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Annual Report of The Social Welfare Branch of the Department of Health and Welfare for the Year Ended… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1958

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 PROVINCE   OF  BRITISH   COLUMBIA
Annual Report of
The Social Welfare Branch
of  the  Department  of
Health and Welfare
for the Year Ended March 31 st
1957
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1958  Victoria, B.C., December 2nd, 1957.
To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Social Welfare Branch of the Department of Health and
Welfare for the year ended March 31st, 1957, is herewith respectfully submitted.
E. C. F. MARTIN,
Minister of Health and Welfare.
Office of the Minister of Health and Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C. Social Welfare Branch,
Victoria, B.C., December 2nd, 1957.
The Honourable E. C. F. Martin,
Minister of Health and Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Social Welfare Branch
for the year ended March 31st, 1957.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
E. R. RICKINSON,
Deputy Minister of Welfare.
Social Welfare Branch,
Victoria, B.C., December 2nd, 1957.
E. R. Rickinson, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Welfare.
Sir,—I submit herewith the Report of the Social Welfare Branch for the year ended
March 31st, 1957.
J. A. SADLER,
Director of Welfare. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
(SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH)
Hon. E. C. F. Martin Minister of Health and Welfare.
SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
E. R. Rickinson Deputy Minister.
J. A. Sadler Director of Welfare.
Miss Amy Leigh Assistant Director of Welfare.
J. McDiarmid Departmental Comptroller.
Miss Marie Riddell Provincial Supervisor, Family Division.
Miss Ruby McKay Superintendent of Child Welfare.
E. W. Berry Chairman,   Old-age  Assistance  and  Blind
Persons'  and Disabled Persons'  Allowances Board, and Cost-of-living Bonus.
Dr. J. C. Moscovich Director of Medical Services.
Mrs. E. L. Page Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions.
Miss E. S. Wyness Provincial Supervisor, Social Service Department, Divisions of Tuberculosis Control
and Venereal Disease Control.
F. G. Hassard Superintendent, Brannen hake School for
Boys.
Miss W. M. Urquhart Superintendent, Girls' Industrial School.
J. M. Shilland Superintendent, Provincial Home.
E. L. Rimmer Administrator, Region I.
R. Talbot Administrator, Region II.
R. I. Stringer„__: Administrator, Region HI.
J. W. Smith Administrator, Region IV.
V. H. Dallamore Administrator, Region V.
Miss Mary K. King Administrator, Region VI.  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Part I.—General and Regional Administration-
General	
Assistant Director of Welfare.
Regional Administration—
Region I	
Region II	
Region III.
Region IV-.
Region V_
Region VI.
Part II.—Divisional Administration-
Family Division—
Social Allowances	
Mothers' Allowances	
Family Service	
Child Welfare Division	
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowances, and Disabled Persons' Allowances Board, and Supplementary Assistance	
Medical Services Division	
Part III.—Institutions—
Industrial School for Boys___
Industrial School for Girls.	
Provincial Home, Kamloops
Welfare Institutions Board...
Page
.    9
. 11
. 14
_ 15
. 17
. 18
. 18
19
22
25
33
37
44
64
69
74
77
79
Part IV.—Medical Social Work Services—
Social Service Department, Division of Tuberculosis Control  86
Part V.—Accounting Division  87  Report of the Social Welfare Branch
PART I.—GENERAL AND REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
GENERAL
Again during the past year the staff of the Social Welfare Branch has made every
effort to help the individual who is in need in the Province. The generic casework
approach has been used, and the service given was preventive, rehabilitative, and remedial.
Whether or not the individual was living in unorganized or organized territory, he
received the same care and understanding. The municipalities have continued, through
their social welfare offices, to give the some good service.
Many projects and problems have faced the Social Welfare Branch through the year,
and research has been necessary. Miss B. W. Snider, research consultant, has been
extremely active in compiling data and information so necessary for efficient operation
of the service, while Mrs. C. Mackenzie, office consultant, has continued to improve office
methods and procedures.
Meetings of Planning Council, Regional Administrators, and the Manuals Committee
continued and have proved most productive. Mr. G. C. Watkins, civil defence liaison
officer, continued his lecture programme to local groups throughout the Province in
connection with civil defence welfare matters.
Population increases have made further demands on our services, and the following
table gives a comparison of case loads for the years 1955, 1956, and 1957:—
Numerical and Percentage Comparison of Case Load by Major Categories
as at March 31st for the Years 1955, 1956, and 1957
Category
1955
Number
Per Cent
1956
Per Cent
1957
Number
Per Cent
Total for Province-
Family Service	
Social Assistance	
Blind Persons' Allowance..
Old-age Assistance-
Old Age Security bonus and health services
Disabled Persons' Allowance	
Child Welfare	
Health and institutional	
61,506
1,728
11,692
440
9,240
31,797
147
5,337
1,125
100.00
2.80
19.00
0.71
15.02
51.70
0.23
8.67
1.82
62,764
1,640
11,610
451
8,853
32,494
959
5,669
1,088
100.00
2.61
18.47
0.72
14.04
51.77
1.53
9.03
1.73
60,383
1,443
9,537
661
8,302
32,865
1,203
5,656
716
100.00
2.39
15.79
1.10
13.75
54.42
1.99
9.37
1.19
For the years 1955 and 1956 the case-load figures show the total of family units
and shared services. In January, 1957, the method of compiling case-load statistics
was changed, so that for the year 1957 the case-load figures denote only the family units
and (or) individuals—that is, cases—and do not include shared services. This change
accounts for the decrease in total case load. The new method was adopted on the basis
of the study and recommendations of the Statistical Returns Method Committee, which
has been giving consideration to all statistical findings within the Branch. S 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Social Assistance figures include both Mothers' Allowance and Social Allowance
cases. The health and institutional returns include tuberculosis, psychiatric, collections,
hospital clearance, Provincial Home, Provincial Infirmary, and welfare institutions
services.
The combined percentages of Old-age Assistance and Old Age Security bonus and
health services show 66.72 per cent for 1955, 65.81 per cent for 1956, and 68.17 per
cent for 1957. Although there was a slight decrease in these numbers in 1956, an
increase has taken place in 1957. This increase is due partially to the increase in population and also to the relaxing of certain eligibility regulations, which has resulted in a
larger group of individuals being included for these old-age benefits.
The co-operation fully extended by the municipal officials and the officials of other
agencies was appreciated by our Branch members.
Respectfully submitted.
J. A. Sadler,
Director of Welfare. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH S 11
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF WELFARE
The task of building a capable staff is the responsibility of the office of the Assistant
Director of Welfare. This has been an educational as well as an administrative task from
the outset.
The basic policies developed by our administration have been accepted by an understanding Civil Service Commission. They rest upon the requirement of professional training for all staff employed in the field service. The schools of social work have been unable
to provide us with the numbers of professionally prepared people we have needed. Their
inability is partly the result of an acute general man-power shortage, and the result, too,
of a " changed world."
The " changed world " is the post-war world, rather than depression and war, which
carry their unique threats to family life. We live to-day in a period of inflation, and this
is proving as great a threat to the family as the other cataclysms ever were. Our Province
is growing rapidly in population and wealth, and with these changes, problems increase
for the individual and the family. The need for social workers to help to decrease the
threat of broken homes, mental illness, delinquency, crime, and alcoholism is obvious to
all enlightened people, but the supply of trained people is as small as the problems are
large.
This agency is meeting the man-power shortage by a sharp increase in the numbers
given in-service training. If all of the latter had professional training, our complement
of social workers to-day might be expected to keep the social upheavals of our people
from becoming worse; with more trained people we could give the quality and quantity
of service that is so desperately needed to build a stronger group of self-supporting citizens.
The Social Welfare Branch has done its share in past years to build professional standards
and to train, well but incompletely, the people without professional qualifications it has
employed. The latter earn our sincerest respect; they merit recognition by the profession
and the schools of social work. They ask only for the opportunity to qualify themselves
as adequately as possible for the task.
This question of education for social work may seem ill-placed in an annual report,
but it is the single most pressing problem facing our Branch to-day. We have the legislative authority, the public goodwill, and as able direction as most public agencies in
Canada.   We have to have competent staff to use all this wisely and well.
The statistics which follow show the number of staff employed by the Branch.
Measured against the total number of people served, they reveal the weight of responsibility each member of our staff assumes. That people are being helped to become independent; that old people are being helped to find comfort and usefulness in their declining
years; that children are being helped in their own homes, in foster homes, and adopting
homes; that the communities of our Province accept and respect all our many services
are the result of the staff's devotion to their work.
The following table shows the number of all staff (clerical, professional, and technical) employed by location as at March 31st, 1957:—
Office of Deputy Minister of Welfare       2
Director of Welfare       4
Field service  306
Medical Services Division     12
Child Welfare Division     19
Provincial Home     31
Brannen Lake School     64
Girls' Industrial School     32
Old-age Assistance Board     74
Family Division        6
Total staff  550 S  12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The following table gives the total professional staff employed and comparative
figures of university and in-service trained men and women at the end of the fiscal years
1956 and 1957, as well as the number receiving formal training, joining, and (or) resigning from the Branch during the past fiscal year:—
Men
Women
University
Trained
In-service
Trained
University
Trained
In-service
Trained
Total
Total staff, March 31st, 1956  	
Psychiatric Division transferred to Department of Provincial Secretary, April 1st, 1956  	
55
14
43
99
28
51
248
42
Number receiving formal training during fiscal year.-	
41
43
71
+2
51
—2
206
Staff appointed, April 1st, 1956, to March 31st, 1957
Resignations, April 1st, 1956, to March 31st, 1957	
41
6
12
43
11
12
73
23
22
49
39
18
206
79
64
Total staff, March 31st, 1957-                   —	
35
42
74
70
221
The following table gives a breakdown of total professional staff according to their
training as at March 31st, 1957:—
Men
Women
Total
Master of Social Work  —
Second year of training but M.S.W. thesis incomplete-
Bachelor of Social Work  	
Social Service diploma-
One year at School but no diploma or degree	
Two years at School but no diploma or degree-
In-service trainees now taking course 	
In-service trained.    	
10
11
21
3
1
4
14
32
46
3
24
27
5
4
9
1
1
1
2
3
41
69
110
Totals..
77
144
The above figures, referring to the fiscal year 1956-57, do not tell the whole story.
Besides the appointments and resignations, there were thirty-five transfers and numerous
staff problems of greater or lesser importance to be handled daily.
The activities planned for the staff's continuing development were as follows:—
The Annual Supervisors' Institute conducted this year for one week in Vancouver,
when the programme was planned as an examination of the supervisors' heavy job, with
a view of defining their responsibilities more clearly.
The two-week orientation of newly appointed supervisors was extended to include
supervisors having some experience. This provides an opportunity for administrative
and divisional policies to be clearly interpreted—necessary because of the progressive
changes in policies, and because of the difficulties of communication between head offices
and distant field offices.
A total of sixty-seven people were given in-service training by the Training Division
in six introductory and three final group sessions.
Three people were granted leave of absence to obtain training at the School of Social
Work, University of British Columbia, two of this number receiving Branch bursaries.
Delegates to various social-work conferences, always a learning experience for staff,
numbered nineteen.
Regional staff meetings were conducted in all regions, the programme devised by
the staff to provide a learning experience in areas of the work in which the staff felt they
needed particular help. Planning for next year's regional meetings was also begun, the
Training Division co-ordinating this total-staff effort. •
REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH S 13
Circulation of library books was higher than usual, and important new books having
a bearing upon our work were added.
The Assistant Director attended national and international meetings as follows:
Canadian Conference on Social Work, Edmonton, lune 18th to 22nd, 1956; A.P.W.A.
West Coast Regional Conference, Portland, October 15th to 17th, 1956; Canadian Welfare Council Conference, Mont Gabriel, December 10th to 13th, 1956; and visited
district offices in Region I (Duncan and Nanaimo), Region II (Burnaby, Coquitlam,
C.S.S.D. (east unit), North Vancouver, and West Vancouver), Region IV (Cranbrook,
Creston, Fernie, and Nelson), Region V (Prince George (district supervisors' and
regional staff meetings)), and Region VI (Abbotsford, Langley, and Surrey).
The Girls' Industrial School Committee, appointed to recommend plans for building
and staffing the new School, held sixteen meetings under the chairmanship of the Assistant
Director, and the School will be opened early in 1958.
Throughout this busy year the team efforts of the administration and staff and the
steady sense of purpose, direction, and growth have provided professional satisfactions
of a high order.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Amy Leigh,
Assistant Director of Welfare. S  14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REGIONAL ADMINISTRATION
REGION I
I beg to submit the annual report of Region I for the fiscal year ended March 31st,
1957.
In Region I there has been no change in the geographical boundaries. The region
includes Vancouver Island, near-by islands, and a northern strip of the west coast of the
Mainland.
From figures compiled in the last census, it is estimated there are approximately
245,000 persons within the boundaries of this region. About half are concentrated in
the southerly part—that is, the Victoria, Saanich, and Gulf Islands areas. About 4 to 5
per cent of these people require services of our Welfare Branch.
The regional social welfare staff is comprised of thirty-two social workers and four
supervisors. This is an increase of one social worker over the previous year. This was
necessitated by the pressure of work in the Municipality of Saanich. It was through its
request that we recognized the case load was heavy and a new worker was needed.
The case load for this region as of March 31st, 1957, was 10,519. This figure
includes all categories. As of last year, there were seven administrative offices (five Provincial and two amalgamated).   These offices are located as follows:—
Provincial:  Courtenay, Alberni, Nanaimo, Duncan, and Victoria district.
Amalgamated:   Victoria City and Saanich Municipality.
The following table shows the distribution of the case load by category of services
among the seven offices:—
Analysis of Case Load by Major Categories of Services in the District Administrative
Offices of Region I as at March 31st, 1957
Category
Alberni
Courtenay
Duncan
Nanaimo
Saanich
Victoria
City
Victoria
District
Total
31
88
1
10
107
323
108
12
64
1
172
8
20
116
531
208
19
31
1
112
8
8
121
444
147
15
58
4
323
14
27
242
1,085
228
17
3
106
9
20
119
965
27
5
10
392
30
53
379
2,115
29
40
176
11
27
159
1,010
88
42
229
Mothers' Allowance	
19
1,369
Blind Persons' Allowance..	
Disabled Persons' Allowance 	
Old-age Assistance  	
81
165
1,243
6,473
Child Welfare....	
779
161
Totals                	
680
1,139
887
1,998
1,249
3,013
1.553      ! 10.519
Recorded statistics will disclose that this region has had a very heavy turnover in
cases. Problems in this region are identical to those faced in other regions. These are:
Care of the aged—completion of applications and yearly reports; protection of children;
juvenile delinquency; adoptions; finding of foster homes and the placing and visiting of
children in these homes; also demands made upon us for financial aid and the requests
for counselling services. The detail of operation in working the mechanics of these
services requires interviewing, recording, and positive action as indicated. All these
actions are time consuming and have taxed our staff to the utmost.
We were rather fortunate in this region in that two new establishments were brought
into existence for the benefit of aged people. These were the Fort Private Hospital at
Comox, which accommodates 30 persons, and the new addition to the boarding home
operated by the Sisters of the Love of Jesus at Colwood, which accommodates 90 patients
(this boarding home is familiarly known as St. Mary's Priory). REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH S 15
It is important to mention that the legislation recently enacted by the Federal Government and approved by the Provincial Government gave the Indians (even though
they still reside on the reservations) the same status in regard to pension allowances as
all other citizens.
In conclusion, may I thank my members of the Branch in this region for their
conscientious endeavour to meet the needs in their areas and for their co-operation with
myself as their administrator; also I would like to acknowledge the co-operation given
by the other agencies, private and voluntary, who have been very helpful.
Respectfully submitted.
E. L. Rimmer,
Regional Administrator.
REGION II
I beg to submit the following report of the activities of the Social Welfare Branch
in Region II for the fiscal year 1956-57:—
The population increases in this area of the Province have continued, and with the
expanding industrial development have created many complex problems for social
agencies. More emphasis has been placed on working with families rather than the
individual, and this emphasis has meant more demand for trained personnel to help
these families understand their own problems. Movements of families of meagre
incomes have become greater with the lure of better jobs on the pipe-lines, in the oilfields, and the increase in manufacturing plants in the cities. The transient family often
finds itself outside local eligibility requirements for financial assistance from public or
private agencies, and policies have to be stretched to meet emergent situations for these
transients.
Following is a listing of total case loads for the region by categories as of March
31st, 1957:—
Case Load by Categories as of March 31st, 1957
Category of Service Number
Family Division—
Family Service  335
Mothers' Allowance  157
Social Allowance  3,413
Divisional total  .•_     3,905
Old-age Division—
Old-age Assistance and Blind Persons' Allowance      3,915
Old Age Security bonus  15,525
Disability Allowance        519
Divisional total  19,959
Child Welfare Division—
Adoption homes pending  155
Adoption homes approved  69
Children in adoption homes  212
Children in Care  269
Foster homes pending  74 S 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Child Welfare Division—Continued
Category of Service Number
Foster homes approved  184
Protection of children -.  33
Children of unmarried parents  302
Special child services  13
Divisional total     1,311
Other divisions—Welfare institutions, tuberculosis, etc.        167
Regional total  25,342
No comparisons can be made with last year's figures because of the change in computing statistics during the year.
