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DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST 1959 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1960]

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31st
1959
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1960  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual Report of the Department
of Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31st, 1959.
W. D. BLACK,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Victoria, B.C.  Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs
Victoria, B.C., January 26th, 1960.
The Honourable W. D. Black,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Annual Report of this Department for the year ended December 31st, 1959.
The municipal tax base continues to grow, with the expansion from 1958 to
1959 being about 10 per cent. The growth over the last six years can be seen from
an examination of the following table.
Growth in Combined Assessed Values and Taxes in Municipalities
of British Columbia
Assessed Values
Assessed Values Actually Taxed
Tax
Revenues
Year
All Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
1954	
1955	
$1,625,968,580
2,108,458,383
2,432,313,912
2,765,873,099
3,047,766,854
3,327,118,937
$1,321,811,326
1,742,081,045
2,035,542,999
2,315,295,651
2,569,271,281
2,805,547,214
$842,093,330
1,350,856,875
1,586,627,603
1,854,677,597
2,053,934,444
2,248,145,499
$842,093,330
1,044,040,275
1,238,390,209
1,415,935,241
1,562,991,738
1,721,746,974
$53,784,569
59,112,580
1956	
66 418 657
1957  	
78 811,653
1958       	
92,429,190
lOO.OOO^OO1
1959 	
1 Estimated.
A sufficient analysis has not been made to allow specific conclusions to be
reached as to the effect of the various factors contributing to the increasing assessed
taxable values of real property. There are basically four factors or influences at
work at the present time—namely, the assessment equalization programme, new
incorporations (including extension of boundaries), new buildings and increased
land values subsequent to the installation of services, and the general rise in the
price index.
An examination of the figures available indicates that the greatest annual gain
in values is in the district municipalities. This view is supported by the estimates
for building permits and for population increases. Although the district municipalities seem favoured with increased taxable values, they also are faced with the
demand for the provision of new services.
For the year 1959, values actually taxed for school purposes in the Province
amounted to 2,875 million dollars and in municipalities 2,248 million dollars. Thus
the municipalities have approximately 80 per cent of such values, which is equal to
the percentage of the population of the Province resident in the municipalities.
There was approved during the year approximately $13,915,000 in new debentures, which is an increase of nearly $2,100,000 compared with 1958. The amount
and purpose for which new debentures were approved are set out below (Vancouver
debentures do not require approval) — X 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Distribution of Debenture Debt by Purposes for the Year 1959
Purpose
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Local
Districts
Total
$3,500,000
77,000
15,000
904,894
172,000
760,000
563,000
743,000
63,500
$3,500,000
$960,000
1,157,525
100,000
77,000
	
975,000
	
2,062,419
272,000
$664,000
1,478,000
760,000
951,000
1,807,000
	
2,178,000
4,028,000
63,500
.
Totals
$6,798,394  1  $4,975,525
$2,142.000  I                     l$13 915.919
The latest figures available for total debenture debt, including other term
indebtedness ranking as debenture debt, as at December 31st, 1958, are summarized
as follows:—
Total Debenture Debt as at December 31st, 1958
Issued, Sold,
and Outstanding
Untuned
and Unsold
Total
$38,590,166
44,159,894
2,014,882
5,046,400
$7,232,031
4,684,226
418,500
742,100
$45,822,197
48,844,120
2,433,382
5,788,500
Totals         	
$89.811.342    1     $13,076,857
$102,888,199
129,444,842
129,444,842
$219,256,184    |     $13,076,857
1
$232,333,041
This Department has been advised by the Department of Finance of the
Government of Canada that all semi-annual repayments have been made on loans
which were obtained under the provisions of The Municipal Improvements Assistance Act, 1938. These loans are guaranteed by the Province. As at January 1st,
1960, the total amount outstanding was $306,595, comprising three cities, $30,529;
three districts, $69, 221; two villages, $8,932; two improvement districts, $16,684;
and the Greater Vancouver Water District, $181,229.
