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Civil Service Commission Thirty-ninth Annual Report JANUARY 1ST TO DECEMBER 31ST 1957 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1958

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Civil Service Commission
Thirty-ninth Annual Report
JANUARY 1st TO DECEMBER 31st
1957
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1958  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G, M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Report of the Civil Service Commission,
Province of British Columbia, from January 1st to December 31st, 1957.
WESLEY D. BLACK,
Provincial Secretary.
Victoria, B.C., January, 1958. The Honourable Wesley D. Black,
Provincial Secretary,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—In conformity with the provisions of section 7 of the " Civil Service Act"
(chapter 51, "Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948 "), I have the honour to submit
herewith the Report of the proceedings and work of the Civil Service Commission from
January 1st to December 31st, 1957.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
HUGH M. MORRISON,
Chairman, Civil Service Commission.
Victoria, B.C., January, 1958. HIGHLIGHTS DURING 1957
• 1,943 persons were appointed to permanent positions.
• 851 persons were appointed to casual or temporary positions.
• 2,689 persons terminated their services.
• There was a 27.84-per-cent turnover of staff.
• 384 Civil Servants gained promotion through open competition with other employees
and with candidates from outside the Service.
Eighty supervisors took supervisory training courses.
Nearly 14,000 bulletins on the techniques of supervision were issued to supervisors.
• Eighteen young men were specially trained and placed in beginning draughtsmen
positions.
• A second class of thirty senior employees started on a three-year Civil Service-University executive-development training plan, and the first class started on its second-
year work.
• There was a 20-per-cent decrease in the number of positions reviewed for purposes of
checking salary classifications, but an increase in the proportion of rejections to proposals for increased classifications.
• Average sick-leave taken remained constant.
• There was one formal grievance heard by the Executive Council. Some of draughtsmen trainees with diplomas, together with the
Honourable Leslie R. Peterson, Minister of Education. CONTENTS
Report of the Civil Service Commission	
Report of the Chief Personnel Officer	
Report of the Classification Officer	
Report of the Personnel Officer, Vancouver	
Report of the Personnel Officer, Essondale	
Appendix—Statistics	
Page
_    9
15
18
20
21
22  Report of the Civil Service Commission
Pursuant to Section 7 of the "Civil Service Act," from January 1st
to December 31st, 1957
The activities of the Civil Service Commission and staff during 1957 were quite
varied. This activity, whilst rapid during the first three quarters of the year, was relaxed
during the last quarter because of reduced and changed departmental needs. More
emphasis was placed on staff assignments within the Service. It was possible to give
increased attention to in-service supervisory and training programmes. Salary discussions with employee associations continued. The Commission rendered assistance and
advice to estabhsnments not under me jurisdiction ol tne " Civil Service Act." The Commission also was called upon to implement Government policies dealing with lunch-hour
time, rest periods, and oath-swearmg procedures upon entry into the Service.
SIZE AND COMPOSITION OF THE CIVIL SERVICE
On December 31st, 1956, the total number of probationary and permanent Civil
Servants was 8,398 (see Appendix, Table 3, Annual Report for 1956); the corresponding
number at December 31st, 1957, was 8,722 (see Appendix, Table 3), an increase of 324.
The gross total (including temporary or casual employees) at the end or 1956 was 9,270;
the corresponding number at the end of 1957 was 9,621 (see Appendix, Tables 3 and 4),
an increase of 351. Of this increase, 334 are accounted for in tne Mental Health Services
of the Department of the Provincial Secretary, where two institutions — namely, the
Burnaby Mental Health Centre and The Woodlands School Fraser View Unit — were
opened. The remaining net increase of seventeen is distributed in accordance with
eleven departments with some increase, three departments with no increase or decrease,
and four departments with some decrease.
Order in Council No. 1891/57, effective October 1st, authorized the extension of
the forty-hour week to psychiatric nurses and psychiatric aides. As a result, the entire
Government staff, with the exception of ferry crews and fire-fighters, was working forty
hours or less per week. The adoption of the forty-hour week for these nurses in the
Mental Health Services was based upon the recommendations contained in a report from
a committee of three representatives—namely, from the staff of this Commission, the
Classification Officer; from the Department, the Mental Health Services Personnel
Officer; and from the British Columbia Government Employees' Association, the
Assistant General Secretary.
The Government approved the results of an extensive study which established a
uniform system, as between Government departments, for the payment of board and
lodging allowances to employees and crews engaged away from designated headquarters.
Order in Council No. 1757/57, pursuant to section 55 of the "Civil Service Act,"
established the time from 12 noon to 1.10 p.m. as a period in which all Government
offices, with the exception of a few required to be open because of Statute or regulation,
are closed to public business in order to permit a uniform time for luncheon for employees.
The purpose of this system was to effect more efficient and consistent service to the
public, avoiding some confusion and annoyance, evident in the former rather loose system
of staggering employee lunch-hours. The new system has proved its value and is well
accepted by the public and the employees.
APPOINTMENTS
During the year 2,794 appointments were made (see Appendix, Table 2), as compared to 2,709 appointments made during 1956, an increase of 85 or 0.03 per cent.   The
9 DD  10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
number of appointments to probationary-permanent positions amounted to 1,943; the
remainder, 851, were appointments to casual or temporary positions. The Chief Personnel Officer reports the number of requisitions processed is slightly reduced from that
processed in 1956—that is, 4,151 as against 4,404 in 1956. This number is still greatly
in excess of the 2,626 processed in 1955. The excess in number over the number reported
for appointments is explained by the many promotional opportunities created when a
vacancy occurs.
