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Minister of Mines PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT For the Year Ended 31st December 1957 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1959

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 Minister of Mines
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year Ended 31st December
1957
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1958 BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES
VICTORIA, B.C.
Hon. W. K. Kiernan, Minister.
John F. Walker, Deputy Minister.
H. C. Hughes, Chief Inspector of Mines.
G. Cave-Browne-Cave, Chief Analyst and Assayer.
Hartley Sargent, Chief, Mineralogical Branch.
P. J. Mulcahy, Chief Gold Commissioner and Chief Commissioner,
Petroleum and Natural Gas.
J. D. Lineham, Chief, Petroleum and Natural Gas Conservation Branch. To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Mining Industry of the Province for the year 1957 is
herewith respectfully submitted.
W. K. KIERNAN,
Minister of Mines.
Minister of Mines' Office,
May, 1958. Cecil George Hewlett, Associate Geologist with the British
Columbia Department of Mines, fell from the headwall of a glacial
cirque and was killed instantly on August 14th, 1957. The accident occurred on Monument Peak, in the Purcell Mountains west
of Invermere within the Mineral King mine area where, with a
field assistant, Dr. Hewlett was engaged in geological mapping.
Dr. Hewlett is survived by his father, mother, and two sisters, his
wife, Catharine, and their sons, John Phillip, born in November,
1956, and Andrew Cecil, born in February, 1958.
Dr. Hewlett was born in Kelowna in 1926 and received his
schooling there and in England. He obtained a B.A.Sc. degree in
geological engineering from the University of British Columbia in
1949, an M.Sc. from Queen's University, and a Ph.D. from the
University of Wisconsin in 1954. In the course of his training he
spent one summer with the Geological Survey of Canada and five
summers with New Jersey Zinc Company. He joined the staff of
the Department of Mines as Assistant Geologist in 1953, and became Associate Geologist in 1956. In 1956 he became a member
of the British Columbia Association of Professional Engineers.
He was named the winner of the Peacock Memorial Prize in 1956,
given for the best Canadian scientific paper on pure or applied
mineralogy. From 1952 to 1956 he was associated with J. T.
Fyles in detailed mapping in the Salmo-Pend d'Oreille River area,
south of Nelson. He had started geological mapping in the Mineral
King mine area at the beginning of the 1957 field season. CONTENTS
Page
Introduction    A 7
Review of the Mineral Industry    A 8
Statistics—
Method of Computing Production  A 10
Table I.—Total Mineral Production for All Years Up to and Including 1957 A 14
Table II.—Production for Each Year from 1836 to 1957, Inclusive  A 14
Table III.—Quantity and Value of Mineral Products for Years 1948 to 1957 A 15
Table IV (Graph).—Mineral Production Value, 1895-1957  A 17
Table V (Graph).—Principal Lode-metals Production, 1913-57  A 18
Table VI.—Production of Principal Metals, 1858-1957  A 19
Table VIIa.—Production, 1956 and 1957, by Mining Divisions—Summary.. A 21
Table VIIb.—Production, 1956 and 1957, by Mining Divisions—Principal
Lode Metals   A 22
Table VIIc.—Production, 1956 and 1957, by Mining Divisions—Miscellaneous Metals      A 23
Table VIId.—Production, 1956 and 1957, by Mining Divisions—Industrial
- Minerals  A 24
Table VHe.—Production, 1956 and 1957, by Mining Divisions—Structural
Materials   A 25
Table VIIIa.—Production to Date by Mining Divisions—Summary  A 26
Table VIIIb.—Production to Date by Mining Divisions—Principal Lode
Metals  A 27
Table  VIIIc.—Production  to  Date  by  Mining  Divisions—Miscellaneous
Metals   A 28
Table VIIId.—Production to Date by Mining Divisions—Industrial Minerals A 30
Table VIIIe.—Production to Date by Mining Divisions—Structural Materials A 32
Table IXa.—Quantity (Gross) and Value of Coal per Year to Date  A 33
Table IXb.—Coal Production (Gross) by Districts and Mining Divisions  A 33
Table IXc—Quantity and Value of Coal Sold and Used, 1947-57  A 34
Table X.—Coke and By-products Production for Years 1895 to 1925 and
1926 to 1957    A 35
Table XL—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1957  A 36
Table XII.—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for Mining Operations
of All Classes  A 40
Table XIII.—Average Number Employed in the Mining Industry, 1901-1957 A 41
Table XIV.—Lode-metal Mines—Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and Gross
Value of Principal Metals, 1901-57  A 42
Table XV.—Lode-metal Producers in 1957  A 43
Table XVI.—Lode-metal Mines Employing an Average of Ten or More Men
during 1957   A 48
Departmental Work    A 49
Administration Branch *  A 49
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)  A 49
Mining Divisions Amalgamated since 1949  A 50
List of Gold Commissioners  A 50
Gold Commissioners' and Mining Recorders' Office Statistics, 1957  A 51
Coal, Petroleum and Natural Gas    A 52
Mining Laws and Laws Relating to the Mineral Industry  A 53
Analytical and Assay Branch    A 53
Inspection Branch  A 56
Mineralogical Branch   A 57
A 5 A 6 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1957
Departmental Work—Continued
Page
Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch  A 58
Grub-staking Prospectors   A 59
Museums   A 60
Rock and Mineral Specimens  A 60
Publications   A 61
Maps Showing Mineral Claims, Placer Claims, and Placer-mining Leases  A 61
Joint Offices of the British Columbia Department of Mines and the Department of Mines and Technical Surveys, Canada  A 61
Topographic Mapping and Air Photography  A 62
Department of Mines and Technical Surveys  A 63
Geological Survey of Canada  A 63
Field Work by the Geological Survey in British Columbia, 1957  A 63
Publications of the Geological Survey  A 64
Mines Branch  A 64
Lode Metals   1
Placer   73
Structural Materials and Industrial Minerals  76
Petroleum and Natural Gas  96
Inspection of Lode Mines, Placer Mines, and Quarries  103
Coal  119
Inspection of Electrical Equipment and Installations  147
Lode Metal Deposits Referred to in the 1957 Annual Report  157
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Photographs
The " Bird Cages " in old Victoria  A 55
The original Legislative Assembly building, with one added wing, on the lawn of the
Parliament Buildings  A 55
Bethlehem Copper Corporation Ltd., Highland Valley :  25
Trojan Consolidated Mines Ltd., Highland Valley  25
Victoria shaft and ore-bins of the Granby company, Phoenix, in 1907  39
Victoria shaft, Phoenix, just before the headframe was demolished in 1957  39
The Heinze smelter on the Columbia River at the mouth of Trail Creek in 1896  42
The Trail smelter and metallurgical works, 1949  42
Rawhiding ore at the True Fissure, Lardeau, 1914  55
The Noble Five aerial tram-line at Cody in 1952, the last year it was operated  55
Cement works at Bamberton, under construction in 1912  89
British Columbia Cement Company Limited plant at Bamberton to-day  89
The McMahon plant at Taylor and Westcoast Transmission Company Limited
pipe-line right of centre  98
Huntingdon metering station, the southern end of the Westcoast natural-gas pipeline  98
figure Drawings
1. McLeese-Cuisson Lakes area  15
2. Takomkane Mountain  19
3. Cowichan Copper Co. Ltd.—"E " zone on 1340 level and possible extension on
1100 level   70
4. Average dust counts obtained each year since 1937  114
I ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTER
OF MINES, 1957
Introduction
A Report of the Minister of Mines of the Province of British Columbia has been
published each year since 1874.
The Annual Report records the salient facts in the progress of the mineral industry,
also much detail about individual operations, including those undertaken in the search
for, exploration of, and development of mineral deposits, as well as the actual winning
of material from mineral deposits.
The Annual Report of the Minister of Mines now contains introductory sections
dealing with Statistics and Departmental Work, followed by sections dealing with Lode
Metals; Placer; Structural Materials and Industrial Minerals; Petroleum and Natural Gas;
Inspection of Lode Mines, Placer Mines, and Quarries; Coal; and Inspection of Electrical
Equipment and Installations at Mines and Quarries, each with its own table of contents.
A table listing the properties described, in geographic groupings, precedes the index.
An introductory review of the mineral industry and notes at the first of several of
the main sections deal generally with the industry or its principal subdivisions. Notes in
the various sections deal briefly with exploration or production operations during the
year or describe a property in more complete detail, outlining the history of past work and
the geological setting as well as describing the workings and the mineral deposits exposed
in them.    Some notes deal with areas rather than with a single property.
The work of the branches of the Department is outlined briefly in the section on
Departmental Work. This section is followed by notes dealing briefly with the work of
other British Columbia or Federal Government services of particular interest to the
mineral industry of British Columbia. Information concerning mine operations and
some of the activities of the Inspection Branch of the Department of Mines is contained
in the section on Inspection of Lode Mines, Placer Mines, and Quarries, early in the
section on Coal and in the section on Inspection of Electrical Equipment and Installations
at Mines and Quarries.
The section on Statistics begins with an outline of current and past practice in
arriving at quantities and calculating the value of the various products.
A 7 Review of the Mineral Industry in British
Columbia, 1957
The end of 1957 was the eve of British Columbia's centennial, but the centennial of
the mining industry was some years earlier. Coal was mined on Vancouver Island for
twenty-two years before 1858, the year of establishment of the colony of British Columbia.
Available records do not give the yearly production, but show a total of 41,871 long tons
of coal, valued at $149,548, mined from 1836 to 1859. Placer-gold production started
with the rush of 1858 and in the first year was valued at $705,000. The production of
placer gold increased rapidly each year until 1865, when it reached its maximum of
$3,491,205. The early mining of coal and placer gold made a major contribution to the
economy, and the search for placer led to the rapid exploration of much of the colony.
Mining in its various forms has continued to be of prime economic importance for the
past 100 years, and still performs the necessary pioneer function of opening up distant
parts of the Province. By 1957 the list of products of the mineral industry included
a dozen metals, nine industrial minerals, a dozen structural materials, and three fuels,
with a combined value exceeding $172,000,000. The accumulated value for the first
100 years amounts to $3,900,000,000, and it is apparent that the 4-billion-dollar mark
will be passed well before the end of 1958, British Columbia's centennial year.
The combined value of all mineral products for 1957 is well below that for 1956,
although it has been exceeded only in that year and in two others, 1951 and 1955. This
was largely because prices for most of the principal metals were lower than for 1956 and
several metal mines were forced to close or to reduce their output. As a result, the value
for principal metals was below the average of recent years, and was $23,000,000 less
than the record achieved in 1956. Increased output of industrial minerals and structural
materials offset some of this loss, however, and the aggregate value of all mineral production, although about $17,800,000 less than for 1956, was greater than the last five-
year average. The relative importance of the various groups of products in 1957 is shown
by the percentages of the total value as follows, with the average of the five preceding
years in parentheses: Principal metals, 65 (74) percent; miscellaneous metals, 7.4 (8)
per cent; industrial minerals, 7.7 (3.5) per cent; structural materials, 15 (9) per cent;
fuels, 4.9 (5.6) per cent.
The complete figures for prices, quantities, and values are tabulated on pages A 13
to A 48.
The metal-mining branch of the industry produces for an international market at
world metal prices. British Columbia sales are affected directly by prices in the United
States and by the value of United States money in terms of Canadian money. Throughout the year United States money was at a discount in Canada. Settlements for all metals
reflect the rate of exchange, which ranged from just over 3 per cent to just under 6 per
cent.   The average discount for the year was about 4.2 per cent.
The price of copper moved downward during the year. The price for electrolytic
copper at refineries in eastern United States fell from an average of 33.337 cents for
January to 22.418 cents for December. Lead and zinc prices in the United States were
stable for the first four months of 1957, then fell fairly steeply in May and June, lead
losing 2 cents a pound and zinc 2>lA cents. Later lead lost an additional cent. The price
for silver in the United States changed very slightly; some other metal prices changed
markedly, notably tungsten ore, for which the December market price was about half
the January price.
A 8 REVIEW OF THE MINERAL INDUSTRY A 9
Prices have reflected uncertainty about stock-piling and stock-piled metal in the
United States and Great Britain. The prospects in the United States are for cessation or
greatly reduced buying of metal for stockpiling, and in Great Britain a limited sale of
stockpiled copper was announced in 1956. Prices also reflect metal supplied in excess
of current demand, and important producers have curtailed production.
British Columbia's output of placer gold fell to the lowest point since the beginning
of the industry. Lode-gold production was greater than in 1956, mainly because of
increased output in the Bridge River district. The closing of copper and silver-lead-zinc
operations affected the output of those metals. Copper was reduced drastically, silver
and lead were reduced slightly, but the output of zinc increased slightly, and a new quantity record was set, although the value was some $8,000,000 less than in 1956. Export
of iron ore was mainly in the last five months of the year, when shipments were resumed
by Texada Mines Ltd. and Empire Development Company began shipping.
Lode-metal development and exploration were carried on actively in many parts of
the Province. Preparations by Western Nickel Limited for production, near Hope; continued diamond drilling by Climax Molybdenum Company, at the molybdenum deposit
on Takomkane (Boss) Mountain; and the activities of several large companies exploring
for copper in the Highland Valley-Merritt area are worthy of note.