During the fiscal year twenty-one Boards of Review were held at the request of the
Director of Welfare to deal with applicants for Social Allowance who had requested a
hearing. This office is appreciative of the time and assistance given by the Board members; Dr. Stewart Murray, Medical Health Officer, Vancouver City; and the respective
Vancouver City representatives.
The Regional Administrator continued to act as a Provincial Government appointed
Board member on the following agency boards: Alcoholism Foundation of British Columbia, Canadian National Institute for the Blind, Narcotic Addiction Foundation of
British Columbia, and Disaster Committee of the Canadian Red Cross Society. The
Regional Administrator continued to act as a member of the Board of the Old-age Assistance Division.
The Assistant Regional Administrator continued to act as chairman of the several
tribunals held during the year in which several methods of establishing proof of age for
applicants of Old-age Assistance were explored.
The largest percentage of the case load in Region II is that portion which is administered by the amalgamated municipal offices. This is understandable because of the
heavy population density of the Greater Vancouver area. The following breakdown of
welfare offices in this region illustrates the heavy responsibilities which are carried by
the municipal administrators:—
Amalgamated offices:   Municipality of Burnaby, Municipality of District of
Coquitlam, New Westminster City, Municipalities of City and District of
North Vancouver, Municipality of Richmond, Vancouver City, and Municipality of West Vancouver.
District offices:   New Westminster district office, Vancouver district office,
and Westview district office.
Per capita municipalities: Municipality of Delta, City of Port Coquitlam, City
of Port Moody, and Municipality of Powell River.
Co-operation from the various municipalities has been of the highest level, and this
has made it possible to give a more efficient service to families in the community.
During this fiscal year the Social Welfare Branch has had the fullest co-operation
from the private agencies. Community organizations and service clubs have offered their
help in all districts. All other government departments at the Federal, Provincial, and
municipal level have willingly assisted us with our problems. Many individuals have
offered us their help in meeting our day-to-day problems. To all who have assisted us in
meeting our responsibilities, a grateful acknowledgment is given.
Respectfully submitted.
R. Talbot,
Regional Administrator. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 17
REGION III
I beg to submit the following report on the activities of the Social Welfare Branch
in Region III for the fiscal year 1956-57.
Interim census figures released by the Federal Government show that in 1951 there
was a population of 117,240, and this had risen to 147,346 by 1956, an increase of
34.2 per cent.
There was a slight change in the regional boundaries between Regions III and IV.
This was made possible by an increase in staff of one social worker in the Kelowna
office. In addition to raising the level of services to the people in that area, it was
possible to extend the boundary to include McCulloch, Carmi, and Beaverdell along the
Kettle River valley. Relocation of staff was made in the Vernon-Salmon Arm area when
the social worker covering Revelstoke area was moved from the Vernon district office
to the Salmon Arm district office. This was to enable him to be closer to Revelstoke
and thereby render a more frequent service. It was necessary to add the services of a
part-time stenographer for the Salmon Arm office.
The following is a comparison of total case loads in the region as at March 31st,
1956, and March 31st, 1957:—
Comparison of Case Load by Categories for Fiscal Years 1956 and 1957 and
Percentages of Increase or Decrease in Region III
Category of Service
Mar. 31, 1956
Mar. 31, 1957
Percentage
Increase (+) or
Decrease (—)
Family Service 	
Mothers' Allowance-
Social Allowance	
Blind Persons' Allowance	
Disabled Persons' Allowance-
Old-age Assistance-
Old Age Security bonus-
Adoption pending	
Adoption approved	
Child in adoption home-
Foster home pending	
Foster home approved-
Child in care _ 	
Protection —	
Unmarried parent	
Special child service-
Welfare institutions-
Health and institutional service-
Totals .
15
1,233
62
130
992
1,153
112
100
103
85
214
344
30
93
9
103
35
313
1,248
4,337
1,090
138
7,126
14
1,184
71
157
922
3,175
97
74
115
62
213
387
29
69
7
42
74
272
1,198
4,325
1,053
116
6,964
-13.1
-4.0
-0.2
-3.4
-15.9
-2.3
The above figures indicate that there was a 4-per-cent decrease in Social Allowance
cases. However, there is actually a 4-per-cent increase in the number of people in receipt
of Social Allowance. This is accounted for by the fact that a Social Allowance case may
involve two or more persons who are members of the same family.
In closing, I would like to thank all those who have interested themselves in the
welfare of the people in their community and who have supported the Social Welfare
Branch staff in their efforts to help people to help themselves.
Respectfully submitted.
R. I. Stringer,
Regional Administrator. S  18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REGION IV
I beg to submit the following report on the activities of the Social Welfare Branch in
Region IV for the fiscal year 1956-57.
The population in this region continues to increase, but at a somewhat slower rate
than the rest of the Province. The interim figures from the 1956 Census indicate that the
population was 98,028, an increase from 89,367 in 1951, being a 9.7-per-cent increase.
There was a slight change in the regional boundary on the west side of the region,
when some fifteen cases in the McCulloch-Beaverdell-Carmi area were transferred to
Region III, to be serviced by the Kelowna district office. This should provide better
services, as the Kelowna district office is closer than Grand Forks is, and the clients concerned travel more frequently to Kelowna.
Following is a comparison of total case loads in the region as at March 31st, 1956,
and March 31st, 1957:—
Comparison of Case Load by Categories for Fiscal Years 1956 and 1957 and
Percentages of Increase or Decrease in Region IV
Category of Service
Mar. 31, 1956
Mar. 31, 1957
Percentage
Increase (+) or
Decrease (—)
173
15
1,054
  1,069
51
119
689
2,329
  3,188
39
33
86
40
143
193
20
31
2
      587
33
61
       94
5,111
167
13
878
      891
52
107
582
2,339
  3,080
61
33
57
44
137
186
11
22
3
      554
41
47
 ■      88
4,780
3 4
— 16.6
Disabled Persons' Allowance —	
-3.3
Special child service                                                .     ....	
-5.6
Totals	
-6.3
6 4
Throughout the year the staff of this region had the fullest co-operation from the
Federal, Provincial, and municipal groups. Service clubs, charities, and other organizations in all districts have been a great help. Through all this co-operation and support, our work has been made easier and our clients have received better service. Their
assistance and understanding are hereby gratefully acknowledged.
Respectfully submitted.
R. I. Stringer,
For J. W. Smith, Regional Administrator.
REGION V
I beg to submit the following annual report of the activities of the Social Welfare
Branch in Region V for the fiscal year 1956-57.
General growth in economic activity and in population was continuous throughout
the year, and two new offices were opened to meet the needs of our communities.   These
J REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH S 19
offices were established in Burns Lake on luly 3rd, 1956, and Vanderhoof on March
18th, 1957.
Nevertheless, for the first time the case load showed a decrease in total numbers.
This may be seen in the following comparison of case loads for the region by categories,
as of March, 1956, and March, 1957.
Comparison of Case Load by Categories of Region V, as at March 31st,
for the Years 1955 and 1956
Category of Service Mar. 31, 1956 Mar. 31, 1957
Family Service  330                234
Mothers' Allowance           9 8
Social Allowance  1,230 1,077
  1,239  1,085
Blind Persons' Allowance        95 97
Old-age Assistance      522 498
Old Age Security bonus  1,403 1,351
  2,020  1,946
Disabled Persons         34 59
Adoption homes pending  108 78
Adoption homes approved  34 36
Children in adoption homes  134 116
Foster homes pending  74 76
Foster homes approved  191 229
Child in care  318 389
Protection of children  72 49
Children of unmarried parents  99 67
Special child service  8 7
Welfare institutions        17
Health and institutional services      128
1,038
1,047
26
58
145
84
Totals  4,806 4,455
The staff, both social work and clerical, is to be commended for the job done, and
I wish to take this opportunity to express to them my appreciation.
Respectfully submitted.
V. H. Dallamore,
Regional Administrator.
REGION VI
I beg to submit the annual report of the activities of the Social Welfare Branch in
Region VI for the fiscal year 1956-57.
The past fiscal year saw further increase in services given within the region, as
shown by the additional 345 individuals and families who received service. However,
due to a change in statistical accounting, the total regional case load of 7,851 cases as
at March 31st, 1957, showed a decrease of 215 cases. There were 57 more children
cared for in foster homes during the year than in the previous one, making a total of
582 children cared for. Three hundred and thirty-eight children remained in foster
homes on March 31st, 1957.   There was an increase of 35 in the number of children S 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
placed in adoption homes, and at the end of the year 106 children were in adoption
homes on probation. The distribution of services remained approximately the same,
with financial assistance under Federal legislation accounting for 66.5 per cent; financial
assistance under the Mothers' Allowance and Social Assistance Acts, 17.8 per cent;
services to families other than financial, 2.6 per cent; and services to children, 11.5 per
cent. These figures indicate a slight trend toward emphasis on the financial assistance
services.
Despite difficulties which had to be faced, the staff of the Social Welfare Branch
and amalgamated municipalities within the region, with the help of the many community
resources who always co-operated so willingly, continued to give the service which the
community had come to expect. To do this it was necessary for staff to expend themselves beyond the call of duty on many occasions.
Annual Statistical Report, 1956-57
Case Load as at March 31st, 1957
•a
a
«    .
in
a
o
c
u
0
u
V.
u
5
0
H
-cn
0
U
u
C
o
GO
CTJ
<L>
U
U
tU
Q
u
M
a
_ &
O u
HP
Abbotsford	
Chilliwack City 	
—
	
—
	
1,584
785
789
828
874
2,991
1,658
789
844
843
948
2,984
7
74
4
55
15
74
	
Haney    _
	
Regional total, 1957	
Regional total, 1956 '   	
206
244
1,405
1,521
5,228
5,271
906
876
106
154
7,851
8,066
7
222
215
Increase or decrease	
-38
-116
-43
30
-48 |   .  |   	
—- |   —    | -215
Intake, April 1st, 1956, to March 31st, 1957
to
T)
a
(A
a
1
Q
ft
U
u
O
O ra
-a
•a
*■£
p u
UU
o
VI
a
V
u
a
o
O
u
p
45
71
86
33
43
130
214
211
158
110
97
501
406
168
173
218
194
764
164
168
128
84
89
308
94 r
776
33
17
14
20
18
64
862
635
559
465
441
1,767
1,658
789
844
843
948
2,984
2,520
1,424
1,403
1,308
1,389
4,751
95
63
152
98
71
Chilliwack City
Haney.    .       	
Langley    	
Surrey    ...   	
134
Regional total, 1957 ,     .
Regional total, 1956 _	
408
388
1,291
1,317
1,923
1,756
166
248
4,729
4,485
8,066
12,795
479
-134
	
Increase or decrease 	
20 |   -26 |     167
165
-82 |     244 |   	
	
345
	 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
Children in Care
S 21
Mar. 31, 1956
Intake
Total Number
in Care,
1956-57
Mar. 31, 1957
Abbotsford	
Chilliwack City	
Chilliwhack Township-
Haney	
Langley  —	
Surrey... 	
53
33
31
51
80
80
Regional total, 1957	
Regional total, 1956  	
Increase ( + ) or decrease (—)..
328
328
29
46
42
23
34
80
254
223
+31
82
79
73
74
114
160
582
525
+57
52
27
42
48
64
105
338
328
-10
Children in Adoption Homes
Mar. 31, 1956
Intake
Total Number
in Adoption
Homes
Mar. 31, 1957
Abbotsford 	
Chilliwack City	
Chilliwhack Township..
Haney	
Langley  	
Surrey 	
16
15
19
10
5
22
Regional total, 1957	
Regional total, 1956	
Increase ( + ) or decrease (—)-.
87
97
-10
29
26
17
8
12
47
139
104
+35
45
41
36
18
17
79
236
233
+3
20
16
17
10
12
31
106
97
+9
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Mary K. King,
Regional Administrator. S 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PART II.—DIVISIONAL ADMINISTRATION
FAMILY DIVISION
I wish to present the report of the Family Division, which covers the services rendered to families and individuals by the Social Welfare Branch under the provisions of the
" Social Assistance Act," the " Mothers' Allowances Act," and the Family Service programme, for the fiscal year April 1st, 1956, to March 31st, 1957.
SOCIAL ALLOWANCES SECTION
Case Load
The case load for the fiscal year under review showed the usual seasonal variations,
with the highest number in April, 1956, and the lowest number in September, 1956.
Thereafter the figures climbed to January, 1957, and then decreased for the last two
months of the year. This will be seen in the following table:—
Table I.—Case Load and Total Number of Recipients on a Monthly Basis
Heads of
Families
Dependents
Single
Recipients
Total
April, 1956	
May, 1956	
June, 1956. 	
July, 1956	
August, 1956	
September, 1956„
October, 1956 .....
November, 1956-
December, 1956-.
January, 1957	
February, 1957	
March, 1957	
3,593
3,452
3,286
3,189
3,142
3,049
3,068
3,174
3,332
3,568
3,597
3,695
9,445
8,776
8,385
8,109
7,902
7,750
7,812
8,349
8,720
9,569
9,551
9,397
6,258
6,022
5,843
5,646
5,556
5,404
5,405
5,498
5,740
6,084
5,986
6,029
19,296
18,250
17,514
16,944
16,600
16,203
16,285
17,021
17,792
19,221
19,134
19,121
As the next table will show, the case load of recipients for March, 1957, has decreased by approximately 3.4 per cent from that for the same month in the two preceding
years of 1955 and 1956. Some of the reasons which may account for this might be the
greater number of persons receiving Disabled Persons' Allowance, relatively high employment opportunities, and an acceleration in our use of the Provincial vocational training
programme, which has enabled numerous handicapped and non-disabled persons receiving assistance to receive vocational training and to obtain employment.
Table II-
—Case Load and Total Number of Recipients
Mar., 1955
Mar., 1956
Mar., 1957
3,688
9,475
7,372
3,730
9,761
6,346
3,695
9,397
6,029
11,060
9,475
10,076
9,761
9,724
9,397
20,535
19,837
19,121
Of the total recipients of social assistance in the Province in March, 1957 (that is,
19,121), the totals according to regions are as follows:— REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 23
Table III.—Regional Totals of Individuals in Receipt of Assistance
in March, 1957
Provincial District Office
Organized Territory (Municipal)
Region I—
Alberni
Courtenay
Duncan 	
Nanaimo ..
Victoria   -
61
Alberni City 	
40
286
43
101
49
357
Central Saanich   —	
        12
241
Cumberland     -	
22
        33
         63
       23
Lake Cowichan Village 	
—        17
Nanaimo 	
_      215
North Cowichan    	
       79
Oak Bay                             	
        18
        90
10
      205
Victoria  	
      684
Region II—■
New Westminster
Vancouver   	
Westview 	
1,046
50
157
46
1,603
West Vancouver .
Westview Village
2,649
Burnaby           516
Coquitlam         224
Delta  	
New Westminster   	
North Vancouver City   	
North Vancouver District	
Port Coquitlam 	
Port Moody  	
Richmond    —
Vancouver  	
129
476
142
145
88
34
260
3,956
71
42
Region III—
Kamloops
Kelowna -
Penticton .
Salmon Arm
Vernon   	
253
482
313
284
148
275
6,083
Armstrong  .
Coldstream
Enderby   	
Glenmore _
Kamloops   ..
Kelowna 	
Merritt	
North Kamloops
Oliver  	
Peachland  	
Penticton 	
Princeton   	
Revelstoke  	
Salmon Arm City 	
Salmon Arm District
Spallumcheen 	
Summerland  	
Vernon 	
6,336
13
19
20
17
228
104
32
101
17
7
180
23
35
21
72
36
54
74
1,053
Region IV—
Cranbrook
Creston 	
Fernie  	
Grand Forks
Nelson  	
New Denver .
Trail  	
428
237
44
78
488
85
119
Castlegar  	
Cranbrook	
Creston Village
Fernie  	
Grand Forks
Greenwood —
Kaslo    _
Kimberley .	
Nelson _ 	
Rossland	
Slocan   	
Trail  _.
Warfield  	
2,555
42
103
36
32
40
16
1,479
598
2,077 S 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table III.—Regional Totals of Individuals in Receipt of Assistance
in March, 1957—Continued
Provincial District Office—Continued
Region V—
Burns Lake	
Pouce Coupe 	
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Quesnel 	
Smithers  	
Terrace	
Williams Lake
Region VI—
Abbotsford
Chilliwack .
100
387
531
83
79
148
93
144
1,565
102
189
291
Organized Territory (Municipal)—Continued
Dawson Creek 	
Fort St. John 	
Prince George 	
Prince Rupert	
Quesnel  	
Smithers 	
Chilliwack City	
Chilliwhack Township
Hope	
Kent 	
Langley  	
Langley City .
Maple Ridge .
Matsqui
Mission District .
Mission Village .
Pitt Meadows	
Sumas	
Surrey  	
122
16
140
186
72
39
575
2,140
123
404
55
12
272
90
294
235
176
34
39
57
1,282
3,073
3,364
19,121
The following are approximate percentages of the total case load by regions as at
March, 1957: Region I, 14 per cent; Region II, 33 per cent; Region III, 13 per cent;
Region IV, 11 per cent; Region V, 11 per cent; and Region VI, 18 per cent.
The distribution of recipient case load between organized and unorganized areas in
the above figures shows relatively little change this year, with approximately 68 per cent
living in municipal territory and approximately 32 per cent living in Provincial territory.
A comparison on the basis of legal residence as defined in the " Residence and
Resonsibility Act " shows the following:—
Table IV.-
—Legal Residence of Social Allowance Recipients
Mar., 1955
Mar., 1956
Mar., 1957
11,790                10,882
8,745        j          8,955
10,299
8,822
Totals         	
20,535
19,837
19,121
It will be seen from the above table that approximately 54 per cent had municipal
residence and approximately 46 per cent had legal residence in Provincial territory.