SEPARATIONS
The number of separations of all types from the Civil Service was 2,689, which is
an increase of 52 or 0.02 per cent of the 2,637 for 1956.   Using the formula of—
Number of separations
 X 100
Total enrolment including casuals
as a measure of the degree of staff turnover, the turnover for 1957 was—
2,689
 X 100 = 27.84
9,621
For comparison purposes, this formula is applied to similar figures for recent postwar years, as follows:—
Year
Total
Separations
Enrolmenti
Turnover
Rate
1949                                                                  .   —                                 	
1,255
1,418
1,963
1,992
2,187
2,529
2,388
2,637
2,689
7,345
7,694
7,994
8,543
8,543
8,523
8,893
9,270
9,621
1950                                                                                              	
1951  	
24 56
1952                                      -         _  _ _ _	
23 32
1953                --   	
25 60
1954                           _  _  	
26 67
1955                                                            ._                                         	
26 85
1956                             _   _  	
28 45
1957                                    _   _	
27 84
1 Including casual employees at December 31st.
The Chief Personnel Officer provides in his report a tabulation of the separations
distributed according to broad occupational classifications. He comments that the pattern is more even than in 1956, and that there are comparatively few classifications
significantly in excess of the general Service average of separations. The greatest turnover occurred among stenographers (46 per cent). In the professional group the greater
proportion of separations occurred among medical doctors, registered nurses, and research assistants. There were relatively few engineers who left the Service. Abnormally
high separations still persist, however, among non-professional nurses, occupational therapists, laboratory staffs, culinary-workers, farm-workers, and business-machine operators.
Significant with the economic character of the year, the "rate of leaving" per month
was much higher from January to October, and much less during the remainder of the
year.
The turnover rate according to classification group was as follows:—
Per Cent
Clerical group  32
Technical group  25
Manual group   21
Professional group  20
The reasons for turnover remained similar to previous years. Table 8 in the
Appendix tabulates the various reasons. During the year sixty-four employees were dismissed for cause, and fifty-eight had their probationary periods extended.    In addition, CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
DD  11
there were three suspensions from duty without dismissal. The following tabulation,
indicating the extent of this type of discipline during the past six years, does little to
support the conception which may prevail in some minds that a Civil Service job is an
easy berth from which no one, no matter how inefficient, is removed: —
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
Number of Civil Servants whose probationary  periods were
extended  _	
Number of Civil Servants who were suspended from duty but
68
8
53
49
11
64
61
10
54
59
4
52
56
2
42
58
3
64
GENERAL ELIGIBILITY EXAMINATIONS
Generally assembled examinations for the establishment of eligibility lists or direct
appointment in beginning stenographic, clerical, and draughting grades were held in Victoria, Vancouver, and Essondale centres.
At the Victoria centre a total of 1,134 applicants were tested. Of this number, 654
or 57 per cent qualified. For more detail according to grades, see the Chief Personnel
Officer's report. At the Vancouver centre 298 wrote examinations, of which 250 or 84
per cent qualified. At Essondale steno-clerical tests to eighty-three applicants were administered; of this number, seventy-four or 86 per cent passed.
The records of these centres during the past few years are as follows:—
Percentage of Qualifications on General Eligibility Examinations for
Initial Entrance to Some Junior Level Grades
Centre
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
Per Cent
71
C1)
(3)
Per Cent
67
88
(3)
Per Cent
64
72
(s)
Per Cent
66
84
(3)
Per Cent
61
89
(3)
Per Cent
66
69
69
Per Cent
62
83
68
Per Cent
57
84
86
1 No record.
- Includes only steno-clerical grades and not beginning institutional positions.
3 No centre.
COMPETITIONS FOR PROMOTION
Of the number of vacancies offering promotional opportunities, 384 or 53 per cent
were filled from within the Service, and 346 or 47 per cent were filled from outside the
Service. The number of promotional appointments made from one department to another
department amounted to sixty or 15 per cent. It should be noted that the comparatively
large percentage of appointments from outside the Service was due to two factors:
(1) Requirement of specialist or professional qualifications not available within the Service, and (2) scarcity of supply in Interior centres. In the Mental Health Services,
seventy-three appointments (or promotions) were made from the eligibility list to fill
Charge and Assistant Charge Psychiatric Nursing positions, male and female. All of
these were promotions within the Service.
IN-SERVICE TRAINING
In-service training courses, including annual conferences, of a specialized character
suited to the department concerned were conducted during the year by these departments.
In addition, in some departments' key personnel were assisted in securing special training
in universities, which fitted them more adequately to discharge their duties or enabled
them to enlarge upon their services to the public. DD  12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Supervisory training courses, consisting of daily round-table discussions of a week's
duration, were continued by a Personnel Officer of the Commission. Eighty supervisors
from three departments were exposed to this type of training. As with former years, the
departments and staffs gratefully acknowledged the assistance rendered. In the minds
of the Commission, this field of supervisory training should definitely be expanded, as the
dividends, though largely intangible, are obvious. Since the inauguration of these courses
in 1950, more than 1,500 supervisors have taken them, as follows:—
Year
1950 _
Number of
Supervisors
Enrolled
               101
1951
              132
1952____
     317
1953____
            287
1954___
                     405
1955
     108
1956
                             117
1957 _
                   80
Total	
  1.547
As a means of assisting in supervision, and as a supplement to the supervisory
training courses, a periodic bulletin, entitled "Supervision—Tips for Supervisors," was
instituted. This is written by Miss Campbell, the Personnel Officer in charge of the supervisory training courses. During 1957 six issues, with the following topics, were sent out
(distribution for each issue exceeded 2,300 copies):—
(1) The Supervisor.