Exploration included airborne magnetometer surveys by several companies and by
the British Columbia Department of Mines. Work for the Department was done with
fixed-wing aircraft and helicopter in areas on Vancouver and Texada Islands known to
contain deposits of magnetite (see B.C. Dept. of Mines, Airborne Magnetometer Surveys,
1956-57, published May, 1958). Exploration undertaken by several companies also
showed interest in iron ores.
Industrial-mineral and structural-materials production both achieved new records,
mainly because of materially increased output of asbestos, sulphur, cement, sand and
gravel. Sulphur has been entirely a by-product of lode-metal mining, but recovery of
sulphur from sour natural gas was started late in 1957 at Taylor. This sulphur was
stockpiled and is not credited in 1957 production figures. Production of most structural
materials was at a high level, and provision has been made for greatly increased production of Portland cement. The capacity of the plant of the British Columbia Cement
Company at Bamberton was increased to 3,500,000 barrels a year, effective in August,
and Lafarge Cement of North America Ltd. built a plant on Lulu Island that began
operating early in 1958.
Petroleum production in British Columbia began in June, 1956. At the end of that
year six wells were producing in the Boundary Lake field and four in the Fort St. John
field. By the end of 1957 a total of eighteen wells had been produced—ten from the
Triassic Schooler Creek formation in the Boundary Lake field, four from the Triassic
" C " formation, one from the Permo-Pennsylvanian, one from the basal Gething at
Fort St. John, and two from the Nikanassin formation at Buick Creek. All these wells
were within about 40 miles of Fort St. John, and all shipped to the XL refinery at
Dawson Creek.
To the end of October, natural-gas production was for use in the village of Fort St.
John. However, the Westcoast Transmission Company pipe-line to the Vancouver area
and the International Boundary was completed and in service in November. At Taylor,
between Dawson Creek and Fort St. John, an absorption plant to remove sulphur and
liquid fractions from the natural gas and a refinery to treat liquid fractions began operating
in November. A branch pipe-line for Inland Natural Gas Company Limited, to convey
gas to the Okanagan Valley and to Trail and Nelson, was completed. Natural gas is
now being produced in large volume to supply the needs of the Greater Vancouver area
and communities along the two pipe-lines, and also for export to the United States.
Exploration has continued to indicate additional gas and oil fields, the Boundary
Lake oilfield has been greatly extended, oil has been found near Mile 100 on the Alaska A 10 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1957
Highway, and two oil wells at Buick Creek began producing in 1957. Although most
activity was in northeastern British Columbia, drilling was done at two sites on the delta
of the Fraser River, and a well was started on Saturna Island. Applications for permits
indicate interest in several parts of British Columbia, including renewed interest in the
Queen Charlotte Islands. Substantial areas are held under permit or lease in the Fernie
area, and much exploratory work has been done there. Exploration and drilling have
been predominantly in northeastern British Columbia, and all the successful completions
have been in that area, in which multiple productive zones feature several of the fields.
So far oil wells have been completed in Lower Cretaceous (Gething and Nikanassin),
Triassic (Schooler Creek and Triassic "C"), Permo-Pennsylvanian, and Mississippian
horizons.
The average number employed throughout 1957 in placer, lode, fuel, industrial-
mineral, and structural-material mining was 13,257. Major expenditures by those
branches of the industry included: Salaries and wages, $56,409,056; fuel and electricity,
$8,937,567; process supplies (inclusive of- explosives, chemicals, drill-steel, lubricants,
etc.), $24,257,177; Federal taxes, $8,170,826; Provincial taxes, $2,872,807; municipal
and other taxes, $907,143; levies for workmen's compensation (including silicosis),
unemployment insurance, and other items, $1,983,553. Dividends amounted to
$24,247,240. The lode-mining industry spent $30,273,900 in freight and treatment
charges on ores and concentrates. Expenditure in exploration for petroleum and natural
gas in 1957 was $10,030,878.
Statistics
The statistics of the mineral industry are collected and compiled and the statistical
tables for this Report are prepared by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce.
In the 1951 Report, extensive rearrangements of tables and of their order were made.
The tables in the present Report closely parallel those presented in Reports for years
preceding 1951, but additional details have been incorporated, and the present order is
considered to make more apparent the relationship between summary tables and the
tables giving the details summarized.
METHOD OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION
The tables of statistics recording the mineral production of the Province for each
year are compiled from certified returns made by the operators, augmented by some data
obtained from the Royal Canadian Mint and from the operators of customs smelters.
The value of each mineral product, in Canadian funds, is calculated at the average price
for the year (see p. A 13). The quantities of metals are net after making deductions for
losses in smelting and refining.
Metals
Prior to 1925 the average prices for gold and copper are true average prices, but,
as a means of correcting for losses in smelting and refining, the prices of other metals
were taken at the following percentages of the year's average price for the metal: Silver,
95 per cent; lead, 90 per cent; and zinc, 85 per cent. For 1925 and subsequent years
the value has been calculated using the true average price and the net metal contents, in STATISTICS A 11
accordance with the procedures adopted by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and the
co-operating Provincial Departments of Mines.
Beginning with the Annual Report for 1948, production figures for individual lode-
mining operations are the assay contents of the products shipped (ore, concentrates, or
bullion), no deductions being made for losses in smelting and refining. In previous
Annual Reports the production figures given for individual properties are net, after
deductions for smelting and refining losses.
Placer Gold
The data on placer-gold production were very largely obtained from the Gold Commissioners until 1925. The value of placer gold in dollars is now obtained from returns
received annually from the operators. At the old standard price, $20.67 per ounce of
fine gold, $17 was regarded as a close approximation of the average value per ounce of
crude placer gold produced in British Columbia. Dividing the production reported in
dollars by 17 gave the equivalent in crude ounces. The average value $17 per ounce is
equivalent to a fineness of 822Vi. Beginning with 1932 the average value per crude
ounce has been based on the same fineness but has recognized the varying price of gold.
The average price per ounce of crude placer gold for the year is listed on page A 13.
Lode Metals, Gross and Net Contents
The gross contents are the gold and silver contents of bullion and for ores and concentrates the total assay contents, obtained by multiplying the assay by the weight. The
quantities for gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc in Table XV and in " Notes on Metal
Mines " are gross.
Calculations of the value of production are based on the total assay content for
gold and on net content for the other principal metals. These are: In lead ores and
concentrates and zinc concentrates, for silver 98 per cent, lead 95 per cent, and zinc
85 per cent of the total assay content; and in copper concentrates, 95 per cent of the
silver and the total assay content of copper less 10 pounds per ton of concentrates.
Quantities for silver, lead, zinc, and copper in Tables I to VIII, inclusive, are net.
Average Metal Prices
In the interests of uniformity the Statistical Bureaux of the Provinces and the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics use the same average metal prices in valuing mineral
production. Up to and including the year 1939 the prices used in evaluating metal and
mineral production were:—
Gold and silver:  The average United States price for the year, as quoted in
the Engineering and Mining Journal, converted into Canadian funds at
the average exchange rate.
Copper, lead, and zinc:  For lead and zinc, the average London Metal Market
price for the year converted into Canadian funds at the average exchange
rate; for copper, until 1932 the New York price for copper was used,
thereafter the average London Metal Market price was used.
Suspension of trading on the London Metal Exchange in September, 1939, and the
controls of metals during the war years necessitated changes from the procedures which
had been followed.
The method of arriving at the price for gold continued unchanged, but the prices for
the metals controlled were those set by the Canadian Metals Controller. In 1945 the
controls were largely removed from sales but not from prices. Control of metal prices
ended on June 6th, 1947. For 1945 and subsequent years the prices are those computed
by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, using information supplied by the principal Canadian refiners of silver and the base metals. A 12 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1957
In the period 1945-47 the prices received for silver, lead, and zinc sold for use in
Canada were substantially less than the prices received for these metals exported to the
United States. The prices for silver in 1945 and 1946 and for copper, lead, and zinc in
1946 and 1947 are weighted averages, taking into consideration sales in Canada at the
ceiling prices and sales abroad at New York prices converted into Canadian funds.
Prices are now arrived at by the methods as given in the .footnotes to table of
average prices on page A 13.
Fuel
Coal
In 1926 a change was made in computing coal and coke statistics. The practice in
former years had been to list as coke production only the coke made in bee-hive ovens,
the coal used in making it not being listed; coke made in by-product ovens was not
listed as coke, but the coal used in making this coke was credited as coal production.
The result was that both the coal and the coke production figures were incomplete.
Starting with the 1926 Annual Report, the standard practice of the Bureau of Statistics,
Ottawa, was adopted. This consists of crediting all coal produced, including that used
in making coke, as primary mine production. Coke-making is considered a manufacturing industry. As the data are of interest to the mining industry, Table X is included
in the Report to show the total coke produced in the Province, together with by-products,
and the values given by the producers. The pre-1926 data have now been reworked and
brought into conformity with current practice. Table IXa lists the full mine output
(gross) produced and its net value, and these figures are incorporated in Table I, in the
total mine production for the Province. Table X gives the complete data for coke, gas,
and by-products manufactured for the period 1895 to 1925, and for each year subsequent
to 1925.
Up to and including the year 1947, production was recorded in long tons (2,240
pounds). Beginning in 1948, production is given in short tons (2,000 pounds). The
quantity of coal produced in the preceding years has been recalculated in short tons.
The average price for coal, listed year by year (see p. A 13), is the total value
divided by the quantity. Up to and including 1945, the quantity is the gross mine output;
for 1946 and subsequent years, the quantity is the quantity sold and used. For 1946 and
subsequent years, the value (Tables I, III, VHa, IXa, IXb, and IXc) is the amount
realized from sales of coal, at colliery loading points, plus the colliery valuation of coal
used under companies' boilers and in making coke. For 1946 and subsequent years the
quantity sold and used is shown in Table IXc. " Use " includes coal used under company
stationary and locomotive boilers, and used in making coke. Washery loss and changes
in stocks, year by year, are shown in the table " Collieries of British Columbia, Production and Distribution by Collieries and by Districts," page 121 of this Report.
Natural Gas
Commercial production of natural gas began in 1954. The production shown in
Tables I, III, VIIa, and VIIIa is gas sold in Fort St. John. The figures are compiled
from the Crown royalty statements filed monthly with the Department of Mines by the
producer. The quantity is reported as thousands of cubic feet at standard conditions
(14.4 pounds per square inch pressure, 60° F. temperature).
Petroleum
Commercial production of petroleum began in 1956. The figures shown in Tables
I, III, VIIa, and VIIIa are compiled from the Crown royalty statements filed monthly
with the Department of Mines by the producer. The quantity is reported in barrels (35
imperial gallons = 1 barrel). STATISTICS
A 13
Average Prices Used in Valuing Provincial Production of Gold,
Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, and Coal
Year
Gold.1
Crude.
Oz.
Gold,
Fine.
Oz.
Silver.
Fine.
Oz.
Copper,
Lb.
Lead,
Lb.
Zinc.
Lb.
Coal.
Short
Ton
1901	
$
17.00
19.30
23.02
28.37
28.94
28.81
28.77
28.93
29.72
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
30.22
28.78
28.78
29.G0
31.29
30.30
28.18
28.31
27.52
28.39
28.32
27.59
$
20.67
	
23.47
28.60
34.50
35.19
35.03
34.99
35.18
36.14
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
36.75
35.00
35.00
36.00
38.05
36.85
34.27
34.42
34.07
34.52
34.44
33.55
Cents
56.002 N.T.
49.55
50.78
53.36 .,
51.33
63.45
62.0G      „
50.22
48.93
50.812    ,.
50.64
57.79 ,.
56.80 ,,
52.10      „
47.20
62.38      „
77.35      „
91.93
105.57
95.80      „
59.52
64.14      „
61.63
63.442    „
69.065    „
62.107    „
56.37 „
58.176    „
52.993    „
38.154    „
28.700    „
31.671    „
37.832    „
47.461    „
64.790    „
45.127    „
44.881    „
43.477    „
40.488    „
38.249 „
38.261    „
41.166    „
45.254    „
43.000   „
47.000    ,,
83.650    „
72.000    „
75.000 Mont.
74.250 U.S.
80.635    „
94.55
83.157    „
83.774    .,
82.982    „
87.851    „
89.373    „
87.057    „
Cents
16.11    N.T.
11.70      „
13.24
12.82      „
15.59
19.28
20.00      „
13.20      „
12.98
12.738    „
12.38
16.341    „
15.27
13.60      ,,
17.28
27.202    „
27.18      .,
24.63
18.70      ,,
17.45
12.50
13.38      „
14.42      „
13.02      „
14.042    „
13.795    „
12.92      ,,
14.570    „
18.107    „
12.982    „
8.116   ,,
6.380 Lond.
7.454    „
7.419   „
7.795   „
9.477    „
13.078 „
9.972    „
10.092    „
10.086    ,,
10.086    „
10.086   „
11.75
12.000    „
12.550    „
12.80
20.39
22.35    U.S.
19.973    „
23.428    „
27.70      .,
31.079 „
30.333    „
29.112    „
38.276    „
39.787    „
26.031     „
Cents
2.577 N.T.
3.66 „
3.81
3.88      „
4.24      „
4.81
4.80      „
3.78       „
3.85
4.00      „
3.98      „
4.024    ,,
3.93
3.50      „
4.17
6.172    ,,
7.91
6.67 ,,
5.19
7.16      ,,
4.09      „
6.16      „
6.54      „
7.287    „
7.848 Lond.
6.751    „
5.256    „
4.575    ,,
5.050    „
3.927    ,,
2.710    ,,
2.113    „
2.391    „
2.436    „
3.133   „
3.913    ,.
