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Civil Service Commission Forty-first Annual Report JANUARY 1ST TO DECEMBER 31ST 1959 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1960

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Civil Service Commission
Forty-first Annual Report
JANUARY 1st TO DECEMBER 31st
1959
Printed by Don McD.armid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1960  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province oj British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Report of the Civil Service Commission, Province of British Columbia, from January 1st to December 31st, 1959.
WESLEY D. BLACK,
Provincial Secretary.
Victoria, B.C., January, 1960. The Honourable Wesley D. Black,
Provincial Secretary,
Province oj British Columbia.
Sir.—In conformity with the provisions of section 7 of the Civil Service Act
(chapter 51, Revised Statutes oj British Columbia, 1948), I have the honour to
submit herewith the Report of the proceedings and work of the Civil Service Commission from January 1st to December 31st, 1959.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
HUGH M. MORRISON,
Chairman, Civil Service Commission
Victoria, B.C., January, 1960. HIGHLIGHTS DURING 1959
• 1,019 persons were appointed to permanent positions.
• 1,013 persons were appointed to casual or temporary positions.
• 1,550 persons left the Service.
• There was a 15.98-per-cent turnover of staff.
• 369 Civil Servants gained promotion through open competition with other employees and with candidates from outside the Service.
• 9 per cent of promotions were made from one department to another.
• The first class of the Executive Development Training Plan received their
diplomas in public administration.
• A fourth class of thirty students from the Interior of the Province commenced
at Kamloops.
• Seventy-eight students completed courses in appraisals leading toward accreditation by the Appraisal Institute of Canada.
• Government employees received salary increases, aggregating 8 per cent additional to payroll, effective April 1st, 1959.
• There were no grievances presented formally to the Civil Service Commission.
• There was a decrease in the average sick leave.  CONTENTS
Page
Introductory  9
Size and Composition of the Civil Service Appointments  9
Appointments  9
Separations  9
General Entrance Examinations  11
Competitions for Promotion  12
In-service Training  13
The Vancouver Office  13
The Essondale Office  14
Classification and Salary Plan  14
Departmental Establishments  15
Sick and Special Leave  16
Grievances  16
Concluding Observations  16
Acknowledgments  17
Appendix—Statistics  17  Report of the Civil Service Commission
Pursuant to Section 7 oj the Civil Service Act, jrom January 1st to
December 31st, 1959
The year 1959 was an active one for the Civil Service Commission and its
staff. Regular monthly meetings were held, and, in addition, a good deal of
business in personnel administration was completed through correspondence.
Deputations from departments and from employee organizations were also received.
As a means of inculcating into the administrative services sound principles and
practices of personnel administration, the Chief Personnel Officer held four all-day
conferences of personnel officials throughout the Government service. Some forty
officials attended these meetings, and many assumed assignments, involving preparation of papers and briefs.   These meetings proved to be useful and popular.
SIZE AND COMPOSITION OF THE CIVIL SERVICE
The number of probationary and permanent Civil Servants at December 31st,
1958, was 8,349 (see Appendix, Table 3, Annual Report for 1958). This number
at December 31st, 1959, was 8,541 (see Appendix, Table 3), an increase of 192.
The total number of Civil Servants, including temporary or casual employees, at the
end of 1958 was 9,263, with the corresponding number at the end of 1959 being
9,819, an increase of 556.
The increase in Civil Service staffs (including those in permanent and temporary
positions) of 556 was largely due to expanded services in the Mental Health
Services and the creation of the new Department of Commercial Transport. There
were, however, slight increases in other departments. All requisitions for personnel
were examined as to necessity before being filled. Excellent co-operation was again
received from the Liquor Control Board in " loaning " of staff to the Motor-vehicle
Branch in its " peak load " months of January and February.
