
her
In senior grades                                         ..   .   _._   .
Correspondence  courses,  taken under  supervision  of teac
who is not qualified to teach senior Home Economics __.
Total, public schools              ____ 	
37,895
665
Private schools—
In elementary grades  '
In senior grades  -
Grand total     _.      ____   	
213
+52
38,560
In the public schools of the Province there are 172 Home Ec
10 in private schools, and 2 in Indian schools, making a total
This shows an increase of 8 centres over the total of last year.
Centres
One-room centre     71
Two-room centre      72
Three-room centre      29
Four-room centre                                                        —       6
onoi
of
l W£
nics centres,
184 centres.
Rooms
71
144
87
24
15
6
14
361
is opened at
Five-room centre  .       3
Six-room centre               1
Seven-room centre            2
184
During the 1958/59 session, a new Home Economics centr
Vananda, in the Texada Elementary-Senior High School. Z 62 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
New schools including Home Economics centres were opened as follows:—
Burnaby—Central Senior High School (two rooms).
Coquitlam—Winslow Junior High School (two rooms).
Penticton—Princess Margaret Junior High School (one room).
Prince George—Connaught Junior High School (two rooms).
Surrey—
Johnston Heights Junior High School (one room).
Shannon Junior High School (one room).
West Whalley Junior High School (two rooms).
Vancouver—Thompson Junior-Senior High School (four rooms).
Victoria—Oak Bay Senior High School (two rooms).
West Vancouver—Hillside Junior High School (two rooms).
Additional Home Economics rooms were included in the following schools:
Chemainus (one), Fort St. John (one), Richmond (one), Surrey—Queen Elizabeth
Senior High School (one), and Semiahmoo Junior-Senior High School (one).
At Williams Lake, the Williams Lake Junior-Senior High School was moved
to a new building.
During the 1958/59 session there were 350 teachers of Home Economics
in the schools of British Columbia, showing an increase of eleven over the total
for last year.
Again this year, an extra-sessional course in Home Economics was offered
by the University of British Columbia, and was conducted by Mrs. Doris Johnson
at New Westminster. Mrs. Johnson was formerly an instructor on the Home
Economics staff of the University of British Columbia.
Miss Mildred C. Orr, B.A. (Brit.Col.), B.S. (Oregon State), has been
appointed as Director of Home Economics, to succeed Miss Bertha Rogers, who
retired at the end of July, 1959. Miss Jean Campbell, B.Sc. (H.Ec.) (Man.), M.A.
(Columbia), has been appointed as Inspector of Home Economics. She has had
twelve years of teaching experience in the public schools of British Columbia. JERICHO HILL SCHOOL Z 63
JERICHO HILL SCHOOL
(A Special School for Aurally or Visually Handicapped Children)
REPORT OF C. E. MACDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D., SUPERINTENDENT
The enrolment for the year 1958/59 was divided as follows:—
Day
Resident
Total
29
39
68
75                  99
174
Totals   .                                                 	
104
138
242
As in previous years, three deaf classes at the intermediate level were held in
regular city schools—Lord Kitchener, Model, and Sir William Dawson. A small
group of pre-school deaf children received part-time instruction on the campus,
while valuable assistance was provided by the Canadian National Institute for the
Blind in the training of pre-school blind children. Some assistance was provided
for three blind pupils enrolled in regular public schools, and magna-type texts
were loaned to a dozen partial-sighted children of elementary grades in various
parts of the Province.
The general health of the resident pupils was particularly good during the
past year, except, of course, for the usual incidence of communicable diseases.
The Metropolitan Health Services provided excellent co-operation in the medical
and dental areas for both day and resident pupils, under the direction of Dr.
Reba Willits. The Health Centre for Children, too, rendered valuable assistance
to the School in the screening of acoustically or visually handicapped children
applying for enrolment.
General Remarks
During the summer of 1958 twenty-three students of special education at
Western Washington Teachers' College visited our school. During the summer
session of 1959 over a hundred students in special education classes at the University
of British Columbia made a similar tour.
Four resident instructors and four teachers attended summer school in 1958
at San Francisco State Teachers' College for courses in special education, while a
few more were enrolled at other centres. This year, again, ten teachers and
instructors have enrolled in special courses at the University of British Columbia
and elsewhere to advance their professional standings.
