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Annual Report of The Social Welfare Branch of the Department of Health and Welfare for the Year Ended… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1959

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 PROVINCE   OF  BRITISH   COLUMBIA
Annual Report of
The Social Welfare Branch
of  the  Department  of
Health and Welfare
for the Year Ended March 31st
1958
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1959  Victoria, B.C., December 10th, 1958.
To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Social Welfare Branch of the Department of Health and
Welfare for the year ended March 31st, 1958, is herewith respectfully submitted.
ERIC MARTIN,
Minister of Health and Welfare.
Office of the Minister of Health and Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C. Social Welfare Branch,
Victoria, B.C., December 10th, 1958.
The Honourable E. C. F. Martin,
Minister of Health and Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Social Welfare Branch
for the year ended March 31st, 1958.
E. R. RICKINSON,
Deputy Minister of Welfare.
Social Welfare Branch,
Victoria, B.C., December 10th, 1958.
E. R. Rickinson, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Welfare.
Sir,—I submit herewith the Report of the Social Welfare Branch for the year ended
March 31st, 1958.
J. A. SADLER,
Director of Welfare. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
(SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH)
April 1st, 1957, to March 31st, 1958
Hon. Eric Martin Minister of Health and Welfare.
SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
E. R. Rickinson Deputy Minister.
J. A. Sadler Director of Welfare.
Miss Amy Leigh Assistant Director of Welfare.
J. McDiarmid Departmental Comptroller.
Miss Marie Riddell Provincial Supervisor, Family Division.
Miss Ruby McKay Superintendent of Child Welfare.
E. W. Berry Chairman, Old-age Assistance and Blind Per
sons' and Disabled Persons' Allowances
Board, and Supplementary Assistance.
Dr. G. E. Wakefield Director of Medical Services.
Mrs. E. L. Page Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions.
Miss E. S. Wyness Provincial Supervisor, Social Service Department, Divisions of Tuberculosis Control
and Venereal Disease Control.
F. G. Hassard    Superintendent,  Brannen  Lake  School for
Boys.
Miss W. M. Urquhart Superintendent, Girls' Industrial School.
G. P. Willie Superintendent, Provincial Home.
E. L. Rimmer Administrator, Region I.
R. Talbot Administrator, Region II.
R. I. Stringer Administrator, Region III.
R. J. Burnham Administrator, Region IV.
V. H. Dallamore Administrator, Region V.
Miss M. K. King Administrator, Region VI.
W. H. Crossley Administrator, Region VII.  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Part I.—General and Regional Administration—
General...    9
Assistant Director of Welfare  11
Regional Administration—
Region I  13
Region II  15
Region III  16
Region IV  18
Region V    19
Region VI  21
Region VII    24
Part II.—Divisional Administration—
Family Division—
Social Allowances  27
Mothers'Allowances  32
Family Service  3 8
Child Welfare Division  42
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowances, Disabled Persons' Allowances,
and Supplementary Assistance  54
Medical Services Division  78
Part III.—Institutions—
Industrial School for Boys  81
Industrial School for Girls    87
Provincial Home, Kamloops  91
Welfare Institutions Board  94
Part IV.—Medical Social Work Services—
Social Service Department, Division of Tuberculosis Control   101
Part V.—Accounting Division  103  Report of the Social Welfare Branch
PART L—GENERAL AND REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
GENERAL
In view of the rapidly growing population of the Province with the resulting constantly increasing demands for welfare services, it seems wise at this time to review
briefly the organization of the Social Welfare Branch.
In 1946 the health and welfare administrations were amalgamated into the Department of Health and Welfare under the Minister of Health and Welfare, and a Deputy
Minister of Health and a Deputy Minister of Welfare were placed in charge of the Public
Health Branch and the Social Welfare Branch respectively.
The Social Welfare Branch is organized on a functional basis with a senior administration consisting of Deputy Minister, Director of Welfare, and Assistant Director of
Welfare.
Specific legislative responsibilities are handled by divisional heads, such as Old Age,
Child Welfare, and Welfare Institutions Licensing. To provide the services under the
welfare legislation with efficiency and flexibility, a policy of decentralization of administration and supervision is used. The Province is divided into seven regions, with a
regional administrator in charge of each region. The offices within the regions, whether
municipal or Provincial, render welfare services as provided by legislation through the
social workers, who deal directly with the persons requesting help with their problems.
The following tables show, on a comparative basis, case loads, changes in case loads,
and the number of recipients.
TABLE I
It is interesting to note in this table that the Family Service, Old-age Assistance,
Health and Institutional case loads have decreased as a percentage of the total case load,
whereas the Disabled and Child Welfare cases have increased on a percentage basis during
the three-year period. The increase of Social Allowances cases in 1958, as compared
with 1957, reflects the increasing unemployment in 1958.
Table /.-
-Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
as at March 31st for the Years 1956, 1957, and 1958
1956
1957
1958
Category
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
62,764
1,640
11,610
451
8,853
32,494
959
5,669
1,003
100.0
2.6
18.5
0.7
14.1
51.8
1.5
9.0
1.7
60,383
1,443
9,537
661
8,302
32,865
1,203
5,656
716
100.0
2.4
15.8
1.1
13.8
54.4
2.0
9.4
1.2
61,783
1,296
10,658
671
8,385
32,761
1,453
5,896
663
100 0
2 1
17 3
Blind Persons' Allowance1..  .
Old-age Assistance1  	
Old Age Security supplementary assistance1
Disabled Persons' Allowance1 	
Child Welfare 	
1.1
13.6
53.0
2.4
9.5
1.1
1 Includes Old-age Assistance Board figures which are not shown in regional reports.
9 O  10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TABLE II
The highlight of this table is the indication of the constant change in case load, with
the resulting demands on staff time.
Table II.—Movement in Case Load during Fiscal Year 1957/58
Major Category of Service
Cases Opened during Year1
Cases Closed during Year
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
2,376
14,821
369
851
6,042
12,624
6.939
5.3
33.0
0.8
1.9
13.5
28.1
15.4
2,640
14,085
408
633
6,181
13,214
7.116
5.8
31.1
0.9
Disabled Persons' Allowance _
OlH-age Assistance
1.4
13.7
29.2
Child Welfare     .
15.7
884        |         2.0
969        |          2.2
44,906
100.0
45,246
100.0
1 Includes new, reopened, and transferred cases.
TABLE III
This table shows that the total case load has decreased steadily as a percentage of
population from 1956 to 1958, although the absolute case load has increased by approximately 1,400 from 1957 to 1958. The steady increase in population in our Province is
responsible for the numerical increase in the number of people being helped, although the
percentage of people needing such help in our population has fallen.
Table III.—Number of Recipients by Category as a Percentage of Population as at
March 31st for the Years 1956, 1957, and 1958
1956
1957
1958
Category
Number
Per Cent of
Population
(1,342,000)
Number
Per Cent of
Population
(1,398,464)
Number
Per Cent of
Population,
(1,487,000)
62,764
1,640
11,610
451
8,853
32,494
959
5,669
1,088
4.7
0.1
0.9
0.1
0.7
2.4
0.1
0.4
0.1
60,383
1,443
9,537
661
8,302
32,865
1,203
5,656
716
4.3
0.1
0.7
0.1
0.6
2.4
0.1
0.4
0.1
61,783
1,296
10,658
671
8.385
32,761
1,453
5,896
663
4.2
0.1
0.7
0.1
Old-age Assistance1	
Old Age Security supplementary assistance1
0.6
2.2
0.1
Child Welfare      	
0.4
0.1
1 Includes Old-age-Assistance Board figures which are not shown in regional reports.
The continued co-operation received from officials of the municipalities, private
agencies, and many other organizations has been appreciated by the staff of this Branch.
Respectfully submitted,
J. A. Sadler,
Director of Welfare. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O  11
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF WELFARE
The annual report of the Assistant Director of Welfare from April 1st, 1957, to
March 31st, 1958, is herewith submitted. Miss Amy Leigh, Assistant Director of Welfare
for the period of time covered by this report, retired on July 1st, 1958, and, therefore,
this account will of necessity be brief because it describes an aspect of the administration
of the Branch in which this writer did not participate during the year under review.
The office of the Assistant Director of Welfare has been, as always, concerned with
the monumental task of recruiting, training, and maintaining of staff, aided by the Supervisor of the Training Division.
As has been stated in the past, the quality and quantity of the service which the
Branch can give is related directly to the number of staff available to us, as well as the
quality of those persons employed and their knowledge, skill, and experience. This is
especially true of the social-work staff, but they would be hampered indeed in their work if
they were not ably supported by clerical staff who ensure that the mechanics and procedures are competency handled. This is equally true of the office of the Assistant
Director of Welfare as in any district or regional office.
This office is not only responsible for maintaining good personnel practices within
those prescribed by the Civil Service Commission, but must be aware of the needs of the
staff to increase their knowledge and to progress in their skills and find satisfaction in their
work, and endeavour to meet those needs.
Only in this way can a happy and stable staff be maintained, and a loyalty inspired
which even under inordinate pressures enables the staff members to meet the demands
for service made upon them. The divisional and regional reports which follow will show
the volume of work and the multitude of services given in the past year.
In order to keep attuned to the problems and needs of the staff, the Assistant Director
of Welfare should visit the field, institutions, and divisions as often as seems advisable.
Six such visits were made in the fiscal year under review.
The following table shows the number of all staff (clerical, professional, and technical) comprising the Branch as at March 31st, 1958:—
Office of Deputy Minister	
Director of Welfare	
Field Service	
Medical Services Division
Child Welfare Division	
Provincial Home	
Brannen Lake School for Boys
Girls' Industrial School	
Old-age Assistance Board	
Family Division	
2
4
297
12
19
35
65
32
77
6
Total
549
The following table gives the total social-work staff employed for the fiscal years
ended March 31st, 1957, and March 31st, 1958:—
University
Trained
In-service
Trained
Total
Total staff, March 31st, 1957 	
109
+3
-     112
-3
221
Staff appointed April 1st, 1957, to March 31st, 1958..	
112
8
109
44
221
52
Resignations, April 1st, 1957, to March 31st, 1958	
120
27
153
32
273
59
Total staff as at March 31st, 1958	
93
121
214 O  12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
To the above total should be added the superintendents and social workers with professional training at the Brannen Lake School for Boys and the Girls' Industrial School—
namely 7, or a total of 221. This figure should not be compared with the total of 221
last year, which did not include the staff of the two correctional institutions. These
seven persons are not included in the Field Services establishment, but in the staff establishment of their respective institutions.
The following table gives a breakdown of the total staff performing professional
services, according to their qualifications, as at March 31st, 1958.
Men
Women
Total
9
3
11
3
5
3
36
9
1
27
23
5
1
3
79
18
4
38
26
10
1
6
115
Totals            	
70
148
218
Divisional Administrators            	
2
Director of Medical Services 	
1
Total	
1
1
221
Of the six persons granted educational leave to attend the School of Social Work
at the University of British Columbia, four were granted Branch bursaries. While these
bursaries by no means meet the total cost of an academic year, they do serve to supplement the personal resources of the individual applicant. Two other members of the staff
were granted educational leave, one to obtain the degree of Master of Social Work and
one for further general academic education.
During the course of the year a total of seventy-six persons were given in-service
training in five introductory and four final group sessions.
The annual District Supervisors' meeting was held in Victoria to discuss topics and
problems of mutual concern and interest to the whole Branch. This annual event is of
infinite benefit to all attending.
The Branch was able to be represented at seven conferences and institutes related
to social welfare, and thirteen delegates attended. Participation in such conferences and
institutes is an integral part of the staff-development programme. Additional proof of
the desire to participate is the number of staff members who also attend at their own
expense, being granted only leave with pay or even attending in their holidays.
An experiment was tried this year in the planning of annual regional staff meetings.
Two such meetings were held—one in early September when the staff of Regions III and
IV met together, and in late September when the staff of Regions V and VI joined. On
both occasions, members of administration and divisional heads attended.
The Girls' Industrial School Committee, under the chairmanship of the Assistant
Director of Welfare, continued to meet and plan for the new School. Five such meetings
were held.
On behalf of the previous Assistant Director of Welfare, Miss Amy Leigh, I wish to
express, as I am sure she would have, appreciation of the spirit of co-operation between
administration and the staff, whose steadfastness of purpose and supreme efforts enabled
the Branch to fufil its sole function, which is to bring service and help to those in want or
distressed because of problems which they cannot resolve for themselves.
(Miss) Marie Riddell,
Assistant Director of Welfare. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
O 13
REGION I
I submit herewith the annual report for the year 1957/58 and place on the record
once again a resume of another year of activity of welfare services in this region.
Region I comprises Vancouver Island, the Gulf Islands, and a small section of the
Mainland contiguous to the Johnstone and Queen Charlotte Straits. According to estimated figures, the population for the region approximates 245,000 persons, with a land
area of roughly 13,000 square miles. About half of the population live in the southerly
part—Greater Victoria area, Duncan, Nanaimo, etc.
The welfare staff consists of thirty-two field workers, with four supervisors, two
municipal administrators, and one regional administrator.
Hereunder are shown three tables as at March 31st, 1958:—
Table I.—Administrative Offices with Distribution of Case Load by Category of Services
Category
Alberni
Courtenay
Duncan
Nanaimo
Saanich
Victoria
City
Victoria
District
Total
19
105
3
107
327
13
138
18
32
182
7
136
522
23
218
13
28
137
9
125
453
12
149
20
46
336
10
196
1,004
37
187
17
117
12
153
937
31
37
6
532
37
442
2,121
76
.....
43
34
179
12
158
1,053
43
102
34
165
1,588
Blind Persons' Allowance  	
90
1,317
Supplementary assistance to Old Age
Security.  	
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Child Welfare	
6,417
235
794
182
Totals
730
1,133
933
1,833
1,287
3,257
1,615
10,788
Table II.-
-Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories in
Region I for the Fiscal Years 1957 and 1958
Category
1957
1958
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
229
1,388
81
1,243
6,473
165
779
161
2.2
13.2
0.8
11.8
61.5
1.7
7.4
1.5
165
1,588
90
1,317
6,417
235
794
182
1           1.5
14.7
0.8
12 2
59 5
Disabled Persons' Allowance... —   	
Child Welfare           _                      	
2.2
7.4
1 6
10,519
100.0
10,788
100.0 O  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table III.—Analysis of Case Load and Populations in Each Municipality
Population
1956 Census
Welfare Services
Area
Per Canita
Plan
Amalgamated
Plan
Welfare
Case Load
3,947
10,373
2,477
3,025
3,247
10,384
12,705
7,781
14,857
38,358
54,584
3,069
1,039
2,107
1,949
726
895
1,151
1,112
1,371
389
520
154
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
	
X
X
141
City of Port Alberni  ._ —	
279
97
113
168
276
700
291
184
1,287
3,257
Village of Ladysmith    „	
Village of Alert Bay.	
Village of Comox	
Village of Parksville.  	
Village of Sidney  —	
ViUage of Tofino	
Village of Ucluelet	
Village of Zeballos 	
Case load in organized territory	
Case load in unorganized territory
6,793
3,995
Total case load for region      10,788
During the year immediately past, changes in welfare administration and costs have
affected the Government, as some of its municipalities were altered. The new legislation
("Municipal Act") relieved five municipalities in this region of their participation in
welfare costs. This applies both to administration costs and shareability of costs by direct
assistance to destitute persons in their areas as under the " Residence and Responsibility
Act." The five municipalities where a change took place are as follows: Campbell River,
Qualicum Beach, Lake Cowichan, City of Ladysmith, and City of Cumberland.
The first three of the above-named municipalities were relieved of welfare costs by
direct legislation and the two city municipalities by vote of the owner-electors. This has
brought additional costs to the region and added clerical work to each Provincial welfare
administrative office.
At the close of the fiscal year, records show that in this region fourteen nursing
homes and thirty-six boarding homes were operating. The monthly rates for maintenance
of welfare cases in these establishments were increased during the year 1957 as follows:
Nursing-home maximum rate to $165 and boarding-home rate to $75.
Civil defence exercises were held during the year—two exercises at Provincial headquarters in Victoria and two in the outside area, one in Nanaimo and one at Alberni.
Industrial disputes affected the economy of the region, with the strike of the pulp-
mill workers, which was closely followed by a strike of the electrical workers.
The weather in the summer of 1957 was on the cool side, which affected the tourist
trade. This was offset by continuous operation, due to suitable weather, for the logging
and lumbering operations.
In conclusion, may I thank my members of the Branch in this region for their conscientious endeavour to meet the needs in their areas and for their co-operation with
myself as their administrator; also, I would like to acknowledge the co-operation given
by the other agencies, private and voluntary, who have been very helpful.
Respectfully submitted. R L r_mmeR;
Regional Administrator. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O  15
'
REGION II
'
-
I beg to submit the following report of the activities of the Social Welfare Branch in
Region II for the fiscal year 1957/58.
In June of 1957 the boundaries of Region II were extended to include the areas of
Prince Rupert, Terrace, and Kitimat. This was to be a temporary arrangement while
details concerning a new region were being finalized. The transfer of these areas to the
new Region VII was effective November 1st, 1957. During the period June to October,
1957, the Regional Administrator made several trips to Prince Rupert, Terrace, and
Kitimat.
The existing offices as of March 31st, 1958, are as follows:—
Amalgamated offices (municipal offices under the charge of municipal administrators) :   Burnaby, District of Coquitlam, New Westminster City, City
and District of North Vancouver, Richmond, Vancouver City, and West
Vancouver.
District offices  (Social Welfare Branch offices under the charge of district
supervisors and serving unorganized areas and per capita municipalities):
New Westminster district office, serving unorganized areas and the Municipalities of Delta, Fraser Mills, Port Coquitlam, and Port Moody;  Vancouver district office, serving unorganized areas of University of British
Columbia Endowment Lands, Howe Sound, Cheakamus Valley, Sechelt
Peninsula, Ocean Falls, and surrounding coast; Westview district office,
serving the District of Powell River and surrounding area.
Unemployment became a factor during the year, and provision was made under the
Federal Unemployment Assistance Act, as amended in 1957, to assist unemployed
employable persons who had exhausted their unemployment insurance benefits.    Vancouver City reflected quite dramatically the increase in need in this area.   In August,
1957, twenty-one applicants were assisted to the extent of $690.50.   By December, 1957,
this had risen to 641 persons, at an expenditure of $25,636.36 for the month.   There was
a slight falling off in January, 1958, but during March, 1958, 565 persons were assisted,
at a cost of $27,925.65, the increased per capita cost being indicative of the slowly depleting resources of individuals because of the more protracted period of unemployment.
The following tables show the distribution of case load in various categories. Table I
shows the breakdown of cases carried by district and municipal offices, while Table II
shows the numerical and percentage comparisons for the years 1957 and 1958 for the
whole of Region II. It should be pointed out that the City Social Service Department in
Vancouver does not carry child and family welfare cases, this work being done by the
children's aid societies.
Table I.
—Cases Carried by District and Municipal Offi
ces
Category
s>
C
3
03
g
'B
cr
o
U
u
5
C
1
_2__«
z£o
t.
C-
I
Z&Q
V
>
fe a
o «
z>
•a
c
o
§
3
_,
u
>
3
O
u
«__■
>u
5
Is
§._,
>Q
aj
3
O
,_. u
oB
<.
'>
_i
<L>
Total
34
335
33
467
2,233
66
379
43
16
103
4
55
265
18
135
42
252
18
186
834
26
114
16
25
141
4
106
484
17
126
8
17
156
13
143
876
28
111
26
19
115
4
76
444
33
110
15
49
73
3
110
395
12
356
26
14
37
5
64
304
12
31
15
90
65
3
28
178
11
95
24
306
2,641
192
2,330
9,287
368
3,918
Blind Persons' Allowance 	
279
3,565
Supplementary assistance to Old
15,300
Disabled Persons' Allowance _.
Child Welfare.	
591
1,457
173
Totals	
3,590
596
1,488
911  |  1,370
1
816
14,818
1,024
482
494
25,589 O  16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories for
the Fiscal Years 1957 and 1958
Category
1957
1958
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
335
3,570
286
3,629
15,525
519
1,311
167
1.3
14.1
1.1
14.3
61.3
2.0
5.2
0.7
305
3,918
279
3,565
15,300
591
1,457
173
1.2
15.3
Blind Persons' Allowance   	
1.1
13.9
Supplementary assistance to Old Age Security	
Disabled Persons' Allowance —  „
Child Welfare        	
59.8
2.3
5.7
0.7
Totals..                	
25.342
100.0
25,589
100.0
On behalf of Mr. R. Talbot, previous Administrator of this region during the period
covered by this report, I wish to take this opportunity to express appreciation of
the co-operation received from private agencies, community organizations, government
departments at the Federal, Provincial, and municipal levels, and to the staff of the Social
Welfare Branch in Region II for their devotion to duty.
Respectfully submitted.
H. E. Blanchard,
Regional Administrator.
REGION III
I beg to submit the following report on the activities of the Social Welfare Branch
in Region III for the fiscal year 1957/58.
This region is a far-flung one, comprising many types of areas—from the narrow,
wooded North Thompson Valley to the wide, rolling cattle country of the Nicola Valley,
to the mountainous country of the Revelstoke area, to the orchard country and semi-desert
country of the Okanagan.
The Kamloops district office serves the most widespread section of the region, and
it may be necessary at a later date to open another office in one of the centres west of
Kamloops so as to save the amount of travelling at present necessary. At the present
time, three of the five workers in the Kamloops office are required to be away in their
districts a week at a time. The main roads in this region have been improved considerably in recent years, but there is still much hazardous and difficult driving off the main
highways. One social worker travels a total of two and one-half days in order to spend
two and one-half days in his district.
There were no changes in regional boundaries during the year under review. The
region is bounded on the south by the International Border, on the north by Wells Gray
Park, on the east by Revelstoke and district, on the west by Bralorne, and includes the
Cities of Kamloops, Vernon, Kelowna, and Penticton. These four cities each employ
their own welfare administrator, who administers the social assistance services within the
boundaries of each city, the Social Welfare Branch providing the balance of the services.
We also provided all social welfare services for the following municipalities: Armstrong,
Enderby, Revelstoke, Salmon Arm, Oliver, Peachland, Princeton, Merritt, Spallumcheen,
North Kamloops, Coldstream, and Glenmore, these services being paid for by the municipalities concerned on a per capita basis. On July 1st, 1957, the Provincial Government
relieved the Villages of North Kamloops, Oliver, and Princeton of responsibility for all
welfare costs. These responsibilities were assumed by the Government and are administered from the local office of the Social Welfare Branch.   On January 1st, 1957, the City REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 17
of Merritt reverted to village status and was also relieved of all responsibility for social
welfare services.
Various community resources have greatly assisted our staff in carrying out their
responsibilities. I would like to take this opportunity of thanking the many organizations,
too numerous to list, who have worked in such close harmony with their district social
worker for the welfare of citizens of the community. It is regretted that no organization
or community has felt able to create and administer a private hospital. This type of care
for the senior citizens of this region is not available within the region, and, as a result,
persons needing chronic bed care must be sent to other parts of the Province. The
resources for boarding-home care continue to be adequate, and during the year two new
boarding homes were established.