APPOINTMENTS
During the year, 2,032 appointments were made (see Appendix, Table 2), as
compared to 1,571 appointments made during 1958, an increase of 461 or 26 per
cent. The number of appointments to probationary-permanent positions amounted
to 1,019, as compared to 885 in 1958. There were 1,013 appointments to casual
or temporary positions, as compared to 686 in 1958. The Chief Selection Officer
reports that 2,995 requisitions for staff in the Civil Service were processed, as compared with 2,772 requisitions in 1958, about a 9-per-cent increase.
SEPARATIONS
The number of employees leaving the Civil Service during 1959 was 1,550, as
compared to 1,979 in 1958 and 2,689 in 1957.   Using the formula of
Number of employees leaving
 x ioo
Total enrolment including casual employees
the turnover for 1959 was
1,550
 Xl00=15.98%
9,819 CC 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
For purposes of comparison, the following table indicates the rate of turnover
for the last ten years, using the above formula. (These figures include employees
leaving for all reasons, not only those leaving to accept employment elsewhere.)
Year
Total
Employees
Leaving
Total
Enrolment
at Dec. 31
Percentage
Rate of
Turnover
1950     	
1,418
1,963
1,992
2,187
2,529
2,388
2.637
2,689
1,979
1,550
7,694
7,994
8,543
8,543
8,523
8,893
9,270
9,621
9,263
9,819
18.43
1951	
24.56
1952._      ...
23.32
1953                                            	
25.60
1954    ....           	
26.67
1955 	
26.85
1956                                                                         	
28.45
1957  	
27.84
1958.                 _                                                  	
21.36
1959                                                                            	
15 98
The rate of turnover in 1959 dropped considerably to the lowest level in the
last ten years. Within the broad classification groups, the rate of turnover in 1959
compares with previous years as follows: —
Year
1956
1957
1958
1959
32
26
33
18
32
25
21
20
20
15
9
17
16.86
11 40
8 06
15.30
For all large groups the rate of turnover shows a continued decline in 1959,
decreasing the costs of training new workers and increasing the efficiency of the
Service due to the retaining of experienced employees. The most serious loss to
the Service has been the professional employees, because of difficulties in obtaining
replacements.
The reasons for employees terminating are listed in Table 6 of the Appendix
for each department.
Termination reports received by the Commission indicate the following percentages leaving for the reasons indicated during the past seven years:—
Pet Cent
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
9
17
12
8
18
7
29
8
18
12
8
201
4
30
9
19
13
7
261
4
22
7
22
14
9
371
4
7
5
26
11
9
331
5
11
7
34
10
9
26i
6
8
8.09
Marital reasons   	
35.21
12.85
111 health                            	
7.69
27.281
Dismissed, unsatisfactory 	
Miscellaneous	
2.78
6.10
1 Includes enlistment in Her Majesty's forces.
Employees leaving for marital reasons continue to increase. More than one
out of each three employees leave for these reasons. About one in four are leaving
to accept other employment. Of those leaving, 27 per cent are males and 73 per
cent are females. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
CC 11
The following tabulation indicates the number of suspensions, dismissals, and
extensions of probationary periods for the past eight years:—
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
68
8
53
49
11
64
61
10
54
59
4
52
56
2
42
58
3
64
50
8
36
27
Civil Servants suspended but not dismissed ...
6
30
There has been a considerable decrease in the number of probationary periods
extended, which may indicate an improvement in the type of applicant being
selected.
GENERAL ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS
General entrance examinations for the purpose of establishing eligibility lists
for appointments to beginning-level stenographic, clerical, business-machine
operators, and draughting positions were held in Victoria, Vancouver, and Essondale centres.
