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REPORT OF THE Department of Recreation and Conservation containing the reports of the FISH AND GAME BRANCH,… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1958

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF RECREATION AND CONSERVATION
Hon. E. C. Westwood, Minister D. B. Turner, Deputy Minister
REPORT OF THE
Department of Recreation
and Conservation
containing the reports of the
FISH AND GAME BRANCH, PROVINCIAL PARKS BRANCH,
TRAVEL BUREAU, PHOTOGRAPHIC BRANCH, AND
COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BRANCH
Year Ended December 31st
1957
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1958  Victoria, B.C., February 24th, 1958.
To the Honourable Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Department of
Recreation and Conservation for the year ended December 31st, 1957.
E. C. WESTWOOD,
Minister of Recreation and Conservation. Victoria, B.C., February 24th, 1958.
The Honourable E. C. Westwood,
Minister of Recreation and Conservation.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Department of Recreation and Conservation for the nine months ended December 31st, 1957.
D. B. TURNER,
Deputy Minister of Recreation and Conservation. CONTENTS
Introduction by the Deputy Minister of Recreation and Conservation.
Fish and Game Branch	
Provincial Parks Branch	
British Columbia Travel Bureau_
Photographic Branch	
Commercial Fisheries Branch	
Page
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5-S Report of the
Department of Recreation and Conservation, 1957
D. B. Turner, Deputy Minister and Commissioner of Fisheries
INTRODUCTION
The Department of Recreation and Conservation was created by Act of Legislature
dated March 28th, 1957. This is the first annual report covering the period April 1st to
December 31st, 1957.
The creation of this new Department was the culmination of several years of careful
examination and favourable thought on the part of the Government of the Province. The
final decision was influenced in no small measure by strong support and endorsement from
senior public servants, from outstanding citizens throughout the Province, and from Provincial and community organizations devoted to the advancement of the general welfare
of British Columbia and its people. The result is that British Columbia can claim the first
Provincial Minister of the Crown in Canada of a department organized to blend together
the major elements of outdoor recreation such as camping, hiking, boating, photographing,
touring and travelling, and hunting and fishing. This integration assures an over-all and
united approach and perspective of recreational outdoor activities.
The Department of Recreation and Conservation comprises the following five
units:—
(1) Fish and Game Branch.—Formerly the British Columbia Game Commission in the Department of the Attorney-General. The Director, hitherto
Game Commissioner, has under his charge the protection, the cropping,
and the management of our fish, fur and game, or wildlife resources.
(2) Provincial Parks Branch.—Previously the Provincial Parks and Recreation
Division in the British Columbia Forest Service. Under the Director, the
main objective of this Branch is to plan, develop, and maintain a park
system, including camp-site and roadside picnic areas and marinas,
capable of meeting the non-urban recreational needs of the people of
British Columbia. Lands and waters for the use and enjoyment of the
public are obtained, largely through establishing reserves of Crown lands.
When necessary to complete a land system of parks or a water system of
marinas, acquisition is by purchase. Occasionally a gift of an area is made
by a public-spirited citizen.
(3) British Columbia Travel Bureau.—Drawn from the former Department of
Trade and Industry. The function of the British Columbia Travel Bureau,
discharged through its Director, is to promote travel within the borders of
the Province and aid and assist in the development of the tourist trade and
the visitor industry.
(4) Photographic Branch.—Was a part of the British Columbia Government
Travel Bureau but became an entity upon transfer to the Department of
Recreation and Conservation. The Photographic Branch supplies visual
coverage, both movie and still, for all departments of the Provincial
Government.
(5) Commercial Fisheries Branch.—Formerly the Department of Fisheries.
Briefly and in broad terms the Federal Department of Fisheries controls
and regulates the catching of fish, such as salmon, halibut, and herring, II 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
while the processing comes under the authority of the Province of British
Columbia.   Inspection of processing plants is the chief function of the
Supervisor of Fisheries.   In addition, because control of the foreshore is
vested in the Province, the shell-fish industry is a Provincial responsibility,
but welcome co-operation in the matter of regulations governing the harvesting of shell-fish is received from the Federal Government.
The major aim of this new Department of Recreation and Conservation is the design
and execution of a carefully drawn outdoor recreational plan, non-urban in character and
for British Columbia as a whole.   In harmony with this recreational plan, the park system,
for example, in time must blanket the Province.   In this way all sections of British Columbia will be used and enjoyed by our citizens.   A major consideration in implementing
the recreational plan is economics.   Obviously Crown lands must be used wherever possible, and hence the operations of the Department of Recreation and Conservation must
lie primarily in unorganized or Crown territory and are exclusive of, except for Class " C "
parks, organized areas such as cities, towns, villages, or district municipalities.
In the following pages of this first Annual Report of the Department of Recreation
and Conservation, the substantial progress made by the respective branches during the
initial nine months is recounted briefly and as graphically as possible. , ■,:■'"...:
^iP*!
.:      ■■■■
FISH and
GAME
BRANCH HISTORY
The first game administration was established in 1905 in
the Department of Lands and Works. Legislation which dealt
with wildlife had been passed as early as 1870. In 1905 the first
hunting licence was introduced. First money for wildlife management was voted in 1908. The Game Branch was transferred
from the Department of Lands and Works to the Attorney-
General's Department in 1910. The "Game Act" was consolidated in 1911. The Game Branch was abolished in 1918, and
administration of wildlife became a responsibility of the British
Columbia Provincial Police. At the same time a Game Conservation Branch came into existence. Further reorganization took
place in 1929 with the separation of the Game Branch from the
Provincial Police. The Fisheries Branch was established in 1932.
The Game Branch underwent another reorganization in
1934, when a Game Commission of three members was appointed. The Game Commission remained until the organization became part of the Department of Recreation and Conservation on April 1st, 1957. The present title is " Fish and Game
Branch."
The responsibilities of the Commission grew in 1938, when
the non-tidal sport fisheries came under Provincial jurisdiction.
Scientific studies of game and fish began to grow in importance
after World War II. •... "'J.
S**S!?*v_j>t-.''
-   :      II
Trapping California bighorn sheep, Chilcotin.
Kamloops trout. II 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
FISH AND GAME BRANCH,  1957
F. R. Butler, Director
Game-management techniques practised elsewhere have been put into effect where
applicable and deemed necessary in the Province. Constant and careful study, examination, and investigation of the numerous wildlife problems are continually to the forefront in Branch activities.
WILDLIFE PROBLEMS
Such problems as obstructions on lakes and streams, pollution, public access, and
public relations are of paramount importance. The Branch is fully aware of the need
for watching any development that might result in pollution or create other problems.
There is very little doubt that the section of the Federal Fisheries Act dealing with
pollution should be studied and revised so that there may be more control over pollution
and obstructions of every kind.
Public access to hunting and fishing areas is of the greatest importance at this time,
as a result of increased pressure. In this connection it is respectfully suggested that this
matter be carefully and fully discussed by heads of Governmental departments concerned
for the purpose of arriving at some suitable over-all access policy that will be acceptable
to government, industry, and recreationists.
Public relations must be constantly improved because it is the best working-tool in
any form of game-conservation work. The Game Branch has done a great deal of work
in keeping the public informed on every phase of the multiple and sustained use of our
very valuable wildlife resource.
GAME AND FISHING REGULATIONS
Each year this Branch has endeavoured to simplify these regulations and to set
seasons in accordance with sound wildlife-management practices. These regulations are
under frequent study, with a view to further simplifying them if possible.