Following is a statement of expenditures made by the Social Welfare Branch during
the fiscal year under review for Social Allowances, medical services, and other charges: — REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 25
Table V.—Expenditures by the Province for Social Allowances, Medical Services,
etc., for Social Welfare Report
Fiscal Year
1954-55
Fiscal Year
1955-56
Fiscal Year
1956-57
1. Cases who are the responsibility of a municipality (80 per cent paid
by the Province)       	
2. Cases who are the sole responsibility of the Province (100 per cent
paid by the Province)
3. Repatriation, transportation within the Province, nursing- and boarding-home care (other than tuberculosis), special allowances and grants
4. Emergency payments, such as where a family may lose its home by
fire or similar circumstances       	
5. Municipal and Provincial Cases—
(a) Tuberculosis, boarding-, nursing-, and private-home cases	
(b) Transportation of tuberculosis cases   	
(c) Comforts allowances for tuberculosis cases	
6. Hospitalization of Social Assistance cases1	
Hospitalization of Social Assistance cases1  	
7. Administration and operation of project and pavilion for Japanese at
New Denver  _     	
8. Medical services and drugs .'_	
Totals    _   	
$2,588,455.80
2,241,850.58
1,262,185.21
39,048.25
444,882.01
4,341.91
16,025.30
$6,596,789.06
20,597.31
53,816.85
1,947,832.23
i.619,035.45
$2,626,760.81
2,350,451.69
1,420,208.51
52,891.24
402,850.12
2,638.57
11,991.16
19,319.36
$2,633,636.62
2,521,431.47
1,505,034.90
37,163.45
327,432.07
2,868.16
8,924.75
13,927.70
i,887,111.46
38,600.41
2,208,252.70
$9,133,964.57
$7,050,419.122
61,990.65
_2,240,710.53_
$9,353,120.30"
1 Effective April 1st, 1954, hospitalization costs (including co-insurance) for Social Allowance cases paid by British
Columbia Hospital Insurance Service. Expenditures under above heading includes only short-stay costs for Social
Allowance cases, Provincial Government share of hospitalization costs for immigrants, and children's hospital pilot plan.
Effective April 1st, 1955, these hospitalization costs paid from Social Allowance Vote.
2 Reconciliation with Public Accounts:— ,
Gross expenditure for Social Allowances as per Public Accounts  __ $7,247,832.41
Less credits (excluding amount chargeable to Government of Canada)         197,413.29
$7,050,419.12
MOTHERS' ALLOWANCES SECTION
For the same period the Province has received from the Federal Government under
the Federal-Provincial Unemployment Assistance Agreement $2,299,894.48.
Some of the developments in the Social Allowance during the fiscal year under
review are as follows:—
(1) Effective April 1st, 1956, the special dental-care programme for dependent children was extended to include children under 12 years of age.
(2) In September, 1956, a revision of the Schedule of Exemptions and Deductions on other income, originally implemented in April, 1955, became
effective. This revision was the result of more than a year's study of the
first schedule, based on changes in allowance rates and the necessity of
some amendment and modification of policy and practice defined in the
former schedule.
(3) The annual Christmas bonus was paid to recipients of Social Allowance
and Mothers' Allowance, amounting to $5 for each family group and $2
for each single recipient.
" Social Assistance Act " and Regulations
During the year one city municipality and four village municipalities were incorporated, making a total as follows: Cities, 37; districts, 30; and villages, 54. Of this total
of 121 municipalities, eighty-two now participate in the administration of social assistance
under the provisions of the " Social Assistance Act " and regulations.
Of these eighty-two municipalities, a total of eighteen have established their own
social welfare departments under section 6, subsection (b), of the regulations to the Act, S 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
while the remaining sixty-four purchase the service from the Province under the provisions
of the same section, on a per capita basis.
As provided in section 13 of the regulations to the Act, a total of twenty-seven
Boards of Review were established during this fiscal year.
There were no amendments to the " Social Assistance Act" or regulations effected
in this fiscal year.
Sponsorship for Physical Rehabilitation
During this year, too, the Social Welfare Branch sponsored fifty-two resident trainees
(ten of whom later received out-patient training) and twenty-one out-patients for remedial
training in the G. F. Strong Rehabilitation Centre and the Canadian Arthritic and Rheumatism Society Medical Centre.   Total was seventy-three persons.
Of these seventy-three persons, sixteen were suffering from arthritis and fifty-seven
were suffering from other forms of physical disability.
From the point of view of residence and responsibility in accordance with the " Residence and Responsibility Act," there were fifty-one municipal responsibilities and twenty-
two Provincial responsibilities.
Since 1940 two factors have had an important effect on the case load.
First was the increase of employment opportunities for women during the war years.
The second was the implementation of the "Social Assistance Act" in 1945, which
offered an alternate form of assistance and, since 1948, equal financial benefit. These two
factors have been joined by others: the increasing cost of living, against which the allowance gives only a basic income; the rise in wages and salaries; increased facilities for
vocational training and retraining; and the growing belief and acceptance that the mother
should have the opportunity for employment, part time at least, when her full-time presence is no longer required in the home.
Between 1940 and 1946 the case load decreased by 49 per cent to 905.
The following table will indicate the trend in the case load since 1946:—
Table I.—Comparative Statement of Case Load
As at March, 1947  863
As at March, 1948  751
As at March, 1949  684
As at March, 1950  643
As at March, 1951  569
As at March, 1952  503
As at March, 1953  470
As at March, 1954  426
As at March, 1955  393
As at March, 1956  323
As at March, 1957  284
From these figures it will be noted that the case load has diminished by approximately 69 per cent since March, 1947. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH S 27
On a monthly basis the case-load figures for this fiscal year are as follows:—
Table II.—Monthly Case Load, April 1st, 1956, to March 31st, 1957
Month
Number of
Allowances
in Pay
Number of Persons
Incapacitated
Husbands
Mothers
Children
April, 1956               -	
319
319
315
310
304
299
296
289
289
287
283
284
319
319
315
310
304
299
296
289
289
287
283
284
733
733
721
706
697
691
678
670
672
659
648
652
47
May, 1956            — 	
50
June, 1956                	
46
July, 1956            _                    	
46
August, 1956           	
45
September, 1956  	
October, 1956    	
November, 1956...   	
December, 1956	
44
45
45
45
January, 1957                                	
44
February, 1957               	
42
March, 1957  	
42 S 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The volume of applications and reapplications has risen very slightly,  and the
following table indicates how these have been dealt with:—
Table HI.—Statement of Applications Considered and Decisions Made
Applications pending as at April 1st, 1956  12
New applications received during year  59
Reapplications received during year  19
Total  90
Decisions—
Grants   58
Refusals   14
Withdrawn by applicant  8
80
Applications pending as at March 31st, 1957  10
Total  90
Reasons for refusals-—
Income in excess  1
Assets in excess  2
Other resources  1
Husband not totally incapacitated  1
Not legally married  1
Not legally separated  3
Mother unable to qualify under section 7 of the " Mothers'
Allowances Act"  1
Not in Province continuously for three years prior to date
of application  1
Property in excess  1
Only child left school  1
Earnings of older children in excess  1
Total  14     .
Reasons for applications pending—
Awaiting information re assets - 2
Awaiting information re other income  2
Decision pending  2
First investigation report not received  2
Awaiting further information  2
Total  10 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH S 29
During the year under review, ninety-seven allowances were cancelled for the
reasons indicated in the following table:—
Table IV.—Reasons for Cancellation of the Allowances
Social Allowance preferable form of assistance  3
Mother deceased  1
Mother remarried  14
Left British Columbia  1
Moved, whereabouts unknown  1
Mother earning in excess  30
Mother ineligible under section 7 of the " Mothers' Allowances
Act"   1
Mother employed and operating a car  1
Mother in G. F. Strong Rehabilitation Centre  1
Mother receiving a rehabilitation grant  1
Husband receiving a rehabilitation grant  2
Husband not totally disabled  7
Husband released from Penitentiary  2
Children removed from the home  1
Only child 18 years of age  4
Only child under 16 left school  1
Only child under 18 left school  7
Only child in hospital indefinitely  1
Earnings of dependent children  3
Older children maintaining  8
Unearned income in excess  4
Withdrawn  3
Total  97
Of the cancelled cases, the length of time each family had been in receipt of Mothers'
Allowance is as follows::—
Years  1     2   3     4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11    12   13    14   15   16   17
Cases—24   16   4   15   67423     5     3     2   .___     112     2
Total cases, 97.   Average length of time on allowance, 4.88 years.
Once again it is apparent that although some families have remained on the allowance for many years, the greater proportion, approximately 60 per cent receive the
allowance for less than the average length of time.
There is an increasing acceptance that once the children no longer need her full-time
care, or other adequate and suitable plans can be made for them, the mother may be
encouraged to seek employment in line with her training and capabilities or take vocational training to enable her to find suitable and satisfying work. Many mothers have
expressed a sincere desire to do so because they say they do not wish to rear their children on a minimum standard of living, and because they believe economic independence
adds strengths and satisfactions to family life which do not come with public assistance.
Many mothers, too, look to the Mothers' Allowance not as a pension, but to bridge
a gap of temporary need until the family can, from its own resources and efforts, proceed
to economic independence.
Following the previous Annual Report, the comparative table has been brought up
to date, indicating the volume and activity in the case loads for the past ten years, and
is given below:— S 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table V.—Movement in Case Load, 1947 to 1957
Volume
Activity
Year
Held Over
from Previous Year
New Applications and
Reapplications
Total
Grants
Refusals
Withdrawn
Cancellations
1947        	
10
40
15
30
14
7
18
16
19
13
12
199
143
176
141
102
143
163
114
94
85
78
209
183
191
171
116
150
181
130
113
98
90
150
93
118
127
83
103
118
79
77
66
58
47
59
29
18
20
26
39
29
22
12
14
6
16
14
12
6
3
8
3
1
8
8
202
19481         	
205
1949       . -       -   .    -	
188
1950        	
165
1951
157
1952 	
169
10S3
151
1954-  	
1955         -
123
110
1956      -	
136
1957 2 -	
97
1 Corrected figure.
2 Ten pending applications as at March 31st, 1957 (.see Table III).
As was pointed out last year, the largest percentage of refusals and cancellations
was based on financial reasons, such as excess income, assets, or other resources. Other
factors of ineligibility rested on the sundry qualifications defined in the " Mothers' Allowances Act" and regulations.
Of the families who were in receipt of Mothers' Allowance as at March, 1957, the
mother qualified under the following groupings, described as " status," in accordance
with the specific definitions of eligibility in the Act and regulations:—
Table VI.—Status and Number of Mothers and Dependents in Receipt
of Allowance as at March, 1957
Status of Mother in Accordance with Eligibility
Number of Children
Qualifications Set by the Act
1
2
3
4
1
5      1      6
7
Total
51
1
3
7
3
7
4
4
1
65
6
4
4
5
6
12
39
2
2
2
2
1
4
4
23
2
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
182
11
8
Incapacitated husbands home   -
Incapacitated husbands away  	
Incapacitated  husbands  O.A.S.,   O.A.A.,   B.P.,   and
D.P.A.
18
6
18
2
16
22
Elder sister  '    	
1
Totals    ..
81
102
56
35
4
3
3
284
From the above table the following figures are derived:—
Table VII.—Number of Individuals for Whom Allowance Granted
Mothers	
Husbands-
Children.-
284
181
652
Total   954
1 This figure applies only to those incapacitated husbands who reside in the home and who are included in the
Mothers' Allowance payment. In addition, it will be noted that there is a total of thirty-two incapacitated husbands
in the mental hospital, out of the home, or in receipt of Old Age Security, Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowance,
or Disabled Persons' Allowance. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH S 31
Costs of Mothers' Allowances
The basic rate of Mothers' Allowances is set by legislation, unchanged since the first
Act of 1920. Mothers' Supplementary Social Allowances are therefore necessary to
make the maximum allowance payable to recipients of Mothers' Allowance equivalent to
that paid to Social Allowance recipients. This supplementary social allowance is 100
per cent chargeable to the Province, as is the statutory Mothers' Allowance.
Because of this it is necessary to present two financial statements to show total
costs. It will be noted that although the case load has decreased, the Supplementary
Social Allowance payment has increased. This is the result of the general increase,
effective April 1st, 1956, of $5 per month for each single person or head of family and
$2 per month for each dependent.
Table VIII.—Mothers' Allowance Financial Statement for the Fiscal Year
April 1st, 1956, to March 31st, 1957
Amount of allowances paid as follows:—
Month Amount of Allowance
April, 1956  $14,592.33
May, 1956  14,082.93
June, 1956  13,891.59
July, 1956  13,705.53
August, 1956  13,626.23
September, 1956  13,120.56
October, 1956  12,730.07
November, 1956  12,925.65
December, 1956   12,996.00
January, 1957  12,822.30
February, 1957  12,672.43
March, 1957  12,602.93
  $159,768.55
Reconciliation with Ledger Account in Controlling and
Audit Branch: Amount advanced by Minister of
Finance 1  $ 159,768.55
The books and records of the Director of Welfare respecting Mothers' Allowances for the fiscal year ended March
31st, 1957, have been examined under my direction.
C. J. FERBER,
Comptroller-General. S 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IX.—Financial Statement of Supplementary Social Allowances Paid to Recipients
of Mothers' Allowance (Vote 190) for the Fiscal Year April 1st, 1956, to March
31st, 1957.
Amount of allowances paid as follows:
Month
April, 1956	
May, 1956	
June, 1956	
July, 1956	
August, 1956	
September, 1956
October, 1956 _
November, 1956
December, 1956
Christmas bonus
January, 1957	
February, 1957 ..
March, 1957	
Amount of Allowance
$14,494.67
14,281.22
14,023.86
13,803.87
13,589.38
13,297.33
12,825.38
13,107.72
13,271.02
1,445.00
12,605.72
12,475.47
12,353.57
$161,574.21
Reconciliation with Ledger Account in Controlling and
Audit Branch: Amount advanced by Minister of
Finance  $161,574.21
The books and records of the Director of Welfare respecting Supplementary Social Allowances paid to recipients of
Mothers' Allowance for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1957, have been examined under my direction.
C. J. FERBER,
Comptroller-General.
Table X.—Statement Showing per Capita Cost to the Province
Fiscal Year
Total
Expenditures
Population
at June of
Each Year
Per Capita
Cost to the
Province
1954 55   .        -	
$401,442.76
332,690.38
321,342.76
1,266,000
1,305,000
1,398,464
$0.32
1955 56
.25
1956_*7
.23
General Comments
No amendments were made to the " Mothers' Allowances Act" or regulations.
Once again, in an annual review it is apparent that this legislation providing a special
categorical assistance has become outmoded in comparison with the wider and more
flexible provisions of the "Social Assistance Act." The restrictions and prohibitions
defined in the Act, based on residence, citizenship, and moralistic aspects, have no relation
to financial need or a place in a modern social welfare programme. From both a municipal and Provincial point of view, such a programme represents a duplication in the
administration of assistance throughout the Province.
So long as the provision stands, however, it is understandably a resource used almost
entirely by municipal administrations, as the following figures will show:— REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH S 33
Table XI.—Proportion of Applications and Grants in Organized Territory
Total applications and reapplications received     78
Applicants residing in organized territory     75
Applicants having legal residence in organized territory    74
Total grants made during year     58
Recipients residing in organized territory     57
Recipients having legal residence in organized territory    55
Allowances in pay as at March 31st, 1957    284
Recipients having legal residence in unorganized territory     26
Recipients having legal residence in organized territory 258
Restrictive categorical assistance such as this should receive earnest study in relation
to its effectiveness or the need for it. A far greater number of mothers and dependent
children are in receipt of Social Allowance, which affords them equal financial and social
benefits, and there is no reason to believe that a transfer to Social Allowance would cause
any disadvantage to those mothers at present in receipt of Mothers' Allowance. It would
in no way restrict the effectiveness of the over-all assistance programme in this Province.
It is hoped that in the ensuing year such a study may be undertaken.
FAMILY SERVICE SECTION
In 1944 "family service" was a new term in public welfare in British Columbia. It
was not, however, a new service, but rather one to which new emphasis was being given.
It was further strengthened, by legislative definition and provision, with the implementing
of the " Social Assistance Act" in 1945.
This term is an over-all one which describes the general family casework service
which this Branch offers to families outside of the two large urban areas of British Columbia. Whether or not they are in receipt of financial assistance, it is available to those
who suffer from some aspect of social disability or disadvantage and who come to us for
help. Not all can be helped by us, but our hope is restoration, in so far as is possible, of
the individual or family to a happier and more satisfactory life.
The family remains the important basic social unit, and our goal is to strengthen
that unit by endeavouring to meet the individual needs of each family by employing our
special knowledge of human behaviour and motivation, our best skills, and by an imaginative use of community resources.
There is no financial statement possible for family service because personal happiness
and satisfaction cannot be expressed in dollars and cents.
The following table gives the monthly Family Service case load for the year under
review:— S 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table I.—Total of Family Service Cases, April 1st, 1956, to March 31st, 1957
April, 1956  1,637
May, 1956  1,578
June, 1956  1,514
July, 1956  1,467
August, 1956  1,422
September, 1956  1,292
October, 1956  1,444
November, 1956  1,422
December, 1956  1,425
January, 1957  1,487
February, 1957  1,476
March, 1957  1,443
These are the families who came to us or were referred with problems of behaviour,
relationships, or social maladjustment, and whom we endeavoured to help within the
limits of our knowledge and skill.