5.110    „
3.344    ,,
3.169    ,,
3.362    „
3.362    „
3.362    ,,
3.754    „
4.500    ..
5.000    ,,
6.750    ,,
13.070    ,,
18.040    „
15.800 U.S.
14.454    ,.
18.4
16.121    „
13.265    ,.
13.680    „
14.926    „
15.756    ,,
14.051     „
Cents
J
2 679
1902	
1903	
1904	
1905	
1906	
1907	
3.125
1908	
1909	
1910	
4.60 E. St. L.
4.90      „
5.90      „
4.80      „
4.40      .,
11.25
10.88
7.566    „
6.94       „
6.24      „
6.52      ,.
3.95
4.86      „
5.62      „
5.39       „
7.892 Lond.
7.409   „
6.194    „.
6.493    „
5.385    „
3.599    .,
2.554    „
2.405    ,,
3.210    „
3.044    „
3.099    ,.
3.315    „
4.902    „
3.073    „
3.069   „
3.411    „
3.411    „
3.411    .,
4.000    „
4.300    „
6.440    „
7.810    „
11.230    „   .
13.930    ,,
13.247 U.S.
15.075    „
19.9
15.874    „
10.675    „
10.417    ,,
12.127    „
13.278    „
11.175    „
1911	
1912	
1913	
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919	
1920	
1921	
1922	
1923	
1924	
1925	
1926	
1927	
1928	
1929	
1930	
1931	
1932	
1933	
1934	
1935	
1936	
1937	
1938	
1939	
1940	
1941	
1942	
1944	
1946	
4.68
1947	
1948	
6.09
1949	
1950	
1951	
1952	
1954	
1955	
1956. . .
6.59
1957	
1 Unrefined p
acer gold,
average pri
ce per ounce, is
aken as $17 divi
ded by $20.67 tir
aes the price of ;
in ounce of
fine gold.
Prices for fine gold are the Canadian Mint buying prices. Prices for other metals are those of the markets indicated,
converted into Canadian funds. The abbreviations are: Mont.=Montreal; N.Y.=New York; Lond.=London; E. St. L
=East St. Louis;   and U.S.=United States.
Prior to 1925 the prices for gold and copper are true average prices, but the prices of other metals were taken at
the following percentages of the year's average price for the metal: Silver, 95 per cent; lead, 90 per cent; and zinc,
85 per cent.
For coal see last paragraph under " Fuel," page A 12.
The bases for the prices listed are discussed in detail on pages All and A 12. A 14 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1957
Table I.—Total Mineral Production for All Years Up to and Including 1957
Total Quantity
Total Value
Quantity, 1957
Value, 1957
Gold—placer -	
Silver ~	
lh.
    lb.
    __   lh.
Pnal
Petroleum, crude5	
bbls.
5,200,296
15,136,211
403,103,630
2,916,652,085
12,284,544,537
9,893,251,300
140,499,723*
8,692,322
489,981
$95.
435.
240.
476.
880.
781.
129.
76
248.
540.
,955,159
,187,967
,061,747
,690,590
,027,584
,317,148
,899,516
,291,020
,696,868
,208,640
411,685
,063,042
2,936
222,506
8,129,971
29,318,494
281,603,346
449,448,607
1,085,657
8,274,942
340,945
$80,990
465,076
,077,708
631,897
.568,086
.225,881
.755,362
,361,751
.626,939
,340,339
366,867
763,721
Totals.
| $3,905,810,966    |
$172,264,617
1 For individual miscellaneous metals, see Tables III and VIIIc, pages A 15 and A 28.
2 For individual industrial minerals, including sulphur, see Tables III and VIIId, pages A 15 and A 30.
3 For individual structural materials, see Tables III and VIIIe, pages A 15 and A 32.
1 Total quantity is gross mine output;   it includes material discarded in picking and washing.   The quantity shown
for 1957 is that sold and used (see also Table TXc).
6 Includes 582 barrels produced for test purposes in 1955, no value assigned.
Table II.—Production for Each Year from 1836 to 1957, Inclusive
1836-95 (incl.)
1896	
1897	
1898	
1899	
1900	
1901	
1902	
1903	
1904	
1905	
1906	
1907	
1908	
1909	
1910	
1.911	
1912	
1913	
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919	
1920	
1921	
1922	
1923	
1924	
1925	
1926	
1927	
$95,355,010
7,507,956
10,455,268
10,906,861
12,429,707
16,344,751
19,671,572
17,486,550
17,495,954
18,977,359
22,461,325
24,980,546
25,882,560
23,851,277
24,443,025
26,377,066
23,499,072
32,440,800
30,296,398
26,388,825
29,447,508
42,290,462
37,010,392
41,782,474
33,296,313
35,543,084
28,066,641
35,162,843
41,304,320
48,704,604
61,492,242
67,188,842
60,729,358
1928   $65,372,583
68,505,527
55,660,399
34,968,916
28,855,660
32,650,554
42,444,013
48,886,303
54,179,442
74,475,902
64,485,551
65,707,398
75,701,145
78,479,719
75,551,093
65,892,395
54,923,803
63,343,949
72,319,951
1947   113,314,314
1948   151,436,039
1949   131,100,468
1950   148,289,687
1951   175,613,693
1952   171,309,429
1953   152,628,683
1954   153,383,860
1955   174,710,606
1956   190,084,302
1957   172,264,617
1929-
1930
1931.
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936.
1937
1938.
1939
1940.
1941..
1942..
1943..
1944.
1945.
1946..
Total ....$3,905,810,966 STATISTICS
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Table IXa.—Quantity (Gross1) and Value of Coal per Year to
Date
Year
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Value
Year
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Value
1836-59
41,871
15,956
15,427
20,292
23,906
32,068
36,757
28,129
34,988
49,286
40,098
33,424
55,4582
55,4582
55,4592
91,334
123,362
155,895
172,540
191,348
270,257
299,708
255,760
315,997
238,895
441,358
409,468
365,832
462,964
548,017
649,411
759,518
1,152,590
925,495
1,095,690
1,134,509
1,052,412
1,002,268
999,372
1,263,272
1,435,314
1,781,000
1,894,544
1,838,621
1,624,742
1,887,981
2,044,931
2,126.965
2,485,961
2,362,514
2.68«,672
$149,548
56,988
55,096
72,472
85,380
115,528
131,276
100,460
124,956
176,020
143,208
119,372
164,612
164,612
164,612
244,641
330,435
417,576
462,156
522,538
723,903
802,785
685,171
846,417
639,897
1,182,210
1,096,788
979,908
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,824,687
2,693,961
2,734,522
3,582,595
4,126,803
4,744,530
5,016,398
4,832,257
4,332,297
4,953,024
5,511,861
5,548,044
7,637,713
7,356,866
8,574,884
1910            	
3,515,944
2,573,444
3,388,795
2,879,251
2,426,399
2,209,290
2,783,849
2,686,561
2,888,170
2,698,022
3,020,387
2,877,995
2,890,625
2,848,146
2,226,037
2,737,607
2,609,640
2,748,286
2,829,906
2,521,402
2,113,586
1,912,501
1,719,172
1,416,516
1,508,741
1,330,524
1,508,048
1,618,051
1,466,559
1,655,217
1,867,966
2,018,635
2,170,737
2,040,253
2,165,676
1,700,914
1,639,277
1,923,573
1,809,018
1,917,296
1,756,667
1,824,384
1,650,619
1,576,105
1,447,608
1,484,066
1,589,398
1,221,766
$11,108,335
1860    ...      	
1861     .
1862.                 	
1911
1912      .
1913                               .   ...
1914 	
1915           ...
1916 	
1917	
1918    	
8,071,747
10,786,812
9,197,460
1863... - _
1864                              	
1865.	
1866	
1867
7,745,847
7,114,178
8,900,675
8,484,343
12,833,994
1868
1919
11,975,671
1869..-	
1870-	
1871
1920	
1921—             _   _     - .
1922.         —
13,450,169
12,836,013
12,880,060
1872
1923-       .
12,678,548
1873
1924                   .
1925	
1926... —
1927.	
1928 -   -	
1929.	
1930	
1931	
1932  _	
9,911,935
1874	
12,168,905
1875- 	
1876	
11,650,180
12,269,135
1877     	
12,633,510
1878        	
11,256,260
1879	
1880	
1881
9,435,650
7,684,155
6,523,644
1933
5,375,171
5,725,133
5,048,864
5,722,502
6,139,920
1883	
1884
1934 	
1935 -	
1885	
1886
1936	
1937-     	
1887
1938         	
5,565,069
6,280,956
7,088,265
7,660,000
1888
1939.	
1940
1890	
1941	
1942-	
1943                  .
1891	
8,237,172
7,742,030
8,217,966
6,454,360
1893     . ..   .
1894 	
1944-	
1945	
1946- 	
1947             	
1895	
6,732,470
1896
8,680,440
9,765,395
10,549,924
1897
1948 - -	
1898 	
1949 -	
1950	
1951	
1899          ..
1900
10,119,303
10,169,617
9,729,739
9,528,279
9,154,544
8,986,501
9,346,518
7,340,339
1901
1952             	
1902
1953   -   .
1903
1954	
1955  	
1956
1904
1905
1906.             - _   .
1907
1957         	
Totals	
1908	
1909  	
140,499,723
$540,208,640
Table IXb.—Coal Production (Gross1) by Districts and Mining Divisions
District and Mining Division
Total to Date
Period
Quantity
Value
1956
Quantity       Value
1957
Quantity       Value
Vancouver Island District
Nanaimo Mining Division	
Nicola-Princeton District
Kamloops Mining Division	
Nicola Mining Division	
Osoyoos Mining Division	
Similkameen Mining Division-
District totals	
Northern District
Cariboo Mining Division...
Liard Mining Division.
1836-1957
1893-1945
1907-1957
1926-1927
1909-1957
Tons
79,685,055
14,995
2,928,372
1,122
4,652,833
294,220,173
59,765
11,065,272
5,008
19,531,750
Tons
200,347
1,170
72,102
1893-1957 I      7,597,322 |    30,661,795
1,629,168
127692
""366,826
73,272 I     378,912
Omineca Mining Division-
District totals	
1942-1944
1923-1957
1918-1957
I
290 I 1,100
86,743 I 577,552
406,524 | 2,490,171
1918-1957
493,557 |      3,068,823
4,642
8,553
38,211
71,234
13,195 I     109,445
East Kootenay District
Fort Steele Mining Division.
Provincial totals _ .
1898-1957 I    52,723,789 I 212,257,849
1,302,584 | 7,228,993
1836-1957 I 140.499.723 I 540.208,640
1.589.398 I 9.346,518
Tons
200,205
1,081
17,696
1,849,306
11,615
92,748
18,777 I     104,363
3,158
4,991
28,421
47,414
8,149 I       75,835
I
I
994,635 I 5,310,835
1.221.766 I 7.340,339
1 Gross mine output, including washery loss and coal used in making coke  (see Table X and discussion under
"Fuel," page A 12).
2 A combined total for 1871, 1872, and 1873 has previously been noted in Annual Reports and the above breakdown
is estimated.
B Table IXc.—Quantity1 and Value of Coal Sold and Used,2 1947-57
Year
District and Mining
Division
Total
Sales8*
Used
under
Companies'
Boilers2t
Used in
Making
Coke2}:
Total Sold
and Used2
District Totals,
1957
Vancouver Island. .
Tons
Tons
Tons
Tons
s
Tons
164,013
$
1,849,306
1947
450,968
365,328
451,074
472,690
391,687
267,346
204.931
181,534
173,861
172,140
163,574
"i~997
1,777
1,672
1,125
899
1,139
1,040
1,256
1,259
1,170
1,081
49,324
49,859
49,906
16,784
3,941
6,306
7,047
29,713
73,475
72,102
17,696
3,786
2,801
3,925
4,329
3,425
2,986
1,798
536
465
389
439
454,754
368,129
454,999
477,019
395,112
270,332
206,729
182,070
174,326
172,529
164,013
3,625,348
3,219,868
4,055,572
4,060,337
3,486,615
2,749,206
2,059,828
2,029,099
1,769,682
1,629,168
1,849,306
1948
1949
1950
1951
„      	
1952
1953
»
1954
1955
1950
1957
Nicola-Princeton	
18.777   I       104.363
1947
261
2,258
1,777
1,672
1,125
899
1,139
1,040
1,256
1,259
1,170
1,081
49,324
49,859
49,906
16,784
3,941
6,306
7,047
29,713
73,475
72,102
17,696
15,493
15,281
14,809
9,926
8,640
11,493
10,400
12.769
12,904
12,092
11,615
329,179
299,387
298,293
87,483
28,094
48,760
51,012
138.080
379,511
366,820
92,748
7,749
895,118
1948
1949
"
1950
1951
1952
::  ==
1953
	
1954
1955
1956
	
1957
Similkameen	
1948
1949
"
"
1951
1952
1953
"■*
"
"
"
1955
1956
1957
"
"
...
