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DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS REPORT for the Year Ended December 31st 1958 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1959

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
REPORT
for the Year Ended December 31 st
1958
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1959  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual Report of the Department of
Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31st, 1958.
W. D. BLACK,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Victoria, B.C.  Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs
Victoria, B.C., February 6th, 1959.
The Honourable W. D. Black,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Annual Report of this Department
for the year ended December 31st, 1958.
The municipal tax base continues to grow, with the expansion from 1957 to 1958
being just over 10 per cent. The growth over the last five years can be seen from an
examination of the following table.
Growth in Combined Assessed Values and Taxes in Municipalities of
British Columbia
Assessed Values
Assessed Values Actually Taxed
Tax
Revenues
Year
All Properties
Taxable
Properties
School
Municipal
1954	
$1,625,968,580
2,108,458.383
2,432,313,912
2,765,873,099
3,047,766,854
$1,321,811,326
1,742,081,045
2,035,542,999
2,315,295,651
2,569,271,281
1
$842,093,330          $842,093,330
1,350,856,875    I    1,044,040,275
1,586,627,603    |    1,238,390,209
1.854.677.597     I     1.415.935.241
$53,784,569
1955  _ -
59,112,580
1956- -
66,418,657
1957 _ _	
78,811,653
1958	
2,061,406,644
1,562,991,738
86,000,0001
1 Estimate.
It is not possible to assign to each factor its specific contribution to this growth, but
part of it is due to new improvements being added year by year and part by a reassessment to bring the value of all properties to a common standard. While municipal tax
revenues have also increased during the same period, the rate of increase has not been as
rapid as the expansion in the assessed values.
It may be of some interest to know that, in so far as values of taxable properties are
concerned, approximately 75 per cent of the value of all such properties are within
municipal areas, even though the latter are confined to less than one-half of 1 per cent of
the land area of the Province. This percentage is surprisingly close to the percentage of
the population (80 per cent) living within municipal areas.
During the year approximately $11,815,000 in new debentures was approved. This
is a decrease of approximately $2,145,000 compared with 1957 and marks the first
decrease since 1952. The amount and purpose for which new debentures were approved
are set out below (Vancouver debentures do not require approval):—■
Distribution of Debenture Debt by Purposes for the Year 1958
Purpose
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Total
Civic projects 	
Electric light and power-
Hospitals .
Local improvementS-
Parks
Protection to persons and property-
Roads   —
Sewers  i	
Waterworks-
Miscellaneous-—
Totals
$774,000
1,132.500
568,014
100,000
127.000
864,000
457.500
40,000
$40,000
40,000
3.187.000
610,413
619,000
80,000
500,000
630,000
831,000
42,000
$4,063,014 | $6,579,413
$413,000
$413,000
$34,000
216,000
512,000
$762,000
$814,000
40,000
4,319.500
1,178,427
719,000
114,000
627,000
1,710,000
2,213,500
82,000
$11,817,427 A A 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The latest figures available for total debenture debt (exclusive of short-term capital
borrowings) as at December 31st, 1957, are summarized as follows:—
Total Debenture Debt as at December 3 1st, 1957
Issued, Sold,
and Outstanding
Unissued
and Unsold
Total
Cities _	
$38,110,219
41.350.404
$1,510,052
1.6S6.358
$39,620,271
43,016,762
7,219,373    |          1,172,100
8,391,473
$86,679,996    1        $4,348,510
127,190,088    |         1,350,000
$91,028,506
128,540,088
Grand totals     _	
$213,870,084    |       $5,698,510
1
$219,568,594
Short-term capital borrowings amounting to $648,193 were approved for eighteen
municipalities. This amount consists of $215,000 for five cities, $399,968 for nine
districts, $17,825 for one town, and $15,400 for three villages.
