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Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the YEAR ENDED MARCH 31ST 1959 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1960

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Annual Report of the
Department of Social Welfare
for the
YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st
1959
Primed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
In right of the Province of British Columbia.
I960  Victoria, B.C., November 6th, 1959.
To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Social Welfare for the year ended
March 31st, 1959, is herewith respectfully submitted.
W. D. BLACK,
Minister of Social Welfare.
Office of the Minister of Social Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C. Department of Social Welfare,
Victoria, B.C., November 6th, 1959.
The Honourable W. D. Black,
Minister of Social Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Social Welfare for the year ended March 31st, 1959.
E. R. RICKINSON,
Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
Department of Social Welfare,
Victoria, B.C., November 6th, 1959.
E. R. Rickinson, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Social Welfare.
Sir,—I submit herewith the Report of the Department of Social Welfare for
the year ended March 31st, 1959.
J. A. SADLER,
Director of Social Welfare. DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE
April 1st, 1958, to March 31st, 1959
Hon. W. D. Black.
Minister of Social Welfare.
E. R. Rickinson
J. A. Sadler	
SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
 Deputy Minister.
 Director of Social Welfare.
Miss Marie Riddell.
J. McDiarmid	
Mrs. Jean Scott.
Miss Ruby McKay.
E. W. Berry	
Dr. G. E. Wakefield.
Mrs. E. L. Page	
Miss M. MacInnis.
F. G. Hassard	
Miss W. M. Urquhart.
G. P. Willie	
E. L. RlMMER.
H. E. Blanchard..
R. I. Stringer	
R. J. Burnham.
V. H. Dallamore.
A. E. Bingham	
W. H. Crossley.
Assistant Director of Social Welfare.
Departmental Comptroller.
Supervisor, Family Division.
Superintendent of Child Welfare.
. Chairman, Old-age Assistance and Blind Persons' and Disabled Persons' Allowances
Board, and Supplementary Assistance.
Director of Medical Services.
^Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions.
Supervisor, Social Service Department, Division of Tuberculosis Control.
.Superintendent, Brannen Lake School for
Boys.
. Superintendent, Willingdon School for Girls.
Superintendent, Provincial Home.
..Administrator, Region I.
.Administrator, Region II.
..Administrator, Region III.
..Administrator, Region IV.
..Administrator, Region V.
..Administrator, Region VI.
.Administrator, Region VII.  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Director of Social Welfare  	
       9
Assistant Director of Social Welfare
     11
Part II.—Regional Administration—
Region I                               .           	
     14
Region II.                                     ....   - -
     16
Region III                                                        ...      	
     18
Region IV                                                       _ -       	
_        20
Region V.       -                                            - '
     22
Region VI.      _                                      - _           	
24
Region VII    	
     26
Part III.—Divisional Administration —
Family Division—
Social Allowances	
Mothers' Allowances	
Family Service	
Child Welfare Division	
  29
  34
  38
  43
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowances, Disabled Persons' Allowances, and Supplementary Assistance  53
Medical Services Division  74
Part IV.—Institutions—
Industrial School for Boys
Industrial School for Girls __
Provincial Home, Kamloops
Welfare Institutions Board...
76
81
85
88
Part V.—Medical Social Work Services—
Social Service Department, Division of Tuberculosis Control
92
Part VI.—Accounting Division  Report of the Department of Social Welfare
PART I.—GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE
In the fiscal year under review, welfare services were the responsibility of the
Social Welfare Branch, Department of Health and Welfare, until March 20th, 1959,
when the Department of Social Welfare Act was proclaimed by Order in Council
No. 558. The Social Welfare Branch, Department of Health and Welfare, then
ceased to exist, and welfare services fell within the jurisdiction of the Department
of Social Welfare.
On September 1st, 1958, by agreement with the municipalities, a new equalization of Social Allowance costs was introduced. The plan was developed to equalize
costs on a per capita basis throughout the Province, and the Provincial Government
agreed to share Social Allowance costs with the municipalities on the formula of
90 per cent Provincial payment and 10 per cent municipal payment. It has been
a major step forward, with details of residence and responsibility within the Province
eliminated and intermunicipal-Provincial billing is simplified. Also on that date
Mothers' Allowance cases were transferred to Social Allowance for administrative
purposes.
Steps were taken to decentralize authority under the Children's Protection Act,
with responsibility placed in the field offices for action to be taken without prior
referral to the Child Welfare Division. Due to certain amendments to the Municipal
Act, some municipalities were relieved of their responsibility for the costs and
administration of welfare services. A change was made in the charge for services by
the Province to municipalities purchasing social welfare services in their areas. The
per capita payment was increased April 1st, 1958, from 15 cents to 30 cents,
Throughout the year the Research and Office Consultants, in addition to activities in their respective fields of research and office procedures, have been revising
the Departmental policy manuals. The Civil Defence Liaison Officer has continued
his lecture programme to local groups throughout the Province and has been
engaged in the preparation of material in connection with civil defence welfare
services.
The following tables show, on a comparative basis, case loads and changes in
case loads:—
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
as at March 31st for the Years 1958 and 1959
Category
1958
Number
Per Cent
1959
Number
Per Cent
Totals for Province..
Family Service	
Social Allowance	
Blind Persons' Allowance1..
Old-age Assistances-
Old Age Security supplementary assistances-
Disabled Persons' Allowance1	
Child Welfare   	
Health and Institutional   	
61,783
1,296
10,658
671
8,385
32,761
1,453
5,896
663
100.0
2.1
17.3
1.1
13.6
53.0
2.4
9.5
1.1
69,046
1,317
17,578
660
8,544
32,239
1,666
6,379
663
100.0
1.9
25.5
1.0
12.4
46.7
2.4
9.2
1.0
1 Includes Old-age Assistance Board figures which are not shown in regional reports.
9 O 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Movement in Case Load during Fiscal Year 1958/59
Major Category of Service
Cases Opened during Year
Number
Per Cent
Cases Closed during Year
Number
Per Cent
Family Service...  	
Social Allowance 	
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Disabled Persons' Allowance..
Old-age Assistance
Old Age Security supplementary assistance.
Child Welfare  _ 	
Health and Institutional.
Totals for Province..
2,084
30,495
338
929
5,997
12,427
6,379
486
59,135
3.5
51.6
0.6
1.6
10.1
21.0
10.8
0.8
100.0
2,063
24,078
349
716
5,838
12,949
5,897
485
52,375
3.9
46.0
0.7
1.4
11.1
24.7
11.3
0.9
100.0
Table III,
-Number of Cases by Category and as a Percentage of Population
as at March 31st for the Years 1958 and 1959
1958
1959
Category
Number
Per Cent of
Population
(1,487,000)
Number
Per Cent of
Population
(1,544,000)
61,783
1,296
10.658
671
8,385
32,761
1,453
5,896
663
4.15
0.09
0.72
0.05
0.56
2.20
0.10
0.40
0.04
69,046
1,317
17,578
660
8,544
32,239
1,666
6,379
663
4.47
0.09
1.14
Blind Persons' Allowance1   	
0.04
0.55
Old Age Security supplementary assistance1	
Disabled Persons' Allowance1   	
Child Welfare            -	
2.09
0.11
0.41
Health and Institutional   -	
0.04
1 Includes Old-age Assistance Board figures which are not shown in regional reports.
The above tables show a marked increase in the Social Allowance case load in
the Province. This increase in case load and the increase in activity in the case load
is due to the unemployment situation which has developed this year.
As the report will show, there has been an increased demand for services not
only in the field of Social Allowance where, due to pressures from many unemployed
persons asking for temporary help, the work programme has changed somewhat,
with emphasis being placed on the meeting of immediate need, but also in connection
with the boys' and girls' schools with increased populations in both schools, and in
family and children's services.
Municipal officials, together with officials of private agencies and many other
organizations, have continued their kind co-operation as in the past and this cooperation is appreciated by the staff of this Department.
Respectfully submitted.
J. A. Sadler,
Director of Social Welfare. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 11
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE
I wish to submit the report of the Assistant Director of Social Welfare for the
fiscal year April, 1958, to March, 1959.
The Assistant Director of Social Welfare shares in part in the planning of the
over-all administration of the Department; is responsible for certain duties delegated
by the Director of Social Welfare; and is primarily responsible for maintaining
social work and clerical staff for the field service and divisions, of the Department.
In so far as the social-work staff is concerned the major portion of responsibility for
recruitment, and in-service training and placement of staff, is delegated to the Provincial Supervisor of Training and her assistant. Office management is the responsibility of the Office Consultant, also a member of the staff of the Assistant Director
of Social Welfare.
Legislatively the responsibility of the Department is defined as " all matters
relating to social and public welfare and social assistance." This, then, does not
mean solely the administration or granting of financial assistance, which is only a
part of a social-welfare programme. It also means a casework service for individuals and families who come to us for help, in order to alleviate or resolve problems
of personality or relationship, apart from economic problems, so that they may live
happier and more satisfying lives and fulfil their maximum potential as citizens.
To do this demands special skill and knowledge which social workers must
learn and continue to develop through experience. The social workers, too, must
find happiness and satisfaction in their work, for without these, frustration and a lack
of sense of achievement are inevitable, which even loyalty to social work cannot
dispel.
The skill and knowledge required of a social worker are learned in professional
training at a school of social work, and it is the goal of the Department to employ
as many professionally trained staff as possible. There is, however, a continuing
shortage of professionaUy trained social workers and many agencies have had to
plan other means to fill staff vacancies.
This Department has had for many years an in-service training programme for
appointees lacking professional qualifications. At this time a tribute should be paid
to the in-service trainees, for they have formed a dependable portion of our staff
complement and without them the Department could not have achieved the enviable
reputation for service which it has had in the past. It should be pointed out, however, that in-service training is training only for work in the Department and cannot
be considered as a substitute for professional training.
Therefore each In-Service Trainee is encouraged to make plans for educational
leave to attend the School of Social Work at U.B.C. at the earliest possible opportunity. To assist in such plans the Department has provision for a few bursaries.
During the year under review six staff members were on educational leave, of which
four were awarded bursaries toward the full costs of an academic year.
In addition to in-service training and educational leave, other means of professional development are encouraged. District staff meetings, held with reasonable
regularity, help social-work staff to increase their knowledge and develop their skills.
Other devices are regular District Supervisors' and regional staff meetings. The
latter are held annually, in so far as possible, with institute leaders brought in from
outside the Department or leadership provided by senior Department personnel, to
concentrate on some particular aspect of social work or the social-welfare programme of the Department. O 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Still another device for staff development is the arranging, whenever possible,
for attendance of selected members of staff to attend national social-work conferences or regional conferences of national and international organizations.
Such devices are essential and their benefits beyond measure if a progressive
and competent social-work staff is to be maintained.
For the clerical staff of the service the need for training and encouragement is
equally important, and the services of the Office Consultant are always available by
correspondence or by frequent visits to the various district offices to share her
knowledge of and experience in office management.
Competence and skill alone are not enough for the social worker unless conditions of work give opportunities for using the knowledge and skill he has; otherwise the quality and quantity of the service of the Department is affected. The
manner in which the staff has met the challenge of a total case load which rose from
61,783 to 69,046 in this fiscal year, with a monthly average active case load of
14,572, is beyond all praise.
Neither could the social workers meet this challenge without the able support
of the clerical staff, for their responsibilities are many, too. Not to be excluded
from any expression of appreciation are the staffs of the two correctional schools and
all divisions of the Department. Each staff member, whatever his role or responsibility, contributes immeasurably by his efforts and loyalty to the work of the
Department in the alleviation of human need and suffering.
The following table shows the total number of staff (clerical, professional, and
technical) that were employed and their location in the Department as at March
31st, 1959:—
Office of Deputy Minister	
Director of Welfare	
2
.__         4
Field Service     _ _ _          ------         	
-    290
Medical Services Division    ___         ___    _ _ 	
___    12
Child Welfare Division                   ■•     _
-.    18
Provincial Home            _
34
Brannen Lake School for Boys._ _           -   .. _ __
Girls' Industrial School    	
62
-      50
Old-age Assistance Board           _   __      _
__-    74
Family Division    ____ __                  -     __ _ 	
5
Total	
_ 551
The following table gives the total social-work stafl
years ending March 31st, 1958, and March 31st, 1959:—
employed for the fiscal
University
Trained
In-service
Trained
Total
Total staff, March 31st, 1958	
Completed formal training during fiscal year 	
93
+6
121
-6
214
Staff appointed April 1st, 1958, to March 31st, 1959	
99
6
115
50
214
56
Resignations, April lst,1958, to March 31st, 1959	
105
28
165
33
270
61
Totals as at March 31st, 1959             	
77
132
209
During the year under review there were 149 resignations and an equal number of replacements to fill them. So that, in all, responsibility for appointment,
promotion, reclassification, and processing of resignations covered a total of 363
staff members. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 13
During the course of the year seventy-six persons were given in-service training
in six introductory and four final group sessions.
The Department was represented at three conferences and institutes related to
social welfare and seven delegates attended. In addition, other members attended
on their own time and at their own expense.
During this fiscal year two combined District Supervisors' meetings were held.
The District Supervisors of Regions V and VII met at Prince George and of Regions
III and IV at Kelowna. The Assistant Director of Social Welfare attended both,
thus also permitting a visit to various district offices in the four regions.
This fiscal year saw the long-awaited opening of the new correctional school,
Willingdon School for Girls, with adequate and well appointed facilities for a treatment programme, which was the goal of the Girls' Industrial School Advisory Committee chaired by the previous Assistant Director of Welfare.
In conclusion, I wish to express my sincerest thanks for the co-operation shown
administration by the staff, and a special word of appreciation to the staff for their
devotion and untiring efforts to maintain the programme of the Department.
My personal thanks go to the staff, professional and clerical, of my own office,
on whose support and willingness I can depend at all times.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Marie Riddell,
Assistant Director of Social Welfare. O 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PART IL—REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
REGION I
I submit herewith the annual report for the fiscal year 1958/59, which outlines statistical information, and, briefly, a resume of the activities of welfare services in this region, designated for administrative purposes as Region I. This
region comprises Vancouver Island, the Gulf Islands, and a small section of the
Mainland contiguous to the Johnstone and Queen Charlotte Straits. According to
estimated figures, the population for the region approximates 245,000 persons, with
a land area of roughly 13,000 square miles. About half of the population live in
the southerly part—Greater Victoria area, Gulf Islands, Duncan, Nanaimo, etc.
Because of migratory population these figures might be slightly over or under last
year's quoted census population figure.
The welfare field staff, servicing the people in the area, consists of thirty-two
social workers, with four supervisors, two municipal administrators, and one Regional Administrator.
Table I.—Administrative Offices with Distribution of Case Load by
Category of Services
Category
Alberni
Courtenay
Duncan
Nanaimo
Saanich
Victoria
City
Victoria
District
Total
14
297
3
115
314
15
146
13
36
269
7
142
527
33
222
11
36
213
9
104
472
16
156
19
44
610
13
227
965
43
192
22
127
6
96
835
30
28
6
1,053
37
464
2,148
76
43
40
269
12
179
1,053
47
126
46
176
2,838
Blind Persons' Allowance....
Old-age Assistance	
Supplementary assistance to
Old Age Security	
Disabled Persons' Allowance
Child Welfare    	
87
1,327
6,314
260
842
Health and Institutional	
182
Totals	
917
1,247
1,025
2,116
1,122       1   3,827
1,772
12,026
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major
Categories in Region I for the Fiscal Years 1957/58 and 1958/59
Category
1957/58
1958/59
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
165
1,588
90
1,317
6,417
235
794
187-
1.5
14.7
0.8
12.2
59.5
2.2
7.4
1.7
176
2,838
87
1,327
6,314
260
842
182
1.5
23.6
0.7
11.0
Supplementary assistance to Old Age Security
Disabled Persons* Allowance -	
Child Welfare    -	
52.5
2.2
7.0
1.5
Tota!s 	
10,788        |        100.0
1
12,026
100.0 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 15
Table III.—Analysis of Case Load and Population in Each Municipality of Region
I at March 31st, 1959, as Related to The Administrative Plan (Section 6 of
the Regulations under the Social Assistance Act).
Population
1956 Census
Welfare Services
Area
Per Capita
Plan
Amalgamated
Plan
Welfare
Case Load
City of Alberni 	
3,947
10,373
3,069
2,477
1,039
3,025
3,247
10,384
2,107
12,705
1,949
7,781
726
14,857
38,358
54,584
895
1,151
1,112
1,371
389
520
154
X
X
(?)
X
(!)
X
X
X
C1)
X
(!)
x
O)
X
0)
(!)
0)
C1)
C1)
C1)
X
X
148
429
103
121
188
271
City of Nanaimo _ ..
Village of Lake Cowichan	
949
305
254
1,122
3,827
Village of Alert Bay.....	
Village of Tofino	
Village of Zeballos	
(1) Organized villages not liable for welfare costs (subsection 2 of section 639 of the Municipal Act).
Total case load in organized territory
Total case load in unorganized territory
Total case load for region
Social welfare case load 	
Total number of individuals, including dependents 	
Approximate percentage, case load to population (245,000)
Approximate percentage, total individuals to population 	
7,717
4,309
12,026
12,026
14,954
4.9%
6%
In this region there is accommodation in private hospitals for approximately
600 persons and accommodation in licensed boarding homes for 700 persons. The
monthly rates paid for maintenance of welfare cases in these establishments ranged
from $75 to $165. Overtures have been made repeatedly for the rates to be increased, but the degree of care offered by the individual establishment is a governing factor and this is being watched closely.
The Family Service and Child Welfare case load was relatively high and within
this group were found most complex and time-consuming problems. Coupled with
the work required in the above two categories, the processing of applications for
old-age assistance and proving eligibility for public aid for employable and unemployable persons, the field staff have experienced a very trying year.
In conclusion, I report that the turmoil of industrial labour disputes again
took its toll, with its immediate disruptory effects and aftermath of readjustments
in the economy of this area which, of course, placed heavier burdens on the social
welfare staff.   Grateful acknowledgment is given to all who participated.
Respectfully submitted.
E.  L.   RlMMER,
Regional Administrator. O  16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REGION  II
I beg to submit the following report of the activities of the Department of
Social Welfare in Region II for the fiscal year 1958/59:—
There have been no changes in the boundaries of the administrative unit known
as Region II since March 31st, 1958. The municipal administrative units within
the region have likewise remained the same.
The existing offices, as of March 31st, 1959, therefore, are again as follows:—
Amalgamated offices (municipal offices under the charge of municipal administrators):  Burnaby, District of Coquitlam, New Westminster City, City
and District of North Vancouver, Richmond, Vancouver City, and West
Vancouver.
District offices (Department of Social Welfare offices under the charge of
district supervisors, serving unorganized areas and per capita municipalities) :   New Westminster district office, serving unorganized areas and
the muncipalities of Delta, Fraser Mills, Port Coquitlam, and Port Moody;
Vancouver district office, serving unorganized areas of University of
British Columbia Endowment Lands, North Arm of Burrard Inlet, Howe
Sound, Cheakamus Valley, Sechelt Peninsula, Ocean Falls, and surrounding coast;  Westview district office, serving the District of Powell River
and surrounding area.
The following tables show the distribution of case load in the various categories, Table I for the years 1957/58 and 1958/59 (April 1st to March 31st) for
the whole of Region II, while Table II shows the breakdown of cases carried by
District and Municipal offices.   It should be pointed out that the City Social Service
Department in Vancouver does not carry child and family welfare cases, this work
being done by children's aid societies.
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major
Categories in Region II for the Fiscal Years 1957/58 and 1958/59
Category
1957/58
Number
Per Cent
1958/59
Number
Per Cent
Family Service. 	
Social Allowance 	
Blind Persons' Allowance-
Old-age Assistance .
Supplementary assistance to Old Age Security-
Disabled Persons' Allowance  	
Child Welfare     -
Health and Institutional  	
Totals  —
306
3,918
279
3,565
15,300
591
1,457
173
25,589
1.2
15.3
1.1
13.9
59.8
2.3
5.7
0.7
100.0
220
7,183
275
3,739
14,697
681
1,472
177
28,444
0.8
25.3
1.0
13.1
51.6
2.4
5.2
0.6
100.0 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O  17
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative
Offices of Region II as at March 31st, 1959
Category
Si
rt
-
3
«
§
rt
"3
O
u
_
|
1
-ft*
-
-
!■_
z£fl
u
>
X
68
- a
o rt
Z>
-
o
6
Jq
_
s
Vancouver
City
Ih
0)
>
S3
u -
9-3
>Q
—
_
>
a
o
'B
Total
25
518
34
456
2,264
76
380
50
17
123
7
80
286
24
133
1
56
467
20
208
773
35
134
16
1,709
18
199
2
102
449
21
123
8
28
198
10
129
848
33
135
31
22
138
2
93
414
34
123
12
20
103
4
88
419
18
317
30
8
36
3
73
317
14
37
16
26
98
1
40
170
3
90
13
220
5,303
192
2,470
8,757
423
7,183
Blind Persons' Allowance
275
3,739
Supplementary assistance to
Old Age Security      ,	
Disabled Persons' Allowance
Child Welfare
14,697
681
1,472
Health and Institutional	
—.,	
177
Totals.	
