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Railway Department PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT Year Ended December 31st 1957 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1958

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 Railway Department
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
Year Ended December 31st
1957
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1958  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to present herewith the Annual Report of the operations and
activities of the Railway Department for the year ended December 31st, 1957.
Victoria, B.C., February 17th, 1958.
LYLE WICKS,
Minister of Railways.
Victoria, B.C., December 31st, 1957.
The Honourable Lyle Wicks,
Minister of Railways, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Fortieth Annual Report of the Railway Department, covering the year 1957, together with Appendices.
Your obedient servant,
W. H. SANDS,
Deputy Minister. FOREWORD
The Railway Department kept pace with the demands of industry during the year,
and pipe-lines, industrial roads, railways, and aerial tramways were inspected during
construction and otherwise.
The training programme with respect to the training of off-highway equipment
drivers was stepped up during 1957.
The Pacific Great Eastern Railway and logging and industrial operations benefited
from the research facilities of the Department during 1957.
Regulations pursuant to the " Pipe-lines Act " were formulated during 1957, subsequent to a series of meetings with engineers from the oil companies and pipe-line
companies. Report of the Railway Department
PACIFIC GREAT EASTERN RAILWAY COMPANY
Inspection of Track, Structures, and Mechanical Facilities
Various operational phases of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway from North Vancouver to Prince George were inspected during 1957. Locomotives, rolling-stock, shop
facilities, station facilities, communications and train operation, road-bed, bridges and
structures, and the investigation of accidents were included in these inspections.
There is considerable improvement over previous years in the general condition of
the track, road-bed, and right-of-way. Rail wear was noticeable in a number of places
where curvatures were in excess of 10 degrees. This is due to increase in traffic and
tonnage. A system of flange-oiling was recommended for locomotives in an effort to
reduce rail wear at points on the railway where sharp curvature exists. Following is the
rail-renewal programme from 1951 to the end of 1957:—
70-pound relay—Mile 45.8 to Mile 50.2	
Miles
"      4.4
Year
1953
1956
1955
1956
1951
1952
1954
1954
1955
1956
1955
1954
1956
1957
19521
85-pound rail (new)—
Mile 39.0 to Mile 40.8	
1.8
•■
Mile 40.8 to Mile 45.8_..__ ________	
5.0
Mile 45.8 to Mile 50.2
...      4.4
....    16.5
Mile 50.2 to Mile 66.7	
Mile 66.7 to Mile 72.9	
6.2
Mile 72.9 to Mile 77.6	
Mile 77.6 to Mile 90.3	
4.7
....      9.7
,
Mile 90.3 to Mile 94.9_._-	
....      4.6
Mile 94.9 to Mile 123.3 ..	
28.4
Mile 123.3 to Mile 160.1	
36.8
Mile 160.1 to Mile 191.6    ..
31.5
Mile 191.6 to Mile 208.3 .....
16.7
_.    54.0
Mile 258.5 to Mile 312.5	
Mile 386.3 to Mile 466.3	
__._    80.0
85-pound rail (second hand) —Mile 312.5 to
Mile 320.1 	
7.6
1957
TotaL
312.3
1 Prince George extension.
The tie-renewal programme is well in hand. Considerable portions of the permanent
way have been brought up to good main-line standards. Following is the ballasting programme from 1954 to the end of 1957:—
Mile 192.0 to Mile 218.9	
Mile 219.3 to Mile 238.3	
Mile 238.3 to Mile 243.3	
Mile 273.4 to Mile 305.5	
Mile 337.3 to Mile 348.7     11.4
Mile 348.7 to Mile 376.4	
Mile 376.4 to Mile 382.3	
Mile 386.3 to Mile 406.3	
Miles
Year
26.9
1957
19.0
1954
5.0
1953
32.1
1957
11.4
1956
27.7
1955
5.9
1956
20.0
1954
Total
148.0 HH 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The relaying of 85-pound rail and ballasting on the section between Exeter and
Williams Lake has been the most important work carried out to improve speed and safety
of train operations during 1957. The coming year, 1958, should see the end of light steel
on the main line, when the gaps between Mile 218 and Exeter and between Mile 320 and
Baker are relaid. With the completion of the 85-pound rail over the entire line, operation and safety will be very much improved.
In addition to the aforementioned improvements, the following capital work has
been completed during the year 1957:—
(1) 4 miles of new railway company sidings and spurs constructed—1.5 miles
by the railway company forces and 2.5 miles by contract.
(2) 1.8 miles of extensions to railway company sidings.
(3) Twelve private sidings constructed during the year, representing 2.1 miles
of private trackage.
(4) Tie-plating the 85-pound rail on tangents on the Squamish and Prince
George subdivisions was continued, with approximately 4,500 tie-plates
installed during the year.
Tie-renewal Programme.—A total of 144,832 ties were renewed during 1957. It is
expected that, during 1958, 30,000 creosoted ties will be laid.
Drainage and Relocation, Mud Hill.—The work which commenced during 1956 at
Mud Hill, which included cutting back of the side-hill slope, installation of sub-surface
drainage, and relocation of trackage, was completed during 1957, so that by the end of
the year the inspection revealed that conditions at Mud Hill are more stabilized than over
previous years.