This Department has been advised by the Department of Finance of the Federal
Government that all semi-annual repayments have been made on loans which were
obtained under the provisions of the " Municipalities Improvement Assistance Act,
1938." These loans are guaranteed by the Province. As at January 1st, 1959, the
total amount outstanding is $397,561, comprising five cities, $69,306; three districts,
$82,286; two villages, $12,054; two improvement districts, $18,554; and the Greater
Vancouver Water District, $215,361.
Pursuant to the " Municipalities Assistance Act," authority has been given for the
Province to guarantee the principal and interest of debenture issues amounting to
$3,001,775, as follows:—
Cities  - - $1,156,000
Districts     1,081,775
Towns  '.        413,000
Villages         351,000
Total  $3,001,775
During 1958 the principal and interest of four debenture issues totalling $200,000
for four villages have been guaranteed by the Province pursuant to the " Village
Municipalities Assistance Act." The amount which should be outstanding, providing
all payments due have been made, as at December 31st, 1958, is $7,474,300. Thirty-six
villages have availed themselves of the provisions of this Act since its introduction in 1945.
During the early part of 1958 there were hopeful signs that the marketing of
municipal debentures would, as far as the municipalities are concerned, be easier than
it had been for some time. However, as the year progressed, the situation deteriorated
rather badly, and the prospects, certainly for the first half of 1959, do not look particularly promising.
At the end of 1957, reserve funds amounted to $8,773,807, which is a decrease
from the previous year of $131,715.
Two routine inquiries were held into applications for certificates of approval to
money by-laws.   In both cases the certificates were granted. ,   ■■  :
.During 1958 thirty-five municipalities were granted certificates of self-liquidation
in respect of thirty-one utility systems and eighteen other municipal enterprises. Subsisting certificates of self-liquidation are necessary where the values of utility systems and
other municipal enterprises are to be included in calculating the statutory maximum
amount which may be borrowed by a municipality.
J REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS AA 7
During the year the Pollution-control Board held eight meetings and granted six
permits for the discharge of sewerage or industrial waste materials into the Fraser River
or sea-waters adjacent to the Lower Mainland. The Municipality of Richmond appealed
to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council from the decision of the Board in regard to the
permit issued to the Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District for the use of
Iona Island as a site for a treatment plant and the waters of Sturgeon Bank as the receiving waters for the effluent from the plant. The permit was confirmed, subject to certain
additional requirements placed upon the sewerage district.
The training programme in municipal administration being provided by the University of British Columbia under the sponsorship of the Department is continuing with full
enrolment in so far as the facilities permit. The continued interest in the course is
gratifying and a credit to the many municipal employees who are enrolled or have completed the course. It is of interest to note that several municipal officials have seen fit
to enrol for further study to enable them to qualify in both the financial and administrative sides of municipal work.
The total enrolment for the 1958/59 year is made up of: First year, 61; second
year, 41; third year, 26; and fourth year, 27.
The Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration of the University of British
Columbia conducted a combined institute at the University in May, 1958, for all four
years of the course, and the results of the examinations were as follows: Completing
first year, 31; second year, 27; third year, 23; and fourth year, 18.
Junior and senior diplomas were granted by the University to all students successfully completing the second and fourth years of the course respectively.
The Board of Examiners constituted in accordance with Part XXVII of the
" Municipal Act" completed its study relating to certification of municipal officers
and recommended new regulations governing the subject. The new regulations were
approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council and were published in The British
Columbia Gazette—Part II, June 12th, 1958, as B.C. Reg. 49/58.
The old regulations, as published in The British Columbia Gazette, March 27th,
1952, page 942, were rescinded.
The Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Municipal Officers' Association was held
in Victoria on May 26th, 27th, and 28th, 1958. Of particular interest were panel discussions on the subjects of budgeting and business tax. Two of the addresses which were
given covered auditing and fund accounting and superannuation. Certain amendments
to the new " Municipal Act " were discussed, which resulted in clarification of the points
involved.
Among other things, two matters of major importance were considered by the delegates to the annual convention of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities held at
Nanaimo toward the end of September. These were the incorporation of the union under
the " Societies Act " and Provincial-Municipal fiscal relations.