Pursuant to the Municipalities Assistance Act, during 1959 authority was
given for the Province to guarantee the principal and interest of debenture issues
amounting to $22,443,225, as follows: —
Cities (excluding Vancouver)   $6,709,500
Districts  2,498,725
Towns  	
Villages  1,627,000
Local districts  60,000
$10,895,225
City of Vancouver  $3,738,000
Greater Nanaimo Sewerage and Drainage
District   1,500,000
Greater Nanaimo Water District  60,000
Greater Vancouver Water District  5,500,000
Greater Victoria Water District  750,000
Total
11,548,000
$22,443,225 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS X 7
The amount of the debentures guaranteed by the Province which should be
outstanding under the Village Municipalities Assistance Act and the Municipalities
Assistance Act, providing all payments due have been made, as at December 31st,
1959, was $32,387,125, as follows:—
Cities (excluding Vancouver)   $8,445,500
Districts       3,761,725
Towns     2,148,500
Villages       6,528,400
Local districts  60,000
  $20,944,125!
City of Vancouver  $3,738,000
Greater Nanaimo Sewerage and Drainage
District   1,500,000
Greater Nanaimo Water District  60,000
Greater Vancouver Water District  5,500,000
Greater Victoria Water District  645,000
11,443,000
Total _.  $32,387,125
i The combined values (under the two Acts) as at December 31st, 1958, were $10,476,075.
This liability is supported by the revenues of self-liquidating enterprises,
amounting to an asset value of at least $98,500,000, comprising $67,500,000 for
waterworks systems, $27,500,000 for sewerage systems, and $3,500,000 for a
municipal toll-bridge. In addition, these debts are a direct obligation (or, in the
case of the special-purpose districts, an indirect obligation) of the municipalities
concerned.
At the end of 1958 reserve funds amounted to $9,890,082, which is an increase
over the previous year of $1,116,275. These funds are available for capital expenditures.
Two routine inquiries were held into applications for certificates of approval to
monev by-laws.   In both cases the certificates were granted.
During 1959 thirty municipalities were granted certificates of self-liquidation
in respect of twenty utility systems and fifteen other municipal enterprises. Subsisting certificates of self-liquidation are necessary where the values of utility systems
and other municipal enterprises are to be included in calculating the statutory
maximum amount which may be borrowed by a municipality.
During the year the Pollution-control Board held eight meetings and granted
nine permits for the discharge of sewerage or industrial waste materials into the
waters coming under the jurisdiction of the Board. To date, a total of thirty-seven
such permits have been issued by the Board.
Toward the end of the year, arrangements were completed for a comprehensive
programme of sampling and analysing of the waters of the Lower Fraser River
and Burrard Inlet, and it is the expectation of the Board that these data will provide
a firm basis for the establishment of suitable standards of purity for these waters.
The training programme provided by the Municipal Administration Course
through correspondence by the University of British Columbia continues satisfactorily compared with previous years. This four-year course is now in its seventh
year, and the Department is gratified to be able to report enrolment as follows:
First vear, 52; second year, 37; third year, 20; and fourth year, 16.
The continued interest in the studies is positive evidence of the value placed on
the course by Municipal Councils and staffs. X 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
During 1959 the Board of Examiners announced the decision to consider applications for certificates of proficiency in three categories—Senior Certificates in
Administration and in Finance, and Junior Certificates.
The University grants diplomas for successful completion of the Municipal
Administration Course, which the Board accepts as evidence of satisfactory academic training.
If the Board is satisfied that a person possesses adequate academic training and
sufficient municipal experience, the Board authorizes the issuance of a certificate of
proficiency either in administration or in finance, which is evidence that in the
opinion of the Board the person possesses qualifications which indicate his proficiency to perform the particular municipal office concerned.
In 1959 the University granted diplomas, following examinations in May, in
municipal administration, as follows: 23 Junior diplomas, 14 Senior Administration—Law, and 11 Senior Accounting—Finance, a total of 48 in the year.
As of December 31st, 1959, the Board of Examiners has authorized the issuance of 15 Junior certificates, 29 Senior certificates in Administration, and 17 Senior
certificates in Finance.
The Twentieth Annual Conference of the Municipal Officers' Association of
British Columbia was held in Victoria on May 25th, 26th, and 27th, 1959. Two
addresses were given—one on the subject of the relations between the Public Utilities
Commission and municipalities and the other dealing with personnel administration.
Panel discussions were held on the principles of purchasing, analysing bids and
awarding tenders; special rates, taxes and charges, and local improvements; and
punch-card, machine, and manual accounting. In addition, certain amendments
to the Municipal Act and other Acts were discussed, resulting in clarification of the
points involved.