Soda Creek Tunnel.—The Soda Creek tunnel was eliminated by means of an open
cut, and the work was completed by 1957. This work has removed a hazard, as the
lining of the Soda Creek tunnel was in bad shape.
Seton Lake Grade Protection. — Riprap where required was completed and new
retaining-walls were installed at various points on this subdivision.
Fencing.—Approximately 10 miles of new right-of-way fences in the Williams Lake
and Quesnel areas were constructed and completed during 1957.
Track-lubricators. — Fifty new track-lubricators were purchased and installed on
85-pound rail during 1957.
Diesel Track-side Fueling Systems.—The advent of Budd trains rendered the diesel-
fuelling systems at Lillooet and Williams Lake inadequate. Consequently, during 1957,
railway company forces installed new fuel-lines at Quesnel shops to the main line adjacent
to the station, and also installed a fuelling system at Lillooet, so that trains are not required
to proceed to the shops for fuelling but may be fuelled at the station while baggage is
being handled.   This speeded up passenger service considerably.
Ballasting, Howe Sound, North Vancouver to Squamish.—Ballasting was completed
along Howe Sound during the year. Slow orders were in evidence at the various points
where highway construction was taking place, and flagmen were engaged so as to make
operation safe; however, it can be reported that when the highway is completed, conditions along the Howe Sound portion of the railway will be very much improved as rock-
scaling and retaining-walls may then be permanently completed.
Rock-scaling Programme. — A rock-scaling programme continued throughout the
year. Considerable improvement was effected in the widening of narrow cuts and day-
lighting of cuts, improving visibility and making snow-removal easier, particularly on the
Squamish subdivision between Garibaldi and Pemberton.
Bridges and Structures.-^-During the year a number of pile trestles were constructed
in North Vancouver and fifty-two other bridges were repaired and maintained on the line. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1957
HH 7
A number of new pipe culverts were installed, replacing existing timber culverts at various
locations.
Stations.—Passenger facilities were greatly improved over the entire line during the
year 1957. The new station at North Vancouver was completed, together with platforms,
fences, and a parking area for motor-vehicles. A new station and freight-shed were completed at Squamish. The new Squamish station and freight-shed area is complete with
black-top paving and parking-lot properly marked for the parking of motor-vehicles.
Adequate outdoor lighting has been installed, and the passenger areas are properly marked
off with white lines and pavement printing for public information. Station facilities at
Williams Lake and Prince George were improved.
Mechanical Facilities.—Annual reports of previous years have reported that the
mechanical facilities on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway were lacking in comparison
with other facilities on the line. The extension of the railway from Squamish to Vancouver created an impetus in all departments of the railway company to bring facilities up to
a better standard; consequently, the mechanical department of the railway was included
in the general 1957 betterment programme to a large extent.
A new mechanical-maintenance shop of steel and concrete construction was built in
North Vancouver, together with mechanical yards, rip-shed, and other facilities, and while
this new installation was not completed by the end of 1957, it is expected it will be in
operation during the early part of 1958. The new maintenance-shops and maintenance-
yards in North Vancouver will not only take care of the extra maintenance brought about
by the advent of trains originating in North Vancouver, but the new installations will go
a long way to alleviating congestion in the mechanical department at Squamish, as it is
expected a great number of the monthly inspections will be carried out at North Vancouver once the new facilities are in operation. The new shop is of modern design and is
comparable to any similar shop on any railway in Canada, as it was designed to accommodate Budd cars and diesels, with no consideration for steam-locomotives, which are
now a thing of the past.
During the latter part of 1957 a new diesel-maintenance shop was under construction at Squamish. This was a most necessary addition to the mechanical department, as
the old shops, built in 1914, were designed to accommodate steam power and were
entirely inadequate to handle the repairs of modern diesel locomotives and Budd trains.
The new mechanical heavy-repair shop at Squamish is of steel and concrete construction,
designed to modern trends for the accommodation of diesel-electric locomotives. The new
shop incorporates the use of a wheel-truing machine. This new type of machine will
true the wheels on diesel locomotives, Budd cars, and passenger-coaches without removing the wheels from the locomotive. Some of the more progressive railways in North
America have installed such machines, and studies indicated that the wheels on a diesel-
electric locomotive could be turned in a few hours, whereas with older methods locomotives were tied up for several days.
The company is to be commended on its choice of the new equipment being installed
at the heavy-repair shops in Squamish, which includes a new 300-ton wheel-press and
modern steel-wheel boring machine. The arrangement of the shop is such that one side
of the shop is designed for heavy maintenance repairs, while the other side is so arranged
to accommodate the daily servicing of modern diesel locomotives and Budd trains.
Modern methods for handling lubricating-oil, waste oil, sand, and fuelling are incorporated in the over-all design of the new Squamish shop, and the design is such that it can
be added to as the railroad progressively grows larger.
The advent of the extensions into the Peace River country, and the extension to
North Vancouver, has necessitated the procurement of extra rolling-stock for the railway.
A large number of box cars and gondola cars are being procured.   Two additional diesel- HH 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
electric locomotives of 1,800 horse-power each were procured and placed in operation by
the company during 1957. In addition, a large wrecking-crane was ordered for delivery
early in 1958.