One community, the Village of Taylor, was incorporated during 1958, for which
Letters Patent were issued on August 23rd. The area of the village is 507.2 acres and
has an estimated population of 750.
In 1958, extensions of areas were granted to the Cities of Kimberley and Prince
George and the Villages of Castlegar, Creston, Keremeos, and New Denver. AA 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The following table shows the increases in area as well as population:—
Area (in Acres)
Population
Municipality
Before
Extension of
Area
Contained in
Area Added
After
Extension of
Area
Before
Extension of
Area
Contained in
Area Added
After
Extension of
Area
Cities
Kimberley 	
Prince George.	
Villages
Castlegar 	
Creston. ' -
1,068.0
2,548.0
466.0
696.2
403.0
124.0
58.0
2,298.8
10.7
120.0
146.0
215.0
1,126.0
4,846.8
476.7
816.2
549.0
339.0
5,774
10,563
1,705
1,844
457
736
37
9
376
17
5,774
10,600
1,714
2,220
474
736
With the exception of Keremeos, the populations shown above are the 1956 Census
plus additions brought about by extensions to areas since then to December 31st, 1958.
For Keremeos the population is as estimated at the date of incorporation plus the population in the area added.
The boundaries of the Village of Chapman Camp were redefined to make for greater
certainty as to their location.
During 1958, Letters Patent were issued for four municipalities which provided for
a change in their classification. Kaslo, Slocan, and Salmon Arm were changed from a city
to a village, and Fort St. John from a village to a town.
Six local areas have been established under the provisions of the " Local Services
Act." Brocklehurst and Taylor were established for the purpose of community planning,
Oyama and Terrace for fire protection, and Courtenay and Parksville-Qualicum for home
nursing care.
A large number of changes were made to the " Municipal Act," but all except two
or three were of a " housekeeping " nature, intended to remove any doubt or ambiguity
in regard to the meanings of the sections amended. Policy changes were largely confined
to the part dealing with shopping hours, where the net effect was to place more responsibility upon Councils, and to the section empowering Councils to enter into contractual
arrangements where the contract period extended beyond the fiscal year.
Other significant changes or additions enacted by the 1958 Session of the Legislature
which affected municipalities are as follows:—
"Assessment Equalization Act, 1953."—The steps to be taken on appeal to the
Supreme Court have been clarified and allow an appeal to the Court of Appeal.
"Hospital Act."—As of the 1st day of April, 1958, the municipal per diem grants
to hospitals were discontinued.
" Motor-vehicle Act."—An item of interest to municipalities is the introduction of
a section designed to give the municipal authorities jurisdiction over those aspects of
traffic-control which are essentially local in nature.
"Municipalities Assistance Act."—This is a new Act which provides authority for
and conditions under which the Province may guarantee the payment of the principal and
interest on debentures issued to finance sewer and water projects.
" Village Municipalities Assistance Act."—The amendments are for clarification.
There is no change in Provincial guarantees on securities of village municipalities.
An innovation in municipal legislation was the introduction of the " Municipalities
Enabling and Validating Act," which now provides a legislative vehicle for the validation
of municipal acts requiring special authorization or endorsement, and also for conferring
special powers upon any particular municipality where such are needed. This method
of conferring special powers on individual municipalities removes the possibility that such REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
AA 9
powers will be overlooked with the passage of time, as this particular Act will always be
brought forward into each new revision of the Statutes.
"Municipal Superannuation Act."—This Act incorporates the provisions of a new
municipal superannuation plan, agreed upon between representatives of employers and
employees and approved by the consulting actuary. Provision is made for Government
assistance in the form of an interest guarantee as well as an annual contribution decreasing
to zero in twenty years.   The former " Municipal Superannuation Act " has been repealed.
" Public Schools Act."—This Act replaces the former " Public Schools Act." Many
terms and procedures are in principle virtually the same as contained in the " Municipal
Act."