3,803
671
922
1,412
838
17,145
999
504
441
28,444
Unemployment continued to be an important factor during this year. The
trend, started last year, continued at an accelerated rate. The Vancouver and New
Westminster offices took the brunt of it due to location. Vancouver, being a large
centre with the possibility of securing aid from voluntary agencies if work was not
available, was attractive to transients. New Westminster is the gateway to Region
II and tends to receive requests for assistance from transients moving in and out
of the region.
Table III compares these two centres and their activities relating to unemployed
persons requiring assistance. This table represents cases which include heads of
families and their dependents, as well as single persons.
Table III.—Unemployed Employables
Vancouver
Number of
Cases
Cost
New Westminster
Number of
Cases
Cost
1958
May
Julv   	
October- 	
1959
March	
565
686
744
799
1,348
1,728
1,831
1,951
2,276
2,504
2,175
2,327
2,393
$27,925
34,797
41,182
43,838
59,817
98,420
107,323
110,980
129,025
142,083
121,294
131,832
138,485
15
19
12
15
26
67
74
73
152
199
221
216
201
$615
807
595
750
1,176
3,210
4,912
5,441
6,910
8,948
9,984
10,295
10,391
However, figures on straight unemployment, as it relates to employable persons,
do not show the complete picture. When able-bodied persons are out of work,
those partially able to support themselves have little chance of getting employment.
Table IV therefore shows a comparison between the same two centres, Vancouver
and New Westminster, as regards total numbers and expenditures for social assistance.   The figures shown are inclusive of those in Table III.
2 O  18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The totals for Region II on the same basis as in Table IV were at March 31st,
1959, for that month as follows:—Number of persons in families, 7,876, $214,767;
single persons, 4,461, $222,061.
Table IV.—Social Allowance Cases
Vancouver
o     -
ill
III
US
uS
New Westminster
IP
I Eft
Z&S
US
Z«B<
— _
US
1958
March 	
April 	
May 	
June	
July-	
August   ...
September
October
November
December .
1959
January	
February-
March 	
2,228
2,378
2,425
2,428
3,098
3,404
3,887
4,121
4,378
4,563
4,291
4,383
4,505
$54,874
64,293
67,287
67,997
79,081
92,800
116,485
112,074
119,001
135,246
118,159
120,214
124,394
2,067
2,138
2,201
2,236
2,668
3,122
3,081
3,221
3,507
3,686
3,503
3,663
3,678
$97,513
105,819
110,649
110,581
118,778
151,973
152,781
155,856
170,684
178,817
$152,387
170,112
177,936
178,578
197,859
244,773
269,266
267,930
289,685
314,063
170,983 289,142
182,577 | 302,791
185,187  j    309,581
263
251
281
298
290
379
$6,748
7,685
7,725
8,251
8,330
10,455
405 | 11,855
399 j 11,454
424 j 11,541
461 I 13,550
560 ! 13,093
485 I 13,348
553 | 14,956
I
136
137
143
130
134
160
158
178
234
282
293
290
269
$5,808
6,327
6,761
6,155
5,688
6,902
7,211
7,750
9,240
11,728
12,145
12,407
12,311
$12,556
14,012
14,486
14,406
14,018
17,357
19,066
19,204
20,781
25,278
25,238
25,755
27,267
I would like to take this opportunity to state that I have met with a large
measure of co-operation from persons in other public agencies and departments, as
well as from private agencies. The work of the Department of Social Welfare is
broad beyond the scope of the above report. The generalized case load carried by
most areas in Region II brings one into contact with cases as varied as human
experience. The field staff, municipal and provincial, who are the key persons in
the standards of service provided, must be given credit for the skill with which
they meet the pressures inherent in their task. They are to be commended for their
devotion to duty.
Respectfully submitted.
H. E. Blanchard,
Regional Administrator.
REGION III
I beg to submit the following report on the activities of the Social Welfare
Branch in Region III for the fiscal year 1958/59.
There have been no changes in the regional boundaries during the past year.
The region is bounded on the south by the International Border, on the north by
Wells Gray Park, on the east by Revelstoke and district, and on the west by Bra-
lorne. The principal concentrations of population are in and around the cities of
Kamloops, Vernon, Kelowna, and Penticton. The Social Welfare Branch services
are provided from six provincial offices, one each located at Kamloops, Kelowna,
Penticton, Oliver, Salmon Arm, and Vernon, and four amalgamated offices located
at Kamloops, Kelowna, Penticton, and Vernon. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 19
The Social Welfare Branch provides welfare services in the municipalities of
Armstrong, Enderby, Revelstoke, Salmon Arm, and Summerland, these services
being paid for by the municipalities concerned on a per capita basis. During the
year, the Provincial Government relieved the municipalities of Peachland, Spallum-
cheen, Coldstream, and Glenmore of responsibility for all welfare costs and administration. These responsibilities were assumed by the Provincial Government through
the local offices of the Social Welfare Branch.
The population in this region continues to grow at an estimated 5 to 7 per cent
per year, which is higher than the Provincial average. This increase in population
has resulted in a greater demand for our services, which is confirmed in the statistics
which follow.
As noted in last year's report, this region has a mixed economy which has, in
the past, tended to provide an adequate income for the majority of the residents.
However, in spite of this, the anticipated increase in unemployed persons requiring
assistance has occurred, and this would seem to be largely because of the tightening
economy throughout the rest of the Province. Persons have come to this region
seeking seasonal work picking fruit and vegetables or in the lumbering industry. In
spite of the fact that there has been the usual amount of employment, it has not been
enough to take care of the large influx of unemployed persons from other areas.
As a result, there has been a greatly increased demand on our services. This year
there was $162,650.07 dispensed to assist employable persons. This is an amount
eight times greater than that dispensed in the year before, which in turn was three
times greater than the previous year.
The foregoing comments on assistance to employable persons are supported
by the fact that the social assistance case load increased from 18.7 per cent of the
total case load to 25.6 per cent, and the total case load increased from 7,083 to
8,133, an increase of 14.8 per cent.
From the above it can be seen that the work load carried by the staff in this
region has increased at a considerable rate, and I would like to take this opportunity
of thanking them for the extra efforts they have been making and for the loyalty and
high ideals and principles that they have maintained under considerable pressures.
The following tables show the regional case load as of March 31st, 1958, and
March 31st, 1959, by types of assistance and location of servicing offices.
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices of
Region III as at March 31st, 1959
Category
Pa
0
o
i
pi
14
a
*_
c
o
c
u
o
P
o
EE
a5
P
o
p
u
>
a
o
o
!>.
_._
rt
i-U
a
o
_.—
O-U
a
o
_ j-
_.-
>U
rt
rO
102
547
22
202
589
1
401    68
155! 186
12|      6
93   106
3401  318
14
1-
27
270
9
152
397
28
235
9
194
6
66
306
16
4
1   265
131| 18"
3|      9
58|    81
146!  3IK
172
3
38
195
12
100
9
74
342
35
5
1402,082
Blind Persons' Allowance 	
Old-age Assistance  	
8|     87
102|   972
33RI3 789
Disabled Persons' Allowance     .
Child Welfare
29|    351    29|      91    18
385! 131| 225|    441 104
23|    121    161      21    11
21
232
1,124
82
Totals	 O 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major
Categories in Region III for the Fiscal Years 1957/58 and 1958/59
Category
1957/58
1958/59
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
251
1,326
81
892
3,234
184
1,028
87
3.5
18.7
1.1
12.6
45.7
2.6
14.5
1.2
265
2,082
87
972
3,289
232
1,124
82
3.3
Social Allowance _
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Old age Assistance   ....
Supplementary assistance to Old Age Security
25.6
1.1
12.0
40.4
2.8
Child Welfare    	
13 8
1 0
Totals	
7,083
100.0
8,133
100.0
Respectfully submitted.
R. I. Stringer,
Regional Administrator.
REGION IV
I submit herewith the annual report on the activities of the Department of
Social Welfare in Region IV for the fiscal year 1958/59.
Region IV is located in the south-eastern section of the Province, forming a
rough triangle, with Alberta and the International Border outlining the eastern and
southern boundaries. The third line of the triangle can be traced through the
immediate areas around Golden in the north to Nakusp and Greenwood to the south.
The total area covered by this region is approximately 28,000 square miles of mountains and valleys, threaded with rivers and dotted with lakes. The present population figure for this region is approximately 114,000.
There are one municipal and seven Provincial offices in this area. The seven
Provincial offices provide services for seven cities—Cranbrook, Kimberley, Fernie,
Nelson, Grand Forks, Rossland, and Greenwood. Kaslo and Slocan have dropped
their status as cities, thereby saving themselves the cost of welfare services. The
City of Trail continues to administer its own welfare programme but will probably
request the Department of Social Welfare to undertake this responsibility as from
April 1st, 1960.
This year has shown a continued upward trend in the amount of Social Allowance granted in the region, and this appears due to the progressively worsening
employment situation. The commencement of construction of a large pulp-mill at
Castlegar has attracted large numbers of job-seeking transients, many of whom have
not been placed. This, in turn, has brought a particularly heavy increase of work
in our Trail office handling the many requests for financial assistance. The numbers of family units and single persons assisted each month by this means increased
by 35.5 per cent over last year. The total amount of assistance granted showed a
corresponding increase.
It will be noted from Table II that all categories of services provided by our
Department showed a gain in numbers during the year with the exception of Blind
Persons' Allowances. These additional numbers of cases represent an increase of
11.6 per cent of our total case load since March 31st, 1958.
Boarding- and nursing-home facilities have increased in this region, but along
with them has grown an ever-increasing need for this type of care for old people. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 21
The Dr. Green Memorial Home has been opened in Cranbrook for persons in need
of boarding-home care and has a number of beds vacant. Being a new resource,
there is a natural reticence on the part of elderly people to seek admission immediately, but once a few have tried it and word is circulated, it will no doubt be filled
to capacity. Mt. St. Francis, a nursing-home in Nelson with a bed capacity of ninety-
eight, is hoping to eventually add a new floor to its building, which will provide room
for another forty-eight to fifty patients. The need for this is definitely proven in the
waiting lists for admission and the continual pressure we have from our general
hospitals to move chronic patients into such an institution.
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region IV as at March 31st, 1959
Category
M
o
o
j-
a
rt
U
c
0
-
V
1
_
ft
_
M
M
o
ft
-a
a
rt
O
_
o
•-
Z
-
_1
Hi    !U
ZQ
"rt
—
>.
"rt
.8"
g|
hs x
£2
"rt
8
37
226
6
100
356
19
150
24
27
134
1
86
228
23
75
6
8
80
4
74
240
18
42
3
6
137
9
110
284
18
34
4
67
334
1
141
583
24
168
15
5
72
3
39
242
5
47
4
15
198
4
107
302
28
90
15
9
115
2
26
126
7
48
7
174
1,296
Blind Persons' Allowance   	
30
683
Supplementary assistance to Old Age Security...	
2,361
142
Child Welfare 	
654
78
Totals	
918
580
469
602
1,333
417
759
340
5,418
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories in Region IV, as at March 31st, for the Years 1957/58 and 1958/59
Category
1957/58
1958/59
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
143
956
42
592
2,330
127
590
77
2.9
19.7
0.9
12.2
48.0
2.6
12.1
1.6
174
1,296
30
683
2,361
142
654
78
3.2
23.9
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Old-age Assistance 	
Old Age Security supplementary allowance	
Disabled Persons' Allowance   	
Child Welfare	
0.6
12.6
43.6
2.6
12.1
1.4
Totals	
4,857
100.0
5,418
100.0
In concluding, I would like to express thanks to all staff members in the region
for their conscientious efforts to meet the many pressing needs with which they have
been faced. I would like, also, to thank the municipal staffs, service clubs, and
other organizations for their kind help and co-operation.
Respectfully submitted.
R. J. BURNHAM,
Regional Administrator. O 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REGION V
I beg to submit the following report of the activities of the Social Welfare
Branch in Region V for the fiscal year 1958/59.
During the fiscal year under review the region continued to be served by six
district offices situated in Fort St. John, Pouce Coupe, Prince George, Vanderhoof,
Quesnel, and Williams Lake. However, the steady growth of population centred at
some distances from these offices foreshadows the need of the establishment of other
offices in the near future. In the meantime, office accommodations in the above
centres have been improved or are planned for improvement. Most notable was
the move of the Prince George office into the new Government Building on July
1st, 1958.
The number of municipalities responsible for welfare services was increased
on June 1st, 1958, when the Village of Fort St. John was incorporated as a town.
Now there are in the region four per capita municipalities—those of Fort St. John,
Dawson Creek, Prince George, and Quesnel—and in these municipalities reside
34.1 per cent of our total case load.
Resources for our clients were enhanced by the opening of the Senior Citizens'
Home in Prince George in February, 1959. This home provides accommodation
for couples at a cost of $50 per month.
We are still facing serious difficulties in the lack of an adequate number of
foster homes for children in care. On March 31st, 1959, we had 291 children in
care and, on our books, 208 foster homes. During the year the number of
children increased by fifty-five and the number of foster homes only increased
by nine. Unfortunately, many of the foster homes included in the above figure are
not available for use on occasion, and those that are available do not include a
sufficient number of families who could take problem children or older children.
We do not have too much difficulty in finding sufficient homes for infants.
In an effort to find more foster homes in Dawson Creek an ex-social worker
was employed for approximately the month of May. There were twenty-three
responses to newspaper and radio publicity but, out of these, only three proved
satisfactory foster-home applicants.
Employment generally throughout the region remained on a comparably high
level in that more people were working than previously. However, employment
did not keep up to the growth of population, with a result that there were an
increasing number of job seekers and many more applicants for social allowances.
Because a higher proportion of applicants were residents of the area with family
responsibility the amounts of our grants were considerably larger.
From Table I, which is shown below, it may readily be seen that the increase
in case load largely took place in Social Allowance, which increased to become
31.6 per cent of the total case load. There is also a considerable increase in the
number of Family Service cases, which is affected by the extra pressures of financial
insecurity. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 23
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major
Categories in Region V for the Fiscal Years 1957/58 and 1958/59
Category
1957/58
1958/59
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
160
941
49
366
819
33
660
37
5.2
30.7
1.6
12.0
26.7
1.1
21.5
1.2
213
1,038
44
379
846
42
700
28
6.5
31.5
Blind Persons' Allowance	
1.3
11.5
25.7
1.3
Child Welfare _
21.3
Health and Institutional	
0.9
Totals  	
3,065
100.0
3,290
100.0
It is interesting to note that services to the younger portion of our population
are increasing at a faster rate than services to the aged persons. For the first time
the aged categories occupy less than 40 per cent of our total case load. It has
always been proportionately a smaller part of our case load than is the situation
throughout the Province as a whole but, in spite of some improvement in the
resources for elderly people in the area, they are becoming an even lesser part of
the group requiring and receiving our services.
Table 11.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices of
Region V as at March 31st, 1959
Category
Fort
St. John
Pouce
Coupe
Prince
George
Quesnel
Vander-
hoof
Williams
Lake
Total
Family Service  	
39
76
2
27
121
3
76
1
43
169
2
62
182
11
109
11
67
518
11
148
227
10
261
10
25
108
35
95
6
105
2
4
48
12
54
91
3
62
....
35
119
17
53
130
9
87
4
213
1,038
44
379
Blind Persons' Allowance  	
Old Age Security supplementary assistance	
846
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Child Welfare-    	
42
700
Health and Institutional	
28
Totals. —
345
589
1,252
376
274
454
3,290
From Table II it may be seen that increases in total case loads occurred in all
Offices except that of Vanderhoof. The decrease in the latter office is ascribed to
very good employment opportunities arising out of construction in the area and a
consistently improving standard of work being done there. A stable office staff has
also contributed greatly to this. The greatest increase in case load, percentage-wise,
occurred in the Fort St. John district, where the increase during the year amounted
to 19 per cent. In November, 1958, social-work staff of this office was increased
through the employment of a social worker on a half-time basis. Nevertheless,
this office has responsibility for an extremely large area radiating from the Alaska
Highway and pressures on staff there still continue at an inordinate level.
At the end of the fiscal year the pressure of work on staff members was greatest
in the Prince George district, where the four social workers had responsibility for
an average case load of 313, the largest in the region. This office also suffered
greatly from change-over of staff. The district supervisor and three of the social
workers had to resign during the year because of family responsibilities and the 0 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
other social worker moved elsewhere. There was some delay in the appointment
of replacements for these persons and the situation was only held by the temporary
appointment of two university students during the summer months.
I wish to express my sincere appreciation to all those members of the community
who have given us so much help and co-operation in bringing service to our clients.
1 also wish to commend all staff on the energy and devotion they have given to
their duties.
Respectfully submitted.
V. H. Dallamore,
Regional Administrator.
REGION VI
I herewith submit the following report, which gives a summary of the activities
of the Department of Social Welfare in Region VI for the fiscal year 1958/59.
There was no change during the year in the regional boundaries. The region
extends from the Pattullo Bridge, on both sides of the Fraser River, to Lytton and to
the summit of the Hope-Princeton Highway, covering approximately 1,000 square
miles. The population of the area is estimated at 155,000, 90 per cent of whom
reside in the sixteen municipalities of the region.
Looked upon primarily as an agricultural area with logging and lumbering, the
Fraser Valley is fast becoming a residential area with some light industry. Illustrative of this growth is the municipality of Surrey. In 1921 the population was
5,000, the present population is estimated at 60,000.
The Department of Social Welfare plays the key role in the community social
services and it is the only social agency which offers a service to each and every
community of the area.
Several noteworthy administrative changes occurred during the past year. The
amalgamation of a municipal and Provincial office took place in two instances. In
May the Chilliwhack Township municipal office amalgamated with the Chilliwack
district office. This amalgamation resulted in the more efficient use of staff and
made possible specialized case loads for the total district served. An amalgamation
of the Langley municipal office and the Langley City, district office in June also
brought about an improved staff and administrative situation. These two amalgamations have proven to us the economic value of the larger administrative unit.
The supervisor finds the task lightened by amalgamation of offices, as case
load assignments can be more reasonably and economically planned and schedules
can be adopted and set more readily with all workers in one office. Time can be
saved by supervisor who does not have to divide time between two offices. With
less pressure the supervisor can maintain better supervision of the total job to be
done. Amalgamation also results in the more efficient use of social workers and
stenographic staff, all of which means a better service to the people to be served.
Effective September 1st, 1958, by Order in Council, the District of Kent was
relieved of its responsibility for social-welfare costs under the terms of the Municipal
Act. By a similar Order in Council, the Corporation of the District of Pitt Meadows
was relieved of its responsibility, effective December 1st, 1958.
The amalgamations reduced the administrative offices in the region from eight
to six. One of these, Surrey, is municipally administered, while White Rock,
Langley, Abbotsford, Chilliwack, and Haney are Provincially administered offices. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 25
At the end of the year we were providing service for ten municipalities on a
per capita basis and service in five municipalities which are not responsible for
social-welfare costs.
The six administrative offices of the region at March 31st, 1959, were staffed
by twenty-nine social workers, four district supervisors, one municipal administrator,
and one Regional Administrator. The staff increased by one during the year, a
municipally employed social worker. This was necessitated by the growth of population in the North Surrey area and the subsequent increase in need for our services.
The social welfare services available to the people of the region during the year
were shaped by the general economic conditions which prevailed. As a result of an
economic slump, by early fall our case load of unemployed employables skyrocketed.
This sudden increase in applications for Social Allowance created problems in all
offices. It became necessary for staff to concentrate on the task of meeting the
dependency needs of an ever-increasing number of people, who had exhausted their
unemployment insurance, their savings, and all employment resources. Priority
was given to meeting the problems involved in people not having the necessary
money to provide food, shelter, and clothing. It was not possible to meet these
sudden demands with additional staff. Therefore, from necessity, procedures were
streamlined and made more flexible so that needs might be quickly met.
In one office we were able to study the closed files on 100 single employable
men (non-transient) and fifty employable men, with families, who received some
assistance during the year under review. Approximately 60 per cent of the men
were under 40 years of age. This group was largely unskilled men whose pattern
appears to be to move from job to job, the first casualties of recession. The married
men, who were in receipt of assistance for one month only (22 per cent), seemed
to represent the more adequate men, who found new work. The single men, who
were on for one month only (50 per cent), seemed unstable, the " no fixed address "
person, who simply moved on. It was of interest to note that of the total group of
150 men, 53 per cent have been in British Columbia since 1940 or before, that is,
at least eighteen years. Because home-visits were not made, we know little of the
relationships or of the children in the family groups. Among the single men 66
per cent had no contact with any relative. Of the families studied, one-quarter
owned or were buying their home and the balance were renting. From the rentals
cited and from the assessed value of the homes owned and being purchased, marginal
shelter would be indicated.