Level Crossings.—During the latter part of 1957 a complete survey was made of all
level crossings on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. The traffic engineer of the Department of Highways as well as the chief engineer of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway were
present in the field during the survey. A number of recommendations were made to
improve safety at level crossings, and in some cases automatic protection has been recommended. In this regard, the automatic protection ordered for the level crossing in the
Village of Quesnel was not completed by the end of 1957, but it is expected the signal
will be in operation during the early part of 1958. The delay has been caused due to the
inaccessibility of repair and installation parts of the automatic crossing signal.
At a number of points on the line, grade-separation projects were in evidence
during the survey, and it is expected that a number of level crossings will be eliminated
by under and over passes. The survey extended to a portion of the northern extension
north to Prince George, where a number of level crossings will exist as well as a number
of overpasses, implementing the advantage of grade separation.
In West Vancouver two automatic protection-gates were installed and placed in
operation during 1957.
The seven new Budd cars procured during 1956 were placed in full operation during
1957. A fast passenger service has thus been inaugurated between North Vancouver
and Prince George. The travelling time between North Vancouver and Prince George,
now 16^ hours, has eliminated the necessity of hauling a dining-car, which has been
replaced by serving aeroplane-type meals on the train. The company is to be commended
upon the excellent service rendered by the use of Budd cars, and it is to be noted that
trains now operate on time, with the exception of the usual delays on any railroad where
slides and washouts are liable to occur. It can therefore be expected that the efficiency
of train service will be improved as the improvements and betterments progress.
Extensions
The southern extension of the line from Squamish to North Vancouver was in full
operation during 1957, which permitted the company to abandon the use of ferries and
barge-slips between Squamish and Vancouver, thereby permitting all traffic to be hauled
by rail. By the end of 1957 the construction on the Squamish-North Vancouver extension was completed, with the exception of betterments and buildings, which will be taken
care of on the annual operating budget.
The northern extension of the line from Prince George to Fort St. John and Dawson
Creek continued during 1957, so that, by the end of the year, steel was laid 130 miles
north of Prince George. The grading was completed from Prince George to Fort St. John
and the grade under construction on the branch line to Dawson Creek in the Peace River
area. A tunnel in the Pine Pass area was not completed by the end of 1957, but it is
expected the tunnel would be completed during the first month of 1958. With the completion of the tunnel, steel-laying will continue, so that it is expected that steel will be
laid into the junction at Chetwynd by March 15th, 1958, with steel into Fort St. John
by May 1st, 1958. The railway bridge across the Peace River was completed by the
end of 1957, so that when the steel-laying gangs arrive there will be no delay at this point.
Spurs were surveyed and laid out to serve the processing plant at Taylor Flats.
The advent of the extensions of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway ushered in a new
era in communications on railways, as the company has installed a microwave system
which will operate from North Vancouver to Fort St. John and Dawson Creek. The new
system of communications will make the telephone communication formerly used obso- RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1957 HH 9
lete, as now trains can communicate directly with dispatchers and vice versa, and also all
company communication can be carried over the microwave system. The company's
communication department engineered the project, and it can be reported the system is
very successful and will do much to increase the efficiency of railway operation.
It is expected that traffic will be moving over the northern extension from Fort St.
John to Prince George before the end of 1958, and it is probable that steel will be laid
into Dawson Creek before the end of the year.
■ . .
Conclusion
Conditions on the permanent way of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway have greatly
improved during the year 1957. The line is safe for operation, and it is expected the
improvements which will go forward during 1958 will do much to speed up traffic over
the line.
The Budd cars purchased during 1956 are doing excellent work, and the passenger
service and passenger schedules have been much improved.
The Squamish to North Vancouver extension was in full operation during 1957, and
it is expected that the northern extension will have progressed during 1958 to the point
that traffic will be moving over the northern extension before the end of 1958.
During 1957 the Pacific Great Eastern Railway added a safety director to its staff,
and by the end of the year the results of a concerted effort on the part of the company
have shown up.   The Department Inspectors advise and assist this safety director.
B.C. ELECTRIC RAILWAY, NEW WESTMINSTER
TO CHILLIWACK
On August 5th, 1957, a general inspection was made of the British Columbia Electric
Railway Company's line from New Westminster to Chilliwack, a distance of 63.8 miles.
Generally the line is in good condition.
Weed-control is well in hand over the entire line. Chemical weed-killer is being
used and applied by the company's own equipment.
All level crossings are maintained in accordance with the " Railway Act." Two
automatic crossing installations exist—one at Scott Road and the other at King George
Highway. A third signal of the gate and flashing-light type has been approved by the
Department for installation at the new Trans-Canada Highway in the vicinity of
Chilliwack.
Freight traffic has increased steadily on this line over the past five years. The
section between Huntingdon and New Westminster serves as a transfer between the
Northern Pacific and the Milwaukee Road terminals in Huntingdon and the C.P.R.,
C.N.R., G.N.R., and P.G.E.R. in the Vancouver area. Seven diesel-electric locomotives
were in service at the time of the inspection, and subsequently two new G.M. 900-horse-
power diesel-electric locomotives have been added.
The betterment programme started in 1951 is 80 per cent completed. New 85-pound
rail is replacing the old 70-pound, and by 1958 all rail will be renewed. Creosoted ties
and reballasting is following through with the rail-renewal. All bridges have been rebuilt
and are in good condition. The railway is generally in good condition and safe for
operation.