" Greater Nanaimo Water District Act."—The areas which may come into the district have been revised. The amending Act of 1957 was not proclaimed and has been
repealed.
" Greater Nanaimo Sewerage and Drainage Enabling Act."—This Act is designed
to allow the Greater Nanaimo Water District to plan sewerage and drainage works to
serve the territory within and in the vicinity of The Corporation of the City of Nanaimo
and the Harewood Improvement District.
" Victoria City Act, 1958."—Certain changes were made in the procedures with
regard to elections contained in the 1921 Act of the city.
In midsummer Mr. J. H. Doughty-Davies retired on superannuation following a
number of years of service in the Planning Division, latterly as Director. Mr. D. South,
the Assistant Director, has been promoted to head up the Division. The staff continued
to carry out their duties in the prompt and efficient manner, which, I believe, is now
widely recognized. Once again I would like to express my thanks to the municipal
officials, both elected and appointed, for their continued courtesy and assistance, to the
members of the executive and executive director of the Union of British Columbia
Municipalities, to the departmental heads and staff of the other departments of Government, and to you, Sir, for your direction and encouragement.
J. E. BROWN, F.C.I.S.,
Deputy Minister.
■ ■
■ AA  10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF MUNICIPALITIES
Victoria, B.C., February 5th, 1959.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—Now that the " Municipal Act," as enacted in 1957, has been in operation for
a reasonable period, it seems opportune to make some observations as to its effect as seen
from the view-point of members of the Department.
Although the general index printed with the Act is not required to the same extent
as it was for the old Act, due to the new arrangements of Parts and Divisions, it has been
found that the index as prepared is inadequate. The amendments of 1958 were consolidated, for convenience only, and a reprint issued in May of this year, and this alone
required a complete review of the index material. Because of this, the Municipal Officers'
Association, at the suggestion of the Department, agreed to and formed a special committee to compile a new and comprehensive index. When the proposed index is received
from the Municipal Officers' Association, consideration will be given to having it published for general distribution with the " Municipal Act."
One of the features in compiling the new Act was the reallocation of approving and
authorizing authorities. With the thought in mind of the importance of a subject-matter
requiring approval or consent, an assessment was made of the relation of the approving
authority to the subject. The first step was to remove wherever practicable the necessity
of a municipality having to ask for and obtain approvals. This was generally accomplished by requiring a two-thirds majority for certain actions of Council which hitherto
had required other approvals.   This step, of course, increased local autonomy.
Another device was to assess certain cases and wherever possible eliminate reference
to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council and substitute the Minister of Municipal Affairs.
These two simple changes alone have resulted in better administrative procedures and
have reduced a great deal of the administrative burden formerly imposed on the Executive
Council, the municipalities, and the Department. An examination of the number of
Minutes of Council prepared in 1958 may appear to refute this statement, but it must be
borne in mind that the transition period required considerable extra work, and, of course,
we have more municipalities now than in 1957 as well as an ever-increasing municipal
population.
The following is a compilation of some of the major activities of the Department
during 1958:—
(1) One hundred and thirty-five visits were made to municipalities. The number of municipalities actually visited was 107, some receiving more than
one visit.
(2) Two hundred and fifty-one Minutes of Council were prepared and subsequently approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
(3) Eighty-three certificates of approval for municipal loan by-laws were
issued. A few of these were cancelled during the year due to the subsequent amendment of the by-law concerned. A new certificate to the
by-law as amended was issued in each of these cases.
(4) Sixty-one debenture issues were examined and subsequently certified by
the Inspector of Municipalities, consisting of 12,151 debentures of a total
par value of $11,817,427.64.
(5) Six hundred and eleven by-laws were examined and registered. Of this
total, forty-four were town by-laws and 567 were village by-laws. Many
of these by-laws required advice and correspondence, resulting in resubmission in revised form. REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
AA  11
(6) Hundreds of draft by-laws and similar documents were submitted for
review and comment, involving considerable correspondence.
