Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce REPORT For the Year Ended December 31st 1958 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1959

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0355426.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0355426.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0355426-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0355426-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0355426-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0355426-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0355426-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0355426-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0355426-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0355426.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce
REPORT
Eor the Year Ended December 31st
1958
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1959  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31st, 1958.
ROBERT W. BONNER, Q.C.,
Minister of Industrial Development, Trade,
and Commerce. The Honourable Robert W. Bonner, Q.C.,
Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce for the year ended December 31st, 1958.
THOMAS L. STURGESS,
Deputy Minister of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce. '
Report of the Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce
For the Year Ended December 31st, 1958
FOREWORD
Although business and economic activity in British Columbia was less buoyant in
1958 than it had been in recent years, the year closed on a note of optimism, with
prospects for a marked improvement in 1959. Recovery started in the early summer,
and moderate gains in the economy were apparent as the year progressed.
Activity in the construction industry was reduced, with the exception of residential
building, which had one of its best years. Logging was hampered by high inventories
and lengthy fire closures. The lumber, plywood, and pulp and paper industries all
increased sales and production over 1957, although prices remained low. The mining
industry experienced decreased demand for base metals, but petroleum and natural-gas
exploration and production continued to be active in the north-east section of the
Province. The fishing industry experienced an exceptionally large sockeye-catch and
good marketing arrangements with the United Kingdom. Agriculture production was
higher than usual, partly owing to the good export market for beef, but the field- and
fruit-crop production was reduced owing to the hot, dry weather. Total manufacturing
production is expected to show a slight decline from the value of production of
$1,817,644,000 recorded in 1957.
Retail sales were maintained at an estimated $1,650,000,000. Greater sales by
department stores and in most lines of consumer non-durables more than offset a decline
in the sales of the automotive and appliance groups.
The value of exports and imports in the first nine months of 1958 was lower than
in the same period of 1957. It is expected that exports and imports will have a value of
$800,000,000 and $440,000,000 respectively for the full twelve months of 1958.
A steady improvement in 1959 is anticipated as reduced domestic and foreign stocks
of materials are replenished.
Industrial inquiries continued in encouraging number, with no indication of lessened
interest in the long-term possibilities in British Columbia. Several new plants and
expansion of existing facilities will increase production and provide employment for
a growing labour force. In the following pages of this Report the activities of the
various divisions of the Department are related. These divisions are the Agent-General's
Office and British Columbia House, London, England; the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics; the Industrial and Trade Office; and the Mechanical Tabulation Division. R 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL
The Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce is ex officio chairman of the board of management of the British Columbia Research Council, and as such
presided at regular meetings of the board throughout the year. The laboratories and
offices of the Council are located on the campus of the University of British Columbia
in Vancouver.
The broad objectives of the British Columbia Research Council are to provide
scientific and technical services not otherwise available to the industry of the Province
and to conduct basic studies leading to the establishment of new industries and the
development of the natural resources of British Columbia. In order to meet these
objectives, the Research Council, through its laboratories, provides a wide range of
services and facilities to industries of all types. The work carried out by the Council
generally falls into a number of categories:-—■
(1) Fundamental or Basic Research.
(2) Product and Process Research and Development.
(3) Industrial Trouble-shooting.
(4) Specialized Testing.
(5) Approvals Testing.
(6) Economic Research and Industrial Survey Studies Related to Scientific
and Technical Developments.
(7) Operations Research.
It is interesting to note that the demand for the Council's services continued to grow
in 1958. Income from projects undertaken in 1958 was 20 per cent higher than in 1957
and apparently was not affected by the business recession. The emphasis has largely
been on service-type work of direct benefit to industrial firms in the Province—product
development, product testing, and industrial trouble-shooting.
The Council's fundamental research programme is financed by grants from various
organizations in Eastern Canada and the United States. Their continued support
recognizes the outstanding reputation of the Council's scientists.
The Council continues to serve industry in many ways other than through sponsored
projects. Through its library, its technical information service, and its programme of
contacts with industry throughout the Province, it brings science a little closer to
industry's door.
During 1958 the board of management of the Research Council consisted of the
following:—
The Honourable R. W. Bonner, Minister of Industrial Development, Trade,
and Commerce of the Province of British Columbia,  Victoria, B.C.
(chairman).
G. S. Allen, Dean, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
P. R. Bengough, 3292 West Tenth Avenue, Vancouver 8, B.C.
J. K. Clarke, Assistant to the Manager, Buckerfield's Limited, foot of Rogers
Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.
P. E. Cooper, Director and Executive Vice-President, Sand well & Company
Limited, 1512 Alberni Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Ian McTaggart-Cowan, Head, Department of Zoology, University of British
Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
K. G. Fensom, Superintendent, Forest Products Laboratory, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Aird Flavelle, Director, Canadian Collieries Resources Limited, c/o Flavelle
Cedar, Port Moody, B.C. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1958
R 7
M. J. Foley, President, Powell River Company Limited, 510 West Hastings
Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
S. J. Hammitt, President, Western Canada Steel Limited,  450 South-east
Marine Drive, Vancouver 15, B.C.
W. C. Koerner, President, Alaska Pine and Cellulose Limited, llll West
Georgia Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.
R. B. McDonell, President, McDonell Metal Manufacturing Company Limited,
1250 Boundary Road, Vancouver 6, B.C.
William MacGillivray, Deputy Minister of Agriculture, Province of British
Columbia, Victoria, B.C.
A. W. H. Needier, Director, Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries Research
Board of Canada, Nanaimo, B.C.
R. D. Perry, Vice-President and General Manager, Consolidated Mining and
Smelting Company of Canada Limited, Trail, B.C.
H. L. Purdy, Executive Vice-President, British Columbia Electric Company
Limited, 970 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
R. V. Robinson, Manager, British Columbia Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
C. A. Rowles, Professor and Chairman, Department of Soil Science, University
of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
G. M. Shrum, Director, British Columbia Research Council, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
T. L.  Sturgess, Deputy Minister, Department of Industrial Development,
Trade, and Commerce, Province of British Columbia, Victoria, B.C.
J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines, Province of British Columbia, Victoria, B.C. R 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
OFFICE OF THE AGENT-GENERAL FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA,
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, LONDON
On September 30th, 1958, W. A. McAdam, C.M.G., LL.D., retired from the post
of Agent-General in London. Dr. McAdam had served at British Columbia House
since 1923. He became Acting Agent-General in 1933 after the retirement of Mr. F.
Burden, and was appointed Agent-General in 1941. Up to 1957 this office was under
the jurisdiction of the Department of Finance, with one representative of the Department
of Trade and Industry. All branches of the Office of the Agent-General then came
under the control of the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce.
Appointed to the post of Agent-General, with effect from October 1st, 1958, was
Maj.-Gen. B. M. Hoffmeister, C.B., C.B.E., D.S.O., E.D. Prior to coming to London,
he visited many parts of the Province and conferred with the leaders of our primary
industries, Chambers of Commerce, business associations, and other organizations interested in the furtherance of trade and the development of our Province.
VISIT OF THE MINISTER TO EUROPE
The Minister, Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C., accompanied the Vancouver Board
of Trade goodwill mission to Europe, visiting Belgium, Holland, Austria, Spain, and
Portugal. Major-General Hoffmeister was with the Minister on this mission as a preliminary to taking up his appointment in London.
SETTLEMENT
General
The number of inquiries about settlement in British Columbia was very reduced this
year because of reports of unemployment in Canada. However, general information
about the Province was disseminated to a considerable number of inquirers in person
and by mail. A particular effort was made to assist those people with capital who were
interested in settlement.
School-teachers
Again this year the facilities of the office were put at the disposal of the Department
of Education in the recruitment of school-teachers. A large number of inquiries resulted
from the advertisements placed, and final appointments numbered 110 in both secondary
and elementary grades. Considering that many of the appointees were married, this
represents a considerable movement of teachers and their families.
VISITORS
During 1958, 2,360 visitors from British Columbia availed themselves of the
facilities given at British Columbia House.
FILMS
Distribution of British Columbia films in the United Kingdom through British
Columbia House, for the year ended December, 1958, amounted to 830 showings to
audiences totalling 70,149, including schools, film societies, clubs, business and private
organizations, etc.
CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS IN GREAT BRITAIN
The main efforts to publicize the Province during the Centennial Year were directed
to a display of historic documents relating to the period of British Columbia's history INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1958 R 9
of 100 years ago, a thanksgiving service in Westminster Abbey at which was present
Her Royal Highness the Princess Margaret, and the presentation of the Royal totem-pole
to Her Majesty the Queen.
The display of historic documents which passed between the Colonial Office and
the Government of British Columbia in connection with the establishment of the territory
as a Crown Colony was opened on July 1 st by His Excellency the Canadian High Commissioner at the Public Record Office, Chancery Lane, London. It was intended that
this should last a period of ten days, but so great was the demand that the exhibition
was continued for a full month.
At the service in Westminster Abbey were some 2,000 invited guests, including all
the Canadian bishops who were attending the Lambeth Conference, and special seating
was accorded in the sanctuary to the five British Columbia bishops present. The lesson
was read by His Excellency the High Commissioner, and the address was given by the
Archbishop of British Columbia, the Most Rev. Harold E. Sexton.