The Annacis Island railway is a branch line of the B.C. Electric Railway and was
officially opened for traffic during the latter part of 1956. This railway was considerably
extended during 1957 to accommodate industrial expansion on the Annacis Island Estate.
All spurs and railway installations were inspected prior to installation and approval given. HH 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
GENERAL INSPECTION OF RAILWAYS AND
OTHER TRANSPORT
Railways
General Trend.—It is common knowledge that the provincially owned Pacific Great
Eastern Railway is being extended by the Government to open up the country and to
keep pace with the industrial expansion and population increase.
A few years ago it was thought that trucking was a cheaper means of transport than
railways. Several of the logging companies tore up their railways and installed truck-
roads on the right-of-way. It has now come to light that in certain operations the cost
to haul logs by truck is approximately two or three times greater than the cost to haul
by rail when based on dollars and cents per thousand board-feet hauled. One of the
larger logging companies installed a new logging-railway last year. The bulk of timber
to be hauled, together with the distance the timber was to be hauled, justified a railway
rather than a truck-road, and the cost per thousand board-feet by rail was so much lower
than by truck that the truck-road was not justified.
Logging-railways.—All logging-railways in British Columbia were inspected during
the year. These inspections included bridges, log-dumps, road-bed, rolling-stock, and
locomotives. All steam-locomotives in use had the boilers hydrostatically tested and
certified by Inspectors of the Department. Where logging-railways are used, the trend is
toward a combination of logging-trucks and railway.
The Comox Logging & Railway Company operation at Ladysmith incorporates the
use of both trucks and railway. The operation at Englewood of Canadian Forest Products Limited now transfers the loads of logs directly from the logging-trucks to railway
cars so they can be transported by rail 30 or 40 miles to tidewater where the sorting is
done and booms made up.
At such logging operations the Inspectors also made inspections of logging-trucks
and truck-roads. They conducted examinations of railwaymen and examinations of
logging-truck operators. At most of the operations the Inspectors conducted driver-
training courses for truck-drivers and also safety courses for railwaymen. The operation
and dispatching of railways was checked, as well as the operation and safety of
truck-roads.
The two new diesel-electric locomotives placed in service during 1956 at the Canadian Forest Products Limited logging operation at Englewood have continued to do
excellent work during 1957. All diesel locomotives were inspected and certified during
the year, as well as all steam-locomotives at the Englewood operation.
The railway of British Columbia Forest Products Limited at Port Renfrew operated
part time during the year 1957. At this operation the railway is used to transport logs
from the trucks to tidewater, and during certain periods of the year the railway operation
is shut down and other parts of the operation using trucks are put into full production.
Safety Trophy.—Since 1952 the Department has put up a safety trophy which is
competed for by the various logging-railway companies. The trophy was won for the
year 1956 by the Comox Logging & Railway Company at its Ladysmith operation.
Mining-railways.—All mining-railways throughout British Columbia were inspected
during the year. The Sullivan mine operation in Kimberley has several miles of narrow-
gauge railway operating between the mouth of the mine and the tipple at Kimberley.
Electric locomotives are used at this operation. The company is very safety conscious,
and the railway is in excellent condition. No accidents were reported on this railway
during the year. The Morrissey, Fernie and Michel Railway has for a number of years
enjoyed a very good safety record.
At the Trail smelter of the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada,
the narrow-gauge railway or tramming operation was inspected several times during the RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1957 HH 11
year. All motormen on this operation are certified by the Department. Various matters
involving safety have been straightened out by the Department Inspectors during the year
at Trail, with particular reference to the lead-concentrator operation, where recommendations have resulted in safe practice.
Kitimat.—The terminal railway of the Aluminum Company of Canada Limited at
Kitimat was inspected during the year. The locomotives were tested and the general
operation of the railway checked. Reports of unsafe conditions reported by union
officials were investigated by the Inspectors, and it was found most of the trouble originated through misunderstandings, which were straightened out once the proper procedures
were established.
Steel-mills.—-The steel-mills in the Vancouver area own and operate their own
trackage in and around the plants. Railway locomotive cranes operate on the trackage
switching cars and loading steel. The boilers of these cranes were hydrostatically tested
and certificates issued during the year. Engineers operating the locomotive cranes were
examined and certified.
Shipyards.—The shipyards in Vancouver and Victoria own their own trackage to
serve the plants. The trackage and locomotive cranes employed were tested and inspected
during the year. At Yarrows Limited, in Victoria, the bridge cranes in the shops and the
hammer-head crane on the dock were inspected as to safety and lifting capacity. In one
case, load tests were made in the interest of safety.
Board of Transport Commissioners, Ottawa.—For the past twenty years the Inspectors of the Department have been appointed as Locomotive Inspectors by the Board of
Transport Commissioners. This appointment is made through the Department of Lands
and Forests, so that the fire-protective appliances on all locomotives operating under
Board jurisdiction within British Columbia are tested. In this capacity the Inspectors
inspect locomotives for fire protection on lines operating under the jurisdiction of the
Board. During 1957 the advent of dieselization on the main-line railways has reduced
the number of inspections necessary on the Canadian Pacific Railway, the Canadian
National Railway, and the Great Northern Railway in British Columbia. This also
includes the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway and the Canadian National Railway on
Vancouver Island. Reports were submitted of all inspections made to the Board in
Ottawa, who, in turn, took up any defects with the railways and the Department of Lands
and Forests.