VIOLATIONS
There is bound to be an increase in violations as hunting and fishing pressure
increases. In 1957 there were 1,373 informations laid, resulting in 25 dismissals, 1 withdrawal, and 1,347 convictions, with fines amounting to $25,198.50.
HUNTING ACCIDENTS
While all reports under this heading have not been received or resolved, some twenty-
four accidents took place in 1957, twelve of which were fatal. Most of these accidents
can be attributed to carelessness.
There has been much discussion and thought given to devising means to prevent
these unfortunate accidents. It would seem, in the final analysis, that the only suitable
solution is by a constant and approved form of education. After careful study of the
whole accident problem, it would seem that requiring hunters to wear specific coloured
clothing will not curtail accidents to any extent.
LICENCES
There was a very decided increase in the number of firearms and anglers' licences
issued during the year. Resident and non-resident firearms and anglers' licences issued
in 1956 totalled 245,222.    In 1957 the total was 273,365, or an increase of 28,143. DEPARTMENT OF RECREATION AND CONSERVATION
REVENUE
Revenue showed a decided increase over 1956, as follows:—
1956  $1,160,273.50
1957     1,3 81,005.05
Increase      $220,731.55
II 13
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Sincere appreciation is extended to all Government Agencies, organized farmers,
game associations, and many other organizations for the friendly co-operation extended
throughout the year, and also for the excellent and often arduous work carried out by
all Game Branch and R.C.M.P. personnel.
FISHERIES MANAGEMENT DIVISION
General
The continued interest in the sport fisheries resource is graphically illustrated in the
following table:—
Angler's Licence Sales
1955
1956
1957
98,517
4,466
22,032
5,020
109,976
5,656
25,101
6,469
127,827
Non-resident—
6,895
25,887
7,187
T"tals
130,035
75.5
147,200
74.7
167,791
76.0
The 168,000 anglers who fished in British Columbia in 1957 caught an estimated
10,000,000 fish and expended roughly $28,000,000 to $29,000,000 in so doing. Resident anglers averaged an expenditure of around $120 to $130, while non-resident anglers
expended as much as $330 each for their fishing in British Columbia (average amount
spent by Californians). It is perhaps important to note that approximately 75 per cent
of angler's licence sales are to British Columbia residents. A large percentage of the
time spent by the Fisheries Management Division is spent on such public services as
lectures, attendances at rod and gun club meetings, dissemination of fishing and hunting
information (particularly during the spring and summer months), as well as the more
important management work associated with the regional sport fisheries.
Management
In 1957 over 115,000 acre-feet of waters were rehabilitated through lake poisoning,
particularly with toxaphene. This compares with a figure of 22,000 acre-feet in 1956.
The number of lakes treated is almost identical to 1956—that is, thirteen—but because
of the economical means of treatment, the lakes treated in 1957 were, on the average,
much larger. Of importance is the fact that many of the rehabilitated lakes of 1956
produced a " fabulous " sport fishery during the summer and fall of 1957. This management procedure is one that is extremely popular.
Eleven scientific publications and articles were prepared by the Fisheries Division
and are available for distribution. Further simplification of the fishing regulations was
achieved. Each year the regulations are leading to a more scientifically managed sport
fishery. II 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Stocking schedules have been considerably revised as more information has been
gathered on individual lakes. Creel-census work, necessary to evaluate the effects of
stocking, bag-limits, and seasons, etc., took up a considerable portion of Management
activities.
The control and licensing of commercial and private fish-farms proceeded effectively
and with few complications in 1957.
Protection
During 1957 continued attention was given to the processing of water-licence
applications and stream-bed gravel-removal applications, industrial pollutions, and prevention of obstructions to fish passage. Increased liaison and co-operation were received
from industry. This is attributable to a sound and technical approach to the problems
facing industry in the protection of the sport-fish resource.
A major project involved a biological survey, in conjunction with the Federal
Department of Fisheries, of the effect on fish-life and aquatic insects of a forest spray
project on Northern Vancouver Island for the control of the black-headed budworm
through the use of DDT aerial spraying.   A complete report has been completed.
Engineering surveys of Morehead Lake near Williams Lake and Westwood Lake
near Nanaimo were conducted to establish means of maintaining these lakes as valuable
recreational areas. Efforts are under way to have a rock obstruction, which is creating
a steelhead blockade, removed from the Coquihalla River.
Assistance was supplied whenever possible to the Federal Department of Fisheries
in negotiations and surveys to further fisheries interests in the event of the construction
of major water-supply and hydro-development projects.
Hatcheries
During 1957 egg production rose from 10,100,000 to 11,600,000, fish production
numbers increased from 3,200,000 to 4,800,000, while total pounds of trout produced
increased from 18,000 to 21,000 pounds. Total cost of fish production was about the
same in 1957 as in 1956 for trout-food, wages, and travel expenses. Total increase in the
hatchery budget from 1956 to 1957 (about $20,000) was almost entirely utilized in
repairs and modernization of existing hatchery facilities. Without expansion of present
facilities, no further increase in hatchery production is possible. Hatchery facilities at
all stations presently are extended far over optimum production capacity, but they still
continue to fall far behind demands of regional management programmes in all areas.
Research
During 1957 final stages of analysis on homing data for the Loon Lake rainbow
trout population was completed. Field studies on behaviour and movement of young
rainbow trout in the outlet and inlet streams of Loon Lake were continued. For the first
time, young trout were observed at night undisturbed by use of infra-red viewing apparatus.   Information was obtained on type and rate of nocturnal down-stream fry movement.
Studies on spring spawning runs of coarse fish were continued at Baker Lake.
Experimental stocking of fall (fry) and spring (fingerling) trout in Baker Lake,
which contains dense populations of competitive and predatory coarse fish, indicated
that survival of both groups of trout was extremely low.
Collections of fish were made in Northern British Columbia and other areas not
previously studied. Several range extensions and additional species new to the Province
were discovered. The effects of proposed water diversions in Northern British Columbia
on fish distribution and possible introduction of predatory species or serious fish parasites
into new watersheds have been pointed out. DEPARTMENT OF RECREATION AND CONSERVATION II 15
A handbook on identification and importance of common diseases and parasites of
fresh-water fishes in British Columbia was prepared for use by anglers, field biologists,
and the general public.
During 1957 many instances were found of the need of revision of certain sections
of the Federal Fisheries Act, and the necessity of a more specific delineation of the
authority responsible for the management and administration of all non-tidal fisheries.
GAME MANAGEMENT DIVISION
Appointments
The Division's responsibility, which rests primarily in game-management regulations,
investigation, and research, has continued in an accelerating trend throughout 1957.
The staff of six regional biologists was increased to seven by the appointment of R. A.
Baynes to the north central area with headquarters at Prince George.
Status of Big-game Populations
The winter of 1956/57 was in most areas favourable to winter survival of big game.
Aerial and ground observations early in the year in several sections of the Province
revealed populations of moose and deer at or near carrying capacity. In many cases,
moose and deer populations were believed to be in excess of the sustainable level of
density, due to several preceding mild winters, allowing a greater than average survival
of young.
An extensive study of big game in the southern Rocky Mountain Trench is covered
in "A Report to the B.C. Game Commission on Game Damage to Ranching Interests in
the Waldo Stockbreeders Area of the East Kootenay " and " The Status, Requirements
and Management of the East Kootenay Game Resource," by W. G. Smith, Regional
Game Biologist, Cranbrook, B.C.
Other extensive big-game surveys occupied much of the time of the Regional Game
Biologists.
Waterfowl Banding and Research
Waterfowl were banded in the Kamloops and Chilcotin areas in July and August as
part of a programme to determine effect of hunting pressure on local duck populations.