Other Services
Family Allowances
This Division also serves as a channel for requests from the Family Allowances
Division of the Department of National Health and Welfare for reports concerning the
use of or eligibility for Family Allowances.
Table II.—Requests Received from Family Allowances Division,
April 1st, 1956, to March 31st, 1957
Pending as at April 1st, 1956     2
Received during fiscal year April 1st, 1956, to March 31st, 1957,
by months—
April, 1956     6
May, 1956     4
June, 1956     6
July, 1956     6
August, 1956     6
September, 1956      4
October, 1956      7
November, 1956  10
December, 1956      6
January, 1957     4
February, 1957     9
March, 1957  12
— 80
Total requests received  82 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 35
These requests for reports were directed as follows:—
Table III.—Referrals to District Offices and Other Agencies
Referrals pending as at April 1st, 1956	
29
Requests forwarded during fiscal year April 1st, 1956, to March
31st, 1957, by regions—
Region I1  30
Region II1  21
Region III .     4
Region IV     3
Region V   17
Region VI     5
—    80
Total number of requests referred   109
1 Includes referrals to private agencies in Victoria and Vancouver.
Table IV.—Referrals Completed within Fiscal Year, by Regions
Region I _
Region II...
Region III
Region IV
Region V _
Region VI
31
25
3
3
21
7
Total
Total number of requests referred
Referrals pending as at April 1st, 1957
90
109
19
Third-party Administration of Family Allowances
During the year two cases were accepted for administration of the Family Allowance. In one case, only a single retroactive cheque was handled in this way. In the
other, administration had been undertaken over a prolonged period while the mother was
receiving hospital care.   Administration was terminated in June, 1956.
Old Age Security
The Old Age Security Division of the Department of National Health and Welfare
also requests our co-operation in a few cases in helping persons who are experiencing
difficulties in completing their application for Old Age Security. S 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table V.—Requests Received from Old Age Security Division
from April 1st, 1956, to March 31st, 1957
Pending as at April 1st, 1956     1
Received during fiscal year April 1st, 1956, to March 31st, 1957,
by months—
April, 1956     4
May, 1956     1
—    5
Total case load     6
Cases completed within fiscal year     6
Table VI.—Requests Forwarded during Fiscal Year April 1st,
1956, to March 31st, 1957, by Regions
Region III  1
Region IV  2
Region V  1
Region VI  1
Total number of requests     5
Pending as at April, 1956     1
Total      6
Table VII.—Reports Completed by Regions
Region III  1
Region IV  2
Region V  1
Region VI  2
Total reports completed     6
Tribunals
During this year only one request was received for the establishment of a tribunal.
This was referred to Region VI.
Conclusion
Once again the Family Division wishes to express sincere appreciation and thanks
to the social workers, district supervisors, and Regional Administrators, on whose unfailing help and efforts the success of the Branch rests in large measure. The Division
wishes to express appreciation, too, to the municipal welfare departments, other departments of government, and the various private agencies, whose co-operation and advice
have been so helpful and freely given during the year.
(Miss) Marie Riddell,
Provincial Supervisor, Family Division. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 37
CHILD WELFARE DIVISION
I beg to present the annual report of the Child Welfare Division for the fiscal year
ended March 31st, 1957.
Table I.—Legal Status and Whereabouts of Children in the Care of the Superintendent
as at March 31st, 1957
P.C.A.
Wards
J.D.A.
Wards
C.A.S.
Wards
O.P.
Wards
Before
the Court
S.C.W.
Non-
wards
Total
Whereabouts—
140
187
298
136
240
222
11
5
6
6
5
9
12
18
14
11
14
21
3
5
4
2
5
8
15
25
22
4
26
23
34
49
40
25
68
65
215
289
384
184
358
348
Totals
1,223
42
90
27
115
281
1,7781
Placed with a Children's Aid Society for special
reasons—
55
16
20
2
3
	
4
8
1
3
29
13
13
91
37
V C.X., Victoria
39
Totals 	
91
5
—
12
4
55
167
In institutions—
B.I.S. and G.I.S      	
8
t
4
_
1
1
	
	
13
DaValla
5
P.M.H	
5
6
Totals
23
4
;.      |         2
	
	
29
31
17
1
16
10
2
	
1
48
28
1,385
52
116
41
119
337
2,050
1 Maintenance required for 1,518.
Table II.—Age and Legal Status of Children in Care of the Superintendent of
Child Welfare as at March 31st, 1957
0-5
Months
6-11
Months
1-2
Years
3-5
Years
6-11
Years
12-13
Years
14-17
Years
18-21
Years
Total
P.C.A. wards   _
8
15
10
1
22
18
6
4
112
47
20
21
190
45
20
9
1
447
89
33
22
6
151
22
8
6
8
7
325
72
22
34
25
20
126
33
12
26
7
1,381
341
119
52
Wards and non-wards of Children's Aid Societies in care of Superintendent of Child
Welfare	
116
411
Totals...    -     	
34
50
200
265
597
202
498
204
2,050
1 Maintenance paid for by other Provinces. S 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The cost to the Provincial Government of maintaining children for the fiscal year
was as follows:—
Table III.—Cost of Maintaining Children
Gross cost of maintenance of children in Child Welfare Division foster homes      $800,297.49
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance
of children with Provincial residence in care of
Children's Aid Societies        572,821.95
Gross cost to Provincial Government of maintenance
of children with municipal residence in care of
Children's Aid Societies        610,660.58!
Gross cost of transportation of children in care of
Superintendent  10,324.29
Gross cost of hospitalization of new-born infants being permanently planned for by Superintendent 21,258.00
Grants to sundry homes  1,300.00
Gross expenditure  $2,016,662.31
Less collections and refunds        346,004.39!
Net cost to Provincial Government  $1,670,657.92
1 The Provincial Government now pays to the Children's Aid Societies 100 per cent of cost of care and collects
20 per cent from the municipalities.
British Columbia's Centennial Year will give opportunity to the citizens of this
Province to speak with pride of many accomplishments, and they need not be silent in the
field of child welfare. Social legislation of a high order has been enacted to protect
children, and the policies and practices of child-caring agencies in the Province reflect an
unwavering concern on the part of citizens for children in need.
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S NEW "ADOPTION ACT"
The first and subsequent Protection of Children Acts were brought into being
through the joint effort of Government and citizens, and the British Columbia "Adoption
Act"—the most recent to be redrafted—is no exception. It is the result of a three-year
study by a committee comprised of Government officials and a large number of lay and
professional persons from many walks of life. Proclaimed on March 29th, 1957, the new
"Adoption Act" is looked upon here and elsewhere as model in many respects.
CHANGING CHILD WELFARE PRACTICE
From the preceding tables, numbers I to III, several trends may be observed. There
is a decrease in the number of children cared for by the three Children's Aid Societies as
at the end of the fiscal year. The increase in the numbers cared for by the Social Welfare
Branch, in the main, is due to the fact that most children needing care are being placed for
adoption within each region. The age range of children in both Children's Aid Societies
and Social Welfare Branch foster homes continues to show a healthy trend toward early
permanent placement. Of the 2,050 children in the care of the Superintendent as at
March 31st, 1957, the majority are over the age of 10 years and only eighty-four are under
the age of 1 year. Many of these are already in permanent homes, and when certain
legal technicalities are resolved or when some specific medical care is completed, they will
be legally adopted by the foster-parents with whom they now live.
ADOPTION DIFFICULT FOR CHILD PAST 6 YEARS OF AGE
The number of children in all agencies between 6 and 11 years is a constant source
of concern.   Each year more from this age-group are being placed with adopting parents,
J REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH S 39
but there are many whose experiences before coming into care make it well nigh impossible for them to accept the closeness of family life implicit in adoption. Their need and
longing for parents is real enough, but many have not been—and may never be—able to
give up the wish for their own family circle.
This wish comes true for some children. During the year 164 from 101 homes were
discharged from care as provided for in the " Protection of Children Act" because the
Court was satisfied the parents or relatives were now able to provide for them. Workers
were also able to recommend to the Court that seventeen boys and girls committed to care
under the " Juvenile Delinquents Act" be returned to their own homes. Not all may be
able to stay out of difficulty, but during their period in foster homes conscientious efforts
were made by workers to help children and parents understand each other's problems
better.
FEW RESOURCES THIRTY YEARS AGO
The desire to help, handed down by those small groups of citizens who formed the
first Children's Aid Society over half a century ago, is deep in the foundations of the
public services in this Province. Thirty years ago there were literally no resources outside
of Vancouver and Victoria for the care of children needing protection. The local police
were many times the only persons available to the Superintendent when reports of neglect
or abuse of children were received. Their contribution is in itself a memorable page in
the history of British Columbia child welfare. As recently as twenty years ago, a two-way
Provincial Police radio in the Court-house at Vancouver was one of the Branch's most
valuable resources to aid children in dire straits in the then many isolated parts of the
Province. Men in police uniforms travelled far to reach children in need and conscientiously arranged for their care until they could be brought to the Coast, where the main
child-care resources existed. To-day there are foster homes in each of the six Social
Welfare Branch regions, and children are placed for adoption as far afield as the Yukon
Territory. Workers strive valiantly to bring only those children who need a special service
out of their home district to the Coast, and the social worker is the official charged with
responsibility for investigating and assessing complaints of neglect.
CHILD WELFARE IS ECONOMICALLY SOUND
Many departments of Government this year will be able to tell of spectacular expansion and take justifiable pride in financial gains. How can the returns on expenditures
made on behalf of children be measured? Most of the Branch's endeavours could be
likened to long-term investments, except that they seldom show gains in the ordinary
financial sense. Good family and child welfare standards, however, accrue interest of
a rich nature. They ensure to the investor (the taxpayer) more stable family and community life and young people better equipped to meet the day-to-day demands of the
Province's accelerated economic development.
One investment, and perhaps the only one in child welfare, in which actual financial returns can be shown is the one made in the placement of children for adoption.
This, like all services to children, is first and foremost a family gain because its whole
purpose is to create a new and strong family life for the child. In terms of the taxpayer's
money, however, adoption placement can be shown to pay substantial cash dividends.
Foster-home placement of one child for 18 years represents an expenditure of some
$20,000, but if that child is placed for adoption soon after birth, a saving of the same
amount is realized. In terms of potential cost, this year's accomplishment in adoption
placement represents a continuously rewarding financial investment.
EARLY ADOPTION PLACEMENT SATISFYING
During the year 390 children were placed for adoption by the Social Welfare Branch,
and 185 of these went directly from hospital to their adoptive parents.   Based on cur- S 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
rent per capita per diem rates, the adoption placement of these 390 children alone represents a saving of almost $500,000 in one year. Add to this a similar amount which
would have been required to maintain the 281 children placed for adoption by the three
Children's Aid Societies during the same period, and the savings become an arresting
figure.
In terms of human values, adoption is rich and rewarding beyond price. The normal healthy infant placed with his adopting parents soon after birth quickly becomes
theirs and a new family is created in every sense of the word.
ADOPTED CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
Becoming one of a family is more difficult for some children, but if the right home
has been chosen for each, it does happen in a miraculous way.
Jimmie, aged 3, with a post-polio limp, viewed his prospective adopting parents
warily for weeks as they visited in the foster home, but finally made his decision to go
with them " for keeps," and he now " belongs." Bill, who had spent much of his brief
seven years in hospital with heavy casts on his legs, also needed time to know he wanted
to be one of the prospective adopting parents' children. Cindy, a beautiful little 4-year-
old girl, needed parents, but they had to have very special skills because Cindy was deaf
from a birth injury. The story of how communication was established between this child,
the foster-parents, the worker, and the adopting parents is in itself heart warming. Coloured moving pictures of children, adults, and animals in foster and adoption home were
exchanged between visits. Infinite thought went into the cut-out pictures and snapshots Cindy received regularly from her prospective adopting parents and their two older
children.   Finally all barriers were removed and Cindy has found " her " family.
Children with asthma or eczema also pose special problems in adoption placement.
They often feel and look unwell, and the natural beauty and spontaneity of childhood
is marred.
Nine-year-old Paul had these major problems to contend with. He also had vivid
memories of the physical and emotional deprivation of his own home. He trusted no
one. He was destructive and rude, and for a long time it seemed unlikely he would ever
let himself " belong " with anyone. To-day he is an integral part of his adopting parents'
life, his own changed behaviour and physical wellness being proof of his affection for them.
The child of mixed racial origin is one who increasingly must be given greater consideration by the citizens of British Columbia. As immigration policies broaden and as
the goal of assimilation and integration of the Native Indian is achieved there will inevitably be more children with different heritage needing care. Quite a number already
are planned for each year through adoption. Sometimes the parents selected are of the
same racial origin, but frequently people of a different colour but with a true belief in
equality will take such a child. They do not minimize the added hurdles they and he.
must face, but they are prepared to be his bulwark against the hazards which beset the
not-wholly-white child in our midst to-day.
Families of two or more children and multiple births also present a challenge in
adoption placement, and in the last three years the limitations of modern housing have
increased the problem. It is always cause for jubilation, therefore, when an application
for two or more children is received. When the study of the home reveals it has five or
six bedrooms to be filled, the day becomes a red-letter one, indeed. This year we were
particularly fortunate, and four families of two children each were placed as well as five
sets of twins.
Socially and spiritually, adoption is a worth-while and thought-provoking human
experience.   Dorothy Faubin, in her poem "Child Adopted," expresses it this way:—
" In this small bed blooms the seedling of fate
This little transplant is ours! " REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
ADOPTIONS COMPLETED BY COURT ORDER DURING
THE FISCAL YEAR
S 41
Of the total 1,177 Supreme Court adoption orders granted during the fiscal year,
705 pertained to children placed by a Children's Aid Society or Child Welfare Division.
Three hundred and sixty-four were stepfather or other relative adoptions, and 108 only
involved children placed by other than a recognized child welfare agency.
The age-groups of the 705 children legally adopted who had been placed by Social
Welfare Branch and the voluntary agencies is shown in Table IV below and speaks well
of the efforts being made to plan permanently for children as soon after birth as possible.
Table IV.—Age-groups of Children in Agency Completed Adoptions as at
the Time of Placement
Under 1
Month
1-2
Months
3-5
Months
6-11
Months
1-2
Years
3-4
Years
5-6
Years
7-8
Years
Total
Region I 	
25
43
24
23
13
18
125
12
26
13
26
15
19
9
7
25
4
29
8
6
10
6
4
6
14
12
10
6
10
4
6
3
7
17
11
5
9
....
4
6
6
6
11
12
9
4
4
2
3
5
6
5
1
1
1
1
4
"1
z
1
2
66
90
60
63
41
Region VI    	
C.A.S     	
44
203
C.C.A.S  - —	
51
F.C.S  	
87
Totals    	
309
147
76
69
63
29
9
3
705
OLDER CHILDREN IN FOSTER HOMES
A good many older wards of the Superintendent, if they were being brought into
care as babies or small children to-day, would be planned for by adoption, but because
this resource did not exist fifteen or more years ago, it is doubly important that they be
given help to gain independence. This year several graduate from high school and are
going to continue their education. Others are taking commercial courses and many are
already successfully employed in the clerical field. Vocational schools in different parts
of the Province have wards enrolled, and a good many have earned special recognition
for their endeavours. Departmental policy with respect to assisting these boys and girls
is sound and is being used thoughtfully by workers.
FACILITIES LACKING FOR DEFECTIVE CHILD IN CARE
For seventy-seven children in care and an equal number in the care of Children's
Aid Societies, little rehabilitative work can be done. These are children with severe
physical and (or) mental handicaps. Many need the care provided in The Woodlands
School, and until increased facilities are available in that institution, workers are hard
pressed to make adequate foster-home placements. Special rates are paid, but replacements are frequent anfl much worker's time is involved which otherwise could be devoted
to tasks more appropriately the responsibility of the Branch. Current interdepartmental
planning will hasten a resolution of this extremely complicated problem.
TREATMENT RESOURCE NEEDED IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
Another group of children for whom there is little to offer in the way of treatment
and cure are those in emotional stress with themselves and others. Usually the damage
starts in the early years, and by the time their unacceptable behaviour is brought to the
attention of schools and communities, the scars are almost beyond healing. No finer
gesture of dedication to the future could be made in British Columbia's Centennial Year S 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
than the development of such a resource. Society would be well repaid. Many boys and
girls destined otherwise to be known in correctional institutions and mental hospitals
through proper treatment could be enabled to take their rightful place in the community
life of the Province.
FAMILY ALLOWANCE FOR CHILDREN IN CARE
During the calendar year $51,982.95 was received from the Family Allowances
Branch on behalf of 1,552 children in the care of the Superintendent. The balance in
trust as at January 1st, 1956, was $39,153.42; a total of $45,992.59 was disbursed in
the twelve-month period; and a balance of $45,143.78 remained as at December 31st,
1956.
HEALTH OF CHILDREN IN CARE OF SUPERINTENDENT
The general health of children in care was good. As reported earlier, however, we
are caring for a higher number of physically and mentally defective children than ever
before, and three of the four deaths to be reported this year were children from this group.
The fourth death was that of an unhappy disturbed adolescent.