The case-load figures given in Table I reveal that our regional case load increased sharply during the year by 960 cases. Social Allowance increased by 762
cases, Child Welfare increased by 117 cases, while the pension categories, which
make up 60 per cent of our total case load, increased by only 83 cases. Family
service was the only category which did not increase.
A number of the municipalities engaged in the Federal Winter Works Programme which was in effect during the most difficult winter months of the year.
Without this work, no doubt many more families would have required our services. O 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table I.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region VI for the Fiscal Years 1957/58 and 1958/59
Category
1957/58
1958/59
Number      Per Cent     Number     Per Cent
Family Service   	
Social Allowance  _  	
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Old-age Assistance	
Supplementary assistance to Old Age Security-
Disabled Persons' Allowance  	
Child Welfare 	
Health and Institutional..
Totals	
180
1,513
67
1,108
4,086
211
963
85
2.2
18.4
0.8
13.5
49.8
2.6
11.7
1.0
168
2,275
59
1,100
4,141
255
1,080
95
8,213
100.0
1.0
9,173 lOOMo"
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region VI as at March 31st, 1959
Category
Abbots-
ford
Chilliwack
Haney
Langley
Surrey
White
Rock
Total
20
494
14
250
820
59
162
23
51
580
14
219
711
50
222
15
26
216
6
112
390
29
130
11
21
231
6
127
546
32
200
8
44
661
15
338
1,355
69
352
23
6
93
4
54
319
16
14
15
168
2,275
Blind Persons' Allowance  	
Old-age Assistance  	
59
1,100
4,141
Disabled Persons Allowance. 	
Child Welfare 	
255
1,080
Health and Institutional-  	
95
Totals  	
1,842
1,862
920
■
1,171
2,857
521
9,173
An outstanding highlight of the past year has been the manner in which all
staff, stenographers and social workers, Provincial employees and municipal employees, have responded to the heavy demands made upon them.   They have worked
together with dedication and skill to provide the best possible service.
Respectfully submitted.
A. E. Bingham,
Regional Administrator.
REGION VII
I submit herewith the annual report of the activities of the Department of
Social Welfare in Region VII for the fiscal year 1958/59.
The geographic boundaries of the region remained the same. The region still
embraces the area from Milbanke Sound to the Alaska Border along the coast-line
and from the Queen Charlotte Islands eastward to Endako on Highway No. 16.
There was no change in the staff complement in the region either in numbers
or distribution. We were, however, fortunate in having supervisory stability in the
Prince Rupert-Terrace areas after a period of change and turnover in the previous
year.
The administrative arrangements with municipalities remained the same, with
our Departmnet doing the social work in the City of Prince Rupert and the District
Municipality of Kitimat on the usual per capita basis. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 27
The economic situation during the year was not as buoyant as previously
experienced. The slump of early 1958 continued throughout 1958 and into 1959.
Much of the activity in the region centres around the lumber industry, which
suffered a market relapse in 1957/58, with recovery slowly appearing in early 1958.
We were, in addition, affected by the recession in construction throughout the
Province, so that aid to the unemployed unskilled labourer entering the region in
search of work became extremely heavy. In Kitimat the abatement in aluminum
production continued, with several more potlines being deactivated. The resultant
lay-offs created some temporary financial difficulties for some families until they
were re-employed as a result of natural staff turnover.
The case load in the region increased a total of 611 cases or 35.6 per cent. The
largest increase was in Social Allowance cases, which increased 451 or more than
100 per cent. It is significant, however, that in the same period the Child Welfare
case load increased 103 or 25.5 per cent, with the greatest increase arising in the
number of children admitted to care under the Protection of Children Act. Children
of full or part native-Indian extraction made up over 60 per cent of these admissions
to care.
In December, 1958, the region became 1 year old, so that the interesting period
of transition was nearly complete. This meant more time was available for administrative improvements and for vital social research. As a result there are achievements in both areas.
In the Prince Rupert office structural changes in conjunction with an office
reorganization inspired by the supervisor have led to a more pleasant reception area
for the clients as well as a much more efficient office. In Kitimat, as a result of
joint meetings with co-operative municipal officials, we were given office space in
the municipal building, and the services of their receptionist in making appointments
for the social worker from Terrace, who now maintains a regular visiting schedule.
This has facilitated a greater output per social-work hour in the District Municipality
of Kitimat.
The recently innovated local research programme has led to some interesting
findings, with particular reference to the difference in social problems in Region VII
as compared with other regions. Aided by the Departmental Research Consultant,
we have also begun some research into the effect on our services as a result of the
movement of native Indians off the reserve. This cross-cultural movement results
in many social breakdowns, especially in Prince Rupert, where the movement is the
most accelerated in British Columbia.
In Region VII we find that the regional case load differs a great deal, on a
categorical percentage basis, from the Provincial picture. In January the average
case load per worker in the Province was 346. The average Provincial case load
contained 220 of the categories administered by the Old-age Assistance Board and
121 of the other categories, largely Social Allowance and Child Welfare. In Region
VII the figures were nearly reversed. Our average case load in January was made
up of 111 Old-age Assistance Board administered cases and 201 cases in other
categories. This indicates that in the region the white population has a greater
percentage of young people. It also indicates the demands on a social worker are
apt to require greater experience, training, and skill to fulfil.
In January we also determined that of the total Indian population in British
Columbia, 23.8 per cent, nearly 8,000 persons, lived within the region. This means
that nearly one-fifth of the population is of Indian status. The enfranchised group
and those of mixed inheritance are not included. It is little wonder that we find
ourselves working more and more closely with the Federal Department of Indian
Affairs.   We have this year held several joint meetings with Indian Agents in which O 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
closer co-operation and understanding on both sides has been achieved. In March
we embarked on a study of the potential cases of neglected children in the Prince
Rupert and Smithers area. It is hoped that the results will aid us in protecting
Native children as well as white more wisely and effectively.
It is hoped that in the coming year more resources for older citizens requiring
nursing-home care will be developed in the North.
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region VII as at March 31st, 1959
Category
Burns
Lake
Prince
Rupert
Smithers
Terrace
Total
15
75
12
36
76
5
59
3
38
452
20
79
240
18
185
10
12
136
18
13
53
139
84
1
36
203
7
30
80
5
179
7
101
866
Blind Persons' Allowance 	
57
158
449
Disabled Persons' Allowance     	
Child Welfare	
167
507
21
Totals	
281
1,042
456
547
2,326
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major
Categories in Region VII for the Fiscal Years 1957/58 and 1958/59
1957/58
1958/59
Category
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
91
415
50
175
523
34
404
22
5.3
24.2
2.9
10.2
30.5
2.0
23.6
1.3
101
866
57
158
449
167
507
21
4.3
37.2
Blind Persons' Allowance...    ...            .....
2.5
68
Supplementary assistance to Old Age Security 	
19.3
Disabled Persons' Allowance      - ..  	
Child Welfare
7.2
21.8
.9
1.715     I        100 0
2,326
100.0
In closing, it is with pleasure I thank municipal officials, school authorities,
police, service clubs, members of the Bar, ministers of many religious groups, and
many private citizens for their interest and help. Our increased family of foster
parents deserve our special commendation. The staff have by their loyalty and
devotion to the needs of the client maintained all urgently required services.
Respectfully submitted.
W. H. Crossley,
Regional Administrator. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 29
PART III.—DIVISIONAL ADMINISTRATION
FAMILY DIVISION
I wish to present the annual report of the Family Division covering the services
provided for families and individuals by the Department of Social Welfare as
described in the provisions of the Social Assistance Act, the Mothers' Allowances
Act, and the Family Service programme for the fiscal year April 1st, 1958, to March
31st, 1959.
SOCIAL ALLOWANCES SECTION
For the year under review the case-load figures show an unprecedented situation. There was, in effect, no seasonal decline and in the summer months, when a
normal reduction in Social Allowance case load might have been expected, the
figures rose alarmingly. The increase between April and September was over 23
per cent, or almost one-quarter. From September, 1958, to March, 1959, the caseload figures rose slightly more than 26 per cent. The annual percentage increase
between April, 1958, and March, 1959, was 53 per cent approximately. There
were many causes for this increase in the Social Allowance case load, but the important fact remains that they were beyond the control of the Department, which
was, therefore, faced with the problem of dealing with this onslaught of applications.
To the field staff, who " manned the ramparts " and dealt with the day-to-day
volume of applications across their desks, this must have been the supreme challenge.
The above figures are demonstrated by the following table, which shows case
load and recipients by each month of the fiscal year.
Table I.—Case Load and Total Number of Recipients in Pay on a Monthly Basis
Heads of
Families
Dependents
Single
Recipients
Total
Case Load
April, 1958  	
4,385
4,436
4.341
4,750
5.018
5,531
5.680
6,208
6.739
6.820
6,981
6,997
11,784
12,007
11.708
12,764
13.R60
14,858
15,648
16.876
18.706
19,234
19.619
19,745
6,944
6,932
6.765
7,501
8,103
8.160
8.779
9 540
10.029
10,058
10.384
10,335
23,113
23,375
22,814
25.015
26,981
28,549
30,107
32,624
35,474
36.112
36.984
37,077
11,329
May, 1958  	
June, 1958 	
July, 1958	
August, 1958        .	
September, 1958 	
October, 1958	
November, 1958-	
December, 1958    	
January. 1959	
11,368
11,106
12,251
13,121
13,691
14,459
15,748
16,768
16,878
February, 1959—.    	
17,365
March, 1959	
17,332
Of the total number of recipients of Social Allowance in the Province in March,
1959 (37,077), an increase of nearly 64 per cent over March, 1958, the totals
according to regions are shown in Table II below. As at March, 1959, nine municipalities were no longer responsible for Social Allowance costs under section 639
of the Municipal Act. However, one municipality became responsible during the
fiscal year, and where no figures are shown this indicates loss or assumption of
responsibility.   March, 1958, figures are shown in parentheses. O 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Regional Totals of Number of Recipients of Social Allowance in March,
1959 (March, 1958, Totals in Parentheses)
Provincial Case Loads
Region I—
Alberni ....
Courtenay
Duncan 	
Nanaimo  .
Victoria ...
250 (97)
804 (480)
289 (203)
745 (405)
472 (282)
2,560 (1,467)
Municipal Case Loads
Alberni City
Courtenay
Central Saanich 	
Duncan     	
Esquimalt   	
Nanaimo 	
North Cowichan	
Oak Bay   	
Port Alberni „ _	
Saanich    	
Victoria     1,601
94
83
35
84
101
533
157
35
212
271
(60)
(41)
(12)
(29)
(69)
(264)
(89)
(18)
(116)
(203)
(993)
3,206 (1,894)
5,766    (3,361)
Region II—
New Westminster
Vancouver	
Westview  	
Region III—
Kamloops	
Kelowna 	
Penticton   	
Salmon Arm
Vernon  	
Region IV
Cranbrook
Creston 	
Fernie	
Grand Forks
Nelson  	
New Denver .
Trail  	
Region V
Fort St. John _
Pouce Coupe
Prince  George
Quesnel 	
Vanderhoof	
Williams Lake
42 (46)
300 (196)
122  (54)
464  (296)
1,183 (874)
395 (226)
702 (376)
270 (174)
673 (354)
3,223 (2,004)
458  (313)
443  (251)
98
113
451
171
(42)
(79)
(530)
(95)
430  (179)
2,164 (1,489)
225 (163)
346 (258)
550 (467)
163 (107)
146 (138)
301 (178)
1,731 (1,311)
Burnaby    1,169
Coquitlam      378
Delta     _  177
New Westminster   832
North Vancouver City .... 300
North Vancouver District 148
Port Coquitlam   131
Port Moody   84
Powell  River _   169
Richmond   362
Vancouver   8,686
West Vancouver  -  90
(708)
(277)
(181)
(412)
(171)
(155)
(94)
(43)
(117)
(351)
(4,873)
(95)
12,526
(7,477)
Armstrong  	
33
51
303
192
399
45
167
94
188
(18)
(38)
(15)
(12)
Kamloops	
(236)
(109)
Peachland   .,,
Penticton   	
(13)
(217)
(36)
(29)
Salmon Arm District
Spallumcheen	
Summerland   	
Vernon    ..
(78)
(29)
(47)
(125)
1,472
(1,002)
Dawson Creek City
Prince George 	
Quesnel  	
Fort St. John	
12,990 (7,773)
4,695 (3,006)
Cranbrook     279 (131)
Fernie   47 (38)
Grand Forks  _. 66 (46)
Greenwood  _._  11 (11)
Kaslo    —- (2)
Kimberley  49 (33)
Nelson     ......  235 (135)
Rossland    67 (38)
Slocan _  (8)
Trail    331 (132)
1,085     (574)
143 (134)
366 (235)
65 (77)
46 (...)
620     (446)
3,249 (2,063)
2,351 (1,757) REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 31
Provincial Case Loads
Region VI—
Abbotsford    209     (119)
Chilliwack   580     (284)
Haney  ... —       48     ( )
837     (403)
Region VII—
Burns Lake  ___  167 (138)
Prince Rupert    234 (155)
Smithers   313 (229)
Terrace      426 (121)
Municipal Case Loads
Chilliwack City         284 (190)
Chilliwhack Township ....       710 (364)
Kent    (5)
Langley            557 (369)
Langley City _           67 (62)
Maple Ridge          523 (287)
Matsqui           670 (302)
Mission District          316 (183)
Mission Town           93 (66)
Pitt Meadows   _  (49)
Sumas          143 (74)
Surrey         1,828 (1,162)
White Rock          223 (187)
5,414 (3,300)
Kitimat        565 (42)
Prince Rupert          70 (287)
6,251  (3,703)
1,140     (643)
635     (329)
1,775     (972)
37,077 (22,635)
The distribution of recipients of Social Allowance between organized and unorganized areas has remained relatively constant in that approximately 67 per cent
resided in organized territory and approximately 33 per cent in unorganized territory. In so far as supervision is concerned, however, 55 per cent is supervised and
administered by Provincial district offices, while 45 per cent is administered and
supervised by municipal staff, of which the Province shares 50 per cent in accordance with the Social Assistance Act. Of this 45 per cent, the City of Vancouver
supervises one-half or 23 per cent approximately, of the total municipal case load.
The following are the approximate percentages of the total number of recipients
by region as at March, 1959, with March, 1958, figures for comparison.
March, 1959 March, 1958
(PerCent) (Per Cent)
Region I  15.6 14.8
Region II     35.0 34.3
Region III      12.6 13.3
Region IV         8.8 9.1
Region V       6.3 7.8
Region VI _ 16.9
Region VII       4.8
16.4
4.3
The following table provides a comparison of Social Allowance case loads, as
well as recipients, as at March 31st for the past three years:—
Table III.—Case Load and Total Number of Recipients
March, 1957
March, 1958
March, 1959
3,695
6.029
4,284
6,857
6,997
10,335
9,724
9,397
11,141
11,494
17,332
19,745
19,121
22,635
37,077
From this table it will be observed that from the end of March, 1958, to the
end of March, 1959, the Social Allowance case load had increased by 6,191 or
slightly more than 55 per cent—alternatively, approximately twenty average case O 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
loads of 300 cases.   This would be in addition to any increase in case loads in other
case loads in the Departmental social welfare service.
In September, 1958, the method of sharing and equalization of Social Allowance costs was changed, but in August, 1958, the distribution of recipients of Social
Allowance on the basis of legal residence in accordance with the terms of the
Residence and Responsibility Act was as shown in the following table:—
Table IV.-
—Legal Residence
of Social Allowance Recipients
March, 1957
March, 1958
August, 1958
10,299
8,822
11,804
10,831
14,566
Provincial responsibilities
12,415
Totals  	
19,121                      22,635                      26,981
Approximately 53 per cent of the recipients were municipal responsibilities and
approximately 47 per cent were responsibilities of the Province.
Effective April 1st, 1958, the basis of sharing Social Allowance costs was
changed from 80 per cent/20 per cent by the Province with the municipalities to
85 per cent/15 per cent which continued until August 31st, 1958. On September
1st, 1958, the proving of legal residence in individual cases became no longer necessary and the total costs of Social Allowance were shared by the Province on a 90
per cent/10 per cent ratio with the municipalities. The municipal portion was to
be and is now chargeable to municipalities on a per capita basis.
Following is a statement of expenditures made by the Social Welfare Branch
for Social Allowances, medical services, etc., during the year April 1st, 1958, to
March 31st, 1959:—
Table V.—Expenditures by the Province for Social Allowances,
Medical Services, etc.
Fiscal Year
1956/57
Fiscal Year
1957/58
Fiscal Year
1958/59"
Cases who are the responsibility of a municipality (80 per cent
paid by the Province)    	
Cases who are the sole responsibility of the Province (100 per
cent paid by the Province)	
Basic Social Allowances 	
Repatriation, transportation within the Province, nursing- and
boarding-home care (other than tuberculosis), special allowances and grants
Emergency payments, such as where a family may lose its home
by fire or similar circumstances	
Municipal and Provincial cases—
(a) Tuberculosis, boarding-, nursing-, and private-home cases
(b) Transportation of tuberculosis cases
(c) Comforts allowance for tuberculosis cases..
Hospitalization of Social Assistance cases	
$2,633,636.62
2,521,431.47
1,505,034.90
37,163.45
327,432.07
2,868.16
8,924.75
13,927.70
Gross Social Allowance costs as per Public AccountS-
Less municipal share of costs and sundry refunds..
Net Social Allowances	
$7,050,419.12
Administration and operation of project and pavilion for Japanese
at New Denver 	
Medical services and drugs ,	
Totals 	
$61,990.65
2,240,710.53
$2,781,941.03
2,919,033.33
1,640,054.12
47,555.23
298,322.92
3,342.22
6,626.00
30,980.20
$10,696,506.04
1,831,882.18
59,008.84
348,610.21
2,471.10
6,941.50
25,678.15
$12,971,098.02
843,215.72
$7,727,855.05! | $12,127,882.30
$36,480.08
2,422,614.32
$38,540.57
2,814,558.80
$9,353,120.30 |$10,186,949.45 | $14,980,981.67
1 Reconciliation with Public Accounts:—•
Gross expenditure for Social Allowances as per Public Accounts.
Less credits (excluding amount chargeable to Government of Canada)..
$7,891,944.34
164,089.29
$7,727,855.05
2 Effective September 1st, 1958, the basis of sharing social welfare costs with municipalities was changed
from 85 per cent/15 per cent to 90 per cent/10 per cent and the municipal share billed on a proportion of
population rather than by individual residence responsibility.    Consequently, social allowance costs for 1958/59
have been shown in gross with the municipal share deducted in total to arrive at net costs. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 33
For the fiscal year 1958/59 the Province received from the Federal Government re—
Unemployment Assistance Agreement  $5,984,364.66
Welfare assistance to immigrants  6,007.25
Welfare assistance to Hungarian refugees  3,695.40
Sundry  3,506.66
$5,997,573.97
Sponsorship for Physical Rehabilitation
During this fiscal year the Social Welfare Branch, and responsible municipalities, where and when applicable, sponsored a total of eighty-nine trainees and
patients in the G. F. Strong Rehabilitation and the Canadian Arthritis and Rheumatism Society Medical Centre for approximately 4,400 days of resident care and
training.
Of these eighty-nine persons, nine suffered from some form of arthritis, and
eighty were physically handicapped or orthopaedically disabled. Three required
speech therapy. Forty-eight were in-patients and forty-one out-patients. In addition,
some of the in-patients later became out-patients.
There is an interesting age-span in this group, ranging from 12 years to 83
years of age.   The age distribution is as follows:—
0-20 years	
21-30     „   	
31-40
41-50
51-60
61-70
71-80
81-90
Not given.
  12
  18
  16
  15
  14
  8
  1
  1
  4
89
With this age-span it is not anticipated that physical retraining or rehabilitation
will also lead to economic rehabilitation. Many trainees do return to employment
or receive vocational training for employment other than that in which they had
previously earned their living. Others were helped to become more sufficient in
self-help and care, thus eliminating the necessity of boarding- or nursing-home care.
Others are trained to operate more efficiently in their own home, and in greater
comfort.
Vocational Training
Again this year through the resource of the Dominion-Provincial Vocational
Training Grants, administered by the Department of Education, many recipients of
Social Allowance have received vocational training to enable them to achieve
economic independence. The Branch participates financially in some instances and
offers help with social planning to any trainees or their families requiring such help.
This is an extremely valuable resource to the Branch.
Developments in Social Assistance Programme
1. Effective April 1st, 1958, the new Social Allowance rates became effective,
comprising a monthly increase of $5 for a single person, $10 for two persons, and
$2 for each additional dependent. O 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
2. On April 1st, 1958, the amendment to section 6 of the regulations to the
Social Assistance Act came into effect, which provided that municipalities with a
population of 15,000, rather than 10,000 as previously, or over employ at least one
social worker. Responsible municipalities, as defined in section 639 of the Municipal
Act and with a population of less than 15,000, may either appoint their own social
worker or purchase social welfare services from the Social Welfare Branch at a fee
of 30 cents per capita rather than 15 cents per capita as previously required.