As Her Majesty the Queen was ill, the totem-pole was received by the Queen Mother
on her behalf. Many hundreds of visitors from British Columbia were present in Windsor
Great Park to witness this memorable event. In her remarks when meeting Chief Mungo
Martin, who carved the pole, the Queen Mother recounted the pleasure which the late
king and she had in visiting the Province in June, 1939.
BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR
As a result of publicity given to this event, both here and in Canada, twenty British
firms exhibited at the International Trade Fair. A stand was also taken by the Board of
Trade, on which were exhibited manufactured products of many other British industries.
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE INQUIRIES
Below are the number of inquiries received at, or initiated by, this office for 1958
(up to December 10th) compared with 1957:—
1958 1957
Great Britain  444 184
Austria  3 6
Belgium  3 3
Denmark  4 3
France  10 6
Germany  59 53
Italy  33 26
Netherlands  50 38
Sweden  12 10
Switzerland  10 7
Other European countries and North Africa  8 9
All the above inquiries are considered worthy of following up, with the object of
increasing business with these countries or, what is more important, the establishment
of new business houses in the Province or the investment of outside capital.
During the year Mr. H. F. E. Smith, Industrial and Trade Secretary, made visits
to industrial centres in England, Scotland, and on the Continent to Holland, Belgium,
Germany, Switzerland, Italy, and France.
In November, soon after taking up his appointment, the Agent-General made
a survey trip to Western Germany, visiting Hamburg (the commercial centre of the
country) and, in addition, the industrial centre of Germany—the Ruhr; contacts were
made at Dusseldorf, Cologne, and Bonn. R  10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TRADE INQUIRIES FROM BRITISH COLUMBIA
During the year sixty-seven British Columbia firms availed themselves of the services
of this office for a variety of reasons: to make contacts with British and Continental
groups; to secure money for investment in the Province; to sell British Columbia
products, patents, services, etc.
PROJECTS COMPLETED FOR 1958
This year saw a remarkable increase in British and Continental investment in British
Columbia, and the records show that this office was concerned directly or indirectly with
the transfer of more than $14,000,000 during the year 1958. This figure does not
include the yet unknown investment which it is expected will accrue because of the
advent of the recently formed Peace River Power Development Company Limited.
This is a consortium of Canadian, British, and Swedish interests and is the prelude to
other developments in the Rocky Mountain Trench area.
During the last twelve months the interest of many British firms was directed to the
Western Canadian market. A total of 313 British and Continental firms used the facilities of this office to explore our markets, and in many cases were put in touch with
prospective agents and distributers through the medium of the Trade and Industry
Bulletin, which is published by the Department in Victoria each month.
Close liaison was maintained with the Industrial Commissioner in Victoria regarding
branch-plant establishment. On behalf of twenty-four British Columbia firms, inquiries
have been instituted in an endeavour to find licence manufacturing opportunities in
Europe with the object of further utilizing the industrial potential of our Province.
SALES PROMOTION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA PRODUCTS
The two main functions of this office are: (1) To attract British and European
capital into the Province, and (2) to promote the sale of British Columbia products in
the United Kingdom and in the countries of Western Europe. In a world of changing
markets and trade patterns, more attention must be paid to the sale of our products, and
it will therefore be the policy of this office to put equal emphasis on both of the above-
stated functions. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1958
R 11
BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS
Before proceeding to review the work accomplished by the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics during 1958, it may be useful to explain that the Bureau is a fact-finding
and advisory body. It has two primary functions; the first is to provide economic
counsel and, when necessary, to conduct investigations into economic questions affecting
the Province; the second function is to collect and compile economic statistics of interest
to the Province.
In order to carry out these objectives, the Bureau is divided into the following
divisions: Economic Research, Transportation and Trade, Statistical, and Market Research. To ensure technical proficiency, the Bureau has endeavoured to follow the policy
of building up a small corps of professionally trained persons who can be relied upon to
perform a variety of difficult economic analyses. It has also been the policy to make the
services of the technical personnel continuously available to all other departments of
the Government.
Since other Government agencies are also concerned with the collection of statistics,
a series of working agreements designed to prevent overlapping or duplication has been
arranged in recent years between this Bureau and the Dominion Bureau of Statistics,
Ottawa, as well as with the Provincial Departments of Mines, Labour, Provincial Secretary, and Health and Welfare. During 1958 the essential statistical services performed
for the other Provincial departments as well as for the Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce were maintained. A description follows of the services
performed by the various divisions during the year.
ECONOMIC RESEARCH DIVISION
This Division functions to provide economic counsel to the Government. Generally
this is done through the medium of a weekly report to the Premier and to the Minister
of each department. This report reviews significant economic events and also contains
statistical information summarizing current business activity. As well, from time to time
technical assistance is given to the various branches of the Government as it is requested.
There are many publications prepared by the Division to keep government and
industry informed on current business conditions. The two most widely distributed are
the Monthly Bulletin of Business Activity, containing a brief description of current
changes in monthly business indicators plus statistical tables and charts, and the Annual
Summary of Business Activity, recording the past year's performance and including
numerous charts and historical series illustrating the economic position of the Province.
The Division receives many requests for information dealing with the Provincial
economy from private individuals, corporations, trade-unions, newspapers, business
publications, and Boards of Trade. Our files and library contain much of the information
requested, but often lengthy tabulations and considerable research are necessary.
The annual study of wage rates for selected occupations in the metropolitan areas
of Vancouver and Victoria and centres in northern and southern areas of the Province
was again prepared and published as a result of this survey. The Civil Service Commission, as well as other Government agencies and the public, was provided with
comparative wage rates.
Trade-union Statistics
In conjunction with the Federal Department of Labour and the Provincial Department of Labour, the annual survey of organized-labour membership in British Columbia
was completed. Data collected from each local include the following: Names and addresses of officers, affiliation, membership, and jurisdiction of the local organization.
A directory of trade-union locals operating in British Columbia is compiled from the
returns and is published in the Department of Labour's Annual Report. R  12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Reported labour-organization membership in British Columbia totalled 233,971
members at January 1st, 1958, compared to 216,070 at January 1st, 1957, an increase
of 8.28 per cent. Expressed as a percentage of paid workers, organized-labour membership reached 53.8 per cent.
Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1956, 1957, and 1958
Unit or
1958
Base
1956
1957
Preliminary
Period
Estimates
$
190,084,643
172,265,000
149,000,000
$
6,713,078
7,546,066
6,575,000
$
7,511,443
7,077,708
7,350,000
$
17,251,872
7,631,897
3,350,000
$
44,702,619
39,568,086
32,675,000
$
58,934,801
50,225,881
43,550,000
$
9,346,518
7,340,339
5,575,000
$
628,586,963
571,829,569
542,787,427
M b.m.
6,307,480
5,661,781
5,349,508
M b.m.
4,793,122
4,412,387
4,991,252
Tons
708,016
741,722
809,149
$
67,522,000    |
63,489,000
98,224,000
Cases
1,118,279
1,424,558
1,900,000
$000
116,043
117,746
121,227
Bushels
4,131,000
6,981,000
6,576,000
Bushels
1,144,000
2,093,000
2,000,000
Cwt.
323,038
240,307
614,107
Mft.
1,526,562
1,364,743
1,612,128
Sq.
1,959,352
1,718,203
1,814,711
$000
1,594,331
1,631,963
1,615,997
$000
209,788
219,635
327,168
$000
344,690
325,809
299,948
Gals.
277,572,000
296,430,000
305,691,000
Tons
14,462,551
11,942,334
12,000,000
000 kwh.
9,773,756
10,540,836
11,682,152
$000
307,223
376,440
400,000
Units
14,940
14,120
19,299
$000
247,096
246,621
265,000
$000
15,231,473
16,621,306
16,244,464
Number
282,926
284,790
292,768
1949=100
120.9
124.5
114.7
1949=100
125.9
124.6
116.8
1949=100
147.9
147.0
112.7
1949=100
125.6
116.1
114.6
1949=100
143.5
141.9
133.0
1949=100
97.2
91.8
75.1
1949 = 100
100.5
82.2
66.5
1949=100
138.6
155.2
111.6
1949=100
151.4
175.7
186.2
1949=100
116.3
127.1
125.6
1949=100
123.3
127.4
124.4
1949=100
113.8
119.0
116.3
$
1,417,409,982
1,500,000,000
1,465,000,000
Mining—
Total value of production __ 	
Gold production  	
Silver production _  	
Copper production 	
Lead production  — -
Zinc production   _	
Coal production.. —  	
Forestry—
Total value of production  	
Timber scaled ... .       	
Lumber production 	
Paper production   	
Fisheries—
Total value of production —	
Pack of canned salmon   	
Agriculture—
Farm cash income _	
Apples—
Total production. 	
Exports    -	
External trade—
Exports of canned salmon.  —
Exports of planks and boards, Douglas fir .
Exports of red-cedar shingles 	
Internal trade—
Total retail sales 	
Department stores
Motor-vehicle dealers _
Gasoline consumed —
Railway freight loaded in British Columbia-
Consumption of electric power 	
Sales of life insurance 	
Construction—
New residential units completed	
Building permits issued 	
Finance—Bank debits   	
Tourist trade—Auto entries on sixty-day permit.