"
75,835
5,958
8,570
12,364
12,250
3,199
3,854
4,815
4.359
3,650
4,642
2,758
10,751
10,920
11,468
13,037
27,904
37,270
42,079
36.572
30.015
8,553
4,991
59
60
6,017
8,630
12,364
12,250
3,199
3,854
4,835
4,359
3,650
4,042
2,758
10,810
10,986
11,531
13,099
27,904
37,270
42,079
36,572
30,015
8,553
4,991
35,012
52,721
76,697
82,258
26,095
42,606
50,895
33.079
32,850
38,211
28,421
63,375
85,981
92,865
104,790
206,799
285,732
324,986
292,862
227,010
71,234
47,414
1948
1949
1950
1951
"
"
„   	
1953
"
20
"
1955
"
	
	
1947
1948
Omineca-	
59
66
63
62
	
"
"
.
"
*'
1955
"
"
	
"
5,310,835
1947
973,358
990,530
842,979
825,315
889,669
822,071
878,865
820,081
803,125
890,100
677,534
24,163
20,227
19,025
15,196
15,977
15,813
12,729
15,310
16,560
19,518
17,830
175,665
154,342
228,792
213,218
236,871
245,528
230,814
218,923
230,464
248,595
199,754
1,173.186
1,165,099
1,090,796
1,053,729
1,142,517
1,083,412
1,122.408
1,054,314
1,050,149
1,158,213
895.118
4,612,033
6,092,157
6,011,688
5,774,509
6,413,374
6,591,942
7,031,158
6.048,655
6,564,544
7,228,993
5.310,835
1948
**
1950
"
1951
"
1952
1953
„      	
1954
|
1956
I
1957
I
1947
1,492,356
1,426,984
1,369,463
1,341,201
1,317,299
1,137,986
1,138,777
1,073.515
1,085,385
1,148,707
867.634
28,328
23,154
23,013
19,587
19,402
18,799
14,547
15,846
17,025
19,907
18.269
175,665
154,342
228,792
213,218
236,871
245,528
230,814
218,923
230,464
248,595
199,754
1,696,349
1,604,480
1,621,268
1,574.006
1,573,572
1,402,313
1,384,138
1,308,284
1,332,874
1,417,209
1.085.657
8.6S0,44O
9,765,395
10,549,924
10,119.303
10,169.617
9,729.739
9,528,279
9,154,544
8,986,501
9,346,518
7,340.339
1,085,657
1948
1049
1950
1951
„   	
1952
1953
„   	
1954
1955
1956
,	
1957
	
 	
7,340,339
1 For differences between gross mine output and coal sold refer to table " Production and Distribution by Collieries
and by Districts" in section headed "Coal" or "Coal-mining" in Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines.
2 The totals " sold and used " include:—
* Sales to retail and wholesale dealers, industrial users, and company employees.
t Coal used in company boilers, including steam locomotives.
t Coal used in making coke.
See also discussion under " Fuel," page A 12.
A 34 STATISTICS
A 35
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O » A 36
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1957
Table XI.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1957
Dividends Paid during 1956 and 1957
1956
Bralorne Mines Ltd        $498,880
Canadian Collieries Resources Ltd  88,333
Canadian Exploration Ltd       6,453,400
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co.
of Canada, Ltd	
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. Ltd	
Giant Mascot Mines Ltd	
Granby Consolidated Mining Smelting
and Power Co. Ltd	
Highland-Bell Ltd	
Island Mountain Mines Co. Ltd	
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C. Ltd	
Reeves MacDonald Mines Ltd	
Sheep Creek Mines Ltd	
Sunshine Lardeau Mines Ltd	
Yale Lead and Zinc Mines Ltd	
Others 	
27,027,453
248,472
179,263
113,058
79,854i
224,033
584,500
93,750
164,000
185,780
321,986
1957
$374,100
176,666
22,113,425
372,708
78,293
218,968
292,250
621,010
Totals  $36,262,682     $24,247,420
1 " Liquidating " payments completed.
Dividends Paid Yearly, 1917 to 1957, Inclusive
Year Amount Paid
1917  $3,269,494
1918  2,704,469
1919  2,494,283
1920  1,870,296
1921  736,629
1922  3,174,756
1923  2,983,570
1924  2,977,276
1925  5,853,419
1926  8,011,137
1927  8,816,681
1928  9,572,536
1929  11,263,118
1930  10,543,500
1931  4,650,857
1932  2,786,958
1933  2,471,735
1934  4,745,905
1935  7,386,070
1936  10,513,705
1937  15,085,293
1938  12,068,875
Year Amount Paid
1939  $11,865,698
1940
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
   14,595,530
16,598,110
13,627,104
11,860,159
11,367,732
1945   10,487,395
1946   15,566,047
1947   27,940,213
1948   37,672,319
1949   33,651,096
1950   34,399,330
1951   40,921,238
1952   32,603,956
1953   22,323,089
1954   25,368,262
1955   35,071,583
1956   36,262,682
1957   24,247,420
Total.  $590,409,525 STATISTICS
A 37
Table XI.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1957—Continued
Lode-gold Mines1
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Arlington „	
Athabasca 	
Bayonne 	
Bralorne Mines Ltd—
Belmont-Surf Inlet.	
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Co. Ltd 	
Cariboo-McKinney Con. M. & M. Co	
Canadian Pacific Exploration (Porto Rico).
Centre Star 	
Erie	
Nelson 	
Tye Siding  	
Bridge River. 	
Princess Royal Island-
Wells 	
Fairview Amalgamated	
Fern Gold Mining & Milling Co. Ltd..
Gold Belt Mining Co. Ltd 	
Goodenough (leasers).
Camp McKinney..
Nelson	
Rossland	
Oliver 	
Hedley Mascot Gold Mines Ltd...
Island Mountain Mines Ltd.	
I.X.L	
Jewel-Denero  	
Kelowna Exploration Co. Ltd. (Nickel Plate).
Kelowna Mines Hedley Ltd.   	
Kootenay Belle Gold Mines Ltd.	
Le Roi Mining Co. 	
Le Roi No. 2 Ltd _ 	
Lome (later Bralorne) 	
Motherlode 	
Nelson	
Sheep Creek	
Ymir	
Hedley 	
Wells	
Rossland	
Greenwood	
Hedley	
Hedley..
Mount Zeballos Gold Mines Ltd 	
Nickel Plate (Hedley Gold Mining Co. Ltd.).
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C. Ltd 	
Poorman    	
Sheep Creek ..
Rossland	
Rossland	
Bridge River..
Sheep Creek...
Zeballos	
Hedley.
Premier Gold Mining Co. Ltd..
Privateer Mine Ltd  	
Queen (prior to Sheep Creek Gold Mines Ltd.).
Relief Arlington Mines Ltd. (Second Relief)	
Reno Gold Mines Ltd _ 	
Bridge River..
Nelson	
Premier	
Zeballos	
Sheep Creek .
Erie	
Sheep Creek Gold Mines Ltd."..
Silbak Premier Mines Ltd	
Spud Valley Gold Mines Ltd	
Sunset No. 2  	
Surf Inlet Consolidated Gold Mines Ltd..
War Eagle	
Ymir Gold	
Ymir Yankee Girl	
Miscellaneous mines .
Sheep Creek.
Sheep Creek .
Premier 	
Zeballos	
Rossland	
Surf Inlet	
Rossland	
Ymir	
Ymir	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold 	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold-copper
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold 	
Gold	
Gold-copper
Gold-copper
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold 	
Gold-copper
Gold	
Gold-copper
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Total, lode-gold mines.
$94,872
25,000
25,000
',386,025
,437,500
,679,976
565,588
37,500
472,255
5,254
9,375
668,595=
13,731
,290,553
:,491,2362
134,025
11,751
,,040,000
780,000=
357,856
,475,000
,574,640
20,450
163,500
165,000
,423,191
,048,914
25,000
:,858,0754
,914,183
98,674
308,000=
,433,6402
,609,375=
,425,000*
168,000
115,007
120,279
,245,250
300,000
415,002=
108,623
$77,300,897
1 The gold-copper properties of Rossland are included in this table.
2 Includes " return of capital " and " liquidating " payments.
3 Former Kelowna Exploration Company Limited;   changed in January, 1951.
4 Up to and including 1936, dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company Limited were derived from operations
of the company in British Columbia. Subsequent dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company Limited have been
derived from the operations of subsidiary companies in British Columbia and elsewhere and are not included in the
figure given. In 1936, Silbak Premier, a subsidiary of Premier Gold Mining Company, took over the former gold
operations of that company in British Columbia.    Dividends paid by Silbak Premier are given above.
6 In several years, preceding 1953, company revenue has included profits from operations of the Lucky Jim zinc-
lead mine.
0 Since March, 1956, company name is Sheep Creek Mines Ltd. A 38 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1957
Table XI.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1957—Continued
Silver-Lead-Zinc Mines
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Antoine   	
Base Metals Mining Corporation Ltd. (Monarch and
Kicking Horse). 	
Beaverdell-Wellington _ 	
Beaver Silver Mines Ltd  	
Bell 	
Bosun (Rosebery-Surprise)   	
Canadian Exploration Ltd  _  	
Capella _ —	
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd..
Couverapee  —   —
Duthie Mines Ltd  	
Florence Silver...  _.
Giant Mascot Mines Ltd	
Goodenough  	
H.B. Mining Co     _ _.
Highland Lass Ltd  —
Highland-Bell Ltd. _ 	
Horn Silver  - - —
Idaho-Alamo  	
Iron Mountain (Emerald) _   	
Jackson.      	
Last Chance  	
Lone Bachelor	
Lucky Jim     	
Mercury.	
Meteor   _ 	
Monitor and Ajax  	
Mountain Con    	
McAllister   _ 	
Noble Five _. 	
North Star    	
No. One  	
Ottawa   	
Payne 	
Providence-     	
Queen Bess   	
Rambler.Cariboo  _ 	
Reeves MacDonald Mines Ltd.	
Reco  	
Ruth Mines Ltd 	
St. Eugene    	
Sheep Creek Mines Ltd    	
Silversmith and Slocan Star4 _ 	
Silver Standard Mines Ltd    	
Spokane-Trinket  	
Standard Silver Lead _ _ 	
Sunset and Trade Dollar   	
Sunshine Lardeau Mines Ltd 	
Torbrit Silver Mines Ltd 	
Utica _ 	
Violamac Mines (B.C.) Ltd 	
Wallace Mines Ltd. (Sally)    	
Washington     	
Western Exploration Co. Ltd  	
Whitewater _ 	
Yale Lead and Zinc Mines Ltd _ 	
Miscellaneous mines. 	
. Total, silver-lead-zinc mines 	
Rambler..
Field.
Beaverdell	
Greenwood	
Beaverdell	
New Denver..
Salmo	
New Denver	
Trail	
Field 	
Smithers	
Ainsworth	
Spillimacheen.
Cody	
Hall Creek	
Beaverdell	
Beaverdell	
Similkameen ...
Sandon	
Salmo	
Retallack	
Three Forks.	
Sandon 	
Three Forks	
Sandon 	
Slocan City....
Three Forks.
Cody.....	
Three Forks..
Cody.
Kimberley—
Sandon	
Slocan City..
Sandon	
Greenwood-
Alamo	
Rambler	
Remac	
Cody..
Sandon	
Moyie	
Invermere.
Sandon 	
Hazel ton	
Ainsworth	
Silverton	
Retallack	
Beaton	
Alice Arm	
Kaslo	
New Denver.	
Beaverdell	
Rambler Station.
Silverton	
Retallack...
Ainsworth..
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead.
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead.
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-Iead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-Iead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-Iead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-Iead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-Iead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
Silver-lead-
zinc
zinc
zinc
zinc
zinc
zinc
zinc
zinc
■zinc.-
zinc
zinc
■zinc
!nc
nc_
he
nc
he
nc
nc_
nc
ne
nc
nc_
inc.
zinc.
zinc.
zinc .
zinc
zinc.
zinc .
zinc.
zinc,
zinc.
zinc.
zinc.
zinc.
zinc .
zinc .
$10,000
586.1431
97,200
48,000
388,297
25,000
11,175,400
5,500
455,692,1222
5,203
50,000
35,393
179,263
45,668
8,904
132,464
1,476,318
6,000
400,000
20,000
20,000
213,000
50,000
80,000
6,000
10,257
70,500
71,387
45,088
72,859
497,901
6,754
110,429
1,438,000
142,238s
25,000
467,250
2,045,750
334,992
125,490
566,000
93,750
1,267,600
1,715,333
10,365
2,734,688
88,000
164,000
390,000
64,000
850,000
135,000
20,000
30,867
592,515
278,620
70,239
$485,290,837
1 Includes $466,143 " return of capital " distribution prior to 1949.
2 Earnings of several company mines, and customs smelter at Trail.
3 Includes $10,504 paid in 1944 but not included in the yearly figure.
4 These two properties were amalgamated as Silversmith Mines Limited in August,
1939. STATISTICS A 39
Table XI.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1957—Continued
Copper Mines
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Britannia M. & S. Co.1   	
Copper. 	