3. On September 1st, 1958, as mentioned elsewhere in this report, the new
method of sharing and allocating social assistance costs between the Province and
municipalities came into effect. The basis of sharing became 90 per cent/10 per
cent with the 10 per cent municipal share allocated on a per capita basis. One of
the important effects of this new arrangement was to eliminate the necessity of
establishing and confirming residence in a local area within the Province. The
necessity of establishing and confirming inter-Provincial residence, however, continued to be necessary.
4. In December, 1958, the customary Christmas bonus to recipients of social
allowance was granted—namely, $5 to heads of families and $2 for single persons.
In accordance with section 13 of the regulations to the Social Assistance Act,
thirty-four Boards of Review were established in this fiscal year.
Under section 9 of the Residence and Responsibility Act, one meeting of the
Board of Arbitration was called.
MOTHERS' ALLOWANCES SECTION
This fiscal year was to see a development concerning Mothers' Allowances
which had been considered for a long time. As has been pointed out in previous
Annual Reports, the case load had been consistently dropping for many years, and
the provision of a categorical form of assistance known as Mothers' Allowance had
become redundant in the light of the broader coverage and implementation of the
Social Assistance Act.
At the time of the inauguration of the new basis of sharing social welfare costs,
mentioned in the Social Allowances section, it seemed also appropriate that the
Mothers' Allowances case load be included. To this end, therefore, from September
1st, all current recipients of Mothers' Allowance commenced to receive their allowance from Social Allowance funds, administered through the local welfare offices,
and no further applications were taken for Mothers' Allowance. This has meant no
hardship whatever, as the rates for Mothers' Allowance and Social Allowance had
been identical for many years, and administrative policies the same, and, what is
even more important, the eligibility qualifications for Social Allowance have always
been broader and less prohibitive since the passing of the Social Assistance Act in
1945.
Thus passed into the history of social welfare in this Province a provision which
had been in the beginning rightly hailed as a most advanced piece of social legislation
and which for many years had admirably fulfilled its purpose. With the advance in
social welfare philosophy and progressive programmes, however, this provision had
outgrown its usefulness, and its purposes integrated into other programmes.
This final report therefore covers the five-month period April 1st to August
31st, 1958, only, after which the case-load figures and costs are incorporated into
the tables in the Social Allowances section.
For the final five months the case-load continued to decrease, as had been the
trend for many years. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
The following table illustrates this trend:—
Table I.—Comparative Statement of Case Load
As at March, 1957  284
As at March, 1958  243
As at August, 1958  232
O 35
On a monthly basis the case-load figures are as follows:—
Table II.—Monthly Case Load, April 1st, 1958, to August 31st, 1958
Month
Number of
Allowances
in Pay
Number of Persons
Incapacitated
Husbands
Mothers
Children
April, 1958 •  ' 	
243
238
239
234
232
243
238
239
234
232
584
569
570
555
547
29
May, 1958	
29
June, 1958 	
29
July, 1958  ... 	
29
August, 1958	
30
The following table illustrates how applications and reapplications were dealt
with in this five-month period:—
Table III.—Statement of Applications Considered and Decisions Made
Applications pending as at April 1st, 1958      8
New applications received to August 31st, 1958  11
Reapplications received to August 31st, 1958     2
Total  21
Decisions—
Grants 	
Refusals .__
Withdrawn
     2
  11
21
Applications pending as at August 31st, 1958     0
Total  21
Reasons for refusals—
Property in excess	
Separation not granted by court
Total	
Reasons for applications pending—
No applications pending. O 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Cancellations during the same period totalled nineteen, and for the reasons
indicated in the following table:—
Table IV.—Reasons for Cancellation of the Allowances
Social Allowance preferable form of assistance  1
Mother earning in excess  7
Mother ineligible under section 7 of the Mothers' Allowances Act  4
Husband released from Penitentiary-
Only child returned to mother's care..
Only child under 18 left school	
Older children maintaining	
Withdrawn	
1
1
2
2
1
Total
.19
Of the cancelled cases, the length of time each family had been in receipt of
Mothers' Allowance is as follows:—
Years  12      3      4      5      6      7      8      9    10    11    12
Cases   4      3       1       3      2      1      __      2      1       1      __      1
Total cases, 19.   Average length of time on allowance, 4.63 years.
The mothers who were in receipt of Mothers' Allowance as at August, 1958,
were eligible for allowance under specific qualifications defined by the Act, and their
status was as follows:—
Table V.—Status and Number of Mothers and Dependents in Receipt of
Allowance as at August, 1958
Number of Children
Total
Qualifications Set by the Act
1
2
3               4
5
6
7
44
2
2
2
5
4
4
48
4
2
2
1
5
1
6
11
37
2
1
2
3
6
2
1
14
2
1
1
2
1
2
3
1
1
3
1
2
1
151
Penitentiary      	
10
3
6
Incapacitated husbands away  	
Incapacitated husbands O.A.S., O.A.A., B.P.,
and D.P.A	
7
17
2
Divorced  	
Deserted 	
16
19
1
63
80
54
•51    1        5     1        _    I        11    in
From the above table the following figures are derived:—
Table VI.—Number of Individuals for Whom Allowance Granted
Mothers  232
Husbands
Children __
6i
547
Total
785
i This figure applies only to those incapacitated husbands who reside in the home and who are included in
the Mothers' Allowance payment. In addition, it will be noted that there is a total of twenty-seven incapacitated
husbands in the mental hospital, out of the home, or in receipt of Old Age Security, Old-age Assistance, Blind
Persons' Allowance, or Disabled Persons' Allowance. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 37
Costs of Mothers' Allowances
The basic amount of Mothers' Allowances was determined by the Mothers'
Allowances Act and had remained unchanged since the Act was proclaimed in 1920.
It was necessary, therefore, to pay a supplementary allowance from the Social
Allowance funds in order that the recipients of Mothers' Allowances would receive
a monthly amount equivalent to the allowance payable to recipients of Social
Allowance. This supplementary allowance, as well as the Mothers' Allowance, was
a total charge on the Province.
Because of the two sources of payment for Mothers' Allowance recipients it
is necessary to present two financial statements in order to report total costs.
Table VII.—Mothers' Allowances Financial Statement for the Five Months
April 1st, 1958, to August 31st, 1958
Amount of allowance paid as follows:—
Month
April, 1958	
May, 1958	
June, 1958	
Amount of Allowance
. $11,342.47
10,829.47
11,125.72
July, 1958       10,950.97
August, 1958          9,755.82
$54,004.45
Reconciliation with Ledger Account in Controlling and
Audit Branch: Amount advanced by Minister of
Finance 	
$54,004.45
The books and records of the Director of Welfare respecting Mothers* Allowances for five months' period
ending August 31st, 1958, have been examined under my direction.
C. J. FERBER,
Comptroller-General.
Table VIII.—Financial Statement of Supplementary Social Allowances Paid to
Recipients of Mothers' Allowances (Vote 188) from April 1st, 1958, to August
31st, 1958.
Amount of allowances paid as follows:-
Month
April, 1958 	
May, 1958 	
June, 1958 	
July, 1958	
August, 1958 	
Amount of Allowance
_ $14,214.80
__ 13,618.30
_ 13,895.25
_. 13,964.85
_    12,461.65
  $68,154.85
Reconciliation with Ledger Account in Controlling and Audit
Branch:  Amount advanced by Minister of Finance  $68,154.85
The books and records of the Director of Welfare respecting Supplementary Social Allowances paid to
recipients of Mothers' Allowances for five months' period ending August 31st, 1958, have been examined under
my direction.
C. J. FERBER,
Comptroller-General. O 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IX.—Statement Showing per Capita Cost to the Province
Fiscal Year
Total
Expenditures
Population
at June of
Each Year
Per Capita
Cost to the
Province
1956/57     ...     	
1957/58     .   .	
$321,342.76
282,383.05
122,159.30
1,398,464
1,487,000
1,544,000
.23
.19
April/58-August/58                                           	
.08
General Comments
No amendments were made to the Mothers' Allowances Act or regulations to
the Act during the year under review. On September 1st, 1958, it became non-
operative as its provisions are no longer used nor required.
At the time of the transfer to the Social Allowance case load the predominance
of cases living in organized territory was still evident, as seen by the following
table:—
Table X.—Proportion of Applications and Grants in Organized Territory
Total applications and reapplications received     13
Applicants residing in organized territory     13
Applicants having legal residence in organized territory-..    12
Total grants made from April 1st, 1958, to August 31st, 1958       8
Recipients residing in organized territory       7
Recipients having legal residence in organized territory.-..      8
Allowances in pay as at August 31st, 1958  232
Recipients having legal residence in unorganized territory    17
Recipients having legal residence in organized territory.— 215
Conclusions
As this final annual report on the administration of the Mothers' Allowances
Act concludes, it is perhaps fitting that some thought should be directed to all those
mothers and children who were helped in some measure by the allowance which
they required to help them face one of the most potentially disastrous hazards of
life—namely, the loss by death, incapacitation, or absence from other causes of the
support and strength of the husband, father, and breadwinner.
The withdrawal of the provision of Mothers' Allowance was undertaken only
after long, careful consideration of what this might mean to the welfare of families
who were already receiving and might require such assistance in the future. It was,
therefore, only in true sincerity and belief that their needs would be served equally
as well and in many instances better that the administrative decision was made to
eliminate a programme which had been in existence for nearly 40 years and predated many of our current social-assistance programmes.
The allowance has never been a beneficent one, but special tribute should be
paid to all those mothers who have used it wisely and well to maintain a happy and
satisfactory home-life for their children, and thus fulfilled to the best of their ability
the primary purpose of this legislation.
FAMILY SERVICE SECTION
" Family Service," as the term implies, is a casework service to families which
the Branch is required to give in accordance with the terms and definitions of the
Social Assistance Act. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 39
For administrative purposes the term is also used in a categorical sense to
cover all those varied services given to individuals and families.
It is the basic service of all others, because it is founded on a belief in the
importance of the family unit in society and on the primary goal of all social work
to preserve and strengthen family life. As has been explained previously its purpose
is to try to save marriages threatening to dissolve, to help when separation seems
inevitable, to encourage and help parents whose conduct or way of life might otherwise lead to loss of guardianship of their children, to work with the troubled teenager or the older person whose sense of worth and security is threatened.
Financial need is not always the criterion of eligibility or need for Family
Service and counselling. But whether or not financial need exists, service to the
family and its children offers us our greatest challenge and scope for preventive and
rehabilitative work. In addition to the special skill and knowledge of the social
worker the most important requirement is precious time for thoughtful, consistent,
and helpful service. Without this latter no amount of skill or knowledge can compensate for its lack. Under inordinate pressure, however, this seems inevitably to
be the area of service which first suffers. The financial and human costs are not
immediately discernible, but they are, nevertheless, ever present and cumulative
and compounded.
The following table gives the monthly Family Service case load and activity
in that case load for the fiscal year under review: —
Table I.—Total of Family Service Cases, April 1st, 1958, to March 31st, 1959
Total at
Beginning
of Month
Opened
Closed
Total at
End of
Month
Last Year
July         ______	
October	
1959
March —   __  	
1.296
1,287
1,274
1,268
1,252
1,258
1,248
1,305
1,263
1,263
1,268
1,315
145
173
145
205
174
191
208
158
120
194
208
163
154
186
151
221
168
201
151
200
120
189
161
161
1,287
1,274
1,268
1,252
1,258
1,248
1,305
1,263
1,263
1,268
1,315
1,317
1,454
1,484
1,448
1,462
1,393
1,360
1,390
1,397
1,400
1,365
1,325
1,296
The significant observation in these figures is that this case load declined in
the previous fiscal year and has risen only slightly in the fiscal year under review,
while other case loads have increased to such an outstanding degree. This seems
to be an unnatural trend which requires further study from many aspects. It is
hoped that this can be done in the ensuing year.
Other Services
Family Allowances
The Family Division continues to serve as a channel for requests from the
Family Allowances Division of the Department of National Health and Welfare for
reports concerning a family's use of, or eligibility for, Family Allowances. O 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Requests Received from Family Allowances Division, April 1st, 1958,
to March 31st, 1959
Received during the fiscal year April 1st, 1958, to March 31st, 1959, by
months—
April, 1958  7
May, 1958  17
June, 1958  2
July, 1958  8
August, 1958  11
September, 1958  5
October, 1958  10
November, 1958 ,  6
December, 1958  4
January, 1959  11
February, 1959  5
March, 1959  9
Total requests received  95
These requests for reports were directed as follows:—
Table III.—Referrals to District Offices and Other Agencies
Referrals pending as at April 1st, 1958 (amended figure)     14
Requests forwarded during fiscal year April 1st, 1958, to March 31st,
1959, by regions—
Region I1  34
Region II1  24
Region III     7
Region IV      5
Region V   11
Region VI   11
Region VII     3
—    95
Total number of requests referred  109
1 Includes referrals to private agencies in Victoria and Vancouver.
Table IV.—Referrals Completed within Fiscal Year, by Regions
Region I  3 7
Region II  22
Region III  6
Region IV  4
Region V  11
Region VI  9
Region VII  3
Total   92
Total number of requests referred  109
Referrals pending as at April 1st, 1959  17 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 41
Third-party Administration of Family Allowances
During this fiscal year there were no requests for third-party administration of
Family Allowances.
Old Age Security
The Division also serves as a referral channel for the Old Age Security Division
of the Department of National Health and Welfare for requests to assist elderly
persons who encounter difficulties in completing their application for Old Age
Security.
Table V.—Requests Received from Old Age Security Division from April 1st,
1958, to March 31st, 1959
Pending as at April 1st, 1958 (amended figure)     3
Received during fiscal year April 1st, 1958, to March 31st, 1959, by
months—
April, 1958      1
May, 1958      4
     2
     2
     1
     1
     1
     1
June, 1958 	
July, 1958 	
August, 1958 	
September, 1958
November, 1958
December, 1958
13
Total case load
16
Table VI.—Requests Forwarded during Fiscal Year April 1st, 1958, to
March 31st, 1959, by Regions
Region II  3
Region III   3
Region V   4
Region VI   3
Total number of requests  13
Pending as at April 1st, 1958 (amended figure)  3
Total   16
Region II
Region III
Region V _
Region VI
Table VII.—Reports Completed by Regions
Total reports completed.
Total number of requests	
3
3
6
3
15
16
Requests pending as at April 1st, 1959. O 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Family Division wishes to express sincere appreciation to the clerical staff,
social workers, district supervisors, and Regional Administrators for their help and
co-operation and gratitude for their loyalty and service, without which the purposes
and responsibilities of the Division and Branch could not be fulfilled.
This appreciation also goes to municipal welfare departments, other departments of Government, and voluntary agencies for their co-operation and advice
whenever sought.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Marie Riddell,
Assistant Director of Social Welfare. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 43
CHILD WELFARE DIVISION
Three thousand three hundred and thirty-seven children were in the care of
the Superintendent of Child Welfare during the fiscal year and 2,586 remain as at
March 31st, 1959. Of these, 2,243 are in foster homes throughout the Province,
193 are in care of a Children's Aid Society for special reasons, 87 have moved
with relatives or foster-parents to another Province, 42 are in correctional institutions, and 21 are in Woodlands School, Provincial Mental Hospital, or Crease Clinic.
In addition, the three Children's Aid Societies have in care 2,229 children.
Table I.—Cost of Maintaining Children
The cost to Provincial Government of maintaining children for the fiscal
year was as follows:—
Gross cost of maintenance of children in Child Welfare Division foster homes   $1,025,368.63
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance
of children with Provincial residence in care of
Children's Aid Societies. (This also includes
children with municipal residence, effective
September 1st, 1958.-)?     1,122,905.13
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance
of children with municipal residence in care of
Children's Aid Societies (April 1st to August
31st, 1958)1        251,972.37
Gross cost of transportation of children in care of
Superintendent   13,235.04
Gross cost of hospitalization of new-born infants
being permanently planned for by Superintendent   30,315.00
Grants to sundry homes  1,100.00
Gross expenditure  $2,444,896.17
Less collections and refunds        377,713.14
Net cost to Provincial Government as per Public Accounts  $2,067,183.03
1 Effective September 1st, 1958, the direct billing of municipalities by the Children's Aid Societies was discontinued. The Provincial Government now reimburses the Children's Aid Societies in full and bills the
municipalities accordingly. O 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Legal Status and Whereabouts of Children in the Care of the
Superintendent as at March 31st, 1959
P.C.A.
Wards
J.D.A.
Wards
C.A.S.
Wards
O.P.
Wards
Before
the Court
S.C.W.
Non-
wards
Total
Whereabouts—
205
264
350
151
216
297
158
10
13
8
7
5
16
5
20
22
11
7
26
4
1
3
2
6
5
9
3
21
17
24
10
39
28
17
22
39
59
18
15
71
19
264
356
Region III 	
Region IV   	
Region V	
Region VI —
Region VII     . 	
465
203
287
447
201
1,641
59
95
29
156
243
2,223
Placed   with   a   C.A.S.   for   special
reasons—
C.A.S., Vancouver  	
C.C.A.S.. Vancouver 	
F.C.S., Victoria
62
25
33
2
3
2
	
3
5
3
2
7
20
13
13
89
46
58
Totals   	
120
7
■
11
9
46
193
In institutions—
B.I.S. and G.I.S.   	
Oakalla         	
17
12
17
3
5
5
	
1
1
1
1
23
19
Woodlands   	
Essondale       	
17
3
1
49
10
......
2
1
1
63
Out of Province with foster-parents _
On active service or otherwise independent    	
48
8
2
1
35
9
1
1
2
87
20
1,866
79
139
43
167
292
2,586
STRENGTHENED PREVENTIVE SERVICES NEEDED
The Superintendent of Child Welfare and the three Children's Aid Societies
begin the new fiscal year with responsibility for 4,815 children—343 more than
have ever been in agency care in this Province.
For about 10 per cent of these 4,815 children, adoption placement with its
promised benefits will be achieved fairly readily. About 20 per cent will return
to their own parents in the course of the next year and a similar number will reach
the age of 21 years or be married or legally adopted, at which time the societies'
and Superintendent of Child Welfare's guardianship will terminate.
Table III.—Age and Legal Status of Children in the Care of the Superintendent
of Child Welfare as at March 31st, 1959
0-5
Months
6-11
Months
1-2
Years
3-5
Years
6-11
Years
12-13
Years
14-17
Years
18-21
Years
Total
14
15
22
4
51
16
13
3
165
29
25
...._
13
1
268
29
37
13
4
554
86
39
2
31
7
187
34
7
10
7
431
64
21
48
29
17
196
19
3
19
38
7
1,866
292
167
Juvenile Delinquents Act— 	
Wards and  non-wards of C.A.S. in
care of S C.W.
79
139
Wards of other Provinces 	
43
Totals        	
55
83
233
351
719
253
610
282
2,586
ADOPTION—A CHILD WELFARE SERVICE
As is seen from Table III above, the majority of children in the care of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare again this year are between the ages of 6 to 14 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 45
years. Many are sisters and brothers. Others have special needs as a result of
physical handicap, race, colour, or creed and all have known upset and hurt far
beyond the due of a child. Some of the national publicity about adoption and child-
caring agencies of late fails to take these and other factors into account when it is
claimed that through agency " red-tape " many children are being deprived of
adopted parents. Adoption, to be successful, must ensure the continuing well-
being of a child, and experience gained from similar publicity in the past points
to the fact that all persons responding to such campaigns for adoption homes are
not motivated solely by a love of children, nor are they all capable of understanding
how early deprivation may seriously limit a child's capacity to form a relationship
with new parents and develop satisfactorily in a family.
Knowing the needs of each child and selecting the home most capable of meeting these is a child-welfare service, and any over-simplification through wrongly
focussed publicity or other means as to what is involved in the process of finding
the right home for each child jeopardizes the future of children, their parents, and
those who earnestly want to adopt.
Table IV.—Number and Age of Children Placed for Adoption, April 1st,
1958, to March 31st, 1959
Region
-J-
a
o
tN
5
G
O
m
I
o
ed
5
u
>
t-H
a>
>
m
fl
M
e_
V
-
__
a
>*
r-
00
(A
CCJ
fl>
>
OS
_
O
u
U
\A
rt
OJ
;*
a
e_»
y3
O
H
I 	
I
33| 17
901  19
33 [  11
231    8
141    6
30| 10
101     5
i
51    9
4
2
5
1
2
1
1
1
3
2
—-
i
...... 11
5	
3|    1
 —
1|    1
3|    1
3
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
—
i
l
l
l
1
1
1
1
i
i
1
1
i
1
1
77
II	
Ill.  	
14|  10|    7
21    31    4
156
IV	
2|    8
2|    5
10|    8
31     1
6     1
4|    1
4    2
3|    1
.__!___
49
V ...               	
36
VI	
VII           .
78
37
Yukon  	
l'2|    1| -
..._.|..._
......|......|    3
Totals   	
233| 78
1
39! 44
I
32f 13| 10
1      I
15|    4
1
41    6]    4|    3|    1
1      1      1      1
2|    1
1
1
l
1|    1)493
1      1
Child Welfare Division, total adoption placements .