It had been deemed desirable for some time past to provide opportunity for
training of eligible blind students in piano-tuning. Through the co-operation of
the Canadian National Institute for the Blind and the Dominion-Provincial training
programme, such an opportunity was made available for one of our seniors, Peter
Schackwidt. During this past year he has successfully completed the first of a two-
year course in piano-tuning at the Piano Hospital in Vancouver, Wash., operated
by Mr. Fries.
A brief on the needs of handicapped children was prepared by a committee
under the chairmanship of Dean Neville Scarfe for presentation to the Royal Commission on Education. Dr. MacDonald completed a questionnaire with regard to
deaf and blind children, which was endorsed by the Advisory Committee. Z 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
Completion of Grade IX was established as the minimum requirement for a
deaf department graduation academic diploma. A vocational certificate may be
awarded on completion of the elementary programme of studies plus satisfactory
completion of an approved vocational course at Vocational Institute or the like.
For the past eighteen years or so the School has remained in session during
the Easter holidays and closed a week earlier in June than other schools to compensate. This year, however, for numerous reasons, our School observed the
holiday period and closing-date prescribed by the Department of Education for all
public schools of the Province.
On the recommendation of the Superintendent, the Advisory Committee
decided to again provide pre-school instruction for severely hard of hearing and
deaf 4-year-olds at Jericho Hill School. For the past several years this instruction
had been provided at the Children's Health Centre. Following the Easter vacation,
a group of seven children were given instruction two days weekly by Mrs. Hodson,
a qualified teacher of the deaf.
In concluding my report, I wish to express sincere appreciation to the Department of Education, the Advisory Committee, staff, and volunteer workers for their
sympathetic understanding and support throughout the past year. CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS Z 65
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
High School and Vocational Courses
REPORT OF EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. es L., DIRECTOR
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the
year 1958/59 was 17,887. This shows an increase of 3,460 students or 24 per cent
over 1957/58.   The following figures regarding our enrolment are of interest.
1. Age of Students
Number Per Cent
School age (under 19 years)  10,632 59.5
Adult (19 years and over)      7,255 40.5
Totals   17,887 100.0
2. Residence
Of the 17,887 students enrolled, 17,413 resided in British Columbia or the
Yukon Territory. The remaining 474 resided outside British Columbia and the
Yukon Territory. Of these 474 students, 302 were enrolled in courses covered
by the Federal-Provincial Agreement on Vocational Correspondence Courses and
were thus able to receive their courses at the rate charged to British Columbia
students.
3. Attendance at School
Many students were in attendance at a school and were at the same time taking
one or more courses by correspondence.
Number of Students Registered
Superior schools (no fee)  391
Small high schools ($5 per student)  1,665
Large high schools ($8 per course)   4,501
Private schools ($8 per course)   293
Totals  6,850
4. Reason for Taking Courses
The principal reasons for taking courses by correspondence and the number
of students stating each reason are listed below.
Remoteness from a classroom  495
Services needed at home  31
Illness  416
Social assistance recipient  67
Incarceration in a correctional institution  876
Lack of the desired course in the school attended  3,692
Time-table difficulties  1,566
Failure in school  1,751
Employed  6,978 Z 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
There were 534 school-age students who took a full grade of six subjects by
correspondence. These students were mainly those who lived too far from a high
or superior school to be able to attend, those too ill to attend school, and those in
correctional institutions.
Of the adult students, 928 were completing their University Entrance requirements under the interrupted programme and 165 were completing under the
ex-service programme.
5. Enrolment by Grade
Those students who could be called school students were classified as to grade,
as follows:  Number PerCent
Grade IX  1,413 17.0
Grade X  1,984 23.9
Grade XI  1,909 22.9
Grade XII  1,897 22.8
Grade XIII  1,122 13.4
Totals   8,325 100.0
6. Fees
Students in superior schools and hospitals, inmates of correctional institutions,
students living too far from a school to be able to attend, students needed at home,
and those in receipt of social assistance were not required to pay fees. Students
of small high schools (high schools with fewer than six teachers) were required
to pay an annual fee of $5 each. Other students paying fees were those who have
the privilege of attending a high school having six or more teachers, gainfully
employed students, students enrolled for Senior Matriculation courses, and students
living outside this Province.
7. Completion of Papers
A total of 178,246 papers were marked during the year, which is an increase
of 20,010 (12.7 per cent) over the number of papers marked in the preceding
year.   We have five-, ten-, twelve-, eighteen-, and twenty-paper courses.