Approximately 1,600 birds were banded.
An experimental nest-box programme to try to increase the density of Barrow's
goldeneye ducks on certain Cariboo lakes was begun during the summer.
Trapping and Liberation of Bighorn Sheep
Twenty-eight head of California bighorn sheep were captured at the Deer Park
trap-site. Eighteen of these were sent to Washington to assist in the re-establishment of
this species in that area.   The remainder were released in the Southern Interior.
Pheasant Releases
A total of 5,822 pen-reared pheasants were released in various sections of the
Province.   This programme has been proven to be ineffective and is to be discontinued.
Game-checking Stations
Temporary checking-stations were operated for one or more week-ends on the
Ladner Delta, Vancouver Island, Saltspring Island, East Kootenay, and at Flood. Operation of the permanent check point at Cache Creek was maintained as in previous years. II 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Cache Creek Checking-station Totals
Year
Deer
Moose
Bear
Caribou
Elk
Mountain-
Goat
Mountain-
Sheep
Waterfowl
Grouse
Hunters
1954 	
1955.__
1,890
2,296
2,397
2,245
1,718
2,301
2,649
2,799
128
82
141
179
26
20
27
48
1
2
4
53
63
56
91
19
26
24
7,430
6,568
7,349
8,193
5,850
4,371
7,032
11,027
10,747
10,966
1956	
14,517
1957 	
14,146
Game-harvest
At the time of writing, the total game-harvest for the Province has not been
determined, but indications from Cache Creek suggest that the over-all harvest in 1957
will exceed that of preceding years, especially in the case of moose. Grouse are building
up to another cyclic peak in Central British Columbia, and 1957 showed a marked
increase in the kill.
Game Regulations
A further liberalization of seasons took place in 1957 to permit a greater harvest of
wildlife. Longer antlerless seasons were allowed on moose and deer in most sections
of the Province.
Public Relations and Education
Over 100 meetings of various types were attended by members of the Game
Management Division. Several technical and semi-technical papers were prepared, and
a great deal of information supplied through correspondence.
A Game Management Handbook for use of other members of the Game Branch
was prepared.
PREDATOR CONTROL DIVISION
Predator controls were very effective and losses were at a minimum throughout the
control areas. A total of 1,823 major baiting-stations were established. Fully three-
quarters were dropped from aircraft in regions that would have been impossible to reach
by ground methods.
Black bears were once again the chief offenders and led the complaint list by a wide
margin.   Controls were adequate, although in some cases damage was relatively heavy.
Cougars were not responsible for a great deal of trouble. The situation indicates
that this species is at a low point in population. There are indications of a rise in numbers
over wide areas of the Interior at the present.
Wolves and coyotes had a very lean year. Baiting techniques and other methods
proved to be quite effective, particularly with respect to wolves. These two species should
never again become a major source of complaint as long as pressures are kept in play
against them.
The rodent-control programme in the East Kootenay area was very successful.
Some 7,500 acres were treated with poisoned oats. This involved approximately 121,000
individual bait placements. The kill on treated areas was estimated at approximately
98 per cent. The programme resulted in congratulations being received from every
organization that received attention. This procedure of control is well established and is
most certainly expected to be continued by the residents of that and other areas. Our
experimentation during 1957 indicated that, besides ground-squirrels, pocket-gophers
and mice could be controlled under a correct programme. Mice would definitely require
a considerable degree of further work and experimentation. 9561
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3rNfllOA      3VIV1 Allocation Of Activities Of Regional
Game Managment Biologist
Harvest Levels Of Game For Vancouver Is.
1954
1955
1356
1957
Willow Grouse
10,000
10,500
15,000
Waterfowl
54,000
48,000
7
Pheasant
4,500
3,800
5,000
Fur Bearers
L
V E      TR;
kPPING
(       Adult
31%
367.
37%
30%   |
j Blue Grouse
60,400
35,000
27.000
30,000 7
(     Juvenile
68 7.
64/.
6 3%
707.   )
Elk
15
10
3 5-40
57J-60
(Black Tail Deer
11,700
15,000
12,400
13-14,000]
;         Harvest  R
atio  Mai
ES  60%. fi
JNTLERLES
S 40%       (   HISTORY
British Columbia's Provincial park system stands to-day as a monument to the foresight of
the people who lived in this Province forty and fifty years ago. Their recognition of the recreational values of our woods and waters fostered in the minds of our people a determination to
achieve the outdoor heritage of parks that they recommended.
The park system includes 117 areas, totalling over 8,000,000 acres in all parts of the
Province.
The first park, Strathcona with an area of 529,000 acres on Vancouver Island, was set
aside by a special Act of the Provincial Legislature in 1911. The creation of Mount Robson
Park in 1913 added 514,000 acres to the Provincial park system. This was followed in 1918 by
the addition of Swan Lake Park of 166 acres.
The decade of the twenties brought ten new parks, with an area of 691,500 acres, into the
Provincial park system. The great depression of the thirties was significant for the first development of our park areas. This development was undertaken as a relief project. The park system
had grown to the imposing total of 6,400,000 acres by the end of 1940, at which time its administration came under the British Columbia Forest Service.
The period of World War II saw a modest development undertaken within the park system.
Seven areas, totalling 2,600,000 acres, were added to the system during the war years. There
was a small Parks Section within the British Columbia Forest Service in those days. The two
foresters in the Section devoted the bulk of their time to reconnaissance work and general
planning.
Since the war, remarkable progress has been made in the management of Provincial park
lands and to-day British Columbia enjoys high recognition for the excellence of its park recreational programme. The Parks and Recreation Division established in 1948 produced a policy
for the management of these recreational assets.
Recreation was recognized as a legitimate land use. The recreational objectives of the
Parks and Recreation Division were established.  These were:—
(1) To develop and manage a park system capable of meeting the non-urban recreational needs of the people of the Province.
(2) To protect areas comprising such a system from alienation and from the real or
fancied claims of individuals.
(3) To develop the park areas to enable their best recreational use by the greatest
number of people by encouraging all practical constructive activities.
(4) To control the recreational areas to ensure that use by minorities shall not interfere or prevent the opportunities and use by other individuals.
(5) To preserve the natural atmosphere of our recreational areas.
(6) To perpetuate the recreational opportunities offered in our park areas.
The Parks and Recreation Division, although influenced by United States practices, endeavoured to broaden the fields of its own particular activities.
The first organized camp-site was established by the Provincial parks organization in 1951.
Seventy camp-ground areas have been developed since that time.
The Parks and Recreation Division entered the newly established Department of Recreation
and Conservation on April 1st, 1957, and became known as the Provincial Parks Branch. Okanagan Lake Park picnic-site.
Okanagan Lake Park camp-site. II 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PROVINCIAL PARKS BRANCH,  1957
H. G. McWilliams, Director
The demand for recreational facilities continues and, in spite of the inclement
weather during most of the summer of 1957, visitors to the parks increased another
10 per cent to 2,100,000. The addition of 350 camping units each year for the past
two has doubled the number of these sites since 1955. Many more will be needed to
meet the demand for camping facilities. Development of each of our major parks will
require the expenditure of large sums to provide the necessary facilities for the surging
use they are now receiving.
Okanagan Lake Park and Champion Lakes Park were opened to the public in 1957.
Shuswap Lake Park will have accommodation for picnicking and camping in the 1958
tourist season.
In co-operation with the North-west Telephone Company, construction of a road
to the alpine meadows in Manning Park was 50 per cent completed.