At the Victoria centre a total of 1,135 applicants were tested, compared to
652 in 1958. Of the number tested in 1959, 751 or 66 per cent qualified, compared to 58 per cent in 1958. The positions for which eligibility tests were conducted were as follows:—
Classification
Number
Examined
Number
Qualified
Per Cent
Qualified
Clerk-Typist   	
394
258
150
66
72
25
11
15
10
5
7
4
3
8
1
106
191
178
107
46
58
21
7
11
9
4
6
4
2
7
1
99
48
69
Clerk    Grade 1    .                                                               -
71
70
80
84
70
73
90
80
86
100
67
87
100
93
1,135
751
66
At the Vancouver centre, 248 wrote examinations, of which 184 or 74 per
cent qualified. At Essondale, stenographic or clerical tests were administered to
102 applicants, of which eighty-two or eighty per cent qualified. Eligibility examinations were also held in a number of other classifications, as indicated in the
Essondale Personnel Officer's report.
Percentage of Qualifications on General Eligibility Examinations jor
Entrance to Some Junior Level Grades
Centre
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
Victoria 	
Vancouver. 	
Essondale2	
67
88
64
72
66
84
61
89
66
69
69
62
83
68
57
84
86
58
75
95
66
74
80 CC  12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
COMPETITIONS FOR PROMOTION
There were 686 competitions for promotion conducted in 1959. Of this
number, 369 or 56 per cent were filled from within the Service and 289 or 44 per
cent were filled from outside the Service. The number of promotional appointments made from one department to another amounted to fifty-eight or 9 per cent.
The following tabulation illustrates the operation of the promotional policy
during the past four years:—
Appointment
1956
1957
1958
1959
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
In-service promotion .
Outside appointments	
361
646
36
64
384
346
53
47
369
197
65
35
369
289
56
44
100
9
Totals..	
Promotions made from
one department to another 	
1,007
67
100
19
730
60
100
15
566
70
100
19
658
58
Total number  of requisi-
4.404
4.151
2.772
2.995
In the Mental Health Services, included in the above tabulation, there were
fifty promotions made from the eligibility lists to Assistant Charge and Charge
Psychiatric Nursing positions.
Invocation at the ceremony for the first class of the Executive Development Training
Programme receiving diplomas in public administration from the University of British
Columbia, held in the Legislative Chambers, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C., on
November 25th, 1959. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT CC  13
IN-SERVICE TRAINING
Executive Development Training Programme
Twenty-one Civil Servants enrolled in Class 1 of the Executive Development
Training Programme received the diplomas in public administration from the Chancellor of the University of British Columbia at a ceremony held in the Legislative
Chambers on November 25th, 1959.
Twenty-seven employees, enrolled in Class 2, entered the third and final year
of the programme. Twenty-nine employees, enrolled in Class 3, entered the second
year of the programme. Class 4 commenced in the fall of 1959 with twenty-seven
Civil Servants and three employees from other Government agencies enrolled.
The employees selected for this class were located in the Interior of the Province
and the lectures are being conducted at Kamloops, the most central point.
Interest in this training programme continues to be high, and the number of
applicants for the course in 1959 was almost 90 per cent higher than 1958.
Courses in Appraisals
The Commission, in co-operation with the Federal Government, the Department of Education, and the Appraisal Institute of Canada, sponsored three courses
in Appraisal 1 and Appraisal 2 for personnel employed in appraising, assessing,
land valuation, and allied fields. Twenty-three candidates attended the course in
Appraisal 1 and fifty-five candidates attended the course in Appraisal 2.
Three graduates of these courses have received full accreditation from the
Appraisal Institute of Canada. It is expected that another twenty-five will receive
full accreditation in 1960.
Supervisory Training
Five sessions of the supervisors' training course were held during 1959. Sixty-
three supervisors in the Departments of Highways and Public Works attended these
courses. Three editions of " Tips for Supervisors " were written and distributed to
all supervisors. It is hoped to expand the programme of training supervisors in
1960. The demand for specific courses, such as Appraising and Court Reporting,
has been very great, and the greater amount of time has been devoted to establishing
these courses.