8. Instructional Staff
An inside staff of four course-writers and an outside staff of seventy-six
instructors were employed during the year.
9. New and Revised Courses
The following new and revised courses were offered during the year: Auto
Mechanics 20, German 90, Homemaking 30a, Homemaking 91a, History 101, Elementary Geology and Mineralogy 29, Mathematics 10, Shorthand 31.
10. Courses
The number of students who enrolled in each of the high-school subjects during the year was as follows:—
English Literature 10, 20, 30, 40, 100  2,615
English Language 10, 20, 30, 31, 40, 101  2,699
Social Studies 10, 20, 30, 32, 33  1,797
Health and Personal Development 10, 20, 30  812
Mathematics 10, 12, 20, 30, 91, 100, 101  4,716 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
Z 67
Science 10, 20	
French 10, 20, 91, 92, 110, 120
German 10, 20, 90, 91, 92, 110 .
Latin 10, 20, 91, 92, 110, 120..
Spanish 10, 20, 91, 92, 110	
Agriculture 10, 20, 38, 39	
Art 10, 20, 39_
Homemaking 10, 20, 30, 91	
Record-keeping 11	
Typewriting 10, 20	
Mechanical Drawing 10, 20	
Bible Literature 10, 20, 30, 40
Extramural Music 11	
English and Citizenship 19, 29.
Business Fundamentals 24	
Electricity 20.
Elementary Geology 29	
Frame-house Construction 29
Sheet-metal Work 20	
Auto Mechanics 91, 92	
Shorthand 21, 31	
Book-keeping 34, 91, 95	
Economics 92	
History 91, 101, 102	
Geography 91	
English 32, 91, 93, 99	
Radio and Wireless 30	
Metal-mining 30	
Forestry 30	
Biology 91	
Chemistry 91, 101	
Physics 91, 101	
Home Furnishing 23	
Secretarial Practice 92	
Diesel Engines 91	
Law 93	
Vocational Courses
Accountancy for Credit Unions..
Air Navigation I, II	
Aviation	
Dressmaking
Electricity for the Buiding Trades
Glove-making	
House Painting and Decorating	
Industrial Mathematics	
Mathematics for Steam Engineering Second Class
Spherical Trigonometry.
Steam Engineering Fourth, Third, and Second Class
Steam Heating for Plant Operators	
Preparation for Citizenship	
1,036
1,137
554
566
373
321
646
978
788
1,691
119
89
28
608
274
227
107
80
2
641
309
633
73
558
175
134
255
9
205
289
277
350
69
28
83
122
11
24
16
24
67
2
18
133
14
15
413
342
23 Z 68
public schools report, 1958/59
English for New Canadians
During the year this division supplied 5,368 students with material from our
course in English I for New Canadians, 1,433 students were supplied with material
from the English II for New Canadians, 380 students took the course in English 19,
and 106 students took the course in English 29 by correspondence. In addition,
365 students were enrolled in the course " Preparation for Citizenship." Classes
in English were held in fifty-three night-school centres, and material was supplied
for other classes and individuals in about 100 small isolated places throughout the
Province.
Elementary Correspondence School
REPORT OF ARTHUR H. PLOWS, DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1958/59 there were 1,304 pupils enrolled in Elementary
Correspondence School. Of these, 1,210 were enrolled at Victoria and the
remainder, 94, at Pouce Coupe in the Peace River District. The tables below
show the enrolment by month and grade for each centre.
ENROLLED AT VICTORIA
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Total
1
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
September	
127
95
94
99
78
78
63
60
694
October	
163
116
114
125
90
95
80
90
873
November
177
125
117
135
100
104
80
103
941
December
186
125
122
142
102
108
83
118
986
January	
200
136
122
153
105
120
95
131
1,062
February	
208
138
126
156
107
129
102
139
1,105
218
140
134
163
110
130
103
149
1,147
1,168
April
215
145
141
162
115
130
108
152
May
214
153
143
168
117
134
108
157
1,194
June  	
208
152
148
173
120
137
110
162
1,210
ENROLLED AT POUCE COUPE (PEACE RIVER BRANCH)
September	
13
9
6
7
6
2
5
4
52
October   	
15
9
6
8
6
2
5
4
55
November	
19
10
7
8
6
2
5
4
61
December	
22
12
8
9
8
2
5
7
73
January	
23
13
11
9
9
5
6
8
84
February	
23
13
11
9
9
5
6
8
84
23
14
11
9
9
5
9
87
April	
22
15
11
9
9
7
7
9
89
May.	