This region has a mixed economy, and for this reason has not in the past been subject to the same economic fluctuations as is sometimes found in other parts of the Province. However, during the year under review there has been a definite tightening of the
economy. This is indicated in the amount of assistance given to unemployed employable
persons, which was almost three times as great as the previous year. This has had some
affect on the time available to spend on the other categories of our work. There was also
a noticeable increase in transient workers, something which had not affected our work in
other years. The early part of 1958 indicated a greater slowness in employment possibilities, and those who would in previous years have been employed for a sufficient period
of time to qualify for unemployment insurance sometimes had not been able to get sufficient seasonal employment to qualify. It is anticipated that the load of assisting the
unemployed employables will be greater in the fall and winter of 1958, as it is evident that
there are a considerable number of persons who have not worked long enough to qualify
for unemployment insurance this coming winter, even under the more liberal eligibility
requirements. In addition, many persons have worked part of the year in non-insurable
employment in the agricultural industry and have not been able to supplement their earnings through other employment during the balance of the year. In addition to those
persons who do not qualify for unemployment insurance, there has been an increasing
number of requests where the bread-winner has qualified for unemployment insurance but
where they have found insurance payments inadequate for the maintenance of large
families.
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices of
Region III, as at March 31st, 1958
Category-
tn
cu
0
O
i
__
C3
0
Id
a
0
<j
c
p.
a,
>
5
c
o
11
_s _;
c
o
E
>
t-
B.
0
5
If,
2_s
a
0
<_
O ■ —
ao
e
o
E__
101
348
19
180
554
20
339
21
25
104
9
87
330
31
123
8
69
113
9
95
331
26
223
19
15
61
4
43
150
8
47
2
11
126
9
90
315
13
84
11
30
182
10
126
385
23
212
13
159
3
36
210
5
61
10
81
337
26
5
...
98
3
54
300
13
8
74
5
100
322
19
251
1,326
81
892
3,234
184
1,028
87
Supplementary assistance to Old Age Security.
Disabled Persons' Allowance _ 	
Child Welfare   	
Totals             .     ,
1,582
717
885
330
659
981
_.n 1 f>n
476
520
!
7,083 O  18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
for Region 111 for the Fiscal Years 1957 and 1958
1957
1958
Number
Per Cent
Number            Per Cent
272
1,198
71
922
3,175
157
1,053
116
1
3.9                     251
3.5
17.2
1.0
13.2
45.6
2.3
15.1
1.7
1,326
81
892
3,234
184
1,028
87
18.7
Blind Persons' Allowance  	
Old-age Assistance _	
Supplementary assistance to Old Age Security.	
1.1
12.6
45.7
2.6
Child Welfare ...	
14.5
Health and Institutional .   .
1.2
Totals	
6,964
100.0
7,083
100 0
Respectfully submitted.
R. I. Stringer,
Regional Administrator.
REGION IV
I submit herewith the annual report on the activities of the Social Welfare Branch in
Region IV for the fiscal year 1957/58.
There have been no changes in the geographical boundaries of the region during the
year nor were there any new offices opened. The population of this area continues to
show an increase which, although not as great as the percentage increase throughout
British Columbia, is comparable to the percentage increase experienced in Canada as
a whole.   Present population estimate for this region is 107,800.
There are seven Provincial and one municipal office in this area. Trail City administers its own welfare programme, while our seven Provincial offices provide the services
for ten other municipalities. Trail City has a population of under 15,000, and it will
likely be their desire to request the Social Welfare Branch to undertake social work within
their boundaries commencing April 1st, 1959.
The City of Kaslo has been seriously considering reverting to a village for some
months, but as yet has taken no definite steps in that direction. Slocan City is definitely
taking steps to revert to a village to save itself the cost of welfare services.
The economy in this region received a rather serious set-back during the year with
the closing of one of the coal mines in the Fernie area. This resulted in approximately
150 men working for the mining company losing their jobs, and this in turn had an
immediate effect in all areas of business in Fernie. This did not, however, result in a
large number of people moving out of the area as was first expected, and gradually, as new
jobs were found, the immediate detrimental effects of the mine closure were being overcome.
There is an ever-increasing demand for more nursing and boarding facilities for older
people, and a number of communities are making efforts to meet this need. Kimberley is
planning on an extension of its present old people's residence. Cranbrook is building a
new Dr. Green Memorial Home, which will provide boarding care for its older citizens,
and has plans for new and larger quarters. Mount St. Francis, in Nelson, continues to be
our most used resource for nursing cases in this region, but there is an ever-present
waiting-list of people desiring admission.
During this year the Social Welfare Branch has received the fullest co-operation
from municipal staffs as well as service clubs and other organizations throughout the district, and their kind assistance is gratefully acknowledged. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O  19
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices of
Region IV as at March 31st, 1958
Category
0
5
x>
c
u
d
o
OJ
u
a.
E
o
M
M
O
B.
■o
d
ro
a
c
o
Z
ZQ
'3
H
ro
a.
"ro
0
H
44
186
5
93
366
19
156
19
23
105
3
72
220
21
84
7
4
60
4
44
203
15
39
5
n
71
8
106
283
18
31
2
30
347
15
175
744
20
115
23
6
49
1
35
185
3
41
2
18
85
4
39
193
20
76
14
7
53
2
28
136
11
48
5
143
956
42
Supplementary assistance to Old Age Security   .
592
2,330
127
Child Welfare   	
590
Health and Institutional  	
77
Totals   -	
888
535
374
530
1,469
322
449
290
4,857
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories in
Region IV for the Fiscal Years 1957 and 1958
Category
1957
1958
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
167
891
52
582
2,339
107
554
88
3.5
18.6
1.1
12.2
48.9
2.2
11.6
1.8
143
956
42
592
2,330
127
590
77
2.9
19.7
Blind Persons' Allowance  _..  	
0.9
12.2
48.0
2.6
Child Welfare        .
12.1
Health and Institutional _. __	
1.6
Totals „ _.	
4,780
100.0
4,857
100.0
Respectfully submitted.
R. J. Burnham,
Regional Administrator.
REGION V
I beg to submit the following annual report of the activities of the Social Welfare
Branch in Region V for the fiscal year 1957/58.
Region V extends for some 600 miles of the 750 miles lying between the northern
boundary and the southern boundary of the Province of British Columbia. On the
northern end it includes the entire length of the British Columbia-Yukon border, and in
the southernmost portion it extends approximately 200 miles from the Alberta boundary.
Its land area is more than half of the entire Province, and it extends into three time
zones—Mountain, Pacific, and Yukon. The population of Region V is estimated at
approximately 75,000. about 5 per cent of the Province's population. Between the census
years of 1951 and 1956 the population increased approximately 50 per cent, while the
Provincial population increased 17.5 per cent.
The western portion of the region was made into a new Region VII in December,
1957, reducing the region by approximately one-quarter to the size described above.
The area is served by six district offices of the Social Welfare Branch, located in Fort
St. John, Pouce Coupe, Prince George, Vanderhoof, Quesnel, and Williams Lake. The
Fort St. John office was established on April 24th, 1957.
There are no municipal offices in Region V, and the three municipalities having
responsibility for welfare services are served by Provincial offices.   Two of these munici- O 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
palities were responsible for social welfare as villages prior to the promulgation of the new
" Municipal Act " on July 1st, 1957, which relieved them of their responsibility. These
were Dawson Creek and Quesnel. Six months later these communities again became
responsible for the welfare needs of their citizens when, on January 1st, 1958, Dawson
Creek became a city and Quesnel became a town. The other responsible municipality is
the City of Prince George.
In a survey done as of December 31st, 1957, it was found that clients receiving our
service while living in these municipalities numbered 826, comprising 27.2 per cent of
the 3,036 active at the time in the whole of Region V. At the time their population was
estimated as being approximately 25,000, or one-third of the population of the region.
Thus, in spite of the proximity of these municipalities to Social Welfare Branch offices, it
is apparent that the needs of the more remote areas are receiving their due proportion of
the social workers' attention.
A lack of organized resources in the area is a major difficulty. Foster homes for the
younger children in care are generally available when needed, but homes for older
children and problem children are sadly lacking. This could be relieved with additional
staff, which could devote more time to home-finding and supervising available homes at
a distance from the offices.
There are no boarding homes for adults in the region, and except for those few
instances when arrangements for specific cases may be made in private homes, we are
dependent upon other areas.
Rotary Harbour, offering low-cost housing to aeed persons, was opened in Dawson
Creek in the spring of 1957 and is gradually being utilized. A similar resource in Prince
George is being planned for opening in the fall of 1958.
Notre Dame School, a boarding school for girls in Dawson Creek, is a good resource
for certain girls in care and is available to all offices. Six of our wards were residing there
on March 31st, 1958.
Service clubs, ministers, teachers, municipal authorities, and other interested persons
give inestimable assistance by way of extra financial help, clothing committees, and, particularly in the remote areas, case-handling. Without them many of our clients would
have received a much lesser standard of service.
The economy of the region is based mainly on lumber, except in the Peace River
area, which is most active in farming and in the production of oil and gas. During the
fiscal year under review the lumber industry experienced a serious slow-down due to a
weakening of lumber markets and exceptionally poor working conditions arising out of
an extended rainy period. These same conditions affected farming adversely and oil
exploration. The result was a rather large number of unemployed, which on March 31st,
1958, was still increasing. Many had to be assisted by the Social Welfare Branch offices,
and their numbers were such that social workers' time for other cases was seriously
restricted.
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices of
Region V as at March 31st, 1958
Category
Fort
St. John
Pouce
Coupe
Prince
George
Quesnel
Vanderhoof
Williams
Lake
Total
14
64
1
35
109
3
64
31
161
3
69
143
5
130
9
71
479
14
109
238
8
186
15
12
89
3
45
106
5
104
3
4
59
12
51
99
3
69
1
28
89
16
57
124
9
107
9
160
941
Blind Persons' Allowance —	
49
366
Supplementary assistance to Old Age Security    ..
Disabled Persons' Allowance... —
Child Welfare   	
819
33
660
37
290
551
1,120
367
298
439
3,065 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 21
Table II.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories in
Region V for the Fiscal Years 1957 and 1958
Category
1957
1958
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
234
1,085
97
498
1,351
59
1,047
84
,3
24.3
2.2
11.2
30.3
1.3
23.5
1.9
160
941
49
366
819
33
660
37
5.2
30.7
Blind Persons' Allowance 	
1.6
11.9
26.7
1.1
Child Welfare  	
21.5
Health and Institutional         ..  .
1.2
Totals	
4,455
100.0
3,065
100.0
The case load increased during the fiscal year. This caused additional pressure of
work in the various offices; nevertheless, staff morale remained at a high level, and by the
end of the year much of the backlog of work was removed.
I wish to commend and thank all members of staff—social work, stenographic, and
clerical—for their industry and loyalty.   It was of the highest order.
I also wish to thank the many members of the community for their understanding
and help.
Respectfully submitted.
V. H. Dallamore,
Regional Administrator.
REGION VI
I submit herewith the annual report of the activities of the Social Welfare Branch in
Region VI for the fiscal year 1957/58.
The geographic boundaries of the region, which extend from Pattullo Bridge, both
sides of the Fraser River to Lytton, and the summit of the Hope-Princeton Highway,
remained unchanged during this fiscal year. However, much growth took place within
these boundaries, and it is estimated that the population increased from approximately
113,000 in 1951 to approximately 155,000 in 1957. The most spectacular growth continued to occur in North Surrey, but other areas such as Chilliwack showed a steady and
sound economic growth. Although industrial development and expansion is anticipated
in the valley, nothing of a large nature has yet taken place. The economy of the valley
is still very dependent upon seasonal employment such as logging, farming, and fishing,
and the impact of the economic recession was severe.
Two new district offices and one additional supervisory unit were established during
the year. Due to the secession of White Rock City from Surrey Municipality, it was
necessary to establish a Provincial district office in White Rock City in May, 1957. In
November, 1957, a Provincial district office was established in Langley City, and a district
supervisor was assigned to this office with supervisory responsibility for three offices
(Langley City, Langley Municipality, and White Rock) and six social workers carrying a
case load of 1,636 cases.
The addition of White Rock and Langley City district offices increased the administrative offices in the region from six to eight. Three of these offices were municipally
administered and five Provincially.
In July, 1957, under the provisions of the new " Municipal Act," the Village of
Hope elected to retain its village status and discontinued to function as a per capita municipality under the " Social Assistance Act."   Due to the addition of White Rock City as O 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
a per capita municipality, this did not affect the total number of per capita municipalities,
which remained at ten.
At the end of the fiscal year, plans were well under way for the change in status of
The Coroporation of the Township of Langley from a municipally administered office to
that of a per capita office. This would enable the amalgamation of the Langley municipal and Langley City district offices and effect a more economical administrative unit.
Plans were also under way for the amalgamation of the Chilliwack City district office and
the Chilliwhack Township municipal office. Here again economies in administration
would be effected.
The eight administrative offices in the region were staffed by twenty-four social
workers, four district supervisors, two assistant supervisors, and three municipal administrators. The two assistant supervisors and two of the municipal administrators carried
partial case loads together with their other responsibilities. The staff increased by three
—one district supervisor, one assistant supervisor, and one social worker—during the
year. This was necessitated by the opening of two additional district offices and the
increase in case-load content and size.
The regional case load had increased by 362 cases by the end of the fiscal year, and
the number of cases accepted for service during the year increased by 354 cases over the
previous year. The highest increase in cases accepted for service was in the Child Welfare
and Social Allowance categories. The Child Welfare intake of cases increased by 154
over the previous year, and the Social Allowance by 175. However, from a case-load
standpoint the pension category showed the greatest increase at the end of the fiscal year.
This increase amounted to 244 cases and can be accounted for by the fact that there is
less turnover of cases—that is, less cases closed—in the pension case load than in the
Child Welfare and Social Allowance.
The increase in the intake of Social Allowance cases can be attributed to the unemployment situation, which became progressively worse during the year. The increase in
the financial assistance required by employable persons who could not find employment is
shown by the following figures. In 1956/57 an average of thirty-four family units and
single individuals per month received a total of $26,574.63 in financial assistance. In
1957/58 an average of fifty-four family units and single individuals per month received
$52,243.44 during the year. This was an increase of twenty recipients per month and
$25,668.92 during the year. There was no indication of any improvement in this situation at the end of the year, but rather an expectation that the situation would worsen
as unemployment insurance benefits were running out for many persons and the employment problem was not improving.
The extra burden placed upon all staff by these increased requests for financial
assistance was obvious, and other categories of service, such as family counselling, protection of children from neglectful parents, and supervision of children placed in foster
homes, suffered.
Community resources, such as community chests, clothing centres, and service
clubs, were made maximum use of during the year due to the increased financial need.
Small housing developments for the aged were being planned and developed in several
communities, but there was no increase in nursing-home facilities. This continued to present a problem in regard to hospital-clearance cases. Boarding-home facilities for the
aged did increase to some extent, but there continues to be a need for an increase in this
type of care for the aged.
The municipalities, with whom we work so closely in our shared responsibility of
administering social allowances and in giving social services to persons in their community, have been most helpful and understanding, and our thanks are extended to them.
Thanks and appreciation are also extended to the many organizations and individuals
who have helped us in many different ways to meet the needs of the people we serve. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 23
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region VI as at March 31, 1958
Category
o
o
XI
S3
<
o
«
°
M
u
VI
1
_=
>,
u
d
ro
a
u
"m_
S.&
rt--
>>
ro
5 =
u
H
3
u
o
Bi
U
ro
o
H
26
314
17
233
748
50
160
19
25
180
10
82
349
27
95
8
27
156
5
114
344
13
131
8
18
138
6
115
403
24
100
10
8
26
18
102
5
15
1
19
140
10
126
449
23
158
5
930~
51
460
15
358
1,353
54
286
25
"2^02~
6
99
4
62
338
15
18
9
180
1,513
Blind Persons' Allowance._	
67
1,108
Supplementary assistance to Old-age Security
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Child Welfare 	
4,086
211
963
85
1,567
776
798
814
175
551
8,213
TaWe //.—Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
in Region VI for the Fiscal Years 1957 and 1958
Category
1957
Number
1958
Per Cent     Number
Per Cent
Family Service 	
Social Allowance.	
Blind Persons' Allowance.
Old-age Assistance.
Supplementary assistance to Old-age Security_
Disabled Persons' Allowance 	
Child Welfare _.
Health and Institutional.
Totals _____	
206
1,405
70
1,086
3,903
169
906
106
7,851
2.6
17.9
0.9
13.8
49.7
2.2
11.5
1.4
180
1,513
67
1,108
4,086
211
963
85
100.0
8,213
2.2
18.4
0.8
13.5
49.8
2.6
11.7
1.0
100.0
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Mary K. King,
Regional Administrator. O 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REGION VII
I submit herewith the following annual report of the activities of the Social Welfare
Branch in Region VII for the fiscal year 1957/58.
This region was created on December 1st, 1957, by the transfer of two offices each
from Regions II and V: Prince Rupert and Terrace offices were transferred from Region
II, Burns Lake and Smithers offices from Region V. The size of the two former regions,
together with the amount of work the Regional Administrators were encountering, made
it necessary to lighten the burden of work and to cut the administrative travelling time
involved so that service could be rendered efficiently.
Terrace was chosen as regional headquarters because it is a growing communications
centre with relatively central access to all parts of the region and convenient air-line
service to Vancouver.
The region lies in the north-west corner of British Columbia, extending from Mill-
banke Sound to the Alaska Border along the coast-line and from the Queen Charlotte
Islands eastward to Endako on the Canadian National Railway. The northern boundary
is the 57th parallel. The direct mileage by auto from east to west is nearly 500 miles.
The major population centres are Prince Rupert and Kitimat on the Coast, together with
the Interior communities of Burns Lake, Hazelton, Smithers, and Terrace and other
smaller villages strung along the Skeena and Bulkley River systems or along Highway
No. 16.
The climatic and biotic endowment of the region deserves notice because there are
two different climatic zones in the region which affect the flora, industry, and lives of
the citizens. The coast-line has a moist, stable, sea-induced climate. As a result, the
Queen Charlotte Islands and the Prince Rupert area are largely fishing or logging centres.
The major fisheries are salmon, halibut, ground-fish, crab, and herring. The climate is
suitable for pulp-manufacture, which has resulted in the building of a large pulp-mill of
Columbia Cellulose at Port Edward. The wood products are coastal, with spruce, hemlock, and red cedar abundant. This coastal climate continues up the Skeena River valley
nearly 200 miles. Terrace lies within this influence, and has thus become the logging-
operation centre for the Columbia Cellulose forest-management area. It is this climate
that makes a small mixed fruit and vegetable production possible at Terrace. At Hazelton
you enter the Central Interior climatic zone. The land alters to become the broader,
grassy, plain-like valleys of the Central Interior. The summer is short; the winter, long
and cold. The valleys make good farm land and cattle country. Smithers is the centre of
a growing agricultural area. Marketing, a problem for years, is being successfully overcome with the growth of local markets at Kitimat and Terrace. The major farm activity
is the Burns Lake area, and continuing south to Francois Lake is cattle-raising. In these
Interior valleys, lumbering is again the most important industry, but the forest is different,
as are the products. Lodgepole pine and Douglas fir, in smaller stands, are the major
cuts. There are many small independent mills in these valleys producing railway ties,
pit-props, and lumber.
The estimated regional population at the end of the 1956 fiscal year was 41,800.
The Social Welfare Branch serves this population through four district offices, employing
eight social workers. The individual office complement is: Prince Rupert, 3; Terrace, 2;
Smithers, 1, plus an assistant supervisor who carries a portion of the Smithers case load
as well as supervising the Burns Lake office, where one social worker is employed.
The staff in Prince Rupert cover the area from Kitimat north to Alaska, the Queen
Charlotte Islands, and the Municipality of Prince Rupert (1956 population, 10,498),
which, being responsible for welfare costs, pays the Branch on a per capita basis for this
service. The Terrace office district includes the District Municipality of Kitimat (1956
population, 9,676), which is similarly responsible for welfare costs and is similarly served
on a per capita basis.    One of the workers in Terrace carries the Kitimat area.    The REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 25
Smithers office covers the district from west of Hazelton eastward to Topley, about 6
miles east of Smithers. Burns Lake office services a wide, scattered sparsely populated
area from Babine Lake south to Francois Lake. Winter driving is hazardous in all the
region save Prince Rupert.
In June, 1957, as a result of the new " Municipal Act," the Village of Smithers,
which had been responsible for welfare costs and administration, although served by the
Branch on a per capita basis, was relieved of the responsibility for its inhabitants in so far
as welfare is concerned.
In October and November the industrial community of Kitimat suffered an economic
dislocation when, due to a slump in its aluminium market, the Aluminum Company of
Canada postponed work on a new series of pot-lines. About 1,500 men were affected,
largely construction-workers. There was a good deal of publicity given this, but through
close co-operation between the company, union, and other officials, the individuals
involved suffered less hardship than could have occurred. Many workers left the area,
but those who stayed have now been absorbed into the work force. As a direct or
indirect result, our Social Allowance case load rose from an average of four to six cases
to an average of twelve to fifteen cases.
The regional case load has been affected this year by the rapid rise in unemployment commencing in the fall and continuing through to the end of the fiscal year. The
Prince Rupert-Terrace case loads have been most particularly affected. In both offices
the case loads increased as follows, due to aid to unemployed employables. The June
figures in both offices show an intake in this category of exactly one-half the like intake
during March, 1958. In both instances the increase in case load in this category was
more than 40 per cent. This is a much higher percentage than has been experienced
in past years when, due to the British Columbia winter climate, there are always more
unemployed. This increased pressure on an already fully extended staff has made it
difficult to maintain an adequate level of service to our other cases and has precluded the
performance of preventive work.
The community resources in this region are limited in contrast to the Lower Mainland. There are many active service clubs in Kitimat, Prince Rupert, Terrace, Smithers,
and Burns Lake. They are an unfailing resource and are typical of the spirit of independence and neighbourliness still found in the north. The Anglican ladies auxiliaries
throughout the region have this year adopted social services as one of their projects, so
that this resource will be available. We have received warm co-operation from municipal officials, Magistrates, educative personnel, members of the Bar, police, hospital
authorities, and the ministers of different religious orders. The foster-parents of our
children in care deserve special mention in our expression of gratitude.
The welcome that has been extended to the new office of Regional Administrator
by those I have met has been most heart-warming.
Table I.—Case Load by Major Categories in the District Administrative Offices
of Region VII as at March 31st, 1958
Burns
Lake
Prince
Rupert
Smithers
Terrace
Total
Family Service  	
9
65
13
38
75
3
34
2
I          32
204
17
71
246
17
126
10
19
90
14
46
127
10
71
1
31
57
6
20
75
4
173
9
91
416
50
175
523
34
Child Welfare	
404
22
239
723
378
375
1,715 O 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
It will be seen from the above table that the region offers some absorbing difference
in case-load content from one office to another.