Two communities were incorporated as local district municipalities. They
are the Local District of Guisachan and the Local District of Cache Creek, for
which Letters Patent were issued on February 6th and February 25th, 1959, respectively. The Local District of Guisachan has an area of 508.8 acres and an
estimated population of 135, while the corresponding figures for the Local District
of Cache Creek are 308 acres and an estimated population of 249.
During 1959 extensions of areas were granted to the Cities of Dawson Creek
and Kamloops, the Districts of Powell River and Salmon Arm, and the Villages of
Burns Lake, Lake Cowichan, Oliver, Salmon Arm, Terrace, and Tofino. Terrace
was subsequently reincorporated as a district.
The following table shows the increases in area as well as population:—
unicipality
Area On Acres)
Population
M
Before
Extension
of Area
Contained
in Area
Added
After
Extension
of Area
Before
Extension
of Area
Contained
in Area
Added
After
Extension
of Area
Cities
2,606.0
957.5
10,049.0
38,014.0
350.5
606.2
386.5
507.2
464.0
633.5
1,054.0
756.0
163.0
3,864.0
252.0
114.7
153.5
145.6
4,838.0
219.0
3,660.0
1,713.5
10,212.0
41,878.0
602.5
720.9
540.0
652.8
5,302.0
852.5
7,531
9,096
9,969
3,100
1,051
1,949
1,354
1,344
1,473
389
661
221
3
26
91
330
4
3,515
8,192
9,317
Districts
9,969
3,103
Villages
1,077
2,040
1,684
1,348
Terrace   	
Tofino    	
4,9S8
389 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS X 9
The populations shown above are the 1956 Census plus additions brought
about by extensions to areas since then to December 31st, 1959.
Two redefinitions of boundaries were made during 1959, the District of Coldstream to include certain lots on the western extremity which did not follow legal
property boundaries and the Village of Squamish to include a portion of a highway
adjacent to the former north boundary of the village.
On December 9th, 1959, Letters Patent were issued providing for a change in
the classification of Terrace from a village to a district municipality, effective January
1st, 1960.
Under the provisions of the Local Services Act the unorganized area of the
Province was established for the purpose of community planning. This replaced
the former regulated areas constituted under the repealed Town Planning Act.
Numerous changes were made to the Municipal Act, but most of these were of
a technical or minor nature. The tax-sale provisions were revised to bring consistency between the Act and the Land Registry Act. Another change of a similar
nature was the rewriting of the replotting procedures.
Other significant changes or additions enacted by the 1959 Session of the
Legislature which affected municipalities are as follows:—
Interpretation Act.—The definition of " municipality " now includes a town.
Assessment Equalization Act, 1953.—The most important amendment is a
statutory formula for assessors to follow in arriving at the value of land and improvements for taxation for school purposes.
Land Registry Act.—There is now included a definition of a " municipality "
to parallel the definition in the Municipal Act.
Local Services Act.—Two changes of a technical nature were made.
Motor-vehicle Act.—There was inserted a section providing for uniformity with
respect to traffic tickets and their use and validity. The section only applies to
municipalities designated by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
Municipalities Enabling and Validation Act.—Special powers were conferred
on eleven municipalities.   Three of the more significant ones were:—
Burnaby:  Special powers regarding special areas for sewers.
New Westminster: Enabling powers for a toll-bridge and guarantee of the
Province for the borrowing.
Richmond: The Richmond Drainage and Dyking Act, 1936, was repealed and
certain special provisions were enacted to deal with the problem of drainage and dyking.
Public Libraries Act.—The minimum requirements for a petition have been
changed and the Municipal Council may pass a by-law with the assent of the electors
for the establishment of a municipal public library.
Welfare Institutions Licensing Act.—Each municipality is now required to
investigate every application for a licence to operate a welfare institution and report
to the Welfare Institution Board as required by the Board.
Union of British Columbia Municipalities Incorporation Act.—By this Act
the members of the Union were constituted a body politic and corporate.
Vancouver Charter.—One of the more important amendments was the insertion of Part XXVII, Planning and Development. Formerly the city relied on the
Town Planning Act, which has been repealed.