Pulp-mills.—During 1957 a large pulp-mill was under construction at Crofton, and
a railway and trackage system were under construction to serve the plant both from the
Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway and from the wharves. This trackage was inspected
during construction and plans approved. In some cases it was necessary to recommend
changes to eliminate close clearances. This company operates its own diesel-electric
locomotive at the Crofton pulp-mill, which was inspected and crews instructed and
examined so that certified personnel would be available for the operation of the railway.
The trackage serving the pulp-mill of MacMillan & Bloedel Limited at Port Alberni
was considerably extended during 1957, as was the trackage and equipment of the same
company's pulp-mill at Harmac. At Harmac a 65-ton diesel-electric locomotive is used.
During the year, inspections were made of the locomotive and rolling-stock.
At the Columbia Cellulose Company Limited plant at Prince Rupert, trackage and
locomotives were inspected and personnel certified. The log-dump was also inspected.
This log-dump is operated by the company, using railway cars hauled by the Canadian
National Railway.
A barge-slip was installed during 1957 at Port Alice to serve the pulp-mill of Alaska
Pine and Cellulose Limited.   This was done to extend rail service to Port Alice by means HH 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
of a barge-slip and car-barges. The installation was approved by the Department and
was inspected upon completion.
At the Elk Falls Company Limited paper-mill at Duncan Bay, Vancouver Island,
the barge-slip and trackage, as well as steam-locomotive and equipment, were inspected.
At this plant, close clearances required a certain amount of adjustment, which was
handled during this inspection. . ,
Canadian Industries Limited.—The barge-slip, trackage, and wharf of this plant at
James Island were inspected. A diesel-electric locomotive is used to switch the barge-
slip and to switch cars around the plant. The locomotive was tested and personnel
examined and instructed in railway safety.
Small Narrow-gauge Railways.—The narrow-gauge railway which serves the power
plant at Jordan River on Vancouver Island was inspected. This railway is several miles
in length and exists to service the flume which serves the power-house. Two small gas-
locomotives are in use. At the time of the inspection, the railway operating personnel on
location were instructed as to safe practices.
A narrow-gauge (3-foot) railway has been constructed and is operated by Mr. G.
Wellburn at Deerholme. This railway is operated by railway fan societies and by Mr.
Wellburn. A 15-ton steam-locomotive is used, as well as 3-foot-gauge rolling-stock,
speeders, and other historical railway equipment. The railway was inspected in the
interests of safety, and as the locomotive is used only periodically, it was not subjected
to a hydrostatic test during 1957 but is scheduled for one during the early part of 1958.
It was recommended to Mr. Wellburn that in the interests of fire protection the locomotive burn oil instead of wood. This request was complied with, and the locomotive
was converted to burn diesel fuel-oil.
The miniature railway operated by the Vancouver Parks Board in Stanley Park was
inspected, and the miniature boiler of the steam-locomotive (which carries 150 pounds
pressure per square inch) was inspected and certified in the interests of public safety as
a number of children are on and around the locomotive during the summer months.
AERIAL-TRAMWAY TRANSPORTATION
The use of aerial tramways in British Columbia has developed steadily over the past
ten years. Three passenger-carrying chair lifts operate on Grouse Mountain and Holly-
burn Ridge, adjacent to Vancouver. These aerial tramways are common carriers, and
their installation and tariff are under the jurisdiction of the " Railway Act." The tramways were inspected and certified during the year, and complaints by the public were
investigated by the Department.
Adjacent to Trail and Rossland, the Red Mountain Aerial Tramway operates to
serve a ski-ground in that area. Four years ago the Department recommended a modernization programme so that the tramway would be brought up to modern standards over
a period of time. It can be reported at this time that during 1957 the modernization
programme was completed, and the Red Mountain Aerial Tramway is now in very good
operating condition and a certificate to operate was issued.
A number of ski-tows within the Province were considered to fall within the category
of an aerial tramway, and consequently ski-tows were also inspected under the same
regulations as aerial tramways.
The aerial tramway of the Cassiar Asbestos Corporation, in the northern part of the
Province, was not inspected during 1957 as an arrangement was made with the Department of Mines to have the Mine Inspectors inspect this installation when they were in the
district.
The North-west Telephone Company found it necessary to install a large and complicated aerial tramway on Dog Mountain, in the vicinity of Yale, in order to serve one RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1957 HH 13
of its microwave towers. This aerial tramway falls within the jurisdiction of the "Railway
Act," and consequently the design was approved by the Department after being carefully
checked by the inspecting engineers. Upon completion the aerial tramway was tested
and certified, and it is now in operation as a part of the North-west Telephone system.
The crossing of aerial-tramway cables over the lines of the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway near Quesnel was approved by the Department in August, 1957.
INDUSTRIAL TRANSPORTATION
Truck Logging.—During 1957 the use of heavy-duty logging-trucks and trailers has
once more been on the increase. One hundred and twenty-four new and reconditioned
logging units were put into service by truck-manufacturers during the year in the Vancouver area alone.