(7) Publication of the Annual Report of Municipal Statistics.
(8) Editing the financial and statistical returns of the municipalities to ensure
conformity with statutory and other requirements.
(9) By correspondence and by personal visits to the various municipalities,
encouraging the adoption of good accounting procedures.
It seemed a year or so ago that the question of late returns for financial reporting
of municipalities was a thing of the past, but to some extent the year 1958 has proved
otherwise. The majority of municipal officials and auditors are worthy of the highest
praise for their co-operation, and there were cases where the delay was the result of
extenuating circumstances. In some, however, one can only come to the conclusion that
there are a few municipal officials and auditors who make no real effort to comply with
statutory requirements. Aside from the disregard of the law concerning the filing of
financial reports and returns with the Inspector of Municipalities is the unfortunate
attitude of non-co-operation. Acknowledging that there may be staff limitations in certain
cases, I must point out that this staff cannot get the work out, assist the municipal officials
on a day-to-day basis, and carry out visits in the field unless the statistical work load can
be dealt with expeditiously in an orderly fashion, and unless certain reports are received
on time and are accurate as to content. Lack of current facts and figures in this office
ultimately works a hardship on the municipalities themselves.
The first city submitting complete financial returns in 1958 was Merritt (now a village); the first district, Kent; and the first village, Gibsons Landing. Municipal officials
and auditors concerned are asked to assist us by early and accurate reporting for the 1958
operations.
The fourth meeting of the Continuing Committee of the Dominion-Provincial Council on Municipal Statistics held in Ottawa on April 28th, 1958, was attended by the
undersigned. The time was devoted chiefly to the preparation of recommendations to
be placed before the Seventh Dominion-Provincial Conference held in Ottawa September
15th to 18th, 1958. I attended as the representative from British Columbia, and the main
purpose of the conference was to give final consideration and approval to recommended
amendments to the Manual of Instructions on Municipal Accounting, Reporting and
Terminology prior to its revision.
In the latter part of the year this Department was made responsible for the general
administration on a Provincial level of the Municipal Winter Works Incentive Programme
instituted by the Government of Canada.
The programme allows for the reimbursement to the municipalities by the Canadian
Government of 50 per cent of the direct labour costs on approved projects, whether done
by contractors or sub-contractors for a municipality.
From the inception of the original offer in November, certain modifications and
a broadening of the programme have taken place from time to time. Because of this,
certain projects which were originally not acceptable have on resubmission been accepted.
Improvement districts, joint municipal operations, and districts such as the Greater Vancouver Water District are deemed municipalities for the purposes of the programme.
Due to the fact that the offer extends to direct payroll costs incurred on approved
projects from December 1st, 1958, to April 30th, 1959, inclusive, I am giving a progress
report on the programme at this time.
As at February 6th, 1959, the following is the listing of numbers of projects for
which approvals have been mailed to municipalities following acceptance by the Canadian
authority:— AA  12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Twenty-two cities with  92 projects
Nineteen districts with  53      „
One town with       3      „
Ten villages with  24      „
One improvement district with       1      „
Three greater districts with       8      „
Total  181
The following table gives a summary of our municipalities' participation on an overall basis as at February 6th, 1959, with a comparison to the totals for all Provinces:—
British Columbia Canada
Applications received  191 1,462
Applications accepted  186 1,395
Applications rejected or pending  5 67
Estimated total cost of projects  $6,681,000        $57,272,000
Estimated total direct payroll cost of
projects  $3,173,000        $20,958,000
Estimated cost of work undertaken
under projects   $4,477,000        $41,694,000
Estimated direct payroll cost of work
undertaken under projects  $1,990,000        $15,656,000
Estimated Federal Government share
of direct payroll costs       $928,000 $7,751,000
Estimated number of extra men to be
hired   1,975 22,712
Estimated extra man-days' work to be
provided        114,478 1,226,358
It is fitting at this time to express our appreciation of the very close co-operation
and assistance received by the Department on behalf of the municipalities from the
officials of the Canadian Department of Labour. No effort has been spared by them in
dealing expeditiously with applications for approval of the winter projects.