23
15
11
9
9
9
8
9
93
June.         	
22
16
11
9
9
10
8
9
94
The number of papers marked in the two centres were as follows: Victoria,
138,924; Pouce Coupe, 8,849; total, 147,773.
In addition to the number of pupils and papers shown above, 296 students
were enrolled in the Adult Section and 7,011 papers marked.
Thus the services of the School were used by 1,600 individuals and 154,784
papers were marked.
As an additional service, kindergarten courses and kits were sent to seventy-
seven pre-school age children.
During the year a study was made of format of lesson material, and appropriate attractive title sheets were designed by Mr. George Sinclair, staff art instructor. CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS Z 69
The Victoria staff consisted of the Director, thirteen instructors, and a clerical
staff of five; at Pouce Coupe, one instructor in charge and one assistant.
The School suffered a great loss in the passing of Miss Mildred U. Barker, a
dedicated teacher, who had served the children of the Province for over thirty-five
years, the last thirteen of which were spent in correspondence instruction. She
was greatly loved and respected by her colleagues and her pupils. Z 70 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
REPORT OF P. G. BARR, DIRECTOR
In presenting my last, the twenty-ninth, annual report and the tenth covering
the Text-book Rental Plan, it is pleasant to look back over such an extended period
of successful growth. Well-laid plans were properly carried out, the net result of
which has been so beneficial to the parents, teachers, and students of the Province.
While I expect to be in my present position for most of the next school-year, I will
not write the report for that year, so I hope the following simple comparative statements will be of interest.
In 1931 the Text-book Branch was completely reorganized and became the
wholesale school-book dealer for the Province. While continuing to supply public
schools with free text-books, etc., we took over control of the purchase and fixed
the resale price of all B.C.-prescribed text-books. By arranging for consolidated
shipments, water transportation, and by other devious means, costs were cut and
text-books were sold throughout the Province at a common reasonable price. Prior
to reorganization, a $1 book in Victoria or Vancouver might sell for $1.50 in Atlin
or Michel, and pupils had difficulty in obtaining the proper books at the right times.
In 1932 there were 116,800 pupils in our public schools, and it cost $52,000
to supply the elementary grades with free text-books. Books to the value of
$115,000 were purchased by the Branch that year, and the total revenue was
$182,300.
This year, 1959, there were 309,000 pupils in our public and private schools
registered with us, and it cost $571,000 to supply the elementary grades with the
free text-books. Books to the value of $1,455,000 were purchased by the Branch,
and our total revenue was $1,496,000. A comparison of the above figures will
illustrate the growth of our Province and highlights the added responsibility this
growth imposes on offices whose duty it is to anticipate and cater to such conditions.
In 1949 the British Columbia Text-book Rental Plan was introduced as a
Government-subsidized scheme to enable students in a Province which maintained
a free, non-sectarian educational system to participate fully in the system without
penalty through the purchase of expensive text-books. All British Columbia students
since 1949 have, in Grades VII to XIII, been able to obtain the prescribed textbooks for a small annual rental fee, and the average subsidy over the ten-year period
has amounted to little more than the salary and wages paid to the office staff. The
average subsidy over that period, $97,000, is in fact less than half the amount to
which the Government agreed when the plan was introduced.
While the Text-book Rental Plan is not a compulsory one, all pupils are participating voluntarily. The following figures from our Rental Plan statistics should
be of interest. In 1949, 59,600 pupils in Grades VII to XIII were issued Rental
Plan books valued at $440,000. That year we collected $190,000 in rental fees,
including $9.32 for lost and wilfully damaged texts.
In 1959, 120,000 pupils in public and private schools, in Grades VII to XIII,
were issued Rental Plan books valued at $695,000 and we collected $578,000 in
rental fees, including $28,700 for lost and damaged books.
Over the ten-year period many books have been prescribed for use for the
first time in our schools; the cost of this new issue has had an average annual value
of $131,000. The average value of all books issued under the Rental Plan amounts
to $469,000 per year. TEXT-BOOK BRANCH Z 71
The overhead costs, which include salaries, outgoing transportation, etc., apportioned to the Rental Plan in 1949 were $42,000, and in 1959 they were $50,600.
This is an increase of but 20 per cent, which is almost incredible when during that
same period the pupil enrolment, with its attendant expense, work, and responsibility
on this office, increased some 200 per cent.