The majority of the boys' crews under the Youth Training Programme were allocated
to the Parks Branch and were gainfully employed on various development projects.
Eleven crews, totalling 130 youths 16 years and older, were used.
ADMINISTRATION
The transfer of the Parks Division of the British Columbia Forest Service to become
a branch of the new Department of Recreation and Conservation was accomplished without interfering with the increased development programme. Additions to the staff
included one engineering assistant, and a forester-in-training to assist with the reconnaissance work.
RECONNAISSANCE AND INVENTORY
Upon the completion of the Yachting Survey, an inventory of potential marine park-
sites was carried out in the Gulf Islands and the Lower Mainland coast in co-operation
with the British Columbia Council of Yacht Clubs. The present inadequate public access
to lakes on Lower Vancouver Island was given careful study, with detailed examinations
of Shawnigan, Cowichan, and Sproat Lakes. The shortage of park land in the Okanagan
Valley and in the vicinity of Kamloops received further attention, with attention being
given to the possibility of acquiring specific private lands to fill this need. Numerous
suggestions for park-sites and offers of private property for park purposes were investigated and recommendations were submitted. Six new parks were constituted, one
cancelled, and five parks were increased in area by the acquisition of adjoining property.
In 1957 a further 133 reserves were recorded for future development.
PLANNING
Plans were completed for seven new camp-ground areas and for the expansion of
seven other sites already in use. Topographic maps for future planning were made of
three areas under reserve, and further development plans were submitted for two of the
major parks. Reports were made on the recreational needs of the Lower Mainland,
Vancouver Island, and a roadside park system along the Trans-Canada Highway. The
last was carried through as a part of a national study of a proposed all-Canadian picnicking and camping chain of parks from Atlantic to Pacific Oceans.
ENGINEERING
Plans were draughted and specifications with contracts prepared for facilities in
a number of our parks. Contracts were awarded, after tender, for a toilet building and
sewage-treatment plant in Mount Seymour Park, a twenty-four-unit motel with combined
service-station and store in Manning Park, a garage and warehouse at Okanagan Lake
Park, and a toilet and change house at Shuswap Lake Park. DEPARTMENT OF RECREATION AND CONSERVATION II 25
OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE
In spite of relatively wet summer, high-use areas such as Vancouver Island, Cultus
Lake, Manning Park, and Okanagan Lake carried an increased work load. The important phases of the work were public control, wood-supply, garbage-removal, sanitation,
renovation of signs and tables, and improving water systems.
To meet the expanded programme of park development, production of park furniture at the Langford workshop consisted of more than 600 fireplaces, 700 picnic tables,
and 800 signs.
The general up-swing in public use of park areas, coupled with a raise in maintenance standards, has been met in part, without a major increase in staff or operating costs,
by the evolution of maintenance regions, which are briefly geographic park groupings
under the direction of a field supervisor. The function in each region is to pool administrative efforts, vehicles, equipment, and personnel. The year 1957 has seen the consolidation of the Vancouver Island region and the establishment of the Okanagan Lake
region, with preliminary planning completed for the expediting of the Shuswap Lake
and Manning regions in 1958.
WILDLIFE
Research and management in Wells Gray Park continued, with emphasis on moose,
deer, caribou, grizzly, and marten. The grizzly bear investigations in the southern part
of Tweedsmuir Park were continued. A reconnaissance in the northern part of the park
revealed an increase in caribou herds.
An initial venture in the field of park interpretation with a nature house in Manning
Park was very successful. The nature house had 13,000 visitors in July and August.
This first nature house, of humble origin, was housed in a tent. Readily available wild
species of plants and animals were shown, and public appreciation indicated a need
for expansion of this type of educational facility.
RESEARCH
The aim of the Research Section is to gain factual knowledge of the essential elements of non-urban recreation. This knowledge will prove of great help in determining
the future non-urban recreational requirements of the Province. Visitor studies were
conducted at Ivy Green, Stemwinder, and Bromley Rock Parks. The Yachting Survey
was completed. A public reaction survey at the Manning Park nature house was undertaken. Two new studies were instituted—one on the use of facilities in Provincial parks
and one on the wear to vegetation cover in camp-sites.
HISTORIC SITES
A Historic Sites Marking Programme was planned as part of the Province's Centennial celebrations. Problems of sign design, site selection, theme of texts, and erection
of the markers has been a responsibility of the Parks Branch. Many departments of
the British Columbia Government joined together to form a working committee under
the British Columbia Centennial Committee. Over 100 potential sites were examined,
and from these about fifty will be suitably marked by the summer of 1958.
PUBLIC RELATIONS
The Public Relations Section has continued to interpret the Branch to the general
public. This has been done through the media of press releases and interviews; the
assistance of writers and journalists; by speeches at service clubs, P.-T.A. groups, and
schools; by pamphlets, correspondence, and personal contact. The Parks Branch was
represented on the British Columbia unit at the California State Fair in August, 1957. II 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
SUMMARY OF PROJECTS UNDERTAKEN BY PROVINCIAL
PARKS BRANCH IN 1957
McDonald.—Forty-seven-unit camp-site and electric pressure-tank water system.
Englishman River Falls.—Ninety-two-unit camp-site and water system.
Little Qualicum River Falls.—Upper camp-site extended by thirty units and water
services added; work begun on forty-three-unit lower camp-site.
Stamp Falls.—Temporary water system added to serve camp-site area.
Miracle Beach.—Work begun on a twenty-one-unit addition to camp-site; concrete
groynes for beach improvement relocated.
Langford Workshop.—Blower system for sawdust-removal from woodworking-
machines. Production of park furniture at Langford workshop for calendar year 1957
is as follows: Picnic tables, 740; fireplaces, 628; signs, 812; large entrance signs, 19;
toilet urinals, 220; large incinerators, 8; small incinerators, 5; signs for outside agencies, 15.
Peace Arch.—Workshop placed on concrete foundations.
Mount Seymour.—Drainage improved by four major culverts; ski-rental building
replaced by temporary steel building, plus first-aid ski patrol shed.
Garibaldi.—-Two and one-half miles of subgrade involving 140,000 cubic yards on
Alouette Lake access, and 25 per cent of 1,000-car parking-lot and x/i-mile beach
reclamation.
Cultus Lake.—Ninety-two-unit camp-site added to Maple Bay and work begun in
fall on 137-unit picnic area and 118 camp-sites at Entrance Bay and Clear Creek.
Manning.—Seventy-five per cent completed for 5-mile 32-foot section of Blackwall
Road, involving 255,000 cubic yards of material (40 per cent rock); clearing of 50 per
cent of Lightning Lakes access road; Nicolum Camp-site (fourteen-unit picnic and
camping area) completed; west park entrance portal and two-unit gateway picnic-site
completed;   and 18,000 trees planted in burn area.
Okanagan Lake.—Park begun in 1956, of eighty camp-sites and sixty-five picnic
units, completed, including irrigation systems, extensive planting, road oiling, and ten
buildings under contract (change-house, toilet building, pump-houses, residence, and
workshop).
Okanagan Falls.—Area reconstructed for thirteen-unit camp-site.
Antlers Beach.—Eighteen-unit picnic area landscaped as setting for new toilet and
change house.
Kelowna.—Six-unit camp-site.
Silver Star.—Extension of mountain access road for one and one-half miles.
Shuswap Lake.—Seventy-five per cent of new park consisting of 228 camp-sites and
ninety-unit picnic area, four parking-lots, boat-launching site, 6 miles of road, and beach
improvement; contract begun for toilet and change house.