Employment—
All employment  	
Manufacturing..
Iron and steel products-
Lumber products	
Pulp and paper	
Mining 	
Logging.
Construction	
Communication.
Transportation....
Services 	
Trade	
Salaries and wages. r
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1958
Economic Indicators in British Columbia
R 13
280
260
240
220
200
180
160
140
120
100
BUILDING PERMITS
1942       1944
1946      1948      1950       1952      1954       1956       1958
YEARS
00
AVERAGE
WEEKLY WAGES
80
60
40
.-'
20
1942       1944       1946      1948      1950       1952      1954       1956       1958
YEARS
15.0
FREIGHT LOADED
_^-
13.5
/
\
/
\
12.0
/
\
s
s
/
10.5
■/
9.0
7.5
6.0
4.5
3.0
1.5
0
BANK DEBITS
16
15
M
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
S
0
1942        1944        1946
160
140
120
100
80
1948       1950       1952       1954
YEARS
EMPLOYMENT
1956       1958
M
49
=  1
"1
1942       1944        1946
1948       1950       1952
YEARS
1954       1956       1958
1800
RETAIL TRADE
1600
w   1400
<
A
§   1200
Uh
O
if)
§   1000
A
A
5
800
600
200
1942       1944
1946      1948      1950      1952      1954
YEARS
1942       1944       1946      1948      1950       1952      1954      1956       1958
YEARS R 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
oo
CN
VO
CN
CN
CO
o_:
<
UJ
>-
U
cri
O
u
Z
I
<
U
Cr.
<
"■'-..■.-.:_..■■■•■
'■::-...|*..-.~
'   '
:.-■ -vv.f-:-'- ■'■■  M-M:M   .;   .
t'.M
Mf3*
i-^"1  1
f
K*WS*^aa"*.
'
\
t
,
HI
/St
.   1
(US
if1
,_%
Affl
11  ' :'     :
ft»» "
f
IM
■II
1
..■fl:
<
savnoa 10 SNomiw INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1958
R 15
o>
:
*.*_
4
*o
-    ,
^*
cn
i J§ <
#
Kxj
•f
! j
1     ill.  i
5      $.»£■*.   ■
**     \ ii
M #J
CN
;
;
Si
:..i...M:   :T-":■'.   ''
CN
m
CN
00
m
■ ■::-:::':'.-:-:'-: ■:■■
o
o
O
1-
ro
CN
00
ON
CN
■|_*-%x
——■■n_r-.wM&
to
.;■■ '■■■'.''■■' ■■'-■'-■■.'
o
c__
<
if
(%t
CN
UJ
>
CQ
M^tss
*
CN
:-v.:.-:--.*K-...M.';^:-
1
CN
CN
U.
O
*****X;
*
■
i
o   OC
** <
CN    ui
O
>-
u
Q
O
Q_
Q.
to
V *
■ §
00
ro
V*
«jL*j
ro
S;      §.....|:p..
:i
■r\
LU
£__
UJ
T
1
i    1
CO
CN
M /I
iff
V
to
u.
IP I
J1
i .f .
1          *
CN
UL
y  1
v w/*
;-
fljf
|            f
CN
o
UJ
_l
"1   /
M 4
^^^
O
1 if
:' .
M 1"
1
CN
iM
00
CM
fliiiii
ML    4
:
S<__r *
CN
Vj&f
^
CN1
savnoa jo SNomiw R 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
'?;-li-
O
IO
o
<*
t>
oo
CN
Os
CN
O
h-
O
in
00
CN
00
O
&$&
>&,
«...
to
W':M.
^MM^^i..
sO
-3-
<
LLI
:■:■:
W
|i:
f    1
■'."::::':::":   '-:
0-
>-
11;
% -M.'.
.__:
iim-
J.
l*.P^'
U
§_¥
4
c_i
LL.
O
MMM/».
CN
■SS.;.;.;.. ■;■   ;:M:.;;
-
z
o
1-
'
1
s ii
s
3«|
O
™#_
■'■'::--:i::;-::---:-
.M;:i:i: ros:::
*v;;j.v:;s:
tlliasS;
■■■   ■ ■ ■■■   ■
.:.t..£i.i:.i.il
CN
u
-)
'.:.:::■:
M_ it
*   <*
CO
Q
O
Q_
n
,*#
.*■ M!
4 Tp
ijfj"*
JLJ
- ■ -',_„
■
Os
"%
\  ;'•
-yr \
•o
>-
MS
Ii
|         ***
o
£__
>f   fl
-4§§
^r
to
UJ
Q_
O
LL.
■s».
O
_/
-*ifl
CN
LL.
/
J
CN
CJ
UJ
_J
<
>
/
O
y
CN
£
00
s
CN
Mill
..     ■ ■  ■ ■■
^_
O
\
™.i:_?
m\U0-W.
"&
O
1
■*
\
o
savnoa do SNomiw INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1958
R  17
oo
m
Ov
O
I-
00
CN
Ov
oi
<
UJ
>-
U
co
Z
o
I-
u
_D
Q
O
Q_
Q.
e>
z
z
5
<
>
1
i
msmmmM
#
^^
i
S \j
#88
'•
y^
.,$..'£.*.,.
0,00^0
|___~._._ .1      ^       ■      1   ..!..-__
Si   p
,.....„._......
:	
MMMr
*^#—
"
_______—
\gSll
:;     :'.
w^*™/
■Mil
;Sf.
savTioa jo SNomiw R 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
oo
m
o
oo
CN
O
to
G_
<
UJ
>
U
CQ
Z
o
I-
u
Z>
Q
O
c__
0-
sD
Z
c__
r-
U
<
u_
D
Z
<
5
UJ
_d
_i
<
>
to
to
O
c_:
<J5
i
1
i
c
i
^
11
i
1
\
I
J
II
M
_L  I
F
J
%
S«W
\i
1
Km*::
J
t
i*"*
i^^
1
*
J
i
1
:!M
.
1
\
i
fS
'"
!
p
 y.:
1
%
1
:i":.:
1
f
|
**•
!M; MM
■':■.: '■
'
1
i
i
«■£::
NIB*
■:■:■::■:■:■.:.-: |
%1;|
a; s.
II:
Ni
S3;
IS.
$::..
3'
|
ilptas
_ "/
3...:
£__
m
.si:W:
t*_
:::N:xS::<:
;1B. s
A
1
:|::::J:v:
i
mi i
A
<
sav~noa do SNomiw INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1958 R 19
TRANSPORTATION AND TRADE DIVISION
Transportation Section
The year 1958 was an extremely heavy one for the Transportation Section of the
Bureau of Economics and Statistics. Studies and briefs were prepared in connection
with the equalization of lumber, fruit, and vegetable rail freight rates in Canada, and
representations were made on behalf of the Government of British Columbia to the Board
of Transport Commissioners at hearings held in Ottawa, Vancouver, and Kelowna. The
judgment of the Board has not as yet been released on these important cases.
Studies were initiated in 1957 in connection with alternatives to horizontal increases
in rail freight rates in consultation with the Prairie and Maritime Provinces. The studies
were timely in view of the application of the railways in August, 1958, for a 19-per-cent
general increase in freight rates. The Governments of British Columbia and the Prairie
and Maritime Provinces vigorously opposed the 17-per-cent increase ordered by the
Board of Transport Commissioners and appealed to the Privy Council for its disallowance. The proposal of the Provinces for a temporary subsidy in lieu of an increase and
an investigation of the rail rate structure was agreed to in part by the Federal Government.   The Transportation Section played an effective role in this connection.
Representation was made on behalf of the Government of British Columbia by the
Transportation Section at the public hearings on tolls held in Ottawa by the St. Lawrence
Seaway Authority. The policy of the Government of British Columbia was to oppose
any change in the proposed toll structure.
The Transportation Section was called upon to assist the Provincial freight-rate
counsel in opposing an increase in rates to the British Columbia Telephone Company in
hearings held before the Board of Transport Commissioners in Vancouver.
Assistance was rendered the Pacific Great Eastern Railway in the establishment of
freight rates on grain and in negotiations for Federal feed-grain assistance and farmer-to-
farmer movements of grain from the Peace River District.
Studies were done to support the position of the Government of British Columbia
that the proposed railway to Pine Point, N.W.T., should be built from Grimshaw, Alta.,
rather than from Waterways.
In addition, the Transportation Section continued to provide a variety of services to
other Government departments, business, and industry, and in return received excellent
co-operation when information or other assistance was requested.
External Trade Section
The year 1958 proved to be a very active one for the External Trade Section.
Numerous requests for import and export data were received from business organizations,
other Government departments, universities, foreign trade commissioners, foreign government departments, and from foreign business organizations. Most of the data supplied
in answer to these requests were obtained from monthly tabulations of punch-cards
received from the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. The monthly tabulations give detailed
quantity and value figures for most of the commodities imported and exported through
British Columbia customs ports. In conjunction with other duties, the External Trade
Section prepared a number of articles and analytical tables for the Bureau's regular
weekly and monthly economic reports and also prepared and released in co-operation
with the Tabulation Section the Bureau's Statement of External Trade for the calendar
year 1957. Regular monthly import and export statistics were also sent to thirty-five
organizations and individuals. In addition to the Section's regular work, several special
reports were prepared; among these was a published report on recent economic developments in mainland China. Another was a statistical report on British Columbia trade
with the United Kingdom and other European countries for use by the Vancouver Board
of Trade's sixth offshore trade mission. R 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
s
0
ft.
s
"ft
U
-s.