Court Reporting Course
A committee has developed a curriculum for a nine-month course in Court
reporting. Advertisements were published for an instructor and for young male
candidates competent in shorthand. There were insufficient applicants for the
course, and it has been postponed. The committee is now considering the possibility of training Court reporters in the use of stenotype.
THE VANCOUVER OFFICE
The work of this office continued to be primarily concerned with recruiting.
However, the office conducted some classification and organizational reviews and
also investigated a number of grievances.
The total appointments for 1959 were 496, as against 593 in 1958, a decrease
of 16 per cent. A number of these appointments concerned services such as the
Gaol Service and Toll Highways and Bridges Authority, which are not included
within the Civil Service.
All candidates for clerical and stenographic positions were required to pass
qualifying examinations.    Formal written tests were also applied as a factor in CC  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
selecting technical personnel to a larger extent than in previous years.   The following table indicates the clerical and stenographic examinations administered:—
Passed Failed
Junior Clerk  42 6
Clerk 1   41 8
Clerk-Typists   53 25
Clerk-Stenographers    59 19
Totals    184 64
Grand total, 248 (240 in 1958).
During the past year it was notably less difficult to recruit manual, clerical, and
technical staff than it had been for several years, but a shortage of professional
applicants was evident and competent stenographers and typists continued to be in
short supply.
THE ESSONDALE OFFICE
The total number of appointments made during the year from this office
amounted to 1,032, an increase of 250 or 24 per cent over the previous year. This
increase was largely the result of the opening of a 300-bed unit at the Home for the
Aged, Port Coquitlam, the opening of several new wards at The Woodlands School,
and the opening of the School for Mental Defectives at Tranquille.
During the year there were 135 competitions which resulted in 162 appointments. Advertising was continued in the United Kingdom for psychiatric nurses,
with good results. Except in the case of professional positions, the vacant positions
were not difficult to fill with qualified applicants in good supply. In order to provide
a larger number of qualified psychiatric nurses, twenty-six nurses were employed on
a part-time basis.
Eligibility examinations were held in the following positions:—
Number Writing Number
Examination Qualified
Chief Psychiatric Nurse—Grade 1  17 13
Chief Psychiatric Nurse:—Grade 2  10 7
Sign Painter   10 10
Foreman Electrician      5 2
Cook—Grade 4      5 3
Cook—Grade 3   14 6
Cook—Grade 2   16 14
Cook—Grade 1   18 8
Psychiatric Nurse   83 37
Clerk-Stenoerapher   42 35
Clerk-Typist    60 47
CLASSIFICATION AND SALARY PLAN
The number of classification reviews was less than in previous years, as indicated in Table 7 of the Appendix. The number of these reviews resulting in an
upward revision was considerably less than those in previous years, being approximately 60 per cent of all reviews. The number of classification reviews resulting
in no change increased considerably over previous years, being approximately 34
per cent of all reviews.
The reduction in the total number of reviews has been the result of more
thorough investigations.   A Personnel Officer interviewed all employees and super- CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT CC  15
visors involved in these reviews in the Victoria and Lower Mainland areas. This
probably has had something to do with the large increase in the proportion of
reviews resulting in no change being made. The personal contact has also
uncovered other problems in classification and organization.
Along with the classification reviews, the Classification Division completed
wage surveys for all the various types of employees within the Service. These, along
with the clerical wage survey conducted by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics,
formed the basis for a general revision in salaries which took effect on April 1st,
1959. Within the Service, the general revision amounted to an average 8 per cent
of the total cost of salaries.
The Classification Division also completed a number of special studies, as
follows:—
(1) A review of board and lodging allowances in the field.
(2) Establishment and shift arrangements in the laundry at Essondale.
(3) Establishment and organization of the Registrar of Voters' office, Vancouver.
(4) Establishment of the Mechanical Tabulation Division, Department of
Finance.
(5) Establishment of supervising draughtsmen throughout  several  departments.
(6) Productivity of stenographers in the Official Committee's office.