The Prince Rupert case loads are close to 60 per cent native or part native. Problems of cultural transition abound, evidenced in a high Social Allowance case load with
poor rehabilitative prospects. Many emergency child-neglect situations, often temporary,
due to the parents partying while in town, arise. In Burns Lake the case load is 37 per
cent native, with many of the same problems as Prince Rupert, plus the complicating high
degree of illiteracy in the native population in this area.
The Kitimat case load is low in financial assistance categories but is high in child
welfare cases, largely adoption cases. Many cases are immigrants from Greece, Portugal,
Italy, or Germany, so that language is often a problem encountered by the worker. In
the Terrace area there are forty-three foster-children, a very high percentage in a case
load of 195.
Table II.—Case Load by Major Categories in Region VII
for the Fiscal Year 1957/1958
Category
1958
Number
Per Cent
91
5.3
415
24.3
50
2.9
175
10.2
523
30.5
34
2.0
404
23.6
22
1.3
Family Service	
Social Allowance —
Blind Persons' Allowance-
Old-age Assistance .
Supplementary assistance to Old Age Security-
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Child Welfare 	
Health and Institutional-
Totals	
1,715
100.0
Respectfully submitted.
W. H. Crossley,
Regional Administrator. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 27
PART II.—DIVISIONAL ADMINISTRATION
FAMILY DIVISION
I wish to present the annual report of the Family Division covering the services
provided for families and individuals by the Social Welfare Branch as described in the
provisions of the " Social Assistance Act," the " Mothers' Allowances Act," and the
Family Service programme for the fiscal year April 1st, 1957 to March 31st, 1958.
SOCIAL ALLOWANCES SECTION
For the year under review the case load showed the customary seasonal decline,
although not as sharp as in former years, up to September, 1957. Thereafter to March,
1958, the number of recipients increased rapidly and markedly. By comparing the
figures of April, 1957, and March, 1958, in the following table it will be noted that the
case load increased by 18.5 per cent while the number of recipients increased by almost
21 per cent.
Table I.—Case Load and Total Number of Recipients on a Monthly Basis
Heads of
Families
Dependents
Single
Recipients
Total
Case Load
April, 1957 	
3,533
3,423
3,369
3,344
3,310
3,304
3,388
3,704
4,054
4,197
4,288
4,284
9,336
9,000
8,731
8,662
8,491
8,476
8,812
9,676
10,845
11,474
11,587
11,494
5,868
5,808
5,643
5.641
5,621
5,588
5,878
6,382
6,783
6,838
6,762
6,857
18,737
18,231
17,743
17,647
17,422
17,368
18,078
19,762
21,682
22,509
22,637
22,635
9,401
May, 1957  	
June, 1957	
9,231
9,012
July, 1957     	
8,985
August, 1957   	
September, 1957 	
8,931
8,892
October, 1957    	
November, 1957	
9,266
10,086
December, 1957    .  .
January, 1958 _  .     .
10,837
11,035
February, 1958	
11,050
March, 1958. 	
11,141
The other remarkable and startling fact in the above table is that from October 1st,
1957, to March, 1958, the case load increased by over 25 per cent and the number of
recipients by over 30 per cent.
Of the total number of recipients of Social Allowance in the Province in March,
1958 (22,635), the totals according to regions are shown in Table II below. For purposes of comparison, March, 1957, totals are shown in parentheses. It should be noted
that by March, 1958, sixteen municipalities were no longer responsible for Social Allowance costs under the provisions of the new " Municipal Act." In the case of these
municipalities, no March, 1958, figures are shown in the table. O 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Regional Totals of Individuals in Receipt of Social Allowance
in March, 1958 (March, 1957, Totals in Parentheses)
Provincial Responsibility
Case Loads
Municipal Responsibility
Case Loads
Region I—
Alberni
Courtenay
Duncan ...
Nanaimo .
Victoria   ..
97
480
203
405
282
(61)
(286)
(101)
(357)
(241)
Alberni City 	
Campbell River Village
Courtenay  	
Central Saanich 	
Cumberland    	
Duncan    	
Esquimau   _ - 	
Ladysmith
Lake Cowichan Village
Nanaimo
North Cowichan
Oak Bay	
Port Alberni
Qualicum Beach Village
Saanich  	
Victoria     	
1,467 (1,046)
60
41
12
29
69
264
89
18
116
203
993
(40)
(43)
(49)
(12)
(22)
(33)
(63)
(23)
(17)
(215)
(79)
(18)
(90)
(10)
(205)
(684)
1,894 (1,603)
Region II—
46
(50)
(157)
(46)
Burnaby  	
Coquitlam —	
Delta ...            	
708
277
      181
(516)
(224)
(129)
(476)
(142)
(145)
(88)
(34)
(260)
(3,956)
(71)
(..._.)
(42)
3,361
7,773
3,006
2,063
(2,649)
(6,336)
(2,555)
(2,077)
      196
54
New Westminster —	
North Vancouver City  _.
North Vancouver District
412
.....     171
155
94
43
...     351
4,873
95
.....     117
Vancouver   	
West Vancouver ~
Westview Village	
Armstrong  	
Coldstream     —	
Enderby  	
296
(253)
7,477
(6,083)
Region III—
      874
(482)
(313)
(284)
(148)
(275)
18
38
15
12
(13)
(19)
(20)
(17)
(228)
(104)
(32)
(101)
(17)
(7)
(180)
(23)
(35)
(21)
(72)
(36)
(54)
(74)
      226
Penticton   —	
Salmon Arm —
      376
      174
354
Kamloops       	
.....     236
Kelowna   	
109
13
217
Peachland   	
Penticton	
Revelstoke    	
36
29
Salmon Arm District 	
Spallumcheen  —
Summerland    - -
78
29
47
....     125
2,004
(1,502)
1,002
(1,053)
Region IV—
.   .     313
(428)
(237)
(44)
(78)
(488)
(85)
(119)
(42)
(103)
(36)
(32)
(40)
(16)
(—)
(19)
(121)
(28)
(14)
(137)
(10)
      251
Cranbrook    	
Creston Village  ,	
Fernie  	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood  	
Kaslo   	
131
38
46
11
2
Fernie 	
       42
        79
Nelson 	
New Denver 	
Trail                      -   -
      530
95
179
Kimberley	
33
.      135
Rossland    	
38
8
132
Trail	
Warfield	
1,489
(1,479)
574
(598) REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 29
Table II.—Regional Totals of Individuals in Receipt of Social Allowance
in March, 1958 (March, 1957, Totals in Parentheses)—Continued
Provincial Responsibility
Case Loads
Region V—
Fort St. John ..
Pouce Coupe  ..
Prince  George
Quesnel
Vanderhoof 	
Williams Lake
Region VI—
Abbotsford
Chilliwack
Region VII—
Burns Lake
Prince Rupert
Smithers  	
Terrace  	
163
(....)
258
(387)
467
(531)
107
(79)
138
(  )
178
(144)
1,311
(1,141)
119     (102)
284     (189)
403     (291)
138 (100)
155 (83)
229 (148)
121 (93)
643     (424)
Dawson Creek
Fort St. John
Municipal Responsibility
Case Loads
 -      134
(122)
(16)
Prince George       235     (140)
Quesnel           77       (72)
Chilliwack City _	
Chilliwhack Township
Hope 	
Kent 	
Langley   	
Langley City	
Maple Ridge	
Matsqui    	
Mission  District   _
Mission  Village ...
Pitt Meadows 	
Sumas   	
Surrey     	
White Rock _
Kitimat  —
Prince Rupert
Smithers 	
446     (350)
190
364
5
369
62
287
302
183
66
49
74
(123)
(404)
(55)
(12)
(272)
(90)
(294)
(235)
(176)
(34)
(39)
(57)
1,162 (1,282)
187     ( —)
3,300  (3,073)
42 (..__)
287 (186)
        (39)
329     (225)
1,757    (1,491)
3,703    (3,364)
972       (649)
22,635 (19,121)
From the above figures it will be noted that the distribution of recipients of Social
Allowance between organized and unorganized areas has varied little since the last
Annual Report. Approximately 66 per cent resided in organized territory and approximately 34 per cent resided in unorganized territory.
The following are the approximate percentages of the total number of recipients by
region as at March, 1958: Region I, 14.8 per cent; Region II, 34.3 per cent; Region III,
13.3 per cent; Region IV, 9.1 per cent; Region V, 7.8 per cent; Region VI, 16.4 per
cent; Region VII, 4.3 per cent.
The following table gives a comparison of Social Allowance case loads as well as
recipients:—
Table III.—Case Load and Total Number of Recipients
Mar., 1956
Mar., 1957
Mar., 1958
3,730
9,761
6,346
3,695
9,397
6,029
4,284
Dependents   	
11,494
6,857
10,076
9,761
9,724
9,397
11,141
11,494
19,837
19,121
22,635
From this it will be seen that in March, 1958, the case load was higher by 1,417
cases than in March of the previous year, or by approximately 14.7 per cent. Another
way of presenting this figure of 1,417 is to point out that it represents almost five addi- O 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
tional average case loads, without taking into account any increase in case loads in any
other categories of assistance or service, which have been added to existing case loads.
Finally, on the basis of legal residence as defined in the " Residence and Responsibility Act," the following table shows the distribution of the recipients of assistance:—
Table IV,
—Legal Residence of Social Allowance Recipients
Mar., 1956
Mar., 1957
Mar., 1958
10,882
10,299
11.S04
Provincial responsibilities _	
8,955
8,822
10,831
Totals 	
19,837
19,121
22,635
From this table it will be noted approximately 52.2 per cent of the recipients of
Social Allowance were municipal responsibilities and 47.8 per cent were responsibilities
of the Province, under the provisions of the " Residence and Responsibility Act."
Sponsorship for Physical Rehabilitation
During the year under review the Social Welfare Branch, and responsible municipalities where applicable, sponsored a total of seventy-nine trainees and patients in the
G. F. Strong Rehabilitation Centre and the Canadian Arthritic and Rheumatism Society
Medical Centre for approximately 4,500 days of resident care and training.
Of these seventy-nine persons, fourteen suffered from some form of arthritis and
sixty-five were physically disabled or handicapped. Fifty-three were resident trainees
and twenty-six were out-patients. At least four of the resident trainees later became
out-patients.
Many trainees are enabled to return to employment or obtain vocational training
for a new type of employment. Others are assisted to become more efficient in self-care,
and thus do not require boarding- or nursing-home care, while still others are enabled to
function more adequately and comfortably in their own home.
Vocational Training
Through the co-operation of the Department of Education, it has also been possible
for many recipients of Social Allowance to receive vocational training under the Dominion-Provincial vocational training grants. The Branch has participated financially in
some instances or assisted in social planning for the single trainee or for the family of a
trainee. This programme we value very highly as a resource for individuals and families
known to us.
Following is a statement of expenditures made by the Social Welfare Branch for
Social Allowances during the year April 1st, 1957, to March 31st, 1958:— REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 31
Table V.—Expenditures by the Province for Social Allowances, Medical Services, etc.
1. Cases who are the responsibility of a municipality (80 per cent paid
by the Province)
2. Cases who are the sole responsibility of the Province (100 per cent
paid by the Province)
3. Repatriation, transportation within the Province, nursing- and boarding-home care (other than tuberculosis), special allowances and grants
4. Emergency payments, such as where a family may lose its home by
fire or similar circumstances	
Municipal and Provincial cases—
(a) Tuberculosis, boarding-, nursing-, and private-home cases..
(_>) Transportation of tuberculosis cases_
(e) Comforts allowances for tuberculosis cases.
6. Hospitalization of Social Assistance cases	
Net Social Allowances	
7. Administration and operation of project and pavilion for Japanese at
New Denver    	
8. Medical services and drugs... 	
Totals  	
Fiscal Year
1955/56
$2,626,760.81
2,350,451.69
1,420,208.51
52,891.24
402,850.12
2,638.57
11,991.16
19,319.36
Fiscal Year
1956/57
Fiscal Year
1957/58
I
$2,633,636.62
2,521,431.47
1,505,034.90
37,163.45
327,432.07
2,868.16
8,924.75
13,927.70
$2,781,941.03
2,919,033.33
1,640,054.12
47,555.23
298,322.92
3,342.22
6,626.00
30,980.20
$6,887,111.46 I $7,050,419.12 I    $7,727,855.051
38,600.41
2,208,252.70
61,990.65
2,240,710.53
133,964.57
$9,353,120.30
36,480.08
2,422,614.32
$10,186,949.45
Reconciliation with Public Accounts:—
Gross expenditure for Social Allowances as per Public Accounts—  $7,891,944.34
Less credits (excluding amount chargeable to Government of Canada).        164,089.29
$7,727,855.05
For the fiscal year 1957/58 the Province received from the Federal Government re-
Unemployment Assistance Agreement  $2,828,568.49
Welfare assistance to immigrants   19,683.69
Welfare assistance to Hungarian refugees  18,727.98
Sundry   1,274.53
$2,868,254.69
Developments in Social Assistance Programme
1. Effective June 1st, 1957, the Social Welfare Branch increased the amount in
which it would share for costs of boarding-home and nursing-home care by $10 and $15
per month respectively. Such increases were to be based on consideration of the standard
of services rendered and facilities provided.
2. Effective November 1st, 1957, the maximum comforts allowance which might be
granted on the basis of need and other resources to persons in receipt of social assistance
in nursing and boarding homes was raised to $10 per month.
3. The annual Christmas bonus was approved for payment, in the amount of $5 for
each head of family and $2 for each single person, to persons in receipt of Social Allowance during the month of December, 1957.
4. In March, 1958, notification was given that, effective April 1st, 1958, Social
Allowance and Mothers' Allowance rates were to be increased by $5 per month for a
single person, $10 per month for two persons, and $2 per month for each additional
dependent. The maximum monthly allowances which may be granted will therefore be
$55 for Unit 1, $86.50 for Unit 2, $104.50 for Unit 3, and $122.50 for Unit 4, and $18
per month for each additional dependent.
5. Effective December 1st, 1957, a new Region VII was created, comprising the
western portion of the former Region V, with the Regional Administrator's headquarters
at Terrace.
" Social Assistance Act " and Regulations
Two amendments were made during this fiscal year to the regulations to the " Social
Assistance Act," as follows:— O 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(1) Section 5 was amended by adding a clause (d) providing that where the
applicant for social assistance is a deserted wife, she shall be expected to
make every reasonable effort to obtain support from her husband if his
whereabouts are known and may, if the circumstances warrant, be required
to make a complaint against her husband under the " Wives' and Children's Maintenance Act."
(2) Section 6, dealing with the duties of municipalities, was amended to
require municipalities with a population of 15,000, rather than 10,000 as
previously, or over to employ at least one social worker, while municipalities of less than 15,000 population may either appoint their own social
worker or purchase the social-work service from the Social Welfare
Branch at a fee of 30 cents per capita of population instead of 15 cents
per capita as previously.
As provided in section 13 of the regulations to the Act, seven Boards of Review
were established during the year.
MOTHERS' ALLOWANCES SECTION
As has occurred for many years past, the Mothers' Allowance case load has continued to fall.
There is little to add to the comments of former years regarding the causes of this
decline. There were increased opportunities and incentives for employment of women
during the war years. With the implementation of the " Social Assistance Act " in 1945,
an alternative form of assistance, with much less prohibitive and restrictive qualifications
for eligibility and of equal financial benefit, presented itself. It is safe to say there are
innumerable mothers and children who might otherwise qualify for Mothers' Allowance,
except for some technicality, in receipt of Social Allowance. Some are recipients of
Social Allowance by choice.
Regardless of the many reasons why the case load has declined, this categorical form
of assistance seems no longer required, and the purpose for which it was first instituted
no longer exists.
As was pointed out in the last Annual Report, between 1940 and 1946 the case
load had decreased by 49 per cent to 905. By March, 1950, it had decreased another
28 per cent to 643.
The following table shows the trend in the case load since 1950:—
Table I.—Comparative Statement of Case Load
As at March, 1951  569
As at March, 1952  503
As at March, 1953  470
As at March, 1954  426
As at March, 1955  393
As at March, 1956  323
As at March, 1957 .. _  284
As at March, 1958  243
Thus it will be seen that since March, 1950, the case load has diminished by approximately 62 per cent
On a monthly basis, the case-load figures for the fiscal year under review are as
follows:— REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 33
Table II.—Monthly Case Load, April 1st, 1957, to March 31st, 1958
Number of
Allowances
in Pay
Number of Persons
Incapacitated
Husbands
Mothers
Children
April, 1957                                                      	
278
279
274
271
269
260
252
252
251
248
244
243
278
279
274
271
269
260
252
252
251
248
244
243
640
638
633
632
634
616
600
600
598
592
582
584
42
May, 1957           	
43
June, 1957    _._   	
41
July, 1957	
40
August, 1957	
40
September, 1957 	
36
October, 1957	
35
35
35
January, 1958	
33
February, 1958 	
31
March, 1958..	
29
1
The volume of applications and reapplications has declined also, and the following table indicates how these have been dealt with:—
Table III.—Statement of Applications Considered and Decisions Made
Applications pending as at April 1st, 1957 .  10
New applications received during year 1— 39
Reapplications received during year  22
Total
71
Decisions—
Grants  47
Refusals  __■-  14
Withdrawn  2
Applications pending as at March 31st, 1958.
Total 	
Reasons for refusals—
Assets in excess	
Male boarder and income in excess
Property in excess
63
8
71
Mother unable to qualify under section 7 (b) and (c) of
the Act  1
Mother ineligible under section 3(c)(1)   1
Desertion eligibility requirements not met  1
Illness of husband and death occurred outside of British
Columbia   2
Husband the petitioner for divorce  1
Social Allowance preferable form of assistance  1
Total
14 O 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table III.—Statement of Applications Considered and Decisions Made—Continued
Reasons for applications pending—
Documents and medical report required  4
Awaiting information re other income  1
First investigation report not received  1
Decision pending  2
Total      8
Cancellations during the fiscal year under review totalled eighty-eight, and for the
reasons indicated in the following table:—
Table IV.—Reasons for Cancellation of the A llowances
Social Allowance preferable form of assistance  3
Mother deceased  1
Mother remarried  9
Left British Columbia  2
Mother in hospital indefinitely  2
Foster-mother in hospital indefinitely  1
Mother earning in excess  32
Mother ineligible under section 7 of the " Mothers' Allowances
Act"   3
Mother receiving a rehabilitation grant  1
Husband receiving a rehabilitation grant  1
Husband not totally disabled  2
Husband released from Penitentiary  3
Deserting husband returned  1
Only child removed   2
Only child 18 years of age  6
Only child under 16 left school  1
Only child under 18 left school  8
Older children maintaining  3
Unearned income in excess  5
Withdrawn   2
Total   8 8
Of the cancelled cases, the length of time each family had been in receipt of Mothers'
Allowance is as follows:—
Years____ 1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8    9  10 11  12 13  14 15 16 17 18  19
Cases ..25 15    65358235321211      1
Total cases, 88.   Average length of time on allowance, 4.94 years.
The above tabulation presents some interesting facts. It is to be noted that over one-
third of the cancellations were because the mother was employed. This is perhaps an
indication of two things: Firstly, the mother's desire for economic dependence so that
her children may derive benefits not possible on social assistance; secondly, that the
allowance is a basic minimum income on which the mother cannot maintain her family.
It is perhaps, too, an indication of the trend toward employment of women in greater
numbers than ever before. In any event, these mothers have made adequate plans for
their children and find themselves free to seek and accept employment. They probably
account for approximately 58 per cent of the mothers who remain on Mothers' Allowance
for less than five years. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 35
This is probably not so of the three mothers who remained on the allowance for
fifteen years or more. Physical or mental inadequacy of the mother or the children as
well as lack of training on the mother's part may have made it impossible for them to
find employment. In addition, they were granted assistance in the days when Mothers'
Allowance was regarded as a pension, and they may have continued to regard it so. If
this is not so, perhaps our present skills do not enable us to help such families along the
road to independence.
For the mothers who were in receipt of Mothers' Allowance as at March, 1958,
they were eligible for the allowance under specific qualifications defined by the Act, and
their status is as follows:—
Table V.—Status and Number of Mothers and Dependents in Receipt
of Allowance as at March, 1958
Status of Mother in Accordance with Eligibility
Number of Children
Qualifications Set by the Act
1
2
>
4
5
6
7
Total
Widows....          —
Penitentiary. 	
42
2
1
2
2
5
4
3
2
52
5
2
1
1
5
6
11
.._
39
2
3
2
1
5
4
1
18
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
3
1
3
1
159
10
4
5
Incapacitated husbands away.	
Incapacitated husbands O.A.S.,  O.A.A.,  B.P.,  and
D.P.A  	
8
16
2
16
Deserted	
20
Foster-mother and elder sister	
3
Totals	
63
83
57
28
4
4
4
243
From the above table the following figures are derived:—
Table VI.—Number of Individuals for Whom Allowance Granted
Mothers _
Husbands
Children _.
243
51
584
Total
832
1 This figure applies only to those incapacitated husbands who reside in the home and who are included in the
Mothers' Allowance payment. In addition, it will be noted that there is a total of twenty-eight incapacitated husbands
in the mental hospital, out of the home, or in receipt of Old Age Security, Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowance, or Disabled Persons' Allowance.
Costs of Mothers' Allowances
The basic amount of Mothers' Allowances is set by the " Mothers' Allowances Act"
and has remained unchanged since 1920. It is therefore necessary to grant a supplementary allowance from Social Allowance funds in order that the maximum allowance payable to recipients of Mothers' Allowances may be equal to the allowance payable Social
Allowance recipients. This supplementary allowance is a 100-per-cent charge on the
Province, as is the Mothers' Allowance, which is statutory.
Because of this it is necessary to present two financial statements in order to report
total costs. O 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VII.—Mothers' Allowance Financial Statement for the Fiscal Year
April 1st, 1957, to March 31st, 1958
Amount of allowances paid as follows:—
Month Amount of Allowance
April, 1957   $12,723.53
May, 1957  12,768.53
June, 1957  12,300.83
July, 1957  12,414.28
August, 1957   11,925.83
September, 1957  11,677.08
October, 1957  11,226.38
November, 1957  11,403.88
December, 1957   11,395.00
January, 1958  11,351.15
February, 1958  11,214.90
March, 1958   11,112.60
  $141,513.99
Reconciliation with Ledger Account in Controlling and
Audit Branch: Amount advanced by Minister of
Finance   $141,513.99
The books and records of the Director of Welfare respecting Mothers' Allowances for the fiscal year ended March
31st, 1958, have been examined under my direction.
C.  J.  FERBER,
Comptroller-General.
Table VIII.—Financial Statement of Supplementary Social Allowances Paid to Recipients
of Mothers' Allowance (Vote 191) for the Fiscal Year April 1st, 1957, to March
31st, 1958.
Amount of allowances paid as follows:—
Month Amount of Allowance
April, 1957   $12,582.32
May, 1957   12,566.02
June, 1957   12,292.17
July, 1957  12,230.87
August, 1957  11,894.72
September, 1957  11,291.92
October, 1957   11,235.42
November, 1957  11,313.42
December, 1957  11,401.95
Christmas bonus   1,255.00
January, 1958  11,035.00
February, 1958  10,988.45
March, 1958   10,781.80
  $140,869.06
Reconciliation with Ledger Account in Controlling and
Audit Branch: Amount advanced by Minister of
Finance   $140,869.06
The books and records of the Director of Welfare respecting Supplementary Social Allowances paid to recipients of
Mothers' Allowance for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1958, have been examined under my direction.