(2) The Line of Human Relations.
(3) Training and Developing the New Employee.
(4) Correcting Employees.
(5) The Probationary Employee.
(6) How Do You Rate as a Supervisor?
The Personnel Officer in charge of training also acted as a liaison officer in organizing, in co-operation with the Technical Education Branch of the Department of Education and the Federal Government Department of Labour, a three-month course for training of draughtsmen. Eighteen of twenty young men qualified and were all placed in
Provincial Government positions (see page 6). In addition, the Personnel Officer assisted
in the organization of a similar course to be given in 1958 for appraisers.
The first-year class of the Executive Development Training Course (referred to in
the Commission's 1956 Report, page 12), completed its first-year study on a very happy
and satisfactory note. The two-week institute held in May on the University campus was
very worth while. As reported by the Chief Personnel Officer, the University officials
have commented upon the excellence of the work of this select group, all of whom
achieved honour standings in their first-year examinations. The group is now proceeding
with its second-year programme. A second class of thirty students has also been selected,
and is at present engaged in the first-year subjects.
THE VANCOUVER OFFICE
This office, in addition to recruiting to Civil Service vacancies, assisted in recruitment for the Haney Correctional Institute of the Gaol Service and the Toll Highways and
Bridges Authority. During the year a total of 777 appointments were made through
referrals from the Vancouver office. In addition, other types of personnel work, such as
assessment of positions, staff organization studies, and the investigation of grievances,
were carried on. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT DD  13
THE ESSONDALE OFFICE
This office carried on duties similar to those of the Vancouver office. During the
year 1,217 appointments were referred through the Essondale office, an increase of 288
over the previous year. The number of classification studies involved was ninety-nine.
Seventy-three appointments or promotions were made from the eligibility list established
for Charge and Assistant Charge Psychiatric Nurses. The Personnel Officer reports that
108 competitions were held, to which 1,258 applied, of which 517 were interviewed and
126 appointments were made from those interviewed. The remaining 1,091 appointments were made through personal interviews. Reclassification of positions amounted to
twenty, and reports on other matters of personnel administration amounted to twenty-five.
CLASSIFICATION AND SALARY PLAN
The Classification Officer reports fewer position classification reviews — 610 as
against 803 during 1956. This is a return to a truer average, as the 803 for 1956 is
abnormally high. One hundred and thirty or 21 per cent of the 610 requests for revision
were rejected. This is a high proportion of rejections, and tends to indicate that many of
the problems were more related to amount of salary than to classification.
The Classification Officer experienced a busy year engaged on salary problems. His
words on this past year's experiences in this field are worthy of repetition:—
" Within the past year there appeared to be considerable stress placed by employees
on their relative value in the general employment market. While this is an important consideration, it is also important that employees be paid wages which reflect their relative
value to the people of this Province, as ascertained by the classification and job evaluation system."
DEPARTMENTAL ESTABLISHMENTS
Studies of organization and establishments were continued within various departments. Two hundred and eighty-six positions were added and twenty-eight deleted during the year, making a net increase of 258 positions. Of these 258 positions, 246 were
in the Mental Health Services, resulting from the opening of the Mental Health Centre
at Burnaby and the Fraser View Unit at The Woodlands School in New Westminster.
The Classification Division carried out investigations in order to determine production standards in respect to stenographic positions for the purpose of enabling promotion
of excellent stenographers who would, in addition, be required to pass a qualifying test on
job knowledge and ability. This experiment deserves to be watched very carefully because it is an earnest attempt to inject a system of rewarding merit and thus remedy the
"mediocrity" effects of a standardized classification system.
SICK AND SPECIAL LEAVE
During the year October 1st, 1956, to September 30th, 1957, a total of 56,271
days' sick-leave was granted, 46,150 days with pay and 10,121 days without pay (see
Table 5, Appendix), an average of 5.85 days. This average is a slight increase over
that for the previous twelve months' period, 5.6. The above totals do not include sick-
leave granted under the Workmen's Compensation Board and under the Department of
Veterans' Affairs section of the Sick-leave Regulations. For comparison purposes, the
average number of days' sick-leave per employee during recent years, shown hereunder,
may be found interesting: —
Year Average Year Average
Ended per Ende'i per
Sept. 30 Employee Sept. 30 Employee
1950  5.3 1954  6.6
1951  6.2 1955  5.5
1952  6.0 1956  5.6
1953  6.4 1957  5.85 DD  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The average daily salary during the year October 1st, 1956, to September 30th,
1957, was $13.28; thus the cost of sick-leave granted with pay during the twelve-month
period was $612,872. In most instances the sick-leave was of short duration, requiring
no payment for relief assistance.
During the year twenty-six employees were granted special leave for the purpose of
training with Reserve units of Her Majesty's forces or to permit them to take further
qualifying courses with the forces. One employee has been granted leave of absence to
serve with the United Nations Organization.
Special leave of absence for varying periods for the purpose of further training and
study, some with assistance provided, as in previous years, from Federal health grant
funds, was granted to sixty-eight employees.
A full report of the activity of the Employees' Health Service in Victoria, which now
has completed very successfully its third calendar year, is included in the Annual Report
of the Health Branch, Department of Health and Welfare.