It is hoped that the above summary of our statistics will completely justify the
statements made in the opening paragraph of this report.
Although our building is too small, antiquated, and unsuitable, we have during
the school-year supplied the free and Rental Plan text-books, various forms, programmes of study, etc., to the schools and School Boards as and when required.
Orders for books from the various dealers throughout the Province were completed
promptly.
To purchase and distribute the free supplies during the school-year 1958/59
to public and private schools, and to corespondence students, required an expenditure of $570,643.96; 4,655 free requisitions were received and filled. This is an
increase over the previous year of $22,192.26, although the actual number of
requisitions shows a decrease of 109. The combined orders, free and saleable,
reached a total of 20,906. From these orders a total of $956,908.62 was collected
and deposited in the Treasury, an increase from the previous year of $71,474.34
and 483 orders. A total of 2,639 Rental Plan requisitions was received, checked,
and completed, and $586,412.49 in rental fees and remittances for lost and damaged
books was collected and deposited in the Treasury. This was an increase of
$152,335.90 over last year. During the year $6,607.35 was refunded to the pupils
who left the school system prior to March 31st. This represents an increase of
$1,703.15 for the year.
The proper carrying-out of all of the detail involved in the above required the
willing co-operation of an efficient staff, school officials, and particularly secretary-
treasurers of the various School Boards. For this splendid co-operation, we are
happy to officially record our thanks.
For the many courtesies we have received from dealers throughout the Province, from my friends in the Yukon, and from " all sorts and conditions of men " in
and connected with our schools, public and private, over the last thirty years, many
thanks.    I ask, and feel sure, this happy condition will be extended to my successor.
The accompanying financial statements are for the fiscal year 1958/59 and are
presented in the form required by the Audit Branch and include the tenth covering
the Text-book Rental Plan.
Stock
The stock on hand in our warehouse, $495,453.93, is valued at the publisher's
price plus incoming freight. The rental stock in the various schools, $660,973.59,
is valued on the same basis, less depreciation. No allowance is made for the costs
involved in moving the stock from the text-book warehouse to the various schools.
Sales
The sales amounted to $1,137,134.51, less a discount of $219,453.20. Our
revenue over expenditure for the fiscal year is $64,893.59 after deducting salaries
and other overhead expenses.
Rentals
We received $577,885.90 in rental fees, which is an increase of $154,953.30
or 36.64 per cent over the previous year. The increase in fee revenue is due to the
increase in rental fees charged to the students.   This is the first increase to students Z 72 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
since the plan was started ten years ago. It will be noted that the combined operations of the Branch, sales and rentals, were carried out at a total cost to the
Government of only $35,403.78.
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 3 1st, 1959
r, Sales
Revenue—
Sales  $1,137,134.51
Less discount        219,453.20
Net sales      $917,681.31
Deduct cost of sales—
Inventory,March 31st, 1958 $527,698.92
Purchases  for year   (cost,
freight, duty)     759,909.39
  $1,287,608.31
Inventory, March 31st, 1959        495,453.93
Cost of sales        792,154.38
Gross profit      $125,526.93
Expenditure—
Salaries and wages        $45,060.84
Packing and general expenses  3,863.01
Freight and delivery  11,204.97
Sundry expenses  504.52
  60,633.34
Excess of revenue over expenditure for the fiscal year
ended March 31st, 1959        $64,893.59
Text-book Rental Plan Operations
Rental fees collected L      $577,885.90
Opening rental inventory, March 31st, 1958      $583,537.48
Plus purchases for year (cost, freight, duty, and S.S.
tax)        694,998.48
$1,278,535.96
Inventory, March 31st, Depreciation!