C. J.  FERBER,
Comptroller-General. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
Table IX.—Statement Showing per Capita Cost to the Province
O 37
Fiscal Year
Total
Expenditures
Population
at June of
Each Year
Per Capita
Cost to the
Province
1955/56                                             	
$332,690.38
321,342.76
282,383.05
1,305,000
1,353,000
1,398,000
$0.25
1956/57                                	
.24
19-57/58   	
.20
General Comments
No amendments were made to the " Mothers' Allowances Act " or regulations to the
Act during the year under review.
As has been reported previously, it is obvious that this legislation, providing a
special categorical assistance based on prohibitive technical and social eligibility, is no
longer a necessary part of the Social Welfare Branch programme.
As it is a 100-per-cent charge on the Province and while the Provision continues to
exist, it is a resource used almost entirely by municipal welfare departments. The following table indicates this fact:—
Table X.—Proportion of Applications and Grants in Organized Territory
Total applications and reapplications received     61
Applicants residing in organized territory     54
Applicants having legal residence in organized territory    57
Total grants made during year     47
Recipients residing in organized territory     43
Recipients having legal residence in organized territory    46
Allowances in pay as at March 31st, 1958  243
Recipients having legal residence in unorganized territory      17
Recipients having legal residence in organized territory 226
Last year it was reported as follows:—
" Restrictive categorical assistance such as this should receive earnest study in
relation to its effectiveness or the need for it. A far greater number of mothers and
dependent children are in receipt of Social Allowance, which affords them equal financial
and social benefits, and there is no reason to believe that a transfer to Social Allowance
would cause any disadvantage to those mothers at present in receipt of Mothers' Allowance. It would in no way restrict the effectiveness of the over-all assistance programme
in this Province.   It is hoped that in the ensuing year such a study may be undertaken."
It is therefore with gratification that it has been learned that active consideration
is being given to the question of continuation of Mothers' Allowances, and that it is probable that some positive action will be taken in the ensuing fiscal year.
Over the years such assistance has served its purpose in keeping families together
and enabling each member to realize his full capacity for success.
This year one particular family was noted. The mother, a widow, and her children
have been in receipt of assistance for eight years since the husband's death. As there
were no other resources within the family or relatives, it was necessary to use community
resources to the fullest extent, such as service clubs, home-maker service when the mother
was ill from a chronic condition, and bursaries to assist the children in their education.
This year the oldest daughter graduated from high school with first-class honours, thereby
winning yet another substantial bursary award to assist her to complete university training in a specialized profession. This girl had worked during summer vacations and after
school as much as she could. O 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
We are sure the mother will be very proud of and happy for her daughter. The
Branch can derive some small satisfaction, too, from the thought that by the granting of
financial assistance it has contributed in part to a happy family and to the academic
achievement of the daughter.
FAMILY SERVICE SECTION
" Family service " is an all-inclusive term covering all those services, including casework, which are given to families and individuals whether or not they are in receipt of
financial assistance.
The family is still regarded as the primary and most important basic social unit,
and the strengthening of family life is our constant concern. Sometimes the limitations of
our skills do not allow us to be as helpful as we would wish to be, but sometimes other
pressures of case load and lack of time do not give us an opportunity to use the skills
we have.
This is unfortunate because the preservation of the family should be the most important preventive work that we do; Otherwise, the costs are high in human values as well
as financially. Unfortunately, too, there is no known way to measure these costs of
broken homes and broken lives or to measure the saving when families are helped to
remain together and to achieve the greatest success and happiness possible for them.
The following table gives the monthly Family Service case load for the year under
review:—
Table I.—Total of Family Service Cases, April 1st, 1957, to March 31st, 1958
April, 1957 1,454
May, 1957   1,484
June, 1957  1,448
July, 1957  1,462
August, 1957  1,393
September, 1957  1,360
October, 1957  1,390
November, 1957  1,397
December, 1957  1,400
January, 1958  1,365
February, 1958  1,325
March, 1958   1,296
Other Services
Family Allowances
The Division continues to serve as a channel for requests from the Family Allowances Division of the Department of National Health and Welfare for reports concerning
a family's use or eligibility for Family Allowances. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 39
Table II.—Requests Received from Family Allowances Division,
April 1st, 1957, to March 31st, 1958
Received during the fiscal year April 1st, 1957, to March 31st, 1958,
by months—
April, 1957  6
May, 1957   4
June, 1957 _ 8
July, 1957
August, 1957 _____
September, 1957
October, 1957 ____
November, 1957
December, 1957 _
January, 1958	
February, 1958 __
March, 1958	
Total requests received
15
11
5
11
9
8
12
2
6
97
These requests for reports were directed as follows:—
Table III.—Referrals to District Offices and Other Agencies
Referrals pending as at April 1st, 1957	
Requests forwarded during fiscal year April 1st, 1957, to March
31st, 1958, by regions—
Region I1   49
Region II1   22
Region III      9
Region IV      3
Region V     8
Region VI      4
Region VII     2
19
—    97
Total number of requests referred
116
1 Includes referrals to private agencies in Victoria and Vancouver.
Table IV.—Referrals Completed within Fiscal Year, by Regions
Region I   53
Region II   25
Region III   9
Region IV   3
Region V   8
Region VI 	
Region VII 	
Total
Total number of requests referred
4
2
104
116
Referrals pending as at April 1st, 1958
12 O 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Third-party Administration of Family Allowances
During this fiscal year there were no requests for third-party administration of
Family Allowances.
Old Age Security
The Division also serves as a referral channel for the Old Age Security Division of
the Department of National Health and Welfare for requests to assist elderly persons who
encounter difficulties in completing their application for Old Age Security.
Table V.—Requests Received from Old Age Security Division
from April 1st, 1957, to March 31st, 1958
Pending as at April 1st, 1957
Received during fiscal year April 1st, 1957, to March 31st, 1958,
by months—
April, 1957  4
May, 1957   1
September, 1957  1
October, 1957  1
November, 1957   1
December, 1957   2
January, 1958   1
— 11
Total case load  12
Table VI.—Requests Forwarded during Fiscal Year April 1st,
1957, to March 31st, 1958, by Regions
Region II  1
Region III   4
Region IV   1
Region V  4
Region VI   1
Total number of requests  11
Pending as at April 1st, 1957     1
Total   12
Table VII.—Reports Completed by Regions
Region II   1
Region III  —  3
Region IV   2
Region V   3
Region VI   2
Total reports completed  11
Total number of requests  12
Requests pending as at April 1st, 1958     1 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 41
Conclusion
As in past years, the Family Division wishes to express sincere appreciation and
thanks to the clerical staff, social workers, district supervisors, and Regional Administrators, whose loyalty and service play no small part in the efforts of the Branch to assist
persons in need throughout the Province.
Our expression of appreciation also goes to the municipal welfare departments,
other departments of government, and the various private agencies for their co-operation
and advice, always freely given and so very helpful during the past year.
(Miss) Marie Riddell,
Provincial Supervisor, Family Division. O 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CHILD WELFARE DIVISION
The Superintendent of Child Welfare is pleased to report a number of accomplishments and trends which indicate progress, but will also draw attention to problems which
have impeded the achievement of a wholly satisfying year in child welfare.
Two thousand nine hundred and eighty-nine children were in the care of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare during the past twelve months, and at March 31st,
1958, 2,287 remained.
Table /.-
-Legal Status and Whereabouts of Children in the Care of the Superintendent
as at March 31st, 1958
P.C.A.
1   Wards
1
J.D.A.
Wards
C.A.S.
Wards
O.P.
Wards
Before
the Court
S.C.W.
Non-
wards
Total
Whereabouts—
150
234
320
149
141
247
111
13
10
7
8
4
14
3
10
14
13
14
6
22
4
1
1
6
6
2
7
4
15
28
15
17
44
35
10
47
46
44
20
27
65
20
236
333
405
214
224
390
Region VII   	
152
Totals  ...
1,352
59
83
27
164
269
1.9541
Placed with Children's Aid Society for special
reasons—
44
26
42
1
4
6
5
5
2
4
14
14
9
67
C.C.A.S., Vancouver -	
49
F.C.S., Victoria 	
60
Totals 	
112
5
16
6
37
176
In institutions—
B.I.S. andG.I.S	
17
9
3
7
6
3
	
1
1
1
2
24
Oakalla —	
14
P.M.H....	
4
7
1
36      |
9
     !       2
1
2
50
41
21
1
4
16
19
1
1
1
1
1
On active service or otherwise independent
47
1,562
78
118
46
173
310
2,287
1 Maintenance required for 1,678.
During the same period the three Children's Aid Societies cared for 2,982 children
and have 2,185 remaining at the end of the fiscal year.
In total, these statistics establish that only about 2.82 per 1,000 of British Columbia's estimated population are children cared for apart from their own parents. This in
itself is reassuring. There has not been a drop in the number of children cared for by
the societies and the Superintendent during the past few years, but the increases have been
low in comparison to the growth in population. This encouraging picture can largely be
credited to (1) the accelerated adoption programme; (2) persistent efforts made by all
staff to return children to their parents at the earliest possible time; and (3) equally
persistent staff efforts to see that, before any child is admitted to care, steps are taken to
strengthen and improve the family situation so that parents and children can stay together
as a revitalized unit.
ADOPTION PLACEMENTS
Four hundred and seventy-three children, ranging in age from 15 days to 14 years,
were placed by the Division. This is eighty-three more placements than last year and
145 more than the year preceding. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 43
Table II.—Number and Age of Children Placed for Adoption, April 1st, 1957,
to March 31st, 1958.
Child Welfare Division total placements,
473
Region
__
(3
o
c
o
&■_
a
o
s
tn
<n
t/_
c_
CJ
(/_
H
s
>l
is
ci
<a
a
to
<D
o
V
OJ
a)
>,
i>
>
>H
c_
aH
CN
*?
>
>-
>
>H
>H
i*
i»
i*
(x
O
hJ«
~
m
NO
-
CN
cn
rr
»o
<&
t>
CO
a.
^
H
I   . _
1
42 1 15
94 | 22
3
8
1
4      2
2
3
3
3
1
3
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
78
n	
8
3
151
in	
41  |    7
14
3
5
3
...
1
-
	
74
IV	
28 |    9
4
3
6
2
1
1
	
1
	
	
	
	
55
v 	
16 |    5
2
4
1
2
	
1
1
	
	
32
VI	
35 j 11
6     —
2 1    1
6
3
1
5
2
1
1
1
1
....
1
1
1
—
1
....
1
_.
—
1
67
VII	
Ifi
5
Totals	
264 | 70
I
41
27
19
13
11
2
7
6
1
2
5
2
1
1
1
473
The emphasis placed upon adoption is further apparent in the increasing number
and widening age range of children placed for adoption by the Division during the past
five years, as shown in the following table:—
Table III.-
-Children Placed for Adoption, 1953/54 to 1957/58
1957/58
1956/57
1955/56
1954/55
1953/54
Age-group
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Under 15 days	
1
174    |    36.5
90    |    18.9
70    !    14.7
41    j      8.6
27    |      5.7
32    |      6.9
13           2.7
26    |      5.4
151
81
68
26
21
24
11
8
38.7
20.7
17.7
6.6
5.4
6.0
2.8
2.0
112
72
64
34
27
10
5
6
33.9
21.8
19.7
10.3
8.2
3.0
1.5
1.8
77
81
21.3
22.7
44
64
77
27
30
7
4
3
17.2
15 davs to 1 month	
25.0
1 to 2 months. 	
98    |   27.4
48    j    13.4
31    [      8.6
12    |      3.3
5    |      1.4
5    [      1.4
30.7
10.5
11.0
2.7
1.5
Over 5 years _	
1.3
Total placements
473    |
1
390
330
357    |     	
1
256
—
In the table above can be noted the steady rise in the percentage of children placed
for adoption directly from hospital, and the steady increase also in the number over the
age of 5 years for whom the security of adoption was found.
In addition to the 473 children placed by Child Welfare Division, the three Children's
Aid Societies placed 329, making a total of 802 placements during the last twelve
months—131 more than last year and 137 more than the year preceding. These figures
are tangible proof of the emphasis being given to adoption.
AGREEMENT WITH YUKON TERRITORY RE ADOPTION
A most satisfactory agreement has been reached with the Yukon Territory about
the adoption placement of British Columbia children by residents of the Yukon. Home
studies made by the Superintendent of Child Welfare in the Yukon, when approved, are
submitted to the Division. When a family is chosen for; a child, the adopting parents
travel to the child to complete the arrangements. The adoption order is then applied
for by the adopting parents to the Yukon Courts. This year five satisfactory placements
were made under this agreement. We have been particularly happy to receive from the
Yukon applications from several homes of the Roman Catholic faith, because we still
have not enough homes throughout British Columbia to take care of all Roman Catholic
children available for adoption. O 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MANY CHILDREN AND PARENTS REUNITED UPON DISCHARGE
The figures on children discharged from care indicate success in reuniting families
as well as creating new families through adoption for wards. Three hundred and ninety-
eight, or over half, of the 702 children who went out of the care of the Superintendent
returned to their own homes; 150 wards under the "Protection of Children Act" who
had been placed for adoption in previous years were adopted by Court order. Of the
remaining 154 discharged, ninety-five children reached the age of 21 years or married;
fifty-seven were returned or transferred to another agency or institution for special care;
one ward was killed in a hunting accident; and another, a grossly retarded child awaiting
placement in The Woodlands School, died.
A similar ratio is found in the three societies' figures. Of the 797 children
discharged from the care of the Children's Aid Societies, 393 returned to their parents.
Table IV.—Availability
of Adoption Homes, 1957/58
Region
Homes Awaiting
Placement
during Year
Homes in Which
Placement
Made
Homes Closed
during Year
Homes Awaiting
Placement at
Mar. 31, 1958
Protestant
Roman
Catholic
Protes-       Roman
tant         Catholic
Protestant
Roman
Catholic
Protestant
Roman
Catholic
I       	
II	
104
188
82
62
36
93
19
7
12
18
17
12
9
10
2
1
71                7
137               14
62               12
46                9
26                6
55                  7
12                  4
3      j          2
17
8
5
5
4
7
4
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
16      |         2
43                3
Ill _.....	
15      |         2
rv	
11                2
v     	
6      |          3
VI 	
30                2
VII	
3
3      |
Totals 	
591
6'
80
n
412      I        61
473
1
51       |          8
59
1
127      |        14
141
1
CHANGING NEEDS OF PREVENTIVE PROGRAMMES
FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH
All phases of child welfare point up the need for reappraisal of staff functions and
duties, but the urgency becomes clear when the changing needs of children apart from
their families are considered. The average child in foster-home care to-day presents
a widely different range of problems to those of fifteen years ago. To delay planning for
the essential modifications in Branch function and practice for which they call is to
jeopardize the future stability of services.
The chronological age and legal status of the 2,287 children in the care of the
Superintendent as at March 31st, 1958, is seen in Table V.
Table V.—Age and Legal Status of Children in the Care of the Superintendent
of Child Welfare as at March 31st, 1958
0-5
Months
6-11
Months
1-2
Years
3-5
Years
6-11
Years
12-13
Years
14-17
Years
18-21
Years
Total
10
20
13
1
24
17
12
	
5
129
36
35
11
1
199
49
26
'
13
2
474
78
48
7
21
7
165
21
18
6
10
11
415
68
21
45
26
20
146
21
20
31
5
1,562
310
173
78
Wards and non-wards of Children's Aid
Societies in care of Superintendent of
Child Welfare	
118
46
Totals 	
44
58
212
289
635
231
595
223
2,287 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 45
Age, though not the major factor in planning for a child, is particularly important
from an administrative standpoint since it is one indication of the varied resources the
agency must develop to meet the needs of children entrusted to it. For instance, if the
majority of the children shown in Table V above were babies needing permanent homes,
our emphasis would have to be on the development of an even more accelerated adoption
programme. This is not the case, however. The Superintendent of Child Welfare's
guardianship in British Columbia fortunately extends to 21 years, and 223 of the total
children in care are within three years of that age.
LENGTH OF STAY IN CARE LESS
On the surface these boys and girls might seem not unlike those in the same age-
group in care ten to fifteen years ago. However, there are a number of important
differences and all affect planning. The majority of children this age then had been in
care since early infancy. They " grew up" in foster homes because not sufficient
recognition was given to the importance of early adoption. Many remained in one
foster home and enjoyed a good family relationship, but the majority lacked the social
and legal security provided for children apart from their parents to-day through adoption.
The average 18- to 21-year-old boy and girl now in agency care has not known
a long history of foster-home placement. A high number are admitted through Court
process under the "Protection of Children Act" after they have reached the age of
12 years, and almost invariably after years of family strife. Others are committed to the
Superintendent of Child Welfare under the "Juvenile Delinquents Act" in their early
teens after they have been in trouble with the law and in the hope that foster-home
placement will help them be diverted from the path leading to delinquency. More and
more the Courts have tended to look to child-caring agencies as a major resource in the
prevention of delinquency. Agencies have met this challenge with commendable readiness and skill. Each has young people under 21 who are self-supporting or on their way
to becoming so. Without this help, undoubtedly these boys and girls would have
continued to be a source of disturbance to police, communities, and themselves.
HELP TO CHILDREN A COMPLEX SERVICE
" Help " is not in the provision of maintenance alone. It is in the diligent search
for the right home for each child, in the earnest effort to rebuild a child's trust and feeling
of self-worth; it is in the unceasing endeavours to bring a child to an appreciation of his
ability to live a satisfying and constructive life within his maximum potentiality.
About two-thirds of the older boys and girls in care are self-supporting and look
to workers for counselling and guidance comparable to that which an adolescent in his
own home requires. Many others are completing vocational or educational training,
and when this is finished, these, too, will take their place in business and industry with
a normal degree of independence.
FOSTER HOMES ARE NOT INDICATED FOR ALL CHILDREN
Of the remaining some 100 boys and girls between 18 and 21 years, about 10 per
cent are children for whom little can be done in foster homes. Some suffer extreme
physical handicap or mental retardation. As their condition worsens, highly specialized
and costly foster care usually must be found for them. Others have been so damaged
mentally and (or) emotionally that their reactions remain uncontrolled and childlike.
They are restive and disorganized in their goals; no foster-parents can control them,
and, as they grow older, too often their delinquent behaviour becomes more flagrant.
Never before have child welfare agencies been called upon to care for so many
physically, mentally, and emotionally handicapped children.   Research would probably O 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
find that about the same ratio of 10 to 15 per cent physical, mental, and emotional
handicap is constant throughout all age-groups of children in agency care to-day.
Diagnostic skills must be developed for earlier detection, and treatment facilities, other
than foster homes, must be available if these boys and girls and their communities are
to be protected.
Many of the observations made above about older children in care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare can be made about the 826 now between 12 and 17 years of
age, except that an even higher percentage has been in care a relatively short period
of time. About one-fourth of these will ultimately be returning to their parents' home,
but for the majority of the remaining, foster-family care must be provided for varying
lengths of time, depending upon their abilities and capabilities.
Six per cent, or fifty-one children, in this age-group were committed to the care of
the Superintendent of Child Welfare under the "Juvenile Delinquents Act." That
frequently their behaviour in the home, school, and community for some time had caused
concern suggests a gap in community resources for detecting problems early as well as
in facilities to treat them. Many adolescents are responding well to foster-home care
and are not likely to repeat their misdemeanours. About fifteen of these fifty-one
children, however, and a probable similar number of wards under the "Protection of
Children Act" in the same age-group represent the " troubled youth " whose behaviour
reflects in many instances the troubles of our time. These young people cannot make
good use of adoption or foster-home placement. So unhappy have been their experiences
thus far with a confusion of parents, step-parents, and successive sets of parents that they
no longer can believe in or respond to the consideration and affection of wholesome
family living. Their urges are against the adult world, and they are lost to society
unless through research, observation, and treatment more can be learned about constitutional as well as environmental factors in their behaviour.
TREATMENT FACILITIES LACKING
Many times in the past the Superintendent has stressed the lack of treatment facilities for children in British Columbia, and each year the need becomes more urgent.
A disproportionate amount of workers' time is being spent placing and replacing this
relatively small group from one foster home to another, and a disproportionate amount
of the money available for the care of children is spent to provide a mere shelter. Chronologically too young and as yet not " sick " enough to be accepted into existing mental-
hospital programmes, their every action tells how they need the protection and safety of
a properly structured and staffed treatment institution.
YOUNGER CHILDREN HAVE SPECIAL PROBLEMS TOO
In the preceding Table V it is shown that a large number of children in care are
between 6 and 11 years. As is seen in the age-group of children placed for adoption
(Table II), an increasing number have achieved adoption this year, but such a plan is
not simple of execution. Many are " troubled " little people with trusts already badly
shaken, and communicating with them takes time, ingenuity, and skill. For others, the
barrier to adoption is racial origin or religious affiliation, and there are some, as the
twins who suffer a congenital sight defect or the 8-year-old little girl totally deaf, whose
adoption placement may never be possible.
SISTERS AND BROTHERS NEED EACH OTHER
In the same 6- to 11-year group there are a larger number of multiple families being
cared for than ever before. Some will be returning to their own homes. Whether this
is the plan, or adoption, or permanent foster-home care, it is essential that they be helped, REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 47
while still young, to understand why they are separated from their parents;  otherwise,
they become candidates for the " troubled youth."
MEETING NEEDS OF THE BABY AND SMALL CHILD
The relatively few children in care under 2 years of age is proof of where workers'
time is now being devoted and of the effectiveness of our adoption programme. No baby
is placed in a foster home if his parents are relinquishing him and he is otherwise ready
for adoption. Ten to fifteen years ago there were more children in care under the age
of 3 years than in any other age-group. To-day, in spite of the heavy demands made
upon staff, the picture has been completely reversed and extraordinarily low figures have
been maintained.   (See Table VI.)
Table VI.—Number of Children under 3 Years of Age in Foster-home
Care during Years 1955 to 1958, Inclusive
Year 15 Days to 5 Mos. 6tollMos. 1 to 2 Yrs.