■S
'C
cq
*_
'if
s ft
CO
"W
fc
s
0
u
k
H
K
&.
a
T-t
ft,
S
-3
l-U
K
«
f>j
IN.
*2
>o
k,
1
cq
K
<*
-g
0
6
«_
«)
ft,
3
>h
s
Jl
o
■K.
&
ft
"W
ft
5
£
o
!j
?>.
«Q
6.
K
0
ft
H
UJ
i_
fej
o -
m in if
t-ONW
VO
mNOr-.0sr--'-HQaNNO
o
tn
Os
no m m © i-h i—i m m ©
r-
■vto^mr-r-ooaom
up
rncor.OnwrJm^o
ON
cn r-      m r- o on *o o
r--
vi cn      r-       (N «h m i-«
*t
w-          cn      ti
nO
■vt'-ii>'dm(Sr-ooo
00
ONOorv-r—mcNi-it—^
V-J
csin^^f Nrtwa a
Ti
so
O^nOhhmXO
^*
a\ar.m^^»r~rH
m
Os
i'^r.ooov t "im^
m i-h       NDm^-NfcOTf
CN
mm      ■«■       t-t •-) cn
tfl-            TJ"       ,_,
CJs
NO
t^
^toor-NOONr-'^r'-'v-)
TH
m0N0CTrr-©r-t--m
>n
0\HlOH^h,l/_CCO\
On
in
mONOm^otNm^
t-v-
in
'S- m cn i—. r- r— cn no ©
NO
CN
>n t-^ i— oor^^j-m^oom
°V
oo" *-7       O NO On t~~ On" Tt
oo"
mm      no      o      f
ON
«■         ^r      --
NO
m^nootn'sOt^'df-'
00
fvtOOOhmH^
^ONOOOOONOcNi-HOvt-
ON
■-I-
r-O'-HONOOvotNw-)
»T)
in
© no (N © *- »— mO—i
ro Os cn "vr cn l— "^ o c-
r--
Os
Q
*-T *■*       rn no r-" "st-" oo in
Os
*t tT        On        OO        CS
o
tfl-            m
ND
W-
On'OOnCncNCN'^"©^"
© m oo cn i—i m >c in w
1
cn
oocNi—'©inNcr-mm
m
OTfr-NOOONONOOOO
cN(NmOi-ir~'-|CNO
On
Os
CN
r- i-h      oo © cn cn co >n
<i*.
mm      •* t-. on       tN
tn
s&r              cn
in
V-f
s—<r-i+-isocnnncno
Os
«ooMn»ff.>i."nn
m
r-CN^o-vtcNONCocNoc
oo
n
m" m* nc ti-' no" o oo cn r^
cn
mNO^OOntm
tn
On
r-; ©_ cn -^r in oo^ •<* r> o\
1—1
nd oc"      i-T r- © m" no m"
co"
m tN       o\       On       cn
CO
&<_-               CN
«■
ONOCNr-ocr-NOONm
6
a
m nc
m m oo oo m r—
m no v. r- O «-h
O c-
«0\tH<NMNNh^
On"
tn
m©>— NOinooaoNOm
m
Os
NOON-^-NDW-ir-CNOON
CN
,-(
r- m      T-cNNO-^-m'rr
tn
^t m       cn       r-       cn
&e-           m
tn
oooncnOcnOoocn'o
ONCN-vtCNmfNi-<-3-©
r-
o
oam^HH^nyo
NO
o
ON«ni-iT^oommOO\
vT
ONCNOND,vt—|r--m»~'
t1-
Os
on.wrt rn o r- oo o
^r
cnm      © i—' m tN m >n
CN
rf- cn       in       m      n
&r               CN
mr^mcNoy_JooTTro
NO
fNmNocN^oorNTj-
r^
P "*- °° ""i "1 ^l °. "*- ^
o^
Os
o't^m'Now^cNmNOND
"t
1C\>CM»if.ii*|H^
^i
Os
nooo       c-i cc *^Os cn Os
so as       cn       o" (N m" ri
CN
CN  CN          NO          NO           CN  ri
CN
W                  •—
en
W5-
mWlOOOCNNONOOOND
NO
r~oooo"/^OONmiOON
TfooTfmONmONOOo
m
m
00
NOONi-iOTT'-'CNr-ON
■*
NoooNor-'-"'-<aNOO
CN
as
oono      r~'-,Nor-ocN
•^■nd      voi-it-r-cNON
NO
CN CN        t—        -^"        (N r-t
CN
V±                         1-H
cn
vooooNr-cNmmmoo
On
cNNOONcNOoor-r-oo
m
r~-«-Hi>-vcO'-'mOr-
t^-
S
0\HttnonoomOt
o
Tf
ovinrvCvtOttNtN
oo
ON
^ CN       y— t> no_ »i cn r^
■*fr
in i-h       oo"      «n m" i-h m"
On"
cn m      oo      "vt      cn
&<_.                  <H
t«
u_
u
a
rt
Ph
•a
c
n
o 2
■    U
to   3
E
3
O
0
•a
0
1
° _7 3
H w -6
T3   rt  j.
rt  rt -C
z
s
t_»
3
0
a
*o
ricultural and fa
h and fishery pre
ire and textile pr
tod, wood produ
n and its produc
n-ferrous metals
n-metallic miner
emicals and allie
scellaneous prod
Totals, all
o
E
£
o
U
<
ES
c
0
z
5 _=
§
•S
s
k.
oq
^>
S
s
to
c
o
vj
o ~
IS
||
5 s
c
-s: h-
^> "*
jg On
*-, ^
s £
ft ft
C   <u
5 J,
p.
ft
ft
-v3
to
^  . o^
oo Tt o r- cn
^H
ooTj-w-imNOooi—i r-vo t
t^
0«n0^c-r-oocNoor-
m
tn
OS
>nmND'-iinv-)NOoocN'-"
r-
oooNCNt—i-HtN-mTfcNr-
3
0\CNO\£)O000ni— tn Os
hOtOfngotMMt
S"
vo h h n (v| o m w h m
«■                              CN
m
oom<NmcN—"0.©',tf|o
ON
ONi-'V-)CNONNO,Ntm^tCv.
tn
r~-voNOi—Noo\ONr-ONi-H
NO
SO
m'^-tinr-cNO\i-H^Hi-H,-H
«nmr-mo\t~-ONOtnNo
O
ON
inmONOooor-^HONr- ■-
m
1-1
vio^ Oih n nO^on co
NOHHMlSr. tniHtt
Vi                              CN
fs.Ncr~'ttmcNr-ONoom
^H
intnONNOtnini-HNpTj-r-
(N-^CNminincnONO-vt
00
ON
tn
ovcNmr-cNtnoNTfr^r-
O
tn
i—mNOoocNooNOOcn^-
On
Os
tNmTf\omi-H(Nr-ooc-
r-
i-HooooONO\Nott-.i-HOom
CN
no            i-Hi-HcncNmi-HTr
r-
feO-                                                l-H
m
Cfl-
inmOmcNOi-HONONO
Tt
ONmr-'NtcN'-HNOTtmNo
O
tr.rHTf-r-'nOoocNr-r-
Tt
CN-^-t_-On£jcnooOnOnu-)
TJ"
tn
movOr->nONw-.i-iaNOo
cn
ON
^■iH\ONtmv.'H(Naiai
ON
Or-r-r-mrNi-H©»nr-
cn
SO                i-hi— OcNTTi-nm
CN
Cfl-                              i-h
m
Cfl-
mcNminCNoo-^-mOO
a
moNNomr-OTTOrHNO
coTtNocNvriNooomc-t-
CN
m
OmOONOOf-OoocNO
m
fntO\HO>nN00Tf[v-
cNOmoNTfmmr~ocm
r~
On
CO
CNt-NONOrNW.OViTt'*
tn
W-j                hhOM^Ow*
Tf
6Q-                                        i-H
cn
«■
r-Tt-rt-mrj-oocNONOooo
Cr
mO^toocNm^tmmtn
o
ttM-in^-ooao^Hq
00_
CN
O" m i-7 On" t* o" CN cn oT tJ-"
oo"
aOr.nui'vtcv.'tNtro
ON
ON
i-HV£>Oooi-Ht--CNinoONO
r*
t \o « m O tj-h \o h in
oo
«n             i-Hi-<ocNin»-Hm
(N
{,0-                                                1-H
cn
tfl-
coqoio m co in t as co r-
HMttK.lflfNmO\0
00
o
mcNNotntnoc-cNNom
in
m>noNNCi-Ha.ootni>T_-
cn
i-HCNmi-H'-Ha\r-r-mON
On
ON
r-•* \c r-oo ih \c Tt o\ cvi
oo
coNoovt-oioMavorv
oo
m            -Hi-tONtNini-HCN
&e-
cn
00  N£
ifir
-f^f^"vomoo
CN
OTTTj-oo-^tt-ocNr-o
NO
tooTfOMMij'H^inm
ON
O
CNttCNM-ONNptn'itTj'ON
1
tn
HtiJOMH6H\OH-|^
ON
mmtNtNONO<NTtmON
m
cNtnt'^rNor-aomcoin
NO
m            i-h       no I- m      i-h
Tj"
w
CN
tfl-
Oi-HNocNmr-»n\omm
O
o\rj-Tj-NooNNomcooNr--
ON
CN NO fN t-
i-h" ^h* oo" OC
► r<l<s
00 Ov -h NO
cn
m tj
" cn cT i-Tcn
t
ooaNCNONintN-cNi-Hoor-
On
Omooi-Hr-Qo^tNomNo
NO
r-oommNo^cNONNom
OO
m             i-h       hth^       —>
O
f&
&e-
ooNotnooTfONrj-Omcn
a wr.Hhaoo^o\
CN
vov.NfcO'^o.iri'vfv.r-
OO
^MOCCrv.iHf.NtV.M
m
■*r
ttmiNO'o^r^movmON
On
NoincNint~-CNmcNt-^i>
Tf
oc>n^-cnm"HO\0\NOO\
CN
m             i-h       «n       ^J"
On
V3-
«■
i-HOoooNOmmrTNONor-
CN
r-o\mooooOi-H»-H(N^t
8
oo C
o. vi_ ov_ oo r- oo ^ vi
r-
-HtnooinTj-Norf-t-g-NO
Tj-ooNoooOcNmr-Om
«cf
TT
NO
On
ooovr-mor-^r^ri-HON
00
1—1
mmmNONONoooNCNom
ON
m            i-h      v.      m       i-h
00
tie-
tfl-
I
tn
tj
CJ
1
3
•a
i J.