Copper	
Copper 	
Copper	
Copper 	
Copper 	
Copper	
$18,803,772
Greenwood —  .
Texada Island. 	
Copper Mountain	
615,399
8,500
Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co.2	
29,873,226
175,000
Hall Mines 	
Nelson 	
233,280
261,470
$49,970,647
1 The Britannia Mining and Smelting Company Limited is one of several mining companies controlled by the Howe
Sound Company, and dividends declared by the latter company are from operations at all mines, but dividends credited
to Britannia Mining and Smelting Company have been paid by that company directly to the parent concern.
2 The Granby Consolidated Mining Smelting and Power Company dividends commenced in 1904 and cover all company activities in British Columbia to date. The dividends as set out in the table in the Minister of Mines Annual
Report for 1942 were incorrect; the correct total is as above. The figure now includes all dividends, capital distributions, and interim liquidating payments, the latter being $4,500,000, paid, in 1936, prior to reorganization.
Coal Mines
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Wellington Collieries Ltd   	
Bulkley Valley Collieries Ltd   .
Nanaimo. 	
Telkwa	
Fernie	
Nanaimo	
Coal	
Coal... 	
Coal	
Coal  	
$16,000,000
24,000
16,346,490
Canadian Collieries (D.) Ltd 	
828,271
$33,198,761
Aggregate of All Classes
Lode-gold mining  $77,300,897
Silver-lead-zinc mining and smelting  485,290,837
Copper-mining  49,970,647
Coal-mining  33,198,761
Miscellaneous, structural, and placer gold  6,901,155
Total.
  $652,662,297
Note.—The term " miscellaneous " noted in each class of dividend covers all payments of $5,000 and under, together
with payments made by companies or individuals requesting that the item be not disclosed.
In compiling the foregoing table of dividends paid, the Department wishes to acknowledge the kind assistance given
by companies, individuals, and trade journals in giving information on the subject. A 40
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1957
Table XII.—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for
Mining Operations of All Classes
Class
Salaries and
Wages
Fuel and
Electricity
Process
Supplies
$37,976,911
41,838
8,377,068
4,477,791
5,535,448
$4,591,908
1,828
967,234
707,860
2,668,737
$16,449,200
Placer-mining  .  	
Fuels—coal, coke and gas plants, petroleum and natural gas 	
15,632
4,517,722
1,355,991
1,918,632
Totals, 1957
$56,409,056
57,260,026
51,890,246
48,702,746
55,543,490
62.256,631
52,607,171
42,738,035
41,023,780
38,813,506
32,160,338
26,190,200
22,620,975
23,131,874
20,051,467
26,913,160
26,050,491
23,391,330
22,357,035
22,765,711
21,349,690
17,887,619
16,753,367
$8,937,567
9,762,777
9,144,034
7,128,669
8,668,099
8,557.845
7,283,051
6,775,908
7,206,637
6,139,174
5,319,470
5,427,458
7,239,726
5,788,671
7,432,585
7,060,109
3,776,747
3,474,721
3,266,000
3.390,106
3,066,311
2,724,144
2,619,639
$24,257,177
Totals, 1956
1954 	
19S1
22,036,839
21,131,572
19,654,724
20,979,411
1957
27,024,500
1951                                       	
1950        .. ..	
1949	
1948    ...        ■ 	
24,724,101
17,500.663
17,884,408
11,532.121
1947     -	
1946	
1945         	
1944	
13,068,948
8,367,705
5.756.628
6,138.084
1943.   ..   _	
1942 	
1941	
1940
1939           	
6,572,317
0,863,398
7,260,441
6,962,162
6,714,347
1938.. .            	
6,544,500
1937..     	
6,845,330
1936    .              	
4,434,501
1935  	
4,552,730
Grand totals, 1935-57  	
$814,873,950
$140,201,538
$296,806,607
Note.—" Process Supplies " include explosives, chemicals, drill-steel, lubricants, etc. statistics
A 41
Table XIII.—Average Number Employed in the Mining Industry, 1901-57
Year
Lode-mining
Coal-mining
<
fi
Structural
Materials
1901	
1902	
1903	
1904	
1905	
1906	
1907	
1908	
1909	
1910	
1911	
1912	
1913	
1914	
1915	
1910	
1917	
1918	
1919	
1920	
1921	
1922	
1923	
1924	
1925	
1926	
299
1927	
415
1928	
355
1929	
341
1930	
425
1931	
688
1932	
874
1933	
1.134
1.122
1934	
1935	
1.291
1.124
1.371
1,303
1,252
1.004
939
1936	
1937	
1938	
1939	
1940	
1941	
489
1943	
212
1944	
255
1945	
209
1946	
347
1947	
360
1948	
348
1949	
303
1950	
327
1951	
205
1952	
230
1953	
132
1954	
199
1955	
103
1956	
105
1957	
67
2,736
2,219
1,662
2,143
2,470
2,680
2,704
2,567
2,184
2.472
2,435
2.472
2,773
2,741
2,709
3,357
3,290
2,620
2,513
2,074
1,355
1,510
2,102
2,353
2,298
2,606
2,671
2,707
2,926
2,316
1,463
1,355
1,786
2,796
2,740
2,959
3,603
3,849
3,905
3,923
3,901
2,920
2,394
1,896
1,933
1,918
3,024
3,143
3,034
3,399
3,785
4,171
'| 3,145
| 2,644
| 2,564
| 2.637
| 2,393
1,212
1,126
1,088
1.1G3
1.240
1.303
1.239
1,127
1,070
1,237
1,159
1,364
1,505
1,433
1,435
2,036
2,108
1,764
1,746
1,605
975
1,239
1,516
1,680
2,840
1,735
1,916
2,469
2,052
1,200
834
900
1,335
1,729
1,497
1,840
1,818
2,266
2,050
2,104
| 1,823
j 1,504
| 1,099
| 1,825
| 1,750
I 1,817
| 2,238
j 2,429
| 2,724
| 2,415
j 3.695
j 3,923
2,589
2,520
2,553
2,827
2,447
3,948
3,345
2,750
3,300
3.710
3,983
3,943
3,694
3,254
3,709
3,594
3,837
4,278
4,174
4,144
5,393
5,488
4,390
4,259
3,679
2,330
2,749
3,618
4,033
5,138
4,341
4,587
5,176
4.978
3,576
2,297
2,255
3,121
4,525
4.237
4,799
5,421
6,115
5,955
6,027
5,724
4,424
4,093
3,721
3,683
3,735
5,262
5.572
5.758
5,814
7.480
8.094
5,734
5,164
5.117
5,464
4,840
808
854
911
966
832
581
542
531
631
907
720
1,168
919
996
1.048
1,025
960
891
849
822
672
960
1,126
1,203
1,259
1,307
1.516
1.371
1.129
1,091
1,043
838
2,461
2,842
2,748
2,948
3,197
3,157
2,036
2,436
2,890
2,771
2,678
3,027
3,158
3,187
2,944
3,072
3,555
2,835
2,981
2,834
2,813
3,461
3,884
3,763
3,759
4,044
4,120
I 3,901
| 3,119
| 3,304
| 3,339
| 3,328
3.041
3,101
3,137
3,278
3,127
3,415
2,862
4,432
4,713
5,903
5,212
5,275
4,950
4,207
3.708
3,094
3,760
3,658
4,145
4,191
4,722
4,712
4,342
3,894
3,828
3,757
3.046
3,814
3,675
3,389
2,957
2,628
2,241
2,050
2,145
2,015
2,286
2,088
2,167
2,175
2,229
1,892
2,240
2,150
1,927
1,773
1,694
1,594
1,761
1,745
1,462
j 1,280
I 1,154
| 1,076
I 1,100
968
1,020
931
910
1,127
1,175
1,280
1,390
907
1,641
1,705
1,855
1,601
1,855
1,721
1,465
1,283
1,306
1,410
1,769
1,821
2,158
2,163
1,932
1,807
1,524
1,615
1,565
1,579
1,520
1,353
| 1,256
1,125
980
853
843
826
799
867
874
809
699
494
468
611
689
503
532
731
872
545
516
463
401
396
358
378
398
360
3,974
4,011
4,264
4,453
4,407
4,805
3,769
6,073
6,418
7,758
6,873
7,130
6,671
5,732
4,991
5,060
5,170
5,247
5.966
6.349
6,885
6,644
6,149
5,418
5,443
5,322
5,225
5,334
5,028
4,645
4.082
3,608
3,094
2,893
2,971
2.814
3,153
2,902
2,976
2,874
2.723
2,360
2,851
2.839
2.430
2,305
2.425
2,466
2.306
2,261
1,925
1,681
1,550
1,434
1,478
1,366
| 1,380
493
647
412
492
843
460
536
376
377
536
931
724
900
652
827
766
842
673
690
921
827
977
1,591
2,120
1,916
1,783
1,530
1,909
1,861
1,646
1,598
1,705
324
138
368
544
344
526
329
269
187
270
288
327
295
311
334
413
378 |
326 j
351 |
335 j
555 |
585 |
056 |
542 j
616 j
628 |
557 j
559 |
638 j
641 |
770 |
625 |
124
122
120
268
170
380
344
408
360
754
825
938
309
561
647
422
262
567
628
586
679
869
754
626
660
491
529
634
584
722
854
474
7,922
7,356
7,014
7,759
8,117
8,788
7,712
9,767
9,672
11,467
10,467
10,967
10.949
9,906
9,135
10,453
10,658
9,637
10,225
10,028
9,215
9,393
9,767
9,451
10,581
14,172
14,830
15.424
15,565
14,032
12,171
10.524
11,369
12,985
13,737
14,179
16,129
16,021
15,890
15,705
15,084
13,270
12,448
12,314
11,820
11,933
14.899
16,397
16,621
16,612
17.863
18.257
I 15,790
| 14,128
| 14,102
| 14,539
j 13,257
1 The average number employed in the industry is the sum of the averages for individual companies. The average
for each company is obtained by taking the sum of the numbers employed each month and dividing by 12, regardless of
the number of months worked. A 42
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1957
Table XIV.—Lode-metal Mines—Tonnage, Number of Mines,
Net and Gross Value of Principal Metals,4 1901-57
Year
Tonnage1
Number
of
Shipping
Mines
Number
of Mines
Shipping
over 100
Tons
Gross Value
as Reported
by Shipper2
Freight
and
Treatment2
Net Value
to Shipper3
Gross Value
of Lode
Metals
Produced4
1901	
926,162
1,009,016
1,288,466
1,461,609
1,706,679
1,963,872
1,805,614
2,083,606
2,057,713
2,216,428
1,770,755
2,688,532
2,663,809
2,175,971
2,720,669
3,229,942
2,797,368
2,912,516
2,146,920
2,215.445
1,586,428
1.592,163
2,447,672
3,413,912
3,849,269
4.775,327
5,416,411
6.241,672
6,977.903
6.804,276
5,549,622
4,354,904
4,063,775
5,141,744
4,927,204
4,381,173
6,145,244
7,377,117
7,212,171
7,949,736
8,007,937
6,894.844
5,786.864
4,879,851
4,377,722
3.705,594
5,011,271
5,762,321
6,125,460
6,802,482
6,972,400
9,174,617
9,660,281
8,513,865
9,126,902
8,827,037
7,282,436
119
124
125
142
146
154
147
108
89
83
80
86
110
98
132
169
193
175
144
121
80
98
77
86
102
138
132
110
106
68
44
75
109
145
177
168
185
211
217
216
200
126
48
51
36
50
75
97
118
112
119
95
80
63
53
70
59
78
75
74
76
79
77
72
59
52
50
45
51
58
56
59
81
87
80
74
60
35
33
28
37
40
55
52
49
48
32
22
29
47
69
72
70
113
92
99
92
96
76
32
31
27
32
33
51
54
58
64
58
48
40
34
40
40
$14,100,282
11,581,153
1902	
1903	
12,103,237
1904	
12,909,035
1905	
15,980,164
1906	
18,484,102
1907	
17,316,847
1908	
15,847,411
1909	
15,451,141
1910	
14,728,731
1911	
11,454,063
1912	
17,662,766
17,190,838
1913	
1914	
15,225,061
1915	
19,992,149
31,483,014
26,788,474
1918
27,590.278
19.750,498
19.444,365
12,920,398
19,227,857
25,347,092
35,538,247
46,200,135
$38,558,613
27,750,364
29,070,075
34,713,887
21,977,688
10,513,931
7,075,393
13,976,358
20,243,278
25,407,914
30.051,207
43,954,077
35,278,483
40,716.869
43,670,298
46.681,822
45,199,404
33,293,703
26,449,408
31,383,625
46,016,841
76,311,087
100.128,727
79.814,604
86,751,361
117,493,684
106,601,451
66,739,892
77.088,160
88,343,241
93,110,262
65,370,185
51,508,031
44,977,082
48,281,825
51.174,859
40,915,395
22,535,573
19,700,235
25,007,137
33,895,930
40.597,569
43,666,452
1937	
$48,617,920
40,222,237
45,133,788
50,004,909
52,354,870
50,494,041
37,234,070
29,327,114
34,154,917
48,920,971
81,033,093
118,713,859
99,426,678
108,864,792
142,590,427
140,070,389
94,555.069
106,223,833
119,039,285
125,043,590
95,644,930
$4,663,843
4,943,754
4.416,919
6,334,611
5,673,048
5,294,637
3.940,367
2,877,706
2,771,292
2,904,130
4,722,010
18.585,183
19,613,185
22,113.431
25.096,743
30,444,575
27,815,152
29,135,673
30,696,044
31,933,681
30,273,900
62,912,783
1938	
53.877.333
1939	
53,522,098
1940	
62.848,642
1941	
62.216,019
1942	
55,359,479
1943	
46,089.042
1944	
39,315,910
1945	
49,997,071
1946	
56.519,691
1947	
93,176.186
1948	
125,979,961
1949	
105.259,001
1950	
121,635,457
1951 	
146,140,477
1952	
134,111,567
1953	
110,341,548
1954	
111,844,340
1955	
129,455,122
1956  	
141,315,045
1957    	
117,209,127
1 Includes mercury ores, tungsten ores, iron ores, and silica (flux).
2 Data not collected before 1937.
3 Previous to 1937 the shipper reported "Net Value at Shipping Point," no indication being given as to how the net
value was computed. From 1937 on, the shipper has reported "Gross Value," from which deduction of freight and
treatment gives " Net Value."