Greater Nanaimo Sewerage and Drainage District Act.—As the title implies,
the purpose of this new Act is to provide sewerage and drainage facilities in the
Greater Nanaimo area. X 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District Act.—The amendments
were for clarification and technical purposes.
Greater Vancouver Water District Act.—The principal amendment was designed, firstly, to change the distribution of voting power on the Board so that the
City of Vancouver, which formerly held a majority, was reduced to an equal number
of votes to those cast by all other members of the Board, and, secondly, to provide
that each municipality shall be represented directly by a member.
Three members of the staff received final University diplomas—one in connection with the Executive Training Programme and two in the Municipal Adiminstra-
tion Course. Not only are they to be congratulated upon their achievement, but
commended for the further evidence of their desire to do a good job. This same
spirit, I am happy to report, prevails generally in the staff. Although it sounds
repetitious, it is gratifying to be able to once again, on behalf of the Department and
and myself, sincerely express our thanks to the municipal officials, both elected and
appointed, for their continued courtesy and assistance, to the members of the executive and executive director of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities and to
the departmental heads and staff of the other departments of government. I am
especially grateful to you, Sir, for your continued confidence, encouragement, and
direction.
J. E. Brown, F.C.I.S.,
Deputy Minister. REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
X 11
REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF MUNICIPALITIES
Victoria, B.C., January 25th, 1960.
J. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—The year gone by has again been one of continued co-operation with and
from the Councils and municipal officials.
It is a particular pleasure to report that there are an increasing number of
municipal officers who visit or write in to the Department with suggestions for
improvement of administrative procedures and methods. Ideas from the field are
most welcome and helpful, and is evidence of a very healthy attitude developing
in the Provincial-municipal field.
The more we can develop this idea of mutual interest, the more will be the
continued growth of general efficiency in the administration of local government.
The following is a compilation of some of the major activities of the Department during 1959:—
(1) One hundred and seventy-eight visits were made to municipalities. The
number of municipalities actually visited was 115, some receiving more
than one visit.
(2) Two hundred and nineteen Minutes of Council were prepared and subsequently approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
(3) Eighty certificates of approval for municipal loan by-laws were issued.
A few of these were cancelled during the year due to the subsequent
amendment of the by-law concerned. A new certificate to the by-law as
amended was issued in each of these cases.
(4) Sixty-nine debenture issues were examined and subsequently certified by
the Inspector of Municipalities, consisting of 14,200 debentures of a total
par value of $13,915,918.83.
(5) Six hundred and forty-seven by-laws were examined and registered. Of
this total, 50 were town by-laws, 588 were village by-laws, and 9 were
local district by-laws. Many of these by-laws required advice and correspondence, resulting in resubmission in revised form.
(6) Hundreds of draft by-laws and similar documents were submitted for
review and comment, involving considerable correspondence.
(7) Publication of the Annual Report of Municipal Statistics.
(8) Editing the financial and statistical returns of the municipalities to ensure
conformity with statutory and other requirements.
(9) By correspondence and by personal visits to the various municipalities,
encouraging the adoption of good accounting and administrative procedures.
It should be noted that the annual issue of Municipal Statistics bears the date
July 31st, 1959, for the 1958 fiscal year, compared to September 10th, 1958, for
the 1957 fiscal year. This was possible due to the assistance of the municipal
treasurers and auditors in submitting their financial returns at an earlier date. It is
hoped that we can do even better, as these statistics are in demand by industry,
commerce, and government, as well as the general public. The earlier the publication date, the more value for those who have an actual use for the figures.
The Government of Canada has again provided an incentive for municipalities
to provide winter work for the relief of unemployment.   This year the offer was X 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
made earlier and has allowed our municipalities to take a greater advantage of the
programme.
In addition, the Government of the Province provides a further incentive by
offering to pay 25 per cent of the approved direct payroll costs with a further 25
per cent of such payrolls which represent wages of a certain specified category of
persons in receipt of social welfare assistance. Due to this offer of the Province
there are winter works projects of some municipalities where the municipality will be
relieved completely of approved direct payroll costs.
Because the Municipal Winter Works Incentive Programme runs from December 1st, 1959, to April 30th, 1960, a progress report is given at this time.
The figures given are based on the estimates of the municipalities on those proposed projects which have been approved by the Province and accepted by Canada
under the terms of the programme.