GRIEVANCES
Under the grievance and appeals procedure, the Executive Council heard an appeal
of the British Columbia Government Employees' Association against a decision of the
Commission in the salary placement upon a revised salary range of a certain number of
male psychiatric nurses who had recently graduated from the training-school at Essondale. The association's case was based on a contractual arrangement alleged to have been
made by the Department when recruiting these nurses into the school. The Executive
Council upheld the contention of the Commission, but as an act of grace the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council permitted the payment of the exact salary which the employees
understood they were to receive upon graduation.
GENERAL OBSERVATIONS
Toward the end of the year the headquarters staff was reduced by two female
clerks. This was effected through transferring one clerk to another department and
through the receipt of a resignation.
The Commission implemented a revised system for the administering of oaths to
employees entering the Civil Service. The new system is intended to impress upon the
new Civil Servant the seriousness of the obligation he or she is undertaking, together with
the privilege of being permitted to serve the public.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The Commission again wishes to renew its annual thanks to all departments of Government and to the various Provincial and Federal Civil Service Commissions for the
continuing co-operation received. Once again thanks should be recorded to the Government Agents of the Department of Finance for their ready assistance in recruitment. It
also wishes to express to you, as Provincial Secretary, its keen appreciation of your continual goodwill and wise understanding.
To each member of its technical and clerical staffs, the Commission wishes to express
acknowledgment for excellent work achieved, and for continuous and loyal support.
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION.
H. M. Morrison, Chairman.
J. V. Fisher, Member. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
REPORT OF THE CHIEF PERSONNEL OFFICER
R. L. W. Ritchie, B.A.
DD  15
1. RECRUITMENT
The following table gives comparative figures for all positions filled by open competition over the past your years. Not included are appointments of junior personnel
also made competitively from eligibility lists.
1954
1955
1956
1957
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
371
238
61
39
373
318
54
46
361               36
646              64
384
53
346
47
609
52
100
14
691
44
100
12
1,007             100
1
1
67      |        19
730
60
100
Promotions made from one
partment to another	
de-
15
Total number of requisitions
cessed  	
pro-
2,120
2,626
4,404
4,151
2. EXAMINATIONS
Written examinations for eligibility lists in Victoria during  1957 were held as
follows:—
Classification
Number
Examined
Number
Qualified
Per Cent
Qualified
417
313
133
53
112
67
10
13
10
4
2
192
174
99
32
79
49
7
7
9
4
2
46
55
74
Clerk-Stenographers—Grade 1 -   -    .-
60
70
73
Draughtsmen—Grade 1 - —  -
70
53
90
100
Computers. __ _ _	
100
Totals                                	
1,134
654
57
3. TRAININ.
The Executive Development Training Course continued successfully during the year,
and the first institute was conducted on the University of British Columbia campus in
May. Of the thirty-one departmental officers selected for this course, twenty-two completed the first year. It is gratifying to note that a high percentage of these achieved
honour standing in their examinations, and officials of the University of British Columbia
noted particularly the very high standard of achievement by this group. This class is now
proceeding with the second year of study, involving Commercial Law, Business Mathematics, Accounting (optional in some cases), and Report and Precis Writing. A second
class of thirty trainees has been selected and is now undertaking the first-year subjects of
Public Administration, Economics, and Psychology.
Supervisory training courses were continued under the direction of the Commission's
Personnel Officer, Miss J. M. Campbell. Departments covered included thirty supervisors
in the Public Works Department, Victoria; thirty-five in the Haney Correctional Institution; and fifteen in the Labour Department, Vancouver. DD  16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
A periodic bulletin entitled " Supervision—Tips for Supervisors " has been instituted
under the editorship of Miss Campbell. This is distributed to all supervisors in the
Civil Service and has been very well received as a valuable aid to good supervision.
A three months' course in map-draughting and surveying was arranged by the Civil
Service Commission with the assistance and co-operation of the British Columbia Department of Education and the Federal Department of Labour. Twenty young men were
selected from centres throughout the Province, and eighteen of these successfully completed the course and have been appointed to junior draughting positions in the Department of Highways and the Department of Lands and Forests. A committee of senior
technical and professional officers planned this course to meet all departmental requirements, with Mr. W. Hall, Chief of Air Surveys, as co-ordinator and Miss J. M. Campbell
as administrative officer. The Civil Service Commission is particularly grateful to the
course instructors—Messrs. Rhodes, Forest Surveys; D. Hall, Air Surveys; J. Dennison
and N. Zapf, Department of Highways; and W. Hutchison, retired Chief Geographer.
In conjunction with the Appraisal Institute of Canada, and again with the assistance
of the British Columbia Department of Education and the Federal Department of Labour,
an intensive course in appraising has been arranged for two weeks in February and May,
1958. Miss J. M. Campbell is acting as course co-ordinator, with a committee including
Messrs. K. Wildman, Assessment Commissioner; J. O. Moore, Surveyor of Taxes;
C. T. W. Hyslop, Superintendent of Lands; and N. Tatrie, Assistant Chief Right-of-way
Agent. Candidates in the fields of assessing, appraising, and land inspection have been
selected from appropriate departments, and municipal assessors are also being included.
The Personnel Branch wishes especially to gratefully acknowledge the kind assistance
of Mr. J. White, Director of Vocational and Technical Training, Department of Education, in arranging Draughting and Appraisal Courses.
4. STAFF TURNOVER
The following is a comparative analysis of staff separations as reported to the Civil
Service Commission covering the past six years:—
Reasons for Leaving
Per
Cent
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
14
17
14
7
19
10
19
9
17
12
8
18
7
29
8
18
12
8
201
4
30
9
19
13
7
26i
4
22
7
22
14
9
371
4
7
5
26
11
111 health                  	
9
33i
5
11
Totals                - -	
100
100
100
100
100
100
Includes enlistment in Her Majesty's forces.