(7) Productivity of stenographers in the Water Rights Branch.
(8) Establishment at Vista and Venture Rehabilitation Centres.
(9) Organization and classification of the Medical Consultation Division.
(10) Organization and classification at the Langford Workshop.
(11) Organization of the General Administration Division, Attorney-General's
Department.
(12) Organization, Deputy Provincial Secretary's office.
(13) Establishment of the Social Services Division at Essondale.
(14) Organization, Business Office, Essondale.
(15) Establishment and organization, School of Nursing, Essondale.
(16) Establishment of the Analytical and Assay Branch.
(17) Employment of male clerks in the northern areas.
(18) Organization of the Department of Public Works.
(19) Field employees required to work on Saturdays and Sundays.
The Classification Division also conducted a number of reviews concerning
the need to fill vacant positions for which requisitions had been received by the
Recruiting Division. During the year thirty-five requisitions for staff were received
by the Commission which were not filled.
During 1959 the classification schedules were revised by the deletion of twenty
titles and the addition of forty-five titles.
DEPARTMENTAL ESTABLISHMENTS
The following tabulation illustrates the number of positions added to and
deleted from the permanent establishment of departments during the year:—■
Department Addition Deletion
Agriculture    	
Attorney-General   12
Commercial Transport   9                   1
Education    	
Finance    4                  1 CC  16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department Addition Deletion
Forest Service      16
Health Branch        4 1
Highways        1 36
Industrial Development, Trade and Commerce	
Labour        1
Lands Service        2
Mental Health Services  260 2
Mines          4
Provincial Secretary       4 1
Public Utilities Commission       1
Public Works  I  1
Recreation and Conservation       1
Social Welfare          5
Totals    324 43
SICK AND SPECIAL LEAVE
Sick-leave granted during the period October 1st, 1958, to September 30th,
1959, totalled 57,092 days—49,882 days with pay and 7,210 days without pay—
an average of 5.85 days (see Table 5, Appendix) and a decrease of 0.69 day over
the average for the previous twelve-month period of 6.54 days. These figures do
not include sick-leave granted under the Workmen's Compensation Board and
under the Department of Veterans' Affairs section of the Sick-leave Regulations.
The average number of days sick-leave per employee for the past ten years was as
follows:—
Year Ended Average per Year Ended Average per
Sept. 30 Employee Sept. 30 Employee
1950  5.30 1955    5.50
1951  6.20 1956  5.60
1952  6.00 1957  5.85
1953   6.40 1958  6.54
1954  6.60 1959  5.85
The average daily salary for the year from October 1st, 1958, to September
30th, 1959, was $15.33, bringing the cost of sick-leave with pay for 49,882 days to
$764,691. In most instances, however, the absences were short and required no
payment for relief assistance.
Fifteen employees were sranted special leave of absence for the purpose of
training with Reserve units of Her Majesty's forces. Two employees were granted
leave to serve with the United Nations Organization. Seventy-three employees
were sranted special leave for the purpose of further training and study.
During the year the Sick-leave Regulations were reviewed with the view to
simplifying and making the application of these regulations consistent.
GRIEVANCES
No formal grievances were presented to the Commission during the year.
The Chief Personnel Officer, however, dealt with seven grievances involving the
promotional policy.
CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS
Certificates testifying to twenty-five vears of service were awarded to twenty-
five employees in 1959, as compared to thirty-two employees in 1958. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT CC  17
An important event of the year was the assistance rendered by the Commission
to the United Nations Technical Assistance Programme by the assumption of
responsibility for a month of internship training for each of two officials of the
Training Section of the Express Organization of Thailand. This training scheme
was administered by the Regional Training Centre for United Nations Fellows,
centred at the University of British Columbia.
In addition, the Commission was pleased to organize, with the assistance of
Government departments, a three-day observation " tour " of various departments
for six students from Iran studying for doctorate degrees at the University of Southern California, through the International Co-operation Administration. The group
was under the supervision and guidance of Professor J. N. Swanson, of the University
of Southern California.