The following tabulation gives a summary of our municipalities' participation
on an over-all basis as at January 22nd, 1960, according to the records of this
Office:  (In Thousands)
Number of men  2.87
Man-days' work  179
Total cost of projects  $11,204
Federal share r  $ 1,423
Provincial share  $797
Municipal share  $777
Total payroll under offer  $2,997
Municipalities Participating Number of Accepted Projects
Cities  119
Districts     76
Towns        3
Villages       36
Other      17
Totals   251
Table III shows the final summary of the Municipal Winter Works Incentive
Programme for the 1958/59 period as issued by the Department of Labour, Ottawa,
and Table IV indicates the same information for the current programme as at
January 15th, 1960.
In spite of the difficulties being experienced in the financing of loans for
municipal purposes, new issues of debentures in total for the past year was surprisingly large.
Without attempting comparisons with other Provinces concerning municipal
borrowings, one must recognize that our Province guarantees the debentures representing borrowings for waterworks and sewerage purposes for all our municipalities,
as well as borrowings of the districts similar to the Greater Vancouver Water District. This policy has made it possible for municipalities to borrow, whereas the
lack of such a policy would have made it virtually impossible for many municipalities
to obtain debenture loans during the past year on their own credit exclusively.
It should be borne in mind that there are certain funds and institutions throughout the country which can only invest in governmental securities or securities
guaranteed by governments. Our Provincial guarantee has been invaluable to the
municipalities throughout the past year.
Cities  	
._ 23
Districts	
Towns	
24
     1
Villages   '
  17
Other	
     8
Totals	
  73 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
X 13
Another factor which must be considered is that British Columbia is the fastest-
growing Province in Canada. This growth creates a demand for municipal capital
works expansion, particularly waterworks and sewerage systems. Current income
cannot cope with the need, and long-term borrowing must be resorted to. Most
municipalities have adopted the policy of borrowing only for essential services, and
a wise policy it is during this period of high interest rates.
The following comparative table may be of interest. It must be borne in mind
that comparability is affected by new incorporations, extension of boundaries,
changes of municipal status, the non-coincidence of census years, and the assessment
equalization programme in progress since the year 1954.
Relative Changes in Net Debt and Assessment
(1949=100)
Taxable
Assessed
Values
Per Capita
Net Debt
1947
1953
1958
Vancouver     	
84
82
31
66
101
139
158
160
103
274
350
178
78
69
86
128
139
200
132
254
422
316
220
87
79
34
66
74
77
76
128
63
109
137
134
With the exception of village municipalities, and recognizing the factors mentioned above, it would appear safe to assume that the relative increase in the value
of real property is greater than the relative increase in debenture debt.
Following a detailed analysis of arrears of taxes as a percentage of the current
levy for the year 1958, letters were sent to all municipalities which had a percentage
greater than 15 per cent. In many cases the explanation of the apparently high
figure for arrears was the policy of certain taxpayers with large accounts preferring
to allow taxes to go unpaid on the assumption that the money used in the business
would earn more for the taxpayer than the cost of the arrears. How sound that
assumption is, is a matter of conjecture. Basically, we found that municipal officials
where arrears of taxes seemed high realized the situation and had taken proper
administrative steps to try and improve the situation. In other words, the officials
were not " asleep at the switch." Furthermore, the experience reported to us was
that the properties involved do not go to tax sale; eventually payment is received
and the truer current picture is represented by total collections as a percentage of the
current levy.   See Table I.
Table II shows for 1958 what appears to be a retrograde step in an apparent
movement of certain classes from a 10-per-cent figure into the up to 20-per-cent
figure for arrears. The main cause for this is the reversion of certain cities to
villages, and from this it would appear that 1958 is fairly comparable to 1957.
J. D. Baird, F.C.I.S.,
Supervisor of Municipalities. X 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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a £ X 18 V, BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR, REGIONAL
PLANNING DIVISION
Victoria, B.C., January 18th, 1960.
J. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—When the Town Planning Act was first adopted in 1925, there were very
few qualified town planners practising in Canada. Consequently, much attention
was given to Town Planning Commissions, who were comprised of lay groups
appointed to advise Municipal Councils on planning problems, to act as sounding
boards for Council's planning policies and to publicize the value of town planning.