4 Gross value as represented by valuing gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc at yearly average prices and since 1956
includes value of tungsten content in concentrates shipped. as
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Copper concentrates, 16,400 tons..
Lead concentrates, 108,086 tons;
zinc concentrates, 260,196 tons;
tin concentrates, 546 tons
Lead   concentrates,   3,364   tons;
zinc concentrates, 11,862 tons
Salvage—lead   concentrates,   60
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zinc concentrates, 649 tons
141,192
102,084
31,874
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Bralorne Mines Ltd., Vancouver
Pioneer   Gold  Mines  of  B.C.
Ltd., Vancouver
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd., Trail
French Mines Ltd., Vancouver
W. B. Graham, Hedley, lessee,
from   Kelowna   Mines   Hedley Ltd.
Granby Cons.  M.S. & P. Co.
Ltd., Copper Mountain
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd., Trail
Sheep Creek Mines Ltd., Nelson
Cowichan Copper Co. Ltd.,
Lake Cowichan
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A 47 A 48
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1957
Table XVI.—Lode-metal Mines Employing an Average of Ten
of More Men during 19571
Name of Mine or Operator
Shipping Mines
Big Bull and Tulsequah Chief (Tulsequah Mines Ltd.).
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Co. Ltd 	
Silver Standard Mines Ltd    	
Torbrit Silver Mines Ltd 	
Britannia Mining and Smelting Co. Ltd..
Highland-Bell Ltd..
Woodgreen Copper Mines Ltd...
Bralorne Mines Ltd	
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C.
French Mines Ltd 	
Ltd.
Copper Mountain (Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co. Ltd.).	
Bluebell (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada, Ltd.)	
Highlander (Yale Lead & Zinc Mines Ltd.)	
Western Exploration Co. Ltd 	
Victor (Violamac Mines Ltd.) 	
H.B. (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada, Ltd.)  	
Jersey (Canadian Exploration Ltd.)..
Emerald-Feeney-Dodger (Canadian Exploration Ltd.)..
Reeves MacDonald Mines Ltd _. 	
Sullivan (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada, Ltd.)	
Mineral King and Paradise (Sheep Creek Mines Ltd.)..
Silver Giant (Giant Mascot Mines Ltd.) 	
Spider (Sunshine Lardeau Mines Ltd.)..
Velvet (Mid-West Copper & Uranium Mines Ltd.) .
Blue Grouse (Cowichan Copper Co. Ltd.)..
Argonaut Mine D'vis'on of Utah Co. of the Americas
Empire Development Co. Ltd  	
Texada Mines Ltd   — -	
Non-shipping Mines
American Smelting & Refining Company ...
Granduc Mines Ltd. 	
Newmont Exploration Co. Ltd	
Northwestern Exploration Ltd... 	
Phoenix Copper Co. Ltd...
Rexspar Uranium & Metals Mining Co. Ltd..
Sunro (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada, Ltd.)..
Wesfrob Mines Ltd. —
Western Nickel Ltd  -
Days
Operating
Mine       Mill
215
279
278
365
N.A.
267
N.A.
365
365
122
120
252
260
286
365
365
365
365
250
250
307
158
293
154
256
110
188
242
365
350
365
N.A.
267
N.A.
365
365
122
120
351
269
219
365
365
365
354
250
355
158
351
110
12
44
110
212
Tons
Mined
142,537
90,796
29,589
154,419
N.A.
15,779
N.A.
141,192
107,998
4,183
568,006
256,118
65,240
16,285
17,633
451,381
420,695
172,160
415,374
2,423,577
168,119
75,237
29,977
7,602
9,234
123,631
402,443
Milled
142,537
90,796
21,758
154,419
N.A.
15,779
N.A.
141,192
102,084
4,183
568,006
256.1182
65,240
13,318
451,381
420,695
172,160
405,531
2,423,577
168,119
75,237
29,355
7,602
81,856s
123,631
402,443
Average
Number
Employed
Mine
133
168
79
104
N.A.
42
N.A.
363
226
9
241
282
62
40
63
117
168
135
125
1,103
307
44
66
28
37
223
51
76
22
66
15
21
15
11
23
10
155
Mill
13
17
14
22
N.A.
48
N.A.
27
21
3
45
20
10
12
14
14
27
24
367
355
6
12
4
1
6
4
22
1 The average number employed includes wage-earners and salaried employees.   The average is obtained by adding
the monthly figures and dividing by 12, irrespective of the number of months worked.
2 Includes 530 tons of tailings dredged from Kootenay Lake at Pilot Bay, site of original concentrator.
3 Concentrates produced by re-treating impure material.    Men noted were employed salvaging equipment, except
for a short period when some were employed in mill.
N.A.=Not available. Departmental Work
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
The Administration Branch is responsible for the administration of the Provincial
laws regarding the acquisition of rights to mineral and to coal, petroleum and natural
gas, and deals with other departments of the Provincial service for the Department or for
any branch.
Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-Mining Recorders, whose duties
are laid down in the " Mineral Act" and the " Placer-mining Act," administer these Acts
and other Acts relating to mining. Mining Recorders, in addition to their own functions,
may also exercise the powers conferred upon Gold Commissioners with regard to mineral
claims within the mining division for which they have been appointed. Similar duties
may be performed by Mining Recorders with regard to placer claims but not in respect
of placer-mining leases. Recording of location and of work upon a mineral claim as
required by the "Mineral Act" and upon a placer claim or a placer-mining lease as
required by the " Placer-mining Act" must be made at the office of the Mining Recorder
for the mining division in which the claim or lease is located. Information concerning
claims and leases and concerning the ownership and standing of claims and leases in any
mining division may be obtained from the Mining Recorder for the mining division in
which the property is situated or from the Department's offices at Victoria, and Room
104, 739 West Hastings Street, Vancouver. Officials in the offices of the Gold Commissioner at Victoria and the Gold Commissioner at Vancouver act as Sub-Mining Recorders
for all mining divisions. Sub-Mining Recorders, who act as forwarding agents, are
appointed at various places throughout the Province. They are authorized to accept
documents and fees, and forward them to the office of the Mining Recorder for the
correct mining division. Officials and their offices in various parts of the Province are
listed in the table on page A 50.
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)
The transcripts of all recordings made in Mining Recorders' offices throughout the
Province are sent to the office of the Chief Gold Commissioner in Victoria twice each
month, and include the names of lessees of reverted Crown-granted mineral claims.
These records and maps showing the approximate positions of mineral claims held by
record and of placer-mining leases may be consulted by the public during office hours
at Victoria and at the office of the Gold Commissioner at Vancouver, Room 104, 739
West Hastings Street. The maps conform in geographical detail, size, and number to
the reference and mineral reference maps issued by the Legal Surveys Branch of the
Department of Lands and Forests, and the approximate positions of mineral claims held
by record and of placer-mining leases are plotted from details supplied by the locators.
Provision has been made to supply the general public, on request to the office of the
Chief Gold Commissioner, with copies of the maps. The charge for these maps is $1
plus 5 per cent tax for each sheet.
A 49 A 50
report of the minister of mines, 1957
Mining Divisions Amalgamated since 1949
Date
Mining Divisions Amalgamated
New Name
Mining
Recorder's
Office
Oct.   1, 1949
Revelstoke 	
Kamloops	
Skeena	
Liard	
Slocan  _	
Dec.  1, 1949
Apr.  1, 1951
Mar. 1, 1952
Aug. 2, 1954
May   1, 1955
List of Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders in the Province
Mining Division
Location of Office
Gold Commissioner
Mining Recorder
Alberni 	
Atlin 	
Alberni _ 	
Atlin    -
T. G. O'Neill -    ...
L. D. Sands	
T. G. O'Neill.
L. D. Sands.
Cariboo	
Clinton
Fort Steele
Quesnel	
Clinton	
Cranbrook	
Golden __	
Grand Forks	
F. E. P. Hughes	
W. E. McLean	
E. L. Hedley       	
F. E. P. Hughes.
W. E. McLean.
E. L. Hedley.
Golden	
R. E. Manson  	
R. Macgregor	
D. Dalglelsh	
R. H. McCrimmon.
E. B. Offin	
W. H. Cochrane _
K. D. McRae	
J. F. McDonald	
R. E. Manson.
D. Dalgleish.
Liard 	
Victoria	
Lillooet	
Nanaimo _	
E. B. Offin.
Nanaimo—	
W. H. Cochrane.
K. D. McRae.
New Westminster	
Merritt  	
G. C. Kimberley.
T. S. Dobson.
G. H. Beley	
T. S. Dalby	
W. T. McGruder	
B. Kennelly —	
T. H. W. Harding	
G. H. Beley.
Osoyoos—	
Revelstoke.	
Similkameen	
Penticton.	
Revelstoke _	
Princeton.     _
Prince Rupert	
T. S. Dalby.
W. T. McGruder.
B. Kennelly.
T. H. W. Harding.
C. Macdonald 	
W. L. Draper	
B. F. Palmer.
Rossland	
W. L. Draper.
J. Egdell                           	
Vernon	
Victoria ..„.	
G. F. Forbes               	
G. F. Forbes. DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 51
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B 2 a 52 report of the minister of mines, 1957
Coal, Petroleum, and Natural Gas
The Administration Branch has been responsible for the administration of the
"Petroleum and Natural Gas Act" and for the "Coal Act" since April 1st, 1953.
Information concerning applications for permits and leases issued under the " Petroleum
and Natural Gas Act" and concerning the ownership and standing of them may be
obtained upon application to the office of the Chief Commissioner, Department of
Mines, Victoria, B.C. Similar information may be obtained respecting licences and leases
issued under the " Coal Act." Maps showing the locations of permits and leases under
the " Petroleum and Natural Gas Act" are available, and copies may be obtained upon
application to the office of the Department of Mines, Victoria, B.C. Monthly reports
listing additions and revisions to permit-location maps and listing changes in title to
permits, licences, and leases and related matters are available from the office of the Chief
Commissioner upon application and payment of a fee of $2.50 per annum each.
Petroleum and Natural-gas Statistics, 1957
Permits—
Issued      88
In good standing  395
Assigned        41
Natural-gas licences—Issued       8
Leases—
Issued     170
In good standing  307
Assigned        3
Petroleum and Natural-gas Revenue, 1957
Permits—
Fees       $97,750.00
Rent  2,595,852.50
Cash in lieu of work        44,386.17
  $2,737,988.67
Leases—
Fees         $4,500.00
Rent       425,677.37
        430,177.37
Tender bonus     1,342,812.69
Royalties—
Gas        $7,264.27
Oil    104,568.73
  111,833.00
Assignment fees  1,125.00
Operators' licences  7,850.00
Miscellaneous     1,051.90
$4,632,838.63 DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 53
Coal Revenue, 1957
Licences—
Fees
$1,450.00
Rent	
11,272.50
$12,722.50
Leases—
Fees 	
$500.00
Rent                            	
1,059.04
Cash in lieu of work	
300.00
1,859.04
Miscellaneous          	
28,805.00
$43,386.54
Mining Laws and Laws Related to the Mineral Industry
Synopses of mining laws and of laws related to mining, and the titles of the various
Acts and the prices charged for each are available on application.
ANALYTICAL AND ASSAY BRANCH
By S. W. Metcalfe, Acting Chief Analyst and Assayer
Rock Samples
During 1957 the chemical laboratory in Victoria issued reports on 1,476 samples
from prospectors* and Departmental engineers. A laboratory examination of a prospector's sample generally consists of the following: (1) A spectrographic analysis to
determine if any base metals are present in interesting percentages; (2) assays for precious metals, and for base metals shown by the spectographic analysis to be present in
interesting percentages. The degree of radioactivity is measured on all samples submitted
by prospectors and Departmental engineers; these radiometric assays are not listed below
in the table.