Reports to the Department have shown at least twenty cases where the operation of
the required safety devices has saved trucks and possibly the lives of the operators when
failures of the braking system have occurred. No report of any serious injury to drivers
of trucks equipped to safety standards has been received.
A total of 867 logging units of all types were inspected and tested. In some cases
these units required alterations or additions to the brake equipment, and in most instances
these defects were promptly rectified. It was found that an occasional operator failed
to make the necessary repairs to his vehicle, thereby forcing the Department to put his
unit out of service until such time as it was repaired to meet operating standards.
Where formerly vacuum and hydraulic brakes were found to be sufficient for what
was required, now air brakes have been found to be safer and more efficient. One disadvantage in using air brakes in the Interior has been the amount of moisture collecting
in the air-reservoirs due to the severe climatic conditions. This condensation was found
to be adversely affecting the mechanism of the different air valves. Upon advice from
the Department, moisture-ejector valves were installed in the air system, which subsequently eliminated this trouble.
The Department Inspectors have conducted classes in all parts of the Province to
teach safety and train drivers of equipment as to the safe use of air brakes and safety
devices used in transportation. The talks and lectures are of a technical nature. Examinations are then conducted, and successful candidates are issued certificates of proficiency.
The Department operates two portable training units, travelling to all parts of the
Province for the convenience of Interior drivers. These units are fully equipped with
demonstration air-brake equipment and compressed air for the operation of the equipment, as well as a movie projector and slide projector. Complete examination material
is also carried, so the Inspector can set up classes and examinations anywhere.
A truck-driver's training classroom has been set up at the Dominion-Provincial
Vocation School in Nanaimo, where the Inspectors conduct courses each month and
examine truck-drivers in the Central Island area. The classroom has been equipped
with operating air-brake devices. One hundred and forty-six students were trained and
examined at the school alone with the aid of these panels, as well as logging-truck drivers
from the surrounding districts. All truck-drivers in industry who hire through Vancouver
receive instruction and take examinations at the Vancouver office.
A total of 742 truck-drivers were certified during the year, bringing the total number
examined to well over 2,500 to date. In addition, two more complete units were constructed for use in the Vancouver office, where other groups have been trained in the use
of air brakes.
Truck Hauling, Mining.—There has been a noted increase in the number of trucks
used in the hauling of ore in the Province. HH 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Difficulties encountered in the braking systems of the truck-trailer units at Argonaut
Mines Limited at Campbell River were investigated and overcome by an Inspector from
the Department.
The roads and equipment of Empire Development at Port McNeill were inspected,
and minor changes in roads and bridges were found to be necessary.
Western Nickel Limited, which began construction work at Hope, is expected to
begin hauling early in 1958. The road was inspected, and it was found that quite a few
sections of the road and some of the bridges required repairs. It is to the credit of the
company that these repairs were made immediately.
The general feeling amongst operators and drivers is that while some time and money
have been involved in the installation of this safety equipment, safety to driver and
machine has increased tenfold. The feeling of assurance that comes from knowing that
tested equipment and devices are now in use on the truck that is driven by a trained and
certified operator cannot be measured in dollars and cents.
A talk was delivered to the Interior Lumber Manufacturers' Association at Penticton
on the "Industrial Transportation Act" and a demonstration of the safety devices shown
by the use of the working model on a panel board depicting a complete air-brake system.
A similar talk and demonstration was also delivered at the annual safety meeting of the
International Woodworkers of America at the Georgia Hotel in Vancouver.
PIPE-LINES
During 1957, pipe-line matters in the Province showed increased activity as a number of pipe-lines were under construction. A Pipe-line Inspector was appointed on
January 1st, 1957.
Four hundred and six miles of various-sized pipe-lines, predominantly gas but including some oil, were constructed, inspected, and tested during 1957, with a number of
applications pending for 1958.
Plans and specifications for bulk oil-products storage plants at Pemberton, Williams
Lake, Clinton, and Squamish were approved by the Department, and the plants were
constructed. During 1957 the oil and gas companies completed the following construction with respect to pipe-lines:—
Shell Oil Company:  An oil-products line in Burnaby (2 miles).
Defence Construction Limited (Department of National Defence):   Two jet-
fuel lines for aircraft at Comox on Vancouver Island (6 miles).
Inland Natural Gas Company: A high-pressure natural-gas main line extending
from a connection with Westcoast Transmission line at Savona through
the Interior of the Province by way of Kamloops, Vernon, Oyama,
Kelowna, Penticton, Osoyoos, Grand Forks, Trail, Castlegar, and terminating at Nelson (375 miles).    In addition, the company also constructed numerous laterals to Interior cities and towns both from its own
main fine to adjacent locations and also from the main line of Westcoast
Transmission Company to locations farther west.
Pacific Petroleums Limited:   A series of short natural-gas "gathering" lines
from gas-wells in the vast Fort St. John fields to feed the large-capacity
Westcoast Transmission line.
Plains-Western Gas & Electric Company:   A natural-gas utility line extending
from the Pacific Petroleums gas cleaning and processing plant at Taylor
on the Peace River to supply the needs of Fort St. John.
The location of pipe-line in some areas created a certain amount of misunderstanding between survey crews and property-owners.   One case in point was in the Castlegar-
Thrums area, where the relocation of the pipe-line was necessary subsequent to a survey
conducted by the Department engineers. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1957 HH 15
Pipe-line regulations pursuant to the Act were prepared and approved during 1957.