OTHER PHASES OF DIVISIONAL WORK
The Canadian Immigration Department this year requested the assessment of plans
for 135 minors in other countries wanting to come to friend or relative in British Columbia. In most instances a favourable recommendation is made, but occasionally the proposed plan is inappropriate, and the Superintendent's entry in the situation safeguards
against it being implemented.
HUNGARIAN REFUGEE CHILDREN IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
Forty-two boys and girls under 18 years of age arrived in British Columbia during
the year under the Hungarian refugee plan who were unaccompanied by parent or guardian, and for whom, as provided by the " Protection of Children Act," the Superintendent
assumed the responsibilities of legal guardian. Neither the Immigration Department nor
the Branch had prior knowledge of their arrival, and this, the language difficulty, and
the fact that many had been fending for themselves for years, and chronologically only
were still children, made planning difficult.
The first months in a new country are telling for the immigrant and new country
alike, and experience with Hungarian refugee youth thus far has shown that if others are
to follow, increased counselling services should be made available to them at immigration reception centres. Twenty-four hours by air geographically removes them from
hardship and want, but it does not change behaviour patterns developed out of experience with terror and violence nor remove the memory of loss by separation or death of
parents and kin which some have known. Conflicts of culture and ideology are apparent, and if help of a professional order is not made available immediately upon the immigrant child's arrival, their entry to this country will be a disappointing venture to them
as well as to the citizens of Canada.
As at March 31st, 1957, it had been necessary to admit to foster-home care the
following Hungarian children:—
Agency Number
Children's Aid Societies  3
Catholic Children's Aid Society  4
Family and Children's Service, Victoria  1
Social Welfare Branch  1 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 43
SERVICES TO SUPREME COURT
The Supreme Court used Branch and voluntary services in seventy-eight new applications concerned with disputes over custody of children this year.
ADMINISTRATION OF " CHILDREN OF UNMARRIED
PARENTS ACT "
Twenty-six Court orders, fifty-six agreements, and twenty-two settlements were
made under the provision of the " Children of Unmarried Parents Act " this year. A total
of $59,093.62 was collected and disbursed in the twelve-month period.
CONCLUSION
Statistics which have to do with families and children can never tell an entire story.
Behind the number of children shown apprehended under the " Protection of Children
Act" or the " Juvenile Delinquents Act" lie the families who for one tragic reason or
another were not able to remain together. The number of children shown as reunited with
their parents or placed in adoption homes during the year conjures a happier picture. No
statistics, however, can indicate the help given parents and children alike to reach the
goal of reunion. Nor can it tell of a worker's grave sense of responsibility for the removal
of a child from his own home or for the decision he must make when selecting adopting
parents for that child in whose way of life he must irrevocably be reared.
These are some of the intangibles of child welfare reporting. Because they represent
in large measure the day-to-day job of staff, the Superintendent would pay special tribute
to workers throughout the Province in this Centennial Year report. They have remained
steadfast to the principles laid down by our predecessors, and through their loyalty and
belief in the Branch are daily building their own particular and fine contribution for the
future. ^
(Miss) Ruby McKay,
Superintendent of Child Welfare. S 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
OLD-AGE ASSISTANCE, BLIND PERSONS' ALLOWANCES, DISABLED
PERSONS' ALLOWANCES, AND SUPPLEMENTARY ASSISTANCE
GENERAL
An analysis of the work completed during the year 1956-57 reveals that the volume
continued to be excessive. As a result of this, in addition to a serious shortage of staff at
the beginning of the year, it was necessary to do a great deal of overtime work, which was
not discontinued until the end of November. I am pleased to say, however, that the staff
situation has improved greatly, and that the flow of work was much closer to normal by
the end of March.
A review of the case load indicates that the number of Old-age Assistance applications received, also the total number on the payroll, continues to decline. During the
year 1956-57 a total of 2,210 applications were received, as compared to 2,281 the
previous year, and as at March 31st, 1957, there were 7,029 on our payroll, including
transfers from other Provinces, whereas a year previously this total stood at 7,441.
Blind Allowances, on the other hand, showed a slight increase, both in numbers
received and on the payroll. The number of applications received increased from seventy-
one in 1955-56 to eighty in 1956-57, and the total on the payroll as at the end of March
increased from 475 in 1956 to 482 in 1957.
The " Disabled Persons' Allowances Act" became effective in British Columbia as
from April 1st, 1955, and during the first year of operation a total of 1,326 applications
were received. As at March 31st, 1956, the total number on the payroll stood at 705.
These figures compare with 430 applications received during 1956-57 and a total on the
payroll of 1,067 as at March 31st, 1957.
In reference to Supplementary Assistance for persons 70 years of age and over, it is
interesting to note that there was a sharp increase both in the number of applications
received and the total number on the payroll. During the year under review 2,216 new
applications were received, as compared to 1,599 the previous year, and the total number
of active cases, including transfers from Alberta and Saskatchewan, stood at 28,059 as at
March 31st, 1957, as compared to 27,028 as at March 31st, 1956.
In summarizing the foregoing it will be noted that the over-all case load is steadily
increasing.
An examination of the financial statement at the end of the report reveals that the
net amount paid by British Columbia in Old-age Assistance during the fiscal year under
review was $118,387.13 less than the net amount paid during the previous fiscal year.
On the other hand, the amount of Supplementary Assistance paid by the Province increased considerably. The total of these Supplementary Assistance payments for all
categories was $2,111,190.10 in excess of the amount paid out during 1955-56, with the
over-70 group leading the upswing with an increase of $1,603,858.13 over the previous
year. The main reason for this sharp rise was, of course, the increase in the maximum
amount of Supplementary Assistance payable from $15 to $20 a month as from April
1st, 1956.
GRAPHIC PRESENTATION COVERING THE PERIOD FROM
JANUARY 1st, 1952, TO MARCH 31st, 1957
Following will be found a graphic presentation of the various aspects of the administration of Old-age Assistance since the coming into force of " The Old Age Assistance
Act "in January, 1952.
In following the line graphs denoting cost of assistance, the initial sharp rise reflects
the numerous applications that were granted in the first year.    In the period between REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 45
7,032
4,500
4,200
3,900
3,600
3,300
3,000
2,700
2,400
2,100
1,800
1,500
1,200
900
600
300
0
1
OLD AGE ASSISTANCE
--BRITISH   COLUMBIA-
JANUARY 1,   1952 TO MARCH 31,   195.7
Cost of Assistance
1
\
1   1
i
 15
0, 000 units per square
300 units per square _
300 units per square
300 units per square
ll
\
\
Number of Applications Granted
Number of Applications Refused                               •
	
1
i
i
R
ecipie
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ansfer
red tc
Old A
ge Sec
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300 units
1
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1953 and 1954 there is a levelling-off in costs. The slight rise in costs in the second
quarter of 1955 is largely due to the increase in the number of applications received and
granted earlier in the year. In 1956 there is a gradual decrease in costs, indicating a
decreasing case load. This is largely due to the fact that all of the initial 7,000 new cases
granted in 1952 had been transferred to Old Age Security by December 31st, 1956, as
five years is the maximum length of time a recipient can receive Old-age Assistance. New
cases granted were not keeping pace with these transfers during this period. Other factors
not shown but which influenced the case load were the number of suspensions and number
of cases dying.
It will be noted in this first five-year period that the various line graphs drew closer
together. This indicates that the Board was gradually moving toward a stabilized case
load—namely, when the number of new applications received, new cases granted, and
cases transferred to Old Age Security would be more or less the same for each year.
For the current fiscal year only, the line graphs show an increase in the number of
new applications in the first quarter because of the weather and road conditions in the
field and an increase in the number of new cases granted in the second quarter, as it
usually takes a month or two to process the applications. New applications decreased in
the second and third quarters close to the level of the previous fiscal year, the decrease
possibly due to the availability of part-time work. The last quarter shows an increase
again in new applications. This is partially due to the inability of the older person to
remain independent in the winter months when opportunities for employment are not
readily available. The last quarter also marks the beginning of the second five-year period. S 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Looking forward, it is anticipated our case load will increase gradually for a number
of years because of the lesser number being transferred to Old Age Security. This future
anticipated increased in case load, apart from the increased number of new applications
caused by the basic changes in the Act and regulations, should reflect greater all-round
welfare costs.
STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1957
Old-age Assistance
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received
2,205
Applications granted  1,973 1
Applications not granted (refused, withdrawn, etc.)      452
1 Includes some left over from previous year.
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Returned to British Columbia
Reinstated	
Deaths 	
Suspended
Transferred to other Provinces ___
Transferred to Old Age Security
Total number on payroll at end of fiscal year
(b) Other-Province recipients—
Transferred to British Columbia	
Reinstated	
Suspended 	
Deaths	
Transferred out of British Columbia
Transferred to Old Age Security
(c)  Total number of British Columbia and other-Province recipients on payroll at end of fiscal year	
34
126
277
306
45
1,935
6,815
162
3
13
10
77
67
7,029 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 47
Table III.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Not of age	
Unable to prove age	
Not sufficient residence	
Income in excess      191
Unable to prove residence
Transfer of property
Receiving War Veterans' Allowance
Information refused	
Applications withdrawn	
Applicants died before grant	
Whereabouts unknown	
Eligible for Old Age Security	
Assistance from private sources
Receiving Old Age Security	
Miscellaneous 	
Total..
452
Number
Per Cent
70
15.49
14
3.08
6
1.33
191
42.26
3
0.66
4
0.88
24
5.31
63
13.94
39
8.63
8
1.78
19
4.21
2
0.44
6
1.33
3
0.66
100.00
Male __.
Female
Table IV.—Sex of New Recipients
Number
      8 81
  1,092
Total
1,973
Per Cent
44.65
55.35
100.00
Table V.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Married      785 39.78
Single       262 13.28
Widows       466 23.62
Widowers       114 5.78
Separated       319 16.17
Divorced ..                                                             27 1.37
100.00
Total
1,973
Table VI.—Birthplace of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
British Columbia       163 8.26
Other parts of Canada      387 19.61
British Isles      534 27.07
Other parts of British Empire          9 0.46
United States of America      189 9.58
Other foreign countries      691 35.02
Total  1,973 100.00 S 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VII.—Ages at Granting of Assistance
Number Per Cent
Age 65  1,011 51.24
Age 66      353 17.89
Age 67      232 11.76
Age 68      218 11.05
Age 69      159 8.06
Total -J  1,973 100.00
Table VIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number Per Cent
Age 65        23 8.30
Age 66        52 18.77
Age 67        51 18.41
Age 68        76 27.44
Age 69        75 27.08
Total      277 100.00
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Number Per Cent
Living alone      703 35.63
Living with spouse      652 33.05
Living with spouse and children      116 5.88
Living with children      258 13.08
Living with other relatives      109 5.52
Living with others        84 4.26
Living in public institutions        30 1.52
Living in private institutions        21  - 1.06
Total  1,973 100.00
Table X.—Where New Recipients Are Living
Number Per Cent
In own house      818 41.46
In rented house      187 9.48
In children's home      272 13.79
In home of other relatives        69 3.50
Boarding         54 2.74
In boarding home        26 1.32
In housekeeping room      309 15.66
In single room (eating out)        44 2.22
In rented suite      143 7.25
In institutions        51 2.58
Total  1,973 100.00 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 49
Table XI.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a)  Holding real property of value-
$0	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500„__
$501 to $750—
$751 to $1,000.
$1,001 to $1,500        189
$1,501 to $2,000	
$2,001 and up	
TotaL
(b) Holding personal property of value-
$0 	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500	
$501 to $750	
$751 to $1,000 _
$1,001 to $1,500_
$1,501 to $2,000..
$2,001 and up	
Total.
1,973
Number
Per Cent
1,245
63.10
12
0.61
50
2.53
76
3.85
100
5.07
189
9.58
142
7.20
159
8.06
1,973
100.00
Number
Per Cent
1,030
52.21
544
27.57
133
6.74
123
6.23
74
3.75
49
2.48
11
0.56
9
0.46
100.00
Table XII.—Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March
31st, 1957, Whose Assistance Is Paid by British Columbia
Alberta	
Granted by
British
Columbia
  21
Granted by
Other
Provinces
12
Saskatchewan  l.                   ._
     9
13
Manitoba 	
     6
5
Ontario      _ __       	
  11
12
Quebec        - ■'.  	
     1
4
New Brunswick	
     1
Nova Scotia  „ -              __._ __
1
1
Prince Edward Island  	
     1
Newfoundland	
Northwest Territories  	
Yukon Territory	
Totals	
  51
47 S 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XIII.—Distribution of B.C. Recipients according to the Amount
of Assistance Received (Basic Assistance, $40)
Amount of Assistance Per Cent
$40  83.39
$35 to $39.99  4.02
$30 to $34.99  3.98
$25 to $29.99  2.80
$20 to $24.99  1.60
Less than $19.99  4.21
Total  100.00
Blind Persons' Allowances
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received     75
Applications granted     511
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc     212
1 Includes some left over from previous year.
2 Number still pending not included.
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a) British Columbia recipients—
Suspended   29
Reinstated   10
Transferred to other Provinces  2
Returned to British Columbia  1
Transferred to Old Age Security  20
Deaths  14
(b) Other-Province recipients—
Transferred to British Columbia     10
Reinstated        5
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended       5
Deaths	
(c) Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia  452
Other Province     30
  482 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 51
Table III.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Not blind within the meaning of the Act.
Income in excess	
Applications withdrawn	
Eligible for Old Age Security.
Number
._    8
_    4
Died before grant     3
Receiving War Veterans' Allowance     1
Information refused     4
Assistance from private sources  	
Receipt of Old Age Security     1
Total.
21
Per Cent
38.09
19.05
14.29
4.76
19.05
4.76
100.00
Table IV.—Sex of New Recipients
Number
_ 30
Male	
Female   21
Total.
51
Per Cent
58.82
41.18
100.00
Table V.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Married _  	
Number
      13
Per Cent
25.49
Single
21
41.18
Widows  _           __   _ 	
2
3.92
Widowers     _ __.
    ____        1
1.96
Separated    	
■    10
19.61
Divorced  	
4
7.84
  51
Total	
100.00
of New Recipients
Number
  21
               18
Table VI.—Birthplace
British Columbia    	
Per Cent
41.18
Other parts of Canada    	
35.29
British Isles	
         1
1.96
Other parts of British Empire	
            4
United States of America	
7.84
Other foreign countries	
      7
13.73
  51
Total  	
100.00 S 52 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VII.—Ages at Granting of Allowance
Number Per Cent
Ages 18 to 21     5 9.80
Ages 22 to 30     8 15.69
Ages 31 to 40     4 7.84
Ages 41 to 50  13 25.49
Ages 51 to 60     8 15.69
Ages 61 to 69  13 25.49
Total  51 100.00
Table VIII.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number Per Cent
Age 21   	
Ages 22 to 30  	
Ages 31 to 40     2 14.29
Ages 41 to 50  	
Ages 51 to 60     1 7.14
Ages 61 to 69  11 78.57
Total  14 100.00
Table IX.—With Whom New Recipients Live
Number Per Cent
Living with parents  10 19.61
Living alone  15 29.42
Living with spouse     6 11.77
Living with spouse and children     5 9.80
Living with children     1 1.96
Living with other relatives     3 5.88
Living with others     2 3.92
Living in public institutions     4 7.84
Living in private institutions     5 9.80
Total  51 100.00 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 53
Table X.—Where New Recipients Are Living
Number Per Cent
In parents' home  11 21.57
In own home  15 29.42
In rented house     3 5.88
In rented suite     1 1.96
In children's home     2 3.92
In home of other relatives     3 5.88
Boarding      1 1.96
In housekeeping room     4 7.84
In boarding home     1 1.96
In institutions     9 17.65
In single room (eating out)     1 1.96
100.00
Total.
51
Table XI.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a)  Holding real property of value— Number
$0   43
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500     1
$501 to $750	
$751 to $1,000     2
$1,001 to $1,500     1
$1,501 to $2,000     3
$2,001 and up     1
Total  51
(b) Holding personal property of value—
$0 	
Number
.__ 36
_ 8
... 1
.__ 1
$1 to $250 	
$251 to $500	
$501 to $750	
$751 to $1,000	
$1,001 to $1,500     2
$1,501 to $2,000     2
$2,001 and up     1
Per Cent
84.32
1.96
3.92
1.96
5.88
1.96
100.00
Per Cent
70.59
15.69
1.96
1.96
3.92
3.92
1.96
Total
51
100.00 S 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XII,
-Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at March 31st,
1957, Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Alberta	
Granted by
British
Columbia
                  1
Granted by
Other
Provinces
2
Saskatchewan	
                       1
2
Manitoba 	
                       1
Ontario 	
1
Quebec	
New Brunswick	
       1
Nova Scotia   	
Prince Edward Island	
Newfoundland 	
Northwest Territories      	
Yukon Territory	
Total	
     4
5
Table XIII.—Distribution of B.C. Recipients according to the Amount
of Allowance Received (Basic Allowance, $40)
Per Cent
  93.36
  3.32
  0.89
  0.44
  0.22
  1.77
$40	
$35 to $39.99 _.