Champion Lakes.—Project extended by 1 mile of park road, 50 per cent of ninety-
unit camp-site, 20,000 tons of crushed-gravel surface on 7-mile access plus final trimming
of road slopes, and sixty-unit picnic and beach area.
Tweedsmuir.—Three-unit picnic-site placed at Burnt Creek Bridge.
Wells Gray.—Biological laboratory placed at Hemp Creek and patrolman's residence placed at Clearwater Lake. department of recreation and conservation
II 27
Within the forest districts, the following project work was supervised by the district
recreational officers:—
Kokanee Creek (Nelson).—Erection of a prefabricated warehouse and 50 per cent
completion of an eighteen-unit camp-site.
Wasa Lake (Nelson).—Twenty-six units (picnic) added.
Lac la Hache (Kamloops).—Twenty-five per cent completed for thirty-unit campsite.
Lac le Jeune (Kamloops).—Camp-site extended by ten units.
Dry William Lake.—Camp-site of 100 units begun. \
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TRAVEL
BUREAU
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•.. HISTORY
The origin of the Travel Bureau may be traced as far back
as 1894, when a Legislative Library and Bureau of Statistics
was created and placed in the Department of the Provincial
Secretary.
The librarian of the Legislative Library acted as secretary of
the Bureau of Statistics and, although the designation of the
latter office was changed in 1901 to Bureau of Provincial Information, it remained under the control of the Provincial Secretary until 1907, when it was transferred to the Department of
Finance.
Formation of the Department of Trade and Industry in 1937
brought the Provincial Bureau of Information into a new government service more directly concerned with the promotion of
the Province's natural assets, but a stricter definition of its
functions called for redesignation to Bureau of Industrial and
Tourist Development.
This new title lasted for approximately one year, when, by
amendment to the Act in 1938, the Bureau of Industrial and
Tourist Development became the British Columbia Government
Travel Bureau and its duties largely confined to stimulation and
promotion of the tourist industry.
The creation of a Department of Recreation and Conservation in March, 1957, transferred the Travel Bureau to the new
organization and brought it into direct association with the
Parks Branch and the Game Branch. Travel Bureau representatives at the Canadian National Exhibition, Toronto.
^^^^^^
The British Columbia Government exhibit at the California State Fair in Sacramento. II 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
BRITISH COLUMBIA TRAVEL BUREAU,  1957
E. Evans, Director
Tourist traffic as reflected by United States entries on customs permits continued to
show a healthy condition during the 1957 season. Traveller's vehicle permits issued at
the British Columbia border totalled more than 283,000. This figure has remained
constant during the past five years.
The dollar value of the industry for 1957 is estimated at $103,000,000. This sum
consists of $48,000,000 spent by United States visitors crossing the border, $35,000,000
spent by Canadians from other Provinces, and $20,000,000 by British Columbians on
vacation in their own Province.
Adverse publicity on highway construction very definitely prevented the number of
United States entries from establishing a record, as the Bureau's tourist inquiries were
very much heavier than normal during the season. On the other hand, the number of
Canadian vehicles returning to Canada, as listed by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics,
showed a 10-per-cent-increase over 1956. This increase is attributed to Eastern Canadians travelling west over United States highways before crossing the British Columbia
border.
PROMOTION
Travel promotion during 1957 was based on the theme "Share the Fun in British
Columbia." Magazine promotions were highlighted by a page shared with Oregon and
Washington in Holiday magazine. This advertisement drew over 10,000 inquiries.
Another 45,000 direct inquiries resulted from advertisements in other Canadian and
United States magazines and in two Pacific Coast newspapers.
Radio programmes were continued in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan,
and Manitoba, and the Bureau increased its billboard and poster programme through
Washington, Oregon, and Northern California. The poster campaign undoubtedly
contributed very largely to the maintenance of the general traffic volume.
PUBLIC RELATIONS
General publicity secured by the Bureau, supplementary to the paid advertising
campaign, added materially to the over-all promotion of the Province's tourist interests.
Publishing houses were assisted by source material and the checking of figures.
As road conditions changed, road reports were issued and in a form which appeared
to be quite satisfactory to the automobile clubs, directional bureaux, and other agencies.
The Bureau arranged for a seven-days-a-week road report to newspapers and radio
stations.
The Bureau assisted at conventions and thus encouraged visitors to stay longer and
travel farther.
A staff member took part in the goodwill tour sponsored by the Victoria Chamber
of Commerce.
LITERATURE
Well over a million pieces of literature were distributed by the Bureau in 1957.
The demand for promotional literature exceeded estimates.
New printing included 150,000 copies of the Accommodations Directory and
325,000 maps.
All basic folders were brought up to date as required, and some appeared under new
cover. The Bureau produced "Alluring British Columbia" with a Centennial cover and
an historic insert in co-operation with the Centennial Committee. The Centennial Year
Calendar of Events was also produced by the Bureau for the Centennial Committee, as
were convention folders.
Four-colour posters were made available to the trade and have been in very active
demand since they were produced at the beginning of the season. DEPARTMENT OF RECREATION AND CONSERVATION II 35
TOURIST INFORMATION CENTRES
Douglas
The Tourist Information Centre on Highway No. 99 at Douglas has been in operation
for three seasons. There has been a steady increase in service each year. More than
17,000 cars, with a total of 48,280 visitors, stopped at the Centre during 1957. These
visitors spent approximately 71,510 days in the Province.
The erection of an authentic 40-foot totem-pole immediately south of the building
has influenced a greater number of visitors to stop at the Centre. A further service was
provided by the Centre this year through the issuance of resident and non-resident anglers'
and firearms licences. The staff at the Centre co-operated fully with the Centennial
Committee in the distribution of literature advertising British Columbia's coming Centennial Year.
Cache Creek
An Information Centre was established in the checking-station at Cache Creek at
the end of June.   This provided a very useful service to people vacationing in the Interior.
" TOURIST ACCOMMODATION REGULATION ACT "
In 1957, for the first time, all types of tourist accommodation were registered under
the Regulations Governing Tourist Accommodations and Trailers. This widening of
scope called for the inspection, registration, and listing of an additional 600 establishments, mainly hotels.
Star rating in 1957 covered an additional 6,500 units, as well as the rerating of
previously graded establishments. Four-star units increased from 15 to 24 per cent of
the total, while three-star accommodation dropped from 36 to 31 per cent. There was
no appreciable change at the two-, one-, and no-star levels.
New tourist-accommodation construction during the year leaned toward two separate
and entirely new types—(1) the modern highway hotel and (2) the privately operated
camp-site.
The Travel Bureau staff working under the " Tourist Accommodation Regulation
Act" were frequently called upon to serve in an advisory capacity. Appreciation of this
service is reflected by steadily increasing requests.
British Columbia has worked very closely with Alberta, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan
on star rating. British Columbia, Alberta, and Manitoba have star-rated with a measure
of uniformity since the end of 1955. Saskatchewan plans to follow in 1958, after a
meeting of the four Western Provinces, at which the regulations and formula may receive
any necessary adjustments. It is expected that the star-rating formula will be used in the
National parks of Canada.
SETTLEMENT
Volume of settlement inquiries increased in 1957, with over 50 per cent of them
from the United States.
The assistance of the Department of Citizenship and Immigration and the National
Employment Service is acknowledged.
The Bureau in no way solicits immigration. All inquiries are attended to promptly
and the necessary information and references are forwarded.