C.A.S., total adoption placements _ __	
C.C.A.S., total adoption placements  	
F.C.S., total adoption placements   	
Total adoption placements
493
186
63
94
836
Eight hundred and thirty-six children planned for through adoption—493 by
the Department of Social Welfare and 343 by the three Children's Aid Societies—
is the highest number of placements ever achieved in this Province in one year.
The year is also memorable for the Department of Social Welfare, in particular,
because of the number of older children, children of mixed racial origin or with a
physical handicap, and children of family groups for whom adoption homes were
found.
MANY OLDER CHILDREN ADOPTED
Three hundred and ninety-four of the children placed by Department of Social
Welfare were under the age of 12 months, but 99 ranged in age from 1 to 19 years.
Many of the latter had been in foster-home care for some time, and the answer to
the question " Why were they not adopted sooner? " is that they were not emotionally and (or) legally ready for adoption. The child who has either good or bad
memories of his parents needs help before he can think in terms of another family
to call his own.   Parents who have failed to carry out their parental duties toward O 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
their children must still be given help and opportunity to alter their pattern of behaviour or, alternatively, to relinquish their child by consent to adoption. When
neither course proves possible, the Court must be satisfied by evidence supplied by
the social worker that waiving the parental consent is in the child's best interests.
Not until the parents' consent or conclusive grounds for waiving it are before the
Court can the adoption order, terminating for all time the parent's right to his child
and the child's right to his parent, be granted.
SISTERS AND BROTHERS ADOPTED
Eight sets of twins, ranging in age from 2 weeks to AV2 years, and five family
groups with a total of twelve children were among those placed for adoption. In
the latter was a family of three—two boys and a girl aged 4, 3, and 2 years. They
were chronologically young but old in experiences; and they needed a great deal
of help from their social worker before they were ready for adoption placement,
even though the family chosen had already legally adopted their two older half-
sister and brother.
CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS ADOPTED
Fifty-seven of the children placed had many out-of-the-ordinary needs. Fifteen had health problems, such as heart conditions, asthma, cleft palate and harelip,
an eye condition, and one suffered from celiac disease. All have responded to
medical care, and the majority were or will be with their adopted parents throughout the entire period of required treatment.
CHILDREN OF MIXED RACIAL ORIGIN ADOPTED
The child with a physical handicap is a child with special needs, but it is still
easier to find families capable of meeting these than it is to find them for another
child with equally special needs—the child of mixed racial heritage.
In Regions V and VII alone, 60 per cent of the almost 500 children in foster-
home care are of Native Indian extraction, and yet but twenty-one of this origin
were placed for adoption this year. This is more than was accomplished in years
preceding, but resources for these children are still too few and the persistent shortage of Roman Catholic adoption homes places an additional limitation on workers'
ability to plan for the part-Indian child through adoption.
Eight children of part Chinese or Japanese background were placed, and four
of them with adopting parents of full Chinese or Japanese parentage. This achievement is worthy of note, because thus far the traditions and culture of the Chinese
and Japanese communities have been bars to adoption of the child of Occidental-
Oriental background. The East Indian community, too, is resistant to the adoption
of the part East Indian child, and this year three children of this heritage were placed
in homes of different background. This was true also for three part-Negroid children, a Syrian child, and a child of part Porto Rican parentage.
Thus far, most persons adopting children of mixed racial origin in British
Columbia are not of the same race and culture. As a result of these differences
there may be some problems for the children in their adoption homes and communities beyond those known to the average child and his family. Problems arising out
of race or colour, however, are problems which, without a family of one's own,
could well prove insurmountable to a growing boy or girl.   Adoption will not elimi- REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 47
nate them, but the support and understanding of a mother, father, and perhaps
sisters and brothers by adoption can make facing them and coping with them wholly
possible. There are risks in these placements for both the child and his adopted
family, but until such time as adults of all races and culture are ready to make
their contribution to the safety and well-being of children—regardless of race,
colour, and creed—the risks are calculated and minimum compared with the hazards the child of mixed racial origin still faces in our society without the bulwark of
a stable family life.
ADOPTION—A BASIC PREVENTIVE SERVICE
Adoption, when it is supported financially and morally by all communities
providing for the child without a family of his own " The something, you somehow
haven't to deserve." as Robert Frost described a home, is one of the most practical
preventive measures against neglect, broken homes, delinquency, and other social
ills which can be undertaken by a Province. Proof of this is not hard to find. All
correctional institutions, mental hospitals, and the rolls of Courts and social agencies everywhere, know many persons who never had the consistent and wise guidance of a mother and father throughout their growing years. What, for instance,
might the future have held for the 836 boys and girls placed with adopted parents
this year if this plan had not been made for them? Six hundred and sixty-eight had
been born to unwed mothers. Fifty-nine to married women separated from their
husbands, who were not the child's father, and 109 were children of married couples unwilling or unable to accept their parental responsibilities.
Much of the old social and legal prejudice against the out-of-wedlock child
has disappeared, but not all, and it is still a difficult road, socially and economically,
for the unwed mother. Boarding-home or day care are available to her for her
baby, but if she must work, others in fact rear him. Replacements of the child are
usually frequent, and he too often grows up confused as to whom he belongs to
and with little of the all-important feeling of well-being and self-worth a loving and
proud mother and father convey to their child in their every action toward him.
The child born of an extra-marital union has almost a less place in his parents'
lives than the child born to the unwed mother. His very existence is an added
complication to the mother's hopes with respect to reconciliation with her husband
or divorce, and the child, sensing her guilt and fear, may learn early to distrust
himself and the world about him.
A high number of the 109 children born to married parents and relinquished
for adoption had first been removed by Court order from their care because of
neglect. Some may bear emotional scars from these experiences all their lives,
but, freed by adoption from their parents' irresponsible and sometimes cruel actions and attitudes, they have now opportunity to " put down roots " and grow to
maximum potential.
Eight hundred and thirty-six children placed with adopted families in one year
is not a large number in the total population of the Province. However, this many
or more placed each year for the next ten years becomes an important figure, and
particularly so when thought of as this many boys and girls entering adulthood with
opportunities through adoption to become valuable citizens who otherwise without
a stable family to guide them would have had precarious upbringings and equally
precarious adult lives. O 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table V.—Referrals to Child Welfare Division of Children Needing
Adopted Parents
Child Referred By Number
Vancouver C.A.S.   145
Catholic C.A.S.   18
F.C.S. (Victoria)  3
S.W.D. Districts   327
Total.
493 ^
1 Comprised of 253 boys and 240 girls.
REGISTRY OF CHILDREN TO BE ESTABLISHED
For several years the Children's Aid Societies, district offices, and Child Welfare Division have endeavoured to share the resources of the entire Province and,
on occasion, those of other Provinces and the Yukon for children needing adopted
parents. The results have been excellent. As shown in Table V, 166 children were
referred this year to Child Welfare Division by a Children's Aid Society and placed
in an adoption home in one of the Department of Social Welfare's regions. To
extend this plan and further ensure that every child in care of the Superintendent
of Child Welfare who should be placed for adoption has parents found for him, a
central registry will be established next year in the adoption placement section of
the Division. The registry will be of value to administration in assessing staff needs
of field and Division and in assigning case loads, and it should prove an asset in the
utilization of all resources for each child registered. Some, because of their special
needs, may remain on the registry a long time, but through it they will be considered
constantly as newly approved adoption homes throughout the Province are also
registered.
MOST ADOPTED CHILDREN PLACED BY A SOCIAL AGENCY
It is a satisfaction again this year to report a remarkably low number of
children adopted who had been placed by unauthorized persons.
Table VI.—Legally Completed Adoptions throughout the Province, According to
the Type of Placement, during the Fiscal Year
Agency
Blood
Relative
Unauthorized
Person
37
7
85
26
19
4
13
3
16
8
61
9
15
6
Total
Region I	
Region II ...
Region III...
Region IV
Region V	
Region VI _
Region VII
73
144
78
47
36
60
21
Totals .
459
246
63
Vancouver Children's Aid Society-
Catholic Children's Aid Society—..
Victoria Children's Aid Society	
Totals 	
205
55
85
345
Child placed in Province but order granted elsewhere..
Total adoptions for year	
805
92
32
12
3
49
8
153
399
106
117
255
101
63
60
130
42
768
329
70
142
541
1
1,310 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 49
In addition to the 1,310 adoptions completed this year, 909 legal notices of
intention to adopt were received, 88 applications to Court were processed but
withdrawn for various reasons by the petitioners, and 171 other adoption inquiries
as interprovincial and international adoption matters were handled by Divisional
staff. Table VII below shows the steady rise in Court hearings throughout the
past five years.
Table VII.—Adoptions Completed by Court Order
Number
Year Completed
1958/59  1,309
1957/58  1,168
1956/57  1,177
1955/56  1,152
1954/55  1,102
PROTECTION OF CHILDREN AND RELATED SERVICES
With the decentralization of protective authority and services to the field in
April, 1958, the Division was relieved of supervisory responsibility on the individual
case basis. However, decentralization of authority and services necessitated the
establishment of certain controls in the Division by which standards of service could
be appraised and through which the field could seek and obtain the help of the
Divisional staff. Decentralization also requires that a consultative service be available to the field through both correspondence and personal contact, and the final
responsibility of seeing that the legal requirements of the Protection of Children Act
are being met must still rest with the Division. Decentralization, therefore, did not
relieve the Division of work but rather changed the nature of the work carried by
broadening its purpose.
The Division is appreciative of the interest and assistance extended to the
Division of the Attorney-General's Department in the many problem cases which
arose out of the administration of the Protection of Children Act.
The field, and rightly so, is also looking more and more to the Division for help
in planning for children who require special placement resources. In an effort to
enable the field to make full use of the limited resources available in British Columbia, Divisional staff this year visited most of the institutions and child-caring
agencies in the Province and will be in a better position to act as liaison between
the field and these agencies.
Interdepartmental negotiations have made it possible to have a much higher
number of children admitted to Woodlands School, Crease Clinic, and Provincial
Mental Hospital, and this has eased a heavy burden from the foster-home programme for the field.
Services related to protection of children, as custody, legitimation, immigration,
repatriation, and " sundry cases " which, in the main, consist of interprovincial and
international problems relating to families and children, have been much in demand
this year. The total handled has been about three times as many as in any year preceding. O 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VIII.—Services Related to Child Protection
Carried
Over
New
Total
Incomplete as at
March 31, 1959
Custody 	
Immigration	
Legitimation ....
Repatriation	
Sundry 	
Totals..
19
80
2
13
105
69
65
10
83
294
145
12
96
399
521
740
25
21
3
9
66
ADMINISTRATION OF THE CHILDREN OF UNMARRIED
PARENTS ACT
A total of $76,024.57 was received and disbursed under this Act this year,
$16,426.82 more than last year. Seventy-two new agreements, twenty-seven new
affiliation orders, and ten settlements were obtained.
SLIGHT DECREASE IN THE OUT-OF-WEDLOCK BIRTHS
For the first time in a number of years the Division of Vital Statistics reports
a decrease in the number of births out of wedlock registered, although there were
sixty-seven more than last year in the non-Indian group.
Table IX.-
—Children Born Out
of Wedlock
Total
Under 15
15-19
20-24
25-29
30-39
40 and
Over
a
a
c
c
e
c
e
Year
•B
x>
•3
•3
•3
-3
.2
Total
S
a
e
■?
c
_
c
jjj
a
9
a
c
c
c
c
■o
c
xj
a
■a
c
•_
c
XI
-
XI
a
■o
B
ti
Z
a
Z
Z
Z
Z
z
Z
1956/57... - -	
481
1,695
4
7
121
477
149
457
99
337
1
96   374
12
43
2,176
535
1,975
3
16
134
584
174
553
175
376
88
400
11
46
2,510
1958/59       	
442
2,042
4
17
111
608
144
586
96
371
77
405
15
55
2,484
Judging from the number of unwed mothers who sought help for themselves
and child from a Children's Aid Society or the Department of Social Welfare, and
the comparatively small number who placed their baby for adoption through channels other than an authorized agency this year, it would appear that less than one-
third of the total 2,484 children born out of wedlock remained with their parent or
parents or were placed by them in the home of a blood relative. It is suspected
that a fairly high percentage of this group of children were born to persons living
together as man and wife but not legally married to each other. Each year a
number of such births are legitimated when marriage to each other becomes possible. In any event, the problems created by the status of these children are in many
ways different to those encountered by the child and his unwed mother alone.
Cultural differences within certain racial groups has bearing upon the incidence
of births out of wedlock as has the integration of other races into white communities.
Whatever the causes, British Columbia's rate of births out of wedlock continues high
compared to the national figure, and the number of unwed mothers each year who
are under the age of 15 years remains cause for deep concern. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 51
Table X.—Births Out of Wedlock for Mothers 12 to 16 Years of Age,
1948 to Fiscal Year 1958/59
Year
12 Years
13 Years
14 Years
15 Years
Total
Indian
Total
Ind.
N/Ind.
Ind.
N/Ind.
Ind.
N/Ind.
Ind.
N/Ind.
N/Ind.
1948 - .
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
3
1
2
3
2
4
4
3
1
2
3
5
2
2
4
6
5
11
11
13
2
6
1
9
6
6
11
6
11
6
9
12
18
21
16
20
28
34
4
8
4
11
11
10
16
8
15
9
9
1949...	
15
1950	
16
1951	
1952 	
1953 	
23
26
25
1954.....	
26
1955	
39
1956	
46
1957 	
7       |      41
54
Totals
—
....      |      ....
96
279
1958/59 (under the age of 15 years) i_
Indian 4, Non-Indian 17
1 Complete statistics from Division of Vital Statistics not yet available.
The majority, if not all, of the non-Indian and many of the Indian adolescent
girls represented in Table X were brought to the attention of a Children's Aid
Society or the Department of Social Welfare. In some instances the police preferred charges against the adults involved, but most of these young persons were
found to have lacked parental supervision and guidance and with few exceptions
their home-life was wanting stability and purpose.
IMMIGRANT CHILDREN UNDER THE PROTECTION OF
CHILDREN ACT
There are but eight Fairbridge boys under the age of 21 years remaining in
care as at March 31st, 1959, and most of them are self-supporting or soon will be.
Of the thirty-six other immigrant children in care during the year, twenty-nine
remain—twenty-eight Hungarian and one Danish. Of the eight discharged during
the year, seven reached their majority or married and one returned to Europe at his
own insistence. The Hungarian boys and girls who came to British Columbia are
not finding their niche readily, and years of living " by their wits " in revolt-tom
Hungary has left many unprepared for study or industrious pursuits.
HEALTH OF CHILDREN
Despite the large number of children in care during the year, the general health
of the group was good although two deaths occurred. A 3-month-old baby contracted pneumonia and failed to respond to medical treatment and a year-and-a-
half-old child awaiting admission to Woodlands School for retarded children died
when complications developed out of his congenital physical condition. O 52 BRITISH COLUMBIA
FAMILY ALLOWANCES
A total of $65,867.24 was received from the Family Allowances Division this
year on behalf of 1,695 children in care.   Disbursements were as follows:—
Table XI.—Family Allowance Disbursements
Balance on hand as at January 1st, 1958  $51,909.49
Receipts for the period January 1st, 1958, to December 31st
1958      65,867.24
Expenditures for the above period     57,170.12
Parents—
Foster-mothers   $32,543.00
Adopting mothers        4,138.43
Natural parents _       5,262.27
Transferred  to  Children's   Aid  Societies        2,419.09
Refunds to Family Allowance Board.. 300.50
Recreational equipment, etc.       8,303.39
Paid to children on discharge       1,766.09
Educational   367.15
Gifts   170.03
Special clothing  629.58
Miscellaneous        1,270.59
$57,170.12
Balance on hand as at December 31st, 1958     60,606.61
Number of children involved in the accumulated balances, 1,695.
The Child Welfare League of America held its first conference in Canada in
Vancouver this year, and the Divisional staff authorized to attend enjoyed and
benefitted from the experience.
In conclusion, my sincere thanks to the clerical and social work staffs throughout the Department. They have met the unprecedented pressures in child welfare
this year admirably and well. I am appreciative, too, of the help and support
received from the three Children's Aid Societies and the six organizations in British
Columbia which offer institutional care to children. Their joint participation and
regular attendance at the meetings of the Committee on Child Care, formed at the
request of the Chairman of the Board of the Welfare Licensing Act, has been particularly valuable. The anticipated increase next year in foster-home rates will be
tangible expression of the Department's recognition of the dedicated service given
by foster-parents throughout this Province. Theirs is a special and unique contribution to the child without which no child-welfare programme could exist.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Ruby McKay,
Superintendent of Child Welfare. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 53
OLD-AGE ASSISTANCE,  BLIND PERSONS'  ALLOWANCES, DISABLED
PERSONS' ALLOWANCES, AND SUPPLEMENTARY ASSISTANCE
GENERAL
The Old-age Assistance Board is a division of the Department of Social Welfare. The Board consists of three members appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor.
These same three members also comprise the Blind Persons' Allowances Board
and the Disabled Persons' Allowances Board. The Boards are charged with the
administration of the respective Federal and Provincial Acts and regulations, including the consideration of applications and the payment of assistance. The Boards
also consider applications for Supplementary Assistance and Health Services and
grant these additional Provincial benefits where applicable.
During the fiscal year under review Mr. Robert Talbot resigned his position
as a member of the Board on his appointment as Director of Social Welfare of the
Province of Saskatchewan, and Mr. Herbert E. Blanchard was appointed to replace
him. Mr. Talbot will long be remembered by the members and staff of the Old-age
Assistance Board for his sincere and friendly interest in the administration.
The work has become more stabilized, although a steady increase in the actual
number of persons receiving assistance has provided increased activity in the
processing and the adjusting of cases.
The effects of major internal administrative changes in the early part of the
year were felt throughout the year. A composite application form was devised to
facilitate the taking of applications. The staff was reorganized, but not increased in
number, and special emphasis was placed upon the elimination of delays in the processing of applications. These two changes, together with others of minor importance, were reflected in the increased number of cases granted during the year in all
categories.
With the increased number receiving assistance and the increased basic rates
payable resulting from the legislative enactments of the previous year, the amounts
expended in all categories have reached an all-time, high. The cost of the Old-age
Assistance programme, including supplementary assistance, was up over $600,000
to a total of nearly $6,000,000 in this Province alone. Payments to the Blind
increased about $50,000 to a total of close to $450,000, while payments to the
Disabled advanced $350,000 to an all-time high of over $1,325,000. The total
amounts include the supplementary assistance payments by the Province to recipients of assistance or allowance.
Supplementary assistance payments to recipients of Old Age Security pension
alone have not increased appreciably over the $6,000,000 of the past two years.
To-day the medical services available to recipients and their dependents in the
Province, provided by the doctors and the Government, who share the cost of these
services, is meeting with wide approval. Housing for elderly persons in the urban
areas is the big problem and will undoubtedly be for some years to come.
GRAPHIC PRESENTATIONS COVERING THE PERIOD FROM
JANUARY 1st, 1952, TO MARCH 31st, 1959
Two graphic presentations on the following pages cover the various aspects of
the administration in this Province of Old-age Assistance since January 1st, 1952,
when the Old-age Assisance Act became effective.
The first, a line graph, shows the relationship between the total cost and the
number of applications received and granted. Detailed explanations have been
given in previous years and no significant changes for the current fiscal year are O 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA
revealed. The second, a bar graph, reveals the relationships among the number of
cases on the payroll, the number of applications received, the number granted, and
the number rejected as of March 31st of each fiscal year.
The bar graph brings to light different relationships from that given in the line
graph:—
1. In the fiscal year 1953, the number of cases granted exceeds the number of
applications received. This unusual situation is caused by a carry-over into the new
fiscal year of a large number of applications received in 1951 and in the early part
of 1952, when the Act first came into force, providing for assistance to all eligible
persons between 65 and 69 years of age.
2. The bar graph also clearly reveals the constant decrease of cases in receipt
of Old-age Assistance from 1954 to 1957. This is due to the fact that all cases that
were initially granted in 1952 were transferred to Old Age Security by 1957. This
also marks the end of the first five-year cycle.
3. The second five-year cycle, commencing with 1957, shows a steady increase
in persons applying for Old-age Assistance, reflecting economic conditions generally.
4. The percentage of the number of the cases rejected to the number of applications received is consistent and falls between 20 per cent and 25 per cent for
each fiscal year.
The trend indicated by both the line and the bar graphs is a steady increase in
the total case load. This increase in numbers of elderly people may focus attention
on the need for housing and many additional ancillary services to the aged.
7,032
4,500
4,200
3,900
|
OLD AGE ASSISTANCE
--BRITISH   COLUMBIA-.
JANUARY  1,   1,52 TO MARCH  11.   m*
1
i
1,
\
 1,
300 units per squar-  _
3,300
3,000
2,700
lj
x
-___::; ;,js_,_,. »,,*;,'.'        __zr__;_"
|
.