$30 to $34.99 _
$25 to $29.99 1
$20 to $24.99 L
$19.90 and less
Total
100.00
Disabled Persons' Allowances
Table I.—Disposition of Applications
New applications received  430
Applications granted  3991
Applications refused, withdrawn, etc.  212
1 Includes some left over from previous year. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 55
Table II.—Miscellaneous
(a)
British Columbia recipients—
Suspended 	
Reinstated 	
(b)
(c)
Transferred to other Provinces	
Returned to British Columbia	
Transferred to Old Age Security	
Deaths	
Other-Province recipients—
Transferred to British Columbia	
Transferred out of British Columbia or suspended	
Reinstated	
Deaths	
Total on payroll at end of fiscal year—
British Columbia  1,043
Other Province        24
34
8
6
2
21
23
1,067
Table III.—Reasons Why Applications Not Granted
Not 18 years of age	
Unable to prove age	
Not sufficient residence 	
Unable to prove residence
Too much income	
Transfer of property	
Refused information	
Number
Whereabouts unknown	
Allowance under " Blind Persons Act"	
Assistance under " Old-age Assistance Act "	
Allowance under " War Veterans' Allowance
Act" 	
Pension under " Old Age Security Act "	
Mothers' Allowance	
Unable to meet medical test	
Referred for rehabilitation	
Tuberculosis sanatorium	
Mental hospital	
Home for the Aged	
Infirmary	
Institution for incurables	
Hospital 	
Nursing home	
Other institutions	
140
17
  4
  3
  1
Application withdrawn  14
Died before grant  13
Per Cent
3.30
1.88
0.47
66.05
8.02
3.30
0.47
1.88
1.42
0.47
6.61
6.13
TotaL
212
100.00 S 56 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IV.—Primary Causes of Disability on Accepted Cases
Per Cent
Infective and parasitic diseases  5.68
Neoplasms  1.99
Allergic, endocrine system, metabolic, and nutritional diseases 4.55
Diseases of blood and blood-forming organs  0.28
Mental, psychoneurotic, and personality disorders  34.94
Diseases of the nervous system and sense organs  31.53
Diseases of the circulatory system  7.39
Diseases of the respiratory system  0.85
Diseases of the digestive system  0.57
Diseases of genito-urinary system    	
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue  0.57
Diseases of the bones and organs of movement  8.81
Congenital malformations  1.14
Symptoms, senility, and ill-defined conditions    	
Accidents, poisoning, and violence (nature of injury)  1.70
Total  100.00
Table V.—Sex of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Male   213 53.38
Female   186 46.62
Total  399 100.00
Table VI.—Marital Status of New Recipients
Number Per Cent
Married     59 14.78
Single  285 71.43
Widow     12 3.01
Widower        8 2.01
Separated      25 6.26
Divorced      10 2.51
  399
Total  _._   _
100.00
of New Recipients
Number
  155
Table VII.—Birthplace
British Columbia      _   ~_
Per Cent
38.85
35.84
7.02
0.50
6.01
11.78
Other parts of Canada	
  143
British Isles       ,   _     _    _
     28
Other parts of British Empire
    _         2
United States of America.    	
     24
Other foreign countries	
     47
  399
Total	
100.00 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 57
Table VIII.—Ages at Granting of Allowance
Ages 18 to 19__
Ages 20 to 24__
Ages 25 to 29__
Ages 30 to 34__
Ages 35 to 39__.
Ages 40 to 44__
Ages 45 to 49__
Ages 50 to 54__
Ages 55 to 59 _
Ages 60 to 64__
Ages 65 to 69__
Ages over 70	
Total.
Number
_ 35
_ 32
. 37
_ 42
_ 29
. 39
_ 44
_ 49
_ 34
_ 53
_ 4
_ 1
_ 399
Per Cent
8.77
8.02
9.27
10.53
7.27
9.77
11.03
12.28
8.52
13.28
1.01
0.25
100.00
Table IX.—Ages of Recipients at Death
Number
Ages 18 to 19_.
Ages 20 to 24.
Ages 25 to 29_
Ages 30 to 34_
Ages 35 to 39_.
Ages 40 to 44_.
Ages 45 to 49_.
Ages 50 to 54_
Ages 55 to 59_.
Ages 60 to 64_.
Ages 65 to 69
Ages over 70__
Total.
Per Cent
2
9.52
4
19.05
1
4.76
3
14.29
3
14.29
4
19.05
2
9.52
2
9.52
1
100.00
Table X.—With Whom Recipients Live
Living with parents.
Living alone	
Living with spouse
Living
Living
Living
Living
Living in public institution-
Living in private institution
with spouse and children_
with children	
with other relatives	
with others	
Jumber
Per Cent
211
52.88
39
9.77
40
10.03
19
4.76
14
3.51
47
11.78
27
6.77
0.50
Total.
399
100.00 S 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XI.—Where New Recipients Are Living
In parents' home	
In own house	
In rented house               _    _   .
Number
  202
     53
     29
Per Cent
50.63
13.28
7.27
In rented suite _ _              _	
     19
4.76
In children's home        _          _
     16
4.01
In home of other relatives.. _
     43
10.78
Boarding                        _ _        . 	
18
4.51
In housekeeping room
     14
3.51
In boarding home.
In institutions               .    	
       3
2
0.75
0.50
In single room (eating out)	
  399
Total	
100.00
Table XII.—Economic Status of New Recipients
(a)  Holding real property of value-
$0	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500	
$501 to $750	
$751 to $ 1,000.....
$1,001 to $1,500.
$1,501 to $2,000.
$2,001 and up.	
Number
. 348
.      2
Total.
7
9
11
12
399
Per Cent
87.22
0.50
0.50
2.01
1.75
2.25
2.76
3.01
100.00
(b)  Holding personal property of value-
$0	
$1 to $250	
$251 to $500	
$501 to $750	
$751 to $1,000	
$1,001 to $1,500	
$1,501 to $2,000	
$2,001 and up	
Number
._ 320
. 49
_ 17
_ 2
. 4
._ 3
Total.
399
Per Cent
80.20
12.28
4.25
0.50
1.01
0.75
1.01
100.00 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 59
Table XIII. — Number of Recipients Living in Other Provinces as at
March 31st, 1957, Whose Allowances Are Paid by This Province
Alberta	
Saskatchewan ...
Manitoba	
Ontario	
Quebec	
New Brunswick
Nova Scotia	
Granted by
British
Columbia
  4
Granted by
Other
Provinces
l
3
Prince Edward Island-
Newfoundland 	
Total..
Table XIV.—Distribution of British Columbia Recipients according
to the Amount of Allowance Received (Basic Allowance, $40)
$40	
$35 to $39.99...
$30 to $34.99...
$25 to $29.99-
$20 to $24.99-
$19.99 and less
Total.
Per Cent
92.99
1.25
2.11
1.06
0.67
1.92
100.00
Supplementary Assistance and Health Services
to the Aged, Blind, and Disabled
New Applications
Number received   2,218
Number granted supplementary assistance and health services 1,115
Number granted supplementary assistance only  3
Number granted health services only  113
Number who died before application was granted  34
Number of applications withdrawn  58
Number of applicants ineligible  293
Number of applications pending  602
Total
2,218 S 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
General Information
Former  old-age  pensioners  still  receiving  supplementary
assistance on March 31st, 1957  13,837
Old-age Assistance recipients transferred to Old Age Security receiving supplementary assistance on March
31st, 1957  _     7,065
New Old Age Security pensioners receiving supplementary
assistance on March 31st, 1957     5,463
Blind persons in receipt of Old Age Security receiving supplementary assistance on March 31st, 1957        224
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
"The Old Age Assistance Act," Year Ended March 31st, 1957
Total amount paid recipients in British       Assistance ^AssSc'l.^ Total
Columbia   $3,369,046.41  $1,481,588.57 $4,850,634.98
Less amount of refunds from recipients—
Overpayments refunded        $20,454.25 $3,021.99       $23,476.24
Miscellaneous refunds  120.00 40.00 160.00
Totals        $20,574.25 $3,061.99       $23,636.24
Net amount paid to recipients in British
Columbia  .  $3,348,472.16 $1,478,526.58 $4,826,998.74
Add amount paid other Provinces on account of recipients for whom British
Columbia is responsible  24,925.94 5,886.75 30,812.69
Less amount received by British Columbia on account of recipients for whom
other Provinces are responsible  63,314.09 10,392.50 73,706.59
Less amount refunded by the Federal
Government      1,674,233.56        1,674,233.56
Total amount paid by British
Columbia   $1,635,850.45 $1,474,020.83 $3,109,871.28 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH S 61
"The Blind Persons Act," Year Ended March 31st, 1957
Supplementary
Allowances Assistance Total
Total amount paid recipients in British Columbia $226,871.95 $101,781.95 $328,653.90
Less amount of refunds from recipients—Overpayments refunded         1,012.95 75.00        1,087.95
Net amount paid to recipients in British Columbia   $225,859.00 $101,706.95 $327,565.95
Add amount paid other Provinces on account
of recipients for whom British Columbia is
responsible   895.76 160.00        1,055.76
Less amount received by British Columbia on
account of recipients for whom other Provinces are responsible         2,907.15        3,026.00        5,933.15
Less amount refunded by the Federal Government      169,386.75      169,386.75
Total amount paid by British Columbia      $54,460.86    $98,840.95 $153,301.81
"The Disabled Persons Act," Year Ended March 31st, 1957
Supplementary
Allowances Assistance Total
Total amount paid recipients in British Columbia $456,133.42 $222,606.56 $678,739.98
Less amount of refunds from recipients—
Overpayments refunded  $241.49 $39.81 $281.30
Miscellaneous refunds  40.00 15.00 55.00
Totals  $281.49 $54.81 $336.30
Net amount paid to recipients in British Columbia   $455,851.93 $222,551.75 $678,403.68
Add amount paid other Provinces on account
of recipients for whom British Columbia is
responsible          2,727.33 860.00        3,587.33
Less amount received by British Columbia on
account of recipients for whom other Provinces are responsible         7,695.95          7,695.95
Less amount refunded by the Federal Government      227,925.98      227,925.98
Total amount paid by British Columbia  $222,957.33 $223,411.75 $446,369.08 S 62 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Old Age Security Pensioners—Supplementary Assistance,
Year Ended March 31st, 1957
Total amount paid recipients in British Columbia  $6,053,908.33
Less amount of refunds from recipients—
Overpayments refunded  8,187.11
Miscellaneous refunds  221.88
Total  $8,408.99
Net amount paid to recipients in British Columbia  $6,045,499.34
Add amount paid other Provinces on account of
recipients for whom British Columbia is responsible  50,450.49
Less amount received by British Columbia on account of recipients for whom other Provinces
are responsible        197,180.12
Total amount paid by British Columbia ... $5,898,769.71
"The Old Age Pensions Act," Year Ended March 31st, 1957
Supplementary
Pensions Assistance Total
Total amount paid pensioners in British Columbia.. $1,838.77      $25.00      $1,863.77
Less amount of refunds from pensioners—From
estates  .     3,274.92                3,274.92
Net amount  $1,436.15!    $25.00      $1,411,151
Less amount paid other Provinces on account of
pensioners   for   whom   British   Columbia   is
responsible         469.65         469.65
Less amount refunded to the Federal Government..    1,077.07                1,077.07
Total amount paid by British Columbia     $110.57      $25.00 $135.57
1 Credit.
Administration Expenses
Salaries and special services  $188,966.11
Office expense  48,630.79
Travelling expense  305.77
Incidentals and contingencies  640.20
Equipment and furniture .  2,597.31
Medical examinations  647.86
Total      $241,788.04 report of social welfare branch
Summary
Administration and Assistance
Administration  $241,788.04
" Old-age Pension Act"  110.57
"Old-age Assistance Act"  1,635,850.45
"Blind Persons' Allowances Act"  54,460.86
" Disabled Persons' Allowances Act"  222,957.33
S 63
As per Public Accounts.
$2,155,167.25
Supplementary Assistance
" Old-age Pension Act"	
" Old-age Assistance Act"	
" Blind Persons' Allowances Act"	
" Disabled Persons' Allowances Act"_
Universal Old Age Security	
As per Public Accounts.
$25.00
1,474,020.83
98,840.95
223,411.75
5,898,769.71
$7,695,068.24
MEMBERS OF BOARD
The following are the members of the Old-age Assistance Board of the Province of
British Columbia:—
Chairman:  Mr. E. W. Berry.
Members:   Mr. J. A. Sadler, Director of Welfare;  Mr. R. Talbot, Administrator, Region II, Social Welfare Branch.
CONCLUSION
In closing this report the Board would like to express its sincere appreciation to the
office and field staffs for the willing spirit in which they have carried on their work
throughout the year and for assistance generously extended by other departments of the
Government and many outside agencies.
Respectfully submitted.
E. W. Berry,
Chairman. S 64 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MEDICAL SERVICES DIVISION
The following is the annual report of the Medical Services Division for the fiscal
year 1956-57.
Table I.—Payments to British Columbia Doctors
Fiscal Year and Breakdown Total Expenditure
1949-50—Agreement    $592,908.17
1950-51—Agreement      688,829.34
1951-52—Agreement      723,524.87
1952-53—Agreement   $1,190,248.30
Immigrant   2,278.96
Other   10,232.25
1,202,759.51
1953-54—Agreement   $1,217,431.12
Immigrant    2,047.75
Other   489.84
1,219,968.71
1954-55—Agreement   $1,359,212.98
Immigrant    1,257.63
Other   2,457.60
  1,362,928.21
1955_56—Agreement   $1,518,274.51
Immigrant    701.89
Other   4,682.00
  1,523,658.40
1956-57—Agreement   $1,479,661.21
Immigrant    1,836.78
Other   4,903.00
  1,486,400.99
Table II.—Categorical Breakdown of Medical Coverage, 1956-57
Average Monthly
Coverage on Percentage
Category a Yearly Basis of Total
Mothers' Allowance  1,047                  2
Social Allowance   17,118                26
Child Welfare Division  3,311                  5
Old Age Security bonus and Blind Persons' Allowance  36,239                55
Old-age Assistance   7,739                10
Disabled Persons' Allowance  975                  2
Total average monthly coverage on yearly basis  66,429
Total yearly payments to S.A.M.S  $1,479,839.34 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 65
Medical Services Division continued its activities to integrate and to co-operate in
the utilization of travelling clinics throughout the Province and the fixed clinics in the
large centres, such as Vancouver and Victoria. Reference is made specifically to the
British Columbia Cancer Institute, Canadian Arthritis and Rheumatism Society, and the
Children's Hospital travelling clinics.
Table HI.—Travelling and Consultative Clinics, 1956-57
Name of Clinic and
Treatment Centre
Number of
Clinics
Name of Clinic and
Treatment Centre
Number of
Clinics
British Columbia Cancer
Institute—
Abbotsford  10
Chilliwack  5
Cranbrook   6
Kamloops  4
Kelowna   11
Nanaimo   11
Nelson  6
Penticton  11
Prince George  3
Prince Rupert  2
Trail  6
Vernon    11
Canadian Arthritis and Rheumatism Society—
Campbell River _.__ 1
Courtenay   1
Cranbrook   2
Creston   1
Dawson Creek   1
Fort St. lohn   1
Invermere   2
Kelowna   2
Kimberley   1
Kitimat  1
Miller Bay   2
Nanaimo   1
Nelson  2
Penticton ,  1
Port Alberni   1
Powell River  1
Prince George  1
Quesnel  1
Sardis    2
Trail   2
Vanderhoof  1
7 Vernon    2
Williams Lake   1
Windermere   1
— 32
During the past year over 117 cases were assisted in being brought down from
various parts of the Province to Vancouver for consultation or treatment.
Table TV.—Summary of Recorded Patients Who Received Treatment in
Vancouver Hospitals from April 1st, 1956, to March 31st, 1957
Children's Hospital-
Okanagan 	
Kootenays  	
Peace River	
Cariboo	
Skeena 	
— 86
2
2
1
1
1
Diagnostic
Classification
Number of
Patients
Age-group
Number of
Patients
Medical general	
Medical neurological..
Unclassified	
Surgical—
General	
Cancer..
G.U	
Orthopaedic.
Eye.
Gynaecology.
Total patients.
48
4
3
13
8
14
15
10
2
1-10 years
11-20 years
21-30 years
41-50 years
51-60 years
61-70 years
71-80 years
81-90 years
6
8
7
14
14
23
24
7
1171
i Male, 78;   female, 39. S 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table V.—Drug-store Charges, 1956-57
Number of
Prescriptions
  115,068
Drug Type
Analgesic 	
Cardiac   50,523
Digestive   43,681
Eye, ear, nose, and throat  14,636
Hormones   14,222
Respiratory    25,933
Skin   13,472
Vitamins  39,096
Miscellaneous   81,724
Yearly totals   398,355
Charge
$207,921.49
139,312.76
82,633.25
23,555.64
30,291.77
59,900.27
19,803.03
119,722.05
218,627.75
$901,768.01
Table VI.—Medicines Supplied through Drug-stores
1955-56 1956-57
Total number of prescriptions          399,367 398,355
Average charge per prescription.            $2,135 $2,263
Average  number  of prescriptions
per applicant                5.85 5.99
Cost of medicines through—
Drug-stores   $823,002.90 $873,145.51
Provincial Pharmacy       73,886.78 92,776.46
Total cost of drugs  $896,889.68 $965,921.97
Table VII.—Percentage Utilization and Average Charge of Prescriptions according to
Type of Medicine Supplied Through Drug-stores
1955-56
1956-57
Drug Type
Number of
Prescriptions
Percentage
Utilization
Average
Charge per
Prescription
Number of
Prescriptions
Percentage
Utilization
Average
Charge per
Prescription
Analgesic.  ...
Cardiac  .
Digestive 	
Eye, ear, nose, and throat...