1957   $564,764.78
Less three years' depreciation at 33% per
cent per annum ....    564,764.78 $188,254.92
Inventory, March 31st,
1958   $592,923.85
Less two years' depreciation at 33V3 per
cent per annum .....    395,282.58    197,641.29
$197,641.27
1 See footnote to balance-sheet. TEXT-BOOK BRANCH Z 73
Brought forward  $1,278,535.96     $577,885.90
Inventory, March 31st, Depreciation
1959  $694,998.48
Less one year's depreciation at 33V& per
cent per annum. .    231,666.16 $231,666.16
$463,332.32
Closing rental inventory at March 31st,
1959         660,973.59
Total depreciation for year
1958/59   $617,562.37     $617,562.37
Add expenses—
Salaries and wages  $37,620.01
Packing and general expenses  3,225.12
Freight and delivery  9,354.57
Sundry expenses  421.20
50,620.90
668,183.27
Excess expenditure over revenue for the fiscal year ended
March 31st, 1959        $90,297.37
1 See footnote to balance-sheet.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1959
Assets
Imprest Account—
Cash on hand  $ 100.00
Cash in bank  1,200.00
  $1,300.00
Inventory—
Stock on hand       495,453.93
Consigned text-books  $1,278,535.96
Less depreciation1        617,562.37
        660,973.59
Accounts receivable  12,415.75
Outstanding publishers' credit notes  9.92
$1,170,153.19
1 Third year depreciation on 1956/57 inventory    $188,254.92
Second year depreciation on 1957/58 inventory       197,641.29
First year depreciation on 1958/59 inventory        231,666.16
Liabilities
Customers' credit balances carried as back orders  $302.03
Outstanding publishers' invoices  11.91
Treasury advances for petty cash, Imprest Account  1,300.00
Advances from Consolidated Revenue Fund  1,168,539.25
$1,170,153.19 Z 74 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1958/59
DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
REPORT OF MARGARET A. MUSSELMAN, DIRECTOR
OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
School radio broadcasts are extensively used both in the schools where specialist teachers are on staff and in schools where teachers feel the lack of special training.
The aim in planning the programmes is to supplement the work of the teacher
through resources of this Department and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
Live and recorded music, world actuality, research, the work of experts—beyond
the resources of individual schools—are made available to all schools and to correspondence students.
The Work of the Radio Broadcasts Branch of the Department
of Education
1. The planning of the year's programmes. Two hundred and forty-eight programmes were aired, of which 160 were prepared by British Columbia. The
remaining eighty-eight were prepared by the other three Western Provinces or the
National School Broadcasts Department of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
The Director for British Columbia served in an advisory capacity for these eighty-
eight.
2. The preparation of scripts. The script-writers were commissioned to write
scripts after discussion on purpose and course content. The scripts when submitted
required varying amounts of editing, revision, and rewriting in this office.
3. The providing of programme guides and supplements, (a) This included
the preparation of a Teachers' Bulletin outlining the year's broadcasts and of supplementary booklets for music, art, and French.
(b) The packaging and mailing of the publications, as follows: Teachers'
Bulletins, 9,500; Pictures in the Air, 4,000; Junior Music, 16,000; Intermediate
Music (Manitoba), 40,000; Ecoutez, 9,500. (The quantities ordered were insufficient to meet requests by schools.)
4. The auditioning and rehearsing of students and choirs used on broadcasts.
5. The supervision of actual studio production. The Canadian Broadcasting
Corporation undertakes the production after the script is in its final form. Either
the Director or the Assistant Director is present at all production rehearsals, being
responsible for relations with schools and for educational points which might arise.
6. The maintaining of contact with schools for suggestions, daily and annual
evaluations, and for pupil participation. School visiting throughout the Province
was unfortunately drastically curtailed by reason of pressure of work.
7. Teacher-training. Illustrated discussions of the use of school broadcasts
were conducted with classes of the College of Education, both in Victoria and
Vancouver, during the regular and summer sessions.
Response to School Broadcasts
The following figures are based on the reports on Use of School Broadcasts,
1958/59, submitted by 77.68 per cent of British Columbia schools.
1. Sixty-eight per cent of schools participated in school broadcasts. (This is
about 2 per cent lower than in 1957/58, partially accounted for by CJAT (Trail)
discontinuing carrying the broadcasts to many schools in the surrounding districts.)
While this is a good percentage, more schools could participate with (a) better DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS Z 75
radio reception; (b) a tape-recording service; (c) appropriate stations, for example
CJAT (Trail), CHWK (Chilliwack), CJVI (Victoria), carrying the broadcasts.
A little under 92,000 pupils heard school broadcasts.
2. The consistently most popular series rated by numbers was Song Time
(primary music), with 1,100 classes participating. As valuable, with a more
restricted audience, was Ecoutez (French), with 307 classes participating.
Ratings and numbers participating in other series, including art, social studies,
science, creative writing, literature, intermediate music, govern our planning for
other years.