These will greatly assist in the administration of the Act both in the office and in the field.
The "Pipe-lines Act" administers pipe-lines located wholly within the Province,
and inspecting engineers of the Department provide the inspection service required.
Before putting a pipe-line into operation following a field inspection a report certifying its safety and soundness of construction is submitted, and the Minister issues an order
of his approval.
Following are the various pipe-lines constructed, inspected, and approved for operation in 1957 (main lines, laterals, and stubs which may operate under pressures up to
960 pounds per square inch are included):—
Inland Natural Gas Company— Miles
Main line _ .~_, 298.00
Prince George lateral       3.03
Williams Lake lateral , _—      6.77
100 Mile House lateral       0.06
Quesnel lateral —       2.41
Kamloops lateral and stubs  ,      3.73
Salmon Arm-Enderby .     27.47
Merritt lateral . -      2.92
Summerland lateral  , ....      9.90
Vernon stub —.—      0.37
Kelowna lateral . _—~      1.20
Osoyoos lateral ._ ..    13,02
Oliver stub       1.19
Grand Forks lateral ___. .       0.50
Rossland-Trail stub       4.21
Nelson stub ._       0.37
	
375.15
Shell Oil Company Limited .       2.00
Pacific Petroleums Limited     20.00
Plains-Western Gas & Electric Company       9.00
Total  406.15
SAFETY
Following is a report of equipment inspections during 1957:—
Hydrostatic tests applied to boilers  62
Internal and external inspections of boilers  6
Internal-combustion locomotives inspected and certified  10
Internal-combustion locomotive cranes inspected and certified.. 15
Air-locomotives hydrostatically tested  9
Electric locomotives inspected and certified  12
Rail-cars inspected and certified  19
Air-receivers tested and inspected  9
Diesel-electric locomotives inspected and certified  58
Electric locomotives inspected on narrow-gauge electric railways 14
Diesel-electric locomotives inspected on Alcan project  3
Locomotives inspected other than hydrostatic tests  41
Logging-trucks inspected  867
Number of cars inspected on industrial railways  352 HH 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Number of cars inspected on common-carrier railways  190
Miles of track inspected  875
Aerial tramways inspected in British Columbia and certified  6
Aerial-tramway inspections conducted  15
Locomotive engineers examined and certified  1
Conductors examined and certified  4
Power-car operators examined and certified  6
Internal-combustion locomotive engineers examined and certified 17
Locomotive-crane engineers examined and certified  5
Engineers examined and certificates issued, P.G.E. Railway  10
Engineers examined and certificates issued, B.C. Electric Railway  2
Motormen examined and certified, Consolidated Mining and
Smelting Co. of Canada  8
Logging-truck operators examined and certified  742
Students examined and certified at Dominion-Provincial Vocational School, Nanaimo  146
Accidents investigated on logging and industrial railways  1
Accidents investigated on logging-truck roads  9
Fatal accidents investigated on logging-truck roads  1
Accidents on P.G.E. Railway  24
Fatal accidents on P.G.E. Railway  6
New diesel-electric locomotives  5
New diesel-electric cranes  1
Second-hand diesel-electric locomotives imported  2
Safety lectures conducted by the Department  15
Truck air-brake lectures conducted by Department  132
Inspection of locomotive fire-protective appliances on P.G.E.
Railway and industrial railways  24
Inspections made of locomotive fire-protective appliances on
C.P.R., C.N.R., and G.N.R., for Board of Transport Commissioners ..  26 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1957
APPENDICES
HH 17
APPENDIX A
Accidents Reported
Killed
1956
1957
Injured
1956
1957
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.-
Passengers i	
Employees..
Other persons.
B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd-
Passengers	
Employees...
Other persons .
Industrial railways—
Employees..
Other persons.
Locomotive cranes—Employees-
Aerial tramways (industrial)-----
Industrial roads (trucks)™—. _
Totals	
26
4
8
12
33
:
i    :.       .
1-'
" HH  18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APPENDIX B
List of Railways and Summary of Mileage
Industrial Railways
Head Office
Operating
Mileage
No. and Owners/Name of Railway
Main
Track
Sidings
etc.
Total
Gauge
Standard Gauge
Mainland
1. Arrowhead Wood Preservers Ltd...
2. Columbia Cellulose Co. Ltd —	
Revelstoke	
Montreal	
Montreal _	
Fernie	
New Westminster
Montreal	
Revelstoke	
Watson Island,
Shames, and
Kalum
North Vancouver
Fernie	
New Westminster
North Vancouver-
Port Mellon	
Kitimat	
North Vancouver
Walker Siding
0.92
7.01
7.00
2.69
0.921
7.011
8.00
6.13
5.20
0.75
3.00
5.70
2.00
0.95
Standard.
3. Dominion Tar & Chemical C6. Ltd....
4. Morrissey, Fernie & Michel Railway Co.
1.00
3.44
5.20
6. Canada Creosoting Co. Ltd \	
0.75
2.00
2.80
1.90
1.00
2.90
0.10
0.95
8. Aluminum Co. of Canada Ltd ~     .,
Montreal. _.