A continuing interest is maintained by the Department in statistics relating to the
collection of taxes by the municipalities in an effort to detect, if possible, any signs which
seem to reflect a progressive trend toward losses of revenue required to meet the demands
of the present and future.
Our records show that, with few exceptions, percentage collections of both current
and arrears of taxes have continued to improve. The ability of the property-owner to
meet the tax demand is, of course, of prime importance, but a feature which is deserving
of recognition is the improved methods of collection instituted by various Treasurers and
Collectors. The importance of this phase of administration is now receiving the attention
it deserves from the municipal officers. Through the exchange of ideas amongst the
officials in the municipalities, in which we have been happy to participate, there is a continuing improvement in tax-collecting procedures which has resulted in a better financial
position for many of our municipalities.
The following tables reflect the improvement noted above:—
Table I shows for the years 1936 to 1957, inclusive, the percentage of current taxes
collected, total collections as a percentage of the current levy, and outstanding taxes as
a percentage of the current levy for all cities (except Vancouver), districts, villages, and
Vancouver.
Table II shows the outstanding taxes as a percentage of the current levy of cities,
districts, and villages for the years shown. T _, „ T _
J. D. L5AIRD, r.L.l.o,,
Supervisor of Municipalities. REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
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05 105 10(5 105 105 I 05>
- Os m os vd r- REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS A A  15
REPORT OF THE ACTING-DIRECTOR, REGIONAL
PLANNING DIVISION
Victoria, B.C., February 4th, 1959.
J. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
COMMUNITY PLANNING
Sir,—Although the authority to adopt an official community plan has been in the
Statutes since 1925, when the " Town Planning Act " was first passed, very little effective
use has been made of this legislation. It has been, I believe, overshadowed by the success of zoning which was declared constitutional in the United States in 1926. Municipalities in British Columbia followed the American practice to the extent that the myth arose
that if a municipality was zoned, it was planned.   Planning became zoning.
Most of the older municipalities in the Province have now adopted the usual regulatory by-laws, such as zoning and subdivision, which guide physical development of the
community. Likewise, newly established municipalities are showing interest in adopting
these by-laws. There is now, I am glad to report, a growing awareness that the existence
of these regulations do not in themselves ensure a desirable community. Helpful though
these by-laws are, they do not prevent a municipality from acquiring an expensive and
inadequate road system, they do not point the way to mould the best land use in the
future, and they do not reserve land for future municipal needs. The effective use of the
official community plan, particularly in those municipalities which still have large unsub-
divided parcels of land, can do much toward creating orderly and efficient development.
The Division is preparing official community plans for three small municipalities.
One of these municipalities has had a zoning by-law since 1946 and has found that while
private land uses are being segregated into what will eventually be an orderly pattern,
the road system is developing in a haphazard manner, and they have requested that we
develop a road plan as part of an official community plan. Some of the larger municipalities which have planning staffs are also preparing official community plans.
The Division prepared draft by-laws dealing with community planning for many
small municipalities and has reviewed many more prior to registration. A growing number of municipalities are adopting the National Building Code of Canada by reference
in their building by-laws. I think this is a gratifying trend because small municipalities
in particular when attempting to draft their own building code have omitted specifications
dealing with heavier construction. In the long run I think the use of the National Building Code will create a better quality of buildings and give manufacturers of building
supplies a chance to standardize their products.
Last spring I had the opportunity to speak to the annual Assessors' course held in
Victoria and to the short-course planning students at the University of British Columbia.
I also was selected as a member of the Special Committee on Housing to the Associate
Committee on the National Building Code and attended the first meeting in Ottawa last
September.