Hormones 	
113,942
57,820
42,833
13,976
14,370
25,577
14,093
37,730
77,026
28.50
14.50
10.72
3.50
3.60
6.90
3.53
9.45
19.30
$1,745
2.662
1.809
1.539
2.095
2.287
1.437
3.009
2.483
115,068
50,523
43,681
14,636
14,222
25,933
13,472
39,096
81,724
28.90
12.70
11.00
3.70
3.60
6.60
3.40
9.90
20.20
$1,806
2.757
1.891
1.608
2.129
2.309
Skin 	
1.47
3.062
2.675
Table VIII.—Costs of Provincial Pharmacy
Fiscal Year Expenditure Fiscal Year Expenditure
1952-53  $15,467.06 1955-56  $73,886.78
1953-54     26,301.69 1956-57     92,776.46
1954-55.
51,741.07 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH S 67
Table IX.—Dental Payments
Total
Fiscal Year and Breakdown Expenditure
1946-47  $6,457.75
1947_48  13,008.82
1948-49  19,290.90
1949-50  24,764.95
1950-51  30,915.12
1951-52  50,044.06
1952-53—Prophylaxis      $1,470.00
Extractions       6,305.39
Dentures     65,234.70
  73,010.09
1953-54—Prophylaxis      $3,621.59
Extractions       6,851.64
Dentures     76,243.94
1954-55—Prophylaxis   $14,017.99
Extractions       7,845.05
Dentures     90,855.99
86,717.17
1955-56—Prophylaxis   $15,385.80
Extractions       8,570.90
Dentures     95,556.04
112,719.03
119,512.74
1956-57—Prophylaxis   $24,996.66
Extractions       7,596.04
Dentures     96,674.86
  129,267.56
Table X.—Optical Payments
Total
Fiscal Year and Breakdown Expenditure
1946-47  $1,821.06
1947-48  2,615.64
1948-49  3,817.73
1949-50 .  13,425.22
1950-51   23,543.17
1951-52  28,972.01
1952-53—Optometric examination     $9,119.84
Glasses      35,738.36
44,858.20
44,330.50
1953-54—Optometric examination     $8,797.23
Glasses      35,533.27
1954-55—Optometric examination     $9,090.55
Glasses      38,983.79
1955-56—Optometric examination     $9,096.05
Glasses      39,245.86
1956-57—Optometric examination     $9,2,13.65
Glasses      41,351.96
48,074.34
48,341.91
50,565.61 S 68
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XI.—Divisional Costs for Ten Years, 1946-47 to 1956-57
Fiscal Year
Medical
Drugs
Dental
Optical
Transportation
Other
Total
1946-47..
1947-48-
1948-49..
1949-50-
1950-51..
1951-52-
1952-53..
1953-54-
1954-55-
1955-56-
1956-57..
$104,375.86
185,613.57
250,004.18
592,908.17
688,829.34
723,524.87
1,202,759.51
1,219,968.71
1,362,928.21
1,523,658.40
1,486,400.99
$65,690.53
123,913.10
172,554.46
299,478.71
387,242.73
448,886.21
625,811.17
658,599.63
753,831.50
896,889.68
873,145.51
$6,457.75
13,008.82
19,290.90
24,764.96
30,915.12
50,044.06
73,010.09
86,717.17
112,719.03
119,512.74
129,267.56
$1,821.06
2,615.64
3,817.73
13,425.22
23,543.17
28,972.01
44,858.20
44,330.50
48,074.34
48,341.91
50,565.61
$4,752.15
6,319.58
10,484.90
14,156.08
13,612.38
14,860.51
16,765.41
17,380.03
23,891.75
22,504.83
23,359.27
$2,876.33
3,602.90
10,317.53
3,990.96
1,839.60
3,170.24
8,492.14
11,100.36
13,454.81
12,733.72
14,421.96
$185
335
466
948
1,145
1,269
1,971
2,038
2,314.
2,623
2,669
,973.68
,073.61
469.70
724.10
982.34
457.90
696.52
096.40
899.64
,641.28
,937.26
CONCLUSION
In concluding this report, sincere appreciation is extended to the Canadian Medical
Association (British Columbia Division), the British Columbia Pharmaceutical Association, the British Columbia Dental Association, the Vancouver General Hospital, the
British Columbia Cancer Institute, the Children's Hospital, the Canadian Arthritis and
Rheumatism Society, and all the many other organizations throughout the Province,
which are too numerous to fist here, but which in the past ten years have assisted in
a magnificent manner to promote the interests of those people receiving welfare services. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 69
PART III.—INSTITUTIONS
INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS
I beg to submit the annual report for the Brannen Lake School for boys for the
period ending March 31st, 1957.
Fiscal Year
Number in School, April 1st	
Number A.W.O.L., April 1st	
Number in Oakalla, April 1st	
Number in Crease Clinic, April 1st	
Number on extended leave, April 1st
Number of new admissions	
Number of recidivists 	
Total number of admissions	
Percentage of recidivism	
Number of releases 	
Number A.W.O.L., March 31st	
Number in Oakalla, March 31st	
Number on extended leave, March
31st	
Number in Crease Clinic, March 31st
Number on special leave, March 31st
Number in the School, March 31st-—
Average daily population	
Total inmate-days
Average length of stay in months	
Total A.W.O.L.'s during the fiscal
year	
56
2
1
129
29
158
18.4
119
7
3
95
7
3
3
102
23
125
18.4
126
14
1
95
74.6
27,295
5.5
(2)
89
86
31,408
89
14
1
3
86
25
111
22.5
126
13
79
13
130
26
156
16.7
128
15
1
104
15
1
104
19
3
79
81.7
29,808
10
(2)          (2)
 I
104
82
30.011
(2)
(2)
121
31
152
20.4
146
19
3
118
23
141
16.3
155
4
1
101
4
1
2
4
105
17
122
13.9
119
15
2
96
15
2
2
171
32
203
15.8
126
9
19
33
131
9
19
33
143
24
167
14.4
212
1
C1)
17
129
1
C1)
17
222
40
262
15.3
237
2
3
1
104
84.3
30,865
(2)
(2)
101
100.6
36,721
9
281
96
102.4
37,383
9.5
432
131
101.9
37,198
(2)
239
129
137.6
50,371
8.3
124
14
152
144
52,576
7.7
156
1 The former practice of transferring boys to Oakalla was discontinued.
2 Not recorded.
During the fiscal year there were 222 admissions and 40 readmissions, making a
total of 262 admitted to the School. There was a 15.3-per-cent rate of recidivism. Nine
of the forty readmissions were committed for the third time. One hundred and seventy-
two of the boys admitted were Protestant, eighty were Roman Catholic, and ten were of
other religions or not recorded. Forty-five of the total number of boys admitted during
the year were of native Indian status.
Range of Age on Admission
Number
Age of Boys Age
9 years  1 14 years..
10 „     1 15    „   _
11 „     4 16    „   ..
12 „     13 17    „   _.
13 „     36
The average age on admission was 14.53 years.
Number
of Boys
._ 71
__ 70
.. 46
__ 20 S 70
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Supervising Agencies of Boys Admitted
Social Welfare Branch	
Provincial Probation Branch
Vancouver luvenile Court	
Victoria luvenile Court	
Children's Aid Society	
Number
of Boys
53
120
48
19
9
7
Catholic Children's Aid Society	
Family and Children's Service  2
Child Welfare Division  2
British Columbia Penitentiary  1
None   1
Of this number, eleven were wards of the Superintendent of Child Welfare, nine of
the Children's Aid Society, seven of the Catholic Children's Aid Society, and three of the
Victoria Family and Children's Service. Twelve of the thirty wards committed were
recidivists.
The 262 boys admitted were committed from the following luvenile Courts:—
Agassiz
Alberni
3
2
Alert Bay  13
Burnaby   10
Campbell River  2
Castlegar  2
Chilliwack  9
Cloverdale  17
Coquitlam Municipality _ 2
Courtenay   3
Cranbrook  3
Creston  1
Dawson Creek  1
Duncan   4
Fernie   1
Fort St. lames  2
Fruitvale   2
Golden   1
Grand Forks   1
Greenwood   1
Haney   4
Hazelton  1
Hope  2
Kamloops  1
Kelowna  2
Kitimat  2
Ladysmith   1
Lake Cowichan  3
Mission City     4
Nanaimo      3
Nelson ...     1
New Westminster     5
North Vancouver     3
Oak Bay     1
Osoyoos      2
Penticton     3
Port Alberni     2
Port Coquitlam     1
Prince George     5
4
2
1
1
1
4
1
Prince Rupert
Princeton	
Powell River _
Queen Charlotte City __.
Revelstoke	
Richmond 	
Rossland 	
Royal Oak     3
Sechelt     8
Sidney 	
Sumas 	
Summerland
Terrace 	
Trail	
Langley ...
Lumby 	
Lytton 	
Masset	
Merritt 	
3
1
4
1
3
     1
     1
     1
     2
     1
Vancouver  59
Vernon     5
Victoria .. .  19
West Vancouver     4
Williams Lake     5
Transfer from British Columbia Penitentiary....    1 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 71
Boys were not in all cases residents of the area served by the luvenile Court which
committed them to the School.
Of the 262 boys committed to the School during the year, 212 were committed for
offences against property, seven offences against persons, and forty-three for other
offences, which included incorrigibility.
Of the 222 new admissions during the year, fifty-six of the boys were never tried
on probation but were committed to the School on their first appearance before the
Court.
There were 237 boys released from the School during the year. The average length
of stay of boys released during the year was 7.7 months. S 72 BRITISH COLUMBIA
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1956-57
Salaries  $212,801.88
Office expense  6,158.99
Travelling expense  1,545.55
Heat, light, power, and water.  22,980.46
Medical services  8,958.25
Medical supplies  1,371.91
Clothing and uniforms  15,017.05
Provisions and catering  58,246.96
Laundry and dry-goods  11,990.62
Equipment and machinery  1,308.36
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  5,724.42
Transportation   2,852.98
Maintenance and operation of equipment  2,320.30
Incidentals and contingencies  3,914.88
Repairs to furnishings and equipment  303.11
Training programme expense  5,179.12
$360,674.84
Less—
Board   $3,771.00
Rent   1,458.90
Transportation   388.90
Received from Workmen's Compensation Board  288.73
Transfer from Inmates' Trust
Account  1,094.34
Sundry credits  622.31
         7,624.18
$353,050.66
Less maintenance receipts         1,156.60
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts  $351,894.06
Salaries and expenses  $360,674.84
Less credits         7,624.18
$353,050.66
Less increase in inventory—
Inventory  as  at  March  31st,
1957  $ 14,347.78
Inventory  as  at  March  31st,
1956     12,455.50
         1,892.28
$351,158.38
Plus Public Works expenditure       41,579.55
Cost of operating School, 1956-57  $392,737.93
Per capita cost per diem: $392,737.93-h-52,576=$7.47. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 73
I wish to thank all staff members, clergymen, service clubs, and other organizations,
including other departments of government, both municipal and provincial, private agencies and other individuals who have shown an interest in the boys of the School by helping the School with its programme of rehabilitation. The School is greatly indebted to
all these persons, and their assistance has been appreciated by the administration of the
School.
Respectfully submitted.
F. G. Hassard,
Superintendent. S 74 BRITISH COLUMBIA
INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
The forty-third annual report of the Provincial Industrial School for Girls, covering the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1957, is herewith submitted.
During the year there were seventy-one admissions, with eleven of these, or 15.49
per cent, being recidivists. This is an increase of one in admissions and a drop of 4
per cent in recidivists over the previous year. While there has been no marked increase
in admission, there has been an unprecedented increase in the number of girls actually
in the School. During the last month of this year we reached an all-time high of sixty-
nine, with a total, including those out without leave, of seventy-eight. The only other
time when the population of the School reached the sixty mark was in 1932, when the
Doukhobor girls were housed here. This increase in population is, to a great extent,
due to the decrease in run-aways—a direct result of the progress plan which sets any
run-away's progress toward release back two months. Of the eleven recidivists, six were
amongst the group released this year and were readmitted only a few weeks after being
released. This could indicate a need for a different kind of plan for a number of our
girls when they leave the School; these same girls have experienced very little trouble
at any time in functioning well within the limits of the institution. The ages on admission of the seventy-one girls were as follows:—
12 years old None
13 years old i     7
14 years old  12
15 years old  17
16 years old  14
17 years old  21
This indicates 49.2 per cent, or almost half of the admissions, have passed their
sixteenth birthday at the time of committal. An interesting study has been done by our
social workers on the backgrounds of these seventy-one girls. Ten were born out of
wedlock. The status of their parents at time of committal may give some indication of
the emotional trauma each had suffered. Twenty-three came from homes which, on the
surface, appeared normal, with both parents in the home, but the history indicated a
variety of problems and misunderstandings in each. The parents of eleven girls had
been divorced, and in ten cases one or both parents had remarried or entered into a
common-law relationship, giving the child two sets of parents; evidence shows that the
girl does not wholly belong in either home. It is heart-breaking to see her attempting
to form a close relationship with both. One couple divorced and both died. Seventeen
girls belonged to parents who had separated, and of this group five mothers and one
father were living in common law, three had both parents living in common law, and one
deserted mother was in receipt of Social Allowance. Fifteen girls had lost one parent
through death, and in this group two mothers and three fathers had remarried, and five
mothers were living in common law. The mothers of five girls were unmarried, three
living in common law, one whereabouts unknown, and one deceased. It is known that
the mothers of three of our girls spent a period in this institution in their teens, and one
of our girls, while she is unaware of it, actually spent the first three months of her life in
the third-floor nursery at 800 Cassiar in the days when unmarried mothers returned from
hospital with their babies to the institution.
During the year there were fifty-five girls released, and the length of time in the
institution increased from 8.5 months in the previous year to 11.6 months this year.
It is anticipated that the longer period may make it possible for our " graduates " to
give a better account of themselves when they return to the community. However,
even with the increased probation services, there is still a gap between the concentrated REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 75
support while in the institution and, in most cases, a complete lack of support from any
agency when they return home. Twenty-two girls were released to both parents; three
to one parent and step-parent; one to her husband; one to relatives as a ward of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare; one transferred to The Woodlands School and released
as a ward of Family and Children's Service; one to a work placement as a ward of the
Superintendent of Child Welfare; two under the supervision of the Indian Department;
one to the welfare authorities, Quebec; twelve to foster homes as wards of children's
agencies; ten released unconditionally, over 18 years old.
In closing, I wish to take this opportunity of expressing my sincere thanks to senior
administration, and particularly our Deputy Minister for his support and encouragement
at all times, and especially during the trying days of April, 1956, to all staff for their
co-operation and interest shown in their work, and to all our many friends in the community who have given so generously of their time to assist us with our programme. S 76 BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICAL STATEMENTS
Population of School, March 3 1st, 1957
On roll, April 1st, 1956  62
Girls admitted during April 1st, 1956, to March 31st, 1957 71
— 133
Officially released  51
Transferred to other institutions with subsequent official release from Girls' Industrial School     2
Transferred to another Province and officially released     2
— 55
Total unreleased, March 31st, 1957     78
Financial Statement, 1956-57
Salaries  $107,648.41
Office expense  2,223.11
Travelling expense  949.11
Office furniture and equipment  12.78
Heat, light, power, and water  6,316.04
Medical services  3,757.43
Medical supplies  1,502.18
Clothing and uniforms L_ 2,919.09
Provisions and catering  16,710.24
Laundry and dry-goods  509.31
Good Conduct Fund    '    1,102.69
Equipment and machinery  1,149.02
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  2,707.29
Transportation   2,011.07
Maintenance and operation of equipment  818.27
Incidentals and contingencies  596.81
Vocational and recreational supplies  1,865.84
$152,798.69
Less—
Board   $519.00
Sundry refunds     117.51
636.51
Expenditure as per Public Accounts  $152,162.18
Plus inventory, April 1st, 1956         7,467.52
$159,629.70
Less inventory, March 31st, 1957         6,154.63
$153,475.07
Plus Public Works expenditure         8,809.97
Cost of operation of School, 1956-57  $162,285.04
Per capita cost per diem: $162,285.04h-16,871=$9.62
Respectfully submitted. (^g) WlNIFRED M UrqUhart,
Superintendent. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH S 77
PROVINCIAL HOME, KAMLOOPS
I am pleased to submit herewith the annual report of the Provincial Home for the
Aged and Infirm, Kamloops, for the fiscal year 1956-57.
BUILDINGS
The Public Works Department completed painting the interior of the buildings—that
is, all wards and rooms which were not decorated the previous year—and a start was
made on the renovation of the exterior of the Home by the demolition of several tall and
unused chimneys.
HEALTH SERVICES
As recorded in previous reports, the general physical and mental condition of new
inmates follows the same pattern. The majority, upon admission, require hospitalization
or sick-ward care immediately for major or minor medical care.
The Irving Clinic continues to provide adequate and efficient medical and surgical
services.
FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR APRIL 1st, 1956,
TO MARCH 3 1st, 1957
Expenditures for the Fiscal Year Ended March 31st, 1957
Salaries   $92,609.80
Expenses—
Office expense  520.92
Heat, light, power, and water  4,005.38
Medical services  5,573.45
Clothing and uniforms  1,263.06
Provisions and catering  33,293.30
Laundry and dry-goods  7,760.66
Equipment and machinery  216.84
Medical supplies  2,536.71
Maintenance of buildings and grounds  1,082.56
Maintenance and operation of equipment  307.30
Transportation   830.68
Incidentals and contingencies  1,062.99
Burials  1,680.00
$152,743.65
Less—
Board   $1,329.00
Rent         523.75
         1,852.75
$150,890.90 S 78 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Inmate-days
Inmates in the Home, April 1st, 1956  124
Inmates admitted during the year     70
  194
Inmates discharged     44
Inmates deceased     24
     68
Total number of inmates, March 31st, 1957  126
Total number of inmate-days    45,064
Summary
Provincial Home expenditure  $150,890.90
Public Works expenditure       13,458.31
Total expenditure  $164,349.21
Cost   per diem:  $164,349.21 ^-45,064=$3.64701
Pensions
Pensions paid to Government Agent, Kamloops     $56,916.22
Reconciliation
Net expenditure as per Public Accounts     $97,386.79
Add maintenance receipts—
Pensions   $56,916.22
Municipalities       6,431.73
Other collections  755.31
       64,103.26
$161,490.05
Add Public Works expenditure       13,458.31
$174,948.36
Less pensioners' comforts     $7,262.81
Less proportion of Tranquille Farm disbursements over receipts       3,336.34
 10,599.15
Total expenditure (as above)  $164,349.21
Respectfully submitted.
J. M. Shilland,
Superintendent. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH S 79
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS BOARD
I herewith submit the annual report of the administration of the " Welfare Institutions Licensing Act" for the year 1956.
LICENCES
The total number of cases dealt with in the year was 937. Of these, 569 were
licensed welfare institutions and 368 were pending applications. During the year 79
licensed welfare institutions closed and 253 pending applications were withdrawn or
cancelled. As of December 31st, 1956, the case load totalled 605, made up of 490
licensed welfare institutions and 115 pending applications. In 1956 licensed welfare
institutions gave some service to 32,094 persons.
BOARD MEETINGS
The Welfare Institutions Board met eight times during the year to attend to matters
of business coming within the jurisdiction of the " Welfare Institutions Licensing Act."
On recommendation of the Board, a committee, with the Chief Inspector as chairman,
was set up to redraft the general regulations and those regulations relating to welfare
institutions for the care of the aged. This committee included members from Vancouver,
Victoria, Saanich, New Westminster Welfare Department and Public Health Department.
WELFARE INSTITUTIONS FOR CHILDREN
A. Full-time Care of Children
Institutions for Child-care
There were 141 fewer children cared for in institutions in 1956, and the days' care
was considerably reduced. One of the oldest institutions for boys closed during the year.
Each of the nine licensed institutions gives special services to children.
St. Christopher's, a residential school for twenty retarded boys, continues to improve its programme. Also, more staff was added during the year. This school now
receives a financial grant toward its operation from the Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia.
St. Euphrasia is a school for emotionally disturbed and pre-delinquent girls ranging
in age from 12 to 15 years. Staff is carefully chosen, and it is planned, in the near
future, to add a psychiatrist to help with the training programme. Admissions to the
school are carefully screened, and only those girls who can benefit from the programme
are accepted. At the present time, admissions are limited to girls who are in the care
of child welfare agencies.
All licensed institutions continue to improve both in programme and staff, and
admission policies are strictly adhered to. Only children needing the service offered by
the institutions are admitted, and no children are accepted simply because the parent or
parents wish to rid themselves of the responsibility.
These institutions have capable and interested boards of administration which are
co-operative.
These institutions use the services of both the local and Provincial welfare agencies,
such as the Children's Aid Societies and Child Guidance Clinic.
Number of institutions licensed in 1956  10
Number of children cared for        516
Total days' care  89,678 S 80 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Private Boarding Homes
Licensing of private boarding homes for children is done in co-operation with the
two Children's Aid Societies in Vancouver and the Family and Children's Service in
Victoria. Our own district workers are responsible for these homes in their rural areas.
By means of licensing, private boarding homes are controlled and the standard of child-
care has greatly improved.
Number of children's boarding homes licensed in 1956  59
Number of children cared for        171
Total days' care  38,058
B. Day Care of Children
Foster Homes for Day Care
Foster day care in Vancouver is under the supervision of the Foster Day Care Association. This agency provides day care for the children of mothers who must of necessity work to support the family. Rates are kept at a minimum, and in many cases where
the mothers are unable to meet the full cost, the agency helps her do so. By supplying
this day-care service, the agency helps families stay together. In other areas of the
Province where there is no special agency set up to provide day care, the homes licensed
for this purpose are under the supervision of a child welfare agency or the Provincial
Social Welfare Branch.
Number of foster day-care homes licensed in 1956  33
Number of children cared for        237
Total days' care  19,628
Kindergartens, Play-schools, etc.
In this Province there has been much development in the field of pre-school education. Training is available to persons interested, no matter where they may live in the
Province. The Adult Education Departments of the Vancouver School Board and the
Victoria College Evening Division give courses in pre-school education, and the Extension Department of the University of British Columbia offers an excellent correspondence
course.
The pre-school organizations held a successful conference in the fall and were responsible also for various workshops, which were well attended. The new College of
Education is interested in pre-school education and has set up an advisory committee
to study this field. The Chief Inspector is a member of this committee. All who have
been active in the pre-school education field are looking forward to the time when the
College will assume the responsibility for the training of teachers for both public and
private schools.
During the year such outstanding persons as Dr. W. E. Blatz, of the Institute of
Child Study, Toronto, Ont, spoke to the pre-school organizations. Also, the groups
were privileged to hear Mrs. Katherine H. Read, Oregon State College, author of " The
Nursery School," one of the prescribed texts of the correspondence course.
It is not presumptuous to say that the " Welfare Institutions Licensing Act " has
been responsible for the development which has taken place in pre-school education and
also the good standards which are being maintained.
Number of pre-school centres licensed in 1956  221
Number of children registered       9,636
Total days' care  781,558 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH S 81
Schools for Retarded Children
There were eight licensed schools, with an attendance of 162 pupils. Schools for
this group of children have been set up in many parts of the Province through the efforts
of parents and other interested persons.
Recognizing that free education is the right of every child, no matter what his capacity, the Provincial Government now makes the same financial contribution toward their
education as is made for normal children. To be eligible for this grant, the local group
is required to be a member of the Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia.
Something has also been done by way of training teachers for these schools.
Number of schools licensed in 1956  8
Number of children registered        162
Total days' care  21,374
MATERNITY HOMES
The three licensed homes are giving a much-needed service as well as a high standard of care. All three homes work closely with the Children's Aid Societies and other
welfare agencies.
Maywood Home, operated by the Salvation Army, will be replaced shortly as the
district in which it is located is now industrial. Plans have already been completed for
the construction of a modern building in a good residential district on a large acreage,
which will afford the necessary privacy. It is planned to have the building ready for
occupancy about the middle of 1958.
Number of homes licensed in 1956  3
Number of mothers cared for _■        278
Number of infants cared for        209
Total days' care (mothers and infants)   26,307
AGED-CARE
There are many fine homes for older people operated by municipalities, ethnic and
church groups. The " Elderly Citizens' Housing Aid Act " provides for financial grants
up to one-third of the cost of construction to non-profit organizations for housing for
older people in the lower-income group. This grant can be obtained for either boarding
home or self-contained housekeeping units.
There is an increasing need for housing of all types for our older people. One of
the boarding homes opened during the year was Pleasant View, located at Mission, with
accommodation for twenty-eight guests. This is an attractive, modern, well-equipped
home planned for comfortable living. Sunnybank, at Oliver, with room for twenty-six
persons, and the Odd Fellows' Home in Surrey, with accommodation for forty persons,
are nearing completion. A 30-bed private-room addition has been added to St. lude's
Home in Vancouver.
It is hoped that before too long there will be sufficient accommodation in homes run
by non-profit organizations for every older person who would like to live in this type
of home. These homes have as their chief object, " service to older people." They are
extremely well run, and the staffs have a sincere interest in the well-being of the guests.
They are much more than " a roof over one's head."
There are still many privately operated boarding homes, and by and large the
standard of care and maintenance is satisfactory. We work continually to improve conditions in these privately operated homes, and we think we have had quite a measure of
success. S 82 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Number of homes licensed during 1956  163
Number of persons cared for       3,645
Total days' care  761,642
UNEMPLOYED ADULTS
One new licence was issued for this type of home. It was for the home operated
by the Alcoholism Foundation of British Columbia, which is proving an excellent resource as part of the treatment programme for alcoholic men. The home provides a
sheltered home atmosphere where both guests and manager understand the problems
which must be faced. Here the alcoholic finds time to think, to work out his difficulties,
and to make plans for re-entry into society as a useful citizen. The foundation now has
plans for opening a similar home for women.
The other four licensed homes provide group living for young women and girls
who are away from home, and continue to give the same high standard of service.
Number of homes licensed during 1956  5
Number of persons cared for        504
Total days' care  17,338
SUMMER CAMPS
You may think some day you have quite grown up
And feel most worldly wise;
But suddenly from out the past a vision will arise
Of merry folk with bare brown knees   .   .   .
and laughter in their eyes!
Each year more interest is being taken in camping, and more people of all ages are
enjoying this experience. Camps reported a record attendance, and some camps, in
order to accommodate all who wished to attend, had to shorten their camping period.
The Provincial departments of health and fire inspect all camps each year to see
that standards are maintained and recommended improvements made.
The Welfare Institutions office staff works closely with the British Columbia Camping Association in all matters pertaining to camps. This association carries on a continuous educational programme to make the public more aware of the value of camping
to persons, regardless of age. A camp directory, with pertinent information on camps,
is published annually. Also, institutes for administrators and counsellors are held. This
year these institutes were most successful and were well attended.
Camping has become popular with many of our older people, and some of the camps
are used by this group during the spring and early fall. By all reports, the oldsters enjoy
this experience and enter into the spirit of the camp programme.
This has been a successful and rewarding year.
Number of summer camps licensed in 1956  67
Number of persons cared for     16,736
Total days' care  165,867
CONCLUSION
Sincere thanks and appreciation is extended to all who helped with the administration of this Act. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 83
STATISTICAL INFORMATION
Table I.—Showing a Comparative Summary of Information Regarding
Licensed Welfare Institutions
1953
1954
1955
1956
Children—Total Care (Excluding Summer Camps)
Number licensed—
Institutions	
Boarding homes  - 	
Capacity—
Institutions   	
Boarding homes..
Number of children under care—
Institutions i	
Boarding homes.
Number of days' care—
Institutions 	
Boarding homes..
Number licensed..
Capacity-
Summer Camps
Number of persons attending..
Number of attendance days	
Number licensed-
Kindergartens-
Children—Day Care
Schools for retarded children .
Foster day care	
Capacity—
Kindergartens  	
Schools for retarded children -
Foster day care-
Number of children enrolled—
Kindergartens.
Schools for retarded children-
Foster day care-
Number of attendance-days-
Kindergartens..
Schools for retarded children-
Foster day care	
Adults—Infirm and Unemployable
Number licensed 	
Capacity-
Number of persons under care..
Number of days' care 	
Number licensed..
Capacity_
Adults—-Employable
Number of persons under care-
Number of days' care	
Number licensed-
Women—Maternity
Capacity (mothers and infants)..
Number of persons under care-
Mothers 	
Infants 	
10
549
126
643
166
140,269
30,553
42
2,642
12,626
118,713
136
29
4,839
183
8,046
Number of days' care..
324
663,378
26,428
133
1,955
2,874
601,941
4
58
406
15,642
3
116
229
218
25,852
10
50
549
146
657
174
129,976
35,053
50
3,369
13,578
122,693
194
28
5,120
137
8,924
254
712,808
18,201
150
2,222
3,299
664,429
4
58
390
16,825
3
115
219
225
26,240
10
58
500
150
596
189
92,264
37,316
58
3,765
15,861
149,616
222
32
5,295
154
8,640
247
745,563
20,087
167
2,426
3,612
724,980
4
69
411
17,012
3
115
271
201
26,671
10
59
452
142
516
171
89,678
38,058
67
4,214
16,736
165,867
221
8
33
5,637
180
104
9,636
162
237
781,558
21,374
19,628
163
2,510
3,645
761,642
5
75
504
17,338
3
115
278
209
26,307 S 84
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table II.—Case Load Showing the Total Number of Licensed Institutions
and Pending Applications, 1956
Licensed
Jan. 1, 1956
Licensed
in 1956
Licensed
Institutions
Closed in
1956
Total Cases
Licensed at
Dec. 31,1956
Licensed
Children—total care—
1. Boarding homes-
2. Institutions	
3. Camps.-. -' —
Children—day-care—
1. Kindergartens...
2. Foster day care..
3. Schools for retarded children-
Aged—
1. Boarding homes	
2. Institutions	
Adults—employable	
Homes—maternity  	
Totals— 	
51
10
56
189
28
101
30
4
3
472
11
32
5
30
2
1
97
11
2
33
9
1
79
48
10
65
24
7
108
32
5
3
490
Licensed, January 1st, 1956 .
Number licensed in 1956	
472
97
Closed in 1956
569
79
490
Carried from January 1st, 1956 .
New cases during 1956 	
106
262
Pending
Jan. 1, 1956
New Cases
in 1956
Closed
in 1956
Total Pending Cases at
Dec. 31,1956
Licences Pending
Children—total care—
15
1
10
41
6
31
2
46
19
89
27
7
70
3
1
53
1
18
80
23
1
74
2
1
8
2. Institutions    	
11
Children—day-care—
50
6
Aged—
27
2. Institutions   	
3
Homes—maternity  	
Totals     	
106
262
253
115
Closed in 1956
368
253
Total Case Load
Licensed
Pending .
115
490
115
605 REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 85
MEMBERS OF BOARD
The following are the members of the Welfare Institutions Board for 1956:—
Chairman:  Mr. J. A. Sadler, Director of Welfare.
Members:  Dr. A. A. Larsen, Consultant Epidemiologist, Department of Health
and Welfare; Mr. F. P. Levirs, Chief Inspector of Schools, Department of
Education;  Miss Ruby McKay, Superintendent, Child Welfare Division;
and Mr. A. A. Shipp, Assistant Administrator, Region II, Social Welfare
Branch.
Chief Inspector:  Mrs. Edna L. Page.
Respectfully submitted.
(Mrs.) Edna L. Page,
Chief Inspector of Welfare Institutions. S 86
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PART IV.—MEDICAL SOCIAL WORK SERVICES
SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT, DIVISION OF
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
In 1956 the Provincial tuberculosis-control programme in British Columbia was 21
years old, and since its inception there has been a social service department staffed by
professionally trained social workers loaned to this Division by the Social Welfare Branch.
It has been the prime responsibility of the social workers in the hospitals and clinics of
the Division to treat the social and personal problems created or aggravated by the
diagnosis of tuberculosis.
Previous annual reports have described in detail the various activities of the Tuberculosis Social Service Department, and in the current year the programme has continued,
There have been many changes since the Social Service Department of the Division
was set up in 1935, and in the next fiscal year there are indications of more changes to
come. If, as seems likely, treatment facilities for the tuberculous will be concentrated in
the Vancouver area, this will involve a reorganization of the Social Service Department
from the Provincial structure that was needed to co-ordinate the work of the Department
in the various hospitals of the Division to a more consolidated medical social service
department within the Division in Vancouver. During the past year a statement of
standards of social-work practice in this medical setting was presented to the administration of the Division of Tuberculosis Control and to senior Social Welfare Branch officials.
In this way the Social Service Department of the Division is preparing to adapt itself to
the changing emphasis in tuberculosis-control in British Columbia.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Enid S. Wyness,
Provincial Supervisor, TB. Social Service. REPORT OF SOCIAL WELFARE BRANCH
S 87
PART V.—ACCOUNTING DIVISION
The functions of the Accounting Division of the Department of Health and Welfare
are to control expenditures, process accounts for payment, account for revenue, forecast
expenditures, and prepare the Departmental estimates of revenue and expenditures in
their final form.
Chart I.—Gross Expenditure by the Social Welfare Branch, Showing the Breakdown
into the Main Services Given, 1956/57
Percent
Service
Administration
Institutions
Field Service (or Casework service)
Maintenance of dependent children
Medical Service,drugs, optical, etc.
Social Allowances, Mothers' Allowances
Old-age Assistance, Blind Persons' Allowances,
Disabled Persons' Allowances, and Supplementary
Assistance for the aged and handicapped
The Mechanical Superintendent and his assistant followed a regular schedule of
inspection trips throughout the Province, in order that a close check be kept on the
mechanical condition of Government-operated vehicles. Aside from the quarterly inspection of Government cars, stress has been laid on safety measures, with suggestions as to
driving vehicles under adverse conditions, such as loose gravel, icy roads, etc.
During the year a Research and Statistics Section was set up within the Division to
work more closely with the divisions and field offices in the Social Welfare Branch. This
Section co-operated in the development of the new system of reporting monthly case-load
statistics, which has reduced the month-end work in the field offices. These newly
designed reports are forwarded to this Section, summarized for the Province, and distributed to senior Branch personnel and to the regions. The section also co-operated in
developing a system of classifying and reporting problems encountered by social workers
in the field, and visited various field offices in this regard. S 88 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Chief Clerk in Charge of Welfare Accounting attended the in-service training
classes and gave instruction in matters relating to accounting procedures.
Chart II.—Main Divisions of Expenditure, 1956/57
Administration
1.7%
The Departmental Comptroller visited a number of offices in the South Okanagan
and Upper Fraser Valley. During these visits, discussions of problems relating to the
field were held.
In addition, Accounting Division representatives attended the Planning Council and
other Branch meetings.
Respectfully submitted.
J. McDlARMID,
Departmental Comptroller.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1958
960-1257-3237

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