1 o.
<»  3
a
3
O
Ih
0
o
Ih
ft
u
3
rt
o-
t
3
•o
c
a
3 9
o   _
d produ
and pro
Toducts
s	
j
v_
3
>.
00
o, __2
« « "d 3   d.
■9
u
rt'o_io_w^.o>'0—-,
o
>
and anim
.xtiles, an
-ood prod
its produ
ous metal
allx mine
Is and alii
neous pro
Totals, al
E
£
o
U
T3
C
rt
1".
P
c
c
Notfo
nimals
bres, t,
'ood, \.
on and
on-ferr
on-met
lemica
iscella:
<
<
E
5=
u
Z
ZL
s INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1958
R 21
The two foregoing tables summarize the external trade of British Columbia from
1947 to 1957. These figures differ from the regularly published trade statistics in that
they are confined to exports of products of British Columbia origin and to imports from
foreign countries for British Columbia consumption. The regular figures deal with all
items imported and exported through British Columbia customs ports.
STATISTICAL DIVISION
This Division is responsible for the collection, compilation, analysis, interpretation,
and publication of statistical information. Also, it is the duty of this Division to assist
other departments in the compilation of statistical information and to assist in establishing uniform statistical methods throughout the service. In addition, it co-operates with
other statistical bureaux in the elimination of duplication and answers inquiries relating
to statistical data.   Following is a brief outline of the statistics compiled in this Division.
Co-operative Statistical Agreements
The co-operative statistical agreements with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and
other Federal offices continued during 1958. The fields of co-operation and dates of the
original agreements are as follows: (1) Mining Statistics, 1926; (2) External Trade
Statistics, 1938; (3) Cost of Foods Statistics, 1939; (4) Provincial Government Payroll
Statistics, 1949; (5) Forecast of Capital and Repair and Maintenance Expenditures for
Provincial, Municipal, and Other Local Authorities, 1950; (6) Census of Construction
Statistics—Building Permits, 1951; (7) Census of Industry Statistics, 1954; (8) Nature
of Business Statistics, 1955; (9) Trade-union Statistics, 1955. In addition, copies of
Dominion Bureau of Statistics monthly reports on production, shipments, and stocks on
hand in British Columbia sawmills have been received since 1948. Commencing in
1953, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics agreed to supply this office with duplicates of
their " Operations in the Woods" forms. In return the Bureau assists the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics by checking mailing-lists, estimating production of delinquent forms,
and other services.
Conferences between the Provincial and Federal statistical bureaux are now held
annually. As a consequence, it is anticipated that continued progress toward the
elimination of duplication in this field will be made.
Conferences are now held periodically with the Federal Department of Labour,
and the elimination of duplication is under way, especially in the fields of trade-union
statistics and working-conditions statistics. The co-operative agreements have resulted
in savings to both Governments, to union secretaries, and to private industry.
British Columbia Cost of Food
The regular compilation of the quarterly Cost-of-food Index for Vancouver, Victoria, and New Westminster was carried on during 1958. Trade-unions, individuals, and
Government departments were supplied with information on food costs during the year.
Forestry Section
The Forestry Section of the Bureau again handled a large number of special requests
from the industry and other Government departments and contributed to the report of
the Fraser River Board. The previously published Statistical Records of the Forest
Industries in B.C. (logging, lumber, pulp and paper) were up-dated, and a new record
for Other Wood and Paper Using Industries was published. The Section also supplied
several commercial magazines with articles on British Columbia forest industries.
One further publication, Export Trade of British Columbia Forest Products, is
under way, and regional studies on the availability of waste material and non-commercial R 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
forest resources in connection with potential forest industries in British Columbia are
planned. Many helpful suggestions for the above-mentioned studies have been gained
from visits to forest operations and plants, and greatest co-operation from industry and
the British Columbia Forest Service has been experienced.
Mining Section
The total value of mineral production in 1957 for all classes of mining in British
Columbia was $172,264,617, and of this the principal metals lode gold, silver, copper,
lead, and zinc accounted for $111,968,693. Placer gold was responsible for $80,990,
the all-time lowest recorded value. Structural materials had a total value of $25,626,939;
industrial minerals, which include asbestos and sulphur, had a total value of $13,361,751;
and miscellaneous metals (antimony, bismuth, cadmium, indium, iron ore, tin, and
tungsten) had an aggregate value of $12,755,362. The total valuation of the production of mineral wealth, starting with coal in 1836 and followed by placer gold in the
rush of 1858, at the end of 1957 amounts to $3,905,810,966, and it is apparent that
the 4-billion-dollar mark will be passed well before the end of 1958, British Columbia's
Centennial Year. The metal-mining branch of the industry produces for an international
market at world metal prices. British Columbia sales are affected by prices in the United
States and by the value of United States money in terms of Canadian money. Throughout the year, United States money was at a discount in Canada. Settlement for all metals
reflects the rate of exchange, and the average discount for the year was about 4.2 per cent.
Fuels, composed of coal, natural gas, and crude petroleum, had a total value of
$8,470,927, of which coal contributed $7,340,339 and the others had a total of
$1,130,588, compared with $319,464 in 1956. Sulphur production from sour natural
gas was started late in 1957 at Taylor; while none was shipped that year, shipments did
start in 1958.
The average number employed in 1957 in all branches of the industry was 13,257.
Major expenditures were: Salaries and wages, $56,409,056; fuel and electricity, $8,937,-
567; process supplies (inclusive of explosives, chemicals, drill-steel, lubricants, etc.),
$24,257,177; Federal taxes, $8,170,826; Provincial taxes, $2,872,807; municipal and
other taxes, $907,143; levies for workmen's compensation (including silicosis), unemployment insurance, and other items, $1,983,553. Dividends amounted to $24,247,420.
The lode-mining industry spent $30,273,900 in freight and material charges on ore and
concentrates. Expenditure on exploration for petroleum and natural gas in 1957 was
$10,030,878. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1958
R 23
t^CNCN©ON(N*-~-mNO
ON00O0i-H-g-fNON0O©NO
0\"* r-^©©tNoc HO\ff|
fN no ©" t* 00* On" On *nON* ©'
fOlni-'CN'-H00NCON«)ON
ONtv|W>rtONl-">*CNOfv|'-l
vCNDt-Vddcr'mVoo'
,_H ,_ ,-H T-H CN B HH1H
ItlVO^tNf
oooo On >nr
©■*frO\«nc
mi-*"    i-"V
moiOiHTHHcomOh
OitiOiHfv|tN\o«giN
oo©oocN"*cnr~co©©
CO    !
t
|
Os    !
1
j
•-HCNoomNO-HTj-aNooONNOoooocNooONONCooo-HONinONr-moin^NOCN
i-Hmm«nr^^^tNtN'-HtNrMON^i--r~inoo^?incN'<tcocN'-'gNOOp~^tN
tj- i-nr-lNOOtn |o'fi,tv.l'_0_h^H cnvooo »nOt^oo ^in^t mONO-rf O©
$ vo <n no* No'in C "
- m On 13- m CN © _	
--H on on tNm oo o © oo r-oo r^ oo on no t-i on^^h
— CN M-'rti-wrt CN i-h" r^^rtr^ri
m©moomONm»ncN
^fm©oovoi-HtncNt^
"ni-^ooin cNtNm cocn
vo" co" oTo* oo" mV* i-h*oo"
HiH(T,[-.|N\cr^*
cn i-h cn CN m m so
on^hno»-cn
cNtnmoo
cNr^O^ONt-^
ONCNVootn
©o^cnr-m
f-HCNTj-'vOON*
1-H ^Hf-OOON
m © m vo --1
m r-vcr-^tn
c- On m On cn
1-hCT.NCO©
fi-( ,_. i- —. (N
oo oo tn mm
VO© mVOrH
O On tN ITliH
ONin't-'O'—*
mocnnh
ooONtnt-vo
1-
W   CO
« X!