Comment.—The greatest significant variation is reflected in the separations for other
employment, which, although slightly lower in 1957 than in 1956, is still much higher
than in preceding years.
The following is a distribution by classification of all separations recorded in this
office for 1956 and 1957. Similar comparative records prior to 1956 are not available.
It is to be noted that these figures include only those cases reported to the Civil Service
Commission. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
DD  17
Classification
1956
Number of
Separations
Percentage
Relative to
Total in
Classification
1957
Number of
Separations
Percentage
Relative to
Total in
Classification
Clerical Group
General clerical	
Business-machine operation, etc _—
Stenography (typists, secretaries, etc.)_.
Storekeeping—  :—
Totals, clerical group  —	
Administrative Group
Deputy Government Agents 	
Manual Group
Animal care and farm labour..	
Cleaning services.   -
Culinary services-
Equipment operation and maintenance ..
Housekeeping services  	
Tradesmen, maintenance service	
Personal services (e.g., hairdresser)	
Totals, manual group	
Professional Group
Agriculture-
Education.—
Engineering (including forestry)-
Laboratory service 	
Legal   -
Library —	
Medical and dental— 	
Nursing (R.N.s)..
Nutrition and dietetics	
Sociology and psychology..
Survey 	
Research 	
Totals, professional group	
Technical Group
Accounting, auditing, assessing	
Agricultural  	
Draughting, surveying, photography-
Engineering (non-professional) 	
Instructional  .—	
Investigation and inspection 	
Laboratory services._  	
Marine services  :	
Medical and nursing (excluding R.N.s) _
Occupational therapy   	
Totals, technical group 	
Totals, entire service.. _
386
61
436
891
26
39
40
13
32
17
127
119
23
13
47
3
74
26
40
13
20
18
14
2,517
27
358
72
517
13
960
31
94
103
11
15
21
2
2,368
I
23
37
46
21
47
18
35
9
24
9
25
Comment.—This table illustrates a more even pattern in 1957 than in the preceding
year. There are comparatively few classifications markedly in excess of the over-all rate
of twenty-five per cent. The greatest relative turnover occurred in the clerical group
(particularly among stenographers, 46 per cent of whom left the Service). In the professional group, a greater proportion of doctors and registered nurses and research assistants left the Service than in 1956, but relatively fewer engineers. The attrition is still
abnormally high among sundry institutional personnel, occupational therapists, laboratory
staff, culinary-workers, farm-workers, and business-machine operators. In a separate
study the average rate of leaving per month was calculated, and it is noted that this was
higher for the period January to October, 1957, but has since dropped considerably. If
this tendency continues, it is expected that the over-all rate of turnover will be considerably less in 1958. /
DD  18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CLASSIFICATION OFFICER
A. G. Richardson, M.A.
WAGE AND SALARY ADMINISTRATION
The first four months of 1957 were devoted largely to the conducting of wage surveys.
These surveys not only included positions within the Civil Service but also positions outside the Civil Service in the Department of Highways, Forest Service, Department of the
Attorney-General, Department of Recreation and Conservation, and Civil Defence. They
included all types of workers where comparisons with other workers could be found. The
results of the surveys were incorporated in a comprehensive report on the salaries of all
positions occupied by Government employees and recommended a complete revision of
the Civil Service salary plan. During the course of the investigations, many meetings were
held with the officials of the British Columbia Government Employees' Association,
separate groups of employees, and departmental officers. The problems involved in wage
determination presented considerable difficulty, particularly as regards the effect on the
classification system and assumed major importance in employee relations.
It became increasingly apparent in applying present methods of wage determination
that the isolated wage survey was unsatisfactory. One employee or a specific group of
employees cannot be dealt with in isolation so far as wage determinations are concerned.
They are members of a large group of Government employees, and their salaries should
be determined in relation to the group considering salaries paid to comparable employees
outside of this group. Within the past year there appeared to be considerable stress
placed by employees on their relative value in the general employment market. While
this is an important consideration, it is also important that employees be paid wages
which reflect their relative value to the people of this Province, as ascertained by the
classification and job-evaluation system.
CLASSIFICATION AND JOB EVALUATION
The reviews of classifications during 1957 were fewer than in the preceding year,
indicating problems to be more concerned with the general wage level within the Service
rather than the internal relationships resulting from the classification system. Of the total
of 610 reviews conducted, 130 resulted in a recommendation that no change be made in
classification, approximately 21 per cent. This high proportion in relation to previous
years has resulted in that many requests for the reclassification of positions were prompted
by wage problems rather than problems involving the methods of classification and job
evaluation.
The task of writing and revising position specifications was continued during the
year. The number of titles listed in the classification schedules totalled 835 at the end
of the year.
ORGANIZATION AND ESTABLISHMENTS
The Division continued its studies of organizations and establishments within the
various departments. Studies of organization were conducted in the Departments of
Highways, Education, and Agriculture, the latter two as yet incomplete. Organization
reports were also made on the Superannuation Branch and Game Branch.