Television
No educational television programmes were released to schools in British
Columbia this year. Reports of E.T.V. in other Provinces and countries were
checked. The Director acted in an advisory capacity for a Canadian Broadcasting
Corporation national series to be aired in early 1960. Initial planning was done
for a proposed western regional series for fall of 1960. This would be a co-operative
project of the Departments of Education of the four Western Provinces and the
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
Relations with Other Organizations
The success of school broadcasts is dependent upon the continued co-operation
of the schools, School Boards, District Superintendents and Supervisors, Parent-
Teacher Associations, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, private radio stations,
and the Department of Education. We are most appreciative of the interest and
help given us by all these groups. It is a large factor in making the work of this
department interesting and rewarding. Z 76 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc., M.S., D.Pjed., DIRECTOR
The appointment of a Royal Commission on Education with broad terms
of reference to investigate the British Columbia educational system was announced
on January 17th, 1958, and many of the activities of the Division have been directed
toward the provision of information for the Commission since that date. Mr. P.
W. Easton was assigned to the Division office to bring previous studies of enrolment, immigration, high-school graduation, pupil achievement, teacher certification,
etc., up to date and to initiate new studies, for example, of beginning teachers and
reasons for withdrawals from the profession. In addition to its present value to the
Commission, his conscientiously collected data will be of great value for comparative studies.
Intermediate Form T of the Metropolitan Achievement Test and Form B
of the Pintner General Ability Test had been administered to 5,485 Grade VII
pupils in 1948. Financial assistance received from the Commission enabled the
study to be repeated in 1959 in half the British Columbia schools. The other half
was given the same intelligence test and a special British Columbia edition of the
new Metropolitan, Advanced Form A, which will make it possible to provide
norms based on pupils in equivalent mental-age groups and also to add data in
several fields not covered by Form T. Eight achievement scores were reported for
each pupil to whom the older edition was administered and fourteen for each Form
A pupil. Including intelligence data, the number of items of information obtained
by hand scoring in this survey exceeded 450,000, and the number of pupil subtest scores reported exceeded 335,000. In addition to twenty-four sets of norms,
various classifications of pupils according to sex, age, mental age, geographical
location, and type of school are being investigated.
A continuation of the study of standards in high-school French produced
norms based on the administration of the British Columbia High School French Test
to 897 French 92 pupils. The test previously had been administered to French II
and French III students in 1950 and French 20 students in 1958. Students at the
University Entrance level who have taken French 92 as an advanced elective course
have a much better knowledge of French than that held by the old French III group
in 1950. It must be noted, however, that the French 92 students have had four
years of instruction instead of three. In addition, they make up a much more highly
selected group, being only one-fifth as large in proportion to the original population,
and having mean I.Q.'s of 119 instead of 113. Those who continue with the study
of languages at the university level will be much better prepared than those who took
the former three-year programme, but it is regrettable that only 5.5 per cent of our
elementary-school population complete the four-year high-school programme in
French.
Repetition of the study of scholastic aptitude of public-school Senior Matriculation students that was done in 1954 showed a slightly greater range of ability, but
the same average, in 1959. Of the 880 for whom information was obtained, 687
had continued directly from Grade XII while 193 were new-comers or students with
interrupted programmes. The reliability of the test over a one-year interval was
.874, and changes in selectivity of the Senior Matriculation subjects since 1954 were
slight. The distributions obtained in 1959 have been used to adjust and extend the
standards for Senior Matriculation examinations.   Students' I.Q.,'s obtained a year DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH Z 77
earlier at the University Entrance level indicate that the Senior Matriculation students were a normal University Entrance group, most selection having taken place
at previous grade levels.
What is probably one of the most extensive independent studies of kindergarten, private kindergarten, and non-kindergarten pupils has been completed to the
end of the Grade III level and will be reported later. A forced-selection technique
was used to rate adaptation to school, and report-card grades for health habits,
general behaviour, and work habits were analysed for 22,298 S.D. 39 and 61 pupils.
Interesting side results of the investigation are the differences in range of report-
card grades issued by certain teachers, the high relationship between adaptation to
school and subsequent achievement as measured by standardized tests, the excess
of retardation over acceleration, and the tremendous sex differences that were found.