P
H S
^3
■Sri
os-.
S'2'o
O..S8
O-J-   «
P P __
o G _;
o
VOtNOTt-ittNCNNO'tfTr
covoi-nmi—ONtNmi—cs
ON O0_© CN TT On On t~- V0 cn
jt cn r-* 1-* r-* oc h* no t* ©*
cNONCNr-'Vi— ©coor-
mtNCN cn cn m vo oo
©Ol-ONON
NO CNVOm CN
COCNt-;tNln
cn* T- m *o ©
O
2
O r- r-ooTf
' " On OOOON
(v|>H\OOW
m in On no r-
m vovqvqm
©*ON*in*in*m"
m r- m vo *tf
t- CN NO NO 00
©r-^t^ocrr
m r-mOTj-
tnos oo©on
3
o-
IA
rt •« -o
'"•Ort
is|
* -_ -o
o ? bo
■ s|
! 3 E
C iC   W
■la
1 B«
HS.
ill
*. .60^
iiii
EsSfe
S3-     N
O.I§|
■■s s '_; __
B" 8 "3
.si S|
E«-.S
«  - 2 !s
*-    >>    «     U
o b c _
'■'■a "'a
<=§ = I
o rt „,[_,
If1: i
in   - ** rt
E^S £
o|^8
S'S ™°
75 3 w_ r*
oa|S_
H" ES
_«
i cn CN-cN on m i— r- so m © no m —.
tootNr-ONCN,3",n^l-0\cNcoi-Hm
3 r^ m m © on cn oo tj-m oncnon ^r
t tN CS CN 00* in rn CN ^frCNOCfN CN NO
CNOCNOr-CNi-HtNCNCN
r~ ooih_om
m*m"<t'**''*
CN
NC
CN»n    !
00
ON
cnrr
ON
tnov   :
ON
CN
1—
<Nr-
OC
oo«n   :
M
fN
CNCN
gON-y-cNinmmcNONNO
vo©ONTHtN©moooN
^r r-; on o_ vo^ © tn •v o\ oo
o"cn tN cn*~ Tf ^-*r-*r* 1-*
r-iP-FHfH1H^cv4rj\£.r>.
Tj-Trvor-r-
■* OONOO
r-r-vo«n
TfrOOifr©
oo tJ- mtN O
r-©ONin vo
CN OO-h^ CO t~~
oc" vcr~*r- vd'
aiir-ot
m^o^i-NO
rf if m <n no
CNOO
»-<m
coin
O
z
cnmovooocN'^"min'*ON
or-ONTrmm^cnoNONm
■*tNmr—moN^t^r-Noco
^ HiHfrj'CAtvTiH-HOO
COTfrtTf
CN i-h i-h CN
oooNCNcoNpvo'-'rv.r^r*
cNONoovoovocNOt-ON
oo ©^ \Or s—r m vq, t-; ro « w
On On On On'ON "n m* ^J* 00 ©
incNvofNTrmt—i—m»n
©©t^voooi-Hcn©oo©
itiiriOooTt
©ONi-r-t-
i-H^vq^tm On
m"r-*r-"o*o*
vo incnm cn
r-r-cN cncn
cn cn m rn »-h t-- r- oo oo ©     vommcNCN
cNOO'*©'^-»nNOOmcoTl-ON»nONOo,n©ir.voiON,^f^iooOr-fNinmO»-
TtcnrHrfcni-Hinm^fvotnootNOcvotNrviONi—ooONinmm'-Hr--ooNOinoc
'-H(Ni-Hm^t'-'i-HNONOVOOOTftrONmOOooOO\ i-h_© — <-. ONOOOOi-nt-OCN
€ft'»-H r-TrnTTco'inin© ocinNOCNON t-~*r~*No*i—o"in*i~H*NO--»n* o* cNOtn*
CNONt^'-Hrncor--r--r--oo,-"NOtnt^-vDr-r--©ONoo—'mm.i-H(N
m m m cn cn '"i'-1 (NOf; ^h     <N«noo©--Oi
m m" \o*No'm* r-Z *A~ c* ri *
tn ri in cn oo
^h oo m no co
m m i— cn cn
©* no m rr* On"
ov m r~ Ovm
■* © NCr in vq
•<* >n Tt [—* On*
VO rj- -<3- Tl- <N
O On © OC CN
m m tn M- oo
vc'vo'tt r-'o"
m cn oc »n m
cn m m «n m
^1-HOl0^mt^cso\^^lnlnr_■©VDr-•Oooo'^_■ocN©co^~r--r~•■,vt©o^>n
*■ o\ i-< cn tT vo ^ cn © cn r- p- m co i-h oo \© © o\ os so m 1-1 co m o cn r- r
o©^r--       ■ ■                    ■■■ -	
5 "0- m t- cn cn m cn cn "* 00 in m on "*.no m on ^ 1—xtovvq 00 on_ on r- •-•icn
*rJHrt     r^rvTNo'o'i—*i-Hm*vo"inO*^rfoN*m*i—o"«*r^*m'in'o*No*ON*'*ON*
ON^t--in'Ni--Hi-'oor--tnvoTr'vfOi-|,r,vfmTrvo-^fcnm'^rin
Ov_ O in cn cn r- vo in vo no *"J On^ o-^ oc •-•
i-Tcn—'* t~-\o*r-*KvN*
CNOi-HOOOTj-itTrTj'NO
iH00YHf^«;fi.h-M*-fv|
O^O in 00 t- CN Os^SO NO i-h
i-h" 00* On* VO* CN* T* TJ-" OO* NO* Tf*
inmr-vooNr-intNVom
i-Hcncn     cNtN-^-vom
moovONON
OOOO tn 00 On
©"oovo'^'oo*
cnTf cn cn©
i-h      r-in-m
VOVOV.if.i-'
*-Hr-mi>r^
m*Ti*T_"o*m*
O\«nvo"nr-
Ov ^ih oc cn
tnmmcS^f
m©"N+tnt^
i-hCN^i-vo
[—CO COVOOn
no oc'c^J 00 r-
m mO fN vri
o On on 00 m
ci tNm'NOVO
Osm ocm cn
VCT-iO-vt
th »^ © i-^cn
SCNVC ON f'
ONm r- vo
00 ©CJ CN©
©'©'i-'dV
CJi-i
■t 1-"
G*ntr-o\t>
ON^CNOncN
movvqoom
cn nV" cNih
■^f c-co-^r Tf
tNcsm men
©mtnONVO
no mm*-H cn
mi-H cNON_m
m*r-"cioo"oo
m © m r- vo
i-h 00 oc m cn
vovo'r-'c-*vo*
cIooti-   unOO^fONOomONinvooo
r^oooN     m m no no tN tN on rn in in r-
Tt noon   ]     i-h tj- mcN inm Tj-r-oom
^©" i-h"©" On vo O*oo co*.-*
hhih     tnr-OtNvo
intNC-TtCN
CN*m" CNCNCN
t—mr^-^mmt-HCcnOoooomo
OOXTfrnitw-iHOMH-HOOh
©mONOo© 00 cn ino\_o^©oo t-< r-
00 00* ©* 00* CN CN* On" r-* CN*NO* ©* Tf" tJ cn
oovitcnmcNcmnOoo
tntn^ONmcnvotNi-Hoo
i-^vqmON ootNON mr-m
t-T 00" Tj* 00 o Tf m* no on* 00*
ro Tt vo tN ih 00 T}-[N t tj-
© vo «n (Nrnri m m cn f-
C~vo No't--»n
0--hh
On ^t On F- On
©C;'—i^m_
mvom©it
OC On 00 00 On
00 On TMnON
m^inNOr^cni*invot^rn^invct^fn-^vnvDr~-m'!tinNOr--cnTrinNOc-
in"nininininininintninininininintnininin»nin"n»ninininininin
OnOnOnOnOnOnOnOiOnONOnOnonOnOnONOnOvOnOnOnOnOnOnOnOnOnOnOnOn
m-^-tnNcr-mTj-mNOt^
mmtnminmmminiri
OnOvOnOvOvOnOsOnOnOn
mittnvDr-m^tmvcr-
m inmminintnmmm
0>OiOnOnOnOnOnOvONOv
vo^menvo
mj^ — vooo
0O°O«CNi-H
in*^ON*o^'
ON^glNVD'-
r^^ooNin
tnONoo-<t ©
H enen
oo^mt^oo
n<2r~at>
r-_<^^^m
°o_r, r-'rfo*
NO£^m©i-H
VD-'* tnCNi-H
m^tnvot-
if.Jit.imn
On On On On Ov
O
E
B
o
U
_3§
o
O
B
lH
c
3
O
F
OJ
5
la
tf>
•0
z R 24
'   '
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Labour Section
During 1958 the co-operative arrangement with respect to the collection and compilation of British Columbia industrial-labour statistics continued between the Department of Labour and the Department of Industrial Development, Trade* and Commerce.