Recipient, Translerred to Old A*. Security             100 units per square
S
\
II
2,100
1,800
1,500
1,200
900
600
300
0
!
:.>•
-"'
;
__—
■-..^
/.
;
_.v
~-~"~
'
	
-,-
|
A
\
/ \
!/
-
/
—i
.._.
>->-,
:_**=
S-=
-:.-
..._
--
__.-.
>c.
2S*-
-fe=
;-■
'=—
	
—.
	
***
--
--
—
—
—
— •
—
—
—
— ■
	
—-
-S tN
m   m
ON Os
CA     CA
m   in
Os     Os
CA     m    m    m     m     rt     XT    XT    XT
in   m   m    m    m m   m   m
Os      Os    Os     Os      Os
SO     \D     *<0     ^O
m    mi   m    v. m v.
OO  CO  00
Os     Os     Os      Os     Os     Os      Os      Os     Os     Os     Os      Os     Os     Os     Os      Os    Os     Os     Os      Os
mm     mOsm     mm
TAm^A CO
m o m    ci
mOsm     m
O        THlTlr-
o  g
Q   %
n s
0  s
a  s
0  s
c   £ REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 55
8,000
7,000
6,000
5,000
4,000
3,000
2,000
1,000
B.C. RECIPIENTS:
No.  on the  Poyroll
No.  of Applications
1  No. Granted Assistance.
No.  Rejected
1953
1954 1955 1956 1957 1958
Fiscal  year   ending   March  31st  of each  year.
STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st,  1959
Old-age Assistance
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received  2,687
Applications granted  2,7021
Applications not granted (refused, withdrawn, etc.)      471
Includes some left over from previous year. O 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a)  British Columbia recipients—
Returned to British Columbia
Reinstated 	
Suspended 	
Deaths 	
  25
  119
  223
  293
  58
  1,885
  7,096
  84
  41
  10
  9
  69
  55
(c)  Total number of British Columbia and other-Province recipients on payroll at end of fiscal year  7,276
Transferred to other Provinces	
Transferred to Old Age Security	
Total number on payroll at end of fiscal year.
(b) Oher-Province recipients—
Transferred to British Columbia	
Reinstated 	
Suspended 	
Deaths 	
Transferred out of British Columbia
Transferred to Old Age Security	
Table III.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Not of age	
Unable to prove age	
Not sufficient residence	
Income in excess	
Unable to prove residence	
Transfer of property
Receiving War Veterans' Allowance
Information refused 	
Application withdrawn	
Applicants died before grant	
Whereabouts unknown 	
Eligible for Old Age Security	
Assistance from private sources	
Receiving Old Age Security	
Miscellaneous 	
Totals
umber
Per Cent
70
14.86
5
1.06
1
0.21
216
45.86
30
95
24
10
13
6
1
471
6.37
20.17
5.10
2.12
2.77
1.27
0.21
100.00
Table IV.—Sex of New Recipients
Male _~
Female
Number
Per Cent
1,272
47.08
1,430
52.92
Totals
2,702
100.00 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 57
Married _.
Single 	
Widows __.
Widowers
Separated
Divorced
Table V.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Number
Per Cent
1,130
41.82
363
13.43
604
22.35
151
5.59
396
14.66
58
2.15
Totals
2,702
100.00
Table VI.—Birthplace of New Recipients
British Columbia	
Other parts of Canada
British Isles	
Other parts of British Commonwealth
United States of America	
Other foreign countries	
Totals
umber
Per Cent
258
9.55
575
21.28
282
10.43
883
32.68
692
25.61
12
0.45
2,702
100.00
Age 65
Age 66
Age 67
Age 68
Age 69
Table VII.—Ages at Granting of Assistance
Number
Per Cent
1,221
45.19
482
17.84
357
13.21
348
12.88
294
10.88
Totals
2,702
100.00
Table VIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Age 65 	
Age 66	
Age 67	
Age 68	
Age 69 	
Totals
Number
Per Cent
29
9.67
23
7.66
54
18.00
81
27.00
113
37.67
300
100.00 O 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Number Per Cent
Living alone      834 30.87
Living with spouse      979 36.23
Living with spouse and children      109 4.03
Living with children      356 13.18
Living with other relatives      213 7.88
Living with others      127 4.70
Living in public institutions        67 2.48
Living in private institutions        17 0.63
Totals  2,702 100.00
Table X.—Where New Recipients Are Living
Number Per Cent
In own home  1,164 43.08
In rented house      266 9.84
In children's home      346 12.81
In home of other relatives        83 3.07
Boarding         72 2.67
In boarding home        25 0.93
In housekeeping room      337 12.47
In single room (eating out)      130 4.81
In rented suite      197 7.29
In institutions        82 3.03
Totals  2,702 100.00
Table XL—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a)  Holding real property ol value— Number Percent
$0  1,557 57.62
$1 to $250  28 1.04
$251 to $500  55 2.04
$501 to $750  69 2.55
$751 to $1,000  94 3.48
$1,001 to $1,500  257 9.51
$1,501 to $2,000  208 7.70
$2,001 and up  434 16.06
Totals   2,702 100.00 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 59
(_>)  Holding personal property of value—
$0	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500	
$501 to $750	
$751 to $1,000 __
$1,001 to $1,500
$1,501 to $2,000
$2,001 and up—...
Number
Per Cent
1,192
44.12
754
27.91
228
8.44
141
5.22
112
4.14
123
4.55
63
2.33
89
3.29
Totals   2,702
100.00
Table XII.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31st,
1959, Whose Assistance Is Paid by British Columbia
Alberta 	
Granted by
British
Columbia
  22
Granted by
Other
Provinces
14
Saskatchewan 	
     6
9
Manitoba 	
     5
3
Ontario 	
  16
11
Quebec 	
     1
4
New Brunswick 	
     1
Nova Scotia 	
1
Prince Edward Island	
Newfoundland      	
Northwest Territories
Yukon Territory       	
Totals 	
  51
42
Table XIII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the
Amount of Assistance Received (Basic Assistance, $55)
Amount of Assistance
$55 	
Per Cent
'             81.72
$50 to $54.99	
4.45
$45 to $49.99 	
3.33
$40 to $44.99 	
       2.20
$35 to $39.99          . .   	
1.92
$30 to $34.99    .    ...
1.82
$25 to $29.99 -   	
....   ...      1.40
$20 to $24.99	
1.11
Less than $19.99	
       2.05
Total	
100.00 o 60 british columbia
Blind Persons' Allowances
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received  80
Applications granted  611
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc.  262
1 Includes some left over from previous year.
2 Number still pending not included.
■ Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a)  British Columbia recipients—
Suspended 	
Reinstated  _	
Transferred to other Provinces 	
Returned to British Columbia	
Transferred to Old Age Security	
Deaths 	
(_>)  Other-Province recipients—
Transferred to British Columbia	
Reinstated	
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended
Deaths	
(c)  Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia	
Other Province 	
20
13
4
3
19
7
9
1
5
1
505
25
530
Table III.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Not blind within the meaning of the Act
Income in excess	
Applications withdrawn	
Eligible for Old Age Security	
Died before grant	
Receiving War Veterans' Allowance
Information refused	
Assistance from private sources	
Receipt of Old Age Security	
Whereabouts unknown	
Number
„ 14
_ 6
._ 4
.. 2
Per Cent
53.85
23.08
15.38
7.69
Totals
26
100.00
Table IV.—Sex of New Recipients
Male _
Female
Number
.__ 32
_ 29
Totals
61
Per Cent
52.46
47.54
100.00 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
Table V.—Marital Status of New Recipients
O 61
Married
Number
„     30
Per Cent
49.18
Single 	
Widows
  16
     4
26.23
6.56
Widowers
     5
8.20
Separated
     6
9.83
Divorced
  61
Totals	
100.00
Table VI.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Number
_______  25
  13
  7
Other parts of British Commonwealth  3
United States of America  3
Other foreign countries  10
British Columbia	
Other parts of Canada
British Isles	
Totals
61
Per Cent
40.98
21.31
11.48
4.92
4.92
16.39
100.00
Table VII.—Ages at Granting of Allowance
Number Per Cent
Ages 18 to 21     5 8.20
Ages 22 to 30     5 8.20
Ages 31 to 40     7 11.48
Ages 41 to 50   10 16.39
Ages 51 to 60  15 24.59
Ages 61 to 69  19 31.14
Totals 1  61 100.00
Table VIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number
Age 21 	
Ages 22 to 30
Ages 31 to 40
Ages 41 to 50
Ages 51 to 60
     2
     3
Ages 61 to 69     3
Per Cent
25.00
37.50
37.50
Totals
100.00 O 62 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Number Per Cent
Living with parents  6 9.84
Living alone  10 16.39
Living with spouse  23 37.70
Living with spouse and children  4 6.56
Living with children  8 13.11
Living with other relatives  2 3.28
Living with others  3 4.92
Living in public institutions  4 6.56
Living in private institutions     1 1.64
Totals   61 100.00
Table X.—Where New Recipients Are Living
Number Per Cent
In parents' home     5 8.20
In own home  24 39.33
In rented house     7 11.47
In rented suite     3 4.92
In children's home     5 8.20
In home of other relatives     4 6.56
Boarding      2 3.28
In housekeeping room      4 6.56
In boarding home  	
In institutions     5 8.20
In single room (eating out)      2 3.28
Totals   61 100.00
Table XI.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a)  Holding real property of value—                         Number Percent
$0  42 68.84
$1 to $250 .  2 3.28
$251 to $500  1 1.64
$501 to $750  1 1.64
$751 to $1,000   2 3.28
$1,001 to $1,500  3 4.92
$1,501 to $2,000   4 6.56
$2,001 and up  6 9.84
Totals      61 100.00 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 63
(Z))  Holding personal property of value—                Number Percent
$0  42 68.84
$1 to $250     2 3.28
$251 to $500      1 1.64
$501 to $750     1 1.64
$751 to $1,000     2 3.28
$1,001 to $1,500     3 4.92
$1,501 to $2,000     4 6.56
$2,001 and up     6 9.84
Totals  61 100.00
Table XII.-
-Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31st,
1959, Whose Allowances Are Paid by this Province
Alberta                               	
Granted by
British
Columbia
     3
Granted by
Other
Provinces
1
Saskatchewan
     1
2
Manitoba
Ontario                                     . 	
Quebec                                         " ...
New Brunswick                 __..
     1
Nova Scotia
Prince Edward Island
Newfoundland
Northwest Territories	
Yukon Territory         	
—
Totals 	
     5
3
Table XIII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the
Amount of Allowances Received (Basic Allowance, $55)
$55
Per Cent
                              91.57
$50 to $54.99                  	
                                 1.85
$45 to $49.99  	
                                 1.44
$40 to $44.99	
                              1.03
$35 to $39.99	
                                       .82
$30 to $34.99	
1.23
$25 to $29.99            	
                                 .82
$20 to $24.99	
                                   .21
$19.99 and less	
                         1.03
Total 	
                           100.00 O 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Disabled Persons' Allowances
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received
Applications granted
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc.
1 Includes some left over from previous year.
418
3791
162
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended 	
Reinstated 	
Transferred to other Provinces	
Returned to British Columbia	
Transferred to Old Age Security	
Deaths	
(_>)  Other-Province recipients—
Transferred to British Columbia	
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended
Reinstated 	
Deaths	
(c)  Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia	
Other Province	
1,551
34
73
36
5
5
1
43
17
8
3
2
1,585
Table III.—Reason Why Applications Not Granted
Not 18 years of age	
Unable to prove age	
Not sufficient residence	
Unable to prove residence	
Too much income	
Transfer of property	
Refused information	
Whereabouts unknown 	
Allowance under Blind Persons Act
Assistance under Old-age Assistance Act	
Allowance under War Veterans' Allowance Act
Pension under Old Age Security Act	
Mothers' Allowance	
Unable to meet medical test	
Referred for rehabilitation	
Tuberculosis sanatorium	
Mental hospital	
Home for the Aged	
Infirmary	
Institution for incurables	
Hospital	
Nursing home	
Number
1
17
8
1
1
111
4
2
Per Cent
.62
10.49
4.93
.62
.62
.62
68.52
.62
2.47
1.23 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 65
Other institutions	
Application withdrawn
Died before grant	
Totals 	
1
.62
9
5.55
5
3.09
162
100.00
Table IV.—Primary Causes of Disability on Accepted Cases
Number Per Cent
Infective and parasitic diseases     23 6.57
Neoplasms       2 .57
Allergie, endocrine system, metabolic,  and nutritional diseases     11 3.16
Diseases of blood and blood-forming organs       2 .57
Mental, psychoneurotic, and personality disorders ... 121 34.69
Diseases of the nervous system and sense organs  102 29.24
Diseases of the circulatory system     34 9.75
Diseases of the respiratory system       5 1.43
Diseases of the digestive system       1 .28
Diseases of the genito-urinary system       1 .28
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissues       2 .57
Diseases of the bones and organs of movement     22 6.31
Congenital malformation       7 2.00
Symptoms, senility, and ill-defined conditions       	
Accidents, poisoning, and violence (nature of injury)     16 4.58
100.00
Totals
349
Table V.—Sex of New Recipients
Male ___
Female
Number
Per Cent
216
57.75
158
42.25
Totals
374
100.00
Married .
Table VI.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Number
               ...             79
Per Cent
21.12
Single 	
           238
63.64
Widow
....                                    _    23
6.15
Widower .
     11
2.94
Separated
     18
4.81
Divorced	
       5
1.34
Totals
374
100.00 O 66 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VII.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Number
British Columbia     .                                   140
Per Cent
37.43
Other parts of Canada                                   141
37.70
British Isles                                                     39
10.43
Other parts of British Empire
United States of America                  20
5.35
Other foreign countries   _                        34
9.09
Totals                        374
100.00
Table VIII.—Ages at Granting of Allowance
Number Per Cent
Ages 18 to 19     48 12.83
Ages 20 to 24     34 9.09
Ages 25 to 29     27 7.22
Ages 30 to 34     33 8.82
Ages 35 to 39     24 6.42
Ages 40 to 44     36 9.63
Ages 45 to 49     35 9.36
Ages 50 to 54     31 8.29
Ages 55 to 59     53 14.17
Aees 60 to 64	
                     51
13.63
Ages 65 to 69 ...
2
.54
Ages over 70       .. 	
Totals 	
  374
100.00
Table IX.-
Ages 18 to 19	
—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number
Per Cent
Ages 20 to 24    	
       1
2.27
Ages 25 to 29	
     3
6.82
Ages 30 to 34   	
     2
4.54
Ages 35 to 39	
Ages 40 to 44               .
Ages 45 to 49     	
     4
9.09
Ages 50 to 54	
       7
15.91
Ages 55 to 59	
  10
22.73
Ages 60 to 64	
  10
22.73
Ages 65 to 69	
     7
15.91
Ages over 70       .
  44
Totals	
100.00 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 67
Table X.—With Whom Recipients Live
Living with parents
Living alone 	
Living with spouse  62
Living
Living
Living
Living
Living
Living in private institution
; with spouse and children
with children	
with other relatives _
with others	
in public institution
Number
Per Cent
171
45.72
36
9.63
62
16.58
16
4.28
22
5.88
45
12.02
.    18
4.81
2
.54
2
.54
Totals
374
100.00
Table XI.—Where New Recipients Are Living
Number
In parents' home  122
In own house  83
In rented house   29
In rented suite  21
In children's home  14
In home of other relatives  77
In housekeeping room  12
In boarding home     	
In institutions  4
In single room (eating out)   12
Totals
374
Per Cent
32.62
22.19
7.75
5.62
3.74
20.59
3.21
1.07
3.21
100.00
Table XII.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a)  Holding real property of value—
$0 	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500	
$501 to $750	
$751 to $1,000	
$1,001 to $1,500.
$1,501 to $2,000.
$2,001 and up	
Number
Per Cent
293
78.34
3
.80
2
.54
7
1.87
2
.54
26
6.95
11
2.94
30
8.02
Totals
374
100.00 O 68 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(_>) Holding personal property of value—
$0	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500        1 8
$501 to $750	
$751 to $1,000         7
$1,001 to $1,500	
$1,501 to $2,000	
$2,001 and up	
Totals  	
Number
Per Cent
262
70.05
58
15.51
18
4.81
9
2.41
7
1.87
7
1.87
4
1.07
9
2.41
374
100.00
Table XIII.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at
March 31st, 1959, Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Granted by Granted by
British Other
Columbia Province-
Alberta        2 1
Saskatchewan     4
Manitoba     1
Ontario     1 5
Quebec   1
New Brunswick	
Nova Scotia	
Prince Edward Island	
Newfoundland 	
Totals     4 11
Table XIV.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients According to the
Amount of Allowance Received (Basic Allowance, $55)
Per Cent
$55  93.18
$50 to $54.99  2.33
$45 to $49.99  1.01
$40 to $44.99  1.14
$35 to $39.99  0.57
$30 to $34.99  0.63
$25 to $29.99  0.32
$20 to $24.99  0.32
$19.99 and less  0.50
Total 100.00 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 69
Supplementary Assistance and Health Services to the Aged,
Blind, and Disabled
New Applications
Number received  1,806
Number granted supplementary assistance and health services  1,074
Number granted supplementary assistance only  21
Number granted health services only  121
Number who died before application was granted  18
Number of applications withdrawn  61
Number of applicants inehgible  224
Number of applications pending  287
Total   1,806
General Information
Former old-age pensioners still receiving supplementary assistance
on March 31st, 1959  10,332
Old-age Assistance recipients transferred to Old Age Security
receiving supplementary assistance on March 31st, 1959 ___    9,307
New Old Age Security pensioners receiving supplementary assistance on March 31st, 1959 ,     6,853
Blind persons in receipt of Old Age Security receiving supplementary assistance on March 31st, 1959        208
Disability pensioners over 70 receiving supplementary assistance
on March 31st, 1959  4 O 70 BRITISH COLUMBIA
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
The Old-age Assistance Act, Year Ended March 31st, 1959
Supplementary
Social
Assistance Assistance Total
Total  amount paid  receipients in
British Columbia   $4,621,534.89 $1,358,868.96 $5,980,403.85
— .       — —
Less amount of refunds from
recipients—
Overpayments refunded         $22,167.78 $3,577.19       $25,744.97
Miscellaneous refunds   330.00 120.00 450.00
Totals        $22,497.78 $3,697.19       $26,194.97
Net amount paid to recipients in
British Columbia   $4,599,037.11  $1,355,171.77 $5,954,208.88
Add amount paid other Provinces on
account of recipients for whom
British Columbia is responsible... 29,439.77 5,252.38 34,692.15
Less amount received by British
Columbia on account of recipients
for whom other Provinces are responsible  82,472.65 10,597.16 93,069.81
Less amount refunded by the Federal Government     2,299,518.55     2,299,518.55
Total  amount  paid  by
British Columbia   $2,246,485.68 $1,349,826.99 $3,596,312.67 report of social welfare branch o 71
The Blind Persons Act, Year Ended March 31st, 1959
Supplementary
Social
Allowances Assistance Total
Total amount paid recipients in British
Columbia   $333,526.91  $113,571.27 $447,098.18
Less amount of refunds from recipients—
Overpayments refunded       $1,738.98 $450.37      $2,189.35
Miscellaneous Refunds    32.00 20.00 75.00
Totals       $1,770.98 $470.37      $2,264.35
Net amount paid to recipients in British
Columbia  $331,755.93 $113,100.90 $444,833.83
Add amount paid other provinces on account of recipients for whom British
Columbia is responsible         1,293.19 540.00        1,833.19
Less amount received by British Columbia
on account of recipients for whom other
Provinces are responsible         5,411.12        2,903.50        8,314.62
Less amount refunded  by  the  Federal
Government      248,799.72      248,799.72
Total amount paid by British
Columbia      $78,838.28 $110,737.40 $189,552.68
The Disabled Persons Act, Year Ended March 31st, 1959
Supplementary
Social
Allowances Assistance Total
Total amount paid recipients in British
Columbia   $981,767.76 $345,235.87  $1,327,003.63
Less amount of refunds from
recipients—
Overpayments refunded         1,454.88 349.75 1,804.63
Net amount paid to recipients in British
Columbia  $980,312.88 $344,886.12 $1,325,199.00
Add amount paid other Provinces on account of recipients for whom British
Columbia is responsible           4,966.74 940.00 5,906.74
Less amount received by British Columbia on account of recipients for whom
other Provinces are responsible       20,507.37   20,507.37
Less amount refunded by the Federal
Government     490,156.46         490,165:46
Total amount paid by British
Columbia   $474,615.79 $345,826.12     $820,441.91 O 72 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Old Age Security Recipients, Supplementary Social Assistance,
Year Ended March 31st, 1959
Total amount paid recipients in British Columbia  $6,170,216.13
Less amount of refunds from recipients—
Overpayments refunded  22,698.61
Miscellaneous refunds  164.93
Total         $22,863.54
Net amount paid to recipients in British Columbia  $6,147,352.59
Add amount paid other Provinces on account of recipients
for whom British Columbia is responsible  50,279.46
Less amount received by British Columbia on account of
recipients for whom other Provinces are responsible       174,422.59
Total amount paid by British Columbia  $6,023,209.46
The Old Age Pensions Act, Year Ended March 31st, 1959
Supplementary
Social
Pensions        Assistance Total
Amount of refunds received from pensioners' estates $3,484.50   $3,484.50
Less amount refunded to the Federal Government    2,613.36      2,613.36
Total net refunds received by British
Columbia       $871.14       $871.14
Administration Expenses
Salaries and special services  $185,762.21
Office expenses  49,818.16
Travelling expenses   315.25
Incidentals and contingencies   744.49
Equipment and furniture   960.15
Medical examinations   228.66
Total _____   $237,828.92
Summary
Administration and Assistance
Administration   $237,828.92
Old-age Assistance Act  2,246,485.68
Blind Persons' Allowances Act  78,838.28
Disabled Persons' Allowances Act  474,615.79
Old Age Pensions Act (credit) 871.14
As per Public Accounts  $3,036,897.53 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 73
Supplementary Social Assistance
Old-age Assistance Act	
Blind Persons' Allowances Act	
Disabled Persons' Allowances Act
Universal Old Age Security 	
As per Public Accounts
$1,349,826.99
110,737.40
345,826.12
6,023,209.46
$7,829,599.97
MEMBERS OF BOARD
The following are the members of the Old-age Assistance Board of the Province of British Columbia:—
Chairman: Mr. E. W. Berry.