I 1955   36 54 138
1956   35 59 181
1957   34 50 200
1958   44 58 212
The cost to the Provincial Government of maintaining children for the fiscal year
was as follows:—
Table VII.—Cost of Maintaining Children
Gross cost of maintenance of children in Child Welfare Division foster homes      $905,751.65
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance
of children with Provincial residence in care of
Children's Aid Societies  639,929.16
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance
of children with municipal residence in care of
Children's Aid Societies        601,638.84
Gross cost of transportation of children in care of
Superintendent  11,271.07
Gross cost of hospitalization of new-born infants being permanently planned for by Superintendent 25,302.00
Grants to sundry homes  1,100.00
Gross expenditure   $2,184,992.72
Less collections and refunds        374,300.09
Net cost to Provincial Government  $1,810,692.63
ADOPTION ORDERS GRANTED
In addition to the 802 adoption placements, the Children's Aid Societies and Social
Welfare Branch supervised homes during the probationary period and assisted in the
preparation of the Superintendent's report to the Supreme Court of British Columbia in
1,152 applications for adoption orders and in sixteen applications made to Courts outside
the Province. One hundred and nine orders only were for children placed through channels other than Social Welfare Branch and the societies. This accomplishment is the
direct result of a child welfare programme which is well accepted by communities, by the
Court, and by members of allied professions. O 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VIII.—Legally Completed Adoptions throughout the Province, according to the
Type of Placement, during the Fiscal Year
Area
Agency
Blood
Relative
Unauthorized
Person
Total
61
106
70
40
34
67
20
35
73
25
20
26
38
10
9
27
4
5
7
6
4
105
206
99
65
67
Region VI        	
Region VII 	
111
34
Totals          	
398
227
62
687
190
53
64
83
5
23
29
9
9
302
67
96
Totals.....
307
111
47
465
10
5
1
16
715
343
110
1,168
ADOPTION CONSENT REVOKED
The new "Adoption Act," a sound, inclusive piece of legislation, offers maximum
protection to all parties concerned. Of the 1,152 adoption reports submitted by the
Superintendent to the Supreme Court, only one application was disallowed and the child
returned to his mother. This was a situation involving the child of a European, recently
immigrated unwed mother. All ordinary steps to aid her reach a firm decision as to
relinquishment had been taken, and it was thought she understood, but in this particular
mother's homeland, adoption with its irrevocable finality, as we know it, does not exist.
Children may be left for years in institutions, to be claimed later by the parents. That
the child has grown up deprived of his right to parental nearness is not a factor considered by the parents who later claim custody.
This one unhappy reversal in decision showed the need for new procedural safeguards. These have been established and should ensure adequate communication with
the foreign-speaking parent and keep to a minimum the risk of revocation of consent.
" CHILDREN OF UNMARRIED PARENTS ACT "
Administration of this Act has altered as the trend moves more and more toward
adoption placement of the child born out of wedlock. Usually the mother seeks help
from the father of her child for confinement expenses only, and this means that fewer
agreements and orders need be enforced over a long period of time. A higher number
of mothers, moreover, who keep their child marry someone other than the child's father
within a relatively short time and often see settlement preferable to a continuation of
monthly payments. Adoption of the child jointly by the mother and husband is frequent,
and in many of these applications for an adoption order the child does gain a father's
protection and love.
A total of $59,597.75 was received and disbursed by the Superintendent under the
" Children of Unmarried Parents Act" during the year on forty orders and fifty-seven
agreements.   In this amount is included $3,196.40 received in settlements this fiscal year. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
Table IX.—Children Born Out of Wedlock by Age of Mother (Including
Non-enfranchised Indians), British Columbia, 1953—58
O 49
Age-group
Rate per
Year
Under
15
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-34
Years
35-39
Years
40-44
Years
45 and
Over
Not
Stated
Total
1,000
Live Births
1953  	
1954  	
1955. .,.	
1956.     „ 	
1956/571	
13
11
13
16
11
19
435
486
542
591
598
718
648
649
665
626
606
727
370
432
380
441
436
501
246
275
271
315
306
301
138
141
140
167
164
187
42
44
48
47
50
50
1
4
2
3
3
7
3
1
1
2
1,896
2,042
2,062
2,207
2,176
2,510
59.7
62.0
60.4
60.9
59.6
1957/581 —	
64.0
Fiscal year.
Table X.—Children Born Out of Wedlock by Age of Mother (Excluding
Non-enfranchised Indians), British Columbia, 1953—58
Age-
?roup
Rate per
Year
Under
15
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-34
Years
35-39
Years
40-44
Years
45 and
Over
Not
Stated
Total
1,000
Live Births
1953 '
1954  	
1955.   	
1956.	
10
6
11
12
7
16
317
379
425
464
477
584
485
493
504
453
457
553
287
331
287
327
337
376
192
205
204
245
250
253
106
105
105
132
124
147
32
34
34
38
39
43
i
2
2
3
2
1
2
1,431
1,554
1,571
1,673
1,695
1,975
47.5
49.8
48.6
48.7
1956/571 _ _.
1957/581  	
49.0
52.4
1 Fiscal year.
The above statistics, obtained from the Division of Vital Statistics, are not in all
respects comparable because figures for the last two calendar years are not yet available.
However, they are sufficiently valid to indicate trends and allow for some observations
to be made.
The increase of births out of wedlock during the six years is relatively low in relation to the estimated population growth of the Province in the same period. The rather
sharp increase which occurred in 1957/58, nevertheless, must be termed a matter for
community concern.
It is also to be observed from Tables IX and X that about one-quarter of the total
births out of wedlock in the six-year period were children born to Indian unwed mothers,
and that approximately the same percentage prevails throughout each year. Tables IX
and X undoubtedly include a number of children born to Indian mothers with white
status, but this is a difficult figure to estimate because of the many social and legal complexities of enfranchisement and assimilation. The over-all statistical picture, nevertheless, seems to indicate a too high rate of births out of wedlock in proportion to the
total Indian population of the Province. Workers in all regions, and particularly those
in localities where a concentration of Indians dwell, know well the cultural, economic,
and social pressures that contribute to this situation. Nor is this the only symptom of
a weakened family life in the Indian community. There are sharply increased numbers
of Indian children having to be apprehended from serious neglect conditions. (In two
of Social Welfare Branch's seven regions, 60 per cent or more of all children coming
into care are Indian.) A disproportionate number of Indian boys and girls are in industrial schools, and far too many Indian men and women are appearing in Courts daily
charged with offences indicative of self-conflict and inability to cope with newly found
freedoms and responsibilities.
A great deal is being done by the two senior governments as well as voluntary
organizations to meet these problems, but there is a crying need for accelerated pro- O 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA
grammes of public health, education, and welfare. These must be carried out on, as
well as off, reservations if, in the Indian's struggle for equality and integration, he is not
to lose for all time his proud heritage of culture and tradition.
CHILDREN IN SCHOOL DORMITORY, NEW DENVER
During the year eleven children of Sons of Freedom Doukhobor parents were apprehended by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for non-attendance at school and committed to the Superintendent of Child Welfare under the " Protection of Children Act."
This brought the total cared for during the year to 103. Seventeen, upon reaching the
alleged age of 15, returned to their parents by Court order, and as at March 31st, 1958,
eighty-six remain. These children have not been placed in foster homes because it
seemed best to keep them together as a group and because non-Freedomite Doukhobor
families, fearful of retaliation from the children's parents, have not offered their homes.
Two, however, this year went to live with an older brother and his family who have left
the sect of their parents to become members of the larger Orthodox Doukhobor community, where education is seen as a basic requirement.
The Doukhobor children in the dormitory at New Denver attend the local school,
take part in all its projects, and generally have become well-liked members of this attractive town in the Kootenays. Extraordinarily few disciplinary problems have presented
themselves, and the children, almost without exception, are diligent students.
FAIRBRIDGE FARM CHILDREN
There are but sixteen remaining in care of the 350 children brought to British
Columbia some fifteen years ago under the auspices of the Fairbridge Farm School child
immigration project. Most of these boys and girls knew separation from parents and
home at a very early age, lived for years in institutions both in the United Kingdom and
later for a time in British Columbia. Settling into a foster home after the project was
terminated in 1949 was not easy for them. Many as adults now are managing well.
Others are known to have a good many personal problems. Much could be learned
through research about the effectiveness or otherwise of such child immigration schemes
as a method of caring for the dependent child.
HUNGARIAN CHILDREN
From April 1st, 1957, to March 31st, 1958, thirty-six Hungarian children were
cared for by the three Children's Aid Societies and Social Welfare Branch. As at April
1st, 1958, twenty-six remain.
Table XI.—Hungarian Children Cared For
Agency Number
Social Welfare Branch  5
Family and Children's Service, Victoria  14
Children's Aid Society, Vancouver  3
Catholic Children's Aid Society, Vancouver  14
Total   36
Under the " Protection of Children Act," section 43, the Superintendent of Child
Welfare " is empowered to act in all matters as parent or guardian " with respect to any
immigrant child " for whom there is no legal parent or guardian in the Province." In the
last twenty years this section has been used effectively in connection with the British and
Jewish children who were brought to Canada as war refugees from overseas. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 51
The Hungarian child's situation differed from these other child immigration experiences in many ways. No planning prior to departure from Europe was possible. Many
had been separated from their parents in the general confusion of revolution and almost
inadvertently had arrived in Canada as camps for displaced persons were being cleared
in Europe. In addition, although chronologically under the age of 18, most of these
boys and girls had long since finished with childhood interests and seemed experienced
and disillusioned far beyond their years. Few had either education or job training, and
language was a barrier to communication. The years of camp living in Hungary had
dulled ambitions, and in some instances had left them ill equipped emotionally and
morally for successful adjustment in any community. Placement, as a result, was extremely difficult, and few successes can be reported thus far. The hazards inherent in
any child immigration plan are many, for the child, for the parent left in the homeland,
as well as for the country receiving the child. They are manifold and almost insurmountable, however, when the project is carried out under the circumstances as they prevailed
in the Hungarian crisis.
FAMILY ALLOWANCES
There has been no change in policy with respect to Family Allowances for children
in care. Workers and foster-parents see in the Allowances a real resource, and it has
proved invaluable to the child learning to manage his savings and spending.
Table XII.—Dispersal of Family Allowances Received during the Year
Balance on hand as at January 1st, 1957  $45,143.78
Receipts for the period January 1st, 1957, to December
31st, 1957     57,662.46
Expenditures for the above period     50,896.75
Parents—
Foster-mothers  $30,005.00
Adopting mothers       2,915.72
Natural mothers       4,611.03
Transferred to Children's Aid Societies      1,950.86
Refunds to Family Allowance Board __ 121.00
Recreational equipment, etc.       6,558.93
Paid to children on discharge        1,715.30
Educational   519.39
Gifts  195.78
Special clothing  607.54
Miscellaneous        1,696.20
$50,896.75
Balance on hand as at December 31st, 1957  $51,909.49
Number of children involved in the accumulated balances, 1,577.
OTHER PHASES OF CHILD WELFARE DIVISION ADMINISTRATION
A considerable increase is shown in Table XIII below in the number of referrals
received this year from (1) Supreme Court re custody disputes; (2) Canadian immigration re the proposed immigration to British Columbia of a child apart from his parents;
(3) Division of Vital Statistics re the legitimation of children; (4) other Provinces
relative to repatriation of the transient or runaway child; and (5) other agencies and
organizations relative to sundry related protective services. O 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XIII.—Services Given by Children's Aid Societies and Social Welfare Branch
Related to Child Protection
C.A.S.
S.W.B.
Total
Incomplete as at Mar
. 31, 1958
C.A.S.
S.W.B.
Total
48
114
3
35
101
49
99
6
45
202
97
213
9
80
303
7
32
1
3
45
12
48
1
10
60
19
80
Legitimation 	
Repatriation	
2
13
Sundry 	
105
CHILD WELFARE INTERPROVINCIAL RELATIONSHIPS
A very fine working relationship exists between the Superintendent of Child Welfare
and the Directors of Child Welfare in other Provinces and in the Yukon. The inter-
provincial movement of children in agency care is carried out in most instances simply
and well. With the exception of three of the ten Provinces, an arrangement in now in
effect whereby an inclusive per capita per diem rate for each child is reciprocally accepted.
Billing and payment are thus simplified and children are assured all services required.
Few administrative complications arise to interfere with social planning when wards move
with their foster-parents away from the legal guardian's jurisdiction. This achievement,
in the main, is a result of the biennial meetings of the Directors of Child Welfare of
Canada.
Other advantages accruing from these meetings and from interprovincial negotiations in specific situations are that each Province has gained in knowledge and understanding of other Province's policies and legislation and each has a greater appreciation
of the need for a desirable degree of uniformity nationally in these two important areas
of child welfare administration.
As at March 31st, 1958, sixty wards of the Superintendent and Children's Aid
Societies were residing outside British Columbia with their foster-parents and forty-six
wards of other Provinces were in British Columbia.
DECENTRALIZATION OF SERVICES
Plans were carried out this year to implement the long anticipated decentralization
of phases of child welfare administration. As the seven regions gain assurance in the
handling of problems formerly directed by the Division, current functions will alter. New
knowledge and skills will be developed and joint efforts should make possible an improved preventive service, providing recognition is given to changed staff needs.
1957/58 has been an active and full year. A great deal could have been included
in this report about successful plans made for individual children and about work done
with their families and foster or adopting parents to portray the ingenuity and resourcefulness of staff. These achievements are now a matter of record. This report, therefore,
has been kept purposefully to an accounting of the administration of child welfare legislation and programme. There was progress to be reported in both areas. The year has
been one in which special effort was made to consolidate services and put into effect a
number of administrative changes, and certain obstacles to the future stability of the
Branch have been noted. When these are successfully overcome, Social Welfare Branch's
services to families and children can be the chief bulwark against future social ills in the
communities of this Province.
In conclusion, the Superintendent expresses appreciation of the conscientious and
thoughtful work being done for children by both professional and clerical staffs in Div- REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 53
ision and field. High praise and unending thanks are also due the many foster-families
throughout the Province who give so freely of their homes, hearts, and minds. Without
them as co-workers, no programme would be possible. With them and through their
loving, understanding, and care of a child, miracles are worked daily.
(Miss) Ruby McKay,
Superintendent of Child Welfare.
■ '
.        -
;    ■ ■
Pi        ■ .'.: O 54 BRITISH COLUMBIA
OLD-AGE ASSISTANCE, BLIND PERSONS' ALLOWANCES, DISABLED
PERSONS' ALLOWANCES, AND SUPPLEMENTARY ASSISTANCE
GENERAL
A review of the work of the administration for the period April 1st, 1957, to March
31st, 1958, indicates that it was a very active year. This is mainly the result of two separate increases in the basic pension—one from $40 to $46 a month as from July 1st, 1957,
and the other from $46 to $55 a month as from November 1st, 1957. There were also
other changes in the Acts and regulations which caused a great deal of extra work reviewing files.   These changes are outlined more specifically in another section of this report.
In contrast to figures in our most recent annual reports, it is interesting to note that
the number of applications for Old-age Assistance shows a decided increase over the
previous year. During the year 1957/58 a total of 2,545 applications were received,
as compared with 2,210 during the year 1956/57. The total number on our payroll,
including transfers from other Provinces, does, however, show a slight drop from 7,029
to 6,907 between March 31st, 1957, and March 31st, 1958.
A comparison of the number of applications received for Blind Persons' Allowance
with those received for Old-age Assistance indicates that the trend was just the opposite
during the year under review. A similar situation is evident when one compares the
total number on the payroll in each category. In other words, while the number of Old-
age Assistance applications received increased, the number of blind applications decreased
from eighty in 1956/57 to sixty in 1957/58. In respect of the total number on the
payroll, the figure for Old-age Assistance shows a decrease, whereas the figure for recipients of Blind Allowances shows an increase from 482 as at the end of March, 1957, to
505 as at the end of March, 1958.
Disabled Persons' Allowances increased both in the number of applications received
and in total number on the payroll. During the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1957, 430
applications were received, and the total on the payroll at the year-end was 1,067. During
the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1958, 475 applications were received, and the total
on the payroll at the year-end was 1,281.
A review of the records in reference to supplementary assistance shows that while
the number of applications received during the current fiscal year decreased over the
previous year, the total number on our payroll as at March 31st, 1958, increased. A total
of 1,876 applications was received, in comparison with 2,216 the previous year, and the
total number on our payroll, including transfers from Alberta and Saskatchewan, stood
at 28,480 as at March 31st, 1958, as compared with 28,059 at the end of the previous
fiscal year.
It will be noted from the foregoing that our over-all case load still continues to
show a steady increase.
A study of the financial statement reveals an increase in amounts paid under all
categories, with the exception of supplementary assistance paid to Old-age Assistance
cases, and this shows a decrease in excess of $91,000 between March 31st, 1957, and
March 31st, 1958. Old-age Assistance payments, on the other hand, increased by an
amount exceeding $292,000 during the same period, which means that the net increase in
payments to the Old-age Assistance case load was over $200,000. Payments of Blind
Allowances increased by approximately $13,000, and supplementary assistance payments
to this group increased by approximately $7,000 during the year. The approximate
amount of the increase to disabled persons was $117,000 in allowances and $57,000 in
supplementary assistance.
In reference to the Old-age Assistance, Blind, and Disabled categories, it should be
noted that the main reason for the increased expenditure was the increase in basic payments as from July 1st and November 1st, 1957, as described at the beginning of this
section. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 55
As far as the Old Age Security group is concerned, it is noted that supplementary
assistance payments show a net increase of approximately $135,500.
In summarizing the financial aspects of the report, the total increase in payments
to all categories amounted to approximately $529,500 for the fiscal year 1957/58 as
compared with the previous fiscal year.
Looking to the future when not only more people, but also more people for a
longer time, will be the concern of governments and administrations of Old-age Assistance programmes and other welfare services, it appears that an increase in case load and
an increase in expenditure is inevitable.
CHANGES IN THE ACTS AND REGULATIONS
The present fiscal year was distinguished from other years by the numerous major
amendments to the Federal Acts and regulations and comparable changes in the Provincial regulations governing the payment of supplementary assistance and health services.
1. The maximum amount to which the Federal Government would share in payment to any recipient of Old-age Assistance, Blind or Disabled Persons' Allowance was
increased from $40 to $46 a month as from July 1st, 1957, and further increased to $55 a
month from November 1st, 1957. Maximum allowable annual income limits were raised
to absorb these increments and, in addition, were further raised to allow for more outside
income. Provincial regulations for supplementary assistance and health services were
amended accordingly. The following table illustrates the changes in income ceilings with
respective dates:— O 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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IIII REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 57
2. In consequence of a previous meeting of the Provincial Advisory Boards, several
amendments to the Old-age Assistance regulations and comparable amendments to the
Blind Persons Regulations and Disabled Persons Regulations became effective July 1st,
1957.   The significant changes are as follows:—
(a) Briefly, a recalculation of income is now permitted:—
(i) When the spouse of a married recipient becomes a recipient of Old
Age Security pension:
(ii) When one spouse dies:
(iii) When the personal property has been reduced by payments of accounts for medical, hospital, professional, or practical nurse, drugs prescribed
for the recipient or his spouse, or for the funeral expenses of the spouse:
(iv)  Where personal property is converted to newly acquired real property:
(b) The income calculation relative to personal property of a married Old-age
Assistance recipient is now to be made under the Blind Persons Regulations or the Disabled Persons Regulations when his spouse is in receipt of
Blind Persons' or Disabled Persons' Allowance. Heretofore, the calculation was based on the Old-age Assistance Regulations.
(c) Certain contributions to a recipient may now be exempted where those
contributions are made for the purpose of paying for the lodging of the
recipient:
(d) A request for an increase may now be made by any person on behalf of
a recipient who desires an increase in assistance or allowance to which he
may be entitled:
(e) Payments in respect of the assistance or allowance and social allowance
may not overlap more than one month.
In addition to the above amendments, the definition of when a person is deemed to
be totally and permanently disabled was redefined in the Disabled Persons Regulations.
3. On November 1st, 1957, the " Old-age Assistance Act " was amended by Parliament to reduce the basic residence requirement from twenty to ten years in Canada. (No
amendments in this respect were necessary to the Blind Persons or Disabled Persons Acts
as this provision under these Acts had been in effect for some time.) The Old-age
Assistance Regulations were subsequently amended by making the necessary changes to
conform to this change in the Act.
4. The " Disabled Persons' Allowances Act" was also amended on November 1st,
1957, to permit contributions, subject to the regulations, in respect of persons in a home
for the aged, an infirmary, or an institution for the care of incurables. The Disabled
Persons Regulations were subsequently altered to permit these contributions.
5. At the Provincial level, in addition to legislating to provide for the changes
occurring during the year in the Federal Acts and regulations, the regulations providing
for supplementary assistance and health services were extended in May to include blind
and disabled persons who had completed three years' residence in British Columbia even
though the Blind Persons' Allowance or Disabled Persons' Allowance was granted in
another Province. Heretofore, these benefits were not available in this category until the
recipient became eligible for Old Age Security pension.
GRAPHIC PRESENTATION COVERING THE PERIOD FROM
JANUARY 1st,  1952, TO MARCH 31st, 1958
Following will be found a graphic presentation of the various aspects of the administration of Old-age Assistance since the coming into force of " The Old Age Assistance
Act" in January, 1952.
On examining the various line graphs prior to March 31st, 1957, it will be noted
that during each year a definite cycle is indicated.  The line graphs rise to the month of O 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA
June and then fall generally during the latter part of each calendar year. Details relative
to these fluctuations have been explained in previous reports.
In the current fiscal year the line graphs reflect the numerous changes in the Acts
and regulations outlined briefly elsewhere in this report. During the latter part of 1957
a marked rise in the line graphs shows the effect of these changes in basic assistance or
allowance rates, income limits, and residence requirements.
The " number of applications" graph rises noticeably due to the fact that the
increase in the maximum allowable annual incomes and the decrease in residence requirements permitted more persons to become eligible.
Further, larger payments of basic allowances were made. Economic conditions also
precluded the older person from employment, and, as a result, the number of persons
receiving full assistance increased by 2 per cent over the previous fiscal year to 85 per
cent of the total case load for this year (see Table XIII). These changes are reflected in
the rise in the line graph for cost.
I
1
OLD AGE ASSfSTANCE
--BPITISH   COLUMBIA..
1
JAr.
UARY 1,   1952 TO MARCH 31,   1958
t of Assistance
1,
\
Coi
0, 000 units per square
300 units per square _
300 units per square
300 units per square
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Number ol Applications Granted
Number of Applications Refused
	
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-.a Tr
msferred to Old A
geSec
urity .
.	
	
300
units per square
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j
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i
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STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1958
Old-age Assistance
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received  2,545
Applications granted   2.1241
Applications not granted (refused, withdrawn, etc.) __     495
1 Includes some left over from previous year. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 59
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a)
British Columbia recipients—
Returned to British Columbia
Reinstated 	
Suspended 	
Deaths 	
(c)
(b)
Transferred to other Provinces	
Transferred to Old Age Security	
Total number on payroll at end of fiscal year .
Other-Province recipients—
Transferred to British Columbia	
Reinstated 	
Suspended 	
Deaths 	
Transferred out of British Columbia	
Transferred to Old Age Security	
Total number of British Columbia and other-Province recipients on payroll at end of fiscal year	
27
111
240
284
56
1,795
6,703
87
26
13
5
75
56"
6,907
Table III.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Number
Not of age      100
Unable to prove age  3
Not sufficient residence  2
Income in excess      188
Unable to prove residence  5
Transfer of property	
Receiving War Veterans' Allowance	
Information refused	
Application withdrawn  88
Applicants died before grant	
Whereabouts unknown	
Eligible for Old Age Security	
Assistance from private sources	
Receiving Old Age Security	
Miscellaneous 	
Total	
Per Cent
20.20
0.60
0.40
37.97
1.01
4
0.80
24
4.84
88
17.80
25
5.05
7
1.41
26
5.28
12
2.42
11
2.22
495
100.00 O 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IV.—Sex of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Male       993 46.78
Female  1,130 53.22
Table V.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Total  2,123 100.00
Married __      __ _ __    	
Number
           822
Per Cent
38.73
Single     	
     ____     330
15.54
Widows    ..   	