Further progress was seen in the matter of joint Provincial and Federal participation
toward a common plan for the standardization of statistical inquiries from both Governments, and with some discussions already under way and further conferences planned,
it is believed the time is not too far distant when labour statistics available to both
authorities might be collected on the basis of a single inquiry.
Under the presently existing arrangement, the annual survey of industry and business was again conducted by the Labour Section covering the previous year, a statistical
review of the findings resulting from this survey being prepared for publication under
heading of " Statistics of Trades and Industries " in the Annual Report of the Department
of Labour for the current year 1958.
In co-operation with the British Columbia Research Council, basic labour data were
supplied for purposes of long-term studies of unemployment at present being undertaken by that body. Information from statistical records involving industrial surveys
conducted by the Labour Section during the past eleven years thus became available
as a basis for the primary work of the current study.
Continuing projects within the Labour Section during the year included the preparation of industrial payroll and employment information on the basis of regional segregations, an alphabetical index of reporting firms arranged by industrial classification and
geographical location, a new edition of the list of British Columbia industrial firms in
size groups, and various other supplementary items.
Maintenance of regional group statistics as applying to metropolitan areas was continued in the case of the metropolitan area of Vancouver and the metr.politan area of
Victoria, the payroll and employment totals in this instance indicating the degree of
expansive growth and new development, particularly in the urban areas.
A distribution of the British Columbia industrial payroll throughout the ten census
areas during the past four years is shown in the following table, the census map being also
presented for reference concerning the geographical location of the various areas.
Comparative industrial payroll totals reported in the metropolitan areas of Vancouver and Victoria are shown in a separate table for the years 1956 and 1957.
British Columbia Industrial Payrolls by Statistical Areas for the
Comparative Years 1954 to 1957
Regional Area
Total Payrolls (Salaries and Wages)
1954
1955
1956
1957
No. 1                        -----	
$17,125,372
32,519,954
20,790,437
389.154,398
117,023,841
12,487,726
22,351,967
18,012,903
23,458,261
3,387,399
5,224,932
$18,197,303
35,044,981
25,599,069
417,102,635
127,543,124
15,313,185
26,336,337
23,336,723
36,329,470
4,591,602
2,421,348
$20,519,964
39,484,744
25.595.831
$19,351,672
41,231,542
No 3      	
24.471.475
489.455.851     I     541.413.422
142,538,408
19,244,778
31,397,256
27,477,359
47,205,898
5,286,187
2,128,123
144,072,303
16,560,167
No 7                                      - -   --
35,770,167
No 8                                               	
23,406,971
41,978,977
13,504,050
Not specified —  	
1,475,248
Totals            - -	
$661,537,190
$731,815,777
$850,334,399
$903,235,994 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE, 1958 R 25
Industrial Payroll Totals Reported for the Census Metropolitan Areas of
Vancouver and Victoria, 1956 and 1957
Area
Payroll (Salaries and Wages)
1956
1957
Census metropolitan area of Vancouver, including Vancouver City, North Vancouver
City and District, West Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Fraser Mills,
$438,319,529
55,182,266
$485,783,691
61,269,565
Census metropolitan area of Victoria, including Victoria City, Esquimau, Oak Bay,
Census Divisions
MARKET RESEARCH DIVISION
Growing interest is being shown by business and industry in the market potential of
the Province. A large and varied number of requests have been renewed during the year
for market data and assessment of industrial and commercial opportunities.
Specific studies dealing with the iron and steel, aluminium, and paper-using industries have been undertaken to indicate the possibilities of industrial expansion in these
fields. Other reports include a forecast of business conditions as anticipated by executives
of leading business firms. R 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PUBLICATIONS
Monthly Bulletin of Business Activity.—This publication has been continued and
expanded. Special articles of current interest have been included throughout the year.
Issues for the first, second, and third quarters include an economic review of the preceding quarter. This review replaces the Quarterly Bulletin of Economic Conditions, which
was discontinued in 1958.
Summary of Business Activity in British Columbia.—This publication is a companion of the above publication. It summarizes the current year's economic picture and
presents historical series relating to business activity in the Province.
External Trade.—Summary of monthly statistics covering external trade are contained in the aforementioned monthly bulletin. A statement of external trade through
British Columbia customs ports and covering commodities with an aggregate value of
$50,000 and over is published annually.
British Columbia Trade Index.—This publication lists the products manufactured
by British Columbia industries.   A new issue was released early in 1956.
British Columbia Directory.—The first issue of this publication was released in
1957 and lists wholesalers and distributers alphabetically and by products, importers
and exporters alphabetically and by products, and an alphabetical list of manufacturers'
agents.
British Columbia Regional Industrial Index.—This index contains available statistics on a wide range of subjects covering all areas of the Province. This publication was
released in 1957.
British Columbia Facts and Statistics.—The twelfth edition of this publication will
be released in 1959. This publication provides graphic, general, and historical facts
and statistics relating to British Columbia under the following headings: Population,
Education, Government and Finance, Judiciary, Banking, Transportation, Communication, Retail Trade, Agriculture, Fisheries, Mining, Forestry, Manufacturing, Water Power,
Tourist Statistics, and Economic Activity.
Establishing a Business in British Columbia.—A revised edition of this brochure
was released in 1958. This publication gives to prospective investors information relating to the establishment of a business in British Columbia.
Salary and Wage Rate Survey, 1958.—This publication provides the salary and
wage rates in selected clerical, professional, and trade occupations in business and industrial establishments for metropolitan Vancouver, and Victoria, Southern Interior and
northern centres.
Executive Opinion Poll.—This publication indicates business conditions in 1958
as compared with 1957 and the outlook for 1959. It covers the following economic
factors: Sales, prices, employment, wages, earnings, and capital expenditure. It is
based on a survey of a number of major companies in British Columbia.
Consumption of Materials and Supplies in B.C. Manufacturing Industries.—This
publication lists the materials consumed by the principal industries in the Province during 1955.   It was compiled from material made available during 1958.
China—An Expanding Market in International Trade.—This is a special report
dealing with recent economic developments in China, with special emphasis on trade
possibilities with British Columbia. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1958 R 27
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE OFFICE
Activity of this office centres on the promotion of new industrial enterprises throughout the Province, assistance to established businesses when required, and promotion of
domestic and export trade.
This work is carried out in co-operation with other Provincial Government departments, Federal Government departments, Boards of Trade, Chambers of Commerce,
the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, industrial
commissions, banks, railway industrial agents, and foreign trade representatives in Canada and overseas.
BRANCH PLANT AND MANUFACTURING UNDER
LICENCE INQUIRIES
The number of inquiries received on the possibility of establishing branch plants
in the Province was most gratifying. This year, however, the Department noted that
the greatest percentage of inquiries received came from United Kingdom manufacturers,
who undoubtedly are becoming more aware of our fast-growing economy.
During the year the Department also made a concerted effort to encourage manufacturing under licence. A questionnaire directed to British Columbia manufacturers
brought an enthusiastic response, detailing facilities available for preferred production
of products under arrangement. This effort is developing most satisfactorily, and through
British Columbia House, London, firms in England and the Continent have been put in
touch with British Columbia firms interested in manufacturing additional lines on a
licence or royalty basis.
COMPOSITE INDUSTRIAL MAP OF THE LOWER MAINLAND
The 1958 edition of this map was printed during November and can be purchased
for $1 per copy, which includes the 5-per-cent social services tax. Numerous requests
for this map have already been received. The map indicates the zoned and potential
industrial areas, comprising an area from North Vancouver to the City of Port Coquitlam.
Zoned industrial areas of twelve municipalities are indicated. White paper prints showing the municipalities of Delta and Surrey, which are not shown in their entirety on the
master map, are available also at no extra cost.
HANDICRAFT DIRECTORY
The 1958 edition of this directory was released during the year. The directory lists
producers in British Columbia who are interested in finding a market and who are in a
position to supply reasonable demands. The usual distribution was made to retail and
wholesale firms as a guide for handicraft items they may wish to purchase. Reports
were again received by the Department on sales made through listings appearing in this
directory.
BRITISH COLUMBIA INDUSTRIAL DESIGN COMMITTEE
The Committee had an active year in encouraging appreciation of industrial design
and its importance as a factor in production and marketing of British Columbia products.
The Committee arranged several lectures and exhibitions, which were held in the
Vancouver Art Gallery. For the first time a seminar on industrial design was held at the
University of British Columbia, which proved to be most successful. The course dealt
with general design principles. Membership of this Committee includes representation
from the Federal Department of Trade and Commerce, Provincial Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce, Department of Education, University of
British Columbia, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, Vancouver Board of Trade,
Vancouver School of Art, British Columbia Research Council, Association of Profes- R 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
sional Engineers of British Columbia, Canadian Association of Consumers, and Architectural Institute of British Columbia.