This Report would not be complete without mention of the retirement of Mr.
Arthur Partridge on August 31st, 1959, after thirty-eight years of service with the
Government. After a few months in other departments of Government, Mr.
Partridge served as Chief Clerk and Administrative Assistant with the Commission
from 1924. He was well known throughout the Service. The good wishes of the
Commission and his many friends in the Civil Service are sent along to him.
Mr. Cyril Wightman gained, through competition, the appointment made
possible by Mr. Partridge's retirement. Mr. Wightman has had wide experience
in the business and newspaper fields, and served for five years as construction
administrator with the Pacific Great Eastern Railway.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The Commission again expresses its thanks to all departments of Government
and to the other Provincial and Federal Civil Service Commissions for their wholehearted co-operation. The Government Agents have rendered valuable assistance
in supervising the recruiting of junior clerical and stenographic positions in their
localities. The technical and clerical staffs of the Commission have performed
their duties loyally and well.
The Commission also extends to you, Sir, as Provincial Secretary, its deepest
appreciation for your continued assistance and understanding.
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION.
H. M. Morrison, Chairman.
J. V. Fisher, Member.
E. R. Rickinson, Member. CC 1.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APPENDIX
STATISTICS
Table 1.—Enrolments in the Civil Service from 1933 to 1959
(as at December 31st, since 1946)
Year Enrolment
1933/34   1,424
1934/35  1,484
1935/36    1,541
1936/37    1,607
1937/38  1,718
1938/39  1,889
1939/40  1,941
1940/41    1,951
1941 /42  1,851
1942/43    1,822
1943/44    2,018
1944/45    2,159
Apr. 1, 1945, to Dec. 31, 1946 4,664
1 Exclusive of 578 casual employees.
2 Exclusive of 755 casual employees.
a Exclusive of 872 casual employees.
* Exclusive of 899 casual employees.
5 Exclusive of 914 casual employees.
6 Exclusive of 1,278 casual employees.
Year
1947..
Enrolment
  5,425
1948  6,417
1949  7,345
1950  7,694
1951  7,994
1952  8,543
1953  8,543
1954  7,9451
1955  8,1382
1956  8,3983
1957  8,722*
1958  8,349 5
1959  8,5418
Table 2.—Appointments Made by the Civil Service Commission
from 1933 to December 31st, 1959
Year
Probationary
Casual
Permanent
Total
1933/34                                   	
1,230
984
1,191
1,417
1,193
1,149
1,264
170
248
258
279
297
328
342
356
352
474
491
547
2,058
2,048
2,041
507
441
600
673
473
533
1,030
923
851
686
1,013
98
85
78
104
185
133
146
121
88
173
184
155
1,245
815
867
370
290
339
378
390
438
332
1,786
1,943
885
1,019
268
1934/35   - -	
1935/36       	
333
336
1936/37	
383
1937/38                      	
482
1938/39	
1939/40  	
461
488
1940/41                           	
477
1941/42	
440
1942/43               	
647
1943/44 	
675
1944/45      	
April 1st, 1945, to December 31st, 1946	
702
3,303
1947 	
1948	
1949           	
1950    .
2,863
2,908
2,107
1,715
1951	
1952                                   	
2,130
2,468
1953   	
1954	
1955   	
1956 .                     	
2,056
2,120
2,626
2,709
1957-	
2,794
1958
1,571
1959..	
2,032
Note.—From 1945 to 1948, probationary appointments are included in the " Casual " column. From and
including 1956, probationary appointments are counted as permanent, and are not counted again when officially
confirmed as permanent. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
CC 19
Table 3.—Number of Civil Servants Enrolled in Departments of Government
as at December 3 1st, 1959, According to Sex
Department
Permanent and Probationary
Male
Female
Total
116
326
143
414
56
1,457
52
273
67
12
43
26
341
6
47
479
102
172
1
50
283
217
267
21
1,909
42
43
21
5
60
26
109
3
26
38
107
346
1
166
609
Education	
360
681
77
3,366
94
316
88
Municipal Affairs	
17
103
Public Utilities Commission   '   	
Highways	
52
450
Railways. _     	
9
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce.