      448
21.10
Widowers .   ____        	
     ____     134
6.31
Separated     _ _
      345
16.25
Divorced	
 __._       44
2.07
Total  2,123 100.00
Table VI.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
British Columbia      175 8.24
Other parts of Canada      430 20.25
British Isles      559 26.33
Other parts of British Empire          6 0.04
United States of America      227 10.69
Other foreign countries      723 34.05
Total  2,123 100.00
Table VII.—Ages at Granting of Assistance
Number Per Cent
Age 65  1,021 48.09
Age 66      378 ■          17.80
Age 67      269 12.67
Age 68      256 12.05
Age 69      199 9.39
Total  2,123 100.00 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 61
Table VIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Age 65
Age 66
Age 67
Age 68
Age 69
Total
Number
Per Cent
23
.    8.09
40
14.08
58
20.43
75
26.42
88
30.98
284
100.00
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Number Per Cent
Living alone       724 34.10
Living with spouse      697 32.83
Living with spouse and children      108 5.18
Living with children      247 11.63
Living with other relatives      112 5.21
Living with others      143 6.73
Living in public institutions         74 ;    3.48
Living in private institutions        18 0.84
Total  2,123 100.00
Table X.—Where New Recipients Are Living
Number Per Cent
In own house _-.      866 40.79
In rented house      187 8.80
In children's home      238 11.24
In home of other relatives       78 ■.. . 3.67
Boarding        70 3.29
In boarding home        12 0.56
In housekeeping room      347 16.34
In single room (eating out)        66 3.12
In rented suite      168 7.91
In institutions         91 4.28
Total  2,123 100.00 O 62 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XI.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a)  Holding real property of value— Number Percent
$0  1,288 60.66
$1 to $250  13 0.61
$251 to $500  43 2.05
$501 to $750  44 2.07
$751 to $1,000  65 3.06
$1,001 to $1,500  130 6.12
$1,501 to $2,000  131 6.17
$2,001 and up  409 19.26
Total  2,123 100.00
(b) Holding personal propertv of value— Number percent
$0  _"_  1,050 49.45
$1 to $250  479 22.56
$251 to $500  185 8.74
$501 to $750  120 5.65
$751 to $1,000  84 3.95
$1,001 to $1,500  91 4.28
$1,501 to $2,000  50 2.35
$2,001 and up    64 3.02
Total  2,123 100.00
Table XII.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March
31st, 1958, Whose Assistance Is Paid by British Columbia
Granted by Granted by
British Other
Columbia Provinces
Alberta   25 12
Saskatchewan      6 13
Manitoba      6 4
Ontario  10 10
Quebec      3 2
New Brunswick	
Nova Scotia  1
Prince Edward Island     1
Newfoundland 	
Northwest Territories   	
Yukon Territory	
Total  51 42 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 63
Table XIII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients according
to the Amount of Assistance Received (Basic Assistance, $55)
Amount of Assistance
$55       -     ._..    ._
Per Cent
_.__               85.11
$50 to 54.99.   .      ..___
          4.15
$45 to $49.99 __._    ._ _
     .___    ____        3.25
$40 to $44.99	
       1.95
$35 to $39.99 _.
1.49
$30 to $34.99    	
       1.44
$25 to $29.99
1.15
$20 to $24.99	
       0.76
Less than $19.99	
       0.70
Total 	
  100.00
Blind Persons' Allowances
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received  60
Applications granted  51x
Applications refused, withdrawn etc.  172
1 Includes some left over from previous year.
2 Number still pending not included.
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended  Lil 18
Reinstated   13
Transferred to other provinces  2
Returned to British Columbia  1
Transferred to Old Age Security  17
Deaths  11
(b) Other-Province recipients—
Transferred to British Columbia  10
Reinstated    14
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended  8
Deaths     	
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia  478
Other Province     27
— 505 O 64 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table III.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Number Per Cent
Not blind within the meaning of the Act     5 29.42
Income in excess     4 23.52
Applications withdrawn     2 11.76
Eligible for Old Age Security  	
Died before grant  	
Receiving War Veterans' Allowance  __.. 	
Information refused     5 29.42
Assistance from private sources  ___. 	
Receipt of Old Age Security    	
Whereabouts unknown     1 5.88
Table IV.—Sex of New Recipients
Table VI.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Total   17 100.00
Male
Number
  28
Per Cent
47.46
Female
  31
52.54
Total 	
  59
100.00
Table V.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Married   25 42.39
Single   20 33.89
Widows      4 6.77
Widowers      2 3.38
Separated      7 11.88
Divorced      1 1.69
Total   59 100.00
British Columbia
Number
  21
Per Cent
35.60
Other parts of Canada  	
  15
____:  11
25.43
British Isles                                   '     ■
18.64
Other parts of British Empire
__    ___.      3
United States of America
5.08
Other foreign countries
     9
15.25
  59
Total 	
100.00 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 65
Table VII.—Ages at Granting of Allowance
Number Per Cent
Ages 18 to 21     4 6.77
Ages 22 to 30     4 6.77
Ages 31 to 40     2 3.38
Ages 41 to 50  10 16.94
Ages 51 to 60   14 23.72
Ages 61 to 69  25 42.42
Total   59 100.00
Table VIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number Per Cent
Age 21   	
Ages 22 to 30     1 8.33
Ages 31 to 40 ,     1 8.33
Ages 41 to 50.__.__     1 8.33
Ages 51 to 60     1 8.33
Ages 61 to 69     8 66.68
Total    12 100.00
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Number Per Cent
Living with parents     8 13.56
Living alone  13 22.04
Living with spouse  15 25.44
Living with spouse and children     7 11.88
Living with children     8 13.56
Living with other relatives     3 5.07
Living with others     3 5.07
Living in public institutions  ___ 	
Living in private institutions      2 3.38
Total   59 100.00 O 66 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table X.—Where New Recipients Are Living
Number Per Cent
In parents' home     6 10.16
In own home  21 35.64
In rented house     4 6.77
In rented suite     5 8.49
In children's home     9 15.27
In home of other relatives     4 6.77
Boarding      2 3.38
In housekeeping room     2 :_.o'i          3.38
In boarding home   ____ 	
In institutions     3 5.07
In single room (eating out)      3 5.07
Total   59 100.00
Table XI.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a) Holding real property of value—                         Number Percent
$0  41 69.52
$1 to $250  	
$251 to $500     2 3.38
$501 to $750     3 5.07
$751 to $1,000      1 1.69
$1,001 to $1,500     1 1.69
$1,501 to $2,000     2 3.38
$2,001 and up     9 15.27
Total   59 100.00
(_j)  Holding personal property of value—                  Number Percent
$0  36 61.06
$1 to $250     9 15.27
$251 to $500     3 5.07
$501 to $750     2 3.38
$751 to $1,000      2 3.38
$1,001 to $1,500     4 6.77
$1,501 to $2,000     1 1-69
$2,001 and up     2 3.38
Total   59 100.00 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 67
Table XII.-
-Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31st, 1958,
Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Alberta _ 	
Granted by
British
Columbia
Granted by
Other
Provinces
Saskatchewan 	
     2
2
Manitoba  	
1
Ontario     	
     1
1
Quebec ____ -__   	
New Brunswick __ 	
     1
Nova Scotia      _
Prince Edward Island 	
Newfoundland	
Northwest Territories	
Yukon Territory ... 	
Total 	
     4
4
Table XIII.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients according to
the Amount of Allowances Received (Basic Allowance, $55)
$55	
$50 to $54.99 _
$45 to $49.99
$40 to $44.99
Per Cent
92.86
1.78
1.00
0.59
$35 to $39.99  0.59
$30 to $34.99  0.79
$25 to $29.99  1.00
$20 to $24.99  0.39
$19.99 and less  1.00
Total
100.00
Disabled Persons' Allowances
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received  475
Applications granted  301x
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc.  148
1 Includes some left over from previous year. O 68 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended   58
Reinstated    11
Transferred to other Provinces  6
Returned to British Columbia  5
Transferred to Old Age Security  4
Deaths   40
(b) Other-Province recipients—
Transferred to British Columbia  15
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended  8
Reinstated   2
Deaths   1
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia    1,253
Other Province         28
  1,281
Table III.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Number Per Cent
Not 18 years of age  	
Unable to prove age    	
Not sufficient residence        1 0.68
Unable to prove residence    	
Too much income       3 2.02
Transfer of property    	
Refused information       2 1.36
Whereabouts unknown        5 3.38
Allowance under " Blind Persons Act"     	
Assistance under " Old-age Assistance Act "____   	
Allowance under " War Veterans' Allowance
Act"  	
Pension under " Old Age Security Act "       1 0.68
Mothers' Allowance    	
Unable to meet medical test  112 75.68
Referred for rehabilitation       7 4.72
Tuberculosis sanatorium     	
Mental hospital       4 2.70
Home for the Aged  	
Infirmary     	
Institution for incurables       1 0.68
Hospital        1 0.68
Nursing home        3 2.02
Other institutions    	
Application withdrawn        4 2.70
Died before grant       4 2.70
Total  148 100.00 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 69
Table IV.—Primary Causes of Disability on Accepted Cases
Per Cent
Infective and parasitic diseases  4.31
Neoplasms   0.57
Allergie, endocrine system, metabolic, and nutritional diseases 3.45
Diseases of blood and blood-forming organs      	
Mental, psychoneurotic, and personality disorders  37.36
Diseases of the nervous system and sense organs  31.33
Diseases of the circulatory system  6.90
Diseases of the respiratory system  1.43
Diseases of the digestive system      	
Diseases of genito-urinary system       	
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue      	
Diseases of the bones and organs of movement  10.92
Congenital malformation   1.43
Symptoms, senility, and ill-defined conditions      	
Accidents, poisoning, and violence (nature of injury)  2.30
Total..
100.00
Table V.—Sex of New Recipients
Number
Male  154
Female    147
Total  301
Per Cent
51.16
48.84
100.00
Table VI.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Married 	
Number
     _.__    48
Per Cent
15.95
Single 	
    ______ 204
67.78
Widow        __
____    12
3.98
Widower 	
            6
1.99
Separated 	
     27
8.98
Divorced 	
4
1.32
  301
Total	
100.00
■ O 70                                                         BRITISH
Table VII.—Birthpl
British Columbia 	
COLUMBIA
ace of New Recipients
Number
  134
Per Cent
44.52
29.90
12.63
0.34
4.31
8.30
Other parts of Canada 	
....    90
British Isles      .,   	
....    38
Other parts of British Empire  _.
1
United States of America _ 	
....    13
Other foreign countries	
____    25
Total	
.___ 301
100.00
Table VIII.—Ages at Granting os
Aees 18 to 19	
f Allowance
Number
.:..   25
Per Cent
8.30
8.63
8.30
8.63
8.30
7.30
9.97
12.30
14.64
11.97
1.66
Ages 20 to 24	
....    26
Ages 25 to 29	
____    25
Ages 30 to 34	
.___    26
Ages 35 to 39	
____    25
Ages 40 to 44	
___    22
Ages 45 to 49	
___    30
Ages 50 to 54	
....    37
Ages 55 to 59	
....    44
Ages 60 to 64	
...    36
Ages 65 to 69  . _
....      5
Ages over 70	
Total	
301
100.00
Table IX.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number Per Cent
Ages 18 to 19     1 2.50
Ages 20 to 24     2 5.00
Ages 25 to 29     3 7.50
Ages 30 to 34  	
Ages 35 to 39     2 5.00
Ages 40 to 44     3 7.50
Ages 45 to 49     2 5.00
Ages 50 to 54     5 12.50
Ages 55 to 59     9 22.50
Ages 60 to 64     7 17.50
Ages 65 to 69     6 15.00
Ages over 70  — 	
Total  40 100.00 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 71
Table X.—With Whom Recipients Live
Number Per Cent
Living with parents  144 47.85
Living alone     24 7.97
Living with spouse     32 10.64
Living with spouse and children     18 5.98
Living with children     15 4.98
Living with other relatives     44 14.62
Living with others      16 5.31
Living in public institution       6 1.99
Living in private institution       2 0.66
Total.
301
100.00
Table XI.—Where New Recipients Are Living
In parents' home
Number Per Cent
  117 38.89
In own house     43 14.29
In rented house     20 6.64
In rented suite     17 5.64
In children's home     14 4.65
In home of other relatives     51 16.96
Boarding      12 3.98
In housekeeping room     15 4.98
In boarding home       2 0.66
In institutions       8 2.65
In single room (eating out)       2 0.66
Total.
301
100.00 O 72 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XII.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a) Holding real property of value—                      Number Per cent
$0   262 87.04
$1 to $250       1 0.34
$251 to $500       2 0.66
$501 to $750  	
$751 to $1,000       1 0.34
$1,001 to $1,500       5 1.66
$1,501 to $2,000       7 2.32
$2,001 and up     23 7.64
Total  301 100.00
(b) Holding personal property of value—               Number Percent
$0   234 77.76
$1 to $250     38 12.63
$251 to $500       7 2.32
$501 to $750       3 1.00
$751 to $1,000       2 0.66
$1,001 to $1,500       1 0.34
•     $1,501 to $2,000       9 2.97
$2,001 and up       7 2.32
Total  301 100.00
Table XIII.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31st, 1958,
Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Granted by Granted by
British Other
Columbia Provinces
1
Alberta        __
     3
Saskatchewan    _ ___   __._ .       	
Manitoba     ___        __    _. 	
     1
Ontario 	
Quebec __   —_         __           .   —
     1
New Brunswick    	
Nova Scotia —    -         - - 	
Prince Edward Island	
Newfoundland
Total	
     5
5 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 73
Table XIV.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients according to
the Amount of Allowance Received (Basic Allowance, $55)
Per Cent
$55      93.36
$50 to $54.99___
$45 to $49.99....
$40 to $44.99—
$35 to $39.99—
$30 to $34.99—
$25 to $29.99—
$20 to $24.99—
$19.99 and less
2.34
1.95
0.69
0.60
0.30
0.23
0.15
0.38
Total  100.00
Supplementary Assistance and Health Services
to the Aged, Blind, and Disabled
New Applications
Number received  1,884
Number granted supplementary assistance and health services 895
Number granted supplementary assistance only  15
Number granted health services only  128
Number who died before application was granted  33
Number of applications withdrawn  98
Number of applicants ineligible  260
Number of applications pending  455
Total  1,884
General Information
Former  old-age  pensioners  still  receiving  supplementary
assistance on March 31st, 1958   12,362
Old-age Assistance recipients transferred to Old Age Security
receiving supplementary assistance on March 31st, 1958    8,265
New Old Age Security pensioners receiving supplementary
assistance on March 31st, 1958     6,289
Blind persons in receipt of Old Age Security receiving supplementary assistance on March 31st, 1958        219
Disability pensioners over 70 receiving supplementary assistance on March 31st, 1958  3 O 74 BRITISH COLUMBIA
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
" The Old Age Assistance Act," Year Ended March 3 1st, 1958
Supplementary
Social
Total   amount  paid   recipients   in   British Assistance Assistance Total
Columbia   $3,990,495.01  $1,389,445.87 $5,379,940.88
Less amount of refunds from recipients—
Overpayments refunded        $19,071.35 $2,666.94       $21,738.29
MisceUaneous refunds   200.00 100.00 300.00
Totals        $19,271.35 $2,766.94       $22,038.29
Net amount paid to recipients in British
Columbia   $3,971,223.66 $1,386,678.93 $5,357,902.59
Add amount paid other Provinces on account of recipients for whom British
Columbia is responsible  26,403.74 5,257.82 31,661.56
Less amount received by British Columbia on account of recipients for whom
other Provinces are responsible  73,010.51 9,671.42 82,681.93
Less amount refunded by the Federal
Government      1,996,604.01        1,996,604.01
Total amount paid by British
Columbia   $1,928,012.88 $1,382,265.33 $3,310,278.21 report of social welfare branch o 75
" The Blind Persons Act," Year Ended March 31st, 1958
Supplementary
Social
Total amount paid recipients in British Colum-        Allowances Assistance Total
bia   $287,077.93 $109,121.31 $396,199.24
Less amount of refunds from recipients—
Overpayments refunded       $1,734.99 $15.00      $1,749.99
Miscellaneous refunds  264.00 120.00 384.00
Totals       $1,998.99 $135.00      $2,133.99
Net amount paid to recipients in British Columbia  $285,078.94 $108,986.31  $394,065.25
Add amount paid other Provinces on account
of recipients for whom British Columbia is
responsible   784.20 120.00 904.20
Less amount received by British Columbia on
account of recipients for whom other Provinces are responsible  4,629.39        3,407.50        8,036.89
Less amount refunded by the Federal Government      213,809.22      213,809.22
Total amount paid by British Columbia      $67,424.53 $105,698.81  $173,123.34
" The Disabled Persons Act," Year Ended March 31st, 1958
Supplementary
Social
Total amount paid recipients in British Colum-        Allowances Assistance Total
bia  $698,447.89 $279,375.03 $977,822.92
Less amount of refunds from recipients—Overpayments refunded  248.73 7.78 256.51
Net amount paid to recipients in British Columbia   $698,199.16 $279,367.25 $977,566.41
Add amount paid other Provinces on account
of recipients for whom British Columbia is
responsible          3,730.43 780.00        4,510.43
Less amount received by British Columbia on
account of recipients for whom other Provinces are responsible       13,002.21         13,002.21
Less amount refunded by the Federal Government     349,099.60      349,099.60
Total amount paid by British Columbia   $339,827.78 $280,147.25 $619,975.03 O 76 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Old Age Security Recipients—Supplementary Social Assistance
Year Ended March 3 1st, 1958
Total amount paid recipients in British Columbia  $6,187,871.66
Less amount of refunds from recipients—
Overpayments refunded  17,586.08
Miscellaneous refunds  304.62
Total         $17,890.70
Net amount paid to recipients in British Columbia  $6,169,980.96
Add amount paid other Provinces on account of
recipients for whom British Columbia is responsible   49,522.42
Less amount received by British Columbia on account of recipients for whom other Provinces
are responsible        185,228.28
Total amount paid by British Columbia ___ $6,034,275.10
" The Old Age Pensions Act," Year Ended March 31st, 1958
Amount of refunds received from pensioners' estates
Less amount refunded to the Federal Government
Pensions
tes       $562.74
Supplementary
Social
Assistance
Total
$562.74
422.04
422.04
Total net refunds received by British Columbia       $140.70            $140.70
Administration Expenses
Salaries and special services  $197,851.96
Office expense  54,681.07
Travelling expense  493.63
Incidentals and contingencies  585.40
Equipment and furniture  1,480.84
Medical examinations  237.06
Total  $255,329.96 report of social welfare branch
Summary
Administration and Assistance
O 77
Administration 	
" Old-age Assistance Act " 	
" Blind Persons' Allowances Act "	
" Disabled Persons' Allowances Act "
" Old-age Pension Act "	
$255,329.96
.    1,928,012.88
67,424.53
339,827.78
(credit) 140.70
As per Public Accounts  $2,590,454.45
Supplementary Social Assistance
" Old-age Assistance Act "	
" Blind Persons' Allowances Act "	
" Disabled Persons' Allowances Act "	
Universal Old Age Security       6,034,275.10
As per Public Accounts  $7,802,386.49
$1,382,265.33
105,698.81
280,147.25
MEMBERS OF BOARD
The following are the members of the Old-age Assistance Board of the Province of
British Columbia:—
Chairman:   Mr. E. W. Berry.
Members:   Mr. J. A. Sadler, Director of Welfare;  Mr. R. Talbot, Administrator, Region II, Social Welfare Branch.
CONCLUSION
In concluding this report the Board wishes to express its sincere appreciation for the
loyal and efficient work of the office and field staffs throughout the year and for the continued co-operation of other departments of Government and many outside agencies.
Respectfully submitted.
E. W. Berry
Chairman.
. O 78
BRITISH COLUMBIA
MEDICAL SERVICES DIVISION
The annual report of the Medical Services Division for the fiscal year 1957/58
does not show any startling changes in so far as policy. It does confirm the trend of
increasing costs, which have been steadily mounting over the previous ten years, as
shown in the following table:—
Table I.—Divisional Costs for Years 1946/47 to 1957/58
Fiscal Year
Medical
Drugs
Dental
Optical
Transportation
Other
Total
1946/47...	
$104,375.86
$65,690.53
$6,457.75
$1,821.06
$4,752.15
$2,876.33
$185,973.68
1947/48	
185,613.57
123,913.10
13,008.82
2,615.64
6,319.58
3,602.90
335,073.61
1948/49	
250,004.18
172,554.46
19,290.90
3,817.73
10,484.90
10,317.53
466,469.70
1949/50	
592,908.17
299,478.71
24,764.96
13,425.22
14,156.08
3,990.96
948,724.10
1950/51	
688,829.34
387,242.73
30,915.12
23,543.17
13,612.38
1,839.60
1,145,982.34
1951/52	
723,524.87
448,886.21
50,044.06
28,972.01
14,860.51
3,170.24
1,269,457.90
1952/53	
1,202,759.51
625,811.17
73,010.09
44,858.20
16,765.41
8,492.14
1,971,696.52
1953/54	
1,219,968.71
658,599.63
86,717.17
44,330.50
17,380.03
11,100.36
2,038,096.40
1954/55	
1,362,928.21
753,831.50
112,719.03
48,074.34
23,891.75
13,454.81
2,314,899.64
1955/56	
1,523,658.40
896,889.68
119,512.74
48,341.91
22,504.83
12,733.72
2,623,641.28
1956/57	
1,486,400.99
965,921.97
129,267.56
50,565.61
23,359.27
14,421.96
2,669,937.26
1957/58..	
1,503,964.91
1,114,674.70
148,223.72
55,440.66
25,763.04
16,983.77
2,865,050.80
It would be an injustice to say that the services provided by these moneys were
unnecessary. On the contrary, although there may be some abuses, those giving the
services know full well the need for them. Yet there must be some form of control, and
this, to be effective, requires the co-operation of all concerned.
The doctors of British Columbia have received no significant change in the form of
payment for their services under the terms of the agreement with the Canadian Medical
Association (British Columbia Division). This in no way indicates that such services
have remained stationary, for the total number of accounts paid through Social Assistance Medical Service have actually increased.   This is evident from Table II.
Table II.—Payments and Accounts
Payments to British Columbia doctors—
1956/57—
Agreement   $ 1,479,661.21
Immigrant   1,836.78
Other   4,903.00
$1,486,400.99
1957/58—
Agreement   $ 1,492,741.27
Immigrant   6,951.51
Other   4,272.13
$1,503,964.91
S.A.M.S. accounts submitted—
1956/57 	
1957/58 	
     140,850
     150,425
Average number of doctors submitting accounts (quarterly)—
1956/57         1,167
1957/58         1,238 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 79
DRUG COSTS
These remain an increasing problem, and it is disturbing to see a rather marked
increase in actual numbers of prescriptions with a relatively unchanged number of persons
eligible for such benefits. This would tend to suggest that although costs of medicines
may have increased along with a general increase in the cost of living, utilization is the
principal factor in our total drug costs (see Tables III and IV).