Members: Mr. J. A. Sadler, Director of Social Welfare; Mr. H. E. Blanchard,
Administrator, Region II, Department of Social Welfare.
CONCLUSION
In concluding this report the Board wishes to express its sincere appreciation
for the loyal and efficient work of the office and field staffs throughout the year and
for the continued co-operation of other departments of Government and many outside agencies.
Respectfully submitted.
E. W. Berry,
Chairman. O 74
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MEDICAL SERVICES DIVISION
I submit the annual report of the Medical Services Division for the fiscal year
1958/59.
Table I.—Gross Costs for Fiscal Years 1952/53 to 1958/59
Year
Medical
Drugs 2
Optical
Transportation
Other
Total
1952/53.
1953/54.
1954/55.
1955/56.
1956/57.
1957/58
1958/59
51,202,759.51
1.219.968.71
1.362.928.21
1,523,658.40
1.486 400.99
1,503.964.91
1,587,997.03
$622,431.21
657,840.68
752.948.50
893,356.88
961,405.50
1 106.153.01
1,281.107.27
$73,010.09
$44,858.20 $16,765.41
86,717.17 44 350.50 17,380.03
112,719.03 48 074.34 | 23 891.75
119,512.74 48,341.91 j 22,504.83
129.267.56 | 50,565.61 | 23 359.27
148,223.72 j 55 440.66 ! 25 763.04
168,051.06 ] 57,050.37 I 41,329.60
$8,492.14
11,100.36
13.454.81
12,733.72
14,421.86
16.983.77
$1,968,316.56
2 037 357.45
2,314 016.64
2 620 108.48
2,665,420.79
2,856 529.11
21,374.78 | 3,156,910.11
 1
1 Not included in these figures is the cost of drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare institutions.
Table II
—Payments to British Columbia Doctors (Gross Costs)
Fiscal Year
Medical
Agreement
Immigrant
Other
Total
1955/56  	
1956/57. 	
$1,518,274.51
1.479.661.21
$701 89
1.836 78
$4,682.00
4.903.00
$1 523,658 40
1.486 400 99
1957/58
1.492.741.27           1           6 951.51
4.272.13           I           1.503.964.91
1958/59  	
1,580,815.44
1 330.62
5,850.97
1,587,997.03
Table III.—Categorical Breakdown of Medical Coverage
With Average Numbers of Recipients
Fiscal Year
Social
Allowance x
Child
Welfare
Division
Old Age
Security Bonus
and Blind
Old Age
Assistance
Disab'ed
P-rsons'
Allowance
Total Average
Monthly
Coverage
1955/56 	
1956/57	
1957/58 	
1958/59 	
19.273
18,165
18,363
19,914
3.208
3,303
3,546
3,814
36 731
36 240
36.440
36,191
8.448
7,739
7.195
7,150
1
453                  68,113
974                66 421
1,221                  66 765
1,516                  68,585
1 Until August 31st, 1958, there was a Mothers* Allowance case load, but effective September 1st, 1958, these
cases became Social Allowance cases. So that figures from 1958/59 will be comparable with previous years,
Mothers' Allowance and Social Allowance recipients have been combined in this statement under the heading
" Social Allowance."
Table IV.—Drug Costs
Number of Prescriptions
Costs of Medicines
Fiscal Year
Provincial L       t
Pharmacy          "
Total
Provincial
Pharmacy 1
Drug-stores
Total
1955/56                 	
15.931    1    393 367
409 298
$70,353.98
88.259.99
113.841.90
137,255.34
$823,002.90
873,145.51
992,311.11
1,143,851.93
$893,3C6.88
1956/57 	
1957/58 	
1958/59 	
19,572    |    398.355
23,487    I    458002
30,140    i    534,352
F
417 927
481,489
564,492
961 405 50
1.106 153.01
1,281,107.27
1 Not included in these figures is the cost of drugs purchased by the dispensary for welfare institutions. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 75
DENTAL PROGRAMME
There was no significant change from the annual increment in costs nor in the
emphasis on each part of the programme. However, it is encouraging to note that
the age-limit for children eligible to take part in the preventive programme of the
Health Branch was raised from 12 to 13 years as of February 1st, 1959.
Table V.—Dental Expenses
Fiscal Year
Prophylaxis
Extractions
Dentures
Total
1955/56  	
$15,385.80
24,996.66
28,430.52
34,115.73
$8,570.90
7,596.04
9,589.80
12,138.92
$95,556.04
96,674.86
110,203.40
121,796.41
$119,512.74
1956/57  --	
129,267.56
1957/58    	
148,223.72
1958/59   	
168,051.06
OPTICAL SERVICES
There was but a slight increase in the costs of these services during the past
fiscal year. Perhaps this represents a levelling off due to these services approaching
an adequate level. One would hope that this is the case, not merely from a cost
factor, but as an indication that there was no lack of proper optical care in the
welfare programme.
Table VI.—Optical Costs
Fiscal Year
Optometric
Examinations
Glasses
Total
1955/56  	
$9,096.05                  $39,245.86
9,213.65        |          41,351.96
9,896.45                    45.544.21
9.735 50         i           47.314.87
$48,341.91
1956/57    	
50,565.61
1957/58 	
55,440.66
1958/59  —       	
57,050.37
As for most other services, there has been no lessening in the providing of
transportation for welfare recipients for medical reasons, but in fact a definite increase. The reason for this is not immediately apparent, but it may represent more
awareness by doctors and the field staff of the availability of such assistance through
the Medical Services Division. Although no tabulation has been kept of welfare
patients seen by the various travelling clinics of the British Columbia Cancer Clinic,
Children's Hospital, and the Canadian Arthritis and Rheumatism Society, considerable numbers of such persons require financial aid to attend these clinics or for
treatment at their respective centres. The travelling costs in such instances cannot
be measured in dollars and cents but in the benefits of improved health and also
frequently the return to self-maintenance.
In conclusion, we would express our appreciation of the services of the various
professional associations, hospitals, and other institutions, without which the health
services benefits of the Department could not be effected. We refer particularly
to the Canadian Medical Association (British Columbia Division), the British
Columbia Dental and Pharmaceutical Associations, the Vancouver and St. Paul's
Hospitals, the British Columbia Cancer Institute, the Canadian Arthritis and Rheumatism Society, and the G. F. Strong Rehabilitation Centre. It is to be hoped that
further efforts can be made in making use of these and other varied facilities, not
only in treating the patients concerned, but also in assisting them wherever possible
to return to a position of self-independence.
Respectfully submitted.
G. Wakefield, M.D.,
Director, Medical Services Division. O 76
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PART IV.—INSTITUTIONS
INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS
I beg to submit the annual report for the Brannen Lake School for Boys for the
period ending March 31st, 1959.
Fiscal Year
o
m
-».
Ov
Os
*_
o
m
ov
in
0*
in
OV
in
m
OS
«n
■*-
ov
in
V.
in
in
o\
>n
<n
ov
00
m
\
r-
in
ON
Ov
in
\
oo
in
Ov
89
14
1
3
86
25
111
22.5
126
13
79
13
104
15
1
104
19
3
101
4
1
2
4
105
17
122
13.9
119
15
2
2
96
15
2
2
171
32
203
15.8
126
9
19
33
131
9
19
129
1
152
2
3
164
Nnmhp.r A.W.O.T.., April 1st
1
Number in Oakalla, April 1st	
Number in Crease Clinic, April 1st
Number on extended leave, April 1st—
33
143
24
167
14.4
212
1
17
17
222
40
262
15.3
237
2
3    3
1
1
14
210
75
285
26.3
265
1
Number on special leave, April lst~
121
31
152
20.4
146
19
3
27
130
26
156
16.7
128
15
1
118
23
141
16.3
155
4
1
4
2
~ioi
100.6
36,721
9
281
240
52
292
17.8
283
Number A W O T. . Mnrrl.  -.1«f
5
Number on extended leave, March 31st
	
104
84.3
30,865
C1)
96
102.4
37,383
9.5
432
131
ioi.9
37,198
O)
239
129
137.6
50,371
8.3
124
14
152
144
52,576
7.7
156
27
164
152
55,516
6
122
34
Number in the School, March 31st	
79
81.7
29,808
10
0)
104
82
30,011
C1)
(*)
162
159
58,079
6
Total A.W.O.L. during the fiscal year_.
1052
1 Not recorded.
2 Involving seventy-three boys.
During the fiscal year there were 240 admissions and 52 recidivists, making a
total of 292 admitted to the school. There was a 17.8-per-cent rate of recidivism.
Eleven of the fifty-two recidivists were committed for the third time. Two hundred
and seventeen of the boys admitted were Protestant, seventy-one Roman Catholic,
and four of other religion. Twenty-seven of the total number of boys admitted
during the year were of Native Indian status.
Age
9
10
11
12
13
years
Range of Age upon Admission
Number Number
of Boys Age                                                          of Boys
     1 14 years  61
     1 15    „      93
     5 16   „      69
     7 17    „      31
  24
The average age on admission was 14.9 years. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 77
Supervising Agencies of Boys Admitted
Provincial Probation Branch	
Social Welfare Branch and amalgamated district offices __
Esquimalt Juvenile Court	
Royal Oak Juvenile Court	
Saanich Juvenile Court	
Vancouver Juvenile Court	
Oak Bay Juvenile Court	
Victoria Juvenile Court	
Indian Department	
Children's Aid Society
Catholic Children's Aid Society .
Child Welfare Division	
Superintendent of Child Welfare, Yukon	
Indian Department and Social Welfare Branch	
Indian Department and Provincial Probation Branch	
Family and Children's Service	
Vancouver Juvenile Court and Children's Aid Society	
Social Welfare Branch and Provincial Probation Branch
None	
Number
of Boys
_ 124
.    36
1
_      4
_      2
_    65
_      1
.    16
_    17
.    10
.      2
.      1
2
-      2
2
1
3
_      2
_      1
Of this number, thirteen were wards of the Superintendent of Child Welfare,
eleven of the Children's Aid Society, two of the Catholic Children's Aid Society,
and one of the Victoria Family and Children's Service. Seven of these wards were
recidivists.
The 292 boys admitted were committed from the following Juvenile Courts:—
Abbotsford
1
Alberni   6
Alert Bay  3
Burnaby    8
Burns Lake  1
Campbell River  4
Chilliwack   8
Cloverdale  15
Colwood   2
Coquitlam   4
Courtenay   3
Cranbrook     2
Creston   1
Dawson Creek  3
Duncan   6
Esquimalt   2
Fernie   1
Fort St. John  1
Gibsons   3
Golden   1
Haney   1
Hazelton   3
Hope  4
Kamloops   2
Lake Cowichan
Langley 	
Lumby 	
Lytton 	
Masset	
Kelowna   2
Kimberley   1
Kitimat   1
Ladner            3
  3
  1
  1
  3
  2
Mission City _.       2
Nanaimo   7
New Westminster  9
North Vancouver   5
Oak Bay  1
Oliver   7
Penticton _-_,  2
Port Alberni .___  2
Port Coquitlam  6
Port Moody  1
Powell River  6
Prince George  11
Prince Rupert   3
Qualicum Beach  3
Quesnel  2 O 78
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Richmond   2
Royal Oak  4
Saanich   2
Salmon Arm   4
Sechelt  1
Smithers   1
Terrace   2
Tele Jaune  1
Trail 	
Ucluelet _.
Vancouver
3
1
72
Victoria  20
West Summerland     1
West Vancouver     1
Whitehorse, Y.T.     2
Williams Lake     6
Boys were not in all cases residents of the area served by the Juvenile Court
which committed them to the School.
Of the 292 boys committed to the School during the year, 223 were committed
for offences against property, 13 against persons, and 56 for other offences which
included incorrigibility.
Of the 240 new admissions during the year, 41 of the boys were never tried
on probation but were committed to the School on their first appearance before
the Court.
There were 283 boys released from the School during the year. The average
length of stay of boys in the School was six months.
Seventy-three boys accounted for the total of 105 A.W.OL.'s. The difference
between these two figures is due to the fact that some of the same boys went
A.W.O.L. two or more times during the year. The majority of the boys who went
A.W.O.L. were picked up within a few hours of going absent, either by members
of the School staff or R.C.M.P. officers.
A total of 484 boys were worked with in the School during the fiscal year.
The population reached a high of 181 at one time.
MEDICAL AND DENTAL TREATMENT
Two hundred and thirty-three boys were given dental care as follows: 681
fillings, 74 X-rays, 315 extractions, 17 new partial dentures made, 1 complete
upper denture made, 13 partial dentures were repaired, 1 denture relined, 16 prophylaxis treatments were done, and 2 examinations of teeth.
The condition of the boys' teeth on admission to the School is very poor. The
majority of the boys need dental care to some extent.
The incidence of accidents ran about normal. Influenza has accounted for a
large number of sick boys but, on the whole, it was a fairly mild type with no
complications. Ear trouble was less. The new boys are still being tuberculin
tested; only those with a positive reaction have a chest X-ray. Two hundred and
forty-three boys were tuberculin tested, twenty of whom had a positive reaction.
In addition to the medical attention given to boys by our School doctor and
nurse, necessary operations were performed by the School doctor at the Nanaimo
General Hospital. The School was billed for 108 hospital days to cover their care
while in hospital. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 79
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1958/59
Salaries	
Office expense	
Travelling expense 	
Heat, light, power, and water
Medical services	
Clothing and uniforms	
Provisions and catering 	
Laundry and dry-goods	
Equipment and machinery ____
Medical supplies
Maintenance of buildings and grounds
Transportation
Maintenance and operation of equipment
Incidentals and contingencies  	
Repairs to furnishings and equipment	
Training programme expense	
Less-
$238,335.56
5,458.18
533.44
22,724.45
12,000.47
8,006.75
59,917.23
15,163.35
1,440.44
1,260.04
5,040.28
2,411.84
2,735.24
3,749.77
381.70
6,538.23
$385,696.97
Board 	
Rentals   	
Transportation
Sundry   	
$3,144.00
3,396.50
312.90
70.77
6,924.17
$378,772.80
Less increase in inventory—
Inventory at March 31st, 1959  $18,920.69
Inventory at March 31st, 1958  15,784.48
Add Public Works expenditure  $46,074.47
Less rental  532.00
3,136.21
$375,636.59
45,542.47
$421,179.06
Per capita cost per diem: $421,179.06-^-58,079=$7.25. O 80 BRITISH COLUMBIA
RECONCILIATION
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts  $353,100.77
Less increase in inventory         3,136.21
$349,964.56
Add—
Maintenance receipts     $3,203.56
Salary revision     22,468.47
Public Works expenditure   $46,074.47
Less rental  532.00
     45,542.47
       71,214.50
$421,179.06
It will be noted that the average daily population of the School was 159 boys.
Since the School has no control over admissions, we must accept all boys committed
to our School.
I wish to thank all staff members, clergymen, service clubs and other organizations, including other departments of Government, both municipal and provincial,
private agencies, and individuals who have shown an interest in the boys of the
School by helping the School with its programme of rehabilitation. The School is
greatly indebted to all these persons and their assistance has been appreciated by
the administration of the School.
Respectfully submitted.
F. G. Hassard,
Superintendent. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 81
INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
I beg to submit the annual report for the Industrial School for Girls covering
the fiscal year ending March 31st, 1959. This is the forty-fifth annual report and
will be the last from the original School at 800 Cassiar St. Early in the new fiscal
year we will be moving to the new Willingdon School for Girls in Burnaby, which
was officially opened by the Honourable Eric Martin, Minister of Health and Welfare, on March 26th, 1959. This has been a year of anticipation by both girls and
staff as we looked forward to the move, and much of the time of senior members of
staff was taken up with details of furnishings and equipment and plans for the
programme in the new School.
We have continued to carry out as full a programme of interests and activities
as possible and there has been increased participation with considerable improvement in general behaviour by the girls.
Stability in staff has continued with no major changes in the permanent establishment. In September, a second school-teacher was added for the high school
grades and commercial subjects and we discontinued almost entirely the use of
correspondence courses. More than two-thirds of our total population attended
academic classes. Four girls completed the hairdressing course and three of them
found employment in beauty-parlours on their release. The fourth girl was too
young to take the Government examinations and sought other employment rather
than accept an apprenticeship in hairdressing. The sewing-room continued to
provide interest for a number of girls producing articles of clothing for all the girls.
Physical education with classes in self-improvement, team games, and swimming,
has continued to play a big part in our rehabilitation programme. An ever growing
number of volunteers have continued to take an interest in the girls and helped to
expand our programme. We feel this group, too, does much to interpret to the
community the real function of the institution and has done much to ease the girls'
return to the community.
Our social workers have continued to strengthen our relationships with the
social agencies in the community by a continued interpretation of the girls and their
desires and needs when they return to the community.
The health of the girls has remained good. Medical needs have been taken
care of by our staff nurse and our doctor, who continued to come to the School
once a week. The V.D. Clinic sees all new admissions. Extensive use has been
made of Vancouver General Hospital Out-patients' Department. A dental clinic
at O.P.D. once every two weeks takes care of emergencies and a minimum of other
dental needs. Eye examinations are carried out by a specialist and glasses provided
when recommended.
During the first six months of the year only twenty-six were admitted, while
during the last six months there were fifty-five admissions, until March found us
with over seventy actually in the School.
During the year there were sixty-six new admissions and fifteen repeaters,
making a total of eighty-one admitted. Only thirty-six came from Metropolitan
Vancouver, and the other forty-five represented every other part of the Province.
Ten out of the fifteen repeaters were from Greater Vancouver, and seven out of
these ten were wards of the Children's Agencies and one of the balance was on the
Woodlands School waiting list. O 82                                                   BRITISH COLUMBIA
Age on admission this year showed an increase in the older age-group.
Age on Admission                            Number Admitted            Age on Admission                            Number Admitted
12      2                15                                17
13   10                16                               28
14                               9                17                                          15
The majority of the charges continue to be incorrigibility or broken probation.
There were seventy-two girls released during the year and the average length
of stay was 10.6 months.   Forty-nine returned to their own homes, twenty-one went
to homes of relatives or to foster homes, one was admitted to Woodlands School, and
one Hungarian refugee accepted voluntary repatriation back to Hungary.
A closer examination of the admissions suggests they fell into three groups:—
(a)  True delinquents capable of being helped in a training school  47
Plus seven Native Indians who would not likely have come to the
School if the Indian had the same laws as the white     7
54
(_>)  Those whose delinquent behaviour pattern had become too firmly
established and who had no desire to change and therefore
were beyond help in an open training school  15
(c)  The more seriously disturbed child requiring treatment in a more
protected and probably a psychiatric setting  11
Plus Woodlands School waiting list     1
81
This report would not be complete without a backward glance over the last
forty-five years.
This old School was built in 1913 and officially opened on April 3rd, 1914, by
Honourable the Attorney-General W. J. Bowser, K.C. The first girl was admitted
on February 28th, 1914, and was sentenced for seven years. The others sent in
during the same year were all for " an undefined period of not less than two years."
Since that date to the end of the present fiscal year fourteen hundred and seventy-one
girls have been admitted. During the forty-five years there have been seven Superintendents: Mr. T. H. Collier and Mrs. Collier, as matron, 1914-17 (Mrs. Collier
passed away this spring at the age of 93); Miss Margaret W. Bayne, deceased,
1918-29; Mrs. A. G. Westman, 1929-44; Miss Maude V. Fleming, 1945-48;
Miss Willa Broderick, 1948-49; Miss Ayra E. Peck, 1949-55. Miss Peck had
also served as teacher and Assistant Superintendent, with a total of twenty years on
staff; and the present incumbent since March, 1955.