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS TRADE AND INDUSTRY COUNCIL
Membership of this Council consists of representatives of trade and industrial promotion departments of all the Canadian Provinces. During the past business year the
Deputy Minister of this Department acted as Chairman. At the annual meeting in
Quebec in October a project of several years' standing was brought to a conclusion with
the announcement by the Federal Department of Trade and Commerce that a detailed
study of imports would be commenced as soon as staff could be organized. It is expected
this Import Replacement Plan will assist the Provinces materially in their effort to attract
new industry, either through foreign branch plant or licence manufacture arrangement
with Canadian firms.
Provincial co-operation with the Department of Citizenship and Immigration in
industrial and commercial enterprises of immigrants is continuing through provision of
literature, statistics, and location information.
REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
During the year this office continued to work closely with industrial establishments,
Boards of Trade, Chambers of Commerce, research groups, and other agencies interested in, or actively engaged in, the industrial development of the Province of British
Columbia. The co-operation received from these organizations is of great value to the
Department.
Several Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce were assisted in their preparation of industrial brochures, etc.
Periodic field-trips were made by the Industrial Commissioner and the field representative, in the course of which they made regular calls on existing industry, Boards of
Trade and Chambers of Commerce, transportation and utility companies, and municipal
officials. The close contact of past years with the British Columbia Research Council
was maintained, and several inquiries were forwarded to that organization. Numerous
inquiries were received from companies and individuals outside of British Columbia who
expressed interest in locating within the Province, and pertinent information was supplied.
PUBLIC RELATIONS, ITINERARIES, AND INTRODUCTIONS
This field, like all other sections of the office, has grown considerably in the past
year and has proven to be of major importance to the businessmen from foreign lands
who visited our Province. Assistance has been given by the Industrial Commissioner
and the Administrative Assistant.
TRADE AND INDUSTRY BULLETIN
During the year under review this bulletin, listing trade inquiries, licence manufacture opportunities, and news of commercial interest, completed nine years of continuous publication. There was a marked increase in the number of inquiries, and numerous agents have been appointed representing a wide range of products.
The Department appreciates the co-operation of the Journal of Commerce in reprinting the Trade and Industry Bulletin as a public service feature.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TRADE PROMOTION
Our office continued its close association with the western representative of the
Department of Trade and Commerce and the B.C. Products Bureau of the Vancouver
Board of Trade.   Overseas markets for numerous products have been found. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1958 R 29
BRITISH COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR
In May of 1958 the first British Columbia International Trade Fair was held in
Vancouver at Exhibition Park. This fair was sponsored by the Government of the Province of British Columbia, Department of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce,
and was the major Centennial event of commercial significance. It was the first international trade fair ever held in Western Canada.
During the nine-day period the fair was open, hundreds of buyers and over 150,000
people passed through the gates. It attracted 160 exhibitors, which were housed in the
various buildings, including eleven government pavilions in the Hall of Nations—Canada,
Alberta, British Columbia, Czechoslovakia, France, Western Germany, Israel, Japan,
South Korea, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. The additional 149 exhibitors
displayed a wide selection of products, ranging from heavy construction equipment to
small household appliances. These products were purchased by the buyers and admired
by the thousands of visitors who thronged the grounds.
The objects of the Trade Fair were fulfilled as exhibitors sold goods and services
estimated in excess of $1,000,000.
The Department takes this opportunity to thank the Trade Fair Committee members and staff for their whole-hearted support. R 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MECHANICAL TABULATION DIVISION
The Mechanical Tabulation Division operates as a data-processing centre for those
departments of the Government requiring the services of mechanical or electronic equipment to handle large-scale statistical or accounting procedures.
To meet the diversified needs of the various departments, a fairly complete installation of punched-card equipment is rented on a monthly basis. Although no charge is
made to the various offices for this work, accurate job costs are maintained through a
time-card system, enabling the Division to assess the value of work done and study
machine utilization. Details as to the value of work done for each department are listed
in the accompanying table, which shows comparative figures for the past five years.
The Division is equipped with eight alphabetic printers, nine sorters, two gang
summary punches, two end-printing document punches, one alphabetic interpreter, two
collators, two multiplying punches, one accumulating reproducer, one facsimile poster,
twelve punches, and seven verifiers.
To operate the equipment, a well-trained staff has to be maintained and at present
consists of a senior supervisor, assistant supervisor, five senior machine operators, eight
machine operators, two senior key-punch operators, eighteen key-punch operators, a
senior clerk-stenographer, and a clerk. In addition, three members of the Liquor Control
Board staff are attached to the Division to maintain liaison and perform necessary clerical
functions.
For operating purposes, the Division is divided into seven sections headed by five
senior machine operators and two senior key-punch operators, each responsible for a unit
of work, the unit of work being determined by the volume and nature of work to be done.
At present the following sections are in operation: Health and Welfare Section, Liquor
Control Section, Forestry Section, General Statistical Section, Annual Report Section,
Forestry Key-punch Section, and General Key-punch Section.
In addition, the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service maintains a Key-punch
Section whose work is tabulated in our Health and Welfare Section.
Similarly, a large volume of punched cards is received from the Dominion Bureau
of Statistics, Ottawa, and the Scaling and Royalty Division of the British Columbia Forest
Service in Vancouver for the preparation of material for special studies on trade and
timber cut.
A distribution of the percentage of work done for the various departments is shown
in chart form in Fig. I.
Fig. II shows a similar distribution of work done by our key-punch sections; the
natural division between Forestry and all other jobs determines the area of responsibility
of the two senior key-punch operators.
To establish the percentage of work done by the five sections of the Division, keypunching has been excluded and the results shown in Fig. III. While this distribution
does not appear entirely equable, the Division has been established mainly on nature of
work and is balanced by employing more experienced personnel in the larger sections.
The work level for the Division has reached a peak for the equipment and staff
employed, so that without a major increase in expenditure we are unable to undertake
any new large-scale operations. A constant effort is directed toward work simplification
and cost reduction so that the best possible use is made of the equipment.
As the result of continuous demands by the various departments for work requiring
the use of electronic data-processing equipment, an Electronic Data-processing Planning
Committee has been set up, with representatives from the departments concerned to
establish the requirement for and feasibility of establishing an electronic data-processing
centre on a service bureau principle. This Committee has in turn appointed an E.D.P.M.
Working Committee to act as the fact-finding body for the Planning Committee. Both
Committees have been very active in the preparation of recommendations for submission
to the Minister of Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE, AND COMMERCE,  1958
R 31
o_
_-
a
u_
I-
0-
LlI
u
z
5
z
w
Q
o
0_
lxl
a.
x
h-
z
o
_>
UJ
>
J
111
5
0-
D
(_>
UJ
D-
_-
_3
u. R 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Comparative Cost Statement
Department and Branch
1953/54
1954/55
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
$685.20
$1,010.26
$1,681.48
$5,709.61
$4,641 61
Attorney-General—
Credit Union	
$187.16
$430.07
Fire Marshal                                  	
8,628.48
28,857.43
105.86
1,227.01
$5,423.86
33,784.56
$5,165.46
38,295.26
$7,355.49
27,721.24
132.24
7,592.25
25,089.79
174 34
Official Committee •           .   . -
Totals       _	
$39,208.42
$43,460.72
$35,208.97
$37,778.93  | $34,513.46
Education—
$1,626.06
1,358.68
$1,388.84
714.80
$1,386.24
$1,549.56
$1,703.73
1,620.81
Division of Tests, Standards, and Research...	
Totals  	
$2,984.74
$2,103.64
$1,386.24
$1,549.56  |    $3,324.54
Health and Welfare—
$16,384.44
$14,525.24
$11,967.42
7,732.71
1
Sin.7fin.17   I  S12.121.14
Vital Statistics              .            -  	
30.15
6.692.22
6,986.86
17,867.14
13.476.98
Totals   -   ,-	
$23,371.30
$32,392.38
$19,700.13
$17,482.54 | $25,598.12
$647.77
$946.73
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce—
1
$12,421.30 | $14,849.50
$15,706.12
1
$11,121.94     $12,188.18
Labour—Annual Statistical Report  	
$2,627.24
$3,621.80
$3,954.83
$3,251.04 |    $3,384.33
Lands and Forests—
$288.88
5,064.96
12,880.46
971.02
$718.83
8,722.76
39,754.31
1,881.64
$462.07
9,767.21
4Q.763..6
$164.77
$7,235.38
31,130.98
1,220.12
10,478.65
49 243.2.1
.     1        	
15 05 |             3.79
$19,205.32
$39,586.48
$51,077.54
$60,007.89 | $59,890.42
$222.36
$236.49 |       $433.98
Provincial Secretary—
$4,929.00
$6,918.86
$7,191.02
$6,567.77
12,895.97
$5,834 41
186.19
11,741.00
11,701.68
10,068.90
9,100.04
$16,670.00
$18,620.54
$17,259.92
$19,463.74 | $15,120.64
Recreation and Conservation—
	
$202.91
$442.46
$32.78
Travel Bureau   	
$549.00
Totals  	
$549.00
$202.91
$442 46 |          $32 78
$117,821.29
$156,194.32
$147,347.23
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1959
,10 -159-7170

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0355426/manifest

Comment

Related Items