On March 26th, 1957, fire destroyed the chemical labratory, causing a considerable
loss and a cessation of analytical work during the months of April and May. Temporary
facilities were provided in the Coal and Petroleum Control Laboratory, where general
analytical work commenced again in June. The spectrograph was totally destroyed, and
its duties were taken over to some extent by the Phillips X-ray spectograph. Spectrographic analyses reported in the following table showing the distribution of laboratory
reports were performed prior to the fire and therefore do not include work done with the
X-ray equipment. It is hoped that a new spectrograph will be installed shortly, when all
samples submitted to the laboratory will be examined for metals which cannot be detected
by X-ray spectrography.
The laboratory reports were distributed in the following manner among prospectors
who were not grantees, prospectors who were grantees under the " Prospectors' Grubstake Act," and Departmental engineers:—
Samples
Spectrographic
Analyses
Assays
Prospectors (not grantees)..
Prospectors (grantees)	
Departmental engineers	
Totals 	
1,103
174
199
159
7
24
2,597
432
386
1,476
190
3,415
*A reasonable number of samples are assayed, without charge, for a prospector who makes application for free
assays and who satisfies the Acting Chief Analyst that prospecting is his principal occupation during the summer months.
A form for use in applying for free assays may be obtained from the office of any Mining Recorder. A 54 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1957
Mineralogical specimens submitted for identification and rocks for classification are
examined by the Mineralogical Branch of the Department.
Coal, Petroleum and Gas Samples
Eighty-nine samples were analysed. Of these, nineteen were samples of formation
water from wells being drilled for oil and gas; fifty were samples of coal for proximate
analysis and calorific value; four were soils tested for oil seepage; seven were crude-oil
samples for examination; one was a sample of gas for analysis and calorific value; two
were samples of oil skimmed off a mud pit and examined for the presence of petroleum;
two were samples of water tested for oil seepage; one was a sample of water and sand
examined for indication of gas and oil; one was a sample of water containing a sediment
examined for evidence of petroleum; two were samples of sand and gravel tested for
oil seepage.
Police and Coroners' Exhibits
Sixty-four cases of a chemical-legal nature, making 153 exhibits, were completed for
the Attorney-General's Department. Nineteen cases were analyses of alcohol only in
blood; five cases were for alcohol in blood and other organs; four cases involved carbon
monoxide poisons (two of these had in addition methyl alcohol in the blood); and in
nine cases viscera were analysed for all possible poisons. Twelve cases were analyses of
liquor and six were analyses of gasoline for colouring matter added in accordance with
the regulations of the " Coloured Gasoline Tax Act." Narcotics were sought in six cases
received from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. The remaining three cases were of
arson, robbery with violence, and suspected wilful damage to a car. On three occasions
evidence was presented in Court.
Miscellaneous Samples
For the Purchasing Commission, specification tests were made on eleven samples of
anti-freeze and on one jelly powder. One tank was examined to determine the nature of
the external and internal coating, and one pad of Terylene fibres was examined.
For the Taxation Branch of the Department of Finance, eight samples of gasoline
were analysed for marker dyestuff.
For the Department of Health and Welfare, one sample of calcium carbonate was
examined by spectrographic and X-ray methods.
For the British Columbia Power Commission, one sample of calcium carbonate was
examined by chemical, spectrographic, and X-ray methods.
For the Testing Branch of the Department of Highways, one sample of anhydrous
calcium chloride pellets was examined by chemical, spectrographic, and X-ray methods.
For the Protection Division of the Forest Service, six wooden rods, using four as
controls, were examined, to determine whether they had been manufactured from logs
which had been immersed in salt water.
For the Department of Public Works, the disk from a time clock was examined to
determine the intervals at which the clock had been punched.
For the Department of Mining and Metallurgy at the University of British Columbia,
two samples were analysed for titanium.
Examinations for Assayers
Provincial Government examinations for certificates of competency and licence to
practise assaying in British Columbia were held at Trail in June and December. In June
ten candidates were examined; seven passed, two obtained supplemental, and one failed.
In December three candidates were examined at Trail; two passed and one failed. L
The " Bird Cages " in old Victoria.   The central building was the Colonial Office
and to the left of it the Legislative Assembly.   (Provincial Archives.)
The original Legislative Assembly building, with one added wing, on the lawn of the Parliament Buildings. This housed offices and laboratories of the Department of Mines from 1896
until it was destroyed by fire in March, 1957. A 56 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1957
INSPECTION BRANCH
Organization and Staff
Inspectors and Resident Engineers
H. C. Hughes, Chief Inspector Victoria
Robert B. Bonar, Senior Inspector of Mines Victoria
L. Wardman, Electrical Inspector of Mines Victoria
E. R. Hughes, Senior Inspector of Mines .Victoria
J. W. Patterson, Inspector and Resident Engineer Lillooet
Robert B. King, Inspector and Resident Engineer Vancouver
A. R. C. James, Inspector and Resident Engineer Vancouver
J. E. Merrett, Inspector and Resident Engineer Cranbrook
J. W. Peck, Inspector and Resident Engineer Nelson
D. R. Morgan, Inspector and Resident Engineer Fernie
David Smith, Inspector and Resident Engineer Prince Rupert
The Inspectors are stationed at the places listed and inspect coal mines, metalliferous mines, and quarries in their respective districts. They also examine prospects, mining properties, and roads and trails.
E. R. Hughes supervised the Department's roads and trails programme and prospectors' grub-stakes.
Instructors, Mine-rescue Stations
Arthur Williams Cumberland Station
T. H. Cunliffe Princeton Station
T. H. Robertson Princeton Station
Joseph J. Haile Fernie Station
W. H. Childress Nelson Station
Staff Changes
W. H. Childress was appointed instructor at the Nelson station on March 6th, 1957.
He replaced H. W. Aitchison, who resigned on November 21st, 1956.
A. R. C. James was transferred from Prince Rupert to Vancouver on April 1st,
1957.
David Smith was appointed Inspector and Resident Engineer at Prince Rupert and
commenced his duties on February 15th, 1957.
J. W. Patterson resigned on July 31st, 1957, to take a position with the Canadian
Government at Ottawa.
T. H. Cunliffe retired because of ill health on September 23rd, 1957, and was replaced by T. H. Robertson, who was appointed instructor for the Princeton station on
July 1st, 1957.
Board of Examiners for Coal-mine Officials
H. C. Hughes, Chairman Victoria
Robert B. Bonar, Secretary Victoria
A. R. C. James, Member Vancouver
R. B. Bonar, A. R. C. James, and the Inspectors for the district in which an
examination is being held form the Board for granting certificates of competency to
coal-miners. In the absence of the Inspector, the mine-rescue instructor is authorized
to act in his stead.
An Inspector is empowered to grant provisional certificates to coal-miners for a
period not exceeding sixty days between regular examinations. DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 57
MINERALOGICAL BRANCH
Field work by officers of the Mineralogical Branch includes geological mapping and
examination of mineral deposits, and studies related to ground-water and engineering
geology. The results are published partly in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines
and partly in a series of bulletins. The Mineralogical Branch supplies information regarding mineral deposits and the mineral industry, in response to inquiries received in great
number. The activities of the Branch also include identification of rock and mineral
specimens submitted directly by prospectors and others, or through the Analytical Branch.
Professional Staff
On December 31st, 1957, the professional staff included the following engineers
classified as geologists or mineral engineers: H. Sargent, Chief of the Mineralogical
Branch; M. S. Hedley, S. S. Holland, J. W. McCammon, N. D. McKechnie, G. E. P. Eastwood, J. T. Fyles, A. Sutherland Brown, J. M. Carr, H. W. Nasmith, A. F. Shepherd,
and J. E. Hughes. Dr. C. G. Hewlett died accidentally in the course of field work,
August 14th.* J. E. Hughes was granted leave in October to continue postgraduate
studies at McGill University.
Technical editing of the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and of other publications was directed by M. S. Hedley. Copy for printing was prepared under the direction of Mrs. C. C. Savage, who serves as editor for English. Messrs. Hedley and Holland
assisted in directing and supervising field work. Most of the other members of the professional staff are assigned to mapping the geology of the selected areas and of mineral
deposits. The following have special assignments: J. W. McCammon, industrial minerals
and structural materials; H. W. Nasmith, ground-water and engineering geology; A. F.
Shepherd, records and library.
Field Work
Systematic field work for the Mineralogical Branch in 1957 was done by eleven
members of the permanent staff, a geologist engaged for the field season, and nine temporary field assistants.
A. Sutherland Brown extended geological reconnaissance in the Cariboo Mountains
from Bowron Lake to the Rocky Mountain Trench via Goat River. Subsequently he
examined mineral properties at McLeese Lake, Takomkane Mountain, and in the southern interior. At the beginning of the field season he examined areas where airborne
surveys had indicated magnetic anomalies on Quadra Island.
J. M. Carr continued geological mapping of the Highland Valley area.
G. E. P. Eastwood and J. T. Fyles completed the most essential geological mapping
for a section from the head of Gainer Creek to the head of Trout Lake. Fyles also
spent two weeks in the Ainsworth area, preliminary to a proposed future campaign of
detailed geological mapping on the west side of Kootenay Lake.
C. G. Hewlett began detailed mapping of the area containing the Mineral King mine.
This work was terminated by his death on August 14th.
S. S. Holland made geological studies of sites proposed for power development on
the Fraser River from the Pavilion site to Big Bar. He spent the major part of the field
season examining beach and inshore sands at Wreck Bay and Cape Caution and in the
northeastern part of Graham Island. H. W. Nasmith contributed to the investigation by
studying physiography and glacial history of northeastern Graham Island. These investigations were undertaken to assist in evaluating such deposits as sources of iron and titanium. A report on this investigation, entitled " Investigation of Beach Sands," has been
published (March, 1958).   Holland and Nasmith spent about a month on geological
* See page A 4. A 58 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1957
reconnaissance bearing on proposals for power development in the area including Taseko
Lake, Chilko Lake, and Bishop River.
J. E. Hughes continued mapping the stratigraphy and structure of post-Palaeozoic
rocks in the area traversed by the John Hart Highway between the West Pine bridge and
Commotion Creek.
J. W. McCammon made ground investigations where magnetic anomalies had been
indicated by airborne magnetometer surveys in Texada Island. McCammon spent the
major part of the field season investigating occurrences of clay, shale, and limestone in
the Prince George, John Hart Highway, and Peace River areas, and making a reconnaissance from Falkland to Louis Creek bearing on the possible occurrence of gypsum
deposits. He also spent a short period reviewing structural materials being used by the
building trade in the lower mainland.
N. D. McKechnie examined mineral properties on Vancouver Island and examined
areas on Salmon River and Campbell Lake, where airborne surveys had indicated magnetic
anomalies. He also supervised removal of bulk samples of coal from two seams on the
Pine River. Coal of fair to good coking quality had been indicated by some tests on
samples from diamond-drill holes. Although surface coal was stripped off before the
samples were taken, it was found that partial oxidation had destroyed the coking properties of the coal, which, however, is of high heat value.
H. W. Nasmith made a soil study on the Kettle River to assist the soil survey being
made by the Department of Agriculture, made a study of ground-water in part of the
Highland Valley area, and a study of an ice-impounded lake and other geological features
bearing on road location in Bear Pass. He collaborated with S. S. Holland in studies
already mentioned.
H. P. Trettin was employed for the field season to make a geological study of the
area along the Fraser River from Lillooet to Big Bar. This work was under the general
direction of Professor K. C. McTaggart, retained as consultant, and is to be continued
in 1958.
Airborne Magnetometer Surveys and Related Ground Investigations.—In 1956 airborne magnetometer surveys were made for the Government of British Columbia on
Texada Island, Quadra Island, and in the Campbell River-Salmon River area on Vancouver Island. In 1957 helicopter-borne magnetometer surveys were made in selected areas
in the Quatsino Sound-Nimpkish Lake-Head Bay area on the west coast of Vancouver
Island. The results of the airborne magnetometer surveys have been released to the public
as prints of twelve maps. In the early part of the 1957 field season A. Sutherland Brown,
J. W. McCammon, and N. D. McKechnie made ground studies in sections where anomalies had been indicated by the 1956 airborne magnetometer work. A report on these
investigations has been published, entitled "Airborne Magnetometer Surveys, 1956-
1957."
PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS BRANCH
Staff
J. D. Lineham, Chief Petroleum Engineer and Chief of Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch Victoria
R. R. McLeod, Senior Petroleum Engineer and Chairman of
the Board of Arbitration Victoria
A. N. Lucie-Smith, Petroleum Engineer and Chairman of the
Conservation Committee Victoria
S. S. Cosburn, Mineral Engineer (Geology) Victoria
T. A. Mackenzie, Engineering Assistant Victoria
W. L. Ingram, Conservation Engineer Dawson Creek
G. E. Blue, Conservation Engineer Dawson Creek
H. B. Fulton, Assistant Geologist  Dawson Creek
P. K. Huus, Engineering Assistant Dawson Creek DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 59
The Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch is responsible for the administration of the
regulation, under the " Petroleum and Natural Gas Act," governing the drilling of wells,
and the production and conservation of oil and natural gas. It was established in April,
1956, although it had functioned, nominally under the Inspection Branch, since April
1st, 1953.