About 70 per cent of the poorly adapted pupils were boys, and twice as many boys
were poorly adapted as well adapted. In thirty-four out of thirty-six comparisons
that were made, the achievement of girls was higher than that of boys of similar
mental age. This study emphasizes the importance of the development of " readiness," particularly among boys, and may lead to the rather radical suggestion that
boys need to be admitted to school for about five months of additional adaptation
or readiness training. Z 78
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sc, DIRECTOR
Submitted herewith is the circulation report of the Division of Visual Education
covering the period September 1st, 1958, to August 31st, 1959:—
Motion Pictures
Filmstrips
District Number and Name
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
1
534
352
354
491
41
153
899
408
120
150
484
376
192
420
214
243
180
222
719
635
67
338
802
1,140
23
248
477
678
228
109
366
597
574
525
1,268
557
459
462
3,347
1,075
2,001
1,335
646
840
299
435
1,018
112
696
499
155
273
343
22
203
781
76
581
412
269
231
244
232
22
90
546
264
81
100
308
226
97
230
190
144
95
157
419
387
44
196
455
708
13
106
248
370
133
54
200
339
352
340
684
315
217
249
2,314
654
1,107
734
362
511
237
220
601
75
348
358
90
200
178
15
101
348
51
369
227
124
56
602
224
41
71
1,138
209
572
59
191
40
130
599
132
52
83
678
487
662
77
1,339
1,118
1,525
360
27
300
149
127
217
252
795
65
460
461
1,029
761
1,050
1,303
1,730
766
938
1,395
197
258
516
1,520
86
381
324
222
73
203
~146
479
116
438
56
73
43
3. Kimberley - —
4. Windermere.     ..  .    	
5. Creston                          	
409
161
22
37
741
8. Slocan 	
130
442
50
11    Trail
149
1?    f.ranrl Fnrk-i
34
13. Kettle Valley...                    .  ..
72
355
119
42
42
18   (".olden
497
19. Revelstoke  	
316
402
54
872
7.3, Kelowna
681
1,056
216
76   Birch Island
25
7.7. Williams lake
152
109
29. Lillooet
65
30. South Cariboo	
132
31. Merritt     .. 	
168
37. Fraser Canyon
454
33. Chilliwack.  	
52
34.   Ahhotsfnrd
356
285
36. Surrey. _     ..
679
37. Delta
474
38. Richmond
603
992
1,167
472
42. Maple Ridge	
545
797
150
45. West Vancouver	
46. Serhelt
211
325
47. Powell River  	
970
75
49. Ocean Falls                         	
250
50. Queen Charlotte.
268
51,   Portland Canal
143
54
117
68
213
58. McBride       —      	
45
296
43
I DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
Z 79
District Number and Name
Motion Pictures
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Filmstrips
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
61. Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
64. Saltspring.
65. Cowichan..
66. Lake Cowichan.
67. Ladysmith	
68. Nanaimo _.	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay 	
72. Campbell River..
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission  	
76. Agassiz..
77. Summerland .
78. Enderby.
79. Ucluelet-Tofmo.-
80. Kitimat 	
81. Fort Nelson	
82. Chilcotin	
Unattached 	
Miscellaneous	
Totals..
6,609
509
303
55
729
137
336
717
417
544
346
1,749
150
612
1,047
112
339
162
90
454
1,306
865
8,902
3,488
371
202
33
361
75
187
536
235
407
235
884
83
249
818
63
243
95
69
287
749
786
28,911
4
742
409
209
1,639
35
129
213
340
463
87
658
76
236
832
150
102
47
161
1,091
430
35,462
541
284
162
919
23
75
200
235
358
70
416
38
105
670
85
74
37
106
773
401
23,346
Picture sets
Dioramas .__
Stereos	
Requested
. 1,234
.     167
547
Supplied
1,064
153
517
There were 897 schools registered with the Division for regular loan service.
There are 3,051  motion pictures,  5,048  filmstrips,  645  picture  sets,  95
dioramas, and approximately 700 stereographs being circulated from this Division. Z 80 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1958/59
EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT
REPORT OF MRS. FREDA KINSMAN, SECRETARY
TO THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1958/59 a total of 217 applications were considered
by the Commission. Of these, twenty-six were turned down, the chief reasons being
that family income was higher than that set by the Commission for grant purposes.
One hundred and ninety-one applications were approved for grants, an increase
of fifteen over the previous year. Students were distributed by grades as follows:
Grade IX, 51; Grade X, 49; Grade XI, 49; Grade XII, 42. During the year
eleven students dropped out and grants were discontinued.
The students in the greatest financial need received $113.80 for the year; the
balance received $98.80. In addition, thirteen students who showed outstanding
ability were granted a bonus of $25. STATISTICAL RETURNS  '
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Z 83
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1958/59
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