73
Public Works ...	
517
209
Social Welfare 	
518
650                         177
4                             4
827
8
Totals        -	
4,786
3,755
8,541
Table 4.-
-Number of Casual Employees Enrolled in Departments of Government
as at December 3 1st, 1959, According to Sex
Department
Casual
Male
Female
Total
5
10
6
18
6
267
10
1
1
98
1
81
1
13
80
79
6
61
9
13
1
333
4
2
10
41
27
2
28
64
11
71
15
31
7
600
14
2
1
Provincial Secretary..   	
11
139
Railways    — —	
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce	
1
108
3
41
144
79
Totals	
677
601
1,278 CC 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
H
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ays I
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tiT\r:Hr9co'H <nooT*t-a\ma\ve^TrrN
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Average
by Total
Enrolment
(with and
without
Pay)
cn                      m                                     r~
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■<*
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Number of
ivil Servant
and Casual
Employees
as at Sept.
30, 1959
sDt~~-t*-osOmrt\OT*-mcAsD<x>~ r- cn -^ o\ n r-
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r-r~QO(»'--vD\O^CiO'-M^(Nav-l'-infNQO«
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! "3 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT CC 21
Table 6.—Number of Separations in 1959 According to Department of Government
Department
Superannuated
Resigned
Died
Dismissed
Finished
Transferred O.S.
Cancelled
Premier's Office 	
Agriculture 	
2
5
8
4
11
3
2
2
11
6
3
1
6
16
95
46
79
7
520
8
18
8
2
110
3
57
8
30
16
90
104
2
1
3
1
2
7
1
1
7
....
2
1
3
3
3
1
3
6
1
1
3
8
2
1
2
2
3
22
33
15
61
3
3
2
12
18
1
29
5
16
11
1
1
2
3
5
1
3
5
2
2
7
	
Education... 	
1
Recreation  and   Conservation ..   	
12
Labour	
1
Provincial Secretary..
Public Utilities Commis-
1
1
Industrial   Development,
Trade, and Commerce
1
Hospital Insurance	
Social Welfare 	
Forest Service —	
Commercial Transport—
1
Totals 	
64
1,219
35
30
234
32
18
Table 7.-
-Classification Reviews by Department in 1959 with Comparative
Figures for Previous Years
Department
T3 > C
£3.2
1=3.2
Q on.
<*_&. c
«ta o
III
|   S
S£f£
a.    " c
D'S.Sw
■o go
Do
g o.
S_e
.= ?_ S M
>.s >.;__
?T_ o
•S3B.S
o:£w.S
.2.E     5
•3|.s|
_E2
1W £
Agriculture. 	
Attorney-General	
Commercial Transport-
Education   	
Finance.— 	
Health 	
Social Welfare  -
Hospital Insurance...	
Highways	
Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce..
Labour 	
Lands  	
Forests	
Mines —	
Municipal Affairs	
Mental Health	
Provincial Secretary..
Public Works _
Recreation and Conservation
Totals, 1959	
Totals, 1957 _...
Totals, 1955. _...
Totals, 1953 	
7
22
12
39
17
17
9
14
3
9
9
50
10
2
20
14
13
12
279
440
479
480
24
14
17
80
3
51
10
11
7
3
9
5
2
2
4
~12
150
123
94
130
2(1
14
36
19
17
7
10
7
6
12
21
11
11
XI
4
28
53
29
22
19
24
5
14
20
64
14
3
34
22
27
15
496
610
659
728
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Primer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1960
260-360-3303   

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