North Vancouver
Quesnel 	
10. Western Plywood (Cariboo) Ltd.	
Totals, Mainland	
15.51
24.15
39.66
Vancouver Island
11. MacMillan & Bloedel Ltd 	
Nanaimo.— 	
Harmac Pulp
Division
Franklin River
Chemainus	
Dunsmuir District
Duncan Bay.	
Youbou...   ■	
Port Renfrew	
1.80
36.80
1.58
1.00
3.00
15.40
16.50
1.15
2.00
129.20
23.40
6.00
0.25
0.33
7.00
12   MacMillan & Bloedel Ltd.
Vancouver 	
Chemainus	
Chemainus	
2.70
3.81
3.10
1.90
3.90
2.15
4.00
17.10
5.05
1.50
1.00
0.60
0.42
39.50
5.39
4.10
3.00
17.30=
20.40
3.30
6.00
146.30
28.45
7.503
1.25
0.33
7.60*
0.42
13. MacMillan & Bloedel Ltd	
14. MacMillan & Bloedel Ltd. / Nanaimo
River Railway
15. Elk Falls Co. Ltd	
Vancouver  ..
Vancouver 	
Vancouver	
17. B.C.  Forest Products Ltd. / Renfrew
Division, South
18. B.C. Forest Products Ltd... 	
19. Canadian Collieries Resources Ltd	
Union Bay	
Vancouver 	
Ladysmith	
Mesachie Lake
Paldi    	
Mesachie Lake
Honeymoon Bay.
Vancouver	
21. Comox Logging & Railway Co	
22. Hillcrest Lumber Co. Ltd 	
23. Mayo Lumber Co. Ltd	
24. Osborn Bay Wharf Co. Ltd __.
Ladysmith	
Mesachie Lake
Paldi	
Osborn Bay	
Honeymoon Bay.
Port Alice plant-
26. Alaska Pine & Cellulose Ltd 	
Totals, Vancouver Island
245.41
47.23
292.64
Totals,   industrial   railways,
260.92
71.38
332.30
1 All leased.
2 Includes 5 miles leased.
3 Includes 5 miles leased.
4 Includes 7 miles leased. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1957
HH 19
APPENDIX B—Continued
List of Railways and Summary of Mileage—Continued
Industrial Railways—Continued
Head Office
Operating
Mileage
No. and Owners/Name of Railway
Main
Track
Sidings
etc.
Total
Gauge
Narrow Gauge
Mainland
27. Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. Ltd 	
Fernie, Coal
Creek, Elk
River, and
Michel
New Westminster
Trail 	
Kimberley..	
7.15
6.00
19.00
9.00
7.15
6.00B
19.00
42.01
Montreal	
Trail... 	
Trail__ _	
30".
28. Canada Creosoting Co. Ltd	
30" and
standard.
18".
of Canada Ltd.
30. Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
of Canada Ltd.
33.01
18", 36".
Totals, Mainland	
41.15
33.01
74.16
Vancouver Island
31. Canadian Industries Ltd	
Montreal 	
James Island
8.25
1.75
10.00
36" and
standard.
Totals, Vancouver Island	
8.25
1.75
10.00
Totals,   industrial   railways,
narrow gauge—  	
49.40
34.76
84.16
Totals,    all   industrial   rail-
310.32
106.14
416.46
Common Carrier
32. Pacific Great Eastern Railway.	
Vancouver	
Vancouv e r,
Squamish,
to Prince
George —
465.90
Sidings	
Spurs, wyes, etc.
Private spurs _
51.40
33.25
16.60
"
Totals  	
465.90
101.25
567.15
Street and Interurban Electric Railways
33.
B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd.
Grand total	
Vancouver	
New Westminster
76.97
25.65     102.62
11086.23
Standard.
5 Includes 3 miles leased. HH 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APPENDIX C
Mileage of All Railways Operating in the Province
Mainland
Main
Line
Sidings
Island
Main
Line
Sidings
Total
Main
Line
Sidings
Under the jurisdiction of the Board of Transport Com
missioners for Canada—
Canadian Pacific Railway  _ 	
Canadian National Railways _- 	
Great Northern Railway  .__
B.C. Electric Railway .__	
Totals  	
Under the jurisdiction of the Provincial Government—
Pacific Great Eastern Railway   	
B.C. Electric Railway      	
Industrial railways—
Standard gauge _ 	
Narrow gauge 	
Totals	
Grand totals—    	
1,824.53
1,342.14
123.20
26.25
549.96
398.53
40.75
26.58
200.24
90.17
53.54
24.21
2,024.77
1,432.31
123.20
26.25
3,316.12 |  1,015.82
290.41
77.75
465.90
76.97
15.51
41.15
101.25
25.65
24.15
33.01
245.41
8.25
47.23
1.75
465.90
76.97
260.92
49.40
603.50
422.74
40.75
26.58
3,606.53  [ 1,093.57
101.25
25.65
71.38
34.76
599.53
184.06
253.66
48.98
853.19 |     233.04
3,915.65  |  1,199.8
544.07  |      126.73
1,326.61
Total mileage of all railways in British Columbia in 1957 .
Total mileage of all railways in British Columbia in 1956 .
Increase in railway mileage during 1957 	
5,786.33
5,750.61
35.72
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1958
210-358-4333

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