The lack of trained planners left many Commissions involved in drafting the zoning
by-laws for Municipal Councils.
In the past ten years the number of community planners practising in the
Province has increased tenfold. With the trend toward the possibility of all municipalities to obtain professional planning advice, the need for Commissions to take
such an active role in planning no longer exists. There is a strong need still for their
advisory role, however.
Boards of Appeal were established by those municipalities which had adopted
zoning by-laws. Their authority was vaguely defined, and in some cases their functions overlapped with the Town Planning Commission. Generally, however, Boards
sat as quasi judicial bodies to weigh individual hardship against community interests
as far as land use was concerned. Nevertheless, there was a need to re-examine the
scope of the Board of Appeal.
In 1957 the Municipal Act absorbed the municipal sections of the Town Planning Act, and the Local Services Act absorbed that part dealing with unorganized
territory.
The Town Planning Commission's name was changed to Advisory Planning
Commission in order to clarify its role in contrast to practice in some American
communities, where Planning Commissions instead of Municipal Councils administer planning policy. Its role in British Columbia is still advisory. " Zoning "
was added to the Board of Appeal's title and its authority was clearly defined.
The regulations of the regulated areas established under the Town Planning
Act now have been changed to conform to the provisions of the Municipal Act and
the Local Services Act. On June 1st, 1959, Order in Council No. 1171 was passed
by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council. This minute rescinded the regulated areas
and made all unorganized territory a local area for planning purposes. Because of
the wide variation of physical conditions and density of population in the Province,
it has not been advisable to pass one set of regulations to cover all of the unorganized
territory. Instead, regulations are passed to suit the needs of designated community planning areas throughout the Province. The regulated areas and the two
local areas have now been designated as community planning areas. These areas
are the equivalent of a municipality for planning purposes, with the exception that
the Minister of Municipal Affairs acts as the Municipal Council. The regulations
are the equivalent to zoning, subdivision, and building by-laws. The Zoning Boards
of Appeal are appointed in a similar manner and have the same scope.
A new feature of planning in unorganized territory is the appointment of
Advisory Planning Commissions for community planning areas. In the past the
local provisions for planning in unorganized territory were set out in a very general
way in Part III of the Town Planning Act.   It turned out that the Boards of Appeal REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
X  19
were often functioning as unofficial Town Planning Commissions. The need for a
lay body interested in the community to advise on planning matters is still evident,
and so Commissions are being appointed for the community planning areas.
COMMUNITY PLANNING  AREAS
The following table gives the name of the old regulated areas with the corresponding community planning area. A record number of dwelling units was built in
1959—611 in comparison to 531 in 1958. The total value of construction increased from almost $7,500,000 in 1958 to over $9,000,000.
The small area around the Village of Taylor was expanded to surround the
Town of Fort St. John also, and so give more effective service to the area developing
just north of the Peace River.
A small community planning area outside of Victoria was established to
preserve a good industrial site for industrial purposes. I am glad to report that
one small industry has located here already.
Place
Dwelling
Units
Built, 1959
Dwelling Units
Built since
Areas
Established
Total Value of
Construction,
1959
110
37
52
4
45
188
18
123
11
2
13
3
5
973            I     SI. 438.248
312
279
6
408
1,330
612
611
158
67
626,405
Community Planning Area No. 3 (View Royal Regulated Area)	
640,698
79,440
Community Planning Area No. 5 (North Saanich Regulated Area)
638,404
2,853,958
Community Planning Area No. 7 (Prince George Regulated Area)
Community Planning Area No. 8 (Kamloops Regulated Area and
218,497
1,664,825
317,920
Community Planning Area No.  10 (Connaught Heights Regulated
26.808
4
Community Planning Area No. 12 (Dawson Creek Regulated Area)-
Community Planning Area No. 13 (Woodhaven Regulated Area)
Community Planning Area No. 14 (Campbell River Regulated Area)
215                   316,728
17                     37,428
2          |    	
19           1           165.121
Community Planning Area No. 16 (Langford Industrial Local Area)
Others  	
62
25,200
.
Totals                     	
fin         i       ^.<m         I    s» n_o «sn
Don South, M.T.P.I.C.,
Director, Regional Planning Division.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1960
810-160-2461 

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