The division continued to exercise some control of establishments, though this control was relaxed in so far as positions included in the Estimates of Revenue and Expenditure were concerned. Two hundred and eighty-six positions were added and twenty-eight
deleted, a net increase of 258 positions. Two hundred and forty-six of the additions were
in the Mental Health Services as a result of the opening of the Mental Health Centre at
Burnaby and the Fraser View Unit at The Woodlands School. Establishment reviews
were conducted in the Motor-vehicle Branch, public health nursing staff, social worker
staff, and clerical staffs. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
DD  19
MISCELLANEOUS
A study was completed of the production of stenographers, and a system devised
whereby stenographers producing a large volume of accurate work could be compensated
by means of the classification system. It is anticipated that departments will be encouraged to combine positions where low production is indicated, thus compensating the
resulting high production position with a higher salary and at the same time increasing the
efficiency of the stenographic staffs.
Reports were completed of living conditions in the northern areas of the Province
in co-operation with the Bureau of Economics and Statistics. A report was also completed concerning board and lodging allowances. DD
20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT
OF
THE
S.
PERSONNEL
B. Williscroft,
OFFICER,
B.COMM.
VANCOUVER
As in previous years, the work of this office was concerned chiefly with the recruitment and placement of personnel, the assessment of positions for classification purposes,
the conduct of staff and organizational surveys, the investigation of grievances, and the
providing of assistance to local Government officials in matters relating to personnel
practices. Also during 1957 your Personnel Officer acted in the capacity of chairman of
a personnel committee appointed for the purpose of reviewing salary and establishment
proposals as they concern any voluntary agency receiving financial aid from the Government.
During 1957 a total of 777 appointments were made through referrals made by this
office. This number includes staff required by the Gaol Service and the Toll Highways
and Bridges Authority, for which this office acts as a recruiting agency. A summary showing the distribution of these appointments by position classification is recorded in Table 7,
Appendix.
As in past years, all candidates for clerical and stenographic positions were required
to write qualifying examinations. In addition, written examinations were used as a
medium for selecting employees for the Toll Highways and Bridges Authority, where as
many as 418 applicants were interested in a single competition. A summary of the results
of the clerical and stenographic examinations is provided in the following table: —
Passed        Failed
Clerk—Junior  36 6
Clerk—Grade 1  51 13
Clerk-Typist—Grade 1 and 2  70 18
Clerk-Stenographers  93 11
Totals    250        48
Grand total, 298.
It should be noted that thirty-six of the 250 candidates who qualified for appointment
subsequently declined acceptance of the position offered because they had received offers
of a higher salary elsewhere.
During 1957 it was noted that less difficulty was experienced in recruiting suitable
male personnel for many positions requiring technical skills than had been experienced
in previous years; however, an acute shortage of trained stenographers and typists persisted throughout the year.
During 1957 this office provided assistance to the Classification Officer by conducting twenty-two studies in position classification and organization. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT DD 21
REPORT OF THE PERSONNEL OFFICER, ESSONDALE
G. L. Tomalty, B.A., M.P.A.
In 1957 there were no basic changes in the duties performed by this office, involving
classification reviews, reports, organizational surveys, recruitment and placement of
personnel.
There were 1,217 appointments made in 1957, an increase of 288 from the previous
year. These appointments were made in ninety-nine classifications (see Table 8, Appendix). Of the 1,217 appointments, 228 resulted from the establishment of new positions
throughout the Mental Health Services. A large percentage of the newly established
positions were for the new Fraser View Unit of The Woodlands School which opened
during the year and the adoption of the forty-hour week in October of this year for the
nursing staff of the Mental Health Services. The reduction of the work-week from forty-
four to forty hours required seventy-seven new positions to basic establishment throughout the Mental Health Services.
During the year seventy-three appointments were made from the eligibility list to fill
Charge and Assistant Charge Psychiatric Nursing positions, male and female. This is
the second year of the eligibility list, and the results are satisfactory. However, a review
of the system is being made, and at the present time discussions are in progress with the
Employees' Association to discuss certain changes that have merit. It is hoped that
agreement will be reached early in the new year so that examinations may be given.
There were 108 competitions held at this office this year, including local postings,
for which 1,258 applied, 517 interviewed, and 126 appointments made.
The remaining 1,091 appointments were made without formal competition, which
required personal interviews of many hundreds of applicants to ensure proper standard
and selection.
During the year twenty reclassifications of staff were made and twenty-five reports
submitted on various areas of personnel administration.
The following examinations were given: Shorthand tests—33 passed, 5 failed;
typing tests—39 passed, 4 failed;   clerical tests—2 passed, no failures;   electricians—
3 passed, 4 failed;   cooks—3 passed,  1  failed;   Chief Psychiatric Nurse, Colquitz—
4 passed, no failures. DD 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APPENDIX
STATISTICS
Table 1.—Enrolments in the Civil Service from 1933 to
(as at December 3 1st, since 1946)
1957
Year Enrolment
1933/34  1,424
1934/35  1,484
1935/36  1,541
1936/37  1,607
1937/38  1,718
1938/39  1,889
1939/40  1,941
1940/41  1,951
1941 /42  1,851
1942/43  1,822
1943/44  2,018
1944/45  2,159
1 Exclusive of 578 casual employees.
2 Exclusive of 755 casual employees.
3 Exclusive of 872 casual employees.
4 Exclusive of 899 casual employees.
Year Enrolment
Apr. 1, 1945, to Dec. 31, 1946 4,664
1947  5,425
1948  6,417
1949  7,345
1950  7,694
1951  7,994
1952  8,543
1953  8,543
1954  7,9451
1955  8,1382
1956  8,3983
1957  8,7224
Table 2.—Appointments Made by the Civil Service Commission
from 1933 to December 3 1st, 1957
Year
Probationary        Casual
Permanent
Total
1933/34  	
1934/35 	
1935/36 	
1936/37  	
1937/38 	
1938/39 	
1939/40—	
1940/41	
1941/42 	
1942/43  _ 	
1943/44  	
1944/45    _-
April 1st, 1945, to December 31st, 1946.