Table III.—Prescriptions and Costs, 1956/57 and 1957/58
Number of prescriptions— 1956/57 1957/58
Drug-stores   399,367        458,002
Provincial Pharmacy     19,572 23,487
Totals   418,939        481,489
Cost of drugs through— 1956/57 1957/58
Drug-stores   $873,145.51       $992,311.11
Provincial Pharmacy       92,776.46 122,363.59
Totals  $965,921.97    $1,114,674.70
Table IV.—Categorical Breakdown of Medical Coverage
Category 1956/57 1957/58
Mothers' Allowance  1,047 877
Social Allowance  17,118 17,461
Child Welfare Division  3,311 3,546
Old Age Security Bonus and Blind
Persons' Allowance  36,239 36,441
Old-age Assistance  7,739 7,195
Disabled Persons'Allowance  975 1,221
Total average monthly
coverage  66,429 66,741
Total yearly payments to S.A.M.S... $1,479,661.21    $1,492,741.27
DENTAL PROGRAMME
Each year there has been small but definite increased cost in the implementing of
this programme with the emphasis in costs remaining on the provision of dentures rather
than on prophylaxis. This is not in keeping with well-established principles of dental
health nor will it save the Province in future expenditures, but rather increase them. The
age-limit remains at up to the 12-year-olds but not including them, in assisting them to
take part in the preventive programme of the Health Branch of the same department.
Table V.—Dental Payments
1956/57 1957/58
Prophylaxis      $24,996.66      $28,430.52
Extractions           7,596.04 9,589.80
Dentures        96,674.86      110,203.40
Totals  $129,267.56    $148,223.72 O 80 BRITISH COLUMBIA
OPTICAL SERVICES
Here also there has been the yearly increase in costs, although not marked. The
following table does not give the payments received by ophthalmologists, as they are paid
under the terms of the S.A.M.S. Agreement:—
Table VI.—Optical Payments
, 1956/57 1957/58
Optometric examinations        $9,213.65 $9,896.45
Glasses        41,351.96        45,544.21
Totals      $50,565.61      $55,440.66
The various travelling clinics have continued to assist us in providing medical services to those in receipt of welfare. It is an invaluable aid to have them, and we can
only hope for their expansion. Our thanks to them is expressed at this time expecially to
the British Columbia Cancer Institute, Children's Hospital, and Canadian Arthritis and
Rheumatism Society, both for their travelling and stationary clinics.
The providing of transportation for welfare recipients for various medical reasons
frequently requires much effort both for field and this Division's staff. The number of
persons brought to Vancouver in this category for the year 1957/58 was 160, an increase
of 43 over the previous year. If this trend continues, we may well require to have some
form of accommodation for them if they are not to be admitted directly to hospital. Of
these 160 persons, there were 108 male and 52 female, a ratio of 3 to 1, which shows an
increase from 2 to 1 respectively in the previous year. Their ages have ranged, as in the
past, from infancy to eighth or ninth decades, and their medical diagnoses have been as
varied, with cancer comprising about one-fifth of them.
As in the past, many people outside this Division have provided their services to our
clients and patients, and have continued to assist in the programme of the Medical Services Division. To them we also express our thanks and particularly the Canadian Medical Association (British Columbia Division), the British Columbia Dental Association,
British Columbia Pharmaceutical Association, the Vancouver General Hospital, St. Paul's
Hospital, the British Columbia Cancer Institute, the Canadian Arthritis and Rheumatism
Society, and the Children's Hospital. The people of this Province have only an inkling
to what extent has been the contribution of the members and staffs of all these associations
and institutions and organizations.
Respectfully submitted.
G. E. Wakefield, M.D.
Director. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 81
PART III.—INSTITUTIONS
INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS
I beg to submit the annual report for the Brannen Lake School for boys for the
period ended March 31st, 1958.
Fiscal Year
as
Ov
©
O,
ON
o
v.
<3\
—
r.
as
m
so
V.
a.
so
o,
oo
r-
as
95
7
3
89
14
1
79
13
104
15
1
104
19
3
118
23
141
16.3
155
4
1
4
2
101
4
1
2
4
105
17
122
13.9
119
15
2
2
96
15
2
131
9
19
129
1
152
Number A.W.O.L., April 1st	
2
3
Number in Crease Clinic, April 1st
Number on extended leave, April 1st—
Number on special leave, April 1st
Number of new admissions	
3
3
2
171
32
203
15.8
126
9
19
33
131
101.9
37,198
0)
239
33
143
24
167
14.4
212
1
17
222
40
262
15.3
237
2
3
1
1
130
26
156
16.7
128
15
1
14
102
23
125
18.4
126
14
1
3
86
25
111
22.5
126
13
121
31
152
20.4
146
19
3
210
75
Total number of admissions	
Percentage of recidivism	
Number of releases	
Number A.W.O.L., March 31st	
285
26.3
265
1
17
104
82
30,011
C1)
O)
129
137.6
50,371
8.3
124
14
152
144
52,576
7.7
156
27
Number in the School, March 31st
89
86
31,408
8
O)
79
81.7
29,808
10
(*)
104
84.3
30,865
(*)
C1)
101
100.6
36,721
9
281
96
102.4
37,383
9.5
432
164
152
55,516
6
1222
Average length of stay in months	
Total A.W.O.L. during fiscal year	
1 Not recorded.
2 Involving ninety-two boys.
During the fiscal year there were 210 admissions and 75 recidivists, making a total
of 285 admitted to the School. There was a 26.3-per-cent rate of recidivism. Eleven of
the seventy-five recidivists were committed for the third time, one for the fourth time.
Two hundred and one of the boys admitted were Protestant, eighty Roman Catholic, and
four of other religion or not determined. Twenty-seven of the total number of boys admitted during the year were of native Indian status.
Range of Age upon Admission
Age
Number
of Boys
10 years     3
11
12
13
14
5
11
20
68
Age
15 years_
16 „   .
17 „   _
18 ,,   _
Number
of Boys
.__ 85
.__ 63
.._ 29
... 1
The average age on admission was 14.8 years. O 82 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Supervising Agencies of Boys Admitted Number
of Boys
Social Welfare Branch  39
Provincial Probation Branch  133
Children's Aid Society  5
Catholic Children's Aid Society  5
Family and Children's Service  8
Vancouver Juvenile Court  57
Victoria Juvenile Court  9
Saanich Juvenile Court  3
Royal Oak Juvenile Court  5
Indian Department  9
Indian Department and Social Welfare Branch  7
Indian Department and Provincial Probation Branch  4
Superintendent of Child Welfare, Yukon  1
Of this number, seventeen were wards of the Superintendent of Child Welfare, four
of the Children's Aid Society, four of the Catholic Children's Aid Society, and one of the
Victoria Family and Children's Service.   Nine of the twenty-six wards were recidivists.
The 285 boys admitted were committed from the following Juvenile Courts:—
Region I
Alberni  3 Nanaimo   5
Alert Bay  1 Port Alberni  3
Campbell River  4 Royal Oak  6
Colwood  1 Saanich ton  1
Courtenay   3 Sidney   3
Duncan   2 Victoria   18
Esquimalt  1 —
Lake Cowichan   1 52
Region II
Bella Coola  3                Richmond      10
Burnaby   16                 Sechelt        7
Coquitlam   6                Vancouver     61
New Westminster  10                 West Vancouver        5
North Vancouver  13                                                        	
Powell River  1 132
Region III
Armstrong  2 Merritt      1
Bralorne   2 Oliver        3
Chase   1 Penticton     4
Kamloops   2 Princeton      1
Kelowna  6 —
Lumby  1 31
Lytton   8 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
Region IV
O 83
Castlegar 	
1
Cranbrook  2
Creston  1
Fruitvale  1
Invermere  1
Kimberley
Rossland _
Trail	
1
1
3
11
Region V
Dawson Creek        _
2                Quesnel   	
     2
Fort Nelson _
1                Williams Lake 	
     1
Fort St. James	
Fort St. John	
Prince George	
Agassiz	
Boston Bar      _
3
2
5
Region VI
_.    4               Hope _   	
16
     2
__    2               Langley 	
2
__ 10
5
Region VII
__    2                Smithers 	
__    1                Terrace 	
6
1
     4
Chilliwack   __.
Cloverdale 	
Haney 	
29
Kitimat	
Masset _ _      __   _
1
     2
Prince Rupert  	
Queen Charlotte City
Yukon Territory	
13
  1
Boys were not in all cases residents of the area served by the Juvenile Court which
committed them to the School.
Of the 285 boys committed to the School during the year, 236 were committed for
offences against property, 13 against persons, and 36 other offences which included
incorrigibility.
Of the 210 new admissions during the year, 53 of the boys were never tried on probation but were committed to the School on their first appearance before the Court.
There were 265 boys released from the School during the year. The average length
of stay of boys in the School was six months. The majority of the boys were released
after between four and eight months' stay in the School, while thirty-four others varied
from nine to twenty-one months' stay in the School, and nineteen others were in the
School not exceeding two months. This latter group was either recalled by the Court
and other dispensation made of their cases or they became involved in more serious
trouble and when before the Court were committed to adult institutions. One of the nineteen was transferred to Essondale Mental Hospital.
Ninety-two boys accounted for the total of 122 A.W.O.L.s. The difference between
these two figures is due to the fact that some of the same boys went A.W.O.L. two or
more times during the year. The majority of the boys who went A.W.O.L. were picked
up within a few hours of going absent either by members of the School staff or R.C.M.P.
officers. Four hundred and fifty-seven boys were worked with in the School during the
fiscal year. O 84 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MEDICAL AND DENTAL TREATMENT
Dental treatment comprised the following: 728 fillings, 75 X-rays, 165 extractions,
33 new partial dentures made, 11 partial dentures repaired, 29 prophylaxis treatments,
and 2 examinations of teeth.
Dental work shows a marked increase. The condition of the boys' teeth on admission to the School is very poor.   The majority of the boys need dental care to some extent.
The incidence of accidents shows a slight increase.
An epidemic of influenza in September was on a large scale, but fortunately there
were no serious complications.
External otitis has been quite prevalent; it has not been serious, although quite
troublesome.
Since March, 1957, all the boys have been tuberculin tested; only those with a
positive reaction have been chest X-rayed.
In March, 1957, 153 boys were tuberculin tested, of which 18 were positive. This
number included both Indian and white boys; 11.8 per cent were positive. In the last
nine months a record of the number of positives among Indian boys and white boys has
been kept. In the group tested, approximately 13 per cent of the white boys had positive
reaction and approximately 36 per cent of Indian boys had positive reaction. The result
of the chest X-rays of boys who have a positive reaction has been negative.
In addition to the medical attention given to boys by our School doctor and nurse,
thirty-one boys required operations, which were performed in the Nanaimo General
Hospital. The School was billed for 143 hospital days to cover their care while in hospital. The hospital X-ray facilities were used for chest X-rays, and an additional twelve
boys were X-rayed for other reasons. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 85
FINANCIAL STATEMENT,  1957/58
Salaries  $228
Office expense  6
Travelling expense	
Heat, light, power, and water  23
Medical services  13
Clothing and uniforms   13
  63
  14
Provisions and catering
Laundry and dry-goods _
Equipment and machinery
Medical supplies
Maintenance of buildings and grounds
Transportation 	
Motor-vehicles and accessories	
Maintenance and operation of equipment
Incidentals and contingencies 	
Repairs to furnishings and equipment	
Training programme expense 	
,517.33
,360.89
799.89
,894.06
,201.45
,724.88
,975.66
043.11
702.65
,371.54
,290.74
,459.76
,143.09
,082.78
,602.47
999.41
,911.47
$399,081.18
Less-
Board
$3,543.00
Rent  3,303.00
Transportation   292.20
Transfer from Inmates' Trust Ac-
Account  6,046.01
Sundry credits  577.48
Less maintenance receipts	
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts-
Salaries and Expenses	
Add salary revision
Less credits
Less increase in inventory—
Inventory at March 31st, 1958_   $15,784.48
Inventory at March 31st, 1957-    14,347.78
13,761.69
$385,319.49
2,939.12
$382,380.37
$399,081.18
14,061.49
$413,142.67
13,761.69
$399,380.98
Add Public Works expenditure	
Cost of operating School, 1957/58	
Per capita cost per diem:  $444,763.17^-55,516
1,436.70
$397,944.28
46,818.89
$444,763.17
=$8.01 O 86 BRITISH COLUMBIA
It will be noted that the average daily population of the School was 152 boys. Since
the School has no control of admissions, there was no alternative but to reduce the average stay of a boy in the School. This resulted in many boys being released before the
School authorities felt the boys were actually ready to return to the community. This in
turn, we believe, is to some degree responsible for the increased rate of recidivism which
occurred during the year. I also feel it would be a mistake to say the increase in recidivism is entirely due to the short period the boys spent in the School, as work with the family while the boy is in the School and the follow-up work on release plus the support the
boys receive from their homes and the community are also contributing factors.
Since the School must deal with all boys committed by the various Courts of this
Province, we do have a certain number of boys who might be classed as mentally deficient
and who cannot benefit from this School programme, and many of them will be recidivists.
There is need for a screening centre and other resources both for the mentally retarded and some of these tender-age boys, whose needs could be better met in a specialized foster home if they cannot be cared for in their own homes with adequate social
services. Forestry or work camps might also better meet the needs of some of the older
boys who are at present being sent to this School. It might also be helpful if parents were
made to assume responsibility within their financial means for the support and care of
their children while in a correctional school. This fact in itself would tend to make parents realize that they must assume responsibility for their children and their misdemeanours rather than foisting this on the public.
I wish to thank all staff members, clergymen, service clubs, and other organizations,
including other departments of government, both municipal and Provincial, private agencies, and individuals who have shown an interest in the boys of the School by helping the
School with its programme of rehabilitation. The School is greatly indebted to all these
persons, and their assistance has been appreciated by the administration of the School.
Respectfully submitted.
F. G. Hassard,
Superintendent. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 87
INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
This is the forty-fourth annual report to be submitted on the Industrial School for
Girls from 800 Cassiar Street, and it covers in brief the activities and progress of the fiscal
year ended March 31st, 1958.
The new School is nearing completion; therefore, only essential repairs have been
carried out.
It is gratifying to record here an increased stability in the staff, with only three resignations and one transfer being received during the year. The school-teacher who joined
the staff in September, 1956, left in August, 1957, to accept a position in the City of Vancouver at a considerably higher salary. One stenographer left for domestic reasons, and
the other stenographer requested a transfer to a Government office closer to her home.
A night supervisor resigned to seek day employment and has recently accepted a position
at the new girls' school in Alberta close to her home. There were no changes in the
senior or supervising staff. Some staff development has been carried out through interesting and well-attended evening staff meetings and also through frequent individual conferences with senior staff. Perhaps the major factor in staff development has been the day-
to-day job, and it has been heartening to note individual members gradually profiting
from experience and taking greater responsibility.
The increased stability among staff has helped to develop a well-balanced programme
of activities and it has been accepted that everyone takes part in it. There has been a
marked improvement in the interest of the girls, and for the majority a natural desire to
participate both in work and recreation. All girls under 15 years must attend regular
school classes. There has been an increase in the number over school-leaving age continuing their education in the school. Approximately two-thirds of the total population
attend school on the same basis as they would in the community. When they first come
to us, the majority have not been too successful in their studies previously and, generally
speaking, are ill-prepared in the fundamental skills of learning. Each presents a special
problem, and we have been fortunate in attracting to our staff a teacher experienced in
remedial teaching who, through a sympathetic attitude and kindly understanding, has
been able to encourage each to some extent to overcome her problems and make some
progress. The beauty-parlour has continued to operate at capacity, with two girls always
preparing for Government examinations and looking forward to returning to the community as qualified hairdressers. More and more girls are also seeking to learn proper care of
their own hair, skin, and nails by spending their spare time after school and work in the
beauty-parlour. Our present beauty-parlour is very cramped and overcrowded. The
sewing-room is another popular spot for a few, and it is hoped in the new School every
girl will have the opportunity to learn at least enough sewing to bring her pleasure in her
own home. Some girls who are beyond or have no further desire for academic training
spend their whole term in the School working in either the kitchen or the laundry, learning as much as possible in these fields. However, it is not always so much what the girl
learns that counts as the close association that generally develops between staff and girl,
and which helps to restore her lost faith in adults and gives her the inner strength to
handle herself in the adult world she must return to on her release. The physical education and recreational programme will always be popular with the girl who comes to the
School; some before reaching us have won honours in school sports. Even with two
swimming periods a week, nearly every girl learns to swim well and earns the Red Cross
swimming awards. Happy, indeed, is the child who cannot swim a stroke on admission
but returns to the community with her senior medallion and the right to instruct. At least
six girls are examined every month by an appointed Red Cross swimming instructor, and
we are always complimented, not only on how well prepared the girls are, but also on
their excellent conduct at the pool. O 88 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Our social workers continued to work closely with the social workers in the community and found the various agencies co-operative in supplying histories and information
on all committals.
The School population kept up all year, with a daily average in the building of 51.6,
as against 46.2 the previous year, and a total average enrolment of 71.6. There were
sixty-six admissions, including seven or 10.6 per cent readmissions. This is a decrease
of five in admissions and a drop of close to 5 per cent in recidivists over the previous
year. This does not give a complete picture because there are always those who go on
to adult institutions, of which we have no accurate record. However, it would appear
that at least 80 per cent of the girls do not come in contact with the law again. Twenty-
two girls were 16 years or over and only four 12 years or under at the time of committal.
Seventy-two girls were relased from the School, and the average length of stay increased
to 12.4 months. The older age-group generally includes a number of girls whose delinquent behaviour has become a fixed pattern; they may conform to get by, but they have
no intention of altering their way of life. While conforming on the surface, they are
generally at the root of any serious trouble in the School, and the younger, less experienced girls either fall in with them and become their tools or live in fear of being forced
into situations not of their making. This is a situation which will never be completely
controlled so long as both groups have to be taken care of in one institution.
Emphasis has been placed this year on a better interpretation of the girl and her
problems to the community in an effort to remove as much as possible the stigma of committal to the School by a wider use of volunteers and invitation to a larger number of
friends to attend programmes put on by the girls. A gymnastic display was repeated on
three different occasions, one performance being specially for our neighbours, who were
invited by letters delivered by two of the girls. Volunteers have joined in practically
every part of our programme either as individuals or groups and have become close
friends of girls and staff alike and a real part of our School. We are most grateful to the
religious groups who come every Sunday, the Elizabeth Fry Society for their Christmas
party and exciting picnic at Boundary Bay and for taking care of girls with no families in
Vancouver for special week-ends and days out, and to all the individuals who joined in
our various activities and make it more possible for us to have a broad and active programme.
The health of the girls has remained excellent. The Venereal Diseases Clinic visited
once a week; our own doctor held clinics every week; extensive examinatons were carried out at the out-patient department of the Vancouver General Hospital; dental clinics
were held every second week at the out-patient department of the Vancouver General
Hospital, but this does little more than take care of emergencies; necessary eye examinations were done by an eye specialist and glasses supplied when prescribed.
While there have been disappointing reports of girls who have left the School only to
fall more deeply into their old habits, there have also been some most encouraging reports
from others. One girl who trained to be a hairdresser while in the School, after some ups
and downs, is now happily settled in the home of one of the staff and doing very well in
a leading beauty salon in the city. Her name appears in their advertisements as the assistant hair stylist. Another spends one evening a week at a swimming-pool as a volunteer
swimming instructor. Others have returned to school in the community and settled down
to a normal life.   Many more good reports could be recorded.
In closing, may I express my sincere thanks to the many volunteers who have spent
so many hours with us, to the senior administration for their interest and support, and to
my staff for all their hard work. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 89
STATISTICAL INFORMATION
Population of the School, March 31st, 1958
On roll, April 1st, 1957  78
Girls admitted during April 1st, 1957, to March 31st, 1958- 66
— 144
Officially released (this includes 4 to correct an old error)- 75
Transferred to other institutions with subsequent official release from Girls' Industrial School	
Transferred to other institutions but not officially released
from Girls' Industrial School this year  	
— 75
Total unreleased, March 31st, 1958     69 o 90 british columbia
Financial Statement, 1957/58
Salaries  $111,368.31
Office expense  2,103.52
Travelling expense  1,006.24
Heat, light, power, and water  6,539.82
Medical services  6,497.61
Clothing and uniforms  3,640.24
Provisions and catering  19,504.13
Laundry and dry-goods  142.56
Good Conduct Fund  1,505.15
Equipment and machinery  916.78
Medical supplies  2,008.58
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  1,065.78
Transportation  1,314.43
Maintenance and operation of equipment  655.19
Vocational and recreational supplies, etc.  772.43
Incidentals and contingencies  508.02
$159,548.79
Less—
Board  $516.10
Sundry receipts     397.90
  914.00
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts  $158,634.79
Salaries and expenses  $159,548.79
Add salary revision         6,749.16
$166,297.95
Less credits  914.00
$165,383.95
Add decrease in inventory—
Inventory at March 31st, 1957- $6,154.63
Inventory at March 31st, 1958__    5,203.58
  951.05
$166,335.00
Add Public Works expenditure         9,537.53
Cost of operating School, 1957/58  $175,872.53
Per capita cost per diem: $175,872.53-^18,851=$9.33
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Winifred M. Urquhart,
Superintendent. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 91
PROVINCIAL HOME, KAMLOOPS
I submit herewith the annual report of the Provincial Home for the Aged and
Infirm, Kamloops, for the fiscal year 1957/58.
BUILDINGS
The exterior of the Home was completely decorated. The front entrance was renovated with a new approach and steps, all steeples removed and the centre roof changed
accordingly, and the old wooden portion was stuccoed. The Home was painted Bermuda
sand with green trimmings, and the fire-escapes red. The entire roof was reshingled with
black asphalt shingles. The outside entrances were rewired in order to flood-light the
fire-escapes. Improvements on the interior of the Home consisted of renovating and
decorating the offices, extra light switches, and some painting.
EQUIPMENT
New equipment received during the year was a bus wagon for the dining-room, a
griddle for the kitchen, a television set and air foam cushions for the sitting-room, and
a canvas stretcher.
ENTERTAINMENT
Concerts were presented by the High School Orchestra, Elks' Band, R.M.R. Band,
Shriners' Band, and Elks' Concert Party. Local organizations visited the Home and
presented concerts and held teas. Religious services were conducted by various denominations throughout the year.
GENERAL
Fire protection for the Home is of major importance, and the staff received lectures
and demonstrations for its prevention.   Total evacuation drills have also been exercised.
The medical and surgical services were again provided by the Irving Clinic and
proved satisfactory. The staff and inmates had their annual X-ray. The drugs and
medicines were purchased from the Provincial Pharmacy, with excellent service. No
epidemics were experienced throughout the year.