TOURIST COUNCIL
The meeting of the Tourist Council will be held in March, 1958, at the University
of British Columbia. Secretaries of Chambers of Commerce and managers of tourist
bureaux will be invited to attend a two-day seminar. II 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
TOURIST SERVICE CLINICS
The Travel Bureau combined a number of ideas which had been worked out in other
areas and were adapted to British Columbia's particular interests in initiating the Tourist
Clinic-Workshop in May, 1957. In general, the clinics were organized by the British
Columbia Government Travel Bureau co-operating with the British Columbia Region,
Canadian Restaurant Association, and the British Columbia Hotels' Association. Organization on the local level was left to the Boards of Trade, who worked in turn with the
local and regional branches of the restaurant, hotel, motel, retail, and service associations
and groups. Boards of Trade which co-operated in the project were Chilliwack, Penticton, Kelowna, Kamloops, Nanaimo, and Victoria. Meetings of restaurant management
and personnel were also held at Vancouver, Vernon, and Alberni, and a general tourist
meeting at Gibsons.
Personnel of the lecture and advisory team comprised Mr. H. L. " Billy " Wortz,
internationally recognized authority on food service and restaurant management, a member of the team through the courtesy of the Vulcan-Hart Manufacturing Company, Louisville, Ky.; Mrs. R. A. Denny, Director of Food Service Training Department, Provincial
Institute of Technology and Art, Calgary, Alta.; Mr. Guy Moore, Director, Development
Branch, Ontario Department of Travel and Publicity; Mr. Jack Melville, Director,
Associated Boards of Trade of British Columbia, and Manager, Advertising and Sales
Promotion, Home Oil Distributors Limited; John Fisher, LL.B., LL.D., Univ. D.Lit.,
Executive Director, Canadian Tourist Association; Mr. P. Edgcumbe, Executive Secretary, British Columbia Region, Canadian Restaurant Association; Mr. Ernest Evans,
Commissioner, British Columbia Government Travel Bureau; and Mrs. P. Campbell,
secretary, who handled correspondence and much organization detail.
The tourist service clinics met with a very high measure of success, and the Bureau
has had a number of requests for extension of this service.
EXHIBITIONS
Emphasis was placed on direct personal contact during the year. With this in mind,
exhibit space was taken at the Canadian National Exhibition, Toronto; California State
Fair, Sacramento; Minneapolis Vacation Show; San Francisco Sport, Travel, and Boat
Show; Los Angeles and Spokane Sport Shows; San Jose and Hillsdale Boat and Vacation
Shows; and San Diego County Fair. The last four shows were in co-operation with
Alberta and were arranged for and managed by the Tourist Trade Representative in San
Francisco for British Columbia and Alberta.
REPRESENTATION
The British Columbia Government Travel Bureau was represented at meetings of
the Federal-Provincial Tourist Conference, Canadian Tourist Association, Okanagan
Valley Tourist Association, Okanagan-Cariboo Trail Association, Pacific Northwest
Travel Association, British Columbia Hotels' Association, British Columbia Innkeepers'
Society, British Columbia Auto Courts and Resorts Association, and at regional meetings
of the Canadian Restaurant Association. The Bureau was also represented at meetings
of the regional and district Boards of Trade and of various travel bureaux throughout the
Province.
CO-OPERATIVE ACTIVITIES
Liaison with all Government departments has been good, and the Bureau acknowledges their assistance. Special appreciation is acknowledged to the Queen's Printer for
technical assistance and collaboration. The Bureau also acknowledges the co-operation
of the Department of Economic Affairs for Alberta and the Director and staff of the DEPARTMENT OF RECREATION AND CONSERVATION
II 37
Alberta Travel Bureau for efforts beyond those normally requested. The Ontario Department of Travel and Publicity and the Director and officers of the Canadian Tourist Association contributed generously to our objectives. Directors and staffs of community and
regional information centres throughout the Province co-operated splendidly and handled
Bureau literature and demonstrated a helpful interest in the Provincial tourist industry
far beyond that dictated by their respective community interests.
HISTORIC SITES
Marking of historic sites during the calendar year was confined to plaques made for
the following sites: Sooke—marking land occupied by Vancouver Island's first settler;
Cowichan Bay—marking landing of the first group of pioneer settlers from H.M.S.
"Hecate"; Information Centre, White Rock—marking Haida totem-pole; Nanaimo—
marking Pioneer Rock, the site where the pioneers of the Nanaimo district first landed;
and Fort Langley—marking original route of the first overland telegraph system. HOW    THE   TOURIST   DOLLAR   IS   SPENT
1. ENTERTAINMENT  8.   RECREATION  8+
2. FOOD    28+
3. LODGING   22 +
4. RETAIL   STORES  20 +
5. TIRES  PARTS & REPAIRS 3+
6. GASOLINE & OIL  19+
SOURCES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA'S
TOURIST  REVENUE
I.UNITED STATES VISITORS CROSSING
WASHINGTON, IDAHO AND ALBERTA BORDERS   $48,000,000.
2£ANADIAN   VISITORS FROM OTHER PROVINCES $35,000,000.
3.BRITISH   COLUMBIANS   HOLIDAYING   AT HOME     $20.000,000.
ESTIMATED  TOTAL REVENUE   1957 $103,000,000.
STATE ORIGIN OF U.S. VISITORS
TO BRITISH COLUMBIA
I. FROM   WASHINGTON      62%
2.FROM CALIFORNIA 15%
3. FROM OREGON 9%
4.FR0M OTHER STATES  14% Photographic
Branch HISTORY
The Photographic Branch of the Government Travel Bureau,
Department of Trade and Industry, was the outgrowth of experience gained from the production of still photographs for publicity purposes which started in 1931. In the years following,
several silent motion-picture films were produced on recreation
and industry. These activities showed such promise that a photographic branch of the Travel Bureau was organized in 1939,
and production started on the first colour-sound travelogue.
Development was slow during the war years, but in 1945 the
Branch was expanded and the production of photographs and
motion pictures increased. The services of the Branch have
been used increasingly to the present by other Government
departments. When the new Department of Recreation and
Conservation was formed in April, 1957, the Photographic
Branch was transferred to it as a separate organization responsible to the Deputy Minister. British Columbia Legislature.
!«•*' *••.,
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MHHfflSIBlM
World championship log burling, All Sooke Day. II 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PHOTOGRAPHIC BRANCH,  1957
R. L. Colby, Chief
Effective April 1st, 1957, the Photographic Branch became a separate unit in the
newly created Department of Recreation and Conservation.
Field work for our photographers started in April and continued to late November.
ASSIGNMENTS
February assignment work commenced with black-and-white and colour coverage
of the carving of the Queen's totem. The Legislature in session sat for an official photograph in March. Photographs of a number of the members of the Legislative Assembly
were taken for the display in the British Columbia Building, Pacific National Exhibition
grounds, Vancouver.
The photograph of the Legislature subsequently won top awards and four trophies
at the Professional Photographers' Association of British Columbia annual salon, including the R. J. Hughes Memorial Trophy as the best photograph of the year. This photograph was taken in black-and-white and colour.
In May a field-trip was made for complete black-and-white and colour coverage of
blossom time in the Okanagan for the world-known publication the National Geographic
Magazine.
Two staff members covered the Oak Street Bridge opening during June. The
Nanaimo Court-house opening was photographed, as was hospital construction on Salt-
spring Island. General still coverage of Vancouver Island was obtained. Group assignment coverage was completed for the Purchasing Commission and Hospital Insurance
Service. The Chief Photographer assisted Mr. David S. Boyer, foreign staff writer-
photographer of National Geographic Magazine, on a Province-wide trip for colour
coverage. The outcome of this three-month-long assignment likely will be a 1958 feature
story in full colour and in black-and-white photography in National Geographic Magazine, considered superb publicity on a world-wide scale.