1947  _ _	
1948  	
1949 	
1950    	
1951  	
1952  	
1953 	
1954 	
1955  	
1956 	
1957  	
1,230
984
1,191
1,417
1,193
1,149
1,264
170
248
258
279
297
328
342
356
352
474
491
547
2,058
2,048
2,041
507
441
600
673
473
533
1,030
923
851
I
98
85
78
104
185
133
146
121
88
173
184
155
1,245
815
867
370
290
339
378
390
438
332
1,786
1,943
268
333
336
383
482
461
488
477
440
647
675
702
3,303
2,863
2,908
2,107
1,715
2,130
2,468
2,056
2,120
2,626
2,709
2,794
Note.—From 1945 to 1948, probationary appointments are included in the "Casual" column. From and including
1956, probationary appointments are counted as permanent, and are not counted again when officially confirmed as
permanent. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
DD 23
Table 3.—Number of Civil Servants Enrolled in Departments of Government
as at December 31st, 1957, according to Appointment and Sex
Department
Permanent and Probationary
Male
Female
Total
121
305
138
413
48
316
52
266
60
14
1,293
24
377
7
47
485
106
152
616
2
48
244
228
278
16
741
42
39
21
5
1,351
30
118
2
24
34
105
362
192
2
169
549
366
691
64
1,057
94
305
81
19
2,644
54
495
9
71
Public Works           	
519
211
514
808
Totals                  __     ..
4.840           1           3.882
8,722
Table 4.—Number of Casual Employees Enrolled in Departments of Government
as at December 31st, 1957, according to Sex
Department
Casual
Male
Female
Total
5
18
7
23
4
43
21
2
73
95
88
3
17
53
5
60
15
25
1
119
3
5
46
1
51
1
4
16
7
21
67
Agriculture    	
10
78
22
48
5
162
24
7
119
1
146
1
4
104
10
38
Forest Service   	
120
Totals  	
452
447
899 DD 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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T-H 00 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT DD 25
Table 6.—Number of Separations in 1957 according to Department of Government
Department
Superannuated
Resigned
Died
Dismissed
Finished
Transferred O.S.
Cancelled
Premier's Office  —
2
2
1
7
3
2
2
11
6
1
10
1
3
1
29
127
69
173
9
418
27
50
15
687
13
97
16
68
42
149
152
4
2
2
8
1
3
1
9
1
1
2
1
1
2
7
4
11
8
1
11
1
5
1
7
3
5
2
25
31
12
2
36
2
2
8
51
4
15
1
46
3
23
15
1
3
4
2
7
6
24
8
1
13
2
9
5
Education 	
Finance — 	
Recreation and Conservation.
4
6
Labour 	
1
13
Public Utilities Commission
Highways  _ _
Railways 	
Industrial Development, Trade,
2
1
2
2
52
2,141
38
64
278
80
36
Table 7.—Distribution of Appointments by Position Classification Initiated
and Tabulated in the Vancouver Office
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
1
1
4
1
1
36
Clerk—Grade 1      46
Apprenticeship Counsellor	
Assistant Director of Apprenticeship
Bacteriologist	
Baker 	
Bridge-tender .
Building Service Worker
Clerk-
Clerk-
-Grade 2
-Grade 3
47
12
Clerk, Junior  26
Clerk, Senior  4
Clerk, Principal  1
Clerk-Stenographer—Grades 1 and 2__ _ 79
Clerk-Stenographer—Grade 3   18
Clerk-Stenographer—Grade 4   11
Clerk-Stenographer—Grade 5   2
Clerk-Typist—Grades 1 and 2  58
Conciliation Officer
Cook 	
Deck-hand 	
Dentist	
Dietician 	
Dietician, Chief	
Draughtsman	
Draughtsman, Senior 	
Driver's Examiner	
Driver, Farms	
Engineer, Stationary _„ 8
Fire-fighter, U.B.C. Endowment Lands 2
Haney Correctional Institution   199
Industrial Relations Officer   9
Inspector, Dairy-farm  3
Inspector, Electrical   3
Inspector, Factories  1
Inspector, Fire Marshal  1
36. Inspector, Gas
37. Inspector, Milk Board
  5
  1
38. Inspector, Social Services Tax  1
39. Instructor, Handicrafts  1
40. Instructor, Resident, Jericho Hill School 8
41. Laboratory Technician  2
42. Labourer
43. Laundryman
44. Laundress 	
45. Maid 	
  1
  1
  1
  9
46. Nurse's Aide   9
47. Nurse, R.N.   8
48. Occupational Therapist   2
49. Operator, elevator  1
50. Operator, Office Equipment  12
51. Operator, Switchboard   2
Orderly   15
Painter   2
54. Plasterer and Tile-setter  1
55. Purser   3
56. Rehabilitation Officer  2
57. Scaling Dispatcher  2
58. Seamstress   1
59. Stockman  3
60. Stockman, Cattle  1
61. Supervisor, Girls' Industrial School  2
62. Supervisor, Jericho Hill School.___      2
63. Supervisor, Scaling
64. Teacher	
65. Toll Collector 	
66.
52.
53.