Ground-floor space is at a premium, as most rooms were gradually occupied by
patients from the sick ward. The staff and attending doctor have commended a programme whereby the patients are encouraged to care for themselves without injury or
hardship, receiving good care and encouragement, thereby vacating the sick ward and
occupying ground-level rooms. This also tends to give more time for better care to the
remaining patients, and it is hoped that two blind patients can be taught to care for themselves and move about the Home. Several acute cases had long periods in the Kamloops
Hospital, thereby increasing the over-all cost of the year's expenses. O 92 BRITISH COLUMBIA
FINANCIAL STATEMENT,  1957/58
Salaries   $90,871.94
Office expense  824.69
Travelling expense  51.90
Heat, light, power, and water  3,120.65
Medical services   9,134.85
Clothing and uniforms  3,643.33
Provisions and catering  33,264.32
Laundry and dry-goods  8,626.59
Equipment and machinery  926.15
Medical supplies  3,686.93
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  1,541.30
Transportation  372.94
Burials   2,470.00
Maintenance and operation of equipment  390.69
Incidentals and contingencies  1,347.18
$160,273.46
Less—
Board     $1,524.00
Rent  422.75
■         1,946.75
$158,326.71
Add salary revision         3,691.86
$162,018.57
Summary
Provincial Home expenditure  $162,018.57
Public Works expenditure       18,504.08
$180,522.65
Per capita cost per diem: $180,522.65-f-42,998=$4.20.
Pensions paid to Government Agent, Kamloops, $65,514.04. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 93
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts     $94,008.58
Add salary revision         3,691.86
$97,700.44
Add maintenance receipts—
Pensions  $65,514.04
Municipalities        5,250.13
Other collections       2,321.87
       73,086.04
$170,786.48
A dd Public Works expenditure       18,504.08
$189,290.56
Less—
Pensioners' comforts     $6,516.37
Proportion  of  excess   of  disbursements  over  receipts
for Tranquille Farm       2,251.54
  8,767.91
$180,522.65
I wish to thank all co-workers for their unfailing assistance and support in the
interest shown in the welfare of the Home.
Respectfully submitted.
G. P. Willie,
Superintendent. O 94 BRITISH COLUMBIA
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS BOARD
I herewith submit the annual report of the administration of the " Welfare Institutions Licensing Act " for the year 1957. As licences are issued on the basis of the calendar year, this report covers the period from January 1st, 1957, to December 31st, 1957.
LICENCES
The total number of cases dealt with during the year was 1,008. Included in this
number were 606 licensed institutions and 402 pending applications. Of the licensed
institutions, 70 closed during the year and 293 pending applications were closed or withdrawn. The total number of cases at December 31st, 1957, was 645, made up of 536
licensed institutions and 109 pending applications. Welfare institutions served 38,613
persons in 1957.
BOARD MEETINGS
There were eight Board meetings held during the year, which alternated between
Victoria and Vancouver. Previously all meetings were held in Vancouver, but as most
of the Board members live in Victoria this new arrangement is more satisfactory. There
were no changes in the personnel of the Board.
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS FOR CHILDREN
A. Full-time Care of Children
Institutions for Child-care
There are nine institutions licensed for the care of children, and no new licences were
issued during the year. These are fairly small institutions and, with the exception of two
which give boarding-home care, the other seven provide special services to children.
Mrs. Kathryn Buckett, who for many years was the able superintendent of St. Christopher's School, a school for the training of retarded boys, retired because of ill health.
Mrs. Buckett's work in this field will long be remembered by those of us who were privileged to work with her. St. Euphrasia's School is doing effective work in training of
emotionally disturbed and pre-delinquent girls. The school limits admissions to girls
between the ages of 12 and 15 years. All applications are carefully screened, and only
girls who can benefit from the programme are accepted. The school now has a psychiatrist working part time on the staff.
A committee, with representatives from the children's institutions, was set up late
in the year under the chairmanship of the Superintendent of Child Welfare. The purpose
of this committee is to look into present legislation as set down in the " Welfare Institutions Licensing Act " and regulations, and to ascertain whether this legislation is adequate
to meet the present and future needs of children in this Province. It is hoped also that
the committee will study the needs of children in our present-day society and, when these
needs are known, to decide what services should be established to meet them. During
the course of the study it may be learned that institutions are not giving all the service they
can to children and also other child-caring agencies may not be fully meeting the needs
of children for whom they assume responsibility. By meeting together and co-ordinating
their services and sharing experiences, these children's institutions will be able to serve all
children throughout the Province better.
Number of institutions licensed in 1957  9
Number of children cared for        468
Total days' care  91,446 < REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 95
Private Boarding Homes
During the year, fifty-four licensed homes were used as private boarding homes for
children. Placement is made by parents, who are responsible for payment, but in the
majority of cases a welfare agency is consulted before placement is made. In Vancouver
these homes are supervised by the two Children's Aid Societies, in Victoria by the Family
and Children's Service, and in the other parts of the Province by the Provincial field service staff.
The co-operation received from the newspapers in checking advertisements of homes
offering to board children is a great help in controlling this situation. In all, more than
200 advertisements were checked and referred to the agency concerned. Most of the
homes advertising to board children are of low or marginal standards, and consequently
very few can be used.
In Vancouver the Advisory Committee on Private Boarding Homes, under the chairmanship of the Senior Medical Health Officer, works continuously to improve the standard of care given children in these homes and also for better physical conditions.
The reasons why children are placed in private boarding homes are as follows:
Broken homes, illness or death of a parent, or economic when both parents must work.
Private boarding homes serve a twofold purpose—the parents keep full responsibility
for their children and maintain interest in their welfare. Parents know that the home where
their child is living is licensed and supervised.
Number of children's boarding homes licensed in 1957  54
Number of children cared for        155
Total days' care  33,089
B. Day Care of Children
Foster Homes for Day Care
Homes giving day care to children also require to be licensed. In Vancouver the
Foster Day Care Association, a Red Feather agency, provides this service for children of
working mothers. This agency refers the children to homes near their own home or near
the mother's place of work so that the child will not have too long a trip each day. Casework services are given by this agency when required.
Homes outside Vancouver giving day care are supervised by municipal or Provincial
social workers.
A good day-care programme for children of mothers who of necessity must work is
an essential and important service in any community. It is the means of keeping families
together and prevents children living apart from their parents.
Number of foster day-care homes licensed in 1957  35
Number of children cared for        277
Total days' care  23,879
Kindergartens, Play-schools, etc.
The interest with which pre-school education was welcomed to this Province has
never lagged. More schools were licensed during the year and there was an increase in
attendance.
The course of training for supervisors in pre-school centres has been defined and
is well accepted. Training for this work can be taken at the Adult Education Department of the Vancouver School Board, at Victoria College Evening Division Courses, the
Extension Department of the University of British Columbia, and this year at the evening classes of the Burnaby School Board. For those unable to attend these classes, a
correspondence course is offered by the Extension Department of the University of
British Columbia.   Since these courses have been started, there are more trained super- O 96 BRITISH COLUMBIA
visors available.   Many qualified supervisors also attend these courses in order to keep
up with the new ideas of programme and materials.
Conferences and workshops were sponsored during the year by the various preschool groups, and these were well attended.
The Advisory Committee on Pre-school Education, set up by the College of Education, met several times during the year to discuss pre-school matters. A course in
demonstration and methods of pre-school education was given the first three weeks in
July at the University and was sponsored by the College of Education and the extension
Department. This course is now given each year, and as the size of the class is limited
to twenty-five persons, it is necessary to register several weeks ahead in order to secure
a place.
Number of pre-school centres licensed in 1957  243
Number of children registered     11,022
Total days' care  883,865
Schools for Retarded Children
The interest in providing training centres for the retarded child is spreading to all
parts of the Province, and the number of these centres is increasing. The British Columbia Association for Retarded Children is responsible for stimulating this interest by keeping local groups advised of what is happening, by sponsoring courses of training for
teachers, and by arranging lectures by outstanding persons in this field.
The Provincial Government gives the same financial contribution for the education
of these children as is made for normal children. This grant is paid by the Government
to the British Columbia association. A local group, to be eligible for the grant, is
required to be a member of the British Columbia association. Many people engaged in
this work are of the opinion that retarded children should attend public school and
receive their training along with normal children. Classes for retarded children have
been established in public schools in some centres of the United States, but more study
and time is required to see if such a plan would be satisfactory and workable.
Number of schools licensed in 1957  13
Number of children registered        227
Total days' care  27,017
MATERNITY HOMES
There are three licensed homes for this type of care, and all are operated by church
organizations. These homes offer care and guidance to the unmarried mother. All
homes work most closely with the Children's Aid Societies and other welfare agencies.
The only rule of these homes is that any girl entering is required to accept casework
services from a welfare agency and all adoption placements are made by these agencies.
As there is an increase in the number of babies placed for adoption, and since these
babies are placed very young, the mother is able to leave the home shortly after confinement.   This leaves room to accommodate more girls who need this service.
The Salvation Army is planning a new home to replace Maywood, which is located
in an industrial area and is no longer suitable for the work. This new home is located
in a good residential district, with large grounds, which will give the necessary privacy.
This home should be ready before too long.
Number of homes licensed in 1957  3
Number of mothers cared for        319
Number of infants cared for        235
Total days' care (mothers and children)   29,309 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 97
AGED-CARE
Providing decent housing and care for our older population is one of our major
problems. Not only is this a major problem, but it is an increasing one as the percentage of older people is becoming greater. There are many ways in which this problem
is being met. However, it is generally agreed that older people should be kept in their
own homes as long as possible, but in order to do this, certain services must be brought to
the home. In many cases a visit from a nurse or an efficient housekeeper working a few
hours a day is all that is needed, and such services can be supplied cheaper than boarding
or nursing care.   There has been a beginning of these services in some communities.
In order to provide good housing for our older people in the lower-income group,
the Provincial Government, through the "Elderly Citizens' Housing Aid Act," gives
financial grants to non-profit organizations for this purpose. These grants are available
for self-contained housing units and boarding homes.
It is interesting to note that more than 50 per cent of the older people needing
boarding-home care were living in these non-profit homes this year. It is hoped that
before too long there will be accommodation in these homes for all who wish to go.
The new Swedish Rest Home was opened during the year in Burnaby. The home
is modern in architecture, attractive and comfortable, with private-room accommodation
for eighty guests. The former Swedish Rest Home, located in North Vancouver, was
closed to make way for a new bridge.
The privately operated homes still continue to give good service, and many older
people still prefer this type of home.
In the last few years much has been done in the field of housing and living arrangements for older people, but before this situation can be dealt with fully and adequately,
more detailed knowledge is required about the present and future needs of the various
types and kinds of housing required.   A study such as this is due in British Columbia.
Number of homes licensed during 1957  170
Number of persons cared for       3,765
Total days' care  803,705
UNEMPLOYED ADULTS
No new licences were issued for this type of care. In all there are five licensed
homes, four of which are for women and are under the direction of church groups. All
the comforts and privileges of home, along with kindly supervision and friendship of
other girls of the same age-group, are given. Here the older adolescent and the young
adult girl adjust with ease in these group-living homes. The homes are under the charge
of capable and understanding matrons, who are always willing to help the girls with their
problems and difficulties. More homes such as these should be opened in the large areas
such as Vancouver as the present ones are always filled to capacity.
The home for the rehabilitation of alcoholics (men) is operated by the Alcoholism
Foundation of British Columbia as part of its services. Admission to the home is voluntary, but all applicants agree to accept certain regulations of treatment and behaviour as
required by the foundation. A total of 139 men used the home during the year. The
results have been satisfactory and successful.
Number of homes licensed during 1957  5
Number of persons cared for        557
Total days' care  19,809 O 98 BRITISH COLUMBIA
SUMMER CAMPS
Give me the moon for a blanket,
Give me the stars overhead;
I'll make the hillside my doorstep,
I'll make the meadow my bed.
Camps were closed with the realization that this was a most successful year. More
camps were licensed, with more campers in attendance. Standards, both physical and
programme, are showing marked improvements. In order to secure older and better
trained senior counsellors, camps are now paying for this service.
The British Columbia Camping Association sponsored an institute for counsellors
this year and also, in co-operation with the Community Chest and Council of Greater
Vancouver, published a directory of camps. Any camp, no matter where located in the
Province, can be included in the directory if they will send information about the camp
to the directory committee. It is hoped that more Interior camps will take the advantage
of this offer and send in the required information in time.
The use of Medical Health Report Form No. P.N. 26 is quite general, and camps
report them as satisfactory. These forms are sent to the camps as a record for the
director.
Many boys and girls who would be unable to attend camp because of lack of funds
were given a camping holiday through the camp referral programme.
Camping is a good experience for all. It affords the experience of group living in
the out-of-doors and the programme of camping consists of all the activities, relationships,
interactions, and experience that enter into the life of the group. Camping has also become popular with older people, and many camps have camping sessions for this group
which are much enjoyed and most successful.
Number of summer camps licensed in 1957  73
Number of persons cared for     21,578
Total days' care  200,516
CONCLUSION
Sincere thanks and appreciation is extended to all who helped with the administration of this Act. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
O 99
Table I.—Showing a Comparative Summary of Information
Regarding Licensed Welfare Institutions
1954
1955
1956
1957
Children—Total Care (Excluding Summer Camps)
Number licensed-
10
50
549
146
657
174
129,976
35,053
50
3,369
13,578
172,693
194
10
58
500
150
596
189
92,264
37,316
58
3,765
15,861
149,616
222
10
59
452
142
516
171
89,678
38,058
67
4,214
16,736
165,867
221
8
33
5,637
180
104
9,636
162
237
781,558
21,374
19,628
163
2,510
3,645
761,642
5
75
504
17,338
3
115
278
209
26,307
9
54
Capacity—■
385
120
Number of children under care—
468
155
Number of days' care—
91,446
33,089
73
Summer Camps
4,891
21,578
200,516
243
Children—Day Care
Number licensed—
13
28
5,120
137
8,924
~254
712,808
18,201
150
2,222
3,299
664,429
4
58
390
16,825
3
115
219
225
26,240
32
5,295
154
8,640
Capacity—
6,310
227
140
Schools for retarded children  	
Number of children enrolled—
11,022
227
Schools for retarded children _  	
247
745,563
20,087
167
2,426
3,612
724,980
4
69
411
17,012
3
115
271
201
26,671
277
883,865
27,017
23,879
170
2,671
3,775
803,705
Number of attendance days-
Kindergartens  .	
Schools for retarded children _	
Adults—Infirm and Unemployable
Number licensed 	
Capacity...   ,	
Number of persons under care 	
Number of days' care	
Adults—Employable
Number licensed	
75
Number of persons under care   	
Number of days' care	
557
19,809
3
115
Women—Maternity
Number of persons under care—
Mothers	
319
Infants  	
235
29,309 O  100
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Case Load Showing the Total Number of Licensed Institutions
and Pending Applications, 1957
Licensed
Jan.1,1957
Licensed
in 1957
Licensed
Institutions
Closed in
1957
Total Cases
Licensed at
Dec. 31,1957
Licensed
Children—total care—
48
10
65
188
7
24
108
32
5
3
6
8
55
6
11
27
3
11
1
1
26
1
5
24
1
43
2. Institutions    	
9
72
Children—day care—
217
12
3. Foster day care	
Aged—■
30
111
34
Adults—employable.  	
5
3
Totals   	
490
116
70
536
Licensed January 1st, 1957
Licensed in 1957	
490
116
Closed
606
70
536
Pendine
Jan. 1,1957
New Cases
in 1957
Closed
in 1957
Total Pending
Dec. 31,1957
Licences Pending
Children—total care—
8
11
50
6
10
27
3
55
7
100
10
41
66
7
1
50
10
116
6
33
70
7
1
13
2. Institutions	
8
Children—day care—
1. Kindergarten   	
2. Schools for retarded children	
3. Foster day care    	
Aged—
34
10
18
23
2. Institutions - 	
Homes—maternity  	
Adults—employable _ 	
3
Totals	
115
287
293
109
Carried from January 1st, 1957
New cases — -	
115
287
Closed
402
293
109
Total Case Load
Licensed
Pending .
536
109
645 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 101
MEMBERS OF BOARD
The following are the members of the Welfare Institutions Board for 1957:—
Chairman: Mr. J. A. Sadler, Director of Welfare.
Members: Dr. A. A. Larsen, Consultant Epidemiologist, Department of Health
and Welfare; Mr. F. P. Levirs, Chief Inspector of Schools, Department of
Education;  Miss Ruby McKay, Superintendent, Child Welfare Division;
and Mr. A. A. Shipp, Assistant Administrator, Region II, Social Welfare
Branch.
Chief Inspector:   Mrs. Edna L. Page.
Respectfully submitted.
(Mrs.) Edna L. Page,
Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions. O  102 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PART IV.—MEDICAL SOCIAL WORK SERVICES
SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT, DIVISION OF
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
During the ten years since the introduction of antimicrobial therapy there has been
steady progress in the handling of tuberculosis in British Columbia. The usual recommended treatment period for patients receiving antimicrobial therapy is from eighteen
months to two years; however, patients ordinarily spend only a portion of this time in
hospital. In 1957 the total admissions to all treatment centres was 1,003*. Of these,
687 patients remained in hospital under seven months and over one-third remained three
months or less. Because the hospital treatment period is shorter, there has been a gradual
decline in the number of beds required for in-patient treatment. During the five years
from January 1st, 1953, to December 31st, 1957, the number of beds in operation by the
Division dropped from 935 to 521. It is anticipated that if the present trend continues,
it will be possible, probably during the latter part of 1958, to accommodate all patients
requiring hospital treatment in the Vancouver units, where 367 beds are in operation—
264 at Pearson unit and 103 at Willow Chest Centre. As a result of the decreased need
for treatment beds, the Division has already closed the two Victoria units, and during the
year has operated only one building at Tranquille. There is social service staff in each of
the in-patient treatment units.
The finding of previously unknown cases of tuberculosis in the community is one of
the most important aspects of tuberculosis control to-day, and during the year the Division
continued to accelerate its case-finding programme. This aspect of the total programme
for tuberculosis control does not directly involve the Social Service Department.
In anticipation of changes in the structure of the Tuberculosis Division and at the
same time to follow up the internal reorganization of the Social Service Department referred to in the previous annual report, there have been a number of changes in Social Service Department structure and function. These developments have resulted in improved
service to patients and more economical use of staff time. During the year Social Service
Department planning has been focused on the delineation of specific areas in which the
hospital social worker can help patients who experience difficulty with the social aspects
of the illness. In order to co-ordinate social service activity with total treatment, several
devices were used. A referral form was prepared so that other professional staff could
make use of the Department, at appropriate times, for the treatment of social and emotional problems which might otherwise hamper the patient's ability to make use of medical
treatment. In the short time that this form has been in use there are indications that in
addition to its being a valuable means of alerting the Department to the needs of the
patients, it is also an effective way of improving interdepartmental communication. During
the year a further major step was taken in interpretation and clarification of the Social
Service Department function within the hospital, when arrangements were made to place
recording of social service activity on the patients' medical records. The attempt was
made to have this recording concise and clearly related to the medical treatment plan.
In situations where intensive casework service was being carried on, an additional social
service record was maintained so that these cases could be studied in more detail by the
social worker and supervisor. Also, as part of the general plan to share social service
activity more completely with other hospital treatment staff, correspondence with Social
Welfare Branch offices and social agencies was placed on medical records.
During the year the total number of interviews by the staff in all units involving
casework service to patients was 3,007, and the number of conferences with other pro-
* Annual Report of Division of Tuberculosis Control for calendar year 1957. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O  103
fessional workers was 2,561. There was some monthly fluctuation in the number of casework interviews and conferences, but the actual volume of cases handled on a long-term
basis remained fairly constant throughout the year. At the same time there was a steady
monthly decrease in the number of interviews and conferences on an incidental service
basis. These involved such services as confirming financial eligibility for appliances. The
changing emphasis in the Department in demonstrated by the marked decrease in the
number of incidental services handled.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) M. MacInnis,
Casework Supervisor. O 104
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PART V.—ACCOUNTING DIVISION
The functions of the Accounting Division of the Department of Health and Welfare
are to control expenditures, process accounts for payment, account for revenue, forecast
expenditures, and prepare the Departmental estimates of revenue and expenditures in
their final form.
Percent
Service
Administration
Institutions
Field Service (or Casework service)
Maintenance of dependent children
Medical Service,drugs, optical, etc.
Social Allowances, Mothers' Allowances
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowances,
Disabled Persons' Allowances, and Supplementary
Social Assistance for the aged and handicapped
The gross expenditure of the Welfare Branch increased by $2,295,900 from
$26,592,160 in 1956/57 to $28,888,060 in 1957/58. This was an increase of 8.6 per
cent. Despite the increase, the breakdown into main services, as shown in the chart, is
almost unchanged.   The following table shows this clearly:—
Proportion of Total Welfare
Main Service
Administration
Institutions 	
Field service	
Expenditure
1956/57 1957/58
Maintenance of dependent children.
(Per Cent)
1.7
2.8
4.3
7.6
Medical services, drugs, optical, etc     10.0
Social Allowance, Mothers' Allowance     28.6
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowance,
Disabled Persons' Allowance, and supplementary social assistance for the aged and
handicapped        45.0
Totals  100.0
(Per Cent)
1.7
2.8
4.5
7.6
9.9
28.6
44.9
100.0 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH O 105
The allowances paid directly to the individuals receiving the benefit (Old-age Assistance, Disabled Persons' Allowance, Blind Persons' Allowance, and supplementary
assistance for the aged and handicapped, Social Allowance, and Mothers' Allowance)
formed 73.6 per cent of the total expenditure. Payments to foster-parents, health
services, institutional care, and the cost of social workers' services were 24.7 per cent
of the total expenditure. This left 1.7 per cent for pure administration, as shown in
the table.
During the year the Research and Statistics Section of the Accounting Division, in
conjunction with members of the Welfare Branch, continued to work on the development
of statistical reporting within the Branch. This included work on problem classification,
intake statistics, and a new Social Allowance application form.
The Mechanical Superintendent and his assistant made quarterly visits throughout
the Province, checking the mechanical conditions of all Welfare Branch motor-vehicles.
There were eighty-eight of these vehicles at March 31st, 1958, and during the year
1957/58 they travelled a total distance of 601,229 miles in all types of weather and
road conditions. In addition, during the year, the social workers operated ninety-five
privately owned vehicles on a mileage basis. They travelled a total of 378,647 miles
in the course of their daily duties.   The total mileage for the year was 979,876.
The Mechanical Supervisor continued to stress safety in the operation of Branch
vehicles on his trips throughout the Province.
The Chief Clerk in charge of the Welfare Accounting Section attended all in-service
training classes giving instructions to the student workers on accounting procedures
pertaining to the Welfare divisions.
The Departmental Comptroller and other members of the Accounting Division
attended the planning councils and Branch meetings, with continued discussion with
divisional heads on matters pertaining to expenditure throughout the Welfare Branch.
J. McDiarmid,
Departmental Comptroller.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1959
1,060-159-7034   

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