A series of photographs showing operation of Sooke fish-traps and of All Sooke Day
were completed in July. Colour transparencies for lecture purposes were taken for the
Travel Bureau. The Summerland Hatchery and stocking of a near-by lake with sport
fish were covered. A field-trip was made to the Okanagan to photograph the Children's
Fishing Derby at Poison Pool, Vernon.
Government camp-sites, Kelowna Regatta, Penticton Peach Festival, and Douglas
Lake Ranch were photographed during August. Up-Island assignments for the Department of Highways and Department of Health and Welfare were completed. A display
of natural-colour prints and hand-coloured transparencies was prepared for the Travel
Bureau.
The Queen's totem was photographed in September. Stills were obtained in
Tweedsmuir Park area.    Cement-pouring at Deas Island Tunnel was photographed.
Stills of Harrison .River Bridge and Pitt River Bridge openings were made in October. Hospital construction on Saltspring Island was photographed. Assignments covering pheasant and duck hunting at Vernon were completed.
In November, for publicity purposes, the Chief Photographer and staff writer covered the trapping of California bighorn sheep in the Chilcotin area and operations of
the Game Branch Cache Creek Checking-station.
During 1957 the Photographic Branch accepted and completed assignments for the
Departments of Agriculture, Highways, Labour, Health and Welfare, Lands and Forests,
Mines, Public Works, Attorney-General, Provincial Secretary; and Provincial Archives,
Provincial Museum, Purchasing Commission, Queen's Printer, Hospital Insurance Service, Game Branch, Parks Branch, Travel Bureau, and Centennial Committee. DEPARTMENT OF RECREATION AND CONSERVATION II 43
MOTION PICTURES
The motion picture "Men, Mountains and the Challenge" was released in 1957.
This picture was made for the Department of Highways and illustrates the problems of
highway construction in the Province and their solution.
Films on camp-sites, Queen's totem, sport fishing, and Anthony Island are in the
course of preparation. The camping film is based on a typical family's ten-day trip and
use of the Province's camp-sites. The Queen's totem picture is a step-by-step colour
production of the carving. Types of sport fishing available in British Columbia will be
shown in the fishing film. The Anthony Island film, which shows the careful removal of
ancient Haida totem-poles, is being made in co-operation with the Provincial Museum.
A motion picture of British Columbia's wildlife has been started, with an inaugural
trip to Tweedsmuir Park for footage on grizzly bear, caribou, goat, and other species of
the Province's wildlife in their natural habitat. Work on this film has so far entailed
extensive, time-consuming travelling in remote areas. Completion of the wildlife film
is expected to take from two to three years.
Motion-picture footage was forwarded to television stations and other publicity
media programmes promoting British Columbia travel.
Short films on Salmon Arm and the Terrace-Kitimat Highway were completed in
co-operation with the Department of Highways. Step-by-step films on Deas Island
Tunnel, Pitt River Bridge, and Fraser Canyon Highway construction are being made.
At the same time, considerable footage of general Provincial highway construction is
being obtained.
A silent colour motion-picture record of the opening of the Legislature was made
in March, with some of the footage shot inside the House. A colour motion picture of
the Speech from the Throne was photographed. The film is the first of its kind produced
in British Columbia.
The Branch's motion picture " The Road Home," which was made for the Department of Health and Welfare, was awarded first prize for sociological films at the Kootenay International Film Festival in May.
DARKROOM PRODUCTION
The number of negatives processed and prints made during the year totalled 4,008
and 20,089 respectively. This work represents a significant increase over last year.
Of the latter, 3,199 were made for writers and editors. Considerable work was done
photographing old prints for the Provincial Archives. Indications throughout the year
signify increased activity is to be expected for the darkroom.
GENERAL OFFICE
In all, 876 letters were received and 891 letters sent out in 1957. Demand for
films remained high throughout the year, with increased requests in the last quarter.
Across-the-counter requests for films have shown a marked rise as the services of the
Branch become more widely known.
Private film showings and audiences in Canada totalled 843 and 38,348, in that
order. For the first six months of the year, there were 964 shows with an attendance
of 53,043 in the United States. In the Branch theatre, fifty-nine showings were made
for various departments, while staff members put on fifty outside shows to clubs and
organizations.
In addition, there were forty-seven television showings in Canada, and in the United
States there were eighty-two showings to the end of September. The general opinion
from television stations toward our films has been very encouraging. The films have been
well received, with requests for new releases when available.    " Legend of the West," II 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
the Branch's motion picture made in the Cariboo and Chilcotin, has met with excellent
response wherever shown. In the comparatively short time since release, it has gained
outstanding popularity locally, in the United States and United Kingdom.
SUMMARY
The year 1957 proved to be one of the busiest in the lifetime of the Photographic
Branch in spite of long stretches of bad weather. Motion-picture and still assignments
created a year-long tight working schedule in the field and in the office. The interest
of writers in British Columbia's growing potential, accentuated still further by the Province's forthcoming Centennial Celebrations, has had its effect in increasing demands for
photographs and films. No work or assignment was refused or postponed unless immediate and unalterable commitments made an alternative impossible, despite the additional
all-round pressure placed on the Branch as a whole. Photographic party in Tweedsmuir Park.
Square dancing, Penticton Peach Festival. Blossom time in the Okanagan.
Old " Birdcage " fire.  HISTORY
It was soon after British Columbia joined Canada that the exploitation of the salmon-
fishery commenced on the Fraser River. Canned salmon reached the export market in 1870,
and has since become one of British Columbia's most valuable commodities of foreign trade.
The halibut-fishery began in 1880, and for some time this fish was sold only on the local market.
By 1890 the export of halibut to the United States was established.
In British Columbia the Federal Government is responsible for the conservation and protection of the fisheries in the same manner as in other Provinces. The regulations which govern
commercial fishing in British Columbia are administered under the authority of the Federal
Department of Fisheries and also include all commercial fishing licences.
The British Columbia Legislature, realizing the importance of the fisheries resource,
provided the necessary authority, and a Fisheries Office was established in 1900 under the
administration of a Commissioner of Fisheries for its control.
In 1947, in order to give recognition to the growing importance of British Columbia's
fisheries, the British Columbia Government, by Act of Legislature, raised the Fisheries Office
to the status of a department, with a Minister of Fisheries at the head and a Deputy Minister
as administrator.
When the new Department of Recreation and Conservation was established in 1957, the
Provincial Department of Fisheries was abolished, and it became the Fisheries Branch of the
new Department.
Jurisdiction over commercial fisheries in British Columbia is divided between the Federal
and Provincial Governments. The Fisheries Branch of the Department of Recreation and
Conservation, under the terms of the " British North America Act," has the right to regulate the
traffic and processing of fish within the Province. These operations are controlled by licences,
which are an annual requirement, and all applications are directed to the Fisheries Branch.
The Fisheries Branch co-operates closely with the Federal Department of Fisheries and
with the fishing industry.   It interprets Government policy to the industry.
The Fisheries Branch co-operates closely with other British Columbia Government organizations, such as the Water Rights Branch, the Game Branch, the Department of Lands and
Forests, the Department of Mines, and the Department of Health and Welfare.
Applications for water licences received by the Comptroller of Water Rights are channelled
through the Fisheries Branch for recommendation. It is the responsibility of the Fisheries
Branch to work with the Federal Department of Fisheries to see that the diversion of water
from various rivers and streams in the Province will not be detrimental to fish-life.