I am happy to report that interest in community planning in small municipalities
remains very high. Although we could not visit all of those places requesting advice, we
are trying to reduce the backlog as quickly and effectively as possible.
REGULATED AND LOCAL AREAS
Building permits for construction valued at almost $7,500,000 were issued in 1958.
This is the highest amount recorded for a year since the regulated areas were formed in
1947.   Five hundred and thirty-one dwelling units were built.   This is almost the same AA 16 BRITISH COLUMBL4.
as the record number of 535 built in 1955. The two greatest centres of activity in construction were in the Kelowna Regulated Area, where 124 dwelling units were built,
almost twice the number built last year, and in View Royal, where forty-five dwelling
units were built, in contrast to a total of nineteen last year. In order to give better service
to the public, the Kelowna Regulated Area received the full-time attention of the Building Inspector, and his duties in Vernon Regulated Area were taken over by a new part-
time Inspector. The office in View Royal, which had been open two mornings a week,
was closed, and the residents of View Royal can now get office service five days a week
at the general office of the Division.
The total construction to date in regulated and local areas is about $46,860,000,
and 4,465 dwelling units have been constructed, enough housing to accommodate a community about the size of the City of North Vancouver.
The proportion of owner-built dwelling units to contractor-built ones is roughly
five to one, the same as last year. This proportion is significant in comparison with more
urbanized areas, where the Inspector is usually engaged in routine inspection of contractors' work. In our regulated and local areas the owner-builder's house requires not
only inspection, but a generous measure of necessary supervision and advice.
Two local areas at Taylor and Brocklehurst have been established under the " Local
Services Act." These local areas are identical in function to regulated areas which were
created under the now repealed " Town Planning Act," and their regulations are created
from the authority of Part XXI (Community Planning) of the " Municipal Act." The
Division has been revising the regulations for local areas in order to ensure that they will
give maximum service.
Requests for the establishment of local areas establishing community planning regulations have come in from at least six communities in unorganized territory in the past year.
Building Permits for Regulated and Local Areas, 1958
Value of All
Regulated areas—                                    Established "in i958lon
Kelowna  1947 $1,637,996
Vernon  1947 371,316
Connaught Heights  1948 59,175
View Royal     1948 471,023
North Saanich     1948 428,250
Prince George District  1949 279,560
Nanaimo District  1949 2,135,671
Kamloops District  1950 1,318,750
Quesnel District  1952 96,676
Alberni  1953 	
Woodhaven    1954 17,368
Dawson Creek  1954 313,647
Campbell River  1955 17,496
Thetis  1955 12,250
Local areas—
Taylor  1957 203,823
Brocklehurst  1958 135,636
Totals for year 1958  $7,498,637 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
AA 17
Dwelling Units Built in Regulated and Local Areas
1947
1            I
1948 1 1949 1 1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
Total
Regulated areas—
Kelowna  	
Vernon  —
Connaught Heights .
129
15
	
167  |    116
51  [      29
18 |       6
7 |      20
17  |      58
1        8
1    170
  1	
|
43
28
3
25
39
46
152
24
15
4
20
26
75
120
24
11
9
5
16
25
189
81
35
8
20
29
22
6
19
33
93
83
63
9
33
35
18
8
26
18
44
91
78
5
27
1
13
50
14
3
18
32
31
107
90
10
25
1
1
149
1
3
70
14
4
12
39
23
99
60
14
21
5
3
1
65
35
7
19
36
57
108
52
13
10
3
4
17
	
124
25
1
45
40
28
131
72
11
3
20
2
14
14
863
275
65
227
363
Prince George District -
594
1,142
Kamloops District	
474
59
147
4
Woodhaven _  ...
14
202
2
Nakusp — 	
Thetis ---	
Local areas—
3
2
14
Brocklehurst— 	
14
Totals —	
144
260 |    407
336
308
399
390 |    364
1
535
365
426
531
4,465
Don South,
A cting-Director.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1959
f 60-359 7851   

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