During 1957 an office was maintained at 1805 One Hundred and Eighth Avenue,
Dawson Creek, in one of three Pan Abode three-bedroom housing units constructed in
1956. The office unit was also used as bachelor quarters, the other two units being occupied as married quarters. A room in the new government building in Fort St. John was
used as an auxiliary office and for the storage of engineering equipment.
The following members were appointed by Order in Council to the Board of Arbitration established under the authority of the "Petroleum and Natural Gas Act": R. R.
McLeod, Department of Mines, Victoria, Chairman; S. G. Preston, Department of Agriculture, Prince George; and A. W. Hobbs, Department of the Attorney-General, Victoria.
The Board of Arbitration grants right of entry by oil operators upon alienated land and
determines conditions of entry and just compensation therefor. It also terminates the
right of entry when the operator has ceased to use the land.
A Conservation Committee was also established under the authority of the " Petroleum and Natural Gas Act," and the following members were appointed by Order in
Council: A. N. Lucie-Smith, Department of Mines, Chairman; N. D. McKechnie,
Department of Mines; and M. H. A. Glover, Bureau of Economics and Statistics, all of
Victoria.   The duties of the Committee are:—
(1) To act as an advisory committee to the Minister on such questions of conservation that the Minister, in writing, shall refer to the Committee for
their consideration and recommendation.
(2) To deal with such questions of conservation and production in the various
fields of British Columbia as may arise between two or more operators in
the same field or between operators and the Branch when appeals on such
questions are made to the Minister and referred by him to the Committee.
Staff Changes
A. N. Lucie-Smith joined the Victoria staff as petroleum engineer on April 1st, 1957.
On October 10th he was appointed Chairman of the Conservation Committee.
G. E. Blue joined the Dawson Creek staff on May 6th, 1957. H. B. Fulton joined
the Dawson Creek staff on November 12th, 1957.
GRUB-STAKING PROSPECTORS
Under authority of the " Prospectors' Grub-stake Act," as amended in March, 1944,
the Department of Mines has provided grub-stakes each year since 1943 to a limited
number of applicants able to qualify. The maximum grub-stake is $300, but an additional amount up to $200 may be added for travelling expenses to and from the prospecting area.
To qualify at the present time the Department requires that the applicant shall be
a physically fit male British subject, holder of a valid free miner's certificate, who has
been resident in the Province during the year preceding his application for a grub-stake,
or who has been honourably discharged from Her Majesty's services, who is between the
ages of 18 and 70, and who can identify common rocks and minerals.
It is required that in order to obtain the maximum grub-stake, he agree to spend at
least sixty days actually prospecting for lode occurrences in one area of his choice in
British Columbia considered favourable by officers of the Department of Mines. If he
prospects a lesser time, the grant will be reduced proportionately. In the past, rebates
have been recovered from grantees to whom payments have exceeded the proper amount
for the time and effort devoted to prospecting. A 60
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1957
The grantee must not accept pay from any other source for services rendered during
the period credited to the grub-stake. At the end of the season he shall provide the
Department with a diary and maps outlining his activities while working under the grubstake.   Any discoveries made, staked, and recorded are exclusively his own property.
Statistical information covering the grub-stake programme since its inception is given
in the following table:—
Grub-stake Statistics
Field Season
Approximate
Expenditure
Men
Grub-staked
Samples and
Specimens
Received at
Department
Laboratory
Mineral
Claims
Recorded
1943 	
1944
$18,500
27,215
27,310
35,200
36,230
35,975
31,175
26,800
19,385
19,083
17,850
19,989
21,169
20,270
22,000
90
105
84
95
91
92
98
78
63
50
41
48
47
47
46
773
606
448
419
469
443
567
226
255
251
201
336
288
163
174
87
135
1945
181
1946 	
1947.. .. _    _	
162
142
1948                   ...	
138
1949 	
103
1950
95
1951.    	
137
1952	
95
1953.. _
141
1954
123
1955 	
183
1956            .       ...        .                  ....
217
1957	
101
Samples and specimens received from grub-staked prospectors are spectrographed,
assayed, and tested for radioactivity.   Mineralogical identifications are made on request.
Of the forty-six grantees in 1957, nineteen were given grants for the first time, and
only four of these proved unsatisfactory. Three grantees who had received previous
grub-stakes were also struck from the list for unsatisfactory work. Five grantees, who
for various reasons were unable to fulfil the terms and conditions of the grant, received
only partial payment or returned the grub-stake. Six grantees reached the maximum age
limit and cannot qualify for further grub-staking. The 1957 season was one of average
performance, and prospecting was done chiefly in the Cassiar, Manson Creek, and Vancouver Island areas, as well as across the southern part of the Province. D. H. Rae again
gave able service in interviewing applicants and supervising grantees in the field.
MUSEUMS
The Department has a large exhibit of mineral rock specimens in the Douglas Building, Victoria; collections are also displayed in the joint office in Vancouver and in the
offices of the Inspectors of Mines in Nelson and Prince Rupert.
Specimens from the collection in Victoria, accumulated in a period of more than sixty
years, are displayed in cases on the fourth floor of the Douglas Building. The collection
includes specimens from many of the mines and prospects in the Province, and also
specimens of type rocks and special minerals from British Columbia and elsewhere.
British Columbia material includes specimens collected by officers of the Department
of Mines and specimens donated by property-owners. The collection also includes type
specimens purchased from distributers. Other valued specimens or groups of specimens
have been donated or loaned to the museum.
ROCK AND MINERAL SPECIMENS
Information regarding collections of specimens of rocks and minerals available to
prospectors and schools in British Columbia may be obtained from the Chief of the
Mineralogical Branch. DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 61
PUBLICATIONS
Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines, bulletins, and other publications of the
Department, with prices charged for them, are listed in the Department of Mines List of
Publications available from the Chief of the Mineralogical Branch.
Publications may be obtained from the offices of the Department in Victoria and
elsewhere in the Province. They are also available for reference use in the Department's
library (Mineralogical Branch) at Victoria, in the joint office in Vancouver, and in the
offices of the Inspectors of Mines in Nelson and Prince Rupert, as well as in public
libraries.
MAPS SHOWING MINERAL CLAIMS, PLACER CLAIMS, AND
PLACER-MINING LEASES
From the details supplied by the locators, the approximate positions of mineral claims
held by record and of placer-mining leases are shown on maps that may be inspected in
the central records offices of the Department of Mines in Victoria and in Vancouver.
Copies of these maps may be obtained on request. The boundaries of surveyed claims
and leases are shown on the reference maps and other maps of the British Columbia
Department of Lands and Forests.
JOINT OFFICES OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES
AND THE DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND TECHNICAL SURVEYS,
CANADA.
The Provincial Department's Inspector and Resident Engineer, the Gold Commissioner and Mining Recorder for the Vancouver Mining Division, and the officers of the
Federal Geological Survey occupy one suite of offices. All official information relating
to mining is now available to the public in the one suite of offices in Vancouver.
The services offered to the public include technical information on mining, the identification of mineral specimens, distribution of Federal and Provincial mining publications,
a reference library, a display of rocks and minerals, and a central records office. Topographic Mapping and Air Photography
Topographic mapping and air photography were continued by the Surveys and
Mapping Branch of the British Columbia Department of Lands and Forests and by the
Canadian Government Departments of Mines and Technical Surveys and of National
Defence during 1957.
In addition, the Legal Surveys Division of the British Columbia Surveys and Mapping Branch was responsible for cadastral surveys of all Crown lands in the Province,
and during the field season carried out surveys of 14,750 acres in the Peace River District for settlement purposes, surveyed the rights-of-way of new highways in the vicinities
of Princeton and Vanderhoof, also various lots and subdivisions for alienation and
reserve totalling fifty-three parcels. In the course of such work, 216 old lot corners were
replaced by permanent monuments.
The Air Division of the British Columbia Surveys and Mapping Branch continued its
programme of compiling interim maps at a scale of 2 inches to 1 mile showing planimetry,
watershed boundaries, and cadastral surveys, and completed a total area of 37,400 square
miles.   The total area mapped is now 194,000 square miles.
The Air Division also flew 18,020 square miles of new photography at various scales,
adding 13,510 photographs to the Air Photo Library. The total number of air photographs (Federal and Provincial) now on hand in the Air Photo Library at Victoria is
427,553.
The Topographic Division of the British Columbia Surveys and Mapping Branch
completed control for twenty-four half-sheets of the National Topographic 1:50,000
series in the Sukunka and Parsnip River areas, also additional control in the Parsnip-
Peace River Valleys to provide for 1-inch-to-1,000-feet pondage maps.
Other parties obtained control for 1:25,000 scale mapping in the Lower Fraser
Valley, special mapping in the Prince George and Lac la Hache areas, and completed a
triangulation tie between the Gataga River in the Rocky Mountain Trench and Muncho
Lake on the Alaska Highway.
The Geographic Division of the British Columbia surveys and Mapping Branch
produced fourteen lithographed maps, of which nine were completely new editions, including three of the National Topographic l-inch-to-2-miles series and one of the 1-inch-
to-10-miles series.
The Canadian Government Departments of Mines and Technical Surveys and of
National Defence, working in close co-operation with Provincial agencies during 1957,
completed the field work for thirty-six half-sheets of the National Topographic 1:50,000
series in the Province.
The 1957 Annual Report of the Deputy Minister of Lands contains key maps
indicating coverage by air photographs and by topographic and interim maps. Further
information concerning these or the corresponding Federal mapping may be obtained
from the Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch, Department of Lands and Forests,
Victoria.
A 62 Department of Mines and Technical Surveys
The Canadian Government Department of Mines and Technical Surveys, created by
an Act of Parliament introduced in November, 1949, took over most of the branches and
functions related to mining of the former Department of Mines and Resources. The
Mines Branch, Geological Survey of Canada, and Surveys and Mapping Branch are the
three branches of the Department of the most direct interest to the mining industry. Brief
reference to the work of the Surveys and Mapping Branch in British Columbia is made
in the preceding note headed " Topographic Mapping and Air Photography." A note on
the Geological Survey of Canada follows this paragraph and is followed by a note on the
Mines Branch.
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA
By an arrangement made at the time the Province of British Columbia entered Confederation, geological investigations and mapping in the Province are carried on by the
Geological Survey of Canada. Several geological parties are in the field each year. Many
excellent reports and maps covering areas of British Columbia have been issued by the
Geological Survey of Canada, and they have made available a great amount of information that has been of much benefit to the mining and prospecting activities in British
Columbia.
A branch office of the Geological Survey of Canada is maintained in Vancouver.
Maps and reports on British Columbia can be obtained there. J. E. Armstrong is in
charge of this office.
Field Work by Geological Survey of Canada in British Columbia, 1957
H. H. Bostock made a special study of a group of granitic dykes about 4 miles
southwest of Penticton.
H. Frebold continued a detailed study of the Jurassic fauna and stratigraphy of
southern British Columbia, examining strata in the Nelson West Half (82 F, W. Vi) map-
area.
W. L. Fry continued a detailed study of the Tertiary paleobotany and stratigraphy
of southwestern and south central British Columbia. Particular attention was paid to the
Princeton and Coalmont areas.
J. G. Fyles continued, and nearly completed, the field study and mapping of the
unconsolidated deposits of the east coast of Vancouver Island between Cumberland and
Campbell River.
H. Gabrielse nearly completed geological field work in Cry Lake (104 I) map-area,
which had been partly mapped by Operation Stikine in 1956.
E. C. Halstead completed a ground-water survey of the Lower Fraser Valley (from
Hope to the Strait of Georgia).
E. J. W. Irish completed field work within Charlie Lake (94 A) map-area, which
includes the Fort St. John gasfield.
G. B. Leech continued the geological mapping of the Fernie 4-mile map-area (82
G, W. Vt.).
J. E. Reesor completed the geological mapping of the Lardeau 4-mile map-area (82
K, E.V2), and began what will be an exhaustive, continuing study of Canadian granitic
rocks.
J. G. Souther refined and largely completed the reconnaissance mapping done in
1956 by Operation Stikine in Telegraph Creek (104 G) and Iskut River (104 B) map-
areas.
A 63 A 64 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1957
H. W. Tipper completed the geological mapping of the Anahim Lake 4-mile map-
area (93 C), and started the mapping of the Quesnel 4-mile map-area (93 B).
R. A. Price completed the geological mapping of the Flathead North map-area (82
G/7, E. V6).   This work extended into Alberta.
Publications of the Geological Survey
A total of fifteen publications of the Geological Survey of Canada relating to British
Columbia was received by the British Columbia Department of Mines in 1957. A list
of the fifteen publications will be supplied on request.
MINES BRANCH
The Mines Branch has branches dealing with mineral resources, mineral dressing
and process metallurgy, physical metallurgy, radioactivity, and fuels and explosives.
A total of eleven publications of the Mines Branch pertaining to British Columbia were
received in 1957 by the British Columbia Department of Mines. A list of these publications will be supplied on request. They included tabular pamphlets dealing with coal
mines, gold mines, stone quarries, petroleum refineries, and milling plants in Canada.

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