  1
  1
  65
  1
  3
  7
  2
70. X-ray Technician  2
Towmotor Operator
67. Waitress 	
68. Ward Assistant 	
69. Watchman 	 DD 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 8.-
-Distribution of Appointments by Position Classification Initiated
and Tabulated in the Essondale Office
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
Bacteriologist—Grade 1 	
Bacteriologist—Grade 2	
Baker, Grade 2	
Building Service Worker—Grade 1_.
Building Service Worker—Grade 2_.
Building Service Worker—Grade 3_
Carpenter	
Cemetery Caretaker 	
Clerk—Grade 1   _	
Clerk—Grade 2 	
Clerk—Grade 3 	
Clerk, Junior	
Clerk-Stenographer—Grade 1 	
Clerk-Stenographer—Grade 2 	
Clerk-Stenographer—Grade 3 	
Clerk-Typist 	
Cook—Grade 1	
Cook—Grade 2	
Cook—Grade 3	
Cook—Grade 4	
Dairyman 	
Dental Assistant—Grade 2 	
Dietician   	
Driver   	
Driver, Bus 	
Driver, Truck 	
Electrician 	
Electrician's Helper 	
Engineer, Assistant Chief Stationary..
Engineer, Stationary—Grade 2 	
Engineer, Stationary—Grade 4 	
Engineer, Stationary, Helper	
Foreman of Works	
Gardener—Grade 1 	
Gardener—Grade 2 	
Gardener—Grade 3 	
Hairdresser	
Handicraft Instructor 	
Herdsman, Beef Cattle	
Herdsman, Sheep	
Housekeeper (Home Supervisor) 	
Housekeeper, Hospital 	
Housekeeper, New Vista	
Housekeeper, Venture 	
Industrial Therapist—Grade 1 	
Kitchen Helpers (Male) 	
Laundress—Grade 1	
Laundress—Grade 2	
Meat-cutters 	
Meat-cutter's Helper	
Music Therapist	
3
1
2
11
4
1
1
1
8
5
3
3
12
31
3
14
14
7
2
1
2
1
1
4
1
5
4
1
1
10
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
7
1
2
10
1
1
1
3
36
2
9
3
1
1
52. Nurse's Aide  1
53. Nurses, Instructor of—Grade 1  4
54. Nurses, Instructor of—Grade 2  3
Nurse, Psychiatric (Male)   66
Nurse, Psychiatric (Female)   172
57. Nurse,   Psychiatric,   Assistant   Charge
(Male)     24
Nurse,   Psychiatric,   Assistant   Charge
(Female)    35
Nurse, Psychiatric, Charge (Male)  7
Nurse, Psychiatric, Charge (Female)__ 7
Nurse, Psychiatric, Chief—Grade 1  1
Nurse, Psychiatric, Chief—Grade 2  1
Nurse, Head   14
55.
56.
58
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
Occupational Therapist—Grade 1  10
65. Occupational Therapist—Grade 2  4
66. Operator, Switchboard—Grade 2  16
67. Physiotherapist    4
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
74.
75.
76.
77.
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
Physiotherapist, Senior       3
Psychiatric Aide (Male)   199
Psychiatric Aide (Female)   248
Psychologist, Clinical—Grade 1
Psychologist, Clinical—Grade 2
Psychologist, Clinical—Grade 3
Painter 	
Pharmacy Student	
Public Health Nurse J	
Resident Physician—Grade 1 __._
78. Resident Physician—Grade 2 ____
79. Rehabilitation Officer—Grade 2
Roofer 	
Seamstress 	
Social Worker-
5
3
4
18
1
1
7
12
1
1
4
14
-Grade 2 	
Social Worker—Grade 3   11
Social Worker—Grade 4   3
Speech Therapist   2
Specialist in Psychiatry  5
Steam-fitter ____   1
Staff Nurse—Grade 1  31
Staff Nurse—Grade 2  4
Stockman, Cattle  9
  1
Grade 2	
89.
90.
91. Stockman, Swine
92. Stockman, Stores
93. Stockman, Stores—Grade 3	
94. Stockman, Stores—Grade 4	
95. Superintendent of Nurses—Grade 1_
96. Supervisor, Venture (Male)	
97. Teacher—Grade 5 	
98. Tile-setter—Grade 1 	
99. X-ray Technician	 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
DD 27
Table 9.—Classification Reviews by Department in 1957 with Comparative
Figures for 1953, 1954, 1955, and 1956
Department
(/_
a
o
11
•o > n
(3*3 •«
mJ   CC.
a
^o
'>
u
•a 3
Its
leg
Q oo.
fl
>'_Z!
°*.§
u'd o
T8!Z
0.  O _,
«fc.S
Upward Revisions
of Positions
Including Several
Employees
Downward Revisions
of Positions
Including Several
Employees
Reviews of Positions
Including Several
Employees Resulting in No Change
Reviews of Positions
Including a Number
of Employees in
Several Departments
rt
O
H
7
52
41
60
21
45
9
3
37
54
11
1
36
2
21
5
9
26
1
4
3
2
2
1
1
26
11
12
19
9
5
6
17
2
8
4
4
3
4
1
6
1
2
4
7
82
Education  	
52
79
Health ___ 	
44
62
14
Labour„„,.  	
Lands     .,
9
43
73
13
1
46
Public Utilities	
2
26
5
Industrial Development, Trade,
9
Welfare	
31
Totals, 1957	
Totals, 1956   ,.
Totals, 1955-.	
Totals, 1954 _	
Totals, 1953	
440      |
592
479
513
480
14
28
17
49
80
123
136
94
87
130
14
27
36
12
19
2
1
1
7
13
10
7
7
12
7
21
9
11
610
803
659
678
728
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1958
260-258-3900 

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