In more recent years the School has been described as a " house of horror "
and, while there have been days when those of us within could agree, there has
never been a day without a bright spot somewhere and there were years when reports
said it was a comfortably furnished home without the appearance of an institution.
To many of the girls who have passed through its doors it has meant a new lease on
life.
In conclusion, we take this opportunity to express our appreciation and thanks
to all the volunteers—individuals and groups—who have taken such a keen interest
in our girls and given so generously of their time in assisting the staff with our
programme throughout the year. We are greatly indebted to them. May I take
this opportunity of expressing my sincere thanks to the senior administration for
their support and encouragement and to my staff for work well done. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 83
STATISTICAL INFORMATION
Population of the School, March 31st, 1959
On roll, April 1st, 1958   69
Girls admitted during April 1st, 1958, to March 31st, 1959  81
—    150
Officially released   71
Transferred to other institutions with subsequent official release
from Girls' Industrial School      1
Transferred to other institutions but not officially released       72
Total unreleased, March 31st, 1959
78
Financial Statement, 1958/58
Salaries  $124,863.61
Office expense	
Travelling expense	
Heat, light, power, and water
Medical services 	
Clothing and uniforms	
  3,241.69
  1,23 3.92
  6,045.73
  6,016.65
  3,003.37
Provisions and catering _          20,497.40
Laundry and dry-goods
Good Conduct Fund	
Equipment and machinery 	
Medical supplies	
Maintenance of buildings and grounds	
Transportation 	
Maintenance and operation of equipment ...
Incidentals and contingencies	
Vocational and recreational supplies, etc. __.
Sundry expense re operation of new School
Less—
Rentals 	
Board 	
Sundry receipts
212.85
1,553.01
326.10
1,813.38
849.19
1,613.92
113.04
316.74
1,308.93
2,542.88
$175,552.41
$45.00
441.00
73.00
559.00
Add decrease in inventory—
Inventory at March 31st, 1958  $5,203.58
Inventory at March 31st, 1959      4,350.14
$174,993.41
853.44
$175,846.85
Add Public Works expenditure       14,741.21
$190,588.06
Per capita cost per diem: $190,588.06-hl8,765=$10.16. O 84 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts  $157,880.35
Add—
Salary revision  $17,113.06
Decrease in inventory  853.44
Public Works expenditure     14,741.21
       32,707.71
$190,588.06
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Winifred M. Urquhart,
Superintendent. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 85
PROVINCIAL HOME, KAMLOOPS
I herewith submit the annual report of the Provincial Home for the Aged and
Infirm, Kamloops, for the fiscal year 1958/59.
BUILDINGS
The interior of the Home received some attention during the year and the
improvements made are enjoyed. Bathrooms in three wards have been modernized.
For the sick ward, added conveniences were completed, chiefly by modernizing the
bathroom and installation of a shower. The kitchen was redecorated, also new tile
for the floor.   Some decorating was done in the rooms.
HEALTH SERVICES
The Home continues to provide good patient care. Medical and surgical
services were again provided by the Irving Clinic and medical supplies purchased
from the Provincial Pharmacy. The diet has been improved with the assistance of
the nutrition consultant and the dietician from Tranquille. An evening snack was
commenced and proved satisfactory, resulting in better rest. The daily bed-patient
average is 12. The average number of patients examined weekly by the attending
physician is 18.   All acute cases receive hospitalization.
ENTERTAINMENT
Concerts and religious services were again presented by local organizations
throughout the year, particularly at Easter and Christmas. Special effort was made
for decorating at Christmas time. The highlight of the year was H.R.H. Princess
Margaret as she passed by the Home. Bingo games are popular and are played
twice a month.   Television is appreciated.   A picture show is held weekly.
EQUIPMENT
Equipment received during the year was a desk, steno chair, and filing cabinet
for the dispensary, new heating elements and plates for the kitchen range, fifty
stacking chairs for a recreation-room, and forty-eight lockers for the staff and
inmates.
GENERAL
A limited canteen was started and is worth while, allowing the more feeble to
purchase extras. The laundry was again processed at the Home after Tranquille
closed. Fire-protection for the Home is always in the fore. The Provincial Home
cemetery was accepted by the Department of Public Works for maintenance and
care.
Ground-floor space is still at a premium as a number of new admittances are
feeble old men and, when stronger, are transferred upstairs. The staff is continually
active in helping to create good relations among the inmates, resulting in them helping each other.
The population in the Home consists of twenty-five nationalities. There are
fourteen different religions. Presently there are only ten inmates under 70 years
of age and only six not receiving a pension. O 86
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The population, by birthdates, is divided as follows:—
Birthdates
1900-1910 	
Number of
Inmates
             l
Average
Age
51
1895-1899 	
     3
63
1890-1894 	
                    6
66
1885-1889     	
    _   .„     22
72
1880-1884                 	
....                  _ 38
76
1875-1879       	
  33
82
1870-1874
17
86
18 65-18 69	
  10
90
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1958/59
Salaries	
Office expense	
Travelling expense	
Heat, light, power, and water	
Medical services	
Clothing and uniforms	
Provisions and catering	
Laundry and dry-goods	
Equipment and machinery	
Medical supplies	
Maintenance of buildings and grounds
Transportation 	
Burials 	
Maintenance and operation of equipment
Incidentals and contingencies	
$95,701.02
690.81
141.91
1,809.47
6,283.10
1,933.41
29,502.05
4,772.50
1,673.86
2,711.56
1,181.42
253.69
1,375.00
394.55
1,854.81
$150,279.16
Less-
Board
Rent .
$1,125.00
420.00
1,545.00
$148,734.16
Summary
Provincial Home expenditure  $148,734.16
Public Works expenditure       11,472.50
$160,206.66
Cost per capita per diem: $16O,206.66-=-43,329==$3.70.
Pensions paid to Government Agent, Kamloops, $76,776.19. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 87
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts     $70,765.96
Add salary revision       10,962.87
Add maintenance receipts—
Pensions 	
Municipalities
$81,728.83
Transfers from Provincial Home
Trust Account	
Other collections	
$76,776.19
4,492.84
2,442.60
327.92
84,039.55
$165,768.38
Add Public Works expenditure       11,472.50
Less—
Pensioners' Comforts     $7,352.75
Proportion of excess of disbursements over receipts for Tranquille Farm       9,681.47
$177,240.88
17,034.22
$160,206.66
I wish to thank all staff members, co-workers, and senior administration for
their assistance and support during the year.
Respectfully submitted.
G. P. Willie,
Superintendent. O 88 BRITISH COLUMBIA
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS BOARD
I herewith submit the annual report of the administration of the Welfare
Institutions Licensing Act for the year 1958. As licences are issued on the basis of
the calendar year, this report covers the period from January 1st, 1958, to December
31st, 1958.
LICENCES
The total number of cases dealt with during the year was 1,058, made up of
656 licensed institutions and 402 pending applications. Of the licensed institutions,
84 closed during the year and 313 pending applications were closed or withdrawn.
The total case load at December 31st, 1958, was 717, made up of 572 licensed
institutions and 145 pending applications.
BOARD MEETINGS
Eight Board meetings were held during the year. In April Dr. J. L. M.
Whitbread replaced Dr. A. A. Larsen as the representative from the Health Branch,
Department of Health and Welfare.   The members of the Board for 1958 were:—
Chairman:  Mr. J. A. Sadler, Director of Welfare.
Members: Mr. F. P. Levirs, Chief Inspector of Schools, Department of Education; Miss Ruby McKay, Superintendent, Child Welfare Division; Mr.
A. A. Shipp, Assistant Administrator, Region II, Social Welfare Branch;
and Dr. J. L. M. Whitbread, Director, Environmental Management,
Health Branch.
Chief Inspector: Mrs. Edna L. Page.
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS FOR CHILDREN
A. Full-time Care of Children
There were no changes in the number of institutions licensed for children or
type of service given. A committee of representatives from these institutions, under
the chairmanship of the Superintendent of Child Welfare, continued to meet during
1958. The purpose of this committee is to look into present legislation, as set down
in the Welfare Institutions Licensing Act and regulations, and to ascertain whether
this legislation is adequate to meet the present and future needs of children in this
Province.
There was no appreciable change in the number of private boarding homes for
children licensed in 1958. These homes continue to give good service to parents
needing to board their children. The Advisory Committee on Private Boarding
Homes for Children, under the chairmanship of the Senior Medical Health Officer,
City of Vancouver, met regularly to discuss children's boarding homes in the
Vancouver area. The other members of this committee were representatives from
the Children's Aid Society, Catholic Children's Aid Society, Foster Day Care
Association, and Welfare Institutions Office.
B. Day Care of Children
Foster Homes for Day Care
During the year an acting executive director was appointed to the Foster
Day Care Association, Vancouver, to replace Mrs. Kathleen Smith, who had given
long and faithful service to this agency. A home-finder was also appointed, and
this resulted in the licensing of a large number of new and suitable homes offering
this service.   The finding of safe homes where working mothers can place their REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 89
children is an important and necessary community programme. This service was
expanded considerably during 1958 as a result of the work done by the Foster
Day Care Association, which supervised this programme in the Vancouver area.
Kindergartens, Play-schools, etc.
The private kindergarten and pre-school programme continued to expand in
British Columbia. Because a well-established training programme is set up, more
qualified persons are now available for positions as pre-school supervisors. The
British Columbia Pre-school Education Association continued to meet regularly,
and the future aims of the group were consolidated.
Schools for Retarded Children
There was a sharp increase in the number of schools of this type licensed in
1958, as interest in the retarded child grew in the Province. The British Columbia
Association for Retarded Children expanded its membership and services. The
association continued to work toward their aim of having the Department of Education provide facilities and assume the cost of educating the retarded child on the
same basis as the normal child.
MATERNITY HOMES
There was no change in the status or programme of the three maternity homes
serving the Province.
AGED-CARE
During 1958 there was considerable public interest in boarding homes and
nursing homes for the elderly.
Throughout the Province several local societies were incorporated, having as
their aim to raise money to provide housing for the aged. Non-profit groups such as
these can apply for financial grants from the Provincial Government under the
terms of the Elderly Citizens' Housing Aid Act to help cover the cost of construction.
During 1958 a start was made on the Dr. F. W. Greene Memorial Home for the
aged in Cranbrook.
Several new privately operated boarding homes were licensed during the year,
and this type of establishment offers a home-like atmosphere to the elderly. Many
of these homes are doing a very worth-while job in caring for persons in receipt of
public assistance in their area.
UNEMPLOYED ADULTS
One of the five homes licensed for this type of care was closed in 1958. The
Bethel Girls' Home, operated by the Mennonite Church, which had provided a home
for girls seeking jobs and to become established, discontinued this service.
The Narcotic Addiction Foundation of British Columbia opened a home as a
treatment centre for addicts. There is residential care for four persons in the home
and out-patient treatment is also offered. The programme consists of therapy and
counselling from professional staff.
SUMMER CAMPS
Clear, through the gathering dusk, a bugle sounds,
In quick response the campers turn from play;
While through the silent hills the call resounds,
They stand erect to honour close of day.
A large number of new applications for licences for summer camps were
received in 1958 as more organizations became interested in providing a camping O 90
BRITISH COLUMBIA
experience for children. Continuing efforts to improve camping standards were
made by the Department of Health and Welfare together with the Provincial Fire
Marshal's office. This year, also, those camps which have electrical installations
were inspected by the Provincial Electrical Energy Department for the first time.
The British Columbia Camping Association continued to offer co-operation and
advice to those interested in camping. A camp directory was published and the
camp referral programme made it possible for underprivileged children to attend a
camp.
STATISTICAL INFORMATION
Table I.—Showing a Comparative Summary of Information
Regarding Licensed Welfare Institutions
1955
1956
1957
1958
Children—Total Care (Excluding Summer Camps)
Number licensed—■
10
58
500
150
596
189
92,264
37,316
58
3,765
15,861
149,616
222
10
59
452
142
516
171
89,678
38,058
67
4,214
16,736
165,867
221
8
33
5,637
180
104
9,636
162
237
781,558
21,374
19,628
163
2,510
3,645
761,642
5
75
504
17,338
3
115
278
209
26,307
9
54
385
120
468
155
91,446
33,089
73
4,891
21,578
200,516
243
13
35
6,310
227
140
11,022
227
277
883,865
27,017
23,879
170
2,671
3,775
803,705
5
75
557
19,809
3
115
319
235
29,309
9
46
Capacity—■
Institutions         -
357
105
Number of children under care—
397
126
Number of days' care—
82,788
30,557
Summer Camps
74
5,280
Number of persons attending     -	
22,695
233,565
Children—Day Care
Number licensed—
260
25
32
5,295
50
Capacity-
6,724
358
Foster day care         	
Number of children enrolled—
154
8,640
247
745,563
20,087
167
2,426
3,612
724,980
4
69
411
17.012
3
115
271
201
26,671
172
11,392
340
320
Number of attendance days—
Kindergartens   .    . -     -   —	
940,628
42,917
Foster day care-       	
Adults—Infirm and Unemployables
27,754
184
2,805
3,851
859,962
Adults—Employable
5
Capacity       - _     	
72
473
16,208
Women—Maternity
3
115
Number of persons under care—■
327
Infants                                                ...
Number of days' care     -    .,:
259
28,795 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 91
Table II.—Case Load Showing the Total Number of Licensed Institutions
and Pending Applications, 1958
Licensed
Licensed
Jan. 1, 1958
Licensed in
1958
Licensed Insti-
tions Closed
in 1958
Total Cases
Licensed at
Dec. 31,1958
Children—total care—
43
9
72
217
12
30
111
34
5
3
3
2
43
13
20
38
1
6
2
36
5
10
23
1
1
40
9
72
Children—day care—
224
20
40
Aged—
126
34
Adults—employable -   -  _
4
3
Totals 	
536             1              120
84
572
Licensed January 1st, 1958
Licensed in 1958 	
Closed
536
120
656
84
572
Licenses Pending
Pending
Jan. 1, 1958
New Cases
in 1958
Closed in
1958
Total Pending
Dec. 31,1958
Children—total care—
13
8
34
10
18
23
3
___
28
15
106
15
80
98
5
2
31
3
103
17
78
79
2
10
2. Inst'tutions.           _. _
3. Camps   	
Children—day care—
1. Kindergartens	
2. Schools for retarded children	
3. Foster day care 	
Aged—
20
37
8
20
42
6
2
Homes—maternity   _ _	
Totals _	
109
349
313
145
Carried from January 1st, 1958
New cases  	
Closed
Total Case Load
Licensed
Pending _
CONCLUSION
109
349
458
313
145
572
145
717
Sincere thanks and appreciation is extended to all who helped with the
administration of this Act.
Respectfully submitted.
(Mrs.) Florence L. Ireland,
Social Worker, on behalf of the late Mrs. E. L. Page. O 92 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PART V.—MEDICAL SOCIAL WORK SERVICES
SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT, DIVISION OF
- TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
During the year ending March 31st, 1959, the Division of Tuberculosis Control
has continued to adapt service to the changing situation in relation to the treatment
of tuberculosis. As shorter hospital-treatment time is required, the number of beds
needed for in-patient treatment continues to decrease, but, of course, the turnover is
faster. The plan to accommodate all patients requiring in-patient treatment in the
Vancouver area was realized in October, 1958, when Tranquille Sanatorium closed
after some fifty years of operation as a tuberculosis sanatorium. The closing of
Tranquille had taken place gradually, beginning in 1954, when 300 patients were
under treatment there, to September 23rd, 1959, when the remaining patients were
transferred to the Vancouver units. Present treatment facilities for those patients
requiring hospital care comprise 367 beds, of which 264 are at Pearson Tuberculosis
Hospital and 103 at Willow Chest Centre. There were 734 admissions in 1958 and
831 discharges.
In addition to offering hospital treatment, the Tuberculosis Division continues
to serve all areas of the Province with diagnostic and follow-up service through
stationary and travelling clinics, in co-operation with the Provincial Public Health
Service. The 1958 annual report for the Division of Tuberculosis Control showed
that there was an increase in the number of tuberculosis cases found by the survey
clinics from 226 in 1957 to 265 in 1958, despite the fact that the number of X-rays
taken was reduced by 90,000. This reduction in X-rays taken was due to greater
selection of cases to be examined and the introduction of tuberculin testing as a
screening method, but was due also in a large part to the fear of radiation. The
number of new reported cases in the calendar year 1958 was 1,128, of which 754
were diagnosed as active.
Major changes in the Social Service Department accompanied the consolidation of the in-patient treatment programme in the two Vancouver units. At the
beginning of this year the position of Provincial Supervisor was deleted, and the
administrative duties which remained became the responsibility of the Casework
Supervisor. Social Service staff complement was established at three—a Casework
Supervisor and two caseworkers. The Department was permitted time to accomplish this change to reduced staff so that service to patients could be maintained
during the period of adjustment. By the end of July, 1958, the necessary staff
reduction had taken place and there have been no staff changes since that time.
One social worker is assigned to Willow Chest Centre, where service is offered to
both hospital and clinic patients, and one social worker is assigned to Pearson Unit,
where the case load consists of in-patients. The Supervisor carries a case load at
Pearson unit but spends regular hours each week at Willow Chest Centre, where the
headquarters of the Tuberculosis Division is located.
The interdepartmental referral procedure described in the previous report has
continued in use and is proving to be a satisfactory method of bringing the service
of the Department to those patients who require help with social or emotional aspects
of their illness, and has also been helpful in planning economical use of staff time.
The Department has continued to place concise recordings of Social Service
activity on medical records for the information of treatment personnel, and on all
new admissions makes a note of potential areas of difficulty as revealed by home
reports. The year's statistics indicate an increase in interstaff discussion in regard
to planning for patients, as compared with the previous year.   It can be assumed REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 93
that both the referral procedure and the chart recording have contributed to this
valuable increase in communication on behalf of patients as well as to the clarification and definition of areas in which the social worker can contribute to the total
treatment plan of the patient.
The Social Service Department has continued to use community resources on
behalf of patients and their families and has worked co-operatively with many
district Social Welfare offices, as well as with Greater Vancouver public and private
social agencies, both in referring patients for service and in receiving requests for
service from other agencies.
The Social Service Department wishes to acknowledge the continued financial
contributions from the British Columbia Tuberculosis Society and the Mt. Garibaldi
Chapter and the Municipal Chapter of the I.O.D.E. These contributions are used
to meet emergency needs of patients for whom no other resources are available.
During the year staff participated in the education programmes of the nursing
education department of the Tuberculosis Division and in the training programme
of the Social Welfare Branch.
Total number of casework interviews with patients by staff in all units was
1,726.   Total number of conferences with other professional workers was 1,953.
Respectfully submitted.
(Mrs.) M. Titterington,
Casework Supervisor.
' O 94
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PART VI.—ACCOUNTING DIVISION
The functions of the Accounting Division are to control expenditures, process
accounts for payment, account for revenue, forecast expenditures, and prepare the
Departmental estimates of revenue and expenditures in their final form.
The gross expenditure increased from $28,888,200 in 1957/58 to $35,264,700
in 1958/59, or $6,376,500. This was an increase of slightly more than 22 per cent,
and the large increase in Social Allowances was due not only to an increase in case
load but also to an increase in basic rates effective April 1st, 1958.
Proportion of Total Welfare Expenditure
Main Service
1957/58
1958/59
Per Cent
Value
Per Cent
Value
1.7
2.8
4.5
7.6
9.9
28.6
44.9
$497,500
816,800
1,289,700
2,185,000
2,853,900
8,259,300
12,986,000
1.4
2.2
3.5
6.9
9.0
37.4
39.6
$495,700
771,800
1,255,000
2,444,900
Medical services, drugs, optical, etc.  ' —
3,156,800
13,177,000
Old-age Assistance,  Blind Persons' Allowance,  Disabled
Persons' Allowance, and supplementary social assist-
13,963,500
100.0
$28,888,200
100.0
$35,264,700
It is interesting to note that expenditure on Social Allowance in 1958/59 is
nearly as large as that on Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowance, Disabled
Persons' Allowance, and supplementary social assistance for the aged and handicapped.
The allowances paid directly to the individuals receiving the benefit (Old-age
Assistance, Disabled Persons' Allowance, Blind Persons' Allowance, and supplementary social assistance for the aged and handicapped, Social Allowance, and
Mothers' Allowance) formed 77 per cent of the total expenditure. Payments to
foster-parents, health services, institutional care, and the cost of social workers'
services were 21.6 per cent of the total expenditure. The balance, 1.4 per cent, was
for operations which were solely administrative.
The Accounting Division continued to produce a monthly report on case loads
and case-load activity from the regional and district reports and assisted in the development of new forms in connection with the administration of Social Allowance.
During the year the total mileage on cars driven by staff members was 991,613,
including eighty-nine Government-owned cars driven 581,568 miles and ninety-
eight privately owned cars driven 410,045 miles paid for on a mileage basis.
Respectfully submitted.
J. McDiarmid,
Departmental Comptroller.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1960
1,060-1259-1831  

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