Public relations consist of distributing fisheries booklets and publications, also answering
many inquiries regarding the fisheries of the Province.
There are approximately twenty-eight different species of fish caught commercially in
British Columbia. The principal species are salmon, herring, and halibut. Other important
commercial species are cod and sole. The major species of shell-fish are oysters, clams, and
shrimps. Fish-cannery, Prince Rupert.
Mending dogfish-nets, Queen Charlotte City, Q.C.I. II 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA
COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BRANCH,  1957
A. A. Bagattin, Supervisor
The Fisheries Branch, under authority of the "Fisheries Act," has direct control
over all fish-processing plants in British Columbia. These operations are controlled by
annual licences issued by the Fisheries Branch.
During the 1957 season, twenty salmon-canneries were licensed to operate in the
Province. This was two more than in 1956. The active canneries in 1957 were located
as follows: Skeena River, 6; Central Area, 2; Rivers Inlet, 1; Queen Charlotte Islands,
1; Fraser River and Lower Mainland, 10. No salmon-canneries have been operated on
the Nass River or on Vancouver Island for several years.
The total canned-salmon pack for British Columbia in 1957, according to preliminary figures as of December 4th, 1957, amounted to 1,443,267 cases. This is
compared with the total pack of 1,112,844 cases in 1956. Although the 1957 pack
increased 330,423 cases over the previous year, the market value decreased. This is
explained by the large pack of pink salmon which is a lower-priced fish, and a smaller
pack of sockeye salmon which is the most highly priced of the salmon.
Two interruptions caused delays in the salmon-fishery during the 1957 season.
These periods of inactivity resulted from price disputes between the fishermen and the
operators. Conservation measures put into effect by the Federal Department of Fisheries
on several occasions curtailed salmon-fishing in most of the major fishing areas.
Preliminary figures compiled by the Federal Department of Fisheries in Vancouver,
B.C., as of December 4th, 1957, showed that the canned-salmon pack for British
Columbia was composed of 227,436 cases of sockeyes, 12,571 cases of springs, 1,315
cases of steelheads, 12,147 cases of bluebacks, 193,762 cases of cohoes, 751,048 cases
of pinks, and 245,024 cases of chums.
British Columbia leads all the Provinces in Canada in point of fisheries wealth.
The average annual marketed value for the previous five-year period amounted to
$68,000,000.
The halibut strike was settled on May 3rd, 1957, but it was several days before the
main fleet reached the fishing-grounds, and landings did not reach the larger ports until
the middle of May.   The summer halibut season started in July and closed in August.
The halibut-fishery is a " long line " fishery on the Pacific Coast and is shared by
nationals of Canada and the United States. The International Pacific Halibut Commission regulates this fishery on a quota basis. For the purpose of regulation, the coast
is divided into a number of fishing areas, the principal ones, from the standpoint of
production, being Areas 2 and 3.
The average price of halibut was less than last year's record price level. Indications
are that the total landings by Canadian boats in Canadian ports during the 1957 season
will be lower than in the previous year.
Statistical information for the 1957 season is not available at this time.
The herring strike was still in effect, and no agreement had been established up to
January 15th, 1958.
There has been very little activity in the herring-fishery this season in comparison
with recent past years. Only part of the herring fleet operated during the fall season,
pending price negotiations between the fishermen and processors. Usually the herring-
fishing season extends from November to March, and, at the present time, indications
are that the herring production will be the lowest in years.
On October 29th, 1957, the Provincial Deputy Minister of Health temporarily closed
all operations of the shell-fish industry in British Columbia. This action was taken as
a precautionary measure in the interest of the public due to the " red tide " toxicity, which
had caused illness in a number of people who had eaten oysters and clams produced in
British Columbia. DEPARTMENT OF RECREATION AND CONSERVATION
II 51
Under the authority of the " Fisheries Act," the Chief Supervisor of Fisheries also
issued a closure notice prohibiting the digging or taking of clams in Fisheries Districts
Nos. 1 and 3, which were the areas involved.
Upon closure a series of laboratory tests was made and the progress of the toxicity
charted. The tests revealed that, in most fishing areas, danger to health waned as swiftly
as it had risen. There were portions of fishing areas, however, in which toxicity persisted.
Upon the recommendations of the Pacific Coast Shell-fish Committee, which includes
representatives of the Provincial and Federal Departments of Health, the Federal Department of Fisheries, the Fisheries Research Board of Canada, and the Fisheries Branch of
the Department of Recreation and Conservation, the harvesting of shell-fish in Fisheries
Districts 1 and 3 was reopened on November 8th, 1957. Still under closure were Fishing
Areas 13, 14, 15, and the northerly portion of 16 and 17.
On December 31st, 1957, as a result of further tests, those areas still under quarantine were reopened for the harvesting of oysters only. A varying degree of toxicity still
existed among clams in specific portions of Fishing Areas 13, 14, 15, and the northerly
portions of 16 and 17; consequently, the digging or taking of clams in these fishing areas
remains closed until the toxicity in shell-fish in this area no longer exists.
The public was assured that crabs, shrimps, fresh fish, and canned fish were not
affected by the " red tide " toxicity in Fisheries Districts 1 and 3.
The following table shows the number of licences issued and revenue collected
during the 1957 season:—
Kind of Licence
Salmon-cannery   20
Herring-cannery  1
Pilchard-cannery   	
Herring reduction   9
Pilchard reduction  	
Tierced salmon   6
Fish cold storage  16
Fish-processing  .  14
Shell-fish cannery  6
Tuna-fish cannery   1
Fish-offal reduction  6
Fish-liver reduction  3
Whale reduction   1
Herring dry-saltery   2
Pickled herring   	
Processing aquatic plants	
Harvesting aquatic plants  	
Dog-fish reduction   	
Fish-buyers   421
Non-tidal fishing licences  187
General receipts   2
Number of
Licences
Revenue
$4,000.00
100.00
900.00
600.00
1,600.00
14.00
6.00
1.00
6.00
3.00
100.00
200.00
10,525.00
188.50
25.00
Total  $18,268.50
Since 1949 there have been no pilchards caught in British Columbia waters.
In 1957 one whale-reduction plant operated at Coal Harbour, Vancouver Island.
Indications are that the value of fisheries production for the 1957 season will show
a decrease.
Note.—This brief report has been compiled for inclusion in the first report of the new Department
of Recreation and Conservation. As the fisheries fiscal year does not end until March 31st in each
year, production figures for the 1957 season are not available at this time. Fisheries statistics for
British Columbia for the 1957 season will be published at a later date and will be mailed upon request.  CATCHES BY CANADIAN BOATS IN WATERS
NORTH OF DIXON ENTRANCE ARE CLASSIFIED
AS  ALASKA
AREAS  PREVIOUSLY DESIGNATED AS "A AND'B*
ARE NOW  SHOWN UNDER THIS HEADING.
AREA"C" -   ALL   FISH CAUGHT OFF THE   COAST
OF   THE   STATE OF WASHINGTON
SOUTH   OF CAPE FLATTERY
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FISHING    AREAS
NORTHERN   HALF
COMPILED FROM INFORMATION
SUPPLIED BY THE FEDERAL DEP.
OF FISHERIES.
STATISTICAL AREAS 	
SALMON FISHING WITH
NETS OF ANY KIND IS NOT
PERMITTED OUTSIDE OF,
THAT IS, SEAWARD OF THE
HEAVY  BLACK   LINE.
DIXON   ENTRANCE
"V->Y-~W4AH
GRAHAM       ))      // Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1958
